You are on page 1of 53

Hybrid Hazelnut Fertilization 

Lois Braun, University of Minnesota

Hazelnuts, like most perennial
plants, are exceedingly efficient
ff
in
their use of plant nutrients because
they recycle nutrients internally.

Hazelnuts, like most perennial plants,
are exceedingly efficient
ff
in their
use of plant nutrients because they
recycle nutrients internally.
q
are
Thus their fertilizer requirements
relatively low.

Hazelnuts, like most perennial plants,
are exceedingly efficient
ff
in their
use of plant nutrients because they
recycle nutrients internally.
q
are
Thus their fertilizer requirements
relatively low.
This is one reason why they have an
important role to play in sustainable
agricultural systems
systems.

Hazelnuts, like most perennial plants,
are exceedingly efficient
ff
in their
use of plant nutrients because they
recycle nutrients internally.
q
are
Thus their fertilizer requirements
relatively low.
This is one reason why they have an
important role to play in sustainable
agricultural systems
systems.
However, they can’t recycle nutrients
that they don’t
don t have.
have

Hazelnuts. This is one reason why they have an important role to play in sustainable agricultural systems. . Thus their fertilizer requirements are relatively low low. However they can’t However. are exceedingly efficient in their use of plant nutrients because they recycle nutrients internally internally. can t recycle nutrients that they don’t have--fertilizers are sometimes necessary. like most perennial plants.

 hazelnuts may thrive and be  productive for up to 50 years or longer productive for up to 50 years or longer.Hazelnut Fertilization • Once established. .

. hazelnuts may thrive and be  productive for up to 50 years or longer productive for up to 50 years or longer.Hazelnut Fertilization • Once established. • The best hazelnuts grow on fertile soil.

 for which soil may  be tilled annually. . • Unlike with annual crops. hazelnuts may thrive and be  productive for up to 50 years or longer productive for up to 50 years or longer. once hazelnuts are  established it will be very difficult to  incorporate fertilizers and other soil  amendments. • The best hazelnuts grow on fertile soil.Hazelnut Fertilization • Once established.

 hazelnuts may thrive and be  p productive for up to 50 years or longer. for which soil may be  tilled annually.Hazelnut Fertilization • Once established. p y g • The best hazelnuts grow on fertile soil. be  il h h h d t i b identified and corrected before hazelnuts are  p planted. such as phosphorus and potassium. • Thus it is essential that potential soil deficiencies. .  especially of nutrients that are immobile in the  soil. other soil amendments. once hazelnuts are established it  ll d ll h l bl h d will be very difficult to incorporate fertilizers and  other soil amendments. • Unlike with annual crops.

 and can be lost from the soil very  quickly. • Otherwise nitrogen becomes a pollutant. nitrogen is extremely  mobile. quickly • Nitrogen fertilizer should only be applied  – in quantities that the plant can take up. – When the plant is able to take it up – In locations where the plant can get to it.Hazelnut Fertilization • Whereas phosphorus and potassium are  immobile in the soil nitrogen is extremely immobile in the soil. g p .

d h l 2.Two Phases for Hazelnut Fertilization 1.  Establishment phase: • Recommendations for immobile nutrients such as  Recommendations for immobile nutrients such as P and K.  Production phase: 2 P d ti h Recommendations are based on: • Observations of plant growth or vigor Observations of plant growth or vigor • Leaf analysis • Yield . and for lime are based on soil test results. • Recommendations for N are based on size of plant  and increase as the plant grows.

  Therefore.Note that no fertilization recommendations  have yet been developed for hazelnuts in the  Upper Midwest.  .   • Apples and grapes are decent approximations. you will have to  substitute a similar crop on the submission  sheet.  • Blueberries may also be used except for pH  recommendations.

