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The

ation

I vessels.

This is the clause which Eng


landmamtained,andwhlch
It is harc
to deny, was in violation of our treat:
wlthher.Thereisalsothe
quest101
whether
the
Canal
can
be
made
any
When the historIan who leaves noth
art
where
near
self-supporting
if
tolls
ing out comes to wrlte the full
accoun
n
o
t
paid
by
all
ship6
using
it.
Now,
Mr
of the passage of the currency blll, hl
wlll not omit reference to the
infiuencc 1 Adamsonargueswithmuchplausibil
1 ity thathisproposalwill
accomplis1
of theChrlstmasspirlt.
Congresswa:
two
things
at
once:
I t will give time fo:
a s eager as a small boy toget OE fol
a test of the revenues of the Canal 11
the holldays; and there stood the crue
relationtoexpenses;and
it will alsc
resolution of theDemocraticmaJorlt!
f
o
r
the
necessary
diplomAtic
give
tlme
not t o adJourn unless the bill was pass
arrangements
if
we
are
finally
to adop
ed. Thisundoubtedlyhadthe
effect 0.
the
policy
of
free
tolls
for
our
coastwisc
hastening
final
action.
The
drawing
vessels.
near of the
gracious
Christmastidt
THURSDLP,

1, 1914.

The Week

seemed to calm the savage breast ofthc


fihbuster,andto
still the passions ol
themakers
of longspeeches
It Tvat
rumored that Senator La Follette woulc
insist upon speakingfortwoorthret
days;andonecanimaginetheappre
henslve looks that were cast in his di
rection. But he
let his music die with.
in
him.
Even
he
could hardly have
faced the universal rage that would
have fallen upon him if he had ruined
the Congressional vacation over t h e hol.
Idays. Thewholething
wa8 a wonderfuldemonstration
of whatChristmas
can do inthesphere
of legislation. It
was the old miracle over again:
No voice 0
: hideous hum
through the archt3d

Senatorial
-.eloquence

d r ~ e dup, obstructionlaid
down its weapons, andCon
gress and the country seized their
Milton and echoed.
-at last our
and perfect is.

tionalCommitteemanfrom
that State,
the Central Committee will be called together soon after the holldays, and will
approve
the
recommendation
cutting
Georgias delegatlonfromtwenty-eight
t o eighteen. Mr. Jacksondoessay,for
home consumption, presumably, that the
action of the National Committee is not
entlrely fair t o the Republican party ~n
theSouth.Buthemakes
another remark that is much
closer t o the point.
However, he says, I believe the plan
willoperate t o strengthenRepublicanism i nt h e South. I t mill have a tendencytoencouragevoterstoturnout
a t elections. He has in mind, of course,
the
provision
that
Congressional
districtsinwhichtheparty
polls 7,500
There are reports of a change in thc
votes or more shall be entitled to an adAdminlstrations
attitude
concerning
ditional delegate.
the retention in the diplomatic servicf
of Ministers whose training and experi
Progressive
irreconcilables
should
ence make the contmuance of their em
keep
a sharp eye upon Kansas.Ayear
ployment a n -obyious requirement oi
ago theProgressiveswereincontrol
soundpublic
pollcy. Failuretorecog
nizethisprinciplehithertolias
been of the Republican party machinery, and
accordmgly there was no Progressive
one of t h e chief sources of criticism of
State
ticket.
The
Republican
nomithe Admmistration on t h e part of fair.
nee for Governor, Arthur Capper, lackmindedobservers.Thereportthat
a
ed onlythirtyvotes
of being elected.
bettercourse is now to be pursued de
Now he is hesitating between annoqncrivesconfirmationnotonlyfrom
the
apparentcertainty of theretention of ing hlmself as a candidate for the ProHenry P FletcherasourMinister
t c gressivenominationforGovernorand
Chili,andtheindicatedprobabllity
of enterlngtheracefortheRepubliean
the continuance of John W. Garrett i n nomination. And beisgettingencourno
Argentma
and
Edwin
V. Morgan In agement in this dublous positlon by
less
an
authorlty
than
Wllliam
Allen
Brazll,butalsofromtheunquestionablefact that President Wilsons own Whlte! A Progressive mho writes to the
convictions and proclivities must lie e n Emporia Gazette to ask why Capper does
not decide one way or the other is gentirelyinthatdirection.Whilehecan
people who lack
not disclaim responsibility f o r what has tly toldthatoften
imagination
cannot
put
themselves
in
thus far happened, itcanfairly
be
the
place
of
others.
.
Mr.
Cappleadedforhim,
if not b$ him,that
theovershadowingimportance
of the per is in the position of a child of diwholovesthemboth
two great legislative projects which
he vorced parents
has lust brought to consummation must tnd is loved by both. Then comes this
shocking explanation:
naturallyhaveabsorbedhisattention
He is not hesitating because he is afraid
the
to
exclusion
of many
matters
If hlmself. Whatever hesltancy he maniwhich, in an ordinary time, would have
fests is due t o the f a c t that he is in a
enlistedhiskeeninterest.
It is t o be ation where a man may not say I t
,lack and
on
side or the other,
hoped thatfromnow
on nothingwill
tnd where a suddendecision,
a hasty
be done to encourage the spoils
concep- mpulslve act, might do incalculable
tion of the dlplomatic service.
:o the best interests of Kansas.

