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Pipelines & Distribution Manual/Volume 3 - Maintenance


Critical Procedures
Energy Isolation and Lock-Outs

PURPOSE AND SCOPE


This subject establishes requirements and guidelines that will ensure the effective and
safe isolation and locking-out of equipment in order to protect personnel and property
from hazardous energy during the performance of planned operations, maintenance,
and/or service work.
This procedure is to be used in conjunction with other referenced procedures.
Electrical and mechanical lockouts eliminate the possibility of inadvertently energizing
circuits or releasing energy or fluids during maintenance or repair work.
REFERENCE
PDM 01-04-06: Safety: Personal Protective Equipment
PDM 01-04-10: Safety: Work Permitting Program
PDM 01-06-01: Management of Change: Process and Administration
PDM 03-02-01: Critical Procedures: General
PDM 03-02-02: Critical Procedures: Confined Space Entry
PDM 03-02-34: Critical Procedures: Safe Electrical Work
PDM 03-08-04: Product Movement Piping & Accessories: Line Testing
PDM 03-08-21: Product Movement Piping & Accessories: Opening Process
Equipment
PDM 03-35-01: Routine Maintenance Fixed Nuclear Gauges: Overview
ASSOCIATED DOCUMENTS
0302F07.Doc: Equipment Lockout Record
0308F13.Doc: Job Safety Execution Plan
0302F18.Doc: Valve Lockout and Drawing List
0302F42.Doc: Pipeline Interruption Request Form

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0302F45.Doc: Energy Isolation T1BP Quick Reference List

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DEFINITIONS
Authorized Person
A qualified person who has been designated by the site to perform specific tasks.
NOTE: Although an individual may be qualified to perform certain tasks, the site may
not give authorization to the worker to perform all tasks in which they are trained and
qualified.
Energy Isolating Devices
A mechanical device that physically prevents the transmission or release of energy,
including but not limited to the following:
A manually operated electrical circuit breaker
A disconnect switch
A manually operated switch by which the conductors of a circuit can be
disconnected from all ungrounded supply conductors, and in addition, no pole can
be operated independently
A line valve
A block, and any similar device used to block or isolate energy
Push buttons, selector switches and other control circuit-type devices are not energyisolating devices.
Energy Isolation Types
a

Mechanical Isolation - Isolation of process and utility piping and equipment,


including tubing and instrument fitting. Underground collection systems (sewers) and
atmospheric vents are also included, even though they are not pressure containing.
b Electrical Isolation - Isolation of electrical devices and energy (including
earthling/grounding of static electricity sources).
c Chemical Energy Isolation/Neutralization Isolation (or neutralization where such
energy is not capable of being isolated) of a source or inventory of chemical with the
potential to unexpectedly release energy (e.g., pyrophoric material, oxidizing agents).
d Kinetic Energy Isolation Isolation of equipment which is free to rotate or move
during maintenance even when the driver is isolated (e.g., air cooled fan blades).
e Radioactive Isolation - Isolation of radiation emitting devices and sources of
radiation.

Energy Sources
Energy sources include but are not limited to generators and accumulators of
electricity, pneumatic energy, hydraulic energy (e.g., oil, water, other fluids in piping),

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thermal energy, chemical energy, kinetic energy, radiant energy, radioactive isotopes
(may include Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials) and gravitational energy.
Equipment
Equipment includes all items which are necessary to complete a job and/or may include
any items which need to be isolated and locked out for a task to be completed.
Lock-Out Devices
A device that utilizes a positive means such as a lock, to hold an energy-isolating
device in the safe position so as to prevent the energizing of a plant, machinery, or
equipment.
Note: Supplementary hardware for facilitating lockout of process equipment includes
blinds and blanks, chains, and self-locking fasteners.
Tag-Out Device
A prominent warning device (such as a tag and a means of attachment) which can be
securely fastened to an energy isolating device in accordance with an established
guideline.
Substation

An assembly of electrical equipment including; switchgear, control center equipment,


motor starters, and distribution panels supplied directly by feeders or by adjacent
transformers. At some CFO locations, a substation can also be referred to as an MCC.