* for apples.Phosphorus for New Hazelnut Plantings P deficiency has not been observed in hazelnuts in Oregon. . Nutrient Management for Commercial  Fruit and Vegetable Crops in Minnesota. P may be applied in bands to just the planting row. blueberries and grapes in Minnesota. blueberries and grapes in Minnesota. but keep in  •mind that hazelnuts roots may eventually span the entire row of 10 to 15 feet.  Bray‐P (ppm) Olsen‐P  (ppm) P to apply  (lbs/acre) 0 – 10 0 ‐ 7 VL 100 ‐ 150 11 – 20 8 ‐ 15 L 75 ‐ 125 21 – 30 16 ‐ 25 ML 50 ‐ 100 31 – 40 26 ‐ 33 M 25 ‐ 75 41 – 50 34 – 41 H 0 ‐ 50 51 + 51 + 42 + 42 + VH 0 25 0 ‐ • Incorporate P before planting.  Thus these recommendations are based on recommendations  for apples. * Rosen and Eliason. y pp j p g .   . p • To economize.

*Olsen. K may be applied in bands to just the planting row. especially if using KCl Incorporate K well before planting especially if using KCl (muriate of potash)  of potash) which can burn roots if too concentrated. *   They have not been tested in the Midwest. and they differ slightly They have not been tested in the Midwest.Potassium for New Hazelnut Plantings These recommendations are slightly modified from those for  hazelnuts in Oregon. .  Hazelnut Nutrient Management Guide.  K2SO4 (potassium sulfate) is preferred.  p y y p but keep in mind that hazelnuts roots may eventually span the entire row of 10  to 15 feet. • To economize. and they differ slightly  from those for other woody crops. Soil test K  ( (ppm) ) K to apply  (lb / (lbs/acre) ) 0 – 75 L 300 ‐ 400 75 ‐ 150 M 200 ‐ 300 150 + H 0 ‐ 100 • Incorporate K well before planting. 2000. Oregon State University Extension Service.

.  a year in advance would be better a year in advance would be better.  i • Incorporate lime into the soil as deeply as  possible.  • Use dolomitic lime to supply magnesium if soils  test lower than 100 ppm l h 100 magnesium. using rates  recommended based on your soil’s buffering  capacity.6.Limingg • The best pH for hazelnuts is about 6.5 but they  can tolerate soil pH from 5.0. possible • Apply lime at least several weeks before planting. p • Apply lime if pH is below 5.0 to 7.

91.Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings • Some N fertilizers can burn. Survival in response  to N applications to to N applications to  new transplants. R2 > 0.002. so it is best not to apply any at all  l i i b l ll at planting.  Ouch!  Survival was negatively correlated with N rate at all sites at p < 0.   . or even kill new  transplants.

 so it is best not to apply any at all  l i i b l ll at planting. • N requirements in first year are so low that  they can easily be supplied from the soil for  the first year after planting. unless soil organic  matter is less than 3%. or even kill new  transplants. 2 year old seedling  .Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings • Some N fertilizers can burn.

July 2005 .3 year old plants. Becker.

July 2005 .22 g N plant‐1 p Controls 3 year old plants. Becker.

Root Excavations at Becker End of Third Year 0g 0 g 3 g 11 g 22 g 33 g .

 unless soil organic  matter is less than 3%. p p .Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings • Some N fertilizers can burn. • N requirements in first year are so low that  they can easily be supplied from the soil for  the first year after planting. apply N  in proportion to size of bush. or even kill new  transplants. • Starting in their second or third year. so it is best not to apply any at all  l i i b l ll at planting.

  • If soil organic matter exceeds 4.Nitrogen for New Hazelnut Plantings Tentative recommendations—these might be too high! Age of plants Age of plants N to apply to apply oz per cubic yard  of bush volume g per cubic meter  of bush volume 1 (establishment year) 1 (establishment year) 0 0 2 0 – 1/8 oz 0 – 5 g 3 0 – ¼ oz 0 – 9 g • For large plantings measure several bushes and average them.5%. . no N is needed.  multiply the amount needed per bush by number of plants per  py p y p p acre to get N application rate per acre.

  especially young hazelnuts.  that may be lacking. • New plantings should not need any nitrogen  New plantings should not need any nitrogen fertilizer for their first year. g • It is very important to do a soil test before  planting and to amend the soil for immobile  nutrients . are low relative to  i ll h l t l l ti t annual crops.   . except on extremely  low organic matter soils. especially phosphorus and potassium.Take‐Home Take Home Points for New Plantings Points for New Plantings • The nutrient requirements of hazelnuts.

Part 2:   Part 2: Fertilizing Established Hazelnuts .

