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JANUARY 2016ISSUE 165

YOUR FREE GUIDE TO THE NYC JAZZ SCENE

NYCJAZZRECORD.COM

best
of 20
15
i ssue

ROVA
SAXOPHONE QUARTET
A LONG HISTORY

JACKY
TERRASSON

OKKYUNG
LEE

HUBERT
LAWS

PEGGY
LEE

Managing Editor:
Laurence Donohue-Greene
Editorial Director &
Production Manager:
Andrey Henkin
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JANUARY 2016ISSUE 165


New York@Night
Interview : Jacky Terrasson
Artist Feature : Okkyung Lee
On The Cover : ROVA Saxophone Quartet
Encore : Hubert Laws
Lest We Forget : Peggy Lee
LAbel Spotlight : MPS
VOXNEWS
In Memoriam

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Staff Writers
David R. Adler, Clifford Allen,
Fred Bouchard, Stuart Broomer,
Katie Bull, Thomas Conrad,
Ken Dryden, Donald Elfman,
Kurt Gottschalk, Tom Greenland,
Alex Henderson, Marcia Hillman,
Terrell Holmes, Robert Iannapollo,
Suzanne Lorge, Marc Medwin,
Russ Musto, Joel Roberts,
JohnSharpe, Elliott Simon,
Andrew Vlez, Ken Waxman
Contributing Writers
Duck Baker, Phil Freeman, Anders Griffen,
Mark Keresman, Ken Micallef, John Pietaro
Contributing Photographers
Tanja Ahlstn, Myles Boisen, Peter Gannushkin,
Philippe Levy-Stab, Heike Liss, Alan Nahigian,
Gabriel Rodes, Sebastian Sighel,
Robert I. Sutherland-Cohen, Jack Vartoogian

nycjazzrecord.com

Festival Report
CD Reviews
Best of 2015
Miscellany
Event Calendar

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by russ musto
by john pietaro
by ken waxman
by alex henderson
by andrew vlez
by ken waxman
by suzanne lorge
by andrey henkin

Another year has passed. 12 months. 52 weeks. 365 days. 8,760 hours. 525,600 minutes.
31,536,000 seconds. We hope that youve spent a good number of those listening to jazz...we
sure have. And the prize for all that listening is presenting our annual Best Of selections,
spreading the finest in albums, musicians, clubs and assorted categories across our glorious
skyline. Before 2016s seconds and minutes and hours and days and weeks get away from you,
peruse our selections for old favorites and new discoveries. The flipside to all that time
passing is the jazz folk who have joined that great concert in the sky. For a full list, please go
to page 12 and take a few moments to remember all these valuable contributors (we also have
a section of CD reviews, pgs. 40-41, from artists who passed in the last year).
But enough nostalgia. 2016 starts out with a bang, or a toot of a NYE horn. The ROVA
Saxophone Quartet (On The Cover) celebrates nearly 40 years of music-making with a week
at The Stone and appearance at Winter Jazzfest. Pianist Jacky Terrasson (Interview), who just
turned 50, is at Smoke. And cellist Okkyung Lee (Artist Feature), in her fourth decade, has a
three-night residency at a Best of 2015 venue JACK and appearances at The Stone.
We thank you for spending some of your 2015 with us and look forward to 2016...
On The Cover: ROVA Saxophone Quartet (Jon Raskin, Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams,
Larry Ochs, left to right. Photo by Myles Boisen)
All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission strictly prohibited.
All material copyrights property of the authors.

2 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

W W W. B LU E N OT E JA Z Z . CO M

JANUARY 2016

CHRIS BOTTI - 11TH ANNUAL HOLIDAY RESIDENCY


JANUARY 1 - 10

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ROY HAYNES

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LATE NIGHT GROOVE SERIES
AARON BERNARD BRIM JAZZ & SOUL EXPERIENCE JANUARY 1 TERRY KID LUCKY LEWIS JANUARY 2 TYLER BLANTON ELECTRIC TRIO JANUARY 8
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WAYNE ESCOFFERY QUARTET

Wayne Escoffery [tenor saxophone] David Kikoski [piano]


Ugonna Okegwo [bass] Billy Drummond [drums]

CHAMPIAN FULTON QUINTET

Champian Fulton [piano & vocals] Stephen Fulton [flugelhorn]


Jerry Weldon [saxophone] Adi Meyerson [bass] Ben Zweig [drums]

AL FOSTERS BIRTHDAY BASH

Eli Degibri [tenor saxophone] Adam Birnbaum [piano]


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TIA FULLER QUARTET

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Billy Harper [tenor saxophone] Francesca Tanksley [piano]


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with trumpeters:
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ARTIST RESIDENCIES

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Carlos Averhoff, Jr. [tenor saxophone] Santiago Bosch [piano]


Edward Perez [bass] Fabio Rojas [drums]

JIMMY COBB BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION


Peter Bernstein [guitar] George Cables [piano]
John Webber [bass] Jimmy Cobb [drums]

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Giacomo Gates [vocals] Grant Stewart [tenor saxophone]


John di Martino [piano] Ed Howard [bass] Alvester Garnett [drums]

JACKY TERRASSON QUINTET

Chris Turner [vocals] Jacky Terrasson [piano] Ben Williams [bass]


Justin Faulkner [drums] Mauricio Herrera [percussion]

NEW ON WEDNESDAYS at 11:30PM (1/6 & 1/20)

HOUSE OF DAVID: DELARIA + BOWIE = JAZZ

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G uitarist

December 2015, the 50th anniversary year of


Chicagos Association for the Advancement of Creative
Musicians drew to a closea year that had seen the
reconvening of pianist and AACM founding member
Muhal Richard Abrams Experimental Band at the
Chicago Jazz Fest, as well as ancillary events in New
York (where many AACM players have made their
home since the early 70s). Brooklyn venue Roulette has
long presented AACM concerts and featured a double
bill of new music from trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith
(a string quartet with trumpet and piano and a chamber
work with dancer Miriam Parker) and reed player
Douglas Ewarts seven-piece ensemble Quasar
(Dec. 10th). The latter group featured vocalists Thomas
Buckner and Mankwe Ndose while J.D. Parran filled out
the woodwinds, standing with a tree of auxiliary
percussion and homemade and modified flutes. Warren
Smith moved between drum kit, concert bass drum and
marimba, stirred by the ruminative postbop grace of
Adegoke Steve Colsons piano and the laptop of Stephen
Goldstein. Throughout a lengthy suite, which began
with an ode to homelessness and closed with a paean to
AACM visionaries, the ensemble triangulated voice,
theatrical movement and tonal colorsometimes with
bebop inflections, at other instants given to spiky
chamber improvisation. The group closed with a
keening processional, Ewart eventually nudging the
group into hushed tones that hung in Roulettes vaulted
ceilings.
Clifford Allen

STEVE ADAMS
JON RASKIN
NELS CLINE
FRED FRITH
ROB MAZUREK
JENNY SCHEINMAN

Mary Halvorson seems to sweeten her


sound, rounding out the angles, as her bands get
bigger. At The Jazz Gallery (Dec. 15th) , she debuted
her expanded octet, fresh from rehearsals, ready to
record her latest (as yet untitled) compositions for
Firehouse 12 Records. The opening set of the twonight/four-set residency began gently, Halvorson
setting the tone with languid arpeggios and looping
figures on her big-bodied Guild guitar, soon joined by
the lush chorale textures from the four-horn frontline
of trumpeter Jonathan Finlayson, alto saxophonist Jon
Irabagon, tenor saxophonist Ingrid Laubrock and
trombonist Jacob Garchik. All of that artistic firepower
was mostly kept in check during the course of the set,
though each horn player enjoyed a brief space to
improvise; Laubrock, in particular, made her presence
felt during a solo flight on the sets fifth number.
Bassist John Hbert and drummer Ches Smith provided
impetus, the former expounding a long soliloquy at the
opening of the second composition, the latter favoring
muted timbres and peppery snare drum bites. The
groups newest member, pedal steel guitarist Susan
Alcorn, added fresh colors to the sonic palette, from
loud raspy ejaculations to swooping theremin-like
glissandi. Halvorsons charts contained subtle
interplay between the horn lines, like something Bach
may have written for a choir, but with an outward
ethos. Robust trombone supplied the solitary closing
statement.
Tom Greenland

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Carter celebrated his 70th birthday in


December 2015 and sometime collaborator, Italianborn and Brooklyn-based drummer Federico Ughi also
celebrated 15 years of living and working in New York.
It was a fitting choice to combine both events into one
three-day festival at Williamsburgs Scholes Street
Studios (Dec. 12th-14th) under the aegis of Ughis 577
Records imprint. The first evenings concerts included
sets from Japanese pianist Eri Yamamoto; poet/rabblerouser Steve Dalachinsky; Ughis quartet with
saxophonist David Schnug, trumpeter Mike Irwin and
the homemade electronics of Jeff Snyder; and a flinty
trio of tenor saxophonist Stephen Gauci, bassist Reuben
Radding and drummer Todd Capp. Of course, the icing
on the cake was the closing set, an absolutely gorgeous
trio of Carter, bassist William Parker (doubling on
shakuhachi) and Ughi, spreading their inventions
across four improvisations. Carter moved effortlessly
between piano, tenor, alto and soprano saxophones,
clarinet and trumpet, often singing pensive, delicate
lullabies with his arsenal. Carter s musicianship is
such that a shift between instrumental families retains
and expands on the continuous flow of his ideas
moving from skirling tenor to spiky piano volleys, for
exampleand the result is a collage of loquacious and
expressionistic melody. Parker and Ughi are a fantastic
team, with the latter s distillation of Billy Higgins, Ed
Blackwell and Elvin Jones making him a formidable
actor in the drum chair.
(CA)

4 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Mary Halvorson @ The Jazz Gallery

W hen bassist Ben Williams, resplendent in a bright

white, wide-winged suit, brought his 12-piece band


(including a classical string quartet) to the Harlem
Stage Gatehouse (Dec. 11th) to perform Dearly
BelovedThe Music of Prince, the audience had to
wonder if this was going to be a lot of jazz and a little
bit of Prince, or the other way around. Fortunately, it
was both. Eschewing the hits, Williams instead covered
choice songs from the Minneapolis maestros diverse
catalog, including: If I Was Your Girlfriend and Do
Me Baby, both sung by guest ingnue Goapele;
All the Critics Love U in NY, amped by W. Ellington
Feltons spoken word artistry; The Cross, sung by
Christie Dashiell over Williams punchy horn
arrangement; and closing with Bilal crooning The
Ballad of Dorothy Parker. Interspersed between minisets were clips from Princes 1984 movie Purple Rain,
establishing new moods for the songs to follow. After a
father/son scene, for example, Williams played a
sensitive solo on acoustic bass. No Prince tribute
would be complete without a funk romp, so Williams
(sans white suit) and company got the cabaret crowd
out of their seats for a medley with singer/keyboardist
Frank McComb, though the funkiest funk came later
on a cover of Sign O the Times served up go-go
style, a nod to Williams Washington D.C. roots. The
show proved that, like Prince, Williams is an out-ofthe-box thinker, bringing new funk to jazz and vice
versa.
(TG)

Marquis Hill has had quite a good year, give or take a R udresh Mahanthappa, back at the Miller Theater for

the first time since his 2012 Hurricane Sandy week


concert, found a much larger crowd to hear his band
perform (Dec. 12th). Playing selections from the awardwinning Bird Calls (ACT Music), the saxophonist
explained that his Charlie Parker-inspired compositions
were not a tribute, but more a devotion to the iconic
alto saxophonists pioneering musical perspective.
And while each of the programs pieces was based on a
particular Bird classic, the quintets improvisations
owed more in temperament to post-Parker
revolutionary Ornette Colemans perspective, with
trumpeter Adam OFarrills solos frequently melding
terse jagged phrases in a manner clearly reminiscent of
Don Cherry. Opening with Bird Calls #1, the leader
blew a thick-toned, robust raga-like line over Thomson
Kneelands droning arco bass, soon buoyed by Matt
Mitchells rumbling piano and Dan Weiss malleted
cymbals. Segueing into On The DL, mottled-toned
trumpet
came
to
the
fore,
complementing
Mahanthappas clarion sound on the Donna Lee
derived song. Throughout the night Mahanthappa and
OFarrill dialogued intensely, trading lithe melodic
lines converging in thick harmonic confluence, as on
the first sets freebopping Chillin, based on Relaxin
At Camarillo, and dirge Talin Is Thinking, a variant
of Parker s Mood, on to the second halfs Nows
The Time and Confirmation spinoffs Maybe Later
and Sure Why Not.
Russ Musto

2015 Jack Vartoogian/FrontRowPhotos

Marquis Hill Quintet @ Dizzys Club

The latest round of Grammy Award nominations has been


announced. Relevant categories are: Best Improvised Jazz Solo:
Joey Alexander; Christian McBride; Donny McCaslin; Joshua
Redman; John Scofield. Best Jazz Vocal Album: Karrin Allyson;
Denise Donatelli; Lorraine Feather; Jamison Ross; Ccile McLorin
Salvant. Best Jazz Instrumental Album: Joey Alexander; Terence
Blanchard Featuring The E-Collective; Robert Glasper Trio; Jimmy
Greene; John Scofield. Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album: Gil
Evans Project; Marshall Gilkes & WDR Big Band; Arturo OFarrill &
The Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra; Maria Schneider Orchestra; Patrick
Williams. Best Latin Jazz Album: Eliane Elias; The Rodriguez
Brothers; Gonzalo Rubalcaba; Wayne Wallace Latin Jazz Quintet;
Miguel Zenn. Best Historical Album: Erroll Garner. Best
Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella: Bob James; John
Fedchock. Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album: Tony Bennett & Bill
Charlap. Best Contemporary Instrumental Album: Bill Frisell;
Wouter Kellerman; Marcus Miller; Snarky Puppy & Metropole
Orkest; Kirk Whalum. Best Score Soundtrack For Visual Media:
Antonio Sanchez; Justin Hurwitz. Best Instrumental Composition:
Arturo OFarrill; Bob Mintzer; David Balakrishnan; Rich DeRosa;
Marshall Gilkes. Best Arrangement, Instruments and Vocals:
Shelly Berg; Maria Schneider; Jimmy Greene. For more
information, visit grammy.com.
The Grammy Hall of Fame has inducted the following jazz
albums, meeting the criteria of recorded more than 25 years ago
and having qualitative or historical significance: Ella Fitzgerald
and Louis ArmstrongElla And Louis (Verve); John Coltrane
Lush Life (Prestige); and Miles Davis QuintetMiles Smiles
(Columbia). For more information, visit grammy.com/news/
grammy-hall-of-fame-class-of-2016.

Concrete plans (pardon the pun) for the construction of a


Bix Beiderbecke museum in the trumpeters hometown of
Davenport, IA have been made, with a target opening date in 2017,
in time for the annual Beiderbecke festival.
Jazz at Lincoln Center announced the opening of Mica and Ahmet
Ertegun Atrium, a mixed-use space in Frederick P. Rose Hall.

Rudresh Mahanthappa @ Miller Theatre

So the story goes that back when they were in their Since the 2007 passing of founding member Michael
teens, the mothers of Freddie Bryant (b. 1964) and
Peter Bernstein (three years his junior) met on the
Upper West Side (the guitarists lived on adjacent blocks
in the high 80s but attended different schools),
discovered their offsprings shared passion and
arranged a literal playdate. Moving forward some
30+ years and about 20 blocks north, the pair reconvened
at Smoke (Dec. 9th) for a relaxed set of their favorite
uncommon standards and one Bryant original. Both
men are now respected practitioners in the middle of
successful careers and chose a rhythm section fitting
that description: bassist Peter Washington and drummer
Lewis Nash. Bryants style is informed by his extensive
classical guitar studies while Bernstein is a left-ofstraightahead player. In performance, their styles were
highly complementary, Bryant more at a boil, Bernstein
spending his time at a simmer. They had fun in breaks
with Nash during the opener, Jesse Greer-Raymond
Klages Just You, Just Me, and rested comfortably on
the pillowy groove of Lee Morgans Mr. Kenyatta.
Bryant switched to classical guitar for a lush and smoky
take on Bruno Martino-Bruno Brighettis Estat,
demonstrating the axiom that the best jazz players
know how to play slow as well as fast. Bryant stayed on
classical guitar for his Alone, a light samba where he
was the warm sand and Bernstein the cool breeze, and
the set closed with a 50s-style burn on Charlie Parkers
Ah-Leu-Cha, just two kids having fun.
(AH)

W H AT S N E W S

The JazzConnect Conference, featuring workshops, panel


discussions and concerts, takes place Jan. 14th-15th at Saint
Peters Church. For more information, visit sites.google.com/site/
jazzconnect2014/home-1.

R.I. Sutherland-Cohen / jazzexpressions.org

month: on Nov. 10th, 2014, he won the Thelonious


Monk Trumpet International Competition; Sep. 3rd,
2015 saw him open up his hometown Chicago Jazz
Festival; and just last month he made his major jazz
club leader debut at Dizzys Club (Dec. 7th). The quintet
was split between his Windy City compatriots and
Big Apple hired guns, Christopher McBride (alto) and
Makaya McCraven (drums) the former, pianist Victor
Gould and bassist Eric Wheeler the latter. Not quite the
exploratory set to which he treated Chicagoans (which
included several guest vocalists and MCs), the Dizzys
set nodded more to the tradition-mindedness of the
Monk competition, via five originalsa few from his
DePaul University daysand Bill Lees Again Never
from the 1990 film Mo Better Blues (released when Hill
was three years old). What did remain from the Chicago
show was the fabulous rapport that exists in the
frontline. The trumpeter and saxophonist have been
working together since their teens and recall such nowlegendary pairings as Lee Morgan-Wayne Shorter or
Donald Byrd-Jackie McLean. However, neither is averse
to modernity and they are the rare young musicians
whose ideas (brains) and abilities (fingers) are perfectly
in sync. More importantly, Hill knows how to write
melodies and arrange tunes; the latter can be taught but
as for the former, you either have it or you dont. Hill
has it and a bright, bright future ahead of him.

Andrey Henkin

Brecker at the tragic age of 57, the band Saxophone


Summit has forged ahead with Ravi Coltrane joining
co-founders Dave Liebman and Joe Lovano to fill out
the three-man frontline. This year s edition of the
ensemble found alto saxophonist Greg Osby stepping
into the Brecker slot for the groups annual Birdland
residency, giving the sextet a new sound, one which
remained faithful to its original late-period John
Coltrane inspiration. With its longtime rhythm section
of pianist Phil Markowitz, bassist Cecil McBee and
drummer Billy Hart driving the saxophones, the
powerful aggregation opened its Friday night second
set (Dec. 4th) with Markowitz Point, an edgy outing
with Liebmans sinewy soprano, Lovanos ethereal
tenor and Osbys tart alto coming together in strident
harmonies recalling the 60s Miles Davis Quintet in its
cerebral intensity. Lovanos Alexander The Great
had horns swinging straightahead on Bye Bye
Blackbird changes over walking bass and explosive
drums. The mood mellowed on Harts Reneda, an
appealing melody spurring lyrical improvisations
from the saxophone trio and Markowitz, whose
rhapsodic piano lent an Ellington-ian elegance,
enhancing the songs beauty. Two Coltrane pieces,
Reverend King and India, had Lovanos alto
clarinet and tenor, Liebmans wood flute, tenor and
soprano and Osbys alto sax joining forces in joyous
sonority to close out the show.

(RM)

Much has been made of the fact that legendary rock vocalist/
composer/multi-instrumentalist David Bowies newest album,
Blackstar, was made with jazz musicians, specifically locals Donny
McCaslin, Ben Monder, Mark Guiliana, Jason Lindner and Tim
Lefebvre. But Bowies 1974 Live and 1975 Young Americans
albums included David Sanborn, 1982s Lets Dance and 1984s
Tonight included Mac Gollehon, Lenny Pickett, Stan Harrison,
Steve Elson and Sammy Figueroa, 1986s Labyrinth included Ray
Russell, Will Lee and Ray Warleigh, 1987s Never Let Me Down
included Earl Gardner, Laurie Frink, Steve Elson and Lenny Pickett
and 1992s Black Tie White Noise included Lester Bowie. Still,
good for him.
Locksmith Isadore, the freebop trio of bass clarinetist Jason
Stein, bassist Jason Roebke and drummer Mike Pride, have been
opening up shows for comedienne Amy Schumer on her recent
tour. Stein and Schumer are half-siblings as it turns out and the
latter is a fan of improvised music. The tour comes to Madison
Square Garden Jun. 23rd.
Pianist Herbie Hancock will have a role in the upcoming sc-fi film
Valerian, a feature adaptation of the French 1967 graphic novel.
The Rutgers University Institute of Jazz Studies has announced
the recipients of its Berger-Carter Jazz Research Awards: Andrea
Jackson-Alexander, Dylan Lagamma, Zach Streeter, Andrew A.
Vogel, Elise Wood, Rashida K. Braggs, Lucas Henry, Brian
Lefresne, Zachary T. Wiggins and Deanna Witkowski. For more
information, visit libraries.rutgers.edu/news/institute-jazz-studiesannounces-berger-carter-jazz-research-awards.
The 2016 Next Generation Jazz Festival, presented by the
Monterey Jazz Festival, is now accepting applications. Middle
school big bands, high school big bands, combos, vocal jazz
ensembles and composers and college big bands, combos and
vocal jazz ensembles may apply by Jan. 15th. For more information,
visit montereyjazzfestival.org.
As part of its annual grant cycle, the National Endowment for the
Arts has given funds to the following local organizations to promote
their jazz programming: Arts for Art, Inc.; Caramoor Center for
Music and the Arts, Inc.; Central New York Jazz Arts Foundation,
Inc.; Jazz Foundation of America, Inc.; The Jazz Gallery; and Jazz
at Lincoln Center, Inc. For more information, visit nea.gov.
Submit news to info@nycjazzrecord.com

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

I NTERVIEW

JACKY

Philippe Levy-Stab

TERRASSON
by russ musto
Jacky Terrasson had already earned widespread notice in the

mainstream jazz community for impressive work with Betty


Carter and Art Taylor prior to stepping into the spotlight in
1993 as winner of the Thelonious Monk International Jazz
Competition. Over the next decade and a half the Europeanborn pianist turned out a series of mostly acoustic trio
albums for Blue Note, demonstrating a growing eclecticism
reflected in his repertoire, which included forays into the
realms of classic and contemporary popular music. More
recently his wide-ranging influences have come center stage
with the addition of electric keyboards to his instrumental
arsenal and collaborations with artists from outside the jazz
milieu. His latest efforts Gouache and Take This are
kaleidoscopic in their range, with percussion-driven
arrangements of compositions from Amy Winehouse and
Justin Bieber to Bud Powell and Dave Brubeck.
The New York City Jazz Record: You were born and
grew up in Europe. Do you feel that affected your
appreciation of the American art form of jazz?
Jacky Terrasson: Things that are exotic generally excite
my curiosity. The art from a Spanish painter, the writing
of Gabriel Garcia Mrquez, the foods from Asian
countries, cultures from elsewhere. On top of loving the
music, the fact that it came from the USA made it even
more attractive to me.
TNYCJR: You came up playing with singer Betty Carter
and drummer Art Taylor. What are some of the lessons
you learned from them and how did working with them
affect your development?
JT: Both of them helped me grow musically. With A.T., it
was all about band sound and the concept of the rhythm
section being a unit, a musical machine! He had played
with all my heroes. We spent hours rehearsing in his
living room. Betty taught me so much. Young musicians
have a tendency to play everything and more. I was no
exception. Betty taught me about space, about peace,
about the air in the music. I remember learning how to
comp for her on ballads at slower tempi than Shirley
Horn. I also learned about putting a set together, telling
a story not only throughout a tune but throughout a set.
More like going on an adventure. She would get mad if
you fell into a routine.
TNYCJR: You recorded your audition for the Thelonious
Monk piano competition in Bradleys, where you played
and listened to others. What did you take away from the
experience leading up to winning the award?
JT: Wow! Youre taking me back 25 years! I remember
doing the demo at Bradleys with [drummer] Leon
[Parker] and [bassist] Ugonna [Okegwo]. A friend and
fan, Richard Salter, had convinced me to participate.
I was reluctant at first because the word competition did
not resonate well with jazz music. I had done a few of
those while studying classical music in Paris. The other

players were amazing. I remember nailing it quite


strongly on the semifinals. Being a young broke
musician at the time, I stayed at my sisters friends
place the night before the finals and was kept awake all
night by a cat that kept jumping on the couch I crashed
on. I dont think my performance on the finals was as
strong and Im thankful that the jury evaluated me on
both days, I guess.
TNYCJR: For many years you worked almost exclusively
as a leader with a steady trio while backing various
horn players as a sideman. How do you approach those
roles differently?
JT: I have not been a sideman for over a decade now and
while Ill admit that it is not entirely my cup of tea when
there is a lack of freedom, but the idea of a collaboration
where every musician had the same importance and
contributes to the arrangements and writing is quite
appealing. When I am the leaderI like conductor
betterI like to have the other musicians very involved
and bring their musical personality to the bandstand.
TNYCJR: What are some of the positive and negative
aspects of having a steady band versus working with
different players?
JT: For obvious reasons, sticking together allows you to
build a repertoire and develop a group sound. This said,
playing with musicians that you are not familiar with,
finding each other musically, is a lot of fun and
sometimes playing for the first time together creates
very exciting moments.
TNYCJR: Your eclecticism, while always there, seems to
have grown in recent years, culminating in your most
recent recordings, where youre playing electric
keyboards along with piano, and your repertoire has
spilled out to include selections from the popular music
canon. Explain your musical philosophy and
development.
JT: Think of a painter who would want to create a very
colorful piece. His palette would be quite busy and he
will have the freedom of choosing the tones that fit
better at any given time. I like to add the Rhodes because
it adds to my musical palette. As far as repertoire, my
philosophy is that if there is melody, form, harmony, its
worth messing with to express your own musical ideas.
It can come from the Great American Songbook, from
classical music, from pop, from soul, from church, from
any culture or style. I do take lots of pleasure in
transforming things.
TNYCJR: Youll have a new band working with you at
Smoke in January. Lets hear how you put this group
together. Youve played with [bassist] Ben Williams
before. Like you, hes a Monk Competition winner. How
did you hook up with him?

6 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

JT: I have a policy of when Im looking for a drummer,


I ask the bass player who he likes and vice versa. At the
time I was playing with Jamire Williams and he
recommended Ben. My philosophy is that if the
drummer likes the bass player, usually theyre going to
hook up and theyre going to let me fly. So I totally
trusted Jamire and I remember at the first rehearsal with
Ben everything just flowed naturally, very musically
and very tranquilly, with passion, excitement and grace.
TNYCJR: Justin Faulkner, who Ive heard with Branford
[Marsalis], will be playing drums on this gig. How did
you decide to use him?

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 54)

Sebastian Sighel

ARTIST FE ATURE

OKKYUNG
LEE

For more information, visit okkyung.wordpress.com. Lee is at


The Stone Jan. 1st and 9th and JACK Jan. 6th-8th. See Calendar.
Recommended Listening:
Tom AbbsThe Animated Ventures of Knox (482 Music, 2005)
Okkyung LeeNihm (Tzadik, 2005)
Okkyung Lee/Peter Evans/Steve Beresford

Check for Monsters (Emanem, 2008)

Evan Parker ElectroAcoustic Septet

Seven (Victo, 2014)

C. Spencer Yeh/Okkyung Lee/Lasse Marhaug

Wake Up Awesome (Mexican Summer/Software, 2012)

Frank Gratkowski/Achim Kaufmann/

Wilbert De Joode/Okkyung LeeSkein (Leo, 2013)

by john pietaro
The music envelops the listener like a postmodern
mosaic: auras of color engulfed in shadow battle the
very framework, expanding the boundaries while
reveling in them. Cellist Okkyung Lee is tempting the
limits again, inventing new means of performance
practice within and in spite of the conventional.
Brandishing technical skills honed from years of
classical training, Lee traverses the realms of
contemporary composition, free improvisation and
raw sound.

I began piano studies at age three, explained
Lee. This is very common in Korea. The music was
Western classical. And then when I turned six, my
mother bought me a cello and said: Okay, so youre
playing cello now. And that was it! she offered,
laughing. I hated it for years, practicing three to four
hours every day. We had tests in school. As a child, the
instrument felt like a symbol of oppression.

Still, the proficiency Lee demonstrated early on
guided her through adolescence. By her teenage years,
the instrument had become a part of her but she still
hadnt committed to it. I wanted to become a sound
engineer instead, so I traveled to Boston to study at
Berklee [College of Music], taking my cello along, but
hoping to leave it in the case. Others in the class would
ask me to play for their recording projects, so it
remained a part of my daily routine.

Becoming frustrated with the technical aspects of
engineering, Lee reconsidered her instrument after
engaging in improvisation sessions with the Berklee
jazz majors. This opened new realms for her as a cellist.
Soon, she switched her focus to composition, earning a
double major in film scoring and arranging, but the
improv had intrigued her enough to expand upon this
too. Moving to New England Conservatory (NEC), Lee
embarked upon graduate studies in contemporary
improvisation, through which she became fixated on
the expanse of new music.

This was a big break for me. Id submitted a tape
of two solo improvisations as part of my audition and
was accepted into the program. But at NEC I learned
extended techniques and a breadth of music I hadnt
been exposed to before. More importantly, within the
contemporary music community at NEC, Lee finally
developed a visceral connection to her instrument,
making full use of her strict classical training or
rejecting it soundly, as needed. Likewise, she began to
draw on the Korean pop songs shed secretly enjoyed
as a child and experiment with the very timbre of the
cellos natural acoustics when exposed to other
instruments including electronics. This can seem
limitless, but offers its own limitations such as the
cellos volume constraints. So I had to find my own
place within the limits and go out from there.

Lee began performing within Bostons new music
circle and encountered trumpeter Dave Douglas, who
encouraged her relocation to New York. After
graduating from NEC in 2000 she came to Manhattan
and was quickly immersed in the scene around Tonic.

I thought it would just be a visit; I had no plans to


stay in the U.S. But Tonic was an incredible place where
I made many friends who remain important to me. It
was so open. One night Thurston Moore would play
post-punk electric guitar pieces, the next night it would
be Matthew Shipps trio performing! Lees
involvement immediately grew from spectator to
participant when she played with John Zorns Cobra, a
band whose lineup included Douglas, Mark Dresser
and Ikue Mori, the latter whom Lee has since worked
with frequently.

Rapidly, the word on the hip new cellist in town
spread throughout the experimental music scene. Lee
became an integral part of Butch Morris ensembles,
playing locally and in Europe. Looking back on this
association, she commented fondly, He was one of the
greatest. One of a kind and still so missed. And via
the Morris connection, she came to know and play
with pianist Vijay Iyer and his vast range of associates.

Over the past 15 years, Lee has encountered the
musics royalty as well as its young lions and found a
home in this sonic landscape of contemporary classical,
free jazz and noise musics. With a performance
calendar that frequently takes her across time zones,
Lee maintains a home in New York as well as roots in
Korea. It might be said that she is truly a global
resident as shown by the stages shes graced and the
luminaries with whom she creates music. These
include trumpeter Wadada Leo Smith, violinist/
performance artist Laurie Anderson, saxophonists
Evan Parker and John Butcher, electronic music
composer David Behrman, turntable virtuoso Christian
Marclay, guitarist Fred Frith, vocalist Jenny Hval,
experimental rock band Swans as well as the
aforementioned Zorn and many others.

As a leader, the cellist has an array of handpicked
associates to choose from and has released numerous
discs offering tapestries of genre and texture. The
music bears the imprint of Lees range of influences,
from classic Downtown restlessness to quasi-Eastern
meditations, the harsh edge of expanded bowing
techniques to contemplative if almost sedate aural
encounters and the rush of sound waves to the
sparseness of atmospheric beauty. Its all part of my
vocabulary, she added.
After recording two powerful ensemble albums
for Zorns Tzadik label, Nihm and the particularly
compelling Noisy Love Songs, Lees latest release further
pushes the limits of the solo cello canon. Ghil, a limited
release on the EditionsMego/Ideologic Organ label,
was recorded in and around Oslo in unorthodox
locations with crude equipment to capture the
instruments natural rawness. Other recent projects
include the ensemble Trio Alive and work with
trumpeter Ambrose Akinmusire. And I have plans to
build a quartet, which pairs drummer Ches Smith and
I with a traditional Korean singer and traditional
Korean percussionist. If I can get the four of us together,
I can already foresee just where this can go. v

JSnycjr0116

12/16/15

4:06 PM

Page 1

Best Jazz Venue of the Year NYC JAZZ RECORD Best Jazz Club NY MAGAZINE+CITYSEARCH

FRI-SUN JAN 1-3

LOU DONALDSON QUARTET


ERIC JOHNSON - PAT BIANCHI - FUKUSHI TAINAKA
MON JAN 4HCLOSED FOR PRIVATE EVENT
TUE JAN 5

RAMBLING
JOHN HBERTS CONFESSIONS
JEN SHYU - ANDY MILNE - BILLY DRUMMOND
WED JAN 6

MATTCHRISMITCHELL
QUARTET
SPEED - CHRIS TORDINI - DAN WEISS
THU-SUN JAN 7-10

ALI JACKSON
STILL DREAMING

CLASSIC
QUINTETS

PRESENTS
THE

EMMET COHEN - MARCUS PRINTUP - CRAIG HANDY - YASUSHI NAKAMURA


TUE-SUN JAN 12-17
WITH

JOSHUA REDMAN-RON MILES


SCOTT COLLEY-BRIAN BLADE
TUE-WED JAN 19-20

JALEEL
SHAW QUARTET
LAWRENCE FIELDS - LINDA OH - JOE DYSON
THU-SUN JAN 21-24

JOHN ABERCROMBIE
ORGAN QUARTET

CHRIS CHEEK - JARED GOLD - ADAM NUSSBAUM


TUE-THU JAN 26-28

MAP TO THE TREASURE:


BILLY CHILDSREIMAGINING
LAURA NYRO
FEATURING

BECCA STEVENS & ALICIA OLATUJA & THE PARKER STRING QUARTET
FRI-SUN JAN 29-31

JIMMY GREENE QUARTET

RENEE ROSNES - JOHN PATITUCCI - JEFF TAIN WATTS


HHHMINGUS MONDAYSHMINGUS MONDAYSHHH
MON JAN 11, 18 & 25

MINGUS BIG BAND

JAZZ FOR KIDS WITH THE JAZZ STANDARD YOUTH ORCHESTRA EVERY SUNDAY AT 2PM - DIRECTED BY DAVID OROURKE

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

ON THE COVER

ROVA SAXOPHONE
QUARTET
A LONG HISTORY

Heike Liss

by ken waxman

Someone once described ROVA as The Grateful Dead

of jazz. A comparison to The Rolling Stones would be


more accurate. For more than 38 years, with only one
change in personnel 27 years ago, the Bay area-based
saxophone quartet has created high quality music.
However, unlike the venerable British rockers, ROVA
continues to evolve and experiment.

This months series of concerts at The Stone offers
a retrospective of classic material as well as new works.
Some sets will feature guest musicians, some of whom
have never played with the band before. Before that,
an expanded ROVA ensemble will perform Electric
Ascension, a 21st Century reimagining of John
Coltranes classic work as part of Winter Jazzfest.
Concurrently, RogueArt will release Channeling
Coltrane: a live performance of Electric Ascension from
the 2012 Guelph Jazz Festival on DVD and Blue-ray;
a CD of the music; and Cleaning the Mirror, a
documentary mixing the story of ROVAs adaptation
with a history of Coltranes seminal session.