NOTES & CAUTIONS


Level 1 Work Activities
Within the scope of Tier 1 Best Practices is a subset of work activities that represent
tasks with the highest risk within that procedure. This has been called Level 1 work
and it requires review and endorsement by a Level 1 Endorser or Tier 1 Best Practice
SME.
The following activities are considered level 1 work within this procedure:
None

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Level 2 Work Activities


All energy isolation activities which are not identified as level 1 work, are level 2. The
QRL form, 0302f45, is to be completed on a quarterly interval for all level 2 energy
isolations
PROCEDURE ORGANIZATION
This procedure is organized into the following sections:
1.0 General Requirements
2.0 Energy Isolation Methods and Requirements
3.0 Locking Out & Tagging Out
PROCEDURE
1.0 GENERAL
The following three points are key requirements covering most of the responsibilities of
workers when performing lock-outs, tag-outs and/or energy isolations.

Understanding this energy isolation and lock-outs procedure prior to commencing


any work, including but not limited to, all requirements associated with the lock-out
and tag-out section of the procedure, the roles and responsibilities associated with
isolating equipment, and testing the isolation to ensure it is complete.

Implementing the lock-out and tag-out activities within this procedure, this includes
but is not limited to, the proper use of the locks and their tags, the proper placement
of the locks and their tags, and understanding the repercussions associated with any
deviations from the procedures.

The proper maintenance of their locks as well as the administration of the tag-out
program.

Energy isolations are required when energy sources need to be isolated from equipment
which will be worked on. Energy isolations are done to avoid any inadvertent change in
the energy state of the equipment which needs to be worked on. Along with energy
isolations, equipment is tagged and locked-out to inform others of the work which is
being completed, and to avoid unintentional operation of the equipment
Equipment is locked out when work needs to be completed and controls are used to
keep the service of equipment fixed, and allow work to progress. Equipment is locked
out using appropriate controls which will avoid an inadvertent switch from the required

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equipment service. These lock-out devices are appropriately tagged, to notify other
personnel of the work being completed.
The Operations Control Centre monitors and controls many sites as part of its
operation. When equipment will be removed from service for a time greater than seven
days and it is either monitored and or controlled by them, they must be notified. This
would include tank cleanings, pumps removed from service or repair. The Pipeline
Interruption Request (0302f42) should be used. This notification will allow them to
disable any alarms associated with the equipment if they choose. When the work has
been completed but before being placed into service they must be informed in advance
to confirm that alarming has been reenabled.
Only workers who are trained in lockout procedures for specific types of equipment
(i.e., mechanical, electrical) will initiate lockout procedures.
For small bore piping (1-1/2 or smaller), or where locking with a chain is not possible,
car or wire seals are an acceptable means of lockout. The Equipment Lockout form
(0302f07) shall be completed and lockout tags must still be used.
Contractor(s) directly involved in the work process (i.e., hands-on equipment) shall
participate in the lockout process.
A Work Permit is mandatory for all lockouts.
The Equipment Lockout Record (0302f07) is to be filled out each time a lockout
occurs.
Facilities should have a lockout board, wall box or equivalent lockout station
displaying colour coded locks, multi lock-out hasps, keys and white tags and a lock-out
record book or alternate file location for the completed lockout forms. Where more
than one lock is used the multi lock-out hasp is attached prior to the first lock. Fill out
the white lock-out tag and attach it to the locked out equipment.
2.0 ENERGY ISOLATION METHODS AND REQUIREMENTS
2.1 Introduction
Energy isolation is required to ensure hazardous energy sources are isolated from all
equipment which is to be worked on. Isolations are accomplished using devices that
cannot suddenly or inadvertently move from their desired position. Isolation standards
have been developed which consider both the type of work to be completed as well as
the substance, these are found in PDM 03-08-21 (Opening Process Equipment).

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2.1.1 - Energy Sources


Workers should be aware of the different types of energies present in IOL P&D
operations. Some types of energies to be considered when performing equipment
isolation for work activities include, but are not limited to:
TABLE 2.1.1a: Various Types of Energies and their Sources
Pneumatic or hydraulic
Oil, water, other fluids in piping
Louvers
Rams or pistons
Bladders
Actuators
Instrument air pots
Electrical
Static or frictional
Induced electro-magnetic fields
Accumulators and batteries
Capacitors
Thermal
Residual heat
Stress relieving pipework
Heat of solution, neutralization or reaction
Chemical
Pyrophoric scale
Molecular sieve, desiccant or catalyst
Strong acid or caustic with water
Oxidizing agents
Any chemical reaction

Kinetic
Shafts
Fin-fans
A swinging load
A grinding wheel
Any moving object
Potential
Process fluids
A coiled spring
A vehicle at the top of a hill (gravitational
energy)
A head of liquid
A stressed furnace tube
Misaligned pipework
Wires or ropes under tension
Suspended loads
Counter-balances
Radiant/Radioactive
Electromagnetic
Radioactive sources, devices and isotopes
(including NORM)
Radio transmissions
UV emissions

2.2 Determine Isolation Points


The steps for determining isolation points includes the following elements and actions,
and shall be performed in the following sequence:

Before beginning work determine the nature, scope and likely duration of the work
to be performed.