• Recommendations for N are based on soil organic  matter and age of plant matter and age of plant.Two Phases for Hazelnut Fertilization 1.  Production phase: Recommendations are based on: • Plant size (large plants need and can take up more) • Observations of plant growth and vigor. 2. Observations of plant growth and vigor • Leaf analysis.  Establishment phase: • Recommendations for immobile nutrients such as  P and K are based on soil test results. e d e po t o ut e ts a est • Yield:  export of nutrients in harvest .

Why not just apply more fertilizer  than the crops are likely to need and  hope for the best? hope for the best? • Wastes your money  reduces your profitability • Nutrients not quickly taken up by the crop may  N i i kl k b h become environmental pollutants: – Nitrogen Nit – Phosphorus • SSome nutrients. can be harmful to your  ti t i b h f lt crop: – Nitrogen. in excess. . if applied as either ammonium or nitrate Nit if li d ith i it t – Potassium if applied as Muriate of Potash (KCl).

.

and why we need leaf analysis. etc.  nitrate. • This is why routine soil tests do not test for N. N is lost through: • Leaching • Volatilization • Denitrification • Immobilization • Plant Uptake Pl t U t k N is gained through: • Fertilization  • Mineralization of organic matter  Mineralization of organic matter N changes between forms in the soil: organic matter. . • N is mobile:  its levels in the soil fluctuate as a  Ni bil it l l i th il fl t t result of the balance between losses and gains. urea.Why do we focus on Nitrogen? y g • N is the nutrient most likely to be limiting. ammonium.

 in making fertilizer  recommendations. but not necessarily.Leaf Analysis • Chlorosis (pale leaf color) may be an indicator of  N deficiency. • Factors that limit growth may result in very high  leaf concentrations of nutrients that are not  li i d limited. • Thus leaf analysis data should be combined with  other information such as about plant vigor and other information. y. such as about plant vigor and  productivity and soil analysis. . y • Vigorous growth may dilute the concentration of  leaf nutrients.

Root Excavations at Becker End of Third Year 0g 0 g 3 g 11 g 22 g 33 g .

  Nitrogen sufficiency ranges based on Braun.50 0.10 0.13 0.Hazelnut Leaf Sufficiency Ranges Deficient Low Normal Excessive < 1.  Hazelnut Nutrient Management     Guide.91 – 2.  Ranges for all other nutrients based on Olsen.50 Calcium (%) < 0.50 Phosphorus (%)  Phosphorus (%) 2 < 0. .61 – 1. Oregon State University Extension Service.80 0.90 – 0.18 0.45 0.08 0.00 Manganese (ppm) Manganese (ppm) < 20 < 20 21 – 25 21 – 26 – 650 > 1 000 > 1.000 Iron (ppm) < 40 41 – 50 51 – 400 > 500 Copper (ppm) <2 3 – 4 5 – 15 > 100 Boron (ppm) < 25 26 – 30 31 – 75 > 100 Zinc (ppm)  < 10 11 ‐ 15 16 ‐ 60 > 100 Nitrogen (%) 1 1.50 > 3.13 – 0. 1 Nitrogen sufficiency ranges based on Braun 2008 2.01 – 2. 2008.00 Sulfur (%) < 0.55 Potassium (%) < 0.50 > 2.00 Magnesium (%) < 0.11 – 2.10 2.50 > 1.00 1.9 1.55 > 0.14 – 0.51 – 0.00 > 3.19 – 0.20 > 0.24 0.81 – 2.12  0.14  > 0.25 – 0. 2000.60 0.11  0.11 – 0.

f i f ll .How to take leaf samples How to take leaf samples • Collect Collect leaves around August 1 leaves around August 1st. • Collect the third fully expanded leaf from the  apex of a stem in full sun.

How to take leaf samples Collect the third fully expanded leaf from the  apex of a shoot in full sun. apex of a shoot in full sun. 1st fully  expanded expanded  leaf Collect the 3rd Not fully  expanded d d 2ndd fully  expanded  leaf .

• Collect at least 20 leaves from 20 stems. .How to take leaf samples How to take leaf samples • Collect Collect leaves around August 1 leaves around August 1st. all in  full sun for each sample full sun. for each sample. • Collect the third fully expanded leaf from the  apex of a stem in full sun apex of a stem in full sun. • Avoid leaves which are damaged.