Its a challenge to work on the older material,
admits ROVA soprano and tenor saxophonist Bruce
Ackley, 67. We mastered these pieces at one point and
now were playing them in a different way. In
preparation for the retrospective, the group has been
rehearsing old and new material since September.
The saxophonist can easily vouch for ROVAs
long-term capabilities. After all it was for a concert
during the 1978 San Francisco Free Music Festival that
he, sopranino and tenor saxophonist Larry Ochs, 66,
alto and baritone saxophonist Jon Raskin, 62, and
original member Andrew Voigt first performed as
ROVA. Ackley had already been part of a wind trio and
had decided that for experimental music, It seemed
pretty natural to stay clear of a rhythm section. Without
a piano you didnt have chord progressions and
without a bass and drums there were no time keepers.
Each musician had been impressed by the harmonies
created on Steve Lacys 1974 Saxophone Special LP with
Evan Parker, Steve Potts and Trevor Watts and the cut
on Anthony Braxtons New York Fall 1974 LP that
included Oliver Lake, Julius Hemphill and Hamiet
Bluiett. Once we heard the harmonic and rhythmic
possibilities of the four reeds and the interactive
methods we evolved, we liked what we were hearing,
remembers Ackley. We realized we could stretch
things out for a long time. Around the same time,
Ochs recorded some of the tunes that became Cinema
ROVAt, the bands first LP on Ochs Metalanguage
label, and sent a tape of it to the Artistic Director of the
Moers Music Festival in Germany. Ochs says the
director played the tape when Braxton happened to be
in his office. Hearing the tape Braxton became so
excited by the sound that he insisted: Hire those
guys and ROVA was booked.

With this carrot as Ochs calls it, in front of them,
the band was encouraged to seek out other performing
opportunities and also began commissioning new
works by the likes of Braxton, Terry Riley, Pauline
Oliveros, Fred Frith, Lindsay Cooper and John Carter.

Being on the West Coast has kept the band together

all these years, suggest Ochs. There was less pressure


to make it. We were sort of isolated and there werent a
billion musicians out here. ROVA soon became
established enough that in 1983 the band were the first
American improvisers to tour the Soviet Union,
documented on hatART as Saxophone Diplomacy.
Acclaimed elsewhere, Ackley suggests the Bay
area situation was different. When we started we
were thought of as unusual, as heretical. We didnt fit
in the [notated] avant garde realm because we didnt
have degrees from Yale and we werent really in the
jazz realm. Our music was idiosyncratic. Determined
to expand the audience, the non-profit organization
ROVA:Arts was created in 1986, administering the
ensembles activities, producing shows, commissioning
new works and applying for funding. Grants let a lot
of things happen, states Ochs firmly. There would be
no Electric Ascension without a grant.

ROVA faced another challenge in 1988 when Voigt
left the band. Although alto and sopranino saxophonist
Steve Adams, 63, technically stepped in as a sub just
before a seven-week European tour, hes been with the
band ever since. A former member of composers
collectives and Your Neighborhood Saxophone Quartet
in Boston, Adams has similar interests to the other
members: ROVA has a creative approach to structure
in improvised music and when I first heard it I found it
was the only group in jazzin its broadest sensethat
was able to erase the differences between composition
and improvisation. The groups openness excited me
when I joined, though playing in ROVA was like
picking up a new language.

Original material from all members will be played
during The Stone residency and Adams is also
rearranging and renovating Ochs 1994 eightsaxophone composition Figurer 8, since three of the
four other participants werent on the original
recording and play different saxophones. Figure 8 is
just one of the many older pieces that will be part of
the retrospective. Another is John Carter s Colors.
Recently ROVA has de-emphasized scores in favor of
improvising, reports Ackley, so its been a challenge to
play something like Colors. Over the years ROVA
has revelled in this kind of challenge as well as forming
ad hoc ensembles with other musicians. Its really
important to have people we play with who really
push it and were always looking for that, says Ochs.

Seeking a new challenge is what convinced the
band in 1995 to tackle the iconic Ascension after both of
Coltranes recorded versions were released in one CD
package. Reading the booklet notes, Raskin was
shocked to realize that Coltranes 11-member ensemble
had never performed the piece live. This is such a
good piece of music, he recalls thinking, ROVA
should do it. Transcribing the arrangement from the
record with the exact instrumentation was pretty
simple, he says. When we got to the end the first
time we played it I was amazed to see how the form
was really a jazz composition. The form decides the
shape of the piece. Theres an exposition, the melody
and four chords to improvise on. Coltrane was involved

8 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

in letting individual players go out and be free and


thats why you end up with that wonderful cacophony.
A few years after the acoustic Ascension was
performed and recorded, Raskin and Ochs thought of
recasting the piece for ROVAs 25th anniversary
celebration. Figuring that Coltrane would have moved
with the times and investigated the possibilities of
using electric instruments, the piece was then arranged
for electric guitar, bass and processing. We imagined
what Trane would have done 30 years later, says
Raskin. Ascension isnt a dead end. If you take
something, move on it and make it your own, thats
whats involved in jazz. How many versions of All the
Things You Are exist, for instance? Adds Ackley:
Ascension has been very important in my life. When I
first heard it I couldnt imagine how intense it was.
And now there are times I walk on stage and cant
believe that Im going to play it.

San Francisco producer/director John Rogers was
involved for many years in filming Cleaning the Mirror
but all the music he had was hand-held-camera
cutaways of the ROVA Orchestra performing the suite.
A multi-camera concert performance with high-quality
sound was needed and the 2012 Guelph Jazz Festival
show was ideal. Im usually the guy who has to face
all the worry and stress when arranging something
like this, recalls Ochs. But when I was on stage [in
Guelph] listening to the performance, I said this is a
great concert. Steve Lacy once said that when you play
you should lift the bandstand and it happened several
times during that concert. Ochs is also excited about a
particular feature of the Blue-ray disc, which allows
viewers to follow one musicians playing throughout.

Ochs is the ROVA member most involved in other
projects. Braxton once said play or die, he relates.
And thats what I do. I like to be on the road or in the
recording studio. Although the others also work in
other local ensembles, none imagines ROVA dissolving
any time in the near future. I dont see any reason for
us to stop, says Ackley. Were still all very
enthusiastic. Yet perhaps Raskin describes the
situation most profoundly: When you hear the band
you know weve been together for a long time. It shows
in the nuances in our playing. After 38 years its
obvious weve been working on things for a long time
and working to make them better. v
For more information, visit rova.org. ROVA is at Le Poisson
Rouge Jan. 17th as part of Winter Jazzfest and The Stone
Jan. 19th-24th. See Calendar.
Recommended Listening:
ROVACinema ROVAt (Metalanguage, 1978)
ROVAFavorite Street (ROVA Plays Lacy)

(Black Saint, 1983)

ROVASaxophone Diplomacy (hatART, 1983)


ROVAThe Works, Vol. 1-3 (Black Saint, 1994-97)
ROVA & Nels Cline Singers

The Celestial Septet (New World, 2008)

ROVAElectric Ascension (Live at the 2012 Guelph

Jazz Festival) (Rogue Art, 2012)

ENCORE

HUBERT LAWS
by alex henderson

More than half a century has passed since Hubert


Laws featured a young Chick Corea as a sideman on
his debut as a leader, The Laws of Jazz (Atlantic), back in
1964. If Laws long recording career teaches us anything
about the veteran flutist (who turned 76 on Nov. 10th),
it is that he has never been comfortable playing one
type of music exclusively.

Laws is one of the most influential jazz flutists of
the last 50 yearsyoung flutists in jazz often cite Laws
and the late Herbie Mann as primary influencesyet
he also has a long list of classical credentials. Over the
years, the Houston native (who now lives in Los
Angeles) has turned his attention to everything from
John Coltranes Moments Notice and The Beatles
Let It Be to the works of Bach, Beethoven, Mozart
and Stravinsky. In 2015, Laws relationship to both jazz
and classical music was underscored when arranger
Steve Barta employed him on an orchestral reworking
of French pianist Claude Bollings Suite for Flute and
Jazz Piano Trio.

When Bolling produced the original version of the
seven-movement suite in 1975, only four musicians
were included: himself, flutist Jean-Pierre Rampal
(the well-known classical musician from France),
bassist Max Hdiguer and drummer Marcel Sabiani.
For Bartas 2015 remake, a jazz quartet (Laws, pianist
Jeffery Biegel, bassist Mike Valerio and drummer
Michael Shapiro) joined forces with a string quartet
and a full orchestra.

Steve decided that he would revisit this piece by
Claude Bolling, but he wished to do it with an orchestral
arrangement, Laws explains. So when Steve
conceived this, he asked me to participate and to
replace Jean-Pierre Rampalwho was the original
flutist. Jean-Pierre did not improvise. All the parts for
the flute were actually written out with the exception
of some places where I took the liberty to improvise.
It was written as a suite for flute and jazz piano and its

really the piano thats doing most of the jazz playing.


The flute is playing all the written parts. So when I was
asked to do it, I think that what Steve Barta had in
mind was taking it to a different level as far as adding
some jazz inflections to the flute partwhich I tried to
do.

Laws embraced Suite for Flute and Jazz Piano Trio
long before Barta recruited him for the 2015 remake:
in the 70s, he performed it live with Bolling himself.
I played some concerts with Claude in New York and
San Francisco during that period of time, Laws recalls.
That was without any orchestral accompaniment: it
was just me with piano, bass and drums. And we
played one of the movements on The Johnny Carson
Show, as I recall.

Laws continues: Of course, I was familiar with
the piece in the 70s. But I had to reorient myself. It had
been some years since Id played it. The piece is
demanding because youre following a script. Its
difficult because its like someone has written the script
for you and you try to deviate from the script and add
your own personality. When you have a lot of notes
already written, it makes it very difficult. In jazz, you
have an outline, but you put the meat on the bone
yourself, so to speak. But here, the meats already on
the boneand you have to follow the pattern as given.
Laws relationship with the European classical
tradition goes back to his youth. As a student at the
Juilliard School of Music in the early 60s, Laws studied
with the famous classical flutist Julius Baker. But when
he recorded The Laws of Jazz in 1964, it was evident that
he was quite capable of playing straightahead jazz.
Along the way, Laws stresses, he has learned how
blessed he was to have the ability to improvise
proficiently.
When I went to the Juilliard School of Music,
I was preparing myself to play in a symphony
orchestra, Laws explains. I thought that by going
there I could learn to play classical music. But I have
an innate gift for improvisation thats very special and
I just took it for granted. I spent a lot of time working
out the difficulties in playing flute sonatas and flute
concerti, but I would have spent more time on
improvising if Id had the realization that I have now:

being able to improvise is a very special gift.


During the 70s, Laws was known for playing
everything from jazz to classical to funk and hasnt
grown any less eclectic in recent decades. Laws (brother
of the late saxophonist Ronnie Laws and singers Debra
and Eloise Laws) paid homage to the iconic singer/
pianist Nat King Cole in 1998 on Hubert Laws Remembers
the Unforgettable Nat King Cole, and was mindful of the
European classical tradition on Hubert Laws Plays Bach
for Barone and Baker in 2005 and Flute Adaptations of
Rachmaninov and Barber in 2009. Laws stresses that as
the music world enters 2016, his main concern will
continue to be not the style or genre of the music, but
the quality.

To me, music is just music, Laws asserts. What
appeals to me in the jazz idiom or the classical idiom
or any idiomhas to be the spirit of the music or the
music itself. Music is like people in that it incorporates
cultures and I think that people from various cultures
have validity. Doing the music from these different
cultures shows that you have a broad-range view of the
world and you are not narrow-minded. It shows that
you dont think that one type of music is superior
and thats all youre going to do. I never did feel that
way. I get quite a bit of enjoyment out of playing and
presenting various music to and from different
cultures. v

wrote songs including big hits like Its A Good Day


(1947), Maana and Fever (1958), all part of her
song catalogue, which, among others, included Hes
A Tramp from her score for Disneys Lady and the
Tramp, Therell Be Another Spring, Johnny Guitar
and The Shining Sea. They established her as one of
the great 20th century popular composers.

For a couple of decades beginning in the mid 40s
and onward, Lee recorded dozens of popular albums
for Capitol and Decca while always returning to jazz
formats. Among those of particular note is her classic
Black Coffee (Decca, 1953), which featured a memorable
12-bar blues title track. She drew upon the best of jazz
players to accompany her, in this case featuring
trumpeter Pete Candoli and the then-young pianist
Jimmy Rowles. There was even a brief flirtation with
movie roles, most notably in Pete Kellys Blues (1955),
which earned her an Academy Award nomination.

Lee loved to entertain and that, combined with her
ability to connect so potently with a live audience,
accounted for why, despite an opening night when a
blizzard blanketed the city, she could draw a 1960 sellout crowd to pack New York Citys then-hot new jazz
club Basin Street East. They were drawn by her voice
and sophisticated style, which radiated bluesy
sensuality with just a dash of hip Mae West wit, which
Lee could convey by merely raising an eyebrow and
the hint of a smile. Glamorously garbed as was her
custom, she was the epitome of popular jazz singing.

When she passed on Jan. 21st, 2002, Nat Hentoff


observed: She was subtle and enticing in contrast
with the belters who show off everything but their
musicianship. Her main quality was a marvelous sense
of subtlety... you can hear her voice after it stops.

Perhaps Andr Previns observations are as potent
as any: For the singing of popular songs, Peggy Lee
was about as good as you can get, with the exception of
Billie Holiday. Her sense of rhythm was unbeatable,
sensational. And when she sang a song of unrequited
love, she really got to you. More than 13 years on,
Lees husky-voiced sensuality remains as alluring as
ever. v

For more information, visit hubertlaws.com. Laws is at


Baruch Performing Arts Center Jan. 10th as a guest of the
New York Flute Club in its tribute to Harold Jones. See
Calendar.
Recommended Listening:
Hubert LawsThe Laws of Jazz/Flute By-Laws
(Atlantic-Rhino, 1964)
Hubert LawsCrying Song/Afro-Classic/
The Rite of Spring (CTI-BGO, 1969-71)
CTI All-StarsCalifornia Concert: The Hollywood
Paladium (CTI-Sony Masterworks, 1971)
Milt JacksonGoodbye (with Hubert Laws) (CTI, 1973)
Hubert LawsIn The Beginning
(CTI - Columbia/Legacy, 1974)
Stanley TurrentineIf I Could (MusicMasters, 1993)

LEST WE FORGET

PEGGY LEE
by andrew vlez
Sultry-voiced

and elegant, Peggy Lee began life as


Norma Deloris Egstrom on May 26th, 1920 in
Jamestown, Ohio. Enchanted by jazz and dance bands
on the radio, by 17 she was on her own and soon
became a veteran of many territorial bands and radio
stations. At 22, while singing at a nightclub in the
Ambassador Hotel in Chicago, she met bandleader
Benny Goodman, who was staying there and looking
for a replacement for vocalist Helen Forrest. Years later
he recalled that first hearing of Lee: I thought she had
a terrific quality. Shortly afterward she was signed
and began making big band history with her first
recording session of Elmer s Tune.

Those early years with Goodman (1941-43), which
included hits like Blues in the Night and Why Dont
You Do Right, established her as a blues singer who
knew how to swing. Years later fellow jazz singer Cleo
Laine observed, (She) came from the big-band era
and knew how to swing. She knew how to sing on
the beat when necessary. A lot of people dont know
how to do that. Her simplicity had a lot of nuances.

In the mid 40s she was married to and eventually
divorced from guitarist Dave Barbour. Together they

10 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Peggy Lee tributes are at Birdland Jan. 12th and The Appel
Room Jan. 21st. See Calendar.
Recommended Listening:
Peggy LeeThe Complete Recordings 1941-1947
(Columbia-Legacy, 1941-47)
Peggy Lee & June ChristyThe Complete Capitol
Transcription Sessions (Capitol-Mosaic, 1945-49)
Peggy LeeBlack Coffee
(Decca-Jasmine/Verve, 1953/1956)
Peggy Lee (with George Shearing)
Beauty and the Beat! (Capitol, 1959)
Peggy LeeIs That All There Is?
(Capitol-EMI, 1967-69)
Peggy LeeLove Held Lightly (Angel-EMI, 1988)

L ABELSPOTLIGHT

MPS

by ken waxman
Christian Kellersmann is now facing one of the most
demanding yet satisfying challenges of his quartercentury career in the recording business. As director of
Content and Creative for Berlin-based Edel: Kultur
since late 2014, its his task to decide which items in the
legendary MPS catalogue will be reissued. Besides
sessions available on LP, analog tape and CD, twice
each month two to five items are made available in
digital form, exclusively on iTunes for a two-month
period, then on all download platforms. This will be
the first time in the history of the label that the entire
jazz catalogue will be available in digital form, he
explains. These timeless chapters in jazz will also be
accompanied by online documentation.
MPS (Musik Produktion Schwarzwald [Black
Forest]) Records was the label founded by industrialist/
audio engineer Hans Georg Brunner-Schwer (19272004) in the 60s initially to record pianists, most
prominently Oscar Peterson, in high-quality sound. By
the time Brunner-Schwer sold the label in 1983, among
its 430 or so discs were ones recorded in New York and
Berlin as well as at Brunner-Schwers famous Black
Forest studios. The eclectic catalog features big band
and small group recordings by the likes of Jim Hall,
Count Basie, The Singers Unlimited, Jean-Luc Ponty,
Wolfgang Dauner, Rolf Khn and Albert Mangelsdorff.
Besides classic jazz titles, artists like Tony Scott and
John Handy put out discs experimenting with what

later would be dubbed world music.


Brunner-Schwer initially sold MPS rights and
masters to Polygram/Universal, with Hamburg-based
Edel AG taking ownership in early 2014. Kellersmann
formerly worked for Polygram/Universal, leaving as
Managing Director of Classics and Jazz. In that position,
besides signing artists such as Till Brnner and Barbara
Dennerlein, he initiated popular CD reissue programs.
One was dubbed Mojo Club presents Dance Floor
Jazz and then there was a classical club-series called
the Yellow Lounge. During that time he met and
worked with Brunner-Schwer and Gigi Campi, who
produced many Kenny Clarke/Francy Boland Big Band
LPs. Although they were both much older than me we
were like soul brothers, Kellersmann recalls.

What this background means is that in his tenure at
Edel: Kultur, Kellersmann is a veteran dealing with
familiar music. However, his marketing philosophy is
different from that of the labels original owners.
I learned a lot reintroducing jazz to a new audience in
the beginning of the 90s, he states. My ambition was
and still is, to reach a new, younger audience. With
MPS the challenge is still valid: reaching the core
audience as well as young, new consumers. He
continues: Universal Music was only focusing on the
top titles. In the meantime many people have been
waiting to get access to all the music. We will release
according to our resources and based on the quality of
artists and productions. Each release should be
something very special.

The MPS reissue program began in May 2014 with
Exclusively For My Friends, an Oscar Peterson boxed set
available on CD, vinyl and digitally. At this point about
250-odd sessions have been reissued as digital

Remembrance
The Elvin Jones Jazz Machine

Exclusively For My Friends


Oscar Peterson

Alive & Jumping


Lionel Hampton

downloads, with the entire catalogue projected to be


available sometime in 2017. So far, the most popular
sessions have been dates featuring piano masters
Peterson and George Shearing and surprisingly enough
what Kellersmann calls hidden champs, pianist
Monty Alexander and late vibraphonist Dave Pike.

Before a title is made available the label consults
with experts, including customers, record collectors
and distributors. MPS was always a very open-minded
label. It was never restricted to any specific genre,
Kellersmann explains. Brunner-Schwer was a musiclover without limitations, except bad quality. Jazz was
the main genre on MPS but you also find classical
music, pop, schlager, bossa nova, Indian music etc. We
want to keep and follow this tradition for music and
quality.

As it stands now the majority of digital-reissues
consist of extant LPs without additional material. In
the cases where we find bonus tracks that are good we
will add them to the session, notes Kellersmann. But
the best music was released alreadyat least according
to Brunner-Schwer. So far the only discovery has been
tracks by Peterson not part of his original MPS LPs but
now included in the boxed set, labeled Lost Tapes 1 and
Lost Tapes 2. On the last you can hear Oscar Peterson
sing, reveals Kellersmann.

Part of the reason Edel: Kultur hasnt yet been able
to discover many bonus tracks is how the company
received the tapes. We got the original audio tapes
from Universal Music in packing cases, some with good
documentations, but mostly without graphic material,
he remembers. We had our own research team, who
searched for liner notes and the original artwork. But

Invitation
The Singers Unlimited

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 54)

Flamenco-Jazz
Pedro Iturralde Quintet

VOX NEWS

JAZZ CHILDREN
by suzanne lorge

Almost 25 years ago, Sheila Jordan played a gig at


Kimballs East in Oakland, California and San Francisco
radio host Bud Spangler happened to capture the
performance on tape. Alan Broadbent was the pianist,
Harvie S the bass player. There Records has just
released the live recording of nine tunes from that
eveningBetter Than Anything, a too-short reprise of
some of Jordans finest standards. Jordan performs the
title cut, one of her signature numbers, in characteristic
fashionat a spry clip, interpolating the melody with
snatches from other tunes (in this case, Oh, Dear,
What Can The Matter Be?) and improvising sung
messages directed at her sidemen and the audience.
Jordan usually performs with spare accompaniment,
frequently only Cameron Browns bass, an unerring
vocal line standing in bas-relief against a minimalist
musical background. Her vocal lines remain one of the
best examples of bebop mastery today; she is hardly
ever not improvising and has at her disposal a
seemingly endless supply of musical ideas. This album
is a thrilling example of Jordans best work. New Yorkbased Jordan last appeared here when she sang at
Cameron Browns birthday gig at Cornelia Street Caf

in December. She will be in Austria for much of January.


But catch her in February when she celebrates the
release of Better Than Anything at Cornelia Street Caf
(Feb. 14th) and joins with Cameron Brown and WORKS
Trio at Brooklyn Conservatory of Music (Feb. 20th).
The Association of Performing Arts Presenters
(APAP) convention comes to New York City every
January, offering workshops on intriguing topics (for
example, Our Global Community: What is the Role of
the Arts Presenters in a Community in Crisis?) and
giving up-and-coming artists the opportunity to
perform for industry professionals. Engaging swing
singer Svetlana Shmulyian and her band the Delancey
Five will be one of the featured acts as will singer Allan
Harris. Alas, the conference is open to members only,
but all jazz artists might consider joining. (Theres
always next year.)
New York City also hosts Winter JazzFest each
January and many fine singers will be at the mic during
this five-day music marathon. On Jan. 15th Roberta
Gambarini performs at The New School Auditorium;
Alicia Hall Moran first and Chargaux later at The
Greene Space; Tierney Sutton at Subculture; Charene
Wade at The New School Jazz Building; Hilary
Gardner at Greenwich House School; Ren Marie at
Zinc Bar; Nicole Henry at The Django at Roxy Hotel;
Kennedy in Sarah Vaughan & Clifford Brown
Reimagined and KING at The Bitter End; and Joey
Arias at Le Poisson Rouge. On Jan. 16th Theo

Bleckmann plays at The New School Tishman


Auditorium; Jos James is at Le Poisson Rouge; Sofia
Rei performs at The New School Glass Box Theater;
Vronique Hermann Sambin at The Django at Roxy
Hotel; Tongues In Trees followed by Carolyn Leonhart
and Angel Rogers with Jay Rodriguez Evolutions at
Zinc Bar; and Michael Mwenso and Brianna Thomas
in a tribute to Louis (Armstrong) and Ella (Fitzgerald)
at Greenwich House School, followed first by Tatiana
Eva-Marie and later by Tamar Korn and Molly Ryan.
One-day passes that allow entry to all the days events
are $45 in advance and two-day passes are $75a
phenomenal bargain, given the talent on offer.

Jane Monheit opens the New Year with several
New York gigs: at Birdland (Jan. 16th) shes singing
Ellas songbook, then at The Appel Room (Jan. 21st)
shes singing Peggy Lees songbook (with Rebecca
Parris, Nellie McKay, Spencer Day and Barb Jungr).
She closes out the month with a run at Blue Note (Jan.
28th-31st) as a guest of David Benoit.
Exceptionally
talented,
largely
unknown,
Pittsburgh-based singer Maureen Budway passed
away a year ago this month. Her final CD, Sweet Candor
(MCG Jazz), with New York pianist David Budway,
was released posthumously in 2015. It deserves many
listens.

In closing, I extend my thanks to singer Katie Bull
as I accept the VOXNews baton from her talented
hands. The conversation continues. v

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

11

I N MEMORIAM
IN MEMORIAM 2015
AL AARONS
EMERSON ABLE
CLIFFORD ADAMS
ANTHONY AGRESTA
WILLIE AKINS
VAN ALEXANDER
JAMES ALKIRE
DAEVID ALLEN
BOB ALLEN
ARCHIE ALLEYNE
ERIK AMUNDSEN
DIETER ANTRITTER
KILLER RAY APPLETON
UMBERTO ARLATI
WEBSTER ARMSTRONG
BEN ARONOV
ARA ARSENIAN
PAUL BACON
PHILIP BARKER
GIL BARRETTO
PA PA JOE BASILE
HAROLD BATTISTE
TONY BAZLEY
GEORGE BEAN
BOB BELDEN
MARCUS BELGRAVE
SNDOR BENK
ABDELHA BENNANI
JOHN BERG
MIRIAM BIENSTOCK
JN PLL BJARNASON
BRENT BLACK
AL BLOCK
GEORGE BOUCHARD
BUDDY BOUDREAUX
DAVID BOURNAZIAN
CEPHAS BOWLES
LENNY BOYD
JENNY BROWN
ALLAN BROWNE
OWEN BRYCE
MAUREEN BUDWAY
THOMAS BUH
LES BULL
MANFRED BURZLAFF
PAPA JOE BUSCHMANN
GEORGE CARIOTE
CARLOS CARLI
JOE CAVALLARO
RICK CHAMBERLAIN
MADHAV CHARI
EMILE CHARLAP
ORNETTE COLEMAN
MICK COLLINS
AUGUSTA LEE COLLINS
JEROME COOPER
KEITH COPELAND
B.J. CROSBY
RON CROTTY
ALICIA CUNNINGHAM
ALBERT DANNIBALE
RICK DAVIES
ADELE DAVIS
DONNA DAVIS
ALAIN DE GROSBOIS
JOHN T. DEVECCHIS
MANFRED DIERKES
SAM DISTEFANO
DON DOANE
ERIC DONEY
EMILO MONK DUPRE
BUDDY EMMONS
WILTON FELDER
ERNIE FELICE
GARRISON FEWELL
VIC FIRTH
DALE FITZGERALD
NIELS FOSS
DICK GAIL
HAL GAYLOR
KEN GIBSON
JEFF GOLUB
COLERIDGE GOODE
SILVANO GRANDI
MAX GREGER
DONALD GRIFFIN
MAHMOUD GUINIA
JOHN GUMPPER
HARRY HACH
DAVE HATFIELD
JOHNNY HELMS
RUSSELL HENDERSON
JUDITH HENDRICKS
HERBIE HESS
TRAVIS HILL
DORIS HINES
HAJO HOFFMAN
MARILYN HOLDERFIELD
DON HURLESS
JRGEN INGMANN
DON INNES
PAUL JEFFREY
ORVILLE JOHNSON
RUSTY JONES
IVAN JULLIEN
BILL JUPP
RAYMOND KATARZYNSKY
JOHNNY KEATING
ORRIN KEEPNEWS
RAY KENNEDY
GARY KEYS
MASABUMI KIKUCHI
MIKE KING
MILTON KLEEB
AL KOHN
HEINZ KRETZSCHMAR
BILL LACY

CYNTHIA LANE
STEVE LANE
JAMES LAST
BRUCE LAWRENCE
MICHAEL LEONARD
MONICA LEWIS
CARL LINDBERG
ERIK LINDSTRM
VANJA LISAK
EDDY LOUISS
BRUCE LUNDVALL
GENE LYNN
JOHN MAIMONE
BRENT MOORE MAJORS
ROBERT MARTIN
ZEN MATSUURA
CORKY MCCLERKIN
MARY MCGOWAN
WILLIAM T. MCKINLEY
HAROLD BAXTER MEAD
LOTHAR MEID
TERRI MERSEREAU
SEPP MITTERBAUER
JAMES L. MOONEY
RICHARD O. MOORE
BUDDY MORENO
NINO MORREALE
MARK MURPHY
BOB MURPHY
ZANE MUSA
RENE NAN
MARTY NAPOLEON
MUSA AFIA NGUM
PETER NIEUWERF
HERMANN NIEWELER
GENE NORMAN
FATHER PETER OBRIEN
KJELL HMAN
HAROLD OUSLEY
BOB PARLOCHA
STEVE PECK
NAT PECK
CONFREY PHILLIPS
DAVE PIKE
STEVE POUCHIE
RICHIE PRATT
GEORGE PROBERT
HUGO RASMUSSEN
MARGO REED
TED REINHARDT
JOERG REITER
DON RENDELL
SLIM RICHEY
EMMANUEL RIGGINS
DANA LYNN ROGERS
PETER ROSE
DOUDOU NDIAYE ROSE
LARRY ROSEN
EARL S. ROSS
BRUNO RUB
GUILLERMO RUBALCABA
HOWARD RUMSEY
TOMMY RUSKIN
WOLFGANG SAUER
DON SCALETTA
PETER SCHMIDLIN
UNGE SCHMIDT
GUNTHER SCHULLER
HAZEN SCHUMACHER
AMBROS SEELOS
PAUL SERRANO
RALPH SHARON
LEE SHAW
CHESTER SHEARD
JACK SIX
BENJAMIN LOUIS SMALLEY
BILL SMITH
JOSEPH SOARES, JR.
LEW SOLOFF
BARRY SOULSBY
MARC STECKAR
GEORGE STELL
ROWENA STEWART
BERNARD STOLLMAN
CHARLES BUTCH STONE
ETTORE STRATTA
STEVE SWANN
WARD SWINGLE
MARCO TAMBURINI
SANDY TAYLOR
JOHN TAYLOR
CLARK TERRY
MARC THOMAS
JOSEPH TORREGANO
ALLEN TOUSSAINT
REIN VAN DEN BROEK
BENNY VASSEUR
ROBERT VEEN
NORBERT VOLLATH
MURRAY WALD
BENGT-ARNE WALLIN
JEAN WARLAND
RAY WARLEIGH
BOBBY WATLEY
LEE WESTENHOFER
BOB WHITLOCK
KEN WILLIAMS
LEOLA KING WILSON
EMILY ANN WINGERT
WILMER WISE
KARL WLASCHEK
JRGEN WLFER
PHIL WOODS
NOAH YOUNG
RICHARD YOUNGSTEIN
STEVE ZEGREE
JEROME ZEIRING

GENE NORMAN
by andrey henkin

AL AARONS (Mar. 23rd, 1932Nov.


17th, 2015) The trumpeter was a fixture
in the 60s Count Basie bands and also
worked under Sarah Vaughan, Kenny
Burrell, Eddie Harris, Stanley Clarke,
Ella Fitzgerald and Zoot Sims, among
others, to go along with occasional pop,
rock and soul credits through the 80s and a single 1995
album as a leader, organized and released by the Los
Angeles Jazz Society. Aarons died Nov. 17th at 82.
LOTHAR MEID (Aug. 28th, 1942
Nov. 3rd, 2015) The German bassist was
a member of the jazz-rock bands Amon
Dl, Embryo and Klaus Doldinger s
Passport and later moved into a parallel
career as a film score composer. Meid
died Nov. 3rd at 73.

Club owner and record producer Gene Norman,


whose career in jazz came through work on the radio,
then concert promotion, and continued with Crescendo,
his Los Angeles club, and his eponymous label GNP
(Gene Norman Presents), died Nov. 2nd at 93.

Norman (n Nabatoff) was born in Brooklyn on
Jan. 30th, 1922. After graduating from college in
Wisconsin, he moved first to San Francisco and then
Los Angeles. It was on the West Coast that he turned a
childhood love for jazz, spurred by visits in his youth
to Manhattan clubs, into the beginnings of a career,
first as a disc jockey for various radio stations and then
producing concerts at venues like the Shrine
Auditorium and Hollywood Bowl. Soon Norman
opened his own club on the Sunset Strip (a stretch of
Sunset Boulevard passing through West Hollywood),
which hosted many major jazz and comedy acts, such
as Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Bob Newhart and
Lenny Bruce.

In 1954, GNP was founded with a series of 10 LPs
by Charlie Ventura, Buddy DeFranco, Gerry Mulligan,
Dizzy Gillespie, Clifford Brown and Max Roach, the
debut by alto saxophonist Frank Morgan, Wayne
Shorter, Lionel Hampton, Tenors West (Bob Cooper,
Jimmy Giuffre, Harry Klee and Bob Enevoldsen with
the Marty Paich Octet) and many others (some recorded
live at Crescendo, which Norman sold in 1963 in order
to focus his energies on the label). However, and
presciently reflecting the labels future eclecticism,
GNP also released discs like Hukilau Hulas, Josephine
Premice Sings Calypso, Tito Puentes Cha Cha Cha for
Lovers and a number of sessions by Cuban bandleader
Rene Touzet.

The 60s saw GNP move away from jazz into movie
soundtracks, via the James Bond franchise, novelty
banjo records, Western-folk outfits like The Moms &
Dads and the album Dylan Jazz, credited to the Gene
Norman Group and including saxophonist/flutist Jim
Horn and a young Glen Campbell on guitar.

Normans son Neil took over the label and moved
it even further away from jazz. The labels online shop
currently only offers a number of historical recordings
by Louis Armstrong, Art Tatum, Charlie Ventura, Cleo
Laine, Duke Ellington, Dizzy Gillespie, Gerry Mulligan,
Stan Kenton and others. These days GNP is much
better known by Trekkies, the label having acquired
the rights to the music of Star Trek films and TV shows
and releasing them for the first time.

In a 2014 interview with Variety, Norman summed
up what he considered the secret to his success and
longevity in the music business: The most important
skill is to have ears... There are very few releases on the
label that I wouldnt still listen to and enjoy. We just
went with what we liked, and if you do that enough,
eventually youll hit one out of the park.

12 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

BUDDY MORENO (Jul. 14th, 1912


Nov. 29th, 2015) The vocalist was
featured in the 40s band of Dick
Jurgens, then moved on to greater
exposure with Harry James band and
leading his own orchestra through the
60s before devoting himself to radio
work. Moreno died Nov. 29th at 103.
KJELL HMAN (Sep. 3rd, 1943Nov.
5th, 2015) The Swedish pianist/organist
released a handful of albums under his
own name from 1966 into the new
millennium and worked with fellow
Scandinavians like Rune Gustafsson,
Bengt-Arne Wallin, Mads Vinding,
Monica Zetterlund and ex-pat drummer Ed Thigpen to
go along with a far more voluminous career as a session
musician for Swedish pop acts. hman died Nov. 5th
at 72.
ALLEN TOUSSAINT (Jan. 14th, 1938
Nov. 10th, 2015) The New Orleanais
royalty, though an accomplished pianist
and performer, earned his jazz credits
indirectly, his songs performed by
artists such as Lou Donaldson, Al Hirt,
David Fathead Newman, Jimmy
Smith, Robin Kenyatta and Thad Jones/Mel Lewis, as
well as via production credits for Ramsey Lewis and
Eric Gale, more recent performing appearances on
albums by Madeleine Peyroux and Oz Noy and his
own 2008 album The Bright Mississippi, wherein he
played ragtime pieces and music by Ellington and
Monk with such modern jazz players as Brad Mehldau,
Don Byron, Marc Ribot, Nicholas Payton and Joshua
Redman. Toussaint died Nov. 10th at 77.
BENGT-ARNE WALLIN (Jul. 13th,
1926Nov. 23rd, 2015) The Swedish
trumpeter has a leader discography
going back to the late 50s on Vik, Dux,
Sonet and Dragon and numerous
sideman/arranging credits with Georg
Riedel, Arne Domnerus, Ernestine
Anderson, Quincy Jones, Lars Gullin, Friedrich Gulda,
Monica Zetterlund and Hans Koller. Wallin died Nov.
23rd at 89.
RICHARD YOUNGSTEIN (Oct. 30th,
1944Nov. 9th, 2015) The bassists
discography includes separate work
with both Paul Bley and Carla Bley
(including the latter s massive opus
Escalator Over The Hill) as well as credits
with
Bobby
Naughton,
Frederic
Rzewski, Roswell Rudd and single album as a leader
(released under the name Noah Young), 1975s Unicorn
Dream. Youngstein died Nov. 9th at 71. v

F ESTI VAL REPORT

DR JAZZ FESTIVAL WE JAZZ FINLAND


by suzanne lorge

by stuart broomer

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

2015

BEST OF

BEST LARGE ENSEMBLE RELEASES


ADAM RUDOLPH /
GO: ORGANIC GUITAR ORCHESTRA
Turning Towards The Light

BEST UNEARTHED GEMS

gabriel rodes

Tanja Ahlstn

MIKE OSBORNE
Dawn

NEW RELEASE HONORABLE MENTIONS


LE REX
Wild Man
RAOUL BJRKENHEIM eCsTaSy
Out Of The Blue

Pedrito Martnez

Juhani Aaltonen

Each weekend guitarist Emmanuel Pea travels more


than four hours from his home in Santo Domingo, the
capital of the Dominican Republic, to teach at
FEDUJazz, a not-for-profit music school in Cabarete, a
small town on the north coast of the country. The
schoolits handful of classrooms just a short walk
from the beachoffers free music classes to students of
all ages and seeks to instill both artistic discipline and
a sense of personal accomplishment in its nascent
musicians. Peas dedication to the school is not
unusual among its teachers, all professional musicians
who volunteer their time to the hundreds of children
annually who attend workshops.
The Dominican Republic Jazz Festival (Nov.
4th-8th), which sponsors FEDUJazz, attracts leading
jazz performers from Latin America, Europe and the
U.S. for a series of free concerts across five nights each
fall, this year in the towns of Santiago, Sosa, Puerto
Plata and Cabarete. During the daytime hours of the
festival, these jazz masters give the students classes in
jazz history, performance techniques and the intricacies
of polyrhythms. At the core of these classes is the
understanding that Latin musical forms, an integral
part of everyday life in the Dominican Republic, have
as much to offer the jazz world as jazz training has to
offer the students.
Part of the festivals mission, says Lorenzo
Sancassani, the Vice Minister of Tourism for the
Northern Coast and founder of the festival 19 years
ago, is to make jazz more popular among Dominicans.
Despite the cultural debt that jazz owes to Latin
America, jazz isnt a mainstream art form in the
Dominican Republic. But local interest in jazz is
growing as Dominican musicians study and perform
abroad and return with their own Dominican-inflected
forms of the music. More than 12,000 people attend the
festival each yearmost of them tourists from other
regions of the Dominican Republicand a known
quantity (merengue, Latin pop tunes) is what they turn
out to hear. As the festival continues to evolve,
however, Sancassani wants to introduce more
contemporary jazz acts to the festival roster.