Determine whether or not the equipment is in-situ, and determine how the
equipment will be removed.

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Determine how the equipment will be flushed or purged, de-pressured and drained
prior to blinding and work commencing. Determine how this activity will affect the
location of energy isolating devices. Isolate equipment at nearest point to
mechanical work.
o Note: Convenience, past practices, etc. do not meet this criteria

Determine whether or not the energy isolating devices need to be removed and
reinstalled during the course of the work to allow the task to progress. If this is the
case ensure an approved plan is in place to manage this.

If available, review any operating procedure required for equipment preparation


(e.g. removal from service, cooling down, flushing and/or purging, where the
equipment is to be drained or de-pressured to and how this is going to be done,
etc.).

2.3 Isolation and Depressurizing of Equipment


Isolate the equipment properly, depressurize and test for toxic gases if applicable.

All inlets and outlets must be disconnected and plugged or blanked at the
connection closest to the vessel for vessel entry.

All valves open/closed for isolation must be locked out and tagged.

Where double block valves are used for isolation, they must be locked out in the
closed position, and the bleed valve between them locked out in the open position.
Refer to PDM 03-08-21 (Opening Process Equipment) for more information.

2.3.1 Valves For Isolation


Manual valves are the preferred type of valve to accomplish energy isolation.
Air, hydraulic, or electrically operated valves are not generally acceptable for isolation.
Subject to the restrictions below, if no manual isolation means is available and one of
these types of valves must be used, a JSEP shall be developed and approved by the
Energy Isolation T1BP SME, which describe the means that these valves will be used
to isolate and to ensure these valves cannot be operated during the planned isolation
period.

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PLC controlled valves shall only be allowed to be used when isolation from the PLC
can be proven.
Valves not acceptable as energy isolating devices:
Control valves with minimum stops
Non-return or check valves
Air-to-close valves
Hydraulically driven valves without position control locking system
Pressure relief valves/devices
Isolation with block valves is further detailed in PDM 03-08-21 (Opening Process
Equipment) under the Isolation standards subsection. This document should be
reviewed prior to commencing any isolation work.
2.4 Electrical Isolation
The steps for completing electrical isolation includes the following elements and
actions, and shall be performed in the following sequence (see PDM 03-02-34 when
working on electrical equipment).
Before an authorized person turns off a machine or equipment, they shall have
knowledge of the type and magnitude of the energy, the hazards of the energy, and
the method or means to isolate the energy

The machine or equipment shall be turned off or shut down using the operating
procedures established for the machine or equipment. An orderly shutdown shall be
utilized to avoid additional or increased hazard(s) to personnel as a result of the
equipment stoppage

All devices that are needed to isolate the energy to the machine or equipment shall
be physically located and operated in such a manner as to isolate the machine or
equipment from the electrical source(s)

Authorized Persons shall affix lock Lockout devices and tag-out devices to each
electrical Energy Isolating Device

Following the application of Lock-Out Devices or Tag-Out Devices to electrical


isolating devices, all potentially hazardous stored or residual electrical energy shall
be dissipated, disconnected, and/or rendered safe;

If there is a possibility of re-accumulation of stored energy to a hazardous level,


verification of isolation (e.g., by grounding) shall be continued until the servicing or
maintenance is completed, or until the possibility of such accumulation no longer
exists;

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Prior to starting work on machines or equipment that have been locked-out or


tagged-out, the authorized persons shall verify that isolation and de-energization of
the machines or equipment have been accomplished.

If an electrical Energy Isolating Device is not capable of being locked-out, the site
shall develop a JSEP to utilize only a tag-out system. The JSEP must be approved
by the Energy Isolation T1BP SME.