It hasbeenunderstoodfromthe
beginning -of the
Wilson
Administration
.
thatnothingwouldbedoneaboutthe
question of Panama tolls until after the
tarlff and currency bills were out of the
way. That was in llne with the singletrack idea. It may, therefore, be more
than a coincidence that on the very day
the currency bill became law, Representative Adamson, Chairman of the Committee on Interstate and Foreign Commerce,
introduced
a joint
resolution
proposing a wayout
of t h e difficulty.
Georgias responsetothe
proposed
Theplan is tosuspend for twoyears
reduction of Southerndelegatesin
Ret h e provision of the Panama act making publicanConventions is asgracious as
theCanalfreetoAmericancoastwise
itisprompt.
If we may trust the Na-

. .

of Capper? But why cannot he say


;hat it is all blackontheRepublican
jide and all white on theProgressive
iide? It is,isnt it? While the
vould liketosee
Mr. Capperdeclare

2
himself a Progressive, i t also realizes
theimmensepull
of themereparty
name on entirely honest people, and so
itaskspatiencefor
Mr. Capperwhile
he makes up his mind. But what would
the Colonel say of a manwho
could
even t h m k of accepting a Republican
nomination after July 19, 1912, and before January l, 1916?
Probablythegreatestfactorinretarding the development of scientific researchamong our industries has been
high tariff. This is n o t the guess of a
poIitician,buttheverdict
of a trade
paper, t h e Jourlzal of Industrial
EnThis high
tariff, it continues, has causedmany ot
our industries to prosper and pay enormous profits in spite of their short-sighted management. Political research, with
viewtoexploiting
t h e consumer,is
well understood by such managers, and
it is a regrettablefact that many of
themhavespentthousands
of dollars
on the lobby and not one cent for placing their busmess o n a sound scientific
footing This is not a new contention.
It 1s part of whatPresidentWilson
means by freeing the American manufacturer
and
dealer.
In this view,
lowerpricesarenottheonlyend
of
tarip
reduction.
The
main
thing
is
theelimination of theartificial conditions that, under exorbitant rates, have
surrounded our industrial
processes,
which, in consequence, mayreceive
a
kind of attention hitherto denied them.
Notnewtalkingpoints,butbetter
quality, becomes the aim of theman
seeking a market.Incidentally,
in the
opinion of t h e Jounzal,
loss of this
tariff protection will, i n t h e end, exert
a great stabilizing influence on our industrialdevelopment.
Efficient is the word most commonly used.to describe the kind of admmistration that New York expects from its
new Mayor. Becausehehimselfmade
hisreputation as Commissioner of Ac.
counts, and because one of the men h e
seemscertaintoputinto
office is an.
other
notable
exponent
of t h e new
science of statistics as applied t o mu.
nicipal government, one is apt to gather
that the citys high expectations for the
next four years are based primarily on
the efficiency of systematization,come
lation, bookkeeping, card
catalogues,

The Nation
andthelike.
Yet there 1s onefaotor
in governmental efficiency which seems
to have been overlooked i n the passionatediscussion of administrativemethodology, and that is the antique virtue
of simplehonesty.
Iftheaveragecitizen looks forward to
years ofefficientgovernmentby
Messrs.Mitchel,
Prendergast, McAneny, andtheir
borough associates, it is primarily because
theaveragecitizen
is convinced t h a t
these men are honest. There is no need
to disparage training and method in the
conduct of municipalaffairs,but
the
motivebehind
themethod is of paramountimportance.Germanmunicipal
governmenthasreached
its highstate
of efficiency because
Germans
employ
experts t o ruletheircities.ButGreat
Britain, which is not in the habit of going in for scientific experimentation and
prefers t o move forward along old lines,
hasalso
developed efficient municipal
government, f o r the simple reason that
it has developed honest municlpal government.
Whether the situation at Calumet is
such as to call for
an investigation by
Congress o r not, it is certainly one that
is of most serious interest to the nation.
TheGovernor of Michigan owes it not
only t o his office and t o t h e people of his
State,buttothe
peopIe of t h e whole
country,togetat
the fullandexact
it promptly.The
truth,andtogetat
terribleChristmastragedy,theaccusationsthataroseout
of it,andthe
attack on Moyer, coming on top of a situation already intensely embittered, make
a combinationfull of sinisterpossibilities.Thestory
of Lawrenceoffers
a
clear enough demonstration of the seriousness of smch a trouble as this, and
the way in vhich it contributes t o ag.
gravate labor troubles in other parts
of
the country: and this Calumet case has
in it elements of fargreaterpotential
mischiefthandidtheLawrencecase.
Justiceandexpediencyalikedemand
t h a t it be taken hold
a t once with t h e
utmost vigor.
Secretary Lanes proposal t o con.
servedeposits
of radium is an illus.
tration of t h e unexpectedramificatione
which a new policy is likely t o develop.
A very
few
years
ago, conservation
meanttrees,water,
coal, a.nd the like.
In a day it has come t o mean radium.