5 Optimal 0 – 0.   • For a large planting.02 8 ‐ 16 2.1 Borderline d l 0. Warning!  These recommendations might be too high! .03 16 ‐ 47 1. • Choose the lower end of the range if the soil is high in organic  matter and the higher end of the range if it is low matter. measure several bushes and calculate their    average size.9 – 2.9 % Deficient 0.Nitrogen Recommendations Based  on Leaf Anal sis and Plant Si e on Leaf Analysis and Plant Size % Leaf N N to Apply Oz per cubic O bi foot of  f t f g per cubic meter of  bi t f bush volume bush volume < 1. and the higher end of the range if it is low.02 – 0.5 Excessive none none • Measure bush diameter (D) and calculate bush volume as D x D x D.1 – 2.01 0 ‐ 8 > 2.01 – 0.

2 1.4 0.6 0.1% 1.2 0.4 2.4 1.0 borderline deficient d % Leaf N % 18 1.6 1.8 1.8 2.0 0.0 Arb    Cerl   Eric  clones Gibs  Lamb  Mick  Price  Shep  GPT clones SpC     SpC     Steck  Stap  GPT stock clones .9% 2.2 2.8 0.% Leaf N (samples from unfertilized bushes) (samples from unfertilized bushes) suffficient 2.6 24 2.

0 Arb    Cerl   Eric  clones Gibs  Lamb  Mick  Price  Shep  GPT clones SpC     SpC     Steck  Stap  GPT stock clones .0 borderline deficient d % Leaf N % 18 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.% Leaf N (samples from unfertilized bushes) Lousy yields yy 2.2 2.8 0.6 suffficient Outstanding  yields 2.8 24 2.9% 2.1% 1.6 1.2 0.6 0.4 1.4 2.0 0.

Jim Mickelson’s Nitrogen Trial g ~ 45 g N applied per plant g pp p p .

Questions:   1. Was 45 g per plant the right amount? 3. How long is this N good for?  . Will this also result in a yield benefit? 2 Was 45 g per plant the right amount?  2.

02 8 ‐ 16 2.02 – 0.Nitrogen Recommendations Based  on Leaf Anal sis and Plant Si e on Leaf Analysis and Plant Size % Leaf N N to Apply Oz per cubic foot of  g per cubic meter of  bush volume bush volume < 1.03 16 ‐ 32 1.5 Excessive none none • Measure bush diameter (D) and calculate bush volume as D x D x D.01 – 0. measure several bushes and calculate their    For a large planting meas re se eral b shes and calc late their average size. Warning!  These recommendations might be too high! .01 0 ‐ 8 >25 > 2.1 – 2.9 % Deficient 0.1 Borderline 0. and the higher end of the range if it is low.5 Optimal 0 – 0.   • For a large planting. • Choose the lower end of the range if the soil is high in organic  matter.9 – 2.

9      (9.  apply 150 lbs/acre N.89  (volume*) cu yds) cu yds) 290 580 290 580 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft 7 ft 10 ft 10 ft  10 ft 10 ft  (9.1 – 2. .1 Borderline 15 29 78 156 228 455 2.9 % 1. because 683 lbs/acre  Let’s hope we never see highly deficient plants that are 10 ft tall because 683 lbs/acre (even 341 lbs/acre) is way too much N to apply at one time!  If such high rates are needed.89  (1. Let’s hope we never see highly deficient plants that are 10 ft tall.9 % Deficient 22 44 117 234 341 683 1. then leaf sample again to see if more is still needed.9 – 2.5 25 E Excessive i none none none none none none * Volume calculations assume plants are as wide as tall.9     (29      (29      cu yds) cu yds) cu yds) cu yds) < 1.Nitrogen Recommendations  g Example Calculations % Leaf  N Plants/acre Apply up to ____ Lbs of N per acre 290 580 Average height  height 4 ft 4 ft  4 ft 4 ft   of plants  in feet  (1.5 Optimal 7 15 39 78 114 228 > 2.

1 %  Sufficiency Threshold 2.Staples Leaf N (2010) 2.2 2.0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 Applied N (g per cubic meter of canopy volume) 70 .4 2.3 2.1 2.5 % Leaf N 2.