Except as allowed in the following note, when a Tag-Out Device is used on an


electrical Energy Isolating Device, which is capable of being locked-out; the TagOut Device shall be attached at the same location that the Lock-Out Device is
attached.
Note: Where a tag cannot be affixed directly to the Energy Isolating Device,
the tag shall be located as close as safely possible to the device, in a position
that will be obvious to anyone attempting to operate the device.

Electrical Lock-Out Devices and Tag-Out Devices shall be standardized within the
facility in at least one of the following criteria: Color, shape, or size, and
additionally, in the case of Tag-Out Devices, print and format shall be standardized.

2.5 Isolation of Remotely Operated Equipment


Request remote start by the Control Centre or any other Control Room that has device
control capability.
a. The last check is a remote start by the remote Control Centre.
b. Ensure Control Room Operator inputs all applicable disable commands once
the remote-start test has been completed (if applicable).
Note: Some equipment is on time delay. You may have to wait a predetermined time to
ensure the power is disconnected.
2.6 Isolation of Multiple Equipment Connected to One Power Source:
The following steps are to be used where multiple equipment is connected to a single
breaker or main breaker and is used in conjunction with general lockout procedures.
1. Check to ensure all equipment on this breaker can remain isolated during the
maintenance activity.
2. Open breaker and install lockouts and Do Not Operate/Lockout tags.
Note: Where the other equipment on the breaker must remain energized, the following
steps are performed by qualified personnel:
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3. With the breaker locked and tagged open, disconnect the power supply wire on the
equipment to be worked on.
4. Tape the exposed power supply wire. Attach Tag "Danger, Voltage Present" on
exposed wiring.
5. Close breaker, energizing remaining equipment.
6. Test to ensure on de-energized equipment, local and/or remote operation is
disabled.
7. Lock out and tag local on/off switch.
2.7 Isolation for Multiple Power Sources Supplying to One or More
Equipment
The following steps are to be used where a single piece of equipment, which is to be
worked on, is powered by multiple power sources (breakers or starters) and is used in
conjunction with general lockout procedures.
1. Determine the number of power sources supplying to the single piece of equipment.
2. Determine what other equipment they are supplying to.
3. If the multiple breakers or starters are supplying to one equipment, open both
breakers and install lockouts and Do Not Operate/Lockout tags.
4. With the breakers or starters locked and tagged open, disconnect the power supply
wire on the equipment to be worked on.
5. Tape the exposed power supply wire. Attach Tag "Danger, Voltage Present" on
exposed wiring.
NOTE: Where the other equipment on the breakers or starters must remain
energized, the following steps are performed by qualified personnel:
6. Close the breakers or starters, energizing remaining equipment.
7. Test to ensure on de-energized equipment, that local and/or remote operation is
disabled.
8. Lock out and tag local on/off switch.
The following are examples of signage and tags that can be used to ensure workers are
informed of this situation:

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Example of signage for equipment supplied by multiple power sources

Figure 2.7a

Sample of Caution Tags to Remind Workers about Two Power Sources

Figure 2.7b

2.8 Isolation for Confined Space Entry Work


When performing isolation work in confined spaces, PDM 03-02-02 (Confined Space
Entry) and 03-08-21(Opening Process Equipment) shall apply as appropriate.
2.9 Isolation for Pressure Tests
Except as allowed in PDM 03-08-04 (Line Testing) line rated blinds shall be installed
on the pressure side of closed valves to meet pressure-testing criteria. Where it is
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impossible or impracticable to use a rated blind, risk assessment and appropriate


engineering calculations shall be carried out and an MOC is to be completed.
2.10 Isolation of Radiation Devices/Sources
Some process equipment will become contaminated with Naturally Occurring
Radioactive Materials (NORM). This condition occurs when trace elements (such as
Radon) are present in feedstock. Site procedures shall consider the likelihood of
NORM and if appropriate, neutralization methods for these materials.
PDM Section 03-35 contains the requirements for safely working with, and isolation of,
radiation devices/sources.
2.11 Isolation of Valves Equipped with Air Operators

Close the air supply line to the valve controller.

Disconnect supply tubing downstream of valve.

Tag the valve with a Do Not Operate/Lockout tag.

3.0 LOCKING OUT & TAGGING OUT


3.1 Requirements
The following information is provided to ensure all workers are aware of the lock
out/tag out requirements for IOL P & D.
3.1.1 Responsibilities

Workers must maintain control of their own locks.


Workers must never trade locks or keys with another worker or function.
Workers must never use a combination lock as a lockout lock.