To this end, Sancassani entered into a partnership
this year with saxophonist Marco Pignataro and
woodwind player Matt Marvuglio of the Berklee
Global Jazz Institute (BGJI), who will be curating the
festival with Sancassani going forward. The first
question that the curator of a Latin jazz festival must
answer is one of basic identity: is the festivals goal to
promote Latin American musicians on the global stage
or to bring big jazz names to the Latin American stage?
Either way, designing a program that strikes the right
balance between local and international musical

H elsinkis We Jazz launched in December 2013 as a


novel approach to the traditional jazz festival,
emphasizing unusual venues and sometimes-novel
approaches to the music itself. The events artistic
director, DJ Matti Nives, stresses that its a kind of
environment, a happening, even a utopia: in its brief
history, it has defined a format for itself that works in
the special terrain of the Finnish capital as winter
approaches. The days are cold and short and its often
raining, but We Jazz goes against the grain to stress
movement, seeking out some of the citys unusual
places. Its a novel ideausing jazz to discover the city
and the city to discover jazz. It began in an ancient
concert hall and ended in a rock palace, along the way
presenting concerts on a moving tram and in a small
apartment.

As it has in previous years, We Jazz (Dec. 7th-13th)
launched at the Aleksanterin Theater. Opened in 1880,
its an insistent visit to the past, a tribute to Saint
Petersburg that looks Austrian, as visually rich as a
Viennese layer cake but with its gold-painted plaster
rosettes showing signs of wear and some bulbs out in
the chandeliers. Its history extends from Russian rule
to a post-WWI home for the National Opera and Ballet.
As in previous years, the first night included a visiting
headliner (this time pianist Vijay Iyer s trio with
bassist Stephan Crump and drummer Tyshawn Sorey,
whose gunshot bass drum added a special
contemporary touch) and an ambitious local project,
drummer Teppo Mkynens Teddys West Coasters.
The latter octet includes many of the citys most notable
musicians, among them trumpeter Jukka Eskola and
saxophonist Jukka Perko, but whats remarkable is the
style: a loving homage to the cool jazz of 50s California,
creating airy, shifting textures from an ensemble that
includes tuba, baritone saxophone, clarinet and
flugelhorns playing music largely composed by
Mkynen and arranged by Jussi Lampela. A driving
arrangement of Harold Arlens Out of this World
summoned up memories of the John Coltrane
recording. It became an apt feature for Eskolas
cascading trumpet lines.

A few nights later, Lampela conducted his score to
Before the Face of the Sea, a full-length supernatural
melodrama from 1926, which is a significant early
entry in Finnish cinema history. Lampela gave a moody
resonance to the film with a starkly dissonant score for
winds and accordion, using some of the same musicians
(reed player Ville Vannemaa and tuba player Miika
Jms) who had worked their way through the sunnier
California visions of Teddys West Coasters. The score
featured trumpeter Verneri Pohjola as soloist, bringing
both depth and facility to the role. Pohjola possesses

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 55)

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 55)

NEW RELEASES

2016

GARY LUCAS' FLEISCHEREI


featuring SARAH STILES
Music From Max Fleischer
Cartoons

THE ED PALERMO
BIG BAND
One Child Left Behind

ERGO
As Subtle As Tomorrow

EMPIRICAL
Connection

NAIMA
Bye

Before you buy, listen at


cuneiformrecords.bandcamp.com
Buy these and thousands of other
interesting releases at our online store:
waysidemusic.com

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

13

CD REVIEWS

Solo Trombone Record


George Lewis (Sackville-Delmark)
The Loneliness of the Long Distance Improviser
Steve Swell (s/r)
Axiom
Andreas Schickentanz (Jazzhaus Musik)
by Fred Bouchard

Trombones

strike us as singularly festive and


traditional celebrants during the holiday season. Bright
bell-like brass horns have heralded grand occasions in
forms largely unchanged for many centuries. In the
realm of performance art, trombonists present lots of
visual action. That said, these three niche products fall
under the rubric of remarkable feats of technical
accomplishment and were undertaken as projects
whose raison dtre might be answered because they
can. Primarily brass geeks, diligent students, curious
and respectful compatriots and discographical
completists will play and study them.

At 24 in 1976, George Lewis exercised his musical
genius and conceptual originality with Solo Trombone
Record, waxed under the auspices of clarinet guru Bill
Smith in Toronto. Lewis in-your-face confabulations
on
thrice-overdubbed
Toneburst
encourage
pleasurable aural free-association: after the opening of
shooting stars whizzing across a clear night sky comes
aural images of frogs pondside, swooning doves,
clucking chickens, marching band tuning up, medieval
chorale and West Coast cool brass reunion.
Phenomenology breathlessly blows eight minutes of
straight-eighths, endlessly fertile, funny, frenetic.
Dream Sequence roams free and fantastic hornscapes.
Lewis reading of Billy Strayhorns Lush Life is no
cantabile romantico, rather punchy planned spatterings
in a mechanical tude, devoid of emotional impact.
Heres a relevant quote from a Lewis essay: My
practice as an improvising musician has taught me that
although all art must involve improvisation,
improvisation itself moves beyond the purview of both
art and craft. He elsewhere remarked that though
playing pieces from the recording seemed to help his
students, he soon after stopped doing solo trombone
pieces I havent revisited the form since and most
likely never will. Nonetheless Lewis utter horn
mastery and musicianship prove a tough act to follow
among this trilogy.

A 40-year veteran of the New York scene, Steve
Swells recent collaborations include Ken Vandermark,
Dave Burrell, Jemeel Moondoc and Frode Gjerstad. On
The Loneliness of the Long Distance Improviser, Swell, 61,
avails himself of no toys or extraneous effects one can
detectjust raw horn over 15 arbitrary, endlessly
variegated cuts. Honesty trumps artistry: the spate of
lurching ideas he pours forth, unvarnished and
unedited, runs thin and thick. Swells brass catalog
runs towards the random, discontinuous, pungent,
unprettied, sometimes funny. His drolly pointed
Harmon-muted dedication to Kenneth Patchen captures
wisps of that poets cosmic cantankerousness. Keep
Your Head Low spouts outraged staccato mutterings;
Cogitation could well accompany a lively animated
cartoon. Informal structures gain momentum towards
the end: Tongue Memory hollers over a staccato bass
pattern, then Blue Spirit recalibrates it with Dicky
Wells and Roswell Rudd shout-outs.

Andreas Schickentanz Axiom shows the 52-yearold Dortmunder to be an old-school melodist who has
mastered lots of technical toys. Despite the electronic
gadgetry and innovations at his command, discernible
meter, melody and harmony are primary considerations.
Lets review but a few of his dozen tracks, many wittily
titled in German. An initial buzzsaw-meets-metal-

chimes yields to multiphonic triads, taut but sliding


into fuzz-bomb static. Avant-bop improv with freemixed subtones, multiphonics, New Orleans blues
cries, speed-demon arpeggiations. Gothic apse-echoed
chorale turns romantic balladic ramble. Leisurely
medium swing trio of overdubs in three voices, open
and Harmon-muted, slips into a fuzzy dreamscape of
tight one-man section work accomplished with
Harmonizer and queasy pitch-sliding. Just when
Schickentanz seems to go fussy and academic (the title
track), he leans louche and jokey with echoing Harmon
mutes on Hundetraumdog dreams indeed!
Ultimately, the set goes soothing, spacy and cinematic,
as effects like flutter-tongue filigree take a swoon dive
and final triad loops fade into taped schoolyard chatter.
For more information, visit delmark.com, steveswell.com and
jazzhausmusik.de. George Lewis is at The Stone Jan. 2nd.
Steve Swell is at The Stone Jan. 1st and 9th and Clemente
Soto Velez Cultural Center Jan. 7th. See Calendar.

Double Arc
Resonance Ensemble (Not Two)
Before The Code
Made to Break (Trost)
by John Sharpe

Chicago-based reed player Ken Vandermark maintains

a bewildering roster of projects. They embrace a


mixture of improv aggregations, one-off collaborations
and vehicles for his invigorating composition. In this
last arena he has lately been investigating a modular
compositional process, which allows his parts to
emerge from the group interaction in new and
unfamiliar ways both on the large and small scale.

In its relative longevity his Resonance Ensemble
has outlasted many of its large-scale precursors, which
were by economic necessity short-lived adventures.
Thats all the more remarkable when you factor in the
multi-national character of the outfit, comprising
players from five countries in this incarnation. Double
Arc captures the culmination of the Ensembles fiveday residency during the 2013 Krakow Jazz Autumn,
consisting of two versions of the titular piece built
around Austrian laptop artist Christof Kurzmann.

The familiar Vandermark strengths remain on
view in stimulating charts containing forceful themes,
ensemble counterpoint, varied settings for soloists and
sequences of small-group communion. Theres a wide
range of dynamics from full orchestra to near silence,
but generally so much happens given the cinematic
sweep of the writing that description is a thankless
task. Its possible to pick out some recurring figures,
such as the jaunty staccato in Arc One: section G,
which reappears in Arc Two: section C, to gain an
insight into Vandermarks construction methods.
Kurzmann uses lloopp software designed to
facilitate live improvising. Arc One: section E
presents not only one of the most exciting sequences,
but also fully incorporates Kurzmanns snaking
swirling line, which blurs the sonic signature of
saxophone and guitar and duels with saxophone and
drums. But that doesnt mean that the rest of the allstar
cast (bassist Mark Tokar, trumpeter Magnus Broo, tuba
player Per-ke Holmlander, trombonist Steve Swell,
drummers Tim Daisy, Michael Zerang and reed players
Dave Rempis, Mikoaj Trzaska and Wacaw Zimpel)
dont get to strut their stuff. Arc Two: section D
notably features blistering interplay between Swell
and Broo.
Kurzmann also plays an integral role in

14 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Vandermarks Made To Break. Before The Code


constitutes their fourth and most accomplished outing
to date. Its a band that stretches the boundaries, where
electronics and post-punk riffs vie with improv and
skronk. Newly joined Dutch electric bassist Jasper
Stadhouders (notably of power trio Cactus Truck)
proves a strong addition, imparting a heavy visceral
energy to the hard-driving sections and a melodic
upper register to the more atmospheric passages. On
drums Tim Daisy brings a tight execution married to
an unruly conception, which finds unpredictable
pitches melded into killer rhythms.
The combustible vamps would make good
accompaniment for the freeway, although Kurzmanns
contributions would have you pull over and book into
the garage for a diagnostic examination. He mixes
repetitive mechanical noises with insectoid hums,
howling winds and what at one point sounds like a
hyperspeed accordion. He also indulges in real time
manipulation and distorted playback of the leaders
horns, resulting in exhilarating exchanges during the
latter stages of the lengthy Window Breaking Hammer.
In Dial the Number, an explosive start of
interlocking motifs suddenly morphs into tappy
percussion and slabs of electronic clamor swirling
between the speakers. Later in the same cut,
Vandermark demonstrates his mastery of the resources
at his disposal, as first Stadhouders and Kurzmann
trade textures before finally he takes up his clarinet for
a scratchy keening duet with Daisys tattoo. Both
bands remain essential for anyone interested in the
continuing evolution of creative music.
For more information, visit nottwo.com and trost.at.
Vandermark is at The Stone Jan. 3rd and 5th-10th, including
Made to Break Jan. 10th. See Calendar.

R
e
c
o
m
m
e
n
d
e
d
n
e
w
r
e
l
e
a
s
e
s

Juhani Aaltonen/Iro Haarla


Kirkastus (TUM)
Autres Voix De Piano (Patrick Defossez/
Anne-Gabriel Debaecker/Daniel Erdmann/
Benny Sluchin)Quatre = Onze ==(7)
(Neos)
Kaja Draksler/Susana Santos Silva
This Love (Clean Feed)
Jessica Jones QuartetMoxie (New Artists)
Mundell Lowe/Lloyd Wells/Jim Ferguson
Poor Butterfly (Two Helpins o Collards)
Arun Ortiz TrioHidden Voices (Intakt)
Oscar Pettiford & Friends
Blues in My Mind (Sonorama)
Valery Ponomarev Jazz Big Band
(with Benny Golson)
Our Father Who Art Blakey (ZOHO)
Dave ScottBrooklyn Aura (SteepleChase)
Torbjrn Zetterberg & Den Stora Frgan
Om Liv & Dod (Moserobie)
Laurence Donohue-Greene, Managing Editor
B.O.A.T. (The Bureau of Atomic Tourism)
Hapax Legeomena (Rat )
Michiel Braam/Bo Van De Graaf
Olanda in Due (Live at Novarajazz
Italy 2015) (Icdisc)
Stanley CowellJuneteenth (Piano Solo)
(Vision Fugitive)
Free Jazz Group Wiesbaden
Frictions/Frictions Now (NoBusiness)
HashimaTideland (s/r)
Guus JanssenMeeting Points (Bimhuis)
Jessica Jones QuartetMoxie (New Artists)
Megalodon Collective
Megalodon (Gigafon)
Adam Rudolph/GO: Organic Guitar
OrchestraTurning Towards The Light
(Cuneiform)
SpinifexMaximus (TryTone)
Andrey Henkin, Editorial Director

A Little Off The Top


Giovanni Di Domenico/Peter Jacquemyn/
Chris Corsano (NoBusiness)
This Is Our Language
Rodrigo Amado (Not Two)
by Ken Waxman

Drummer Chris Corsano converted to free music after

witnessing performances by Cecil Taylor and William


Parker and brings the same animation and restraint to
these discs as he has used with Evan Parker, Paul Flaherty
and Akira Sakata. Without compromising his style, hes
crafty enough to forge a different strategy for each CD.

Italian pianist Giovanni di Domenico is a player to
whom Corsano can easily relate. Like a fundamentalist
preacher s sermons, his playing makes no space for
hesitation or fragility. Nearly every note on A Little Off
The Top is splashed out with a power-lifter s
determination, textures clashing together like Mahjong
tiles and glissandi hammered into ferocious blurs. His
playing isnt without humor though. On the extended
Golondrina hints of boogie-woogie and balladic
pacing sneak in, then vanish, like insect chirps before a
storm. Belgian bassist Peter Jacquemyn is no musical
milksop either. Adept at col legno and other extended
string techniques, his speed-of-light string slashes,
bumps and shakes often join inner-piano-string plucks
to create pulsating rhythmic drones. Faced with bulky
tone-propelling from his partners, Corsano takes the

opposite approach. His response is to sweep and pat


corrosive accents from his knit, working these gestures
into a constantly flowing course of downplayed but
swinging pressure points. The paramount instance of
this is Tibutn. With Corsano breaking up the time
alongside Jacquemyns rich viola-de-gamba-like tone,
di Domenico jabs staccato sounds into the continuum
like flies landing on, but not sticking to, flypaper.

This Is Our Language is a high-energy sound
eruption with Corsano, Portuguese tenor saxophonist
Rodrigo Amado, Joe McPhee on pocket trumpet and
alto saxophone and bassist Kent Kessler. The four press
ahead with ferocity that makes the above album seem
like a chamber trio. But theres also discipline beside
the ferocity. Corsanos deliberate polyrhythms and
Kessler s propulsive thumps arent even heard until
the second track. Before that McPhee and Amado use
their saxophones to tease out the undulating theme as
if slowly unrolling a carpet. The former s idiosyncratic
style has developed over the years, but there are points
of congruence with the latter s technique. Although
more mellow in execution, as demonstrated on the
introductory The Primal Word, Amado is a pointillist,
building up his solos in bites and slices until it jells
into a gratifying whole. Perhaps because his initial
instrument was trumpet, McPhee relies more on quick
tonguing and repeated vibrations. Corsanos aptitude
is given its showcase on Ritual Evolution: as the
horn players splatter tones, he underscores the color
scheme with rumbles from hands and brushes so as not
to upset the scene. Later, as Kessler holds onto the beat,
the drummer splashes out a tapestry of constantly
undulating polyrhythms alongside him.
For more information, visit nobusinessrecords.com and
nottwo.com. Corsano is at The Stone Jan. 5th and JACK Jan.
6th. See Calendar.

Skullduggery
Universal Indians w/Joe McPhee (Clean Feed)
by Stuart Broomer

Universal Indians is an Amsterdam-based trio of


American-born tenor saxophonist John Dikeman and
Norwegian bassist Jon Rune Strm and drummer
Tollef stvang. If the name raises question marks, even
a cursory listen will suggest Albert Ayler s 1967
composition from Love Cry! Dikemans allegiance to
Ayler is a strong one, his playing often marked by
vocal extremes, but he has his own resources as well,
sometimes creating continuous multiphonics, which
include lines resembling throat singing. Dikeman is in
ideal company with Joe McPhee. Already 74 when this
concert was recorded at the Zuiderperhuis in Antwerp
in 2014, McPhee is a direct link to the musical ferment
of the 60s and his work, whether on pocket trumpet or
saxophone, testifies to its power and ongoing relevance.

The improvisations sometimes generate firestorms
of sound, at others slip into subtle sonic play and
pointed conversation. Sheer force comes to the fore in
the intense wailing on the extended Yeah and? and
the title track, which moves from energy music to blues
to a Dikeman jeremiad standing as a benchmark for
how much emotion can be forced out of a saxophone.
Theres an empathy between Dikeman and McPhee that
sometimes has them exchanging identitiesthe
formers ferocity, the latters elegancewhether the
moment is characterized by heat or light.

The quartets greatest strength is that it plays

genuinely four-way music, with Strm and stvang


rarely far from a listener s immediate attention. Strm
is frequently prominent, whether conversing with
rapid trumpet sonics, bowing with reed-like fluency or
plucking with a force that has the strings slapping
against the fingerboard. For his part, stvang is
equally at home providing sympathetic accents to a
dialogue or propelling the music forward, all the way
to the unison riffing and walking bass that suddenly
emerge to conclude the final Wanted.
For more information, visit cleanfeed-records.com. Joe
McPhee is at The Stone Jan. 6th and Clemente Soto Velez
Cultural Center Jan. 14th. See Calendar.

UNEARTHED GEM

An Evening With
Joe Albany (SteepleChase)
by Mark Keresman

The life of Joe Albany (born 92 years and died 28


years ago this month) has parallels with other
legendaryand tragicjazz pianists. Albany was a
tremendous player, respected by Charlie Parker and
Lester Young, both with whom hed worked. Albany
spent much of his life battling heroin addiction and
that and prison time interfered with his career. In
2014, the movie Low Down, based upon a memoir by
his daughter Amy-Jo, was released. Yet Albany had
great triumphs amid the tragedies and one of them
was the night of performances that eventually
became the album An Evening With Joe Albany.

The first volumes liner notes mention it was
recorded at the Jazzhus Montmartre in Copenhagen,
May 1973, but there is no audience sound. Like Art
Tatum, a major influence, Albany flourished in solo
rather than group contexts; also like Tatum, Albany
had an ornate style that could be breathtaking.
Evening is Albany unaccompanied on a program
of standards. A medley of Vernon Duke tunes,
Autumn in New York/April in Paris/I Cant Get
Started, immerses the listener into Albanys sonic
world. He respects the melodies, injecting many rich
flourishes along with his mercurial improvisations.
Albanys sense of swing is more than a bit oldschool, jaunty rather than driving, favoring elegance
over breakneck tempos. Albany does All the Things
You Are wonderfully, making you feel as if youre
in someones living room, then jolts you into a jazz
bistro after midnight by playing some gracefully
percussive notes. With As Time Goes By, Albany
takes you from Humphrey Bogarts Casablanca to his
very own, affectionate deconstruction of the melody,
teasing the ear with shards of the song, his little
asides hinting to intrigues as yet unrevealed.

The Gershwins Our Love is Here to Stay
begins almost serenely, then Albany shows that love
can be equal parts reverence, reverie and high-wire
balancing act, the latter displayed by his knotty,
witty improvisations, yet never losing the songs
innate sweetness. Ellington medley In A
Sentimental Mood/Prelude to A Kiss/In My
Solitude is essayed with such a rhapsodic intensity
it can only be described as ravishing.
For more information, visit steeplechase.dk

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

15

flashpoint for political and cultural unrest, Serbia has


embraced jazz through its festivals, clubs and talented
young musicians.

Polar captures violist Szilrd Mezeis septet live
at the Kanjia Jazz Festival, with flutist Andrea
Berendika, reed player Bogdan Rankovi, trombonist
Branislav Aksin, pianist Mt Pozsr, bassist Ern
Hock and drummer Istvn Csk. Blending
contemporary classical approaches with jazz
improvisation and folk music, Mezeis pieces are
complex and multi-layered, yet with an underlying
buoyancy and simplicity, as on the mischievous title
track, which features Rankovis stuttering bass
clarinet; the swinging ensemble figures of Hep 25;
or latter half of Wandering By Then, where the
puckish viola playing suggests Roma ebullience.
Hep 22 and So No also have attractive lines, with
a lightness at odds with the more abstract moments
of 98%, opening of Hep 25 and elsewhere. Some
of the sonic detail (particularly in the bass and drums)
is muted in the recorded mix, but the interactivity is
intense and overall effect highly successful.

Like Mezei, Vladan synthesizes classical, jazz
and folk musics; Ornaments, his solo piano debut, is
an expansive portrait of his unique style. The opening
notes of the rhapsodic title track evoke the
romanticism of Chopin, delivered with a gracefully
loose but precise touch, accompanied by distinctive
figurations that reveal his heritage of Serbian and
Romani folk music, heard in the melodramatic tugs
and quick flourishes decorating his melodic lines.
Rock and Folk, Leoland and Homeland show
his facility with percussive diatonic vamps, two
hands playing off each other like a conguero, doubletime passages erupting over a strong pulse. If the
latter track veers towards easy listening, Biljana,
the following track, is comparatively uneasy, even if
its impatient atonal opening later develops into an
elegant melody. Vladan makes his deepest
impressions on the restful Serbian Leaves and in
his inspired flights over Improv IV.
Hashima, a Belgrade-based quartet led by
guitarist Igor Mikovi, is named for the abandoned
Japanese island that was once a forced labor camp,
now only a concrete graveyard. The cover of Tideland,
their debut, features this ghostly prison, towering
above a steep seawall, a visual metaphor for the stark
but richly laminated music contained within.
Mikovis archtop electric guitar, filtered through
deep reverb and wet, washy signal processing, creates
a distinctive sonic thumbprint; his unusual chords
are ambiguous yet richly suggestive, tremolo
strumming more textural than declarative. Tenor
saxophonist Sran Mijalkovi adds more familiar jazz
elements while bassist Vanja Todorovi and drummer
Aleksandar Hristi bring a harder edge to the sound.
Among many compelling moments, Muted stands
out for its interactivity and angular lyricism.
For more information, visit nottwo.com, vladan.com and
thehashima.com

Clarinetist Aaron Irwin has recorded a stunningly


beautiful collection of tunes inspired by and reflecting
upon the stories of short-lived West Virginia writer
Breece D J Pancake. With a band of Matthew McDonald
(trombone), Pete McCann (guitar) and Thomson
Kneeland (bass), Irwin has created a work of gorgeous
delicacy, large in scope yet intimate, adventurous but
straightforward melodically and harmonically.
The opening title track is haunting, McCann
playing the melody solo, soon joined by Irwin. With
ghostly punctuation from McDonald and Kneeland,
the piece becomes a brief hymn to loneliness. In the
Dry has a swinging lilt, led by Kneelands powerful
and direct bassline, the horns playing a heartbreakingly
bittersweet chant, followed by McCann and Irwin
improvising deliriously over the pulsating rhythm.
Fluttering clarinet propels the melody stated by
trombone on The Salvation of Me. McDonald weaves
his way beautifully with bass and guitar giving
persuasive foundation. The two stringed instruments
solo, briefly and emphatically, without ever overstating
their cases.

Turn to any piece and you will find a constancy of
purpose, which also allows for true distinctiveness. And
Irwin and his cohorts truly understand spacein The
First Day of Winter, the day and the season seem to
emerge out of a vast landscape, the players filling in the
painting with individual brushstrokes. This is a session
where the musicians have listened deeply to each other
and play in a way suggesting all have had a part in the
projects evolution. Each piece is nuanced and individual
but also a part of the overall world of the stories.
For more information, visit aaronirwin.com. This project is
at St. Johns Lutheran Church Jan. 9th. See Calendar.

For more information, visit sunnysiderecords.com. Hazama


is at Symphony Space Leonard Nimoy Thalia Jan. 10th with
New York Jazzharmonic. See Calendar.

papo vazquez
mighty pirates Troubadours
Papo Vzquez Trombone / Willie Williams Tenor Sax
Rick Germanson Piano / Dezron Douglas Bass
Alvester Garnett Drums / Anthony Carrillo Percussion
Carlitos Maldonado Percussion / Gabriel Lugo Percussion
Special Invited Pirates
Sherman Irby - Alto Sax, Flute / Orlando Maraca Valle - Flute
Victor Jones - Drums / Pete Nater - Trumpet
Roberto Quintero - Tambores Culo de Puya, Maracas
Piaroa Chaman, Rufino Ponare - Canto de Cascada
Deep in the world of the
invisible, each of us and all of
us are animated by a
mysterious characteristic
known as spirit.
They are spirit warriors
wielding insight,
imagination and ingenuity
with an undying
integrity to enrich us with
art crafted for the ages. They
never, ever leave
the battlefield.
That is Papo.
Wynton Marsalis

Time River
Miho Hazama (Sunnyside)
by Mark Keresman

At risk of hyperbole, Tokyo-born, NYC-based pianist


Miho Hazama may be an heir to Gil Evans and
shoulder-to-shoulder with contemporaries Maria
Schneider and Carla Bley. Like them, Hazama uses a
big band as her palette: she is influenced by classical
music like Evans; coaxes vividly beautiful textures
from her band like Schneider; and is stylistically quirky
(without being arch) like Bley.
The program commences with The Urban
Legendamid gently clattering percussion, a Latinhinted melody swoops in, enriched by a small bank of
strings and a wiry counter-melody. Pianist Alex Brown
then takes a spare, punchy but lyrical solo until the
horns engage in a bit of Phillip Glass-style repetition
before a (recurring) cinematic passage swells, and
vibraphonist James Shipp and drummer Jake Goldbas

16 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD BEST OF 2015


BEST OF 2015 THE
BEST
NEWLATIN
YORK CITYRELEASES
JAZZ RECORD BEST OF 2015

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papovazquez.com
JAZZ RECORD
BEST OF 2015

15

In the heart of southern Europes Balkan Peninsula, a

A Room Forever
Aaron Irwin Quartet (s/r)
by Donald Elfman

THE
JAZ NEW Y
Z O
BE REC RK
20 ST OF ORD CITY
15

Polar
Szilrd Mezei Septet (Not Two)
Ornaments
Vladan (s/r)
Tideland
Hashima (s/r)
by Tom Greenland

pick up on the minimalist motif. It might seem like a


bunch of seemingly incongruous elements all mashed
together, but Hazamas expertise makes it flow. Under
the Same Moon begins with unaccompanied accordion
by Gil Goldstein, soft and ever-so-slightly discordant.
Soon the orchestra gently billows like a fog bank
rolling in at dusk, gradually building to a gorgeous
50s swing melody. Accordion returns to take the lead,
much as a crooner fronting a big band, followed by a
soaring soprano saxophone solo from Ryoji Ihara,
punctuated by the orchestra, until the urbane theme
returns. It ends as it begins, accordion and strings
providing a gracious and enigmatic denouement.

Closer Magdelena is the only non-original here,
composed/performed by progressive rock band A
Perfect Circle. Structured somewhere between a march
and a dirge, the piece is driven by a massive,
apocalyptic theme that virtually pummels the listener.
Theres
a
rollicking,
hard-swinging
Andrew
Gutasauskas baritone saxophone solo over the seething
orchestra, before wry motifs and sinuous, classicalsounding strings trading off and a massed saxophone
chorus where the phrasing distorts in a manner not
unlike an electric guitar. Then, as a storm can, it ends
as suddenly as it began.

Theres plenty of hot musicianship herein, but no
showboating. Hazamas compositions are about the
stories they tell and one can feel she writes for the
strengths of the musicians in her orbit, a big part of her
establishing such an outstanding style. Time River is
much like its cover arta slightly noir-ish, beautiful
mini-portrait of the leader.

THE
JAZ NEW Y
Z O
BES REC RK C
T
20 OF ORD ITY

G LO B E U N I T Y: S E R B I A

From a spark lit


by the NY free jazz
fire of the 1960s

to Havana in
the last days of
the embargo..

Bobby Kapp began as a


pioneer in the 60s Free Jazz
movement in NYC. In the summer
of 2014 he revisited the style in
Themes 4 Transmutation.
The musicians for the session
were given only single concepts
to improvise from, leading to
creativity without borders.

Two months later, along with Cuban


pianist Gabriel Hernandez, Kapp
recorded Cilla Sin Embargo,
days before the embargo was lifted.
Kapp did the vocals while
Hernandez assembled a group
of Cubas top jazz musicians.
Dedicated to a love lost to illness,
it is jazz with a bi-cultural soul.

With: Matt Shipp piano


Tyler Mitchell bass
Ras Moshe tenor/soprano sax/flute

Check out a video clip at:


http://youtu.be/_kZsUghyQbA

THE NEW YORK CITY

JAZZ RECORD
BEST OF 2015
BEST DEBUT RELEASES

bobbykappjazz.com
Rez Abbasi

DownBeats Top-Ten Guitarists - 2015 Critics Poll

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD BEST OF 2015


2015
Best
New JAZZ
Releases
BEST OF 2015 THE
NEW
YORK
CITY
RECORD BEST OF 2015
Intents & Purposes (enja)

BEST OF 2015

Rez Abbasi Acoustic Quartet (RAAQ)


with
THE NEW Bill
YORK CITY Ware-vibraphone/
THE NEW YORK CITY
Stephan JAZZ
Crump-bass/Eric
RECORD
JAZZMcPherson-drums
RECORD

THE NEW YORK CITY

JAZZ RECORD
BEST OF 2015

BEST OF 2015

BEST OF 2015

THE NEW YORK CITY

JAZZ RECORD
BEST OF 2015

Abbasis compositions are slippery


THE NEW YORK
but CITY
engaging, and hes judicious with
his impressively fluent technique.
- New York Times
BEST OF 2015

THE
JAZ NEW Y
Z O
BES REC RK C
T
20 OF ORD ITY
15

JAZZ RECORD

THE
JAZ NEW Y
Z O
BES REC RK C
T
20 OF ORD ITY
15

available at

BOBBY KAPP

In his hands, the globes music feels


new and progressive.
- Los Angeles Times

THE NEW
YORK CITY
relentlessly

JAZZ RECORD
BEST OF 2015

Upcoming NYC Performances:


Rez Abbasis Junction at WinterJazzFest:
Saturday, January 16 - 10:40pm
The New School Glass Box Theater
w/Mark Shim-tenor sax & midi windcontroller/
Ben Stivers-keyboards/Kenny Grohowski-drums
Rez Abbasis Invocation at Asia Society:
Saturday, January 23 - 8pm
w/Vijay Iyer-piano/Elizabeth Means-cello/
Rudresh Mahanthappa-alto sax/Dan Weiss-drums/
Johannes Weidenmueller-bass

RezTone.com

Proximity
Enrico Pieranunzi (CAM Jazz)
60 Out of Shape
Jesper Lundgaard Trio (Storyville)
The Music of Enrico Pieranunzi
Brussels Jazz Orchestra/Bert Joris/Enrico Pieranunzi
(W.E.R.F.)
by Ken Dryden

Italian pianist Enrico Pieranunzi has spent much of his


career leading trios with a bassist and drummer.
Proximity is a dramatic shift in a new direction, pairing
the contrasting voices of trumpeter Ralph Alessi and
saxophonist Donny McCaslin with bassist Matt
Penman and no drummer. The resulting quartets
chemistry is quickly apparent as they interpret the
pianists diverse compositions. Line For Lee is an
intricate bop line reminiscent of Lee Konitz masterful
reworking of chord changes into new songs, as the
composer and Penman provide stimulating support
for whimsical tenor and sassy cornet. The wistful
ballad Sundays features McCaslin on soprano and
Alessi on flugelhorn, alternating in a conversation
growing more emotional with each chorus. Simul is
an angular waltz where Pieranunzi adds a Monk-like
descending line, evolving into a whirlwind duet by the
pianist and trumpeter. A portion of the title track
detours into freeish territory, utilizing a brief theme as
a launching pad, then seeing where the groups
improvisations takes it. Hopefully, this quartet will
reassemble for future recordings. Only the CDs

MIKE NOCK ON FWM RECORds

47-minute length is disappointing, leaving the listener


wanting more.

Pieranunzi is found in a supporting role for the
live CD 60 Out of Shape, recorded on Danish bassist
Jesper Lundgaards 60th birthday at Jazzhus
Montmartre in Copenhagen. Pieranunzi is, of course,
prominent, as is veteran Danish drummer Alex Riel,
who began appearing at the original club back in its
early days. The venues intimacy, with its maximum
seating of 75 attentive audience members, inspired
these explorations of familiar standards and jazz gems.
One of the joys of hearing top-caliber musicians is their
ability to find fresh, often surprising approaches to
such well-known songs. Autumn Leaves is a bit
tentative and mysterious at first, with Pieranunzis
glistening introduction leading into a powerful bop
setting negotiating the periphery of the theme. The
band doesnt settle for Dizzy Gillespies famous B-flat
introduction to All The Things You Are, opting
instead for a constantly shifting aural kaleidoscope,
with Lundgaards masterful solo as its centerpiece.
Pieranunzi uses waves of sound and a samba
undercurrent to change the texture of My Funny
Valentine, waiting until well into the performance to
reveal its melody. Only Oleo follows anything close
to a traditional arrangement, though Pieranunzis
explosive attack, along with aggressive arco bass, helps
unveil new sinews in this old warhorse.