[Vol. 98, NO. 2531


The principle ,once accepted, we are not
greatly surprised at the finding of new
obJects t o which ~t may be applied. One
element in Secretary Lanes p,roposal is
novel. H e aslrs forauthority.notonly
or the President to reserve to the Governmentallrights
in radium-bearmg
f o r ttb.e
ores on, publiclands,butalso
Secretary of theInteriorto
proceed
with the mining and treatmg
of these
ores in ,such a way as to obtain a supply
of radiumfor the use of t h e Government and f o r hospitals throughout the
country. To thiskind of Government,
operation of industry no objection m11
be raised.
Arkansassnewapplication
of
local option principle, now upheld
by the
State Supreme Court, virtually disfranchisesthenegroupontheliquor
question.Instead
of providmgforwiping
out saloons by a majority of the voters
inany locality, it forbidsanymunicipality or township t o license a drinkinga
placeexcept upon petitionsignedby
majority of theadult
residents.
The bill was passed by the efforts of t h e
anti-saloon forces, andhadtheusual
avowed Southern motive of keeping liquor fromtheblackpopulation.Approval of the ends sought can hardly eutend to the means
employed, espec~ally
in a State whlch increasingly recognizes
the coloredvote,
andwhichhas
hitherto resisted a grandfather
clause.
Thereseems
no wirrantforvesting
controloversaloons
in a n artificially
restricted
portion
of the
popula~tion.
Theliquorinterests,
however, declare
that they will n o t carry the matter
theUnitedStatesSupreme
Court, as
this would involve too many delays.
Thisimpliesthatothermeanswillbe
sought to bringthewholeplanto
a
final test of legality.
The high moral purpose behind theexhibition of the
whlte-slave
films,
which has now been brought t o an end
in this city, is r e ~ e a l e d i n t h e r e m a r k
made by the impresario of one of these
enterprises to tb.e effect m a th ew a s
busy taking in the money while the goingwas
good. It is easytodeclaim
against police censorship in this matrter
of white-slaveexploitation in tKe theaon the canvas screen. But what,
tre
it has
after all, is police censorship
been employed?Thereis
no question

The Nation
here of allowing the policeman to decide pine Government, is a great admirer of
as one would SUPwhether a certamexhibitlon
is t o be t h e Moros; and not,
tolerated
not. There has been no at- pose, because t h e Moro with his kree
tempt on the part of Mr. Waldo or his and hls faculty f o r runnlng amuck constltutesone of thefavoritearguments
subord~natestoimposetheirarbitrary
against grantmg self-government to the
wlll on themanagers
theseenterThe
head-hunter
and
the
prlses.Thematterhasbeentried
out Filipmos.
1 Moro haveneverfalled
t o betrotted
in thecourtsandthedecisionagainst
the films is not police decision, b u t 1 out as proof that the removal of Amerj u d i c ~ a l decision. In a broad
sense,
1 lcan
would mean the handing over
there IS, of course, a censorship by the
of the peaceful population of the islands
Tohce, and it i s exercised upon the citi- torapineandmurder.Butnowwe
zen in everywalk
of life.There
is a r e a d t h a t Mr. Worcester
police censorship on crime and o n pub- believes that, If properly governed through
men who
them-and
with
licnuisances. In a stillbroadersense,
them,
day they ma9 be made lawthe
power Of State
the
is In- abiding
self-respecting citizens of the
voked by Legislatures and courts when
phlllpplne&
it comes toany form of reglilation in Does this mean that the Mindanao dat.
the interests of t h e public welfare. The to on the rampage can expect more S Y m
citizenwhocomplainstothe
pollce of pathy from the present white masters
a nauseating moral exhibition is like of the islands than he wouldreceive
t h e citizenwhowouldcomplaintothe
from the Filipinos themselves? Or does
police of a soap factors next door. The
the sympathetic treatment t h e Mora
police are the primary agents whom the needs take the form of being civilized
communitycalls
in tobring
a public with
Krag?Ineither
case, a native
nuisancebeforetheattention
of the Government at Manila ought to be equal
courts. With public
opinion
against
t o the task. Mr. Shuster, in his admirathem, the p o k e cannot destroy the hbble article in the
points out the
ertles of the cltizen; and what other trishallowness of the Moro argument.A
bunal ean the moral crusaders ask
Fllipinogunboat,equippedwith
a few

3
attitude of sulky resentment is not likely to
this country to terms.