3.1.2 Lock Ownership


IOL Personnel (or owner rep) Only: Pipelines & Distribution personnel will install
individual personal lockout locks on all equipment/piping impacting their planned
activities.
In situations where other P&D personnel will be conducting maintenance activities, in
the same area, each individual employee will jointly lock out all equipment/piping
impacting their planned activities, and a Work Permit will be completed.

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External Third-Party Personnel: Each individual company on-site to identify a
designated worker for each skill/trades function to ensure that each function attaches
their own unique lock(s) to the equipment that is scheduled for repair.
Contractors must supply their own locks and provide unique locks for each individual
function group.
In the event of a transfer of lock ownership, all workers (IOL & external third-party)
must complete section E in the Equipment Lockout Record (0302f07).
3.1.3 Tagging Locks
All locks must be tagged with the following information:
Printed name and signature of the worker.
Date and time installed.
Written instructions telling workers not to start or operate the equipment.
Description of the work (or reference to lockout record).
3.1.4 Forceful Removal
If an employee loses his key or inadvertently leaves his lock on a lockout device and is
unavailable for its removal, the employee will:

Fill out an authorization in section F on form 0302F07.Doc: Equipment Lockout


Record

Obtain master key (if available) and remove the lock. There should be no reason to
cut a company lock off a lockout device.

Note: Forceful removal of a lockout device without first receiving authorization is


subject to disciplinary action or a "non-conformance" report for contractors.
3.1.5 Deviating from Lockout Procedure
Total disregard of the lockout procedure will lead to disciplinary action.
In situations where the lockout procedure is not reasonable or practical (e.g. during a
large shut down, turnaround or difficulty with existing equipment, need to shutdown
complete site to isolate), procedure with equal or greater protection must be used with
prior approval of the Operation Manager or the site may implement "multiple
equipment connected to one breaker" found later in this subject, if applicable.
Note: Any deviations from this lockout procedure require approval through the
Management of Change procedure (PDM 01-06-01)

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3.1.6 Decommissioning Equipment


Prior to isolating and locking out equipment to be worked on, ensure adequate
approvals and notification to on-site personnel and Operations Control Centre, when
applicable, of the repairs to be done or the equipment to be shutdown.
For Pipelines, notification can be verbal or documented on a Pipeline Interruption
Request (PDM 0302F21) form based on the magnitude of the planned work activity or
system throughput volumes. Any equipment monitored by Operations Control Centre
that will be removed from service for more than seven days must use an interruption
report.
Ensure the equipment is de-energized/isolated before locking out.
Perform decommissioning activities as required for the equipment to be worked on
after energy isolation and lock-outs have been completed. Depending on the
equipment, there may be additional decommissioning procedures contained within the
PDM. See the applicable section as required.
3.1.7 Testing of Locked-Out Equipment During Work
If equipment testing is required during the course of work, a JSEP shall be developed to
ensure continuing protection of people when isolations have to be removed and
reinstalled to allow the work to progress.
The JSEP, at the minimum, must include the following steps:
1. Clear the machine or equipment of tools, materials, and people;
2. Notify affected personnel
3. Remove the lock-out and/or tag-out devices
4. Energize and proceed with testing or positioning
5. De-energize all systems and reapply and verify energy control measures to continue
the servicing and/or maintenance per established PDM lock-out/tag- out procedure.
The JSEP shall be approved by the Energy Isolation T1BP SME
3.1.8 Commissioning Equipment
Perform commissioning activities as required for the equipment to be worked on after
energy isolation and lock-outs have been removed. Depending on the equipment, there
may be additional commissioning procedures contained within the PDM. See the
applicable section as required.
Confirm that alarming to Operations Control Centre has been reinstated before
equipment has been placed back in service if applicable.