Pieranunzi is also a prolific composer, though his
music has been infrequently performed by large
ensembles. Frank Vagane, Director of the Brussels
Jazz Orchestra, corrected this oversight by recruiting
the pianist and trumpeter Bert Joris as guests for two
concerts, both of which were recorded. With Joris
contributing the arrangements and trumpet solos,
Pieranunzis music benefits from the larger canvas and
its many colors. While the focus is often on the pianist,
Joris and the rhythm section of bassist Jos Machtel and
drummer Toni Vitacolonna, the orchestra is a major
force when present, with a few excellent (though
unidentified) soloists. Joris creative use of reeds and
brass in the elegant Fellinis Waltz gives the soloists
strong support. The darting horns and reeds in
Newsbreak bring to mind the hectic nature of the old
newsrooms shown in films while Pieranunzis intense
improvisation fast-forwards the piece to the modern
world. The gorgeous ballad Distance From Departure
provides Pieranunzi with an opportunity to show off
his considerable chops, with orchestra providing a
pulsating backdrop for Joris equally striking solo.

group of hirsute musicians and vastly more


entertaining.

Whirlpool is a surprisingly mature collective, each
member but guest Miles contributing material. In that
way Miles goes beyond mentor to benefactor, the
assembled
musiciansalto
saxophonist/vocalist
Caroline Davis, guitarist Jeff Swanson and drummer
Charles Rumbackperforming with subtlety and
power in a handful of evocative compositions. Welloiled and simpatico, this quartet travels a unique
musical path. With many of their compositions of the
through-composed variety, Whirlpool is thoughtful in
execution and measured in delivery. Miles pungent
tone and swift delivery glue the performances together,
his mature talent at both allowing the band great
freedom while invisibly nudging them forward part of
his silent yet provocative skill-set.

The slow-mo wailing tones and melody of All Of
Your Secrets has something of a Klezmer feeling to its
compact structure. Conversely, The Crew swings
like an outtake from one of Shelly Mannes At the
Blackhawk dates, Rumback kicking it off with explosive
brush swipes and assaults, followed by the frontlines
hardbop unison delivery, which changes mood when
joined by Swansons flowing chordal work. A beatnikworthy blowout. Rumbacks ride-cymbal pulse is
especially delicious here, a shimmering saucer full of
swing. Then Whirlpool tilts the boat, with Davis
lending her soulful, pretty vocals to the dissonant
dancing samba Right Where. Album closer Ridges
ends too soon, Whirlpool rumbling in an Ennio
Morricone-tinged rubato intro, then gliding through a
hovering, heaving pulse as arid as the big Denver sky.
For more information, visit earsandeyesrecords.com. Miles
is at Jazz Standard Jan. 12th-17th. See Calendar.

For
more
information,
visit
camjazz.com,
storyvillerecords.com and dewerf.be. Pieranunzi is at
Village Vanguard Jan. 12th-17th. See Calendar.

now available on BandCamp

BEGINNING and ENd of KNOWING - FWM006


Mike Nock / Laurence Pike - duo improvisations
recorded Rainbow studios, Oslo
TWO-OUT - FWM005 Mike Nock / Roger Manins - duo playing standards
HONORABLE MENTION - NEW RELEAsEs (2015)
THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORd
sUITE sIMA - FWM004 Mike Nock Octet - Jazz Ensemble of the Year
2015 Australian Bell Awards
KINdREd - FWM003 Mike Nock / Laurenz Pike - duo improvisations
HEAR and KNOW - FWM002 Mike Nock Trio-Plus ( 5 stars - The Australian, 2012)
An ACCUMULATION of sUBTLETIEs - FWM001 Mike Nock Trio ( 2 Cd set ) Best Australian Contemporary Jazz Album
2011 Bell Awards

FOR MORE INFORMATION vIsIT MIKENOCK.COM

Dancing on the Inside


Whirlpool (with Ron Miles) (ears&eyes)
by Ken Micallef

Who

says New York City is the center of the jazz


universe? Denver (by way of Indianapolis) native and
cornet player Ron Miles has been a significant jazz
inspiration to many for years, endowing such nowpopular players as drummers Rudy Royston and
fellow cornet player Kirk Knuffke with guidance,
motivation and a swift kick in their modus operandi.

His many records include 1999s Ron Miles Trio,
2013s Circuit Rider and the current Dancing on the
Inside by the band Whirlpool, as hip as any Williamsburg

18 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Steve CromityS reCording


All my tomorrowS iS mASterful. it hAS All the
elementS whiCh embodieS good jAzz And mAkeS thiS
pleASing to the eAr.
-frAnk wilner, rAdio hoSt (ConCord,n.h.)
Steve CromityS Cd giveS uS Solid jAzz ChopS,
An exCellent ChoiCe of muSiC, And A well-CrAfted
enSemble providing ACCompAniment.
(george fendel, iSojAzzSCene)
All my tomorrowS feAtureS the voCAlS of A fine
Singer, Steeped in the jAzz trAdition. hiS bAritone
voiCe iS inStAntly AppeAling And hiS innAte jAzz
feeling mAkeS thiS Album A delight.
(joe lAnge, jerSey jAzz)

SteveCromity.Com

Whats New: Reimagining Benny Goodman


Oran Etkin (Motma Music)
by Joel Roberts

Clarinetist Oran Etkins previous albums have tilted


towards world music but for his latest release, he heads
in a much different direction, looking back to the music
of the King of Swing, Benny Goodman. His ties to
Goodman run deep. Etkin came to the U.S. from Israel
at four and one can hear touches of Yiddish and Eastern
European melodies in his playing, much like Goodman,
also the son of Jewish immigrants. Both men were also
impacted at an early age by Louis Armstrong, whose
influence Etkin (who says he first heard Armstrong
when he was nine and then listened to nothing else for
the next five years) calls life-changing.

Etkin, however, is no mere revivalist. Hes not
interested in recreating Goodmans signature swing
sound, but rather in reimagining it in his own way. He
takes familiar Swing Era standards like King Porter
Stomp, Where or When and Sing, Sing, Sing and
gives them a decidedly personal twist, even delving
into near-Ornette Coleman territory on a raucous
reading of Dinah. A handful of original compositions
also pay tribute to Goodman, including Be Good
Lady, based on Goodmans introduction to Lady Be
Good, and soulful When Every Voice Shall Sing,

inspired by James Weldon Johnsons Lift Every Voice


and Sing and written in recognition of Goodmans
important role in the fight against segregation.

Etkin has assembled a superb quartet (marvelous
young stride pianist Sullivan Fortner, vibraphonist
Steve Nelson and drummer Matt Wilson) following the
instrumentation of Goodmans classic 30s group
(Teddy Wilson, Lionel Hampton and Gene Krupa),
famed for its furious brand of swing, as well as one of
the first popular jazz bands to break the color barrier.
Singer Charene Wade is also heard to fine effect on a
fiery romp through Why Dont You Do Right and
sultry stroll through After Youve Gone. It may be
eight decades since the Swing Era, but Etkin shows
that theres still something new and exciting to be said
about the music of Benny Goodman.

Accortet
Michael Bisio (Relative Pitch)
by Phil Freeman

New York area, often as a collaborator with pianist


Matthew Shipp. Accortet is his first album in quite a
while as a leader and the lineup features a surprising
choice of instrumentation: Kirk Knuffke on cornet, Art
Bailey on accordion and Michael Wimberly on drums.

The tone of the album is set immediately, with its
opening track AM. Bisios playing is much more
groove-oriented than it has ever been with Shipp; he
sets up a throbbing pulse atop which Knuffkes rich,
full lines soar and swoop. The accordion sounds
remarkably like a hockey-rink organ when in the
background (though Baileys solos are quite boppish,
an initially odd sound that quickly becomes highly
enjoyable). Wimberly has a light, deft touch while
moving things forward with insistent vigor. Henrys
Theme finds Bisio picking up the bow, the drummer
adding evocative booms on the floor tom. Knuffkes
solo starts out melodic and sorrowful, but expands
into the realm of extended technique, inserting soft
puffs and hisses without ever vanishing into mere
sonic exploration at the expense of the larger piece.

Hilariously titled I Want to Do to You What
Spring Does to Cherry Trees is one of the most purely
lovely pieces of music in recent memory. Bailey is in
full French caf mode and Knuffkes solo is a lyrical
wonder. Bisio does little but chug along beside them,
as Wimberly maintains a gentle, brushed rhythm. The
quartet splits in half toward the discs conclusion:
Livin Large (A&D) is a wild, free accordion-drums
duel while Livin Large (C&B) is much gentler,
cornet and bass dancing around each other rather than
crashing head-to-head like battling rams.

Bassist Michael Bisio has been operating at the fringes


of the jazz and improvised music scene for years, first
from his base in Washington State and now from the

For more information, visit relativepitchrecords.com. Bisio is


at Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center Jan. 14th and 21st and
Dizzys Club Jan. 20th with Matthew Shipp. See Calendar.

For more information, visit motema.com. This project is at


Birdland Jan. 14th. See Calendar.

STANLEY
COWELL

BEST OF 2015

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD BEST OF 2015


JuNETEENTh (PiANO SOLO)
(ViSiON FugiTiVE)
ALbum OF ThE YEAr

For performances,
lectures, workshops:
pianochoir@comcast.net
pianochoir.wix.com/stanleycowell

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

19

Many A New Day: Karrin Allyson


Sings Rodgers & Hammerstein
Karrin Allyson (Motma Music)
by Andrew Vlez

W ay back when, releasing a collection focusing on a

single songwriter s work from the Golden Age of the


Great American Songbook was a fairly common event.
Ella Fitzgerald set a very, very high benchmark with
her now classic Songbook series. Sarah Vaughan cut her
share of enduring Gershwin and Ellington sessions.
Today, however, it seems as if singers no longer come
out of a musical culture, one which would enable them
to express the great songs credibly. Only the occasional
distaff songbird such as Stacey Kent seems able to do it
deliciously. And, as is clearly evident on Karrin Allyson
Sings Rodgers & Hammerstein, the four-time Grammy
nominee knows of what she sings.

Beginning with Oh, What a Beautiful Morning
from Oklahoma!, Allyson and her cohorts, NEA Jazz
Master Kenny Barron (piano) and John Patitucci
(upright bass), seem to weave a single new whole out
of the songs. Starting with a toy piano sound from
Barron and a smile in her voice, Allyson ambles
through the opener. Soon they are joined by joyful
plunking from Patitucci, Barron cuts loose with some
down-home chords and Allyson scats some down

the road. Her ability to scat comes out further with a


spin on Happy Talk, which culminates with soaring
high notes. She is totally believable. When she sings
happy, her feeling is right there, just as she can
express seductiveness when she purrs the chorus to I
Caint Say No while drawing out a final no that
sounds much more like yes.

These artists are remarkably in sync throughout.
Patituccis simple opening chords and then Barron
coming in form the perfect intro to express the
loneliness of Bali Hai. By the time Allyson gets to
her alluring, come to me, come to me, she has swept
us under her spell. Hello, Young Lovers from
The King and I shakes us awake, beginning with some
church bell-like peals from Barron before Allyson slips
in and soon they are all whirling off into the joy of this
celebratory waltz.

Its sterling, sterling work by all.
For more information, visit motema.com. Allyson is at
Birdland Jan. 17th. See Calendar.

Nocturnal
Lisa Hilton (Ruby Slippers Productions)
by Marcia Hillman

P ianist

Lisa Hiltons new release is about exploring

20 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

a night of personal emotions by means of nine of her


originals plus Ann Ronells Willow Weep For Me
and cover of The Pixies Where Is My Mind?. Joining
her on this exploration are tenor saxophonist J.D.
Allen, trumpeter Terell Stafford, bassist Gregg August
and drummer Antonio Sanchez.
The feelings Hilton touches upon are anger,
confusion, sadness, desire, love and hope, reflected in
the titles: Whirlwind, Where Is My Mind, Willow
Weep For Me, Desire, to mention only some. Her
compositions are melodic and flow easily, as does her
pianistic style. Hilton has the ability to convey
emotions by way of the chord changes she writes as
well as with the dynamics of her playing. She shows
off her classical background with Midnight Sonata,
written in three sections for traditional piano trio,
following the classic sonata format but including
improvisation, blues and other jazz techniques,
creating a fresh approach to the form.
The musicians joining Hilton make notable
contributions. Allens warm tenor sound enriches the
title track while Staffords flowing trumpet style adds
much to Willow Weep For Me, wherein there is a
wonderful musical conversation among Hilton, Allen
and Stafford. Sanchez shows off on the Latin-flavored
A Spark In The Night and on the Twilight section
of Midnight Sonata. August contributes a lyrical
bass on the slow, sensual Seduction, which also has
classic trio instrumentation.

This offering should be listened to as a whole,
rather than for one track or another. The music is meant
to cover one nights parade of feelings and Lisa Hilton
has done a remarkable job of achieving that goal.
For more information, visit lisahiltonmusic.com. Hilton is
at Weill Recital Hall Jan. 17th. See Calendar.

Craig Harris

January 16 18, 2016 @7PM $25PER NIGHT $65SERIES


3 INTIMATE EVENINGS OF MUSIC, HORS DOEUVRES, WINE, AND DESSERT

27 Mount Morris Park West bet West 122 & 123 @ Fifth Ave
nd

rd

JAN 16TH CRAIG HARRIS - WE BE THREE


Craig Harris Trombone Calvin Jones Bass
Khalil Kwame Bell - Percussion

JAN 17TH BOB STEWART - FIRST LINE HORNS

Bob Stewart Tuba Curtis Stewart Violin Jerome Harris Guitar


Randall Haywood Trumpet Nick Finzer Trombone
Bob Stewart

JAN 18TH DALEY SMITH ROBINSON TRIO

Joseph Daley

Joseph Daley Tuba/Euphonium Scott Robinson Reeds


Warren Smith Percussion

T I C K E T S @ W E L C O M E T O H A R L E M . C O M 2 1 2 - 6 6 2 - 7 7 7 9 ( seating is limited)

The Tuba Trio Chronicles


Joseph Daley/Warren Smith/Scott Robinson
(JoDa Locust Street Music)
by George Kanzler

This is a fond tribute to the late tenor saxophonist and


Loft Scene pioneer (Studio RivBea) Sam Rivers,
recreating and expanding on the instrumentation of
one of his 70s bands, a Tuba Trio that featured Joseph
Daley and a drummer. Filling that latter role here is
Warren Smith, who played in one of the original Tuba
Trios. Smith and multi-instrumentalist Scott Robinson,
who completes this trio, also contribute to its expanded
nature: the former by adding various percussion
instruments, including vibraphone and marimbas,
various drums such as timpani, plus cymbals and hand
percussion, the latter bringing in a variety of wind
instruments as well as his Theremins. And Daley,
besides playing tuba and euphonium, programs in
processed sounds on one track. No attempt is made to
recreate the original trio sound, as all but one of the
seven tracks here are originals, written and/or
spontaneously created by Daley and his fellow
musicians.

It may sound oxymoronic, but a lot of free jazz is
too unfocused and devoid of any kind of structure,
over-reliant on raw energy. Not so here, where Daley

and his cohorts bring internal focus to their creations,


as well as congruent sonic form. Bookending the album
are pieces described as explorations of Sam Rivers
concepts, alternating free improvisation with episodic
lines and stricter tempos. They include march rhythms
on Interplay, pairing euphonium with tenor
saxophone, and processional and semi-rubato rhythms
on Proclamation, featuring tuba and bass saxophone.
Other originals create attractive sonic atmospheres,
cinematic in their strong impressionism. Modality is
a brooding modal line delivered by the dark tones of
tuba and bass saxophone, along with bass marimba.
Emergence is a vivid, Jackson Pollack-like aural
canvas of many hues and textures, employing
euphonium with eccentric horns such as contrabass
sarrusophone and jazzophone (a hybrid, two-belled
sax with trumpet mouthpiece and Harmon mute), all
surrounded by timpani, cymbals and bass drum.
Rivers ballad Beatrice is also enticingly sumptuous,
with tuba and bass flute sharing the theme with
vibraphone, Robinson adding a tenor solo reminiscent
of the Tristano School. Terrarium, the CDs
centerpiece and longest track (20 minutes plus), takes
its form from processed sounds created by Daley, as
each trio member creates a personal solo using all the
tools at his disposal.
For more information, visit jodamusic.org. This project is at
Harlem Safe House Jazz Parlor Jan. 18th. See Calendar.

Tout va monter
Jolle Landre/Benot Delbecq/
Carnage the Executioner (Nato)
14 Rue Paul Fort, Paris
Jolle Landre/Benot Delbecq/Franois Houle (Leo)
Ink
Benot Delbecq 3 (Clean Feed)
by Kurt Gottschalk

Some 75 years after composer John Cage first inserted

22 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

For more information, visit natomusic.fr, leorecords.com and


cleanfeed-records. Delbecq is at Greenwich House Music
School Jan. 18th and Cornelia Street Caf Jan. 21st. See
Calendar.

Watch concerts from legendary

Jazzhus Montmartre
in Copenhagen
www.jazzhusmontmartre.dk/tv
Access live streams every week and our
Archive for only 7 dollars a month

first month free

DR . LONNIE SMITH PHOTOGR APHET BY EDDIE MICHEL

bits of rubber and metal between the strings of a piano,


the preparation of the instrument has become
commonplace enough no longer to survive by novelty
alone. The instrument has its masters and it has its
users, the former class seemingly dominated by French
speakers. Jacques Demierre and his students Sylvie
Courvoisier and Eve Risser have each developed
idiosyncratic ways of playing through (not in spite of)
the alterations, as from a different stream has the
Parisian Benot Delbecq.

Still rare in the realms of free improvisation,
however, is the human beatbox. Napoleon Maddox
who has recorded with Clare Daly, Roy Nathanson and
Archie Sheppmay have been the first to bring oral
percussion over from the hip-hop realm (where it is
largely, as it happens, a thing of the past) and, in fact,
might have held that court alone until the emergence
of Carnage the Executioner (n Terrell Woods),
a member of the Ill Chemistry crew (a spoken word/
beatboxing/hip-hop group based in Minneapolis),
who has been working in the rap world for the last
decade. He joins Delbecq and the extraordinary bassist
Jolle Landre in the fast-paced Tout va Monter. Its a
good bit of fun, never quite taking shape and never
falling apart.

Delbecq and Landre have worked surprisingly
little together (at least on record) considering how
compatible players they are and their geographical
proximity. Both find great musicality in unorthodox
techniques and both favor long, luxurious lines.
Mr. Executioner is rather the odd man out. The three
embrace and work the tension but they dont quite get
over it.
Delbecq and Landres trio with Vancouver

clarinetist Franois Houle is quite the opposite; they


know instinctively where theyre going and the results
are relaxed and sublime. Houle has a magnificent tone
on the instrument and knows well its properties (too
often the clarinet is picked up as a second instrument
and played like its a saxophone). There may be no
surprises for dedicated followers on their 14 Rue Paul
Fort, Paris, but top to bottom it is beautifully played.

Part of Delbecqs magic is how gracefully he
negotiates sudden changes, between registers or
between prepared and non-prepared areas of the
instrument. In his own group, however, he takes a
more traditional approach. Ink is a classic piano trio
(with liner notes by fellow pianist Fred Hersch, no
less) and in a more straightahead setting its easier to
hear what an exquisite sense of timing Delbecq has.
While the playing is never aggressive, the rhythm
section is always propulsive, which is hardly
unexpected. Drummer Emile Biayenda draws influence
from the heavy rhythms of Congo and bassist Miles
Perkin (replacing the late Jean-Jacques Avenel in the
trio) is a Mingus aficionado. Delbecq and Perkin have
worked together in other settings and the trio benefits
from experience.

Delbecq finds plenty of room to play within this
more traditional frameworkalthough traditions, of
course, are fluid things. Bill Evans defined the
contemporary piano trio in 1960, whereas Cage
prepared his first piano in 1938. Delbecq, in any event,
quite successfully finds his way into and claims a place
in both lineages.

St. Regnegade 19a 1110 Copenhagen K

The Conduct of Jazz


Matthew Shipp Trio (Thirsty Ear)
by Clifford Allen

Even if the name on the proverbial marquee and


overarching concept remain consistent, changing just
one member of an ensemble can significantly alter the
shape. After all, the John Coltrane Quartet was a very
different beast when Roy Haynes or Pete La Roca sat in
for drummer Elvin Jones. Pianist Matthew Shipps trio
has shifted personnel a few times over the last decade,
though the focus throughout has been on a composite
field of unified invention. He and bassist Mike Bisio
have been at the groups core since 2009, with Newman
Taylor Baker recently taking over the drum chair from
Whit Dickey. The Conduct of Jazz is this particular
variants first outing and finds them working through
seven of the pianists originals.

Baker has a dry and particulate approach to the
kit, snappy and allover and can work in loose, airy
parallel to the actions of bass and piano as well as
create a web of delicate play. Listening to how he
shapes rhythm around the driving, Mal Waldron-like
hook of Blue Abyss, its striking that Baker s ride
cymbal almost disappears, hanging back as Shipp
stomps out the lower register theme and, as the
pianists hands tessellate upward in a brief soloistic

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eddy, the drummer locks into a fluid, shimmering


backbeat with Bisio providing a harmonic edge. On the
second piano solo, as Shipps cubes dance and tumble,
Baker gives chase with a thin, galloping bedrock,
supplanted by the occasional triple-time chunky fill.
On the closing The Bridge Across, connections
between rolling, jaunty keyboard progressions and
rumbling pizzicato are drawn through easy, concise
patter as broadly accented strokes canvass Shipp and
Bisios intertwined harmonic rabbit-holes, shaping the
trios needling improvisations. All three musicians are
traditionalists and collective tugs often find resolution
in boppish tempo sections or the caress of melody
against subtonal growls. In essence, a trio is a study in
refereed counterpoint and depending on where ones
ears go, the path followed may be towards a deep
recognition of cooperative dialogue behind the soloist
or divergent trails of lopsided drama.

BEST OF 2015

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD BEST OF 2015

HONORABLE MENTION
NEW RELEASES (2015)

Duo Autres Voix de Piano


(Patrick Defossez &
Anne-Gabriel Debaecker
musicians invited
Daniel Erdmann &
Benny Sluchin)
QUATRE = ONZE == (7)
(NEOS Music)

For more information, visit thirstyear.com. This project is


at Dizzys Club Jan. 20th. See Calendar.

What Is This All About?


Joo Lencastres Communion (Auand)
by Elliott Simon

Although the subject of What Is This All About? is left


unsaid, Lisbon-based drummer Joo Lencastres
Communion may be referring to itself. Their focus,
beginning with their 2006 debut, has been Lencastres
creative interactions with established NYC musicians,
like-minded in their eclectic approach, but differing in
the routes that got them there. Tunes from and beyond
the jazz canon served as platforms for novel treatments.
Early on, material from Coltrane to Coleman to
Coldplay provided safe harbor. On this, the bands
fourth release, with the exception of pianist Jacob
Sacks exquisite interpretation of Bachs Opus 39, N.
9, the band discovers itself.
Back are Sacks, alto saxophonist David Binney,
trumpeter Phil Grenadier, guitarist Andr Matos and
bassist Thomas Morgan. These sidemen have played
with each other often but not necessarily under
Lencastres leadership. Those experiences add to the
diversity, give the session its NYC feel and eliminate
indecision as the music horizontally expands through
styles and formats. Lencastres job is not an easy one
but he herds these cats, all leaders, with a long leash.

Morgans inclinations are very much in sync with
the approach, a measured raggedness resulting from
how he and Lencastre fluidly assume their roles as
architects,
time-keepers,
clear
respondents,
equivocators and colorizers. On the very loose
Picture they respond to Binney and Grenadier s
explorations by sanctioning dissonant punctuation
while they maintain The Games elegance by not
allowing it to stray out of bounds. Matos expands the
sound with searing leads on the title track but Sacks
uses the opposite approach to open up the borders of a
paean to director Stanley Kubrick. Each is given
their own space, Sacks on the Bach piece and Matos on
gorgeous session closer Alma, but the listener is left
wanting more. While the synthy electronics on a few of
these cuts disturbs the organic flow, the answer to the
titular inquiry is unquestionably the music.
For more information, visit auand.com. Lencastre is at
SEEDS Jan. 20th, The Firehouse Space Jan. 21st and Ibeam
Brooklyn Jan. 29th. See Calendar.

An osmosis between
written New Music,
improvised art music and
electro-acoustic music

Patrick Defossez
Composition, acoustic and digital piano,
percussion, laptop / extended piano
Anne-Gabriel Debaecker
Composition, digital piano,
electro-acoustic live-sculpture, bowls
Daniel Erdmann
Soprano, tenor and baritone saxophones,
percussion
Benny Sluchin
Tenor trombone, duplex-euphonium
and percussion

2dlyres.net/carnet
neos-music.com
forcedexposure.com

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

23

Renaissance (A Journey From Classical to Jazz)


Bucky Pizzarelli (Arbors)
by Alex Henderson

Sat, Jan 2

Wed, Jan 6

Thu, Jan 7

Fri, Jan 8

Sat, Jan 9

Sun, Jan 10



Mon, Jan 11


Tue, Jan 12



Wed, Jan 13
Thu, Jan 14
Fri, Jan 15
Sat, Jan 16
Sun, Jan 17



Mon, Jan 18



Tue, Jan 19

Wed, Jan 20

Thu, Jan 21



Fri, Jan 22

Sat, Jan 23



Sun, Jan 24



Mon, Jan 25

Tue, Jan 26



Wed, Jan 27

Thu, Jan 28



Fri, Jan 29




Sat, Jan 30



Sun, Jan 31

JACOB SACKS QUINTET 9 & 10:30PM


Ellery Eskelin, Tony Malaby, Michael Formanek, Dan Weiss
BASS FEST
MATT BREWER QUINTET 8PM
Charles Altura, Aaron Parks, Ben Wendel, Justin Brown
PETER BRENDLER QUARTET 8PM
Rich Perry, Peter Evans, Vinnie Sperrazza
MATT PAVOLKA THE HORNS BAND 9PM & 10:30PM
Kirk Knuffke, Loren Stillman, Jacob Garchik, Mark Ferber
TONY MALABYS APPARITIONS 9PM & 10:30PM
Ben Gerstein, Michael Formanek, Billy Mintz, Randy Peterson
ISRAELI JAZZ FEST
ODED TZUR QUARTET 8PM
Shai Maestro, Colin Stranahan
EDAN LADIN GROUP 9:30PM
Dayna Stephans, Desmond White, Daniel Dor
YOTAM SILBERSTEIN/GILAD HEKSELMAN DUO 8PM
GADI LEHAVI BAND 9:30 PM
Tal Mashiach, Shachar Elnatan
DIDA 8PM
Tal Ronen, Rodney Green
ZIV RAVITZ TRIO 9:30PM
Shai Maestro, Gilad Hekselman
JORGE ROEDER DUO FEST
SOFIA REI 8PM / JULIAN LAGE 9:30PM
SHAI MAESTRO 8PM / ZIV RAVITZ 9:30PM
MIGUEL ZENN 9PM
SAM NEWSOME/ANDREW CYRILLE DUO 9PM & 10:30PM
TOM GUARNAS WISHING STONES PROJECT 8PM
Linda Oh, Jon Cowherd, E.J. Strickland
STEPHAN CRUMPS RHOMBAL 9:30PM
Ellery Eskelin, Adam OFarrill, Tyshawn Sorey
SAX FEST
PAUL JONES, SHORT HISTORY BAND 8PM
Alex LoRe, Matt Davis, Sullivan Fortner, Johannes Felscher
JEREMY POWELL QUINTET 9:30PM
Jonathan Powell, Vitor Conalves, Sam Trapchak, Allan Mednard
JON IRABAGON QUARTET 8PM
Luis Perdomo, Yasushi Nakamura, Rudy Royston
JON IRABAGON TRIO 8PM
Mary Halvorson, Nasheet Waits
BENOIT DELEBECQS THE CONVERSATION 8PM
Mark Turner, John Hbert, Gerald Cleaver
THOMAS MORGAN TRIO 9:30PM
Pete Rende, Dan Weiss
VOCAL FEST
JEN SHYU 8PM
SARA SERPA & ANDR MATOS 9:30PM
AUBREY JOHNSON SEXTET 9PM
Tomoko Omura, Michael Sachs, Matt Aronoff, Jeremy Noller
LEALA CYR GROUP 10:30PM
Hailey Niswanger, Elias Meister, Francesco Marcocci, Sheldon Thwaites
ASARAN EARTH TRIO 8PM
Anne Boccato, Astrid Kuljanic, Artemisz Polonyi
ALICE RICCIARDI 9:30PM
Pietro Lussu
JULIA PATINELLA 8PM
Andreas Arnold
THE WESTERLIES 8PM
Riley Mulherkar, Zubin Hensler, Andy Clausen, Willem de Koch
DAN RUFOLO TRIO 9:30PM
Marty Kenney, Philippe Lemm
JOCHEN RUECKERT QUARTET FEATURING MARK TURNER 8PM
Mike Moreno, Orlando Le Fleming
BRAZILIAN EXPRESSIONS FEST
JASON ENNIS 8PM
Michael OBrien, Yayo Serka
EDUARDO BELO GOUP 9:30PM
Sergio Krakowski, Livio Almeida, Alejandro Aviles, Dan Pugach
RUBENS SALLES GROUP 9PM
John Clark, Michel Gentile, Leco Reis, Kenny Grohowski
ROGERIO BOCCATO AND
AFTER BOSSA NOVA PROJECT 10:30PM
Nando Michelin, Dan Blake, Jay Anderson
BILLY NEWMAN QUINTET 9PM
Ben Holmes, Michal Attias, Leco Reis
LIVIO ALMEIDA QUINTET 10:30PM
Adam OFarrill, Michael OBrien, Zack OFarrill
BRAZIL EXPRESSIONS FEST: ARTHUR KAMPELA 8PM

Many musicians have fused jazz and European


classical elements over the years yet veteran guitarist
Bucky Pizzarelli chooses to keep them separate on
Renaissance: A Journey from Classical to Jazz.

The disc opens with Mario Castelnuovo-Tedescos
three-part, 21-minute Tedesco Concerto No. 1 in D
Opus 99, which finds Pizzarelli joined by a 10-piece
classical ensemble (conducted by Dick Lieb) and
playing an acoustic six-string classical guitar instead
of his usual electric. Born in Florence, Italy in 1895,
Castelnuovo-Tedesco was one of Italys most famous
classical guitarists of the 20th Century. Henry Mancini,
Andr Previn and other Hollywood film composers
were influenced by his work. Pizzarelli sounds
perfectly comfortable on the concerto; he does not
improvise at all in a straightahead classical
performance, but his playing isnt any less expressive
than it would typically be in a jazz environment.

The rest of Renaissance is swing all the way, with
Pizzarelli on electric guitar in a series of duets with
fellow guitarist and long-time collaborator Ed Laub
(who, at 16, became one of his students back in 1968).
Pizzarelli and Laub embrace a variety of familiar
standards, turning their attention to everything from
Tin Pan Alley with Richard Rodgers-Lorenz Harts
Have You Met Miss Jones and the Duke EllingtonBilly Strayhorn songbook with Satin Doll to Stephen
Sondheim. Many jazz improvisers have shied away
from the latter s songbook, which they insist can be
notoriously difficult to play, but Pizzarellis threeminute performance of Send in the Clowns sounds
effortless.

Another highlight is Pizzarellis acknowledgement
of the late Philadelphia-born composer David Raksin,
performing the themes from two of his best known
film scores, 1944s Laura and 1952s The Bad and the
Beautiful. Pizzarelli is also quite impressive on Hoagy
Carmichaels Stardust, Sir Charles Thompsons
Robbins Nest and Gordon Jenkins Goodbye.

Both the classical and jazz sessions were recorded
in early 2015, when Pizzarelli was 89. Jan. 9th marks
Pizzarellis 90th birthday. When we should be giving
him gifts, he presents us with one with Renaissance.
For more information, visit arborsrecords.com. Pizzarellis
90th Birthday Bash is at 92nd Street Y Jan. 27th. See
Calendar.

Last Tour
Steve Lacy Quintet (Emanem)
Tips (featuring Irene Abi)
Steve Lacy/Steve Potts
(hatHUT-Corbett vs. Dempsey)
by Robert Iannapollo

Soprano saxophone innovator Steve Lacy had a long

and illustrious career from the 50s until his death in


2004. During his youth, when he performed with Cecil

24 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Taylor, Gil Evans and his hero, Thelonious Monk, he


was pretty much the only modernist playing the
instrument. We are thankful he left behind a massive
discography, over 125 albums as a leader or co-leader.
Its an intimidating oeuvre well worth investigation.

During the last 30 years of his life Lacy devoted a
large amount of time to his quintet/sextet. The Last
Tour presents the final iteration of the ensemble. It was
initially assembled after his move back to the States to
interpret his Beat Suite and included longtime
collaborators: singer Irene Aebi, bassist Jean-Jacques
Avenel and drummer John Betsch. Trombonist George
Lewis was a replacement for alto saxophonist Steve
Potts, a fixture of Lacys ensembles for 25+ years. The
quintet was coming into its own on this tour, expanding
their repertoire, performing two selections from the
aforementioned suite, adding classic Lacy compositions
including The Bath, Blinks and Train Going By
as well as a new piece, Baghdad. They play with an
audible energy and enthusiasm and the rhythm section
is very in sync both with each other and
backing soloists. Lewis is particularly impressive,
drawing on his complete instrumental vocabulary,
especially deft with his mute (check out Naked
Lunch). Lacys lines are full of soaring grace and his
almost obsessive stepwise motion. The weak link here
is Aebi, who sings on five of the eight tracks. Her voice
seems a bit ragged and timing a bit off on occasion but
her interludes are fairly brief. It should not deter the
listener from what is otherwise one of the finer late
Lacy discs.

Few know Lacys music better than Aebi, his wife
and member of his groups since the late 60s. Tips
comes from Lacys late 70s purple patch, when he
seemed to be churning out an album a month. But even
within this profligacy, Tips is unique. A trio recording
with Potts and Aebi, its a setting of the musings of
artist Georges Braque, sung by Aebi. Here she is in fine
form singing in her unique cabaret style, suiting Lacys
music perfectly. Each brief vocal interlude is matched
with composed saxophone lines. They are then
explicated upon by Lacy and Potts, dovetailing and
swirling around each other in brilliant counterpoint.
There are solos from each saxophone as well. Tips is
unique in that it borders on art-song territory but also
incorporates long sections of improvisation, pulling it
towards jazz. Its an excellent fusion of both, sacrificing
the impact of neither. While not one of the more
frequently cited recordings from Lacys oeuvre, this
reissue (a complete reproduction of the hatHUT
original) should bring more listeners to one of Lacys
more unique works.
For more information, visit emanemdisc.com and
corbettvsdempsey.com. A tribute to Lacy is at The Stone
Jan. 21st. See Calendar.

Samuel Blais / Dave Liebman

Andr Leroux

Emie Roussel trio

Gilles Bernard

new release

in nomination for best album of


the Year at OPUS price, Quebec

best jazz album of the year at


lADISQ, Quebec

new release

FND137

FND140

BEST OF THE YEAR


Honorable Mention
- New releases 2015 NYCJR Pierre Labb sextet - Tromper Eustache
FND142

FND139

FND143

Skate Board Park


Joe Farrell (Xanadu-Elemental Music)
by Duck Baker

This

is not only one of reed player Joe Farrells


strongest leader dates, but one decades overdue for
reissue. It is not perfect, but the positives far outweigh
the negatives. Skate Board Park was recorded at the end
of the 70s, a decade that saw Farrell achieve crossover
popularity, first as a member of Return To Forever and
then leading dates for CTI, which were a cross between
RTF-oriented fusion and the straightahead styles Farrell
had mastered earlier in his career. Whether any of these
were equal to the classic dates he had done as a sideman
with the likes of Elvin Jones, Jaki Byard or Andrew Hill
are a matter of taste, but they were interesting and well
received. After his brush with success, Farrell made a
couple of forgettable, purely commercial records in the
late 70s, but with Skate Board Park he delivered the first
of several very desirable dates, marking a sort of indian
summer in his all-too-short career (he died 30 years ago
this month at 48).