09 cubic m meters increase in volum me 12 10 8 6 4 16 g N 16 g N 2 0 0 10 20 30 40 50 60 applied N (g N per cubic meter of canopy volume) 70 .Staples Growth Increase in Canopy Volume Spring 2010 to Fall 2011  significant at p = 0.

 herbivory.  Soil moisture.  and weeds) within 1st year Increased Leaf N  ((darker green color) g ) Other factors (weeds. etc) 2ndd or 3rdd year Enhanced Growth Other factors (especially genetics) (especially genetics) later Increased Yield . other limiting nutrients.Applied N Applied N Oh f Other factors (esp.

Fertilization Based on Yield Fertilization Based on Yield .

7 % Sh ll Shells 03% 0.2 % Husks 0.3 % Kernels 65% Shells 9% .N Removed with Harvest N Removed with Harvest % of Weight Harvested Based  on 36%  shell shell‐ out rate Kernels 22% Husks 39% N Removed with Harvest Shells 39% Husks 26% N  Concentration Kernels 3.

5 11.4 7. .06 Husks 1. less N will be removed with harvest.4 7.79 1.0 0. Note that if you return either husks or shells to the planting.51 0.29 4.2 0.8 4.82 Shells 1.18 0.21 0.1 0.29 2.4 18.18 14 36 58 Total Estimated N Removed Estimated N Removed per Acre (lbs/acre) per Acre (lbs/acre) Assuming 10 by 15 ft spacing (290 plants/acre) Rule of thumb:   Multiply the kernel yield (in whatever units you like) by 5%  to  get a rough estimate of N removed (in the same units).8 4.N Removed with Harvest Projected Yield  (lbs/plant) Estimated N Removed per Plant  (oz/plant) Low Medium High Lo Medium High Kernels 1.98 3.17 0.0 2.5 4.52 1.1 0.

When to Apply Fertilizer  to Hazelnuts l • Apply when conditions are good for growth: Apply when conditions are good for growth: – Late July or early August best – Early summer through early fall okay Early summer through early fall okay • Do not apply when plants are leafless or when  th i l their leaves are senescing. i • Do not apply when plants are water stressed.  either due to drought or due to waterlogging. .

  tree stakes. to get it in the plant root zone  and to prevent losses.How to Apply Fertilizer  to Hazelnuts l • Apply Apply within the  within the “drip‐line” drip line  of the bushes. of the bushes. • Incorporation of fertilizer is desirable. • Slow release fertilizers such as coated ureas. or composted manure release  nutrients at a rate at which the crop can take  them up. .  Incorporation of fertilizer is desirable especially for N. and to prevent losses. or composted manure release tree stakes. • Control weeds within zone of fertilization.

500 lbs manure  @ 3% P = 75 lbs P Fertilizer to  Apply (lbs/acre) Apply 2.Calculation of  How much fertilizer to buy and use How much fertilizer to buy and use  Example B:  Established Apple Orchard Amount required  (lbs/acre) Ratio required d source (dairy manure) N P K 30 lbs 75 lbs 150 lbs 2  5 10 2 % 3 % 3 % Needed to supply 75 lbs  of P 2.500 lbs  dairy manure 2.500 lbs manure will also  supply 50 lbs N 75 lbs K Still needed Still needed 30 – 50  30 50 = < 0 75 75 = 0 75 – 75 = 0 150 75 = 75 lbs 150 – 75 = 75 lbs Analysis of K source (K2SO4) (potassium sulfate) 0 0 50 % Potassium sulfate needed 0 0 150 lbs @ 50% =  Apply 150 lbs  75 lbs K K2SO4 .

• Fertilizer recommendations for established  hazelnuts are based on a combination of leaf hazelnuts are based on a combination of leaf  analysis. right time and  with the right method to minimize waste and  pollution. may damage the crop and is  environmentally polluting environmentally polluting.Take‐Home Points • Applying nutrients in excess of crop needs wastes  money. • Apply fertilizer at the right rate. • Researchers may develop recommendations  based on yield. soil analysis and observations about  plant health and vigor. ll ti .

Hazelnuts. their use of plant nutrients because they recycle them. them This is part of their beauty! . like most perennial plants are exceedingly efficient in plants.