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3.2 Applying the Lock-out/Tag-out
3.2.1 On-site Worker or Job Supervisor (normally Work Permit Issuer)
Initiate all lockout procedures by tagging and applying a multiple lockout device with
your lock.
At the determined energy isolation location(s) (see section 2.2), such as the
isolation valves, substation or identified electrical disconnect switch (es),
close/open the valve(s), or turn the disconnect switch (es) for the equipment to be
worked on to the OFF/OPEN position.
Apply the lock-out device(s) as required to ensure energy isolation for the work
The lockout device must ensure that the valve cannot open/close or the master
switch cannot be turned on (or operated) and is strong enough to prevent
accidental removal. For example, ensure that lockout devices on manual valves
are tight enough so the valve will not open/close.
Fill out the header and section A of 0302F07.Doc: Equipment Lockout Record with
name, date, equipment ID, reason and lock number (if applicable). If more than a
single energy isolation point is locked out, complete section G, as required. List the
additional equipment and initialling the P & D On column, indicating that each
point is isolated.
If further room is required, or for more complex jobs such as pipeline drain
downs spanning multiple locations, form 0302F18 can be utilized in addition to
form 0302F07.
Apply the tag-out device(s)
Tag-out devices, where used, shall be affixed in such a manner as will clearly
indicate that the operation or movement of energy isolating devices from the
"safe" or "off" position is prohibited; The tag-out device shall be securely
fastened, be weather resistance and durable and identify person who affixed it.
Verify that all store energies are released or safely isolated before work commence.
(Section 2.3 and 2.4)
Test the Local ON-OFF hand-switch to ensure the power is disconnected. (Ensures
equipment is properly locked out.)
3.2.2 Maintenance Workers/ Contractors
This may be the same person as in section 3.2.1

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Before working on the equipment, apply your locks and tags (if applicable, Do Not
Operate/Lockout tag may have previously been installed) to the multiple lockout
devices.
Verify that the equipment has been isolated. Complete section B in the Equipment
Lockout Record (form 0302F07). If more than a single energy isolation point is
locked out, verify the list of equipment in section G, as required. Initial the worker
On column indicating that each point is isolated.

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3.3 Removing the Lock-out/Tag-out


3.3.1 Maintenance Workers/ Contractors
Inspect the work area to ensure that non-essential items have been removed and to
ensure that machine or equipment components are operationally intact
Inform site representative of work completion
Complete work area and equipment inspection with site representative and that all
personnel have been safely positioned or removed
If applicable inform the Operations Control Centre to ensure that alarming for the
equipment has been reinstated. This notification must be given in advance to allow
for time to perform this work.
Upon approval from site representative, remove all locks and tags
After Locks and Tags have been removed and before a machine or equipment is
started, affected personnel are notified that the lock-out or tag-out device(s) have
been removed. Affected personnel are any persons still working on or near
equipment that is to be started.
Complete section C and G, if applicable, on the Equipment Lockout Record (form
0302f07).
3.3.2 On-site Worker or Job Supervisor (normally Work Permit Issuer)

The last lock(s) removed must be the on-site workers/ job supervisors.
Check to ensure that work is complete. Complete work area inspection with
worker.
Complete additional verification that all vents and drains are closed.
Confirm all worker locks have been removed. If applicable, consult/update
Lockout Record in decommissioning/commissioning plan.
Remove your lock(s) and the multiple lockout devices in preparation for equipment
to be commissioned/flooded/pressurized.
When applicable, leave electrical isolation and electrical lock-outs in place until
all equipment has been flooded, vented, and prepared for operation.
Open/close any manual valves that had been used for isolation and depressurizing.
Complete equipment flooding and venting, using lock-out record to ensure all
required valves are positioned as required for safe commissioning activities.
Complete a thorough inspection of the equipment and the work site before starting
up the equipment. To ensure safety, this must be done by the on-site worker/ job
supervisor.
When equipment is verified to be ready for operation, remove electrical isolation
lock(s)
Inform the Operations Control Centre and/or other third-party facility owners that
work is complete.
Tests equipment to ensure it is working properly.
The last lock(s) removed must be the on-site workers/ job supervisors.
Complete section D and G, if applicable, on the Equipment Lockout Record (form
0302f07).

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3.4 Lock Box Procedure
The following procedure is used when a lock box is utilized as part of the lockout
procedure due to a multiple number of personnel and/or locations involved.
The project manager, operations sponsor, or designate, locks out all the mechanical
and electrical systems of the facility to be worked on.
The keys of the individual locks are placed into the lock box. These keys cannot be
removed from the lock box until all workers associated with the lockout have
removed their locks.
A walk through of the isolation means and methods is completed with the prejob
tailgate or turn over meeting.
A flow diagram or P&ID should be available to aid with the explanation of the
isolation.
All workers (or designated function representatives as determined by provincial
legislation) involved with the work, are required to place their lock on the lock box
to start the work, and reversely, remove their lock when the work is completed

February 2014
Pdm30205.doc

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