Farrell is joined by erstwhile boss Chick Corea
(piano and electric piano), Bob Magnusson (bass) and
Larance Marable (drums) for a program of three
originals, two standards and Coreas High Wire
-- The Aerialist. The latter and Farrells Bara-Bara

are fine examples of period pieces, which use fusion


elements to enliven the modal style prevalent when
Farrell was an up-and-comer, but the rambunctious
title track takes things even further, throwing funk and
bebop elements into the mix. Farrell also uses all these
stylistic ingredients in his soloing; like Art Pepper, he
was making an honest effort to make positive use of
devices that, in other hands, seemed like mere
pandering to prevailing public tastes.
All of this makes for engaging, even exciting
listening, but the record suffers from the awful sound
Magnusson got from his bass, using a pickup with the
action set low and constantly sliding and/or sustaining
notes where theres no good reason to do so; all of this
was thought of as very with it in 1979, of course. His
solos work well enough, but many will find his ensemble
playing distracting. Nonetheless, fans of Farrell and
Corea will be overjoyed to have this one back in print.
For more information, visit elemental-music.com

The Jazz Giants


Wild Bill Davison (Sackville-Delmark)
by John Pietaro

Concepts of cool are born of a moment in time on


which the industry machine feeds before the next

26 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

whimsy strikes usor is engineered to do just that.


Once upon a time, jazz was drenched in the blues,
marching to the strain of freely contrapuntal music that
tore loose the constraints of the day. Such traditional
jazz, born most excitedly in New Orleans but really in
many places, cast seedlings universally. By the 20s
some of its greatest exponents ventured northward,
inspiring the so-called Chicago school.

By 1968, when cornet player Wild Bill Davison
(born 110 years ago this month) brought The Jazz Giants
to Toronto, hed trumpeted in the tradition, so to speak,
for more than four decades, braving the ire of booking
agents and modernists alike. For Davison, the classic
instrumental lineup was all that was necessary and
here it was comprised of woefully under-recorded
clarinetist Herb Hall (brother of Edmond), trombonist
Benny Morton (big band royalty), pianist Claude
Hopkins (of Wilbur Sweatmans early 20s band and
Josephine Baker), Louis Armstrong All-Stars bassist
Arvell Shaw and drummer Buzzy Drootin, a regular at
Eddie Condons nightclub and name bands alike.

Struttin With Some Barbecue, fittingly, opens
the disc. The spirit of Chicago resounds but also that of
the Armstrong Hot 5. Hear time-honored titles like
Them There Eyes, Black and Blue, I Surrender
Dear plus one that harkens back to a groundbreaking
1928 Condon session, I Found a New Baby. The mix
keeps it fresh, the features for the members spreads the
wealth. And for those squeamish about the Dixieland
moniker, listen to the free interactions between horns
out front and an ignited rhythm sectionand enjoy the
fact that Albert Ayler and other revolutionists rode the
tradition right into New Thing fire music.
For more information, visit delmark.com

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 30)

TrosT reCorDs & Cien fuegos

The Thing
shake

MaDe
To break
before
The CoDe

akira
sakaTa
The Tale of
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TR141 LP/CD

TR143 DoLP

DikeMan
noble serries
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sChliPPenbaCh/
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noble/oMalleY
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signals

PeaCeMaker
asseMblY

TR137 PICTURE LP

TR136 LP/CD

TR142 LP/CD

TrosT jukebox
7 series

MCPhee/boni JBX003
The Thing/
shiT & shine JBX004

gusTafsson/
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www.trost.at
www.cienfuegosrecords.com

Winter 2015

PeTer
brTzMann
niPPles CF013 LP
alarM CF014 LP

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konzerT fr
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TR134 LP/CD

Ken Vandermark
S T O N E R E S I D E N C Y : N E W YO R K , U N I T E D S TAT E S , E U R O P E

1 / 5 T U E S D AY

8pm

10pm

Sylvie Courvoisier/Chris Corsano/Ingrid Laubrock/Ken


Vandermark Quartet
Sylvie Courvoisier (piano) Chris Corsano (drums) Ingrid
Laubrock (sax) Ken Vandermark (reeds)
Side A Ken Vandermark (reeds), Chad Taylor (drums)
and a special guest (piano)

1 / 6 W E D N E S D AY

8pm

Mat Maneri/Joe McPhee/Ken Vandermark Trio


Mat Maneri (viola) Joe McPhee (sax/pocket trumpet)
Ken Vandermark (reeds)

10pm

Tom Rainey/Ned Rothenberg/Ken Vandermark/and a


surprise guest Quartet
Tom Rainey (drums) Ned Rothenberg (sax/clarinet) Ken
Vandermark (reeds) and a special guest (piano)

1 / 8 F R I D AY

8pm

10pm

CD release concert for All Directions Home


Ken Vandermark/Nate Wooley Duo
Ken Vandermark (reeds) Nate Wooley (trumpet)
DEK / Lisabeth Arnik (piano) Kiki Dern (drums)
Ken Vandermark (reeds)

1 / 9 S AT U R D AY

8pm

10pm

Kristof Curzmann/Okkyung Lee/Marina Rosenfeld/


Ken Vandermark Quartet
Kristof Curzmann (lloopp) Okkyung Lee (cello) Marina
Rosenfeld (turntables) Ken Vandermark (reeds)
Paal Nilssen-Love/William Parker/Steve Swell/Ken
Vandermark Quartet
Paal Nilssen-Love (drums) William Parker (bass)
Steve Swell (trombone) Ken Vandermark (reeds)

1 / 7 T H U R S D AY

1 / 1 0 S U N D AY

8pm

8pm

Paal Nilssen-Love/Ken Vandermark Duo

10pm

Made To Break
Tim Daisy (drums) Kristof Curzmann (lloopp)
Casper Tadhouders (electric bass)
Ken Vandermark (reeds)

10pm

Ikue Mori/Joe Morris/Ken Vandermark/Nate Wooley Quartet


Ikue Mori (electronics) Joe Morris (guitar) Ken Vandermark
(reeds) Nate Wooley (trumpet)
Eric Revis 11:11 Quartet Eric Revis (bass) Jason Moran
(piano) Nasheet Waits (drums) Ken Vandermark (reeds)

The STONE
Corner of Avenue C
& 2nd Street, NYC
thestonenyc.com
All sets $20
Austrian artists appear with generous
support from the Austrian Cultural
Forum and from the Austrian Federal
Chancellery, Division II: Arts & Culture

Photo: Andy Moor

BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015

ALBUMS OF THE YEAR


REZ ABBASI ACOUSTIC QUARTET
Intents and Purposes (Enja)
STEVE COLEMAN AND THE COUNCIL OF BALANCE
Synovial Joints (Pi)
VIJAY IYER TRIOBreak Stuff (ECM)
JULIAN LAGEWorlds Fair (Modern Lore)
CHRISTIAN MCBRIDE TRIO
Live at the Village Vanguard (Mack Avenue)
RUDRESH MAHANTHAPPABird Calls (ACT)
MYRA MELFORDSnowy Egret (Enja)
MATT MITCHELLVista Accumulation (Pi)
MARIA SCHNEIDER ORCHESTRA
The Thompson Fields (ArtistShare)
RYAN TRUESDELLS GIL EVANS PROJECT
Lines of Color: Live at Jazz Standard (Blue Note/ArtistShare)
-David R. Adler
HOWARD ALDENGuitar Solo (K2B2)
DAVID CHESKY JAZZ IN THE NEW HARMONIC
Primal Scream (Chesky)
JACK DEJOHNETTEMade in Chicago (ECM)
SCOTT DUBOISWinter Light (ACT)
MARY HALVORSONMeltframe (Firehouse 12)
LE POTHera (Everest)
CHARLES LLOYDWild Man Dance (Blue Note)
LARRY OCHSThe Fictive Five (Tzadik)
MATTHEW SHIPP TRIO
The Conduct of Jazz (Thirsty Ear)
KAMASI WASHINGTONThe Epic (Brainfeeder)
-Laurence Donohue-Greene
STANLEY COWELL
Juneteenth (Piano Solo) (Vision Fugitive)
JACK DEJOHNETTEMade in Chicago (ECM)
ANDREW DRURYContent Provider (Soup and Sound)
FREE NELSON MANDOOMJAZZ
Awakening of a Capital (RareNoise)
JACOB GARCHIKye Olde (s/r)
MARY HALVORSONMeltframe (Firehouse 12)
KONSTRUKTLive at Tarcento Jazz (Holidays)
PULVERIZE THE SOUNDEponymous (Relative Pitch)
MIKE REEDS PEOPLE PLACES & THINGS
A New Kind of Dance (482 Music)
JOHN ZORN
The True Discoveries of Witches and Demons (Tzadik)

UNEARTHED GEMS

MILES DAVISMiles Davis at Newport 1955-1975:


The Bootleg Series, Vol. 4 (Columbia-Legacy)
BENGT NORDSTRM, SVEN-KE JOHANSSON,
ALEXANDER VON SCHLIPPENBACH
Stockholm Connection (Umlaut)
MIKE OSBORNEDawn (Cuneiform)
HOWARD RILEY/JAKI BYARDR&B (SLAM)
LUCKY THOMPSON & BARNEY WILEN
Four Brothers (Sonorama)

LARGE ENSEMBLE RELEASES

STEVE COLEMAN AND THE COUNCIL OF BALANCE


Synovial Joints (Pi)
JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA
Live in Cuba (Blue Engine)
ARTURO OFARRILL & THE AFRO-LATIN
JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Cuba: The Conversation Continues (Motma)
ADAM RUDOLPH/GO: ORGANIC
GUITAR ORCHESTRATurning Towards The Light
(Cuneiform)
KAMASI WASHINGTONThe Epic (Brainfeeder)

LATIN RELEASES

GABRIEL ALGRIA AFRO-PERUVIAN SEXTET


10 (ZOHO)
CARLOS HENRIQUEZThe Bronx Pyramid (Blue Engine)
ARTURO OFARRILL & THE AFRO-LATIN
JAZZ ORCHESTRA
Cuba: The Conversation Continues (Motma)
CHUCHO VALDSTribute to Irakere (Live in Marciac)
(Jazz Village)
PAPO VAZQUEZ MIGHTY PIRATES TROUBADOURS
Spirit Warrior (Picaro)

ORIGINAL ALBUM ARTWORK

TOM BLANCARTE/PETER EVANS/


LOUISE DAM ECKARDT JENSEN/DAN PECK
The Gauntlet of Mehen (Destiny Records)
JOHN ELLIS & DOUBLE-WIDECharm (Parade Light)
BLA SZAKCSI LAKATOS/TIM RIES/ROBERT HURST/
RUDY ROYSTONClimate Change (BMC)
SCOTT ROBINSON SPACETETTE
Mission in Space (Sciensonic Laboratories)
SLOBBER PUPPole Axe (RareNoise)

THE NEW YORK CI


REISSUES

KENNY BARRONAt the Piano (Xanadu-Elemental)


JOHN COLTRANEA Love Supreme:
The Complete Masters (Impulse!-Verve)
FREE JAZZ GROUP WIESBADEN
Frictions/Frictions Now (LST-NoBusiness)
ERROLL GARNERThe Complete Concert By The Sea
(Columbia-Legacy)
LAST EXITIron Path (Virgin-ESP-Disk)

BOXED SETS

JOE CASTROLush Life (Clover-Sunnyside)


OSCAR PETERSONExclusively For My Friends (MPS)
VARIOUS ARTISTS3 Nights at Caf Oto (Matchless)
VARIOUS ARTISTS
The Complete Dial Modern Jazz Sessions (Dial-Mosaic)
VARIOUS ARTISTSTurtle Records: Pioneering British
Jazz 1970-1971 (Turtle - Cherry/RMP)

VOCAL RELEASES

DUCHESSEponymous (Anzic)
CCILE MCLORIN SALVANT
For One to Love (Mack Avenue)
JEN SHYU & JADE TONGUE
Sounds and Cries of the World (Pi)
MARY STALLINGSFeelin Good (HighNote)
CASSANDRA WILSONComing Forth By Day (Legacy)

DEBUTS

BANDA DE LOS MUERTOSEponymous (Barbs)


JACKSON HARDAKERWatering Can (s/r)
METTE HENRIETTEEponymous (ECM)
BOBBY KAPPThemes 4 Transmutation (s/r)
KAMASI WASHINGTONThe Epic (Brainfeeder)

TRIBUTES

STEFAN PASBORGThe Firebirds (ILK Music)


MATTHEW SHIPP TRIOTo Duke (Rogue Art)
CHARENE WADEOffering: The Music of
Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson (Motma)
CASSANDRA WILSONComing Forth By Day (Legacy)
NATE WOOLEY QUINTET(Dance To) The Early Music
(Clean Feed)

-Andrey Henkin

HONORABLE MENTIO

Admiral AwesomeMakeout Music for Modern Lovers (Gateway Music) All IncludedSatan in Plain Clothes (Clean Feed) Barr
Fred AndersonQuintessential Birthday Trio, Vol. II (Asian Improv) Richard AnderssonSplitting up in Boston (Hobby Horse)
Tim Bernes SnakeoilYouve Been Watching Me (ECM) Andrew BishopDe Profundis (Envoi) Raoul Bjrkenheim eCsTaSyOut of The B
James Brandon LewisDays of FreeMan (OKeh) Rodriguez BrothersImpromptu (Criss Cross) Jean-Luc Cappozzo/Douglas R. Ewart/Jolle
Larry CoryellHeavy Feel (Wide Hive) Marilyn Crispell/Gerry HemingwayTable of Changes (Intakt) Steve CromityAll M
Patrick Defossez/Anne-Gabriel DebaeckerQuatre = Onze ==(7) (Neos) Benot Delbecq 3Ink (Clean Feed) Aaron D
Kaja Draksler/Susana Santos SilvaThis Love (Clean Feed) Paul Dunmall/Tony BiancoHomage to John Coltrane (SLAM)
Oran EtkinWhats New: Reimagining Benny Goodman (Motma) Charles EvansOn Beauty (More is More) Orrin EvansThe Evolution of One
Erik FriedlanderIlluminations (Skipstone) Erik FriedlanderOscalypso (Tribute to Oscar Pettiford) (Skipstone) Satoko Fujii TobiraYamiyo Ni
Albert Tootie Heath TrioPhiladelphia Beat (Sunnyside) Thomas Heberer/Pascal NiggenkemperMiners Pick (FMR) Mark Helias Op
Paul Hubweber/Frank Paul Schubert/Alexander von Schlippenbach/Clayton Thomas/Willi KellersIntricacies (NoBusiness) Dick HymanHouse of
Darius Jones QuartetLe Bb de Brigitte (Lost in Translation) (AUM Fidelity) Jessica Jones QuartetMoxie (New Artists) Kirk KnuffkeA
The LadybugsEponymous (s/r) Ingrid LaubrockUbatuba (Firehouse 12) Le RexWild Man (Cuneiform) Liberty ShipThe Wide Open Suite & No
Russ LossingEclipse (Aqua Piazza) Joe Lovano/Dave Douglas Sound PrintsLive at Monterey Jazz Festival (Blue Note) Megalodon Collective
Mostly Other People Do the KillingMauch Chunk (Hot Cup) The NecksVertigo (Northern-Spy) Mike Nock/Roger ManinsTwo - Out (FWM
Eric PersonDuoscope (Distinction) PlatformAnthropocene (Va Fangool) Rara AvisEponymous (Not Two) Rempis
John Russell/Steve Beresford/John Edwards/Stle Liavik SolbergWill It Float? (Va Fongool) Christian Sands/Thomas Fonnesbk/Alex RielT
Irne Schweizer/Han BenninkWelcome Back (Intakt) Secret KeeperEmerge (Intakt) Sonny Simmons/Moksha SamnyasinNomad
Tiziano Tononi/Awake Nu QuartetThe (CherryCo)mpany (Nu Bop) Gebhard Ullmann Basement ResearchHat And Shoes (Between The Lines) The Uppe
Nate Wooley/Dave Rempis/Pascal Niggenkemper/Chris CorsanoFrom Wolves to Whales (Aerophonic) Nate Wooley/Ken VandermarkEast by Northw

ITY JAZZ RECORD

BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015 BEST OF 2015

RUDRESH MAHANTHAPPA BIRD CALLS


Adam OFarrill, Matt Mitchell, Chris Tordini, Rudy Royston
Winter Jazz Fest, Minetta Lane Theater, January 10th
VIJAY IYER TRIO
Stephan Crump, Marcus Gilmore
Jazz Standard, April 26th
RYAN TRUESDELLS GIL EVANS PROJECT
Jazz Standard, May 16th
GHOST TRAIN ORCHESTRA
Jalopy Theater, May 22nd
MARIA SCHNEIDER ORCHESTRA
Birdland, June 3rd
LIBERTY ELLMAN SEXTET
Steve Lehman, Jonathan Finlayson,
Stephan Crump, Damion Reid
Cornelia Street Caf, September 17th
TOM HARRELLS FIRST IMPRESSIONS
Wayne Escoffery, Charles Pillow, Meg Okura, Rubin Kodheli,
Rale Micic, Ugonna Okegwo, Johnathan Blake
Village Vanguard, October 11th
JULIAN LAGE TRIO
Scott Colley, Kenny Wollesen
Zankel Hall, October 17th
DARCY JAMES ARGUES SECRET SOCIETY
REAL ENEMIES
BAM Harvey Theater, November 18th
TYSHAWN SOREY TRIO
Corey Smythe, Chris Tordini
Village Vanguard, November 22nd
David R. Adler

CONCERTS OF THE YEAR


VIJAY IYER/LIBERTY ELLMAN/
REGGIE WORKMAN/TYSHAWN SOREY
The Stone, January 22nd
CHARLES LLOYD NEW QUARTET
Jason Moran, Reuben Rogers, Eric Harland
Village Vanguard, March 15th
CHARLES LLOYD
Jason Moran, Joe Sanders, Eric Harland,
Sokratis Sinopoulos, Mikls Lukcs
Metropolitan Museum of Art Temple of Dendur, April 18th
MUHAL RICHARD ABRAMS/ROSCOE MITCHELL/
GEORGE LEWIS
AACM50: Bohemian National Hall, April 29th
MATTHEW SHIPP/MICHAEL BISIO
Zrcher Gallery, May 27th
NASHEET WAITS EQUALITY
Darius Jones, Arun Ortiz, Mark Helias
Cornelia Street Caf, June 13th
DARIUS JONES QUARTET
Sean Conly, Pascal Niggenkemper, Gerald Cleaver
Rendall Memorial Presbyterian Church, October 13th
WADADA LEO SMITH SEXTET
Bobby Naughton, Yuko Fujiyama, Brad Jones,
Reggie Nicholson, Thurman Barker
AACM50: Community Church of New York, October 16th
GEORGE LEWIS IMPROMPTUS
Thurman Barker, Eli Fountain, Tyshawn Sorey
AACM50: Community Church of New York, October 23rd
THE TURBINE!
Harrison Bankhead, Benjamin Duboc,
Ramn Lpez, Hamid Drake and guest Steve Swell
Zrcher Gallery, November 17th

TROKER
El Tiburn Santillanes, Samo Gonzlez, Gil Cervantes,
Frankie Mares, Christian Jimenez, DJ Zero
Winter Jazz Fest, Bowery Electric, January 10th
CHARLES LLOYD NEW QUARTET
Jason Moran, Reuben Rogers, Eric Harland
Village Vanguard, March 15th
JULIAN LAGE TRIO
Scott Colley, Eric Harland
Jazz Standard, April 15th
LARRY OCHS/NELS CLINE/GERALD CLEAVER
JACK, May 26th
JACOB GARCHIKS YE OLDE
Mary Halvorson, Brandon Seabrook,
Jonathan Goldberger, Vinnie Sperrazza
Joes Pub, July 20th
LETIERES LEITE AND ORKESTRA RUMPILEZZ WITH
GUESTS ARTURO OFARRILL, STEVEN BERNSTEIN
Damrosch Park, July 30th
PHILM
Dave Lombardo, Gerry Nestler, Pancho Tomaselli
The Stone, August 3rd
THE THING
Mats Gustafsson, Ingebrigt Hker Flaten, Paal Nilssen-Love
Roulette, September 29th
STEVE WILSON/LEWIS NASH
Jazz at Kitano, October 10th
NONOKO YOSHIDA SOLO
The Stone, November 11th
Andrey Henkin

Laurence Donohue-Greene

MUSICIANS OF THE YEAR

MUHAL RICHARD ABRAMS (piano)


MARY HALVORSON (guitar)
CHARLES LLOYD (tenor saxophone/flute)
MATTHEW SHIPP (piano)
KAMASI WASHINGTON (saxophone)

ONSNEW RELEASES

LABELS OF THE YEAR

Clean feed (cleanfeed-records.com)


highnote (jazzdepot.com)
intakt (intaktrec.com)
MOTMA (motema.com)
sonorama (sonorama.de)

VENUES OF THE YEAR

JACK (Fort Greene)


The jazz gallery (NoMad)
ROULETTE (Boerum Hill)
the stone (Alphabet City)
village vanguard (West Village)

ry Altschuls 3Dom FactorTales of the Unforeseen (TUM) AMMPlace sub. v. (Matchless) AMMSpanish Fighters (Matchless)
AtomicLucidity (Jazzland) The Bad Plus/Joshua RedmanEponymous (Nonesuch) Michael BatesNorthern Spy (Stereoscopic)
Blue (Cuneiform) Ran BlakeCocktails at Dusk (A Noir Tribute to Chris Connor) (Impulse!) Samuel Blaser QuartetSpring Rain (Whirlwind)
Leandre/Bernard Santacruz/Michael ZerangSonic Communion (The Bridge Sessions) Chicago Reed QuartetWestern Automatic (Aerophonic)
My Tomorrows (Cromcake) Actis Dato QuartetEarth is the Place (Leo) De Beren GierenOne Mirrors Many (Clean Feed)
DiehlSpace Time Continuum (Mack Avenue) Mike DiRubboThreshold (Ksanti) Dave DouglasBrazen Heart (Greenleaf)
Harris EisenstadtCanada Day IV (Songlines) Liberty EllmanRadiate (Pi) Ellery EskelinSolo Live at Snugs (hatOLOGY)
eself (Smoke Sessions) James Falzone/The Renga EnsembleThe Room Is (Allos Documents) Chico Freeman/Heiri KnzigThe Arrival (Intakt)
Karasu (Libra) Rich HalleyCreating Structure (Pine Eagle) Scott HamiltonPlays Jule Styne (Blue Duchess) Alexander HawkinsTrio (s/r)
pen LooseThe Signal Maker (Intakt) Eddie HendersonCollective Portrait (Smoke Sessions) Hoodoo MagicBlues & Roots (Clean Feed)
Pianos (Arbors) Abdullah IbrahimThe Song Is My Story (Sunnyside) Mikko InnanenSong For A New Decade (TUM) Ochion JewellVOLK (s/r)
Arms & Hands (Royal Potato Family) John Korsruds Hard Rubber OrchestraCrush (s/r) Pierre Labb SextetTromper Eustache (Effendi)
oises at Sea (Eclipse) John Lindberg/Anil EraslanJuggling Kukla (NoBusiness) London, Meader, Pramuk & RossThe Royal Bopsters Project (Motma)
Megalodon (Gigafon) Livio Minafra/Louis Moholo-MoholoBorn Free (Egea) Nicole Mitchell/Tomeka Reid/Mike ReedArtifacts (482 Music)
M) Evan Parker/Peter JacquemynMarsyas Suite (El Negocito) Mario PavoneBlue Dialect (Clean Feed) Gary Peacock TrioNow This (ECM)
Percussion QuartetCash and Carry (Aerophonic) Simon Rose/Stefan SchultzeThe Ten Thousand Things (Red Toucan)
Take One (Storyville) Schlippenbach TrioFeatures (Intakt) Christophe Schweizers Young Rich & FamousGrand Grace (Between The Lines)
dic (Svart) SpinifexMaximus (TryTone) Steve Swells Kende DreamsHommage a Bartk (Silkheart) The ThingShake (Trost)
ercut | Matthew Shipp/Mat WalerianLive at Okuden (ESP-Disk) Steve Wilson & Wilsonians GrainLive in New York: The Vanguard Sessions (Random Act)
west (Pleasure of the Text/Audiographic) Yells at EelsIn Quiet Waters (For Tune) Torbjrn Zetterberg & Den Stora FrganOm Liv & Dod (Moserobie)

(CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26)

opening gambit, but this time accompanied by darkly


abrasive bass sawing.
For more information, visit 482music.com and
thirstyear.com. Reid is at Clemente Soto Velez Cultural
Center Jan. 5th and 8th with Jason Kao Hwang, Roulette
Jan. 6th with her quartet, The Stone Jan. 17th and Soup &
Sound Jan. 18th. See Calendar.

Artifacts
Nicole Mitchell/Tomeka Reid/Mike Reed (482 Music)
Eponymous
Tomeka Reid Quartet (Thirsty Ear)
by John Sharpe

Cellist Tomeka Reid looks set to become just the latest

talent to emerge from Chicagos Association for the


Advancement of Creative Musicians (AACM). For over
ten years she has graced outfits such as flutist Nicole
Mitchells Black Earth Ensemble and has shared the
stage with luminaries such as reed players Roscoe
Mitchell and Anthony Braxton and trombonist/
electronicist George Lewis. She moves closer to the
spotlight on two recent outings with some of her
longtime associates.

In 2015, the year of the AACMs 50th anniversary,
Reid partnered with fellow members Mitchell and
drummer Mike Reed to celebrate the organizations
history through its music. All three served on the
bodys Executive Committee from 2009-11 but the ten
numbers on Artifacts they have chosen from the canon
come from several decades earlier. Whatever the
source, the trio accentuate the melodic and rhythmic
aspects of their characters.

Reids strongest moments come when she leaves
the pseudo-bass role behind to stretch out as she does
on violinist Leroy Jenkins Clowns, which begins
with outbursts of atmospheric bowing and makes use
of silence in one of the classic AACM tropes, and
pianist Muhal Richard Abrams jerky marching
Munktmunk, where her energetic arco counterpoints
airy dancing flute. Propulsive drumming ensure that
the pieces swing like crazy whenever there is the
opportunity, generating a jazzy dash on Braxtons
relentless 23B and a loping foot-tapper from
drummer Steve McCalls BK. Mitchell ensures
variety through her voice, shading her phrases such
that you cant quite be sure whether its larynx or
instrument that dominates and even adds a vocal chant
to pianist/vocalist Amina Claudine Myers Have
Mercy Upon Us. She makes subtle use of electronics
on the same cut and on saxophonist Ed Wilkersons
urgent Light On The Path, which provides a joyous
ending to a suitably upbeat and varied program.

On her leadership debut with her eponymous
quartet, Reid takes her rightful place in the frontline,
with Jason Roebke capably holding down the bass
chair. In an indication of the wider circles she frequents
these days, Reid has enlisted in-demand, NYC-based
guitarist Mary Halvorson and adventurous drummer
Tomas Fujiwara to complete the string-dominated cast.
Reid curates one cover, two brief improvisations and
seven originals into a program on which her cello
sings, soars, groans and croaks.

Her spiky colloquy with Halvorson illuminates
Eric Dolphys 17 West while Fujiwara and Roebke
maintain a sprightly shuffle. On Billy Bangs Bounce
she evokes the dedicatees joie de vivre before adopting
one of his favored strategies in going off the map to
build prodigious tension before a glorious release. The
elegant lilt of Etoile brings to mind Parisian
boulevards and contains an inventive Halvorson single
line solo that flirts with dissonance. One of the standouts, Glass Light is a luminous dirge encapsulating
some nervy interplay while another highpoint, The
Lone Wait, is a dreamy ballad, which fragments and
then congeals into cantering interaction between
darting guitar and throaty cello before a return to the

Caros Song
Vox Arcana (Relay)
Different Clocks
Steel Bridge Trio (Relay)
October Music Vol. 1: 7 Compositions for Duet
Tim Daisy (Relay)
by Ken Waxman

Quietlywell, as quiet as a drummer can be


Chicago-based percussionist Tim Daisy has established
himself as one of jazz go-to players. Besides ongoing
partnerships with the likes of reed players Dave
Rempis and Ken Vandermark, Daisys discs showcase
his own bands playing his compositions, which range
from the raucous to the refined.

Seconded by fellow Chicagoans clarinetist James
Falzone and cellist Fred Lonberg-Holm, Vox Arcana
could be termed an excursion into improvisatory
chamber music, but with none of the solemnity
associated with the term. In fact, Vox Arcanas blend of
reed flutter-tonguing, sympathetic string-stopping
and marimba shimmers gives all six pieces a breezy
fluid tone. Daisy, like someone who excels at both
sprinting and long-distance running, moves between
the wooden bars and the full kit with equal skill.
A perfect instance of this is on The Mad Dance.
Invested with a Caribbean lilt via drum patterns,
Daisys additional mallet wizardry, coupled with
puckered clarinet trills, navigate the menace of the
cellists staccato processing. What emerges is a track
invigorated with the contentment that can result from
a refreshing tropical storm. In stark contrast, Objects
is the most intense track. What initially appears as if
its going to be terpsichorean-styled theme swiftly
turns darker, surprisingly enough through the pseudothunder and lightning whipped up by Falzone and
Lonberg-Holm. It resolves with a triple-paced
conclusion that is durable without being disheartening.

On the Bay-area recorded Different Clocks, Daisys
partners are local bassist Safa Shokrai, who works in
avant-rock bands and does film-scoring, and
transplanted Windy City-ite Aram Shelton on alto
saxophone and bass clarinet. The latter s astringent
Ornette-like alto slurs and glottal bass clarinet runs
easily negate any clichs about passive West Coast jazz
while Shokrais triple-stopping and sentry-like walking
add to the seriousness. Thats seriousness, not
sluggishness though, since none of the of the six pieces
plod. Instead Steel Bridge Trio excels in high-energy
contemporary improvisations, which gleam like newly
scrubbed fenders. Tunes such as Montrose and
Some See Hope glide with feline grace, as reed and
vibraphone patterns amplify each other s quick-paced
narratives. Scraps confirms the trios links to earlier,
Chicago-birthed free jazz forms: raggedly guttural
bass clarinet explorations have an Anthony Braxtonlike air to them; Shokrais string-shaking power relate
to Fred Hopkins; and Daisys temple-bell like tinkling
and the jangling hubbub created by other parts of his
kit recall the AACM preference for little instruments.
Like most AACM compositions, no matter how atonal
a tune becomes, the trio ensures that the finale slides
back to the head with peanut butter-like smoothness.
For instance, In Times Like Those, notable for

30 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Sheltons hiccupping alto saxophone jumps, includes a


repeated motif, which keeps it highly focused and
swinging.

October Music Vol. 1: 7 Compositions for Duet is a
compendium of tracks matching Daisys drums or
marimba with seven of his contemporaries
instruments, like a novelists collection of short stories
published in book form. Besides Falzone and Rempis,
his associates are bassoonist Katherine Young, cornet
player Josh Berman, vibraphonist Jason Adasiewicz,
pianist Marc Riordan and violist Jen Clare Paulson.
Daisy cycles through several styles, emphasizing the
drums sympathetic percussiveness and the marimbas
lyrical affirmation. Writers is the most jazz-like, with
Riordans sharpened keyboard feints angling towards
the stratosphere while supple drumming keeps the
improvisations grounded. Bermans limber blasts,
which sprinkle bugle-like fanfares and brassy smears
amid his solos like paprika in a stew on Painted, are
almost pre-modern. On the other hand Youngs husky
reed-rasping and Paulsons studied string shuffles are
in thrall to the so-called classical notated world.
Without mocking their earnestness, Daisy strips out
any lingering romanticism by using the marimbas
hard wooden-bar pops. Metaphorically moving from
the Impressionist to the Abstract art wing of this sound
museum, the percussionist finds that pulsating
rhythmic emphasis counters any rugged avant garde
excesses implicit in Rempis tough glossolalia and
Adasiewicz powerhouse clanging.

Versatility and inventiveness are the watchwords
of a mature percussionist like Daisy. He may march to
his own drum beat but always encourages others.
For more information, visit timdaisy.com. Daisy is at The
Stone Jan. 10th. See Calendar.

VTY Jazz
creating the
best jazz
experience
on Earth

Is Proud To Announce
Another Sunday Serenade

CEdAr
WAlTon
TrIbuTE

david Hazeltine (piano)


Vincent Herring (alto sax)
david Williams (bass)
Willie Jones III (drums)
*live from The West End lounge*
Sunday, January 17, 4-7 pm
$25 with one drink minimum
The West End lounge
955 West End Avenue @ W. 107th Street
reservation Hotline: 917-882-9539
Sunday Street Parking no Meters
Food & beverages Are Available
February 21st:
Altos For Pepper with
dmitry baevsky & Mike dirubbo

vtyjazz.com

The Fictive Five


Larry Ochs (Tzadik)
by Stuart Broomer

Larry Ochs may be best known as one-quarter of the


ROVA Saxophone Quartet, the Bay-area group, which,
in its near-40 year history, has created large-scale
works with composers as diverse as Terry Riley and
Barry Guy. Ochs projects outside of ROVA have often
been just as noteworthy. He first assembled The Fictive
Five for a performance at his 2013 residency at The
Stone and this recent recording testifies to the way the
bands strengths realize Ochs compositional
methodology.

Its a band of mostly younger New York musicians:
trumpeter Nate Wooley, bassists Ken Filiano and Pascal
Niggenkemper and drummer Harris Eisenstadt. A
certain empathy is assured, with Wooley and
Niggenkemper members of Eisenstadts Canada Day
among other associations, but Ochs approach to
organization supports and emphasizes the bands
creative strengths. Each of Ochs extended pieces
makes extensive use of cues with some specified
drones and occasional melodic figures, creating openended works playing to the bands developed
spontaneity and genuinely collective vision.

The compositions are fundamentally cinematic,
each dedicated to a filmmaker and conceived as a kind
of soundtrack, a sequence of shifting textures that
might generate images rather than serve them. The
opening Similitude (for Wim Wenders) moves from
an opening unison cry and fragment of melody through
segments highlighted by Wooley shifting from clarion
call to wild sprays of particulate sound and Ochs using
his sopranino to suggest a shofar. Ultimately, though,
its a collective creation: the bassists often function
orchestrally, with bowed chords and multiphonics
dense with microtones and Eisenstadt constantly
prodding and commenting on everything around him.

By Any Other Name (for William Kentridge) has
a modal Spanish tinge (Jelly Roll Mortons term),
something that will link this to figures from Morton
through Miles and Coltrane, but, like all the music
here, its consistently fresh. It breaks new ground while
working through the deep roots of Ochs conception,
invoking Archie Shepp and Albert Ayler to achieve a
depth of expression reaching back to New Orleans
primitives (according to Jerome Rothenberg, primitive
means complex) like the Eureka Brass Band.
For more information, visit tzadik.com. Ochs is at Le
Poisson Rouge Jan. 17th as part of Winter Jazzfest and The
Stone Jan. 19th-24th, all with ROVA. See Calendar.

Legacy: The Music of Ross Taggart


Jill Townshend Big Band (Cellar Live)
by Donald Elfman

Ross Taggart was something of a ubiquitous figure on


the Canadian jazz scene at the time of his early death

three years ago this month at 45. The Vancouver


musician was a talented saxophonist and pianist,
accomplished composer and true scholar of jazz
history. Jill Townsend celebrates her personal
connection with Taggart as well as his large contribution
to the artistic life of the country with this big band
tribute. Townsends Big Band and the Cellar Live label
are also essential elements of jazz in Vancouver and
Western Canada.

The band begins to paint a picture of the man they
remember. Dont Call Before 10 keeps the groove
both light and heavy, emotional without wearing its
heart on its sleeve. The baritone solo by Chad Makela
stokes the passion as well as being a paean to humor,
a key quality in Taggarts short life. A mellow ballad,
Light at the End of the Tunnel, follows, adding
another color to the palette of the composer and a big
band passionate enough to realize this depth of
emotion. Trumpeter Brad Turner and guitarist Bill
Coon add further delicate textures in their solos.