Mr. Andrew Furuseths resignatlon in


a huffrom the London Conference on
Ocean Safety so conErmshisstamp
of
radicalismthat it willinevitablydamage his position upon the Seamens bill.
TheHousewillbemoreinclinedthan
ever toheararguments
pro and
upon a measure which could thus lead
t o a sharpsplitwithaninternationaland-impartla1
body. President
Wilsonhasalreadyexpressed
a wish
that aotion i n Congress may await the
recommendations of t h e Conference on
matters pertinent t o the bill. That this
be done is hlghlydesirable, f o r repeated protestsfromforeignandnative
shipowners have left no doubt that the
bill
requires
amendment.
Its
provisionsforthe
protection of crewsare
now generallyacquiescedin,butcertainclausesrelatingto.thesafety
of
passengers
are
held
exaggerated
and
unreasonably
drastic.
The
report
of
theConference is notlikely t o e r r on
the side of laxity; it will be expert in
every sense of the word; and a rational
willingness t o be guided by it will not
merelysupportthegeneralmovement
rapid-Erers, would be enough to protect
f
o r internationaluniformityinregulaCant somebody do something, at this the people ofLuZOn agalnst murderous
tions
upontransoceanic
traffic, b u t
happy season, t o cheer up Col Harvey? invasion.
lieve
t
h
e
blll
of
the
charge
that it now
H e is havlng a terrlbly doleful tlme in
violates certam treaty obligations.
t h e North AnLerzcan Revkeao overthe
British Cabinets decision against
slns and shortcomings of President W11- oacial partleipation
England in the
son. Trouble,trouble,andnothingbut
O n his recentvislttoLondon,AnaPanama fair is
by the Libertroubledoeshe
see-the
Constitution al
once t o the
and defended, so far as it is tole France was taken just
subverted,foreignrelationsin
par- defended at all,byConservativenewstheatre. And what does the reader suplous state,businessdepressloualready
papers. This has
beeu t h e usual fate Of pose was the play by which the cultivatupon thecountry,andpollticaldefeat
of
Mr. Asquiths foreign policies
The bit- ed Frenchman was t o gethisidea
f o r the Democratic party impending. We terest
the present state of the English drama?
crlticism
against
Sir
Edward
cant be sure what
is the matter with
Greys policy intheNearand
Middle Why, it was Joseph and His Brethren
Harvey but we have
idea that
East has come
supporters of the Why not? It wasgiven at Sir Herbert
hehaslosthis
old stronggrip on his Ministry, and the Tory London Tzm,es Treestheatre, it has run f o r nobody
theology.Whenonerecalkthetliumcanrecall how manymonths, so why
was for a time regarded as the
phant way In which,only a few short man for Sir Edward. In the matter of not invite the supreme ironistof France
years ago he
it Out that
spirit at this tedious specthe fair the severest indictment against t o soothe
Wilson was foreordained, before the the Government has been formulated by tacle, andfrom
it carryback
an imfoundation of t h e world, to be President the Radical Ghronzcle, which points out pression of the
present
ideals
and
of the United States, it does seem as if with undeniable force the absurdity of achievements of the stage in England?
it might do t h e Colonel good, in this the plea that tl?e British treasury can- Doubtless, M. France is t o o shrewd a
h o u r whenhiscountenancehasfallen
not afford the sum of half million dol- manto be deceived by this stroke of
and his spirit is cast down within him,
lars towards an act of international English hospitality. H e probably knows
if he
Only reach Out and take a courtesywhoseeffect
on Anglo-Ameri- that his experience was very like what
stiff dose of his favorite old family med- can relations could hardly fail to be it would betoaskEdmund
Gosse in
icine, predestination.
beneficial. Conceding the point that E n g Paris to pass ,by the Comedie and the
land has
justiEable grievance against Ch%teletand go over the rivertothe
We read that Dean C. Worcester, ex- us over the question of Panama tolls, it ThebtreClunytojudge
of what the
Secretary of the Interior in the Philip- needs no special acumen to see that an French are doing in the dramatic art.

IL