Another part of the Taggart personality and sense
of the past is revealed in the boppish strut emerging
from the start of T.V. Lunch. The smart line is deftly
handled by the brilliant section playing and each of the
soloists that followTurner, tenor saxophonist Steve
Kaldestad and drummer Dave Robbinsdeftly
combine instrumental prowess with the ability to tell a
story. That story is about a man who made a difference
and how his spirit is kept alive in the big band where
his talent was nurtured.

Melancholy and obscure Irving Berlin composition


Walking Stick (waxed by Louis Armstrong with the
Mills Brothers in the late 30s) and featuring some
Django-influenced guitar and bluesy clarinet. The
finale, Song of the Islands, is a low-key affair, which
adds De Cauter s son Waso on guitar.

This release will delight traditional jazz fans. One
complaint is that only a few composer credits are given
in the liner notes and not at all in the song list.
For more information, visit jazzology.com/ghb_records.php.
Christopher is at Dizzys Club Jan. 12th and Greenwich
House Music School Jan. 15th as a leader and with Jon-Erik
Kellso as part of Winter Jazzfest. See Calendar.

LE POT HERA

MENGIS PFAMMATTER TROLLER FRIEDLI

For more information, visit cellarlive.com

www.everestrecords.ch

JOO LENCASTRE TRIO


New Orleans Rendezvous
Evan ChristopherKoen De Cauter/David Paquette
(GHB)
by Ken Dryden

Evan Christopher has made his mark as a jazz


clarinetist leading various traditional jazz bands like
Clarinet Road and Django la Crole, his style building
upon the sound of New Orleans clarinet greats like
Sidney Bechet, Barney Bigard and Johnny Dodds. This
is truly an international session, with Belgian guitarist
Koen De Cauter, New Zealand pianist David Paquette,
American bassist Mark Brooks and English drummer
Trevor Richards. It dates from 1999, when the musicians
were gathered to record material to expand an earlier
LP into CD length. They then decided to play a few
more songs, not realizing the music would lie dormant
for more than 15 years.

While Christopher is the youngest member of this
assembled group, he plays with the fire and skill of a
veteran, whether soloing or within the ensemble. The
meeting sounds like old friends and personal favorites,
with no one trying to show off their chops to excess, as
some artists influenced by Bechet and Django Reinhardt
are known to do. The piano sounds like one found in a
joint that hasnt seen a tuner in some time, adding to
the informal air.

Blues My Naughty Sweetie Gave to Me is an
easygoing opener showcasing Christopher to good
effect. Chlo-e (Song of the Swamp) is probably best
known to listeners over 60 from the wild Spike Jones
arrangement of the 40s. Christopher takes it back to its
roots with a lyrical, understated setting, beautifully
supported by De Cauter. Paquette adds his raspy,
Jimmy Rowles-flavored vocals to the loping, weary
treatment
of
Marty
Bloom-Walter
Melroses

JANuARy 20Th - SEEDS BROOkLyN 10pm


JACOB SACkS-pIANO
EIvIND OpSvIk-BASS
JOO LENCASTRE- DRumS, COmpOSITION
JANuARy 21ST - FIREhOuSE SpACE 8pm
JACOB SACkS-pIANO
EIvIND OpSvIk-BASS
JOO LENCASTRE-DRumS, COmpOSITION
JANuARy 29Th - IBEAm BROOkLyN 8:30pm
LEO GENOvESE-pIANO
DAvE AmBROSIO-BASS
JOO LENCASTRE-DRumS, COmpOSITION
(...)Lencastres intuitive timekeeping
keeps things interesting.(...)
-mODERN DRummER

JOAOLENCASTRE.COm

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

31

The Bell
Ches Smith/Mat Maneri/Craig Taborn (ECM)
by Ken Micallef

Drummer Ches Smith isnt a typical jazz musician.


Hes worked with Mr. Bungle, 60s electronic maestro
Terry Riley and Marc Ribot; gives solo performances
with his electronically oriented Congs For Brums;
leads aggressive tune-shredders These Arches; and is
part of Tim Bernes turbulent Snakeoil. Smith is a wild
card, more likely to rock a groove than swing it, as
proficient at mallet-smashing timpani and ringing
vibraphone as snare drum rudiments, adept at
conjuring tones and textures, the basic ingredients for
the ethereal sound-world of ECM producer Manfred
Eicher. Smith, pianist Craig Taborn and violinist Mat
Maneri seem intent on resolving the sounds between
their notes, as if waiting for the silence to spring forth
with sound. The songs beginnings are sometimes
vague, as if no one wants to make the first move.

Barely Intervallic begins with queasy piano
notes and cracked icebell shout-outs, followed by
horror show violin squeaks over timpani thuds:
its like a barnyard of sickened farm animals. Isnt It
Over takes a more pastoral overview, gently massaged
cymbals producing a fog-like sound, which lays the
groundwork for tinkling piano and seesawing violin.
The fragile melody is at once lyrical and questioning,
stated by Taborn and eventually leading to a full-on
rock groove by Smithlike its composer, the song is a
multi-faceted beast. Ill See You On The Dark Side Of
The Earth, at nearly 11 minutes the longest track on
the album, begins tentatively, then moves through
various permutations, including squealing cymbals
and off-kilter violin, thunder-sheet crashing over
morose piano chords, flailing drums rolling over
trilling piano, all coalescing over a lightly played twoand-four groove. In Wacken Open Air, named for
worlds biggest heavy metal festival, the trio assimilates
a rock groove into a comedy of tumbling sounds.

Smiths trio is still finding their way on this
unusual ECM offering, the instruments spiraling close
together then far apart as if searching for boundaries
that never appear. Within this oddball sound world lie
truly unique improvisations and fresh storytelling.
For more information, visit ecmrecords.com. This project is
at New School Tishman Auditorium Jan. 15th as part of
Winter Jazzfest. See Calendar.

Evolution
Dr. Lonnie Smith (Blue Note)
by Joel Roberts

This is Hammond B-3 legend Dr. Lonnie Smiths first

album in 45 years for Blue Note Records, the label for


whom he made several classic soul-jazz albums in the
late 60s. Smiths style hasnt really changed much over
the intervening four decades: still deeply entrenched
in the gritty organ-jazz school of Jimmy Smith and Jack

McDuff, mixing blues and funk grooves with postbop


riffs. But at 73, hes a master of that style and his new
release places him in a winning context with a larger
group featuring guitar, as many as three horns and two
drummers, plus two high-profile guests from the Blue
Note stable: Robert Glasper and Joe Lovano.

The opener, an older Smith tune called Play It
Back, is an infectious funk workout featuring catchy
horn lines and a nice solo turn from Glasper on piano.
The younger keyboard player fits easily into Smiths
ensemble, which is no surprise given that Glasper s
hip-hop inspired brand of jazz owes much to soul-jazz
pioneers like Smith. Another vintage Smith
composition, the more relaxed Afrodesia, follows,
adding Lovano (on G mezzo soprano saxophone), who
made his recording debut on Smiths 1975 album of the
same name. A new original, Talk About This, features
a heavy funk groove, chanting and energetic soloing
from trumpeter Maurice Brown. The evocative closing
number, African Suite, highlights the breakneck
dual drumming of Joe Dyson and Johnathan Blake,
along with John Ellis melodic flute.

Two covers round out the album: a faster-thanusual take on Monks Straight No Chaser, with
Jonathan Kreisbergs guitar in the forefront, and a
majestic reading of My Favorite Things. The latter is
especially rewarding, showcasing Smiths fondness for
using dynamics. The song opens like a whisper; you
may need to turn up the volume to hear it at all. But
after about three minutes of calm, Smiths organ kicks
in at full volume in a delirium of sublime noise,
pushing the familiar tune to ecstatic heights.
For more information, visit bluenote.com. This project is at Judson
Church Jan. 15th as part of Winter Jazzfest. See Calendar.

pleasant surprise. Raghavan isnt an especially showy


player, either, though his strumming on A New
Beginning has trance-inducing power. Green has a
loose, but emphatic swing to his playing; he often
seems like hes just barely holding back from a
machine-gun snare roll.

Reminiscent is fairly thoughtful, which makes the
collective eruption of the closing Blues Up and Down
that much more surprising. Still, everything fits together,
making this one of Stephens best recordings to date.
For more information, visit crisscrossjazz.com. Stephens is
at Judson Church Jan. 15th as a leader and with Dr. Lonnie
Smith as part of Winter Jazzfest. See Calendar.

LISA
HILTON

NOCTURNAL
SUN JAN 17TH 2PM

WEILL RECITAL HALL AT CARNEGIE HALL


The world premiere of NOCTURNAL, including
Midnight Sonata will feature RUDY ROYSTON, J.D.
ALLEN, INGRID JENSEN and BEN WILLIAMS.
BOX OFFICE 57th & 7th Ave (student tix avail)
www.carnegiehall.org / 212-247-7800
For more info go to: www.LisaHiltonMusic.com
WATCH SEDUCTION: YouTube.com/LisaHiltonMusic
BUY NOCTURNAL JAN 22ND AT: Amazon.com/iTunes/CDBaby.

Reminiscent
Dayna Stephens (Criss Cross)
by Phil Freeman

On Dayna Stephens third album for Criss Cross, hes


joined by fellow saxophonist Walter Smith III, pianist
Aaron Parks, guitarist Mike Moreno, bassist Harish
Raghavan and drummer Rodney Green. Stephens wrote
4 of 10 tracks, Smith contributes 3 and interpretations
of Bill Evans Blue in Green, Gene Ammons/Sonny
Stitt blowout Blues Up and Down and trumpeter Erik
Jekabsons A New Beginning are also included. The
latter, which recalls Coltranes 1961 Village Vanguard
recordings in mood and feel, is a highlight.

Stephens is a straightahead postbop player with a
slight tendency to edge in the direction of spirituality,
without going full Pharoah Sanders. His solos have a
natural build to themhe doesnt rocket out of the
gate, but takes the listener on journeys reaching peaks
that always feel earned. He plays tenor, soprano and
baritone, his work on the latter (also featured on his
recent album Peace) remarkably expressive, bringing
out the big horns melodic potential. Smith, a sleek,
modern player who retains a dash of the blues from his
Texas upbringing, is an ideal foil; their voices
harmonize beautifully on the melodies and his solos
bring out additional facets of the tunes.
Parks playing is more traditional and less
dramatic than on his 2008 Blue Note album Invisible
Cinema or his 2011 ECM disc Arborescence; hes focused
on accompaniment here, taking only relatively brief
solos. Moreno only makes himself noticed a few times;
his sliding tones on Uncle Jr. are a particularly

32 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

January 12th
Mike Longos NY State
of the Art Jazz Ensemble
with Ira Hawkins
January 26th
Dave Chamberlains
Band of Bones
Tribute to J.J. Johnson
New York Bahai Center

53 E. 11th Street
(between University Place and Broadway)
Shows: 8:00 & 9:30 PM
Gen Adm: $15 Students $10
212-222-5159
bahainyc.org/nyc-bahai-center/jazz-night

Adeus
Susannah McCorkle (Sonorama)
by Andrew Vlez

Vocalist and sometime songwriter Susannah McCorkle

emerged in the late 70s during a time when classic pop


had entered a deep slump. Undeterred, she told New
York Times writer Stephen Holden, I have a cause and
it is great songs. McCorkle became one of the top jazzinfluenced singers interpreting music from the Golden
Era of American popular song (1925-55), along with
superior later works. The freshness and uplifting nature
of her singing is evident here on this previously
unreleased 1996 live set, which includes music as varied
as Cole Porter, Paul Simon and Antonio Carlos Jobim.
McCorkle credited hearing Billie Holidays
recording of Ive Got a Right to Sing the Blues as
transformative and the very reason she started singing.
The same emotional directness that characterized
Holidays singing is especially evident in McCorkles
rendition of another Holiday classic, That Ole Devil
Called Love. Kai Rautenbergs piano is the perfect
companion: clear, unadorned and richly melodic. Its a
luminous performance by both.

Its followed by a sizzling version of Dont Fence
Me In with Cole Porter as the unlikely song source,
which originally was written to be sung by cowboy star
Roy Rogers to his horse Trigger. Rautenberg and Walter
Gauchel on tenor saxophone mix it up with McCorkle to
make it a fresh interpretation on modern relationships.
Further along, in tandem with Ned Irving dusting the
drums and Gauchel warmly echoing her bluesiness, the
take on the Johnny Mercer-Jimmy Van Heusen gem I
Thought About You is quite haunting.

Once again that Holiday-ish directness is evident in
her acappella intro to Simons Still Crazy After All
These Years. As she gets deep into the song, Rautenberg
and Gauchel are totally down with her and conclude
with Gauchel moaning some gorgeous punctuation. The
simpatico McCorkle had throughout her career for the
samba sound is celebrated with a Jobim song for which
she wrote English lyrics. In both English and Portuguese
her luscious caramel sound is irresistible.

Bursting as this recording is with joy and life it is
still painful to accept McCorkles suicide in 2001 (she
would have been 70 this month). We are thankful she
left us a musical legacy to cherish, to which this concert
becomes a welcome addition.
For more information, visit sonorama.de

Neon Art: Volume One


Art Pepper (Widows Taste-Omnivore)
by Marcia Hillman

Long

regarded as one of the legends of jazz alto


saxophone, Art Pepper sadly had a history of drug
addiction and incarceration that magically did not affect
his playing. This live release proves the point. Recorded
almost 35 years ago at Parnells in Seattle on Jun. 28th,

1981 (the year before he died), Pepper, joined by pianist


Milcho Leviev, bassist David Williams and drummer
Carl Burnett, plays lengthy takes of two of his original
bluesRed Car (referring to a favorite car) and Blues
For Blanche (after Blanche DuBois in Tennessee
Williams A Streetcar Named Desire). Peppers technique
is flawless and his improvisational ideas are endless. He
plays in sentences, paying just as much attention to the
spaces in between the notes as to the notes themselves.

Both tracks have many notable moments. Red
Car is a lively, funky affair with a heavy rhythm pattern
on piano emphasized by bass and drums. Peppers solo
is beautifully built, his choruses forging ahead, then
retreating only to forge ahead to a higher level and
always in a conversational manner where his horn really
talks to the listener. One of the highlights of this track
is Levievs work. He too has marvelous technique and
incredibly is able to solo with both his left and his right
hand at the same time, beautifully building his lead as
well. Blues For Blanche, though more subdued than
the former track, also has its moments in the imaginative
trades between Pepper and Burnett and Leviev and
Burnett. Williams has an inspired bass solo, accompanied
by some fancy tap-dancing drums.

This album is full of energy and captures the
whistles, yells and applause of a responsive audience.
Thanks to co-producer Laurie Pepper (his widow) for
preserving this important piece of jazz history.
For more information, visit omnivorerecordings.com

Ralph MacDonald on CTI). Sometimes the CTI influence


is too pervasive, especially the tendency to stress tunes
and arrangements over improvising, leaning toward a
smooth jazz sound. Some tracks succumb but others,
like Not So Serious, avoid it with a funky-funny
soprano solo from composer Stephenson. Benacks
Roylike has a bouncy backbeat conjuring Roy
Hargrove and Jones two appearancesreplacing
Benackare solo highlights, both for compelling
trumpet and the interplay between he and Williams.
For more information, visit elevationsmusic.com. Benny
Benack is at Dizzys Club Jan. 18th and Metropolitan Room
Jan. 22nd. See Calendar.

Lori BeLL Quartet CD reLease ConCerts

Lori BeLL fLute / Jason Yeager piano /


DannY WeLLer Bass / roBert Weiss Drums
speCiaL guest Dan Levine tromBone
JanuarY 13th @ smoKe 11:30 pm
2751 Broadway, NyC 212- 864-6662
saturDaY, JanuarY 16th @ the DraWing room 7pm & 8:30pm
56 willoughBy Street # 3, BrooklyN, Ny 917-836-2105
sunDaY, JanuarY 17th @ sanKofa aBan 3pm to 6pm
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LoriBeLLfLute.Com

MARY FOSTER
To The Stars (feat. Warren Wolf & Sean Jones)
Elevations (Corona Music)
by George Kanzler

CONKLIN

Elevations

is a quintet of musicians from Pittsburgh


who came together earlier this decade as teenagers. On
this debut album, consisting entirely of compositions
from band members, they enlist the talents of guests
Warren Wolf (vibraphone) and Sean Jones (trumpet), as
well as cameos from others. The album is dedicated to
the memory of Horace Silver, Mulgrew Miller, Cedar
Walton and George Duke. Silver is evoked on El Gran
Arado, trumpeter Benny Benack IIIs homage to such
early Silver hits as Seor Blues, replete with congas
from added percussionist George Jones. Someone Like
Mulgrew honors the late pianist with a flowing tropical
vibe incorporating vibraphone and flute from guest
Evan Hertrick, courtesy of drummer and quintet
energizer George Heid III, who also contributes Mr.
Walton, a waltz adding Wolf and Hertrick in a George
Shearing-like combo vibe. George Dukes more fusion
sound informs the opening and closing tracks, both
from Heids pen: Planet Earth adds vibraphone and
Carolyn Perteetes wordless vocals to a smoothly
sensual theme while To The Stars finds pianist Brett
Williams doubling on synthesizer to produce guitar-like
solos and saxophonist Michael Stephenson declaiming
lyrics in a brassy, Stevie Wonder-influenced style.

But while honoring the legacy of the aforementioned
four recently departed artists, this album also fills the
template of a less recent jazz auteur, Creed Taylor. It
sounds like it could have come out on Taylors iconic
60s-70s label CTI. Here are all the hallmarks that made
up the CTI sound: avoiding barnburner tempos; long
solos; rudimentary head-solos-head arrangements;
added aural textures like flute, voice, synths and
tropical-flavored, but not overly aggressive, AfroLatin
percussion (George Jones here being the equivalent of

34 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

PHOTOGRAPHS

CD RELEASE DATE FEbRuARY 2 ON MOCKTuRTLE MuSIC


AvAILAbLE AT CDbAbY.COM AND ITuNES

FebRuARy 4, 2016 AT 6Pm


bIRDLAND, NYC - CD RELEASE EvENT
FebRuARy 7, 2016
METROpOLITAN ROOM, NYC
LIvE RADIO bROADCAST - WbAI-FM
MARCh 19, 2016 AT 8pM
E SpOT LOuNgE @ vITELLOS, LOS ANgELES, CA
WITh LA SONgWRITER MARK WINKLER
A sensitive artist (but not frail)
with a wide-ranging boldly
colored voice and an open ear
for off-beat material.
-The Washington post

MARYFOSTERCONKLIN.COM

Take Off
Ramn Valle (In + Out)
by Elliott Simon

The deluxe version of Cuban pianist Ramn Valles


Take Off includes both a studio CD and live DVD
featuring between-song commentary from the artist.
While the music on both is similar, the live set better
captures Valles emotional playing style and his trios
synergy. This reviewer suggests listening to the CD
several times to concentrate on the music before
expanding on the experience by viewing the DVD.

Valle at times uses tight arrangements to nudge
popular tunes like What are You Doing the Rest of
Your Life and Stevie Wonder s Es Una Historia into
straighter-ahead jazz territory. However, his structural
understanding enables the more interesting takes on
other peoples music. These include using gorgeous
harmonies to expand Leonard Cohens haunting
Hallelujah without sacrificing the songs powerful
lyricism and, with much assistance from bassist Omar
Rodrigues Calvo and drummer Ernesto Simpson,
kicking mushy chestnut and CD opener All the Things
You Are into a higher gear.

Valles own music though is where the band cooks
and his unique blend of Latin, classical and jazz is best
displayed. Steps in the Night, unfortunately missing
from the DVD, takes Coltranes Giant Steps through
a new set of fleet paces while Trance Dance in Blue is
a swinging Latin blues buttressed by meshing Valles
percussive flair with Simpsons pops. Levitando,
with airy chords and emotive bass, lives up to its title
and serves as a fitting encore to the live set.

Despite his crisp technique Valle also judiciously
employs a tender touch: such is the case on the initial
section of the otherwise speedy Principe Enano;
superbly expressive Y Si Volviera, which features
beautiful basslines; and refrain of Cinco Hermanas,
a tribute to Valles five sisters. Kimbara Pa ico,
paean to Cuban guitarist ico Saquito, is as out as the
band gets. Its combination of biting seriousness, Latin
vibe and playfulness capture Saquitos essence. An
essential member of Cubas second generation of jazz
pianists, Ramn Valle brings his conservatory training,
compositional insight and fleet fingers to Take Off.
For more information, visit inandout-records.com. This
project is at Dizzys Club Jan. 25th. See Calendar.

Something About Jobim


Harry Allen (Stunt)
by Alex Henderson

H arry Allens breathy, lyrical tenor saxophone playing

does, to be sure, draw some inspiration from pre-bop


tenor masters yet is hardly oblivious to the chord
progressions of bop. On Something About Jobim, he pays
homage to someone who had a profound effect on post
50s jazz: Brazilian composer/pianist Antonio Carlos
Jobim, who was 67 when he died on Dec. 8th, 1994.


Exalted as The George Gershwin of Brazil for
his prolificacy, Jobim has been the subject of numerous
tributes in both straightahead jazz and Brazilian pop.
Many of those have played it way too safe, limiting
themselves to the most overdone Jobim standards. But
Allen and his Brazilian sidemen (pianist Helio Alves,
drummer Tutty Moreno and the discs producer, So
Paulo-based bassist Rodolfo Stroeter) devote much of
the 56-minute CD to lesser-known Jobim gems.
Dindi, the opening track, is a standard recorded by a
long list of instrumentalists and singers but the fact
that Allen also embraces Captain Bacardi, Antigua,
Mojave and Angela demonstrates that he had no
problem making some less obvious choices. Tema
Jazz and Sue Ann (both from Jobims Creed Taylorproduced Tide album of 1970) are songs with which
only really hardcore admirers are likely to be familiar.

Something About Jobim is mostly instrumental but
Allen features veteran Brazilian singer Joyce (Tutty
Morenos wife) on Voc Vai Ver (Youll See),
Chovendo na Roseira and Gerry Mulligans Theme
for Jobim (all of which she performs in her native
Portuguese). Joyce, now 67, has been recording since
the 60s and hasnt lost a thing since then. (Tutty
Moreno, Stroeter and Alves backed Joyce when she
toured North America during the summer of 2015.)
Many homages to Jobim have been way too
predictable for their own good, but Allen is not afraid
to surprise us. The result is one of the more interesting
in recent years.
For more information, visit sundance.dk. Allen is at 92nd
Street Y Jan. 27th as part of the Bucky Pizzarelli Birthday
Bash. See Calendar.

tension with the turbulent quartet. The latter represents


a brief end-of-session jam full of extemporized riffs
and an irrepressible sense of fun. Conversely the
tender piano/voice rendered Song (for Whitney)
from the 2012 Montreal concert contained in that boxed
set surfaces here for the first time.

Live at La Resistenza reveals Parker in freeflowing
mood. Hamid Drake is the perfect partner for such
exploits, as he always finds ways to avoid repetitive
figures. When you think of saxophonists borne aloft by
the pair, such luminaries as Fred Anderson, Kidd
Jordan and Peter Brtzmann come to mind. The name
John Dikeman isnt the next that naturally falls off the
lips. But the Wyoming-born, currently Amsterdambased, saxophonist holds his own in exalted company.
By now Parker is so relaxed in Drakes presence that
either can almost do whatever they wish, secure the
other will summon an appropriate response. So it is
here in a program created by joining together excerpts
from two live sets from Belgium into a continuous
42-minute performance. They conjure all manner of
rhythmic wizardry, flexing and corralling time to steer
and shadow Dikemans Ayler-inspired wail, unfolding
in a series of three-way conversations, which pause to
allow bass-drum interludes to emerge. They hit an
attractively buoyant groove on Bad Uncle John!
while the concluding WY Funk features a staccato
incantation from Dikeman in which he treats lyrical
phrases to ear-shredding tonal distortion. By the close
of his muscular overblown rhapsody he proves himself
a fine foil for his illustrious backers.
For more information, visit aumfidelity.com and
elnegocitorecords.com. Parker is at Clemente Soto Velez
Cultural Center Jan. 4th, 15th, 16th and 24th and The Stone
Jan. 9th and 30th. See Calendar.

Interpretations 27
Great Spirit
William Parker/Raining on the Moon (AUM Fidelity)
Live at La Resistenza
John Dikeman/William Parker/Hamid Drake
(El Negocito)
by John Sharpe

Bassist William Parker s talent has been in figuring


out how to propel ensembles through long-form
improvisation without falling into a rut, yet keeping an
elastic swing. His range of expression seems boundless
from solo bass to large ensembles. Somewhere between
those two poles comes the discs considered here, one
from a regular outlet, the other as part of the most
in-demand rhythm section in the business.

Great Spirit is the fourth album by Raining On The
Moon, the premier vehicle for Parker s affecting
melodies and heartfelt songs. Recorded at the same
2007 session as the wonderful Corn Meal Dance it is
anything but outtakes. At the core of the group is the
blues-infused piano of Eri Yamamoto and elegantly
soulful voice of Leena Conquest. The latter makes light
work of fitting the lyrics to the music, which can lead
to unsettling contrasts as when Parker s bleak words
about slavery are matched to the infectious vamp of
Feet Music. Rob Browns alto saxophone and Lewis
Barnes trumpet often function as a unit, although they
do occasionally step out for aphoristic solos, like
Browns refined statement on the lovely Bowl Of
Stone Around The Sun. Prayer-Improv and
Potpourri appeared as bonus tracks on the now outof-print Wood Flute Song boxed set. The former includes
an improvisation, which followed the stunning duet
rendition of Prayer captured on Corn Meal Dance. As
the dueling horns spiral above the fast beat, the
beautiful song returns, which produces a striking

FEB 4

Lori Freedman: The Virtuosity of Excess


Morton Subotnick & Lillevan

MAR 10 Alvin Singleton 75th Birthday Celebration


APR 14

Marek Choloniewski // Adam Rudolph

MAY 5

Thomas Buckner performs Bun Ching Lam,


Karen Power, Blue Gene Tyranny.

ROULETTE 509 Atlantic Ave Brooklyn NY

2, 3, 4, 5, A, C, G, D, M, N, R, B, Q & LIRR | $20 General $15 Members, Students, Seniors

INTERPRETATIONS.INFO, ROULETTE.ORG

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

35

Drop Your Plans


Bambi Pang Pang (featuring Andrew Cyrille)
(El Negocito)
by Ken Waxman

Maturity

can be defined in diverse ways. Master


American drummer Andrew Cyrille, 76, improvises
with an economy of motion, reflecting more than a halfcentury of accomplishment with everyone from
Coleman Hawkins and John Coltrane to Cecil Taylor
and Sun Ra. Despite their bafflingly juvenile name, the
three musicians who make up Belgian band Bambi Pang
Pang (all several decades Cyrilles junior) are mature as
well. Drop Your Plans, their second album and debut
collaboration with Cyrille (after a concert at the Jazz
Middelheim festival), stands out because the sound is
developed to treat the tunes with slowly evolving
understatement.

The paramount instance of this is Dr. Licks,
composed by Cyrille. As the drummer defines the
accompaniment with off-center plastic water bottle-like
clunks, tenor saxophonist Viktor Perdieus sketches the
theme with a variety of craggy spits and slurs. Pianist
Seppe Gebruers bottom-triggered notes, which steady
the slowly-evolving melody with pedal-pushed
percussiveness, resound with a density that suggests
they emanate from the giant keyboard Tom Hanks

dances on in Big rather than the standard instrument.


That tune impresses with its easygoing gait
surrounding a rugged inner strength. This reasoning
insinuates itself into most of the CDs 11 pieces. The title
track, for example, floats like a boat on calm water, with
the languorous performance so transparent, every
motion from Laurens Smets bass strings shines with
precision. Gebruers processional outpouring on his
own Frases dawdles at a languid pace yet the piece
never slips off beat or out of tune.
Yet Bambi Pang Pang demonstrate that their
philosophy doesnt result from instrumental feebleness.
Fuks and Border/Grens are hard-blowing efforts
highlighting saxophone triple-tonguing and fanning
piano cascades. Perdieus and Gebruers, ferociously
intersecting with each others propulsion, prove that
the group can swing with the power of the Jazz
Messengers if needed. Probably the most convincing
testimony to the groups notable vigorand collective
maturityis that it never seems that Cyrille is anything
more than a wholly integrated member of a fullyfunctioning working band.

serious in the way it develops its material. Wearing


the Wig of Atrophy, for example, is a kind of tainted
pastoral, almost a ballad but with a subtle disorder in
its tonality. Utensil Strength has particularly dark
timbres, with lower register tenor saxophone almost as
dry as a bassoon against slashing piano forays. The
concluding Damaged Center ends with a repeating
and emphatic rhythmic unison that is a perfect
embodiment of Mitchells strengths. Its powerful,
looming, even foreboding music, but it resists the kind
of bombast it might engender in other hands.
For more information, visit pirecordings.com. This project is
at Jazz Standard Jan. 6th. See Calendar.

IN PRINT

For more information, visit elnegocitorecords.com. Cyrille is


at Cornelia Street Caf Jan. 16th. See Calendar.

After Django: Making Jazz in Postwar France


Tom Perchard (University of Michigan Press)
by Clifford Allen

Vista Accumulation
Matt Mitchell (Pi)
by Stuart Broomer

Pianist

Matt Mitchell has played with a variety of


leadersTim Berne, Dave Douglas, Darius Jones,
Rudresh Mahanthappawhose work ranges from the
visceral to cerebral, each able to balance expression and
abstraction. That balance is Mitchells own defining
quality on this two-CD set as he leads a quartet with
Chris Speed (clarinet and tenor saxophone), Chris
Tordini (bass) and Dan Weiss (drums). The music is a
fresh extension of a long Third Stream tradition, one
that connects with early Dave Brubeck and the work of
Jimmy Giuffre and Paul Bley, both together and apart,
with interest in particular kinds of structured dialogue
and the clear delineation of complex states.

Mitchells compositions have their own sense of
contour, an organic language fusing disparate rhythmic
and harmonic materials. Each disc has a couple of
longer tracks12 to 16 minutesand a couple of
shorter ones, but all are fully developed works,
concentrated matrices in which written elements seem
to be developed as far as they can before the group
turns to improvisation. He has published a series of
piano tudes and the study of a specific issue, technique
or theme is very close to the spirit of this music.

The writing frequently emphasizes clarinet and
piano, coupling the natural discrepancies in overtone
patterns with shifting rhythmic values. Theres often a
kind of impinging quietude, articulated from the outset
in Select Your Existence, a piece alternating different
themes with improvised passages in a way that creates
tremendous freedom and movement. Mitchell isnt in a
hurry to solo, ceding the first lead to Tordini, who
weaves his lines in a kind of disjunct undertone. When
Mitchell does solo, he reveals a passionate, inventive
virtuosity. By the time the piece is fully underway there
is both tremendous freedom and a sense of densely-knit
structure, a collective invention in which Speed,
Mitchell, Tordini and Weiss play equal parts.
Gravity is a hallmark of this work. Its not
ponderous or burdensome, but willing to be genuinely

36 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

While New York is a cosmopolitan city and one can


fill nearly every musical taste with some regularity, it
stands to reason that most people will hinge their
affections on hometown heroes. This is especially
true in jazz, wherein most tend to pay the greatest
heed to American artists. Part of that is due to what is
available and while its easier in the digital age to
hear a lot of European, Asian and African jazz (and
some of these figures do make appearances stateside),
most American jazz listeners just dont know much
about the music outside our borders.

This is where books like Tom Perchards After
Django come in, at least to a degree, for it is a scholarly
tome. Perchards text is a study not only of postwar
French jazz and free music, but also the criticism
surrounding it and the evolution of writing about
postwar culture. This isnt necessarily easy stuff
Hugues Panassi, Andr Hodeir and the evolution of
rightist and leftist intellectual thought vis--vis art is
probably not the starting place for most musicians
and listeners interest, but it is how the stage is set for
the development of music and ideas in relation to one
another. After all, during the Nazi occupation of
France, jazz music was downright outlawed (and it
was not commonly heard before the Second World
War) and its reintroduction was concomitant with the
emergence of new intellectualism.

Perchards writing is detailed and clear and he
spends less time on obvious doyens of Parisian jazz
and more on obtuse native proponents of modern
jazz like saxophonist Barney Wilen and the short but
influential stays of Monk and Miles. His approach to
French free music similarly focuses on Wilen, pianist
Franois Tusques and reed player Michel Portal,
rather than the players who arrived from elsewhere.
Perchards illumination of the obstinate, quixotic
nature of Wilens playing in particular is profound.
But mostly, whether or not one has familiarized
oneself with the participants, After Django presents a
crisp, sometimes wry and ably supported picture of
the evolution of art and ideas in postwar France. This
is exactly the kind of heft that, even if not always at
play, is worth lining ones quiver with in any serious
artistic or experiential endeavor.
For more information, visit press.umich.edu

The First Quartet


John Abercrombie (ECM)
by Phil Freeman

This set contains remastered reissues of three albums

by guitarist John Abercrombies quartet of pianist


Richie Beirach, bassist George Mraz and drummer
Peter Donald. As the product of a working band and
demonstrations of speedy collective evolution, theyre
both fascinating and highly enjoyable.
1978s Arcade offers five compositionstwo by the
leader, three by the pianist. The opening title track and
closing Alchemy are the longest, adding up to more
than half the running time. The groups collective voice
is established quickly; Abercrombies carefully chosen
single notes spring out in streams, then fall gracefully
to earth, occasionally given extra life through judicious
use of pedals, while Beirachs chords forcefully box
him in. Mraz has the heavy, rubber-band sound of late
70s acoustic jazz, but just as much melody as the piano
and Donald is as comfortable with militaristic snare
barrages as gentle yet precise swing. The mix is
extremely clean, with just the slightest touch of reverb,
more like room sound than an effect.

On the quartets 1979 self-titled second album, the
compositional duties are evenly divided between
Abercrombie and Beirach, with the latter s

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e.g. Fresh Sound, Criss Cross,
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contributions coming in a row, one-two-three,


following two pieces by the guitarist and succeeded by
one more. Its a slightly more melancholy and
meditative set than Arcade, with more room for
individual statementsDear Rain opens with a twominute bass solo and Beirach is out there alone for the
first three minutes of Madagascar. The subsequent
Riddles is a hard-driving vamp/groove providing a
launching pad for Donalds solo, which marries the
discipline of jazz to the exuberance of arena rock (those
toms!).
1980s M is the only one to feature a composition
not by the guitarist or pianist; bassist George Mraz
closes the disc with the delicate, rippling Pebbles. It
opens with Boat Song, the most beautiful piece on
any of the discsnearly ambient for half its 10-minute
running time, it eventually becomes a swaying,
swinging ballad. Thats followed by the title piece,
which has an uptempo feel and a bouncing-in-place
melody that edges it into the zone where fusion and
instrumental prog rock meet. As a final statement by
this group, it keeps them on the path theyd been
traveling, without suggesting they were out of ideas
when they split.


Costas dexterous arranging skills are confirmed
in the compositions final minutes. Following Kyungmi
Lees upsetting piccolo shrills and factory-whistle-like
clangor from the reeds, Jesse Stackens relaxed, halfspeed piano chording sooths the music back to serenity.
As he plays, theres the sudden realization that this
leitmotif has been expressed in variants throughout
the piece. Stackens final notes explicitly link to the
original theme and associate the exposition and
conclusion as effectively as a reusable plastic storage
bag is resealed.
For more information, visit carlocostamusic.com. Costa is at
Delroys Cafe and Wine Bar Jan. 25th. See Calendar.

ON SCREEN

For more information, visit ecmrecords.com. Abercrombie is


at Jazz Standard Jan. 21st-24th. See Calendar.
Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story
N.C. Heikin (Hieronymus Pictures)
by Russ Musto

Strata
Carlo Costas Acustica (Neithernor)
by Ken Waxman

H aving established himself with smaller bands,


drummer Carlo Costa ups the ante with Strata, an
extended piece for 13 musicians, which, like the
sedimentary matter it reflects, intermingles graphical
and notated scores with improvisation to expose sonic
layers. The Italian-born, NYC-based Costa is just one
of many younger musicians exploring the possibilities
implicit in creating large-scale, cyclical performances,
including his frequent associates violinist Franz
Loriotwho isnt on this discand bassist Pascal
Niggenkemper, who is.

The piece, recorded live at IBeam Brooklyn in
2014, carves out an interface midway between
meandering Morton Feldman-esque inevitability and
AMM-like nearly endless discursions. Taken at a
moderate tempo, the composition gains traction not
from the brief solos, but from contrasting outbursts of
paired or more numerous players, separated by a series
of connective tutti. Every so often unexplained signal
processing-like judders are heard. But the strength of
this compositionand the players skillsis that these
sounds too are the result of wholly acoustic playing.
Throughout Strata challenges are set up and
resolved. For instance, the positioned strums of Todd
Neufelds acoustic guitar are seconded by half-valve
effects from Joe Moffetts trumpet. In another case, Ben
Gersteins gutty trombone bellicosity and combined
brass and reed section squeals are finally nudged into
parallel forward motion via a soothing bass clarinet
ostinato from Jean-Brice Godet. At points Costa joins
with the dual bassists Niggenkemper and Sean Alis
knotty sawing strings to keep the narrative balanced.
Costas proficiency is such that the rhythmic impetus
is implied, not with overloud effects, but with small
bell-like pings and scuffs, which seem to resonate from
a matchbook cover rather than any part of the
percussion set.

The life of Frank Morgan abounded with the stuff


from which movies are made, so its not surprising
that Sound of Redemption: The Frank Morgan Story
should be such an engaging look at the life of the
alto saxophonist. The brainchild of crime fiction
writer Michael Connelly, whose popular Harry
Bosch detective novel series regularly references
jazz and its makers (including Morgan), the film,
directed and written by N.C. Heikin, weaves the
narrative of Morgans life through footage from a
live concert fting the late saxophonist at San
Quentin, where he spent the better part of 30 years.

Morgans biography1933 birth to a prostitute
mother pimped out by his celebrated father (Ink
Spots guitarist Stanley Morgan), brothel upbringing,
youthful musical achievements and on to his heroin
addiction, criminal exploits, periods of incarceration
and eventual release and emergence into the jazz
spotlightare depicted through photographs, news
accounts and testimony from family and colleagues,
as well as performance excerpts and a TV interview
with the artist himself.

Equally compelling is the footage of the 2012
San Quentin concert, where Morgan had once been a
member of the prisons legendary big band, which
at times featured the likes of Dexter Gordon,
Hampton Hawes and Art Pepper. While the
bebopping music delivered by a sextet of alto
saxophonists Mark Gross and Grace Kelly,
trombonist Delfeayo Marsalis (who receives credit
as Heikins co-writer), pianist George Cables
(Morgans second act bandmate), bassist Ron
Carter and drummer Marvin Smitty Smith, is
truly satisfying, it is the visible transformational
effect on the prisoners that is most compelling.

Kelly speaks of Morgans mentoring friendship
when she was not much more than a child and
Horace Tapscott offers insight into the effect that
racism had on artists of the era and its role in their
turning to the balm of heroin. Morgan is forthright
and charming in his recounting tales of crime and
punishment, spirituality and deliverance and stirring
in his performances, which spill off the screen with
emotion and strength.
For more information, visit thefrankmorganproject.com

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

37

B OXED SE T

The Complete Remastered Recordings


on Black Saint & Soul Note
Archie Shepp (CAM Jazz)
by Anders Griffen

The latest among the CAM Jazz boxed set series


The Complete Remastered Recordings on Black Saint &
Soul Note, this Archie Shepp set consists of,
chronologically, A Sea of Faces, Down Home New York,
Live On BroadwayCalifornia Meeting and Little Red
Moon, each packaged in a slipcase with the original
album artwork. A Sea of Faces was recorded in August
of 1975 while the other three dates were recorded
between February 1984-December 1985. Shepp was
already well established, having made classic
recordings with John Coltrane, Cecil Taylor, Gil
Evans, Bill Dixon and Don Cherry, among many
others. As a leader, he had already produced over 30
albums, including about a dozen albums for Impulse!
between 1964-69 and 1971-72. which many consider
his best work. His singular personality imbues all of
his recordings and he has just received the nations
highest jazz honor, being named a National

Endowment for the Arts Jazz Master.



A Sea Of Faces opens with the infectious
Hipnosis, written by trombonist Grachan Moncur
III. Its a one-bar bassline, accenting a tritone,
Cameron Brown repeats for much of the cuts 26
minutes. Dave Burrells piano and Shepps tenor
introduce counterpoint melodies before extended
improvisations. Rafi Taha reads Shepps title poem
while Bunny Foy sings Semenya McCords Song
For Mozambique. Foy also has a beautiful feature
on I Know bout The Life (though she sings
About), consisting of words by playwright Aisha
Rahman set to music by Shepp, somewhat
reminiscent of his Steam (Shepps theater and
poetry background are central to his art). The album
closes with a swinging instrumental reading of Cal
Masseys Lookin for Someone To Love.

Shepps quintet of trumpeter Charles McGhee,
pianist Kenny Werner, bassist Saheb Sarbib and
drummer Marvin Smitty Smith grooves a funky
two-bar vamp on the title track of Down Home New
York, playing for three minutes before Shepp
introduces Bazzi Bartholomew Gray and his vocal
variations on a theme of fascination with New York
CityThe city is where I had to be / just to be here
among the crowd / folks coming from miles and
miles around / I cant think of any place Id rather
be. The band adds their collective shout before the
scene fades out at 11 minutes. Sarbibs evocative
May 16th is a medium-bright waltz, which feels
like a reflective ballad, while Shepps Africaninfluenced The 4th World is a joyful stroll in 4/4
with an accent on beat 4 followed by a tacet 1.
Monks Round About Midnight and Coltranes
Straight Street round out this great set.


Live On BroadwayCalifornia Meeting was
recorded in Sacramento, CA at The On Broadway Bar
& Caf. The room comes alive with the vocal entrance
of Royal Blue on the set-opening St. James
Infirmary and the band swings hard on A Night In
Tunisia, perhaps the strongest number in the set;
its just the trio of George Cables (piano), Herbie
Lewis (bass) and Eddie Marshall (drums) until they
hit the tag just before the five-minute mark and
Shepp enters with his soprano (which sounds a bit
strident through the live mics, the tone better when
hes slightly off mic). Marshalls fantastic drum solo
sparks loud applause and Cables is burning on the
fleet Giant Steps. They modulate the tempo for the
last chorus and loosen into an extended ending like a
group cadenza and the crowd goes bananas. The set
closes with a gorgeous My Romance.

Little Red Moon plays like a jam session where
the band is swinging but not always gelling, lacking
the focus and ambition of the previous studio dates.
After the meandering blues of the title cut and
Impromptu, Coltranes beautiful Naima is
probably the best track, performed as an uptempo
waltz led by Wilbur Littles bass groove. Benny
Golsons Whisper Not is given a unique rendering
with a great outro. Trumpeter Enrico Rava and
frenetic pianist Siegfried Kessler display some
rapport on the set-closing Sweet Georgia Brown.

This boxed set is just a small snap shot of Shepps
prolific output. The first two records here are
absolutely great and California Meeting is a fine live
set. Little Red Moon, however, is probably reserved
for collectors and the die-hard Archie Shepp fan.
For more information, visit camjazz.com

New from
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jeff tain watts

ibrahim maalouf: kalthoum

JA N 4

joey alexander trio

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orchestra with ted nash

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jazz at lincoln center youth


orchestra with marquis hill

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9:30pm hugh coltman

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ARBORS RECORDS

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parts 14

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38 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

ARCD 19445

Dick Hyman:
House of Pianos

Jazz piano legend


Dick Hyman performs
solo while recording live
at the famous
Farleys House of Pianos
in Madison, Wisconsin.
Brilliant piano jazz
at its best!
51 S. Main Ave., Suite 301, Clearwater, FL 33765
Phone: (727) 252-00123 Fax: (727) 466-0432
Toll Free: (800) 299-1930
E-mail: mrd@gate.net www.arborsrecords.com
U.S. and Canada distribution by Allegro

I N ME MORIA M 20 1 5

Free Form Improvisation Ensemble 2013


Abdelha Bennani/Burton Greene/Alan Silva/
Chris Henderson (Improvising Beings)
by Clifford Allen

Pianist Burton Greene (b. Chicago, 1937) and multi-

instrumentalist Alan Silva (b. Bermuda, 1939) have


been playing together for the better part of 53 years.
They may not reconvene often these days, but when
they do, the results are endlessly stimulating. Greene
and Silva founded the Free Form Improvisation
Ensemble (FFIE) in Brooklyn in late 1962 and it
continued until the close of 1964; in that group, Silva
played the contrabass and their duo of an extended
language of sound-painting (or action music) was at
the core. The FFIE also consisted of saxophonist Gary
William Friedman, flutist Jon Winter and drummer
Clarence Walker and they were eventually part of the
Jazz Composers Guild. Their few surviving recordings
were collected on an eponymous archival disc released
by Cadence Jazz Records in 1998.

15 years later the FFIE name was revived for a
group featuring electronic percussionist Chris
Henderson and the French-Moroccan tenor saxophonist
Abdelha Bennani, who died in August 2015 at 65.
Bennani was a student in Silvas Institute for Art,
Culture and Perception in the 80s and they continued
to work together in a variety of configurations.

Free Form Improvisation Ensemble 2013 is a two-disc
presentation of the FFIE captured live at the Sunset jazz
club in Paris and each disc consists of an improvised
suite divided into multiple sections. Silva began to
move away from the bass as a tool for expressing his
sonic canvases in the 70s and now almost exclusively
works with synthesizers, allowing him to orchestrate
massive section-based improvisations without the
logistical challenge of maintaining an orchestra (which
he did at various points) and with the individualized
physicality of space-bending glissandi that has been
part of his palette since the 60s. Coupled with Greenes
arcing East European progressions and Bennanis
pillowy grumble, which, remarkably, follows Silvas
actions in telepathic fashion, the music of the FFIE is an
expansive proposition, yet rooted in statements of
collective nuance.
For more information, visit improvising-beings.com

Jazz Rolls Royce


Howard Rumseys Lighthouse All-Stars
(Omega-VSOP)
by George Kanzler

Those were the days! Homecoming Weekend (football)


at UCLA, 1957 and a jazz band is commissioned to
create and play the music for the big event: Howard
Rumseys Lighthouse All-Stars, a sextet based at the
bassists club of the same name in Hermosa Beach,
south of Los Angeles. For the Homecoming, Rumsey
(Nov. 7th, 1917Jul. 15th, 2015) expanded to a

16-strong orchestra and composer-arranger Bob


Cooperthe bands reed playerwrote six charts in a
concerto grosso format for the sextet backed by nine
brassfour trumpets, four trombones, tubaand a
percussionist doubling timpani and vibraphone. The
music is surprisingly intricate and sophisticated
melodically and harmonically for what was a concertdance event, with frequent counter-melodies, tonal
contrasts, tandem soloing and tempo-rhythm shifts
and dropouts. Yet the music defies easy stereotypes of
West Coast/cool jazz by exhibiting a forceful, swinging
momentum.

Proceedings open with the one non-original Strike
Up the Band, written as a fight song for UCLA by
George Gershwin. Cooper briefly honors the songs
genesis with a marching snare and brass opening,
which soon morphs into a swing version featuring
Victor Feldmans vibraphone on top and in a solo before
the All-Stars horns trade fours with drummer Stan
Levey. Timpani, Coopers oboe and vibraphone bring
pastel colors to Prelude to A Queen, spotlighting Stu
Williamsons flowingly resonant trumpet. Coopers
tenor saxophone is featured on other tracks, mostly
notably Coop Salutes the Co-Op and slow blues
Bruinville, My Bruinville, playing creatively and
assertively in the Four Brothers style. The star soloist is
trombonist Frank Rosolino, whose artistic prowess is
too often overshadowed by his terrible suicideinfanticide demise. For Rosolino, who came up in
bebop-era Detroit, ranks right up there with J.J. Johnson,
Jimmy Cleveland and Curtis Fuller as a giant of postSwing era trombone. His solos here, whether bopping
through The Clowns Dance or slippery horn
preaching on the blues, are indelible moments on a
very special album.
For more information, visit magnebit.xeran.com/store

Live at the Deer Head Inn


Phil Woods Quintet (Deer Head Records)
by Ken Dryden

Phil Woods (Nov. 2nd, 1931Sep. 29th, 2015) was a

perennial poll winner in a career spanning eight


decades. Although he battled emphysema in his later
years, the alto saxophonist gave his all for every
performance and record date until his retirement last
September, shortly before his death. This 2014 set at
the Deer Head Inn, near his home in The Poconos,
features his quintet. Bassist Steve Gilmore and
drummer Bill Goodwin spent over 40 years in Woods
bands, trumpeter Brian Lynch over 20 while this marks
pianist Bill Mays first recording with the group,
though he had been playing with them for some time.

Woods was a master in putting together a set,
kicking off with a punchy take of Bohemia After
Dark featuring his sassiness, followed by Lynch (the
youngster in the band at just 59) at his expressive best.
A sauntering take of the infrequently played ballad
We Could Make Such Beautiful Music Together is
the perfect description of the Woods quintet, old
friends playing effortlessly for an enthusiastic
audience. Ageless pianist/vocalist Bob Dorough,
another Poconos resident, wrote Ive Got Just About
Everything I Need, which the quintet builds from a
saunter into a rousing cooker. Mays humorous boogiewoogie introduction to Duke Ellingtons Im Just a
Lucky So And So prompts vocal encouragement from
the leader and great solos all around, though Gilmores

40 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

superb choruses stand out. Woods recasts Im a Fool


to Want You with a Latin undercurrent, the poignant
work of the leader and Lynch conveying its longing
theme. Woods always encouraged his band to
contribute originals to his book and Mays brassy
Bicks Bag, adding the inevitable set-closing tag of
Hows Your Mama? (Phils Theme), sends the
audience away on a high note.

The saxophonists health is never in question
throughout this delightful set. Woods doesnt execute
with the speed he had in his prime but builds on his
decades of experience to create memorable solos.
For more information, visit deerheadrecords.com

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THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

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www.slamproductions.net

On the Way to Two


Kenny Wheeler/John Taylor (CAM Jazz)
by Ken Micallef

duo recording between melodic instrumentalists


can be a tricky beast. It exposes the ability to swing
without the usual rhythm section, can test maturity at
the responsibility of accompanying another musician
where typically they lay out and separates the men
from the boys in areas of pure strengththe two
musicians must perform full-out with no mental break
for the entirety of the song. For drummers and bassists
this is no big deal; theyre the equivalent of the musics
infantry, always required to keep the arrangement
flowing while the frontline takes turns soloing,
smoking or stepping out for a toilet break.

No quarter is given or expected in On the Way to
Two, a recording between two masters of their
respective instruments. In the hands of pianist John
Taylor (Sep. 25th, 1942 - Jul. 17th, 2015) and trumpeter/
flugelhorn player Kenny Wheeler (who died in 2014),
the assembled songs flow like a river, swing like mad
and reveal the players strengths under any stress test
youd care to offer.
Recorded in Ludwigsburg, Germany in 2005,
covering Wheeler material and one composition by
Billy Strayhorn, On the Way to Two is majestic, touching,

exhilarating, enlightening. The beauty of Wheeler s


trumpet, a penetrating, bracing sound like no other,
over Taylor s buoyant, muscular and glistening piano
is endlessly thrilling and touching. Who Knows,
a ruminative ballad, begins with Wheeler issuing
melancholy notes, Taylor quickly shifting gears into a
rolling groove, Wheeler then weaving around him
with perfect melodic trails. The two are so strong as
one, you want for no other musician to enter lest they
spoil the spell. Sketch No 2 is spectral, Taylor
brushing piano wires and tapping the piano body as
Wheeler pursues long, dry notes that arc and diminish.
The pair imbues Strayhorns A Flower Is A Lovesome
Thing with grace and delicacy, their notes floating as
if on the wind. A beautiful recording, start to finish.

OLDEST CONTINUOUSLY RUNNING JAZZ CLUB


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For more information, visit camjazz.com

EVERY THURSDAY JAZZ JAM NO COVER


1/8 Dan Wilkins Septet
1/9 Nancy Reed Trio
1/10 Bill Test
1/15 Vinny Biancis La Cuchina
1/16 Alon Nechushtan Trio
1/17 Mitchell Cheng
1/22 Davey Lantz Trio
1/23 The Jost Project featuring Tony Miceli
1/24 Marty Wilson Trio
1/25 Phil Woods COTA Orchestra
1/29 Spencer Reed Quintet
1/30 Kate Baker & Vic Juris
1/31 Erica Golaszewski Quartet

Invisible Resonance Trio


Garrison Fewell
(Creative Nation Music)
by Clifford Allen

Boston-based guitarist and educator Garrison Fewell,


who passed on Jul. 5th, 2015 at 61 after battling a long
illness, rooted much of his improvisational approach
in spirituality. Not only did he believe music to be a
spiritual quest, but he also believed that interacting
with others on an open, honest and learning-centric
footing was innately spiritual. Though I never took a
course from him at Berklee College of Music, where
hed taught since the 70s, a reading of the interviews
collected in his self-published tome Outside Music,
Inside Voices (Saturn University Press, 2014) is a
testament to the importance and spirituality of
continued dialogue. These conversations with a range
of musicians spotlight the process of creating and the
connections musicians might have with a broader
personal search. Its also a testament to Fewells
tenacity that, even when his physical body was
struggling, he maintained a steadfast commitment to
learning, teaching and improvising.

The Invisible Resonance Trio was a small collective
unit with trumpeter-flutist Roy Campbell, Jr. (19522014, also in Fewells Variable Density Sound
Orchestra) and drummer Luther Gray. Both Campbell
and Fewell approached free music with an ear toward
(and experience in) the jazz tradition; the trumpeter s
fat, gauzy linearity could remind one of Art Farmer
before fragmenting into bright, incisive and crinkled
micro-bursts, goaded into the burred stratosphere by
Fewells muted, delicately-funky scumble. The
guitarist could eke out a few country licks that would
have pleased Hank Garland (as he does on the opening
cut) and, minutes later, match the violin bow to his
instrument with a nod to West African string musics
and avant garde cello technique. Grays sinewy
rhythms, couched in toms, bells and cymbals on the
title piece, lend a strong North African cast to the
dusky landscape of flute and bowed grit; elsewhere,
his brush- and stick-work are loosely applied to create
a dry, allover insistence. It is this kind of rootedness
that makes it possible to look towards actualization of
an eternal nowmusically or otherwise. While twothirds of the trio are sadly departed, the quality of
spirit they brought to their work will live on in the
communities they touched.

Jazz Packages Available


includes music, lodging, dinner

For more details, visit www.deerheadinn.com



DEER HEAD INN 5 MAIN STREET DELAWARE WATER
GAP PA 18327 570-424-2000



Live at the Deer Head Inn Recordings:

Nancy Reed & John Coates, Jr.


Guitar Trio: Bucky Pizzarelli, Ed Laub,
Walt Bibinger
Quartet: Joe Locke, Bill Goodwin, Jim
Ridl, Tony Marino
Sweet Sue Terry & Friends
Phil Woods Quintet
Five Play

For more details, visit www.deerheadrecords.com

For more information, visit creativenationmusic.com

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

41

M ISCELLANY
ONTHISDAY
by Andrey Henkin

Mode for Joe


Joe Henderson (Blue Note)
January 27th, 1966

Showcase
Jimmy Deuchar (Vogue)
January 27th, 1953

Tenor

Scottish trumpeter Jimmy Deuchar


made his career in the modern jazz
scene of 50s London and then Europe
at large. His discography shows work
with Tubby Hayes, Kenny Clarke and
participation in the 1986 Charlie Watts
Orchestra. His albums as a leader were
early and few, a handful from this
debut to 1958s Pal Jimmy. British jazz
royalty joins him here: Don Rendell
(tenor) and Phil Seamen (drums),
along with Derek Humble (alto), Dill
Jones (piano) and Sammy Stokes (bass)
for two originals, one Rendell piece
and American standards.

saxophonist Joe Henderson


debuted on Kenny Dorhams 1963
Blue Note album Una Mas and pretty
much recorded for the label exclusively
as leader and sideman through 1966.
This was his fifth and final album
before a two-volume live set in 1985.
Three other prize fillies from Blue
Notes stable join himLee Morgan
(trumpet), Curtis Fuller (trombone)
and Bobby Hutcherson (vibes)and
the rhythm section of Cedar Walton,
Ron Carter and Joe Chambers for three
originals, two Walton pieces and
Morgans Free Wheelin.

Alors!!!
Michel Portal (Futura)
January 27th, 1970

Perpetual Stroll
Rufus Reid (Theresa)
January 27th, 1980

for Peace
Billy Higgins (Red)
January 27th, 1993

Trio was a brief but influential


group of British saxophonist John
Surman and American bassist Barre
Phillips and drummer Stu Martin.
Interestingly, their only official
documents came as collaborations
with Europeans: German Albert
Mangelsdorff for one and Frenchman
Michel Portal here for what was his
second album as a leader. Portals
countryman percussionist Jean-Pierre
Drouet is also on board but doesnt
contribute any compositions, Phillips
writing half of the eight tunes, Surman,
two, Portal and Martin the remainder.

Bassist Rufus Reid has recently come

Drummer for Donald Byrd, Grant


Green, Eddie Harris, Clifford Jordan,
Lee Morgan and, most notably, Ornette
Coleman, Billy Higgins never really
had the time to wax his own records,
releasing less than 10 in a discography
of over 700 albums. This session finds
him leading a quartet of Harold Land
(soprano and tenor saxophone),
William Henderson (piano) and Jeff
Littleton (bass), only contributing
Something for Juno to go along with
tunes by his bandmates, Charles
Tolliver and standards Whats New?
and Someday My Prince Will Come.

The

to the fore with his new millennium


Motma albums after years of being
known for his work as a sideman. But
he has a respectable discography
under his own name. This is Reids
debut, made for California-based
postbop label Theresa. Reids trio is
comprised of pianist Kirk Lightsey and
drummer Eddie Gladden, Dexter
Gordons
Backstairs-era
rhythm
section, and plays three Reid originals
along with Lightseys Habiba,
Herbie Hancocks One Finger Snap
and Oscar Pettifords Tricotism.

BIRTHDAYS
January 1
Al McKibbon 1919-2005
Milt Jackson 1923-99
Helmut Brandt 1931-2001
Sonny Greenwich b.1936
Susannah McCorkle 1946-2001
Chris Potter b.1970
James Shipp b.1980
January 2
Nick Fatool 1915-2000
Arthur Prysock 1929-97
Noah Jarrett b.1978
January 3
Preston Jackson 1902-83
Herbie Nichols 1919-63
Musa Kaleem b.1921
Geezil (Harolde) Minerve
1922-92
John Jenkins 1931-93
Motohiko Hino 1946-1999
James Carter b.1969
January 4
Frankie Newton 1906-54
Joe Marsala 1907-78
Slim Gaillard 1916-91
Frank Wess 1922-2013
Al Dreares b.1929
John McLaughlin b.1942
Eugene Chadbourne b.1954
Alex Cline b.1956
January 5
Wild Bill Davison 1906-89
Lennie Hastings 1927-78
Dizzy Reece b.1931
Chuck Flores b.1935
Myra Melford b.1957

January 6
Bobby Stark 1906-45
Keith Christie 1931-80
Danny Moore 1941-2005
Barry Altschul b.1943
Adam Larson b.1990

January 11
Wilbur De Paris 1900-73
Tab Smith 1909-71
Bob Enevoldsen 1920-2006
Osie Johnson 1923-66
Cal Massey 1927-72

January 7
Henry Red Allen 1908-67
Chano Pozo 1915-48
Keg Purnell 1915-65
Sam Woodyard 1925-88
Kenny Davern 1935-2006
Eldee Young 1936-2007

January 12
Trummy Young 1912-84
Jay McShann 1916-2006
Guy Lafitte 1927-98
Ronald Shannon Jackson
1940-2013
Ernst Bier b.1951
Jane Ira Bloom b.1955
Ivo Perelman b.1961
Ingrid Jensen b.1966
Gene Lake b.1966

January 8
Wendell Culley 1906-83
Bobby Tucker 1923-2007
Bill Goodwin b.1942
Thurman Barker b.1948
Marilyn Mazur b.1955
Dan Tepfer b.1982

January 13
Quentin Butter Jackson
1909-76
Otis Johnson 1910-94
Melba Liston 1926-99
Joe Pass 1929-95
Bill Easley b.1946
Eero Koivistoinen b.1946

January 9
Kenny Clarke 1914-85
Jimmy Maxwell 1917-2002
Betty Roche 1920-99
Roger Guerin 1926-2010
Bucky Pizzarelli b.1926
Carson Smith 1931-97
Malcolm Cecil b.1937
January 10
Haywood Henry 1913-94
Buddy Johnson 1915-77
Max Roach 1924-2007
Willie Dennis 1926-65
Allen Eager 1927-2003
William Parker b.1952
Mike Stern b.1954

January 16
Irving Mills 1884-1985
Aldo Romano b.1941
January 17
Big Sid Catlett 1910-51
George Handy 1920-97
Cedar Walton 1934-2013
Ted Dunbar 1937-98
Billy Harper b.1943
Pheeroan akLaff b.1955
January 18
Don Thompson b.1940
Al Foster b.1944
Steve Grossman b.1951
Clark Gayton b.1963
Dominic Lash b.1980
January 19
JR Monterose 1927-93
Horace Parlan b.1931
Hod OBrien b.1936
Phil Wilson b.1937
Sam T. Brown 1939-77
Joe Magnarelli b.1960

January 14
Jimmy Crawford 1910-80
Billy Butterfield 1917-88
Joe Muranyi 1928-2012
Kenny Wheeler 1930-2014
Grady Tate b.1932

January 20
Jimmy Cobb b.1929
Valery Ponomarev b.1943
Chuck Domanico 1944-2002
Andy Sheppard b.1957
Jeff Tain Watts b.1960
Tatsuya Nakatani b.1970

January 15
Gene Krupa 1909-73
Artie Shapiro 1916-2003
Bob Maize 1945-2004
Baikida Carroll b.1947

January 21
Steve Potts b.1945
Lou Grassi b.1947
Kevin Norton b.1956
Jason Moran b.1975

January 22
Juan Tizol 1900-84
Teddy McRae 1908-99
JJ Johnson 1924-2001
Teddy Smith 1932-79
Jean-Louis Viale 1933-84
Alan Silva b.1939
Eberhard Weber b.1940
Maarten Altena b.1943
Michal Urbaniak b.1943

January 26
Stephane Grappelli 1908-97
Alice Babs 1924-2014
Dick Nash b.1928
Benny Golson b.1929
Aki Takase b.1948
January 27
Oran Hot Lips Page 1908-54
Jimmie Smith b.1938
Bobby Hutcherson b.1941

January 23
Benny Waters 1902-98
Django Reinhardt 1910-53
Teddy Napoleon 1914-64
Scoops Carry 1915-70
Ray Abrams 1920-92
Marty Paich 1925-95
Curtis Counce 1926-63
Harold Ousley b.1929
Gary Burton b.1943
Andre Hayward b.1973

January 28
Ronnie Scott 1927-96
Buddy Terry b.1941
Bob Moses b.1948
Kent Kessler b.1957
Lorenzo Sanguedolce b.1975
January 29
Arnold Ross 1921-2000
Ed Shaughnessy 1929-2013
Frank Assunto 1932-74
Derek Bailey 1932-2005
Jeff Clyne 1937-2010
Jeanne Lee 1939-2000

January 24
Avery Parrish 1917-59
Jimmy Forrest 1920-80
Joe Albany 1924-88
Lenny McBrowne b.1933
Bobby Scott 1937-90
Julius Hemphill 1938-95
Marcus Printup b.1967
Duane Eubanks b.1969
January 25
Wellman Braud 1891-1966
Truck Parham 1913-2002
Floyd Smith 1917-82
Barbara Carroll b.1925
Antonio Carlos Jobim 1927-95
Alexis Cuadrado b.1971

January 30
Roy Eldridge 1911-89
Bernie Leighton 1921-94
Ahmed Abdul Malik 1927-93
Tubby Hayes 1935-73
Tony Levin 1940-2011
Ralph Lalama b.1951
January 31
Bobby Hackett 1915-76
Garnett Brown b.1936
Frank Ricotti b.1949
Per Zanussi b.1977

VALERY PONOMAREV

January 20th, 1943

The Russian trumpeter was


a news item in 2006 when,
traveling through Charles
de Gaulle airport in Paris, he
was
involved
in
an
altercation with officials
who wouldnt allow him to
carry on his instrument,
leading to a broken arm. But
Ponomarev
had
made
bigger and better news
some 30 years earlier when
he became the first and only
non-American member of
drummer Art Blakeys Jazz
Messengers, staying until
1980 and recording several
albums with the group.
Ponomarev ftes his former
boss with his current big
band and has also recorded
with Robert Watson, David
White, Stevens, Siegel &
Ferguson and Miroslav
Vitous to go along with
several albums as a leader
on Reservoir Records. (AH)

CROSSWORD
1

11

ACROSS

10

12

13

15

14

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

26

25

27

28

By Andrey Henkin

29

1. Simplest song form


4. A Bruit Secret catalogue prefixes
7. English bassist Skeat
8. Charlie Byrd and Mike Westbrook have
covered this composers
In The Bleak Midwinter
11. Uppermost register on woodwinds
13. Major label debut by Last Exit
15. Ken Vandermark has a dedication to this
photographer Robert on Acoustic Machine
17. Saxophonist Johnson who played
The Pink Panther theme
18. Kln-based jazz record label
19. First Lady of Song
20. 1977 Red Garland Galaxy album
23. Dave Brubeck compilation
__________ Legend
26. Marilyn Crispell song ______ Tongues
Lap Up The Burning Air
27. NYC ethnic concert presenting org.
28. Sofia-based sch. where Milcho Leviev
is a professor
29. Home of A Blog Supreme

visit nycjazzrecord.com for answers

42 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

DOWN
1. Benny Goodman album Clarinet ____ King
2. Kenny Wheeler song Ma ___
3. Region from where Mike Nock and
Alan Broadbent hail
4. Final track on Horace Silvers
The Tokyo Blues
5. Where Sarajevo Jazz Fest. is held
6. 1959 Bud Shank World Pacific album
_____ When Wet
9. Norwegian label _______ Superjazzz
10. Billy Cobhams favorite type of eclipse?
12. Mostly Other People Do the Killings Jon
14. Uptown ed. inst. offering jazz
classes for ages 2-18
15. 90s label for Keiko Matsui and Peter White
16. Sixth track on Ivo Perelmans
Black On White
21. Bucky Pizzarelli foil Ed
22. Repeated, tune on Trio
BraamDeJoodeVatchers Colors
24. Label of early Peter Brtzmann LPs
25. Henry Threadgill/Fred Hopkins/
Steve McCall

Hes available now! Call Steves cell at 630-865-6849.

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ft: Jim Cox, Chad Wackerman,


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ft: Evan Christopher, Matt Munisteri


and Kerry Lewis

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Jim Cullums Happy Jazz : Listen Some More


Jim Cullums Happy Jazz : Happy Landing!
Frankie Carle Quartet : Ivory Stride 1946-47
Don Friedman : Jazz Dancing
Danny Stiles Five w. Bill Watrous : In Tandem Into The 80s
Bill Watrous : Watrous In Hollywood
Brooks Kerr - Paul Quinichette Quartet - Prevue
Roland Hanna Trio : Time For The Dancers
Sadik Hakim : A Pearl For Errol / A Prayer For Liliane (2-LP Set)
Butch Miles : Swings Some Standards

CALENDAR
Friday, January 1

John Zorn Improv NightA Stone Benefit: John Zorn, Craig Taborn, Ikue Mori,
Billy Martin, Nate Wooley, Okkyung Lee, Steve Swell, Steven Bernstein;
John Zorns Bagatelles By Night: Jamie Saft Trio with Brad Jones, Kenny Wollesen
and guest Chris Speed
The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
The Bad Plus: Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson, David King

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Lou Donaldson Quartet with Eric Johnson, Pat Bianchi, Fukushi Tainaka

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Richard Bona Group; Casimir Liberski

Club Bonafide 8, 10:30 pm 12 am $40-60
Wayne Escoffery Quartet with David Kikoski, Ugonna Okegwo, Billy Drummond

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
ELEW with Reginald Veal, Jeff Tain Watts

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $45
Russell Halls Big Love
Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Birdland Big Band directed by Tommy Igoe

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Jon Davis; Spike Wilner Trio; Johnny ONeal

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Charles Ruggiero Quartet; John Marshall Quintet with Grant Stewart, Jeb Patton,
David Wong, Phil Stewart; Joe Farnsworth

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1:30 am $20
Mike King; Jared Gold/Dave Gibson; Will Terrill

Fat Cat 6, 10:30 pm 1:30 am
Nick Bello Trio with Alex Tremblay, Jake Robinson

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Masami Ishikawa Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Harrington Doty Shaich
Shrine 6 pm
Fukushi Tainaka Trio; Tom Tallitsch Trio; James Stewart Trio

The Garage 12, 6:15, 10:45 pm

Saturday, January 2
Ted Nash Quartet with Steve Cardenas, Ben Allison, Matt Wilson

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Leni Stern Quartet with Alioune Faye, Mamadou Ba, Kofo

Club Bonafide 10:30 pm $20
Jacob Sacks Quintet with Ellery Eskelin, Tony Malaby, Michael Formanek, Dan Weiss

Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Ed Cherry Trio
Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Spike Wilner; Spike Wilner Trio; Anthony Wonsey

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Oscar Williams; Raphael Dlugoff Quintet; Greg Glassman Jam

Fat Cat 7, 10 pm 1:30 am
Uri Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm

John Zorn Improv NightA Stone Benefit: John Zorn, Tim Keiper, Brian Marsella,
Ches Smith, Matt Mitchell, Charles Bernstein, George Lewis, Tyshawn Sorey,
Cyro Baptista; John Zorns Bagatelles By Night: Brian Marsella solo

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
The Bad Plus: Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson, David King

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Lou Donaldson Quartet with Eric Johnson, Pat Bianchi, Fukushi Tainaka

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Wayne Escoffery Quartet with David Kikoski, Ugonna Okegwo, Billy Drummond

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
ELEW with Reginald Veal, Jeff Tain Watts

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $45
Russell Halls Big Love
Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $20
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Barbara Carroll
Birdland 6 pm $30
Birdland Big Band directed by Tommy Igoe

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Chuck Redd Quartet; John Marshall Quintet with Grant Stewart, Jeb Patton,
David Wong, Phil Stewart; Philip Harper Quintet

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1:30 am $20
Marika Hughes
Barbs 6 pm $10
Kadawa
Silvana 6 pm
Kayo Hiraki Trio; Joel Perry Trio; Akiko Tsuruga Trio

The Garage 12, 6:15, 10:45 pm

Sunday, January 3
Interplay: Dylan McCarthy, Dan Davis, Nicholas Telesca, Jared Nelson, Elliot Steele;
Shapes and Sounds: Kyle Lashley, Dave Savitsky, Tariq Allen, Kevin Quinn,
Vinne Martucci, Jon Francke, John Luther; Look Up Quartet: Mark Dziuba,
Aquiles Navarro, John Menegon, Tscheser Holmes and guests Teri Roiger

ShapeShifter Lab 7 pm
Eco-Music Big Band
Joes Pub 7 pm $16
John Chin
Mezzrow 9:30 pm $20
Johnny ONeal Trio; Hillel Salem Smalls 7:30 pm 1 am $20
Terry Waldos Gotham City Band; Jade Synsteliens Fat Cat Big Band;
Brandon Lewis/Renee Cruz Jam Fat Cat 6, 8:30 pm 1 am
Ben Monder solo
Barbs 7 pm $10
David Acker Trio
Club Bonafide 7 pm $15
Oneway; Blu Cha Cha
Silvana 6, 8 pm
Shrine Big Band
Shrine 8 pm
John Zorn Improv NightA Stone Benefit: John Zorn, Ken Vandermark,
Sylvie Courvoisier, Clarence Penn, Mark Feldman, Dave Douglas, Kenny Wollesen;
John Zorns Bagatelles By Night: Erik Friedlander/Mike Nicolas

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
The Bad Plus: Ethan Iverson, Reid Anderson, David King

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Lou Donaldson Quartet with Eric Johnson, Pat Bianchi, Fukushi Tainaka

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35

2016

WINTER

Wayne Escoffery Quartet with David Kikoski, Ugonna Okegwo, Billy Drummond

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
ELEW with Reginald Veal, Jeff Tain Watts

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Ben Goldberg; Louise D.E. Jensen Downtown Music Gallery 6, 7 pm
David Bixler Auction Project
Saint Peters 5 pm
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Brian Drye solo
Gallery 440 4:40 pm $5
Institute for Collaborative Education Fundraiser: Roy Nathanson and
The Jazz Passengers with guests Marc Ribot, Pete Karp, ICE Songwriters

Littlefield 1 pm $25
John Zorns Bagatelles: Sylvie Courvoisier Trio with Drew Gress, Kenny Wollesen

The Stone 3 pm $20
Johnny ONeal
Blue Note 11:30 am 1:30 pm $35
Roz Corral Trio with Yotam Silberstein, Boris Kozlov

North Square Lounge 12:30, 2 pm
Marsha Heydt Project of Love; David Coss Quartet and Jam Session

The Garage 11:30 am 6:30 pm

Monday, January 4
David Henderson; Hamiet Bluiett Group with William Parker;
Ingrid Laubrock/Tom Rainey
Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Jason Robinson Janus Ensemble with George Schuller, Ches Smith, Drew Gress,
Marcus Rojas, Bill Lowe, Michael Dessen, Liberty Ellman, J.D. Parran, Oscar Noriega,
Marty Ehrlich
ShapeShifter Lab 8:15 pm $10
Jenny Lin/Uri Caine
Le Poisson Rouge 7:30 pm $15-25
Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Jazz Orchestra with guest Ted Nash

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Pedrito Martnez
Subrosa 8, 10 pm $20
John Merrill; David Hazeltine; Sacha Perry

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am $20
Asaf Yuria Quintet; Ari Hoenig Nonet; Jonathan Barber

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1 am $20
Johnny ONeal; Willie Applewhite Quintet; Billy Kaye Jam

Fat Cat 6, 9 pm 12:30 am
Pamelia Stickney/Dalit Warshaw The Stone 8 pm $15
Tomo Jacobson, Leonid Galaganov, Charlie Rauh; Triple: Anas Maviel, Gao Jiafeng,
Daniel Carter, Claire DeBrunner, Daro Behroozi, Franois Grillot, Sean Ali,
Jake Sokolov-Gonzales, La Lano

Delroys Cafe and Wine Bar 9, 10 pm $10
Paul Ju Bong Lee Trio with Dustin Kiselbach, Piotr Pawlak; Kendra Shank Trio with
Paul Meyers, Dean Johnson
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Kazuya Araki Trio
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Sagi Kaufman Trio
Silvana 6 pm
Iveta Gaile
Shrine 6 pm

COMING SOON ...

NYC

JAZZFEST LE POISSON ROUGE

FEBRUARY 13

GREGORY PORTER

J A N U A R Y 1 3
The Ex / Bill Laswell
Colin Stetson / Happy Apple
@ LPR
J A N U A R Y 1 4
Kamasi Washington & guests
@ Webster Hall
J A N U A R Y 1 5 - 1 6
NYC Winter Jazzfest Marathon
100+ Artists @ Multiple NYC Venues
J A N U A R Y 1 7
Channeling Coltrane:
Rova's Electric Ascension
with Nels Cline
@ LPR

WINTERJAZZFEST.COM #NYCWJF
44 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

@ THE TOWN HALL

FEBRUARY 20

MESHELL
NDEGEOCELLO

MARCH 16

TORTOISE
LPR.COM #LIVEATLPR

Tuesday, January 5
Sylvie Courvoisier, Chris Corsano, Ingrid Laubrock, Ken Vandermark;
Side A: Ken Vandermark/Chad Taylor and guest

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
George Cables Trio with Essiet Essiet, Victor Lewis

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
John Hberts Rambling Confessions with Jen Shyu, Andy Milne, Billy Drummond

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Jeff Lorber Fusion with Eric Marienthal, Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Jazz at Lincoln Center Youth Orchestra with guest Marquis Hill

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Tivon Pennicott Quartet with Phillip Dizack, Yasushi Nakamura, Joe Saylor

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $5
OGs Neo-Urban Folk Project: Larry Roland, Waldron Ricks, Michael Moss,
Michael Wimberly; James Brandon Lewis Trio with Luke Stewart,
Warren Trae Crudup III; Mazz Swift/Tomeka Reid

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Kenny Warren, Bobby Avey, Noah Garabedian, Satoshi Takeishi; Kris Davis,
Stephan Crump, Eric McPherson Korzo 9, 10:30 pm
Big Eyed Rabbit: Max Johnson, Ross Martin, Jeff Davis; Yoni Kretzmer, Jason Ajemian,
Kevin Shea; Alex Weiss Fighter Planes & Praying Mantis with Eyal Maoz, Rick Parker,
Yoni Halevi, Dmitry Ishenko
Muchmores 9, 10, 11 pm $10-15
Akiko Pavolka Trio with Matt Pavolka, Nate Wood

Barbs 7 pm $10
Gillian Margot
Mezzrow 7:30 pm
Carlos Cuevas; Alexi David
Fat Cat 7 pm 12:30 am
Prawit Siriwait Trio with Daniel Durst, Dayson Seck; Daniel Ori Trio with
Yotam Silberstein, Deutsch
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Setsuko Hata
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Logan Evan Thomas solo
Jazz at Kitano 8 pm
Jeremy Danneman Group with Tim Keiper, Anders Nilsson

Troost 9 pm
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Nick Holtzman Trio
Silvana 6 pm
Tom Blatt Project
Shrine 6 pm

Wednesday, January 6
Okkyung Lee, Chris Corsano, Ches Smith

JACK 8 pm
Mat Maneri, Joe McPhee, Ken Vandermark; Tom Rainey, Ned Rothenberg,
Ken Vandermark and guest
The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Matt Mitchell Quartet with Chris Speed, Chris Tordini, Dan Weiss

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Tomeka Reid Quartet with Jason Roebke, Tomas Fujiwara, Mary Halvorson

Roulette 8 pm $25

Vincent Herring Quartet with Mike LeDonne, David Williams, Joe Farnsworth

An Beal Bocht Caf 8, 9:30 pm $15
Lafayette Harris solo; Uri Caine; Sarah Slonim

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Ben Allison Quartet; Sanah Kadoura

Smalls 7:30 pm 1:30 am $20
Steve Lehmans Selebeyone with Maciek Laserre, High Priest, Gaston Bandimic,
Carlos Homs, Drew Gress, Damion Reid

SEEDS 9 pm
Steve Dalachinsky; Fay Victors In Praise of Ornette with Darius Jones, Kenny Wessel,
Sean Conly; Yoni Kretzmers 2Bass Quartet with Sean Conly, Reuben Radding,
Mike Pride
Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Caili ODoherty with Tamir Shmerling, Cory Cox, Ben Flocks, Alex Hargreaves

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Tivon Pennicott Quartet with Phillip Dizack, Yasushi Nakamura, Joe Saylor

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $5
Champian Fulton Quintet with Stephen Fulton, Jerry Weldon, Adi Meyerson, Ben Zweig

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Matt Brewer Quintet with Charles Altura, Aaron Parks, Ben Wendel, Justin Brown

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Russ Nolan Quartet with Mike Eckroth, Daniel Foose, Ronen Itzik

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Andy Biskins 16 Hammers with John Carlson, Ron Horton, Kenny Warren, Rob Garcia

Barbs 7 pm $10
Dre Hocevar Collective Effervescence with Bram De Looze, Chris Pitsiokos,
Lester St.louis, Philip White
Happylucky No.1 8 pm $10
Jonathan Lipscomb/Sam Weinberg; Chris Pitsiokos Quartet with Jaimie Branch,
Max Johnson, Kevin Shea
Rye 9, 10:15 pm
Raphael Dlugoff Trio +1; Groover Trio; Ned Goold Jam

Fat Cat 7, 9 pm 12:30 am
Nicolas Letman-Burtinovic, Patrick Brennan, Nathan Elman-Bell

Bar Chord 9 pm
Michael Gallant Trio
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
George Cables Trio with Essiet Essiet, Victor Lewis

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jeff Lorber Fusion with Eric Marienthal, Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Jaemin Lee
Silvana 6 pm
Oskar Stenmark
Shrine 6 pm
Rossano Sportiello/Nicki Parrott Saint Peters 1 pm $10

Thursday, January 7
Tribute to McCoy Tyner: Azar Lawrence Quartet with Benito Gonazalez, Gerald Cannon,
Billy Hart
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $30-40
Ikue Mori, Joe Morris, Ken Vandermark, Nate Wooley; Eric Revis 11:11 Quartet with
Ken Vandermark, Jason Moran, Nasheet Waits

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Nicholas Payton Trio with Vicente Archer, Herlin Riley

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Tivon Pennicott Quartet with Phillip Dizack, Yasushi Nakamura, Joe Saylor

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
Erik Friedlanders Black Phebe with Shoko Nagai, Satoshi Takeishi

Barbs 7 pm $10
The Classic Quintets: Ali Jackson with Marcus Printup, Craig Handy, Emmet Cohen,
Yasushi Nakamura
Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Brandon Wright Quartet with David Kikoski, Boris Kozlov

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Hadar Noiberg Trio with Haggai Cohen Milo, Allison Miller; Screaming Headless Torsos:
David Fiuczynski, Freedom Bremner, David Ginyard, Daniel Sadownick

Rockwood Music Hall Stage 2 7:30, 9:30 pm
Reimaging Brahms: Lev Ljova/Dan Tepfer

National Sawdust 9:30 pm $25
Trio Dance: Yoshiko Chuma, Yukio Suzuki, Megumi Eda;
Chad Taylor/James Brandon Lewis; Steve Swell Trio with Max Johnson,
Jeremy Carlstedt
Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Peter Brendler Quartet with Rich Perry, Peter Evans, Vinnie Sperrazza

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Dayramir and Habana enTRANC with Daymar Calvario, Willy Rodriguez and guests
Jadele McPherson, Dean Tsur The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
John Marshall Quartet with Jeb Patton, David Wong, Phil Stewart

The Django at Roxy Hotel 10:30 pm
Charlie Rauh, Leonid Galavanov, Tomo Jacobson

The Firehouse Space 8 pm $10
Jordan Pettay Quintet; Saul Rubin Zebtet; Tadataka Unno

Fat Cat 7, 10 pm 1:30 am
Flavio Silva Trio with Charlie Wang, Dennis Bulhoes; Marvin Dolly Trio with
Lonnie Plaxico, McClenty Hunter Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Ken Slavin with John Colianni, Paul Bollenback, Frank Tate

Metropolitan Room 9:30 pm $25
Vicki Burns Trio
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Marco di Gennaro Duo
Cleopatras Needle 7 pm
Okkyung Lee, Mat Maneri, Stephan Crump

JACK 8 pm
Spike Wilner solo; Uri Caine; Theo Hill

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Steve Lehmans Selebeyone with Maciek Laserre, High Priest, Gaston Bandimic,
Carlos Homs, Drew Gress, Damion Reid

SEEDS 9 pm
Champian Fulton Quintet with Stephen Fulton, Jerry Weldon, Adi Meyerson, Ben Zweig

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
George Cables Trio with Essiet Essiet, Victor Lewis

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jeff Lorber Fusion with Eric Marienthal, Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Weathervest
Silvana 6 pm
Donee Middleton
Shrine 6 pm

Ken Vandermark/Nate Wooley; DEK: Lizabeth Arnik, Kiki Dern, Ken Vandermark

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Jon Davis; Joanne Brackeen; Johnny ONeal

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
The Brazilian Trio: Helio Alves, Nilson Matta, Duduka Da Fonseca and guest
Maucha Adnet
Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Ed Palermo Big Band with guest Napoleon Murphy Brock

Iridium 8, 10 pm $30
Madeleine Peyroux
City Winery 8 pm $45-60
Steve Wilsons Next Generations of Jazz with Riley Mulherkar, Chris Pattishall,
Linda Oh, Ulysses Owens, Jr.
The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $22
Lance Gries/Jason Kao Hwang; Tony Malaby, Mat Maneri, Daniel Levin;
Jason Kao Hwang Trio with Tomeka Reid, Anders Nilsson

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Matt Pavolkas The Horns Band with Kirk Knuffke, Loren Stillman, Jacob Garchik,
Mark Ferber
Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Chet Doxas
Ibeam Brooklyn 8:30 pm $15
Joe Giglio Trio with Michael Gold, Eric Peters

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
David Cook Quintet; Brooklyn Jazz Underground Ensemble

Prospect Range 7:30, 9 pm $20
Dida Pelled Quartet; Troy Roberts Nu-Jive 5; Jared Gold

Fat Cat 6, 10:30 pm 1:30 am
DODO Orchestra
Metropolitan Room 9 pm $20
Michi Fuji Trio
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Julia Martina Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Tribute to McCoy Tyner: Azar Lawrence Quartet with Benito Gonazalez, Gerald Cannon,
Billy Hart
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $30-40
Nicholas Payton Trio with Vicente Archer, Herlin Riley

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Tivon Pennicott Quartet with Phillip Dizack, Yasushi Nakamura, Joe Saylor

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
The Classic Quintets: Ali Jackson with Marcus Printup, Craig Handy, Emmet Cohen,
Yasushi Nakamura
Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
John Marshall Quartet with Jeb Patton, David Wong, Phil Stewart

The Django at Roxy Hotel 10:30 pm
Okkyung Lee/Michelle Boul
JACK 8 pm
Steve Lehmans Selebeyone with Maciek Laserre, High Priest, Gaston Bandimic,
Carlos Homs, Drew Gress, Damion Reid

SEEDS 9 pm
George Cables Trio with Essiet Essiet, Victor Lewis

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jeff Lorber Fusion with Eric Marienthal, Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Craig Yaremko Organ Trio
Silvana 6 pm
MinJin Seo Quintet
Shrine 6 pm

Friday, January 8
Al Foster Birthday Bash with Eli Degibri, Adam Birnbaum, Doug Weiss

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $38

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

45

Saturday, January 9
Christof Kurzmann, Okkyung Lee, Marina Rosenfeld, Ken Vandermark;
Paal Nilssen-Love, William Parker, Steve Swell, Ken Vandermark

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Clifton Anderson
BAMCaf 9 pm
Reggie Woods
Sistas Place 9, 10:30 pm $20
Chisa Hidaka/Paul Singh; Tidepool Fauna: Kyoko Kitamura, Ingrid Laubrock,
Ken Filiano; Andrew Lamb Movin with Larry Roland, Juan Pablo Carletti

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Tony Malabys Apparitions with Ben Gerstein, Michael Formanek, Billy Mintz,
Randy Peterson
Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Music Now! Unit: Ras Moshe Burnett/Andrew Drury; Music Now! Expanded Unit:
Ras Moshe Burnett, Anas Maviel, Lee Odom, Matt Lavelle, John Pietaro, Adam Matlock,
Stephanie Griffin, Andrew Drury The Firehouse Space 8, 9 pm $10
Ralph Lalama; Eric Wyatt Quartet Smalls 7:30 pm 1:30 am $20
Tal Ronen; Chris Beck; Greg Glassman Jam

Fat Cat 7, 10 pm 1:30 am
John Raymond Trio
Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Jason Mears
Ibeam Brooklyn 8:30 pm $15
Aaron Irwin Quartet with Matthew McDonald, Pete McCann, Thomson Kneeland

St. Johns Lutheran Church 7 pm
Linda Presgrave; Craig Brann Trio Tomi Jazz 8, 11 pm $10
Jim Hickey and Friends
Symphony Space Bar Thalia 9 pm
Denton Darien Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Al Foster Birthday Bash with Eli Degibri, Adam Birnbaum, Doug Weiss

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $38
Spike Wilner; Joanne Brackeen; Anthony Wonsey

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
The Brazilian Trio: Helio Alves, Nilson Matta, Duduka Da Fonseca and guest
Maucha Adnet
Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Ed Palermo Big Band with guest Napoleon Murphy Brock

Iridium 8, 10 pm $30
Madeleine Peyroux
City Winery 8 pm $45-60
Steve Wilsons Next Generations of Jazz with Riley Mulherkar, Chris Pattishall,
Linda Oh, Ulysses Owens, Jr.
The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $22
Tribute to McCoy Tyner: Azar Lawrence Quartet with Benito Gonazalez, Gerald Cannon,
Brandon Lewis
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $30-40
Nicholas Payton Trio with Vicente Archer, Herlin Riley

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $45
Tivon Pennicott Quartet with Phillip Dizack, Yasushi Nakamura, Joe Saylor

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $20
The Classic Quintets: Ali Jackson with Marcus Printup, Craig Handy, Emmet Cohen,
Yasushi Nakamura
Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Barbara Carroll
Birdland 6 pm $30
John Marshall Quartet with Jeb Patton, David Wong, Phil Stewart

The Django at Roxy Hotel 10:30 pm
Steve Lehmans Selebeyone with Maciek Laserre, High Priest, Gaston Bandimic,
Carlos Homs, Drew Gress, Damion Reid

SEEDS 9 pm
George Cables Trio with Essiet Essiet, Victor Lewis

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jeff Lorber Fusion with Eric Marienthal, Jimmy Haslip, Gary Novak

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Marika Hughes
Barbs 6 pm $10
Matt Panayides Group
Silvana 6 pm
Asako Takasaki
Shrine 6 pm

Sunday, January 10
Paal Nilssen-Love/Ken Vandermark Duo; Made To Break: Tim Daisy,
Christof Kurzmann, Jasper Stadhouders, Ken Vandermark

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
No Fast Food: Phil Haynes, Drew Gress, Dave Liebman

Scholes Street Studio 7:30 pm $20
Mister Mozart: Drew Williams, Nick Grinder, Jonathan Goldberger, Nathan Ellman-Bell,
Devin Gray; Marty Ehrlich Trio Exaltation with John Hbert, Nasheet Waits;
Anna Webber Quartet with Jonathan Goldberger, Michael Bates, Jeff Davis

Threes Brewing 7:30 pm $15
New York Jazzharmonic with Miho Hazama and guest Jim McNeely

Symphony Space Leonard Nimoy Thalia 7 pm $25
Hajime Yoshida Tri with Asher Barreras, Colin Hinton; Satoshi Kataoka Quartet with
Glenn Zaleski, Allan Mednard
ShapeShifter Lab 7, 8:15 pm $10
Joe Magnarelli
Mezzrow 9:30 pm $20
Johnny ONeal Trio; Behn Gillece Quartet

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm $20
Terry Waldos Gotham City Band; Steve Kortyka Sextet;
Brandon Lewis/Renee Cruz Jam Fat Cat 6, 8:30 pm 1 am
Oded Tzur Quartet with Shai Maestro, Colin Stranahan; Edan Ladin Group with
Dayna Stephans, Desmond White, Daniel Dor

Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Akihiro Yamamoto Trio
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Al Foster Birthday Bash with Eli Degibri, Adam Birnbaum, Doug Weiss

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $38
Nicholas Payton Trio with Vicente Archer, Herlin Riley

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
The Classic Quintets: Ali Jackson with Marcus Printup, Craig Handy, Emmet Cohen,
Yasushi Nakamura
Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
George Cables Trio with Essiet Essiet, Victor Lewis

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Chris Botti with Richie Goods, Lee Pearson, Ben Butler, Geoffrey Keezer, Andy Ezrin,
Sy Smith, Lucia Micarelli
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $95
Eric Quinntet
Silvana 6 pm
New York Flute Club Tribute to Harold Jones with guest Hubert Laws

Baruch Performing Arts Center 5:30 pm $25
Vitor Gonalves, Dan Weiss, Chris Tordini, Todd Neufeld

Saint Peters 5 pm
Antlers & Capillaries: Daniel Levine, Kenny Warren, Sean Ali, Flin Van Hemmen;
The Sandbox: Eliot Cardinaux, Dennis Zurilovitch, Daniel Levine, Joanna Mattrey,
Isaac Luxon, Devin Gray
Downtown Music Gallery 6, 7 pm
John Zorns Bagatelles: Jim Black Trio with Elias Stemeseder, Thomas Morgan

The Stone 3 pm $20
Requinte Trio: Nanny Assis, John di Martino, Janis Siegel

Blue Note 11:30 am 1:30 pm $35
Jay Clayton Trio with Jack Wilkins, Dean Johnson

North Square Lounge 12:30, 2 pm

Monday, January 11
Gato Barbieri

Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45

Cecil Taylor Tribute: Karen Borca Band with Hill Greene, Warren Smith, Jackson Krall;
Jemeel Moondoc Group with Larry Roland, Reggie Nicholson;
Sound River Trio: Mark Hennen, Richard Keene, Jackson Krall

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Yotam Silberstein/Gilad Hekselman; Gadi Lehavi Band with Tal Mashiach,
Shachar Elnatan
Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
John Merrill; Eli Degibri; Sacha Perry

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am $20
Randy Ingram Quartet; Ari Hoenig Trio; Jonathan Michel

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1 am $20
Ned Goold Quartet; Billy Kaye JamFat Cat 9 pm 12:30 am
Sagi Kaufman Trio with Gal Shaya, Roy Ben Josef; Valentina Marino Trio with
Jazz Azzolina, Cameron Brown Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
The Slow Uncoil: Sean Ali, Leila Bordreuil, Joanna Mattrey

Delroys Cafe and Wine Bar 9 pm $10
Paul Bedal Quartet
Silvana 6 pm
Paulo Siqueira Band
Shrine 6 pm

Tuesday, January 12
Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley, Brian Blade

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Maceo Parker
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Enrico Pieranunzi Quintet with Seamus Blake, Diego Urcola, Ben Street, Adam Cruz

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Stacy Sullivan Tribute to Peggy Lee and Marian McPartland

Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Evan Christophers Clarinet Road Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Michael Mwenso and the Shakes Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $5
Mike Longos NY State of the Art Jazz Ensemble with Ira Hawkins

NYC Bahai Center 8, 9:30 pm $15
Matana Roberts, Peter Evans, Ches Smith; Matana Roberts, Kevin Tkacz, Ohal Grietzer

The Stone 8, 10 pm $15
Miles Okazakis Trickster with Craig Taborn, Anthony Tidd, Sean Rickman

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
Patrick Brennans Transparency Kestra with Angelo Branford, Gene Coleman,
Ken Filiano, Haruna Fukuzawa, Brian Groder, Jerome Harris, Thomas Heberer,
Patrick Holmes, Richard Keene, Adam Lane, Nicolas Letman-Burtinovic, Michael Lytle,
David Sidman, Harvey Valdes, Rod Williams; Connie Crothers/Patrick Holmes;
Ellery Eskelin solo
Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Jeff Davis Quartet with Russ Lossing, Eivind, Opsvik;
Jason Robinson Janus Quintet with Marty Erlich, Liberty Ellman, Drew Gress,
George Schuller
Korzo 9, 10:30 pm
Ken Thompson, Anna Webber, Russ Johnson, Alan Ferber, Adam Armstrong,
Daniel Dor
ShapeShifter Lab 8 pm
Dida with Tal Ronen, Rodney Green

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Joris Teepe/Greg Murphy
Mezzrow 7:30 pm
Saul Rubin Zebtet; Peter Brainin Latin Jazz Workshop

Fat Cat 7, 9 pm
Isaac Darche Trio with Adrian Moring, Cory Cox; Chase Baird Trio with Johannes Felcher,
Kimberly Thompson
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Marie-Claire with Alberto Pibiri, Luc Decker, Sam Raderman

The Piano Room 7:30 pm $10
Logan Evan Thomas solo
Jazz at Kitano 8 pm
Filipe Duarte Duo
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Steve Picataggio
Silvana 6 pm
Teodor Vanovski
Shrine 6 pm

Wednesday, January 13
Winter Jazzfest: The Ex: Terrie Hessels, Arnold De Boer, Andy Moore,
Katherina Bornefeld; Bill Laswell/Colin Stetson; Happy Apple: Dave King, Erik Fratzke,
Mike Lewis
Le Poisson Rouge 8 pm $25
Carlos Henriquez The Bronx Pyramid

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Michael Mwenso and the Shakes Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $5
The Other Quartet: Russ Johnson, Ohad Talmor, Pete McCann, Mark Ferber

SEEDS 9 pm
Tia Fuller Quartet with Shamie Royston, Mimi Jones, Rudy Royston

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Lori Bell Quartet with Jason Yeager, Danny Weller, Danny Levine

Smoke 11:30 pm
Kurt Ellings PassionWorld
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Matana Roberts, Vijay Iyer, Miya Masaoka; Matana Roberts, Helga Fassonaki,
Ava Mendoza, Tomas Fujiwara The Stone 8, 10 pm $15
Sinne Eeg Quartet with Jacob Christoffersen, Hans Glawischnig, Mark Ferber

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Amirtha Kidambi Group with Jaimie Branch, Brandon Lopez, Jonathan Lipscomb;
Chris Welcome Quartet with Jonathan Moritz, Shayna Dulberger, Mike Pride

Rye 9, 10:15 pm
Lafayette Harris solo; Will Vinson; Sarah Slonim

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Sharel Cassity Quintet; David Gibsons BOOM

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm $20
Raphael Dlugoff Trio +1; Harold Mabern Trio; Ned Goold Jam

Fat Cat 7, 9 pm 12:30 am
Molly Ryan
Metropolitan Room 9:30 pm $24
Chris Pitsiokos Quartet with Andrew Smiley, Henry Fraser, Jason Nazary;
Jorge Sylvester Quartet IMAGINATION with Nora McCarthy, Donald Nicks,
Kenny Grohowski; Daniel Levin, Jon Irabagon, Juan Pablo Carletti

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Jorge Roeder/Sofia Rei; Jorge Roeder/Julian Lage

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Hiroki Honshuku Trio
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley, Brian Blade

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Maceo Parker
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Enrico Pieranunzi Quintet with Seamus Blake, Diego Urcola, Ben Street, Adam Cruz

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Miles Okazakis Trickster with Craig Taborn, Anthony Tidd, Sean Rickman

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
Lehcats Quintet
Shrine 6 pm
Art Lillards Heavenly Big Band Saint Peters 1 pm $10

Thursday, January 14
Winter JazzfestJazz Legends for Disability Pride Fundraiser: Mike LeDonne,
Wynton Marsalis, Benny Golson, Christian McBride, Jimmy Cobb, Monty Alexander,
Harold Mabern, George Coleman, Buster Williams, Louis Hayes, Bill Charlap

Quaker Friends Meeting Hall 6:30 pm

46 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Winter Jazzfest: Kamasi Washington with Miles Mosley, Ronald Bruner, Jr., Tony Austin,
Patrice Quinn, Cameron Graves, Ryan Porter, Igmar Thomas

Webster Hall 7 pm $50
Endangered Blood: Chris Speed, Oscar Noriega, Trevor Dunn, Jim Black

Barbs 8 pm $10
Sylvie Courvoisier Trio with Drew Gress, Kenny Wollesen;
Sylvie Courvoisier/Mark Feldman ShapeShifter Lab 8:15, 9:30 pm $15
Hafez Modirzadehs Pulsivity Works 2 with Leo Genovese, Cornelius Dufallo,
Jeffrey Zeigler
National Sawdust 9:30 pm $25
Kirk Knuffke Quartet with C. Knoche, Mark Helias, Kenny Wollesen;
Joe McPhee/Michael Bisio; K.J. Holmes/Jeremy Carlstedt

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Ibrahim Maaloufs Kalthoum with Mark Turner, Linda Oh, Clarence Penn

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Michael Mwenso and the Shakes Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
Matana Roberts, Nate Wooley, Evan Rapport, Caroline Shaw; Matana Roberts,
Shoko Nagai, Stuart Bogie, Forbes Graham, Hannah Marcus

The Stone 8, 10 pm $15
Jamison Ross
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Jon Burr Quintet with Tim Ouimette, Steven Frieder, Mike Eckroth, Jerome Jennings

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Kenneth Salters with Marcus Strickland, Myron Waldon, Aki Ishiguro, Brad Whiteley,
Spencer Murphy
The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
Spike Wilner solo; Gilad Hekselman/Aaron Parks; Theo Hill

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Ladies Day Jazz Quartet: M.J. Territo, Linda Presgrave, Iris Ornig, Barbara Merjan

Metropolitan Room 7 pm $20
New West Guitar Group with guest Sara Gazarek

Rockwood Music Hall Stage 3 10 pm $15
Ken Fowser Quintet; Greg Glassman Quintet

Fat Cat 7, 10 pm
Dave Juarez Trio with Marty Isenberg, Zack OFarrill; Daniel Eli Weiss Trio with
Luke Sellick, Charles Gould
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Kathryn Allyn Duo
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Michael Ritali Trio
Cleopatras Needle 7 pm
Zocalo Brass; Tamuz Nissim
Silvana 6, 8 pm
Judi Marie
Indian Road Caf 7:30 pm
The Other Quartet: Russ Johnson, Ohad Talmor, Pete McCann, Mark Ferber

SEEDS 9 pm
Tia Fuller Quartet with Shamie Royston, Mimi Jones, Rudy Royston

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Jorge Roeder/Shai Maestro; Jorge Roeder/Ziv Ravitz

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Oran Etkins Reimagining Benny Goodman with Sullivan Fortner, Bryan Carrott,
Matt Wilson, Charene Wade
Birdland 6 pm $30
Kurt Ellings PassionWorld
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Sharel Cassity Quintet; Roxy Coss Quintet

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm $20
Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley, Brian Blade

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Maceo Parker
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Enrico Pieranunzi Quintet with Seamus Blake, Diego Urcola, Ben Street, Adam Cruz

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Eric Pierce Quintet
Shrine 6 pm

Academy Records
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Friday, January 15
Winter JazzfestECM @ Winter Jazzfest: David Torn solo; Mark Turner Quartet with

Avishai Cohen, Joe Martin, Marcus Gilmore; Craig Taborn solo; Avishai Cohen Quartet
with Jason Lindner, Tal Mashiach, Nasheet Waits; Ches Smith, Craig Taborn,
Mat Maneri; Vijay Iyer Trio with Stephan Crump, Marcus Gilmore; David Virelles Mboko
with Romn Daz, Matt Brewer, Eric McPherson

New School Tishman Auditorium 6 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Roberta Gambarini; Roy Hargrove; James Blood Ulmer;
Christian McBride Quartet with Marcus Strickland, Josh Evans, Nasheet Waits;
Forro in The Dark: Mauro Refosco, Guilherme Monteiro, Aaron Heick, Aaron Johnston,
Jeff Hill, Felipe Hostins; Nublu Orchestra: Brandon Ross, Doug Wieselman,
Kenny Wollesen, Graham Haynes, Mike Kiaer, Jonathan Huffier, Ilhan Ersahin,
Mauro Refosco
New School Auditorium 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: James Carney Sextet with Stephanie Richards, Chris Speed,
Oscar Noriega, Dezron Douglas, Nasheet Waits; James Francies Kinetic with
Alan Hampton, Jeremy Dutton, Matt Stevens, Joel Ross; Naytronix: Nate Brenner,
Stephen Patota, Ben Sloan; Dave King Trucking Company with Chris Speed,
Brandon Wozniak, Erik Fratzke, Chris Morrissey; Oscar Noriega Quartet with
Brandon Seabrook, Trevor Dunn, Dan Weiss

New School Glass Box Theater 6:40 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Chris Morrisseys Standard Candle with Mike Lewis, Grey McMurray,
Josh Dion; Chris Speed Trio with Chris Tordini, Dave King;
Charene Wades The Music of Gil Scott-Heron and Brian Jackson with
Brandon McCune, Lonnie Plaxico, Darrell Green, Nikara Warren, Dave Stryker,
Lakecia Benjamin; Marc Carys Indigenous People with Tarus Mateen, Russel Carter,
J.S. Williams, Jacques Schwarz-Bart, Terri Davis; Sharel Cassity and Elektra with
Ingrid Jensen, Shamie Royston, Linda Oh, Allison Miller

New School 5th Floor Theater 7 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Joey Arias Basic Black with Brandon Seabrook, Allison Miller;
Sexmob@20: Steven Bernstein, Briggan Krauss, Tony Scherr, Kenny Wollesen;
Red Baraat: Sunny Jain, Rohin Khemani, Chris Eddleton, Jonathan Goldberger,
Jonathon Haffner, Sonny Singh, Ernest Stuart, John Altieri

Le Poisson Rouge 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Quarktet Burnt: Greg Tate, Mikel Banks, Shelley Nicole, Julie Brown,
Lewis Flip Barnes, Avram Fefer, V. Jeffery Smith, Moist Paula Henderson,
Leon Gruenbaum, Ben Tyree, Jared Michael Nickerson, LaFrae Sci;
Dayna Stephens 3wi with Gilad Hekselman, Sam Yahel, Adam Arruda;
Dr. Lonnie Smiths Evolution with Keyon Harrold, Dayna Stephens, Jonathan Kreisberg,
Johnathan Blake, Allison Miller; Sarah Neufeld/Colin Stetson

Judson Church 6:40 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Matana Roberts solo; Tierney Sutton Band with Christian Jacob,
Kevin Axt, Ray Brinker; Yellowjackets: Bob Mintzer, Russell Ferrante, Dane Alderson,
Will Kennedy; Mark Guiliana Quartet with Jason Rigby, Shai Maestro, Chris Morrissey;
Keyon Harrold with Shedrick Mitchell, Burniss Earl Travis, Chris Dave,
Casey Benjamin; Jeff Lederers Brooklyn Blowhard with Petr Cancura, Kirk Knuffke,
Brian Drye, Art Bailey, Allison Miller, Stephen LaRosa, Gary Lucas, MaryLaRose

Subculture 6 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Alicia Hall Moran with Brandon Ross; Dither: James Moore,
Taylor Levine, Josh Lopes, Gyan Riley; Chargaux: Jasmin Charly Charles/
Margaux Whitney; The Ex: Terrie Hessels, Arnold De Boer, Andy Moore,
Katherina Bornefeld
The Greene Space 7 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Makaya McCraven with Matt Gold, Marquis Hill, Justefan,
Joshua Ramos; Terrace Martin with Andrew Renfroe, Robert Joseph Searight,
Jonathan Barber, Latonya Geneva Givens, Taber Gable; KING: Paris Strother,
Amber Strother, Anita Bias; Terry Slingbaums Ravel Reimagined with Adam Jackson,
Bendji Allonce, BIGYUKI, Marcus Strickland, Keyon Harrold; Sarah Vaughan and
Clifford Brown Reimagined: Ray Angry, Kennedy, Christie Dashiell, Keyon Harrold,
Josh Evans, Burniss Earl Travis, Nasheet Waits; Mark de Clive Lowes CHURCH with
John Robinson, Igmar Thomas, Jaleel Shaw, Burniss Earl Travis, Nate Smith

The Bitter End 7 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Cyro Baptista Banquet of Spirits with Tim Keiper, Brian Marsalla,
Shanir Ezra Blumenkranz; James Brandon Lewis Trio with Luke Stewart,
Warren Trae Crudup; Yosvany Terry Quintet with Michael Rodriguez, Manuel Valera,
Hans Glawischnig, Obed Calvaire; Ren Marie with Jon Cowherd, Jerome Jennings,
Elias Bailey; Gregorio Uribe Big Band; Pedrito Martnez with Jhair Sala,
Alvaro Benavides, Edgar Pantoja-Aleman

Zinc Bar 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Tom McDermott; The Bumper Jacksons: Jess Eliot Mhyre,
Chris Ousley, Alex Laquement, Dan Samuels, David Hadley;
Evan Christophers Clarinet Road with Hilary Gardner, Ehud Asherie, Jackie Williams;
Jon-Erik Kellso and The EarRegulars with Matt Munisteri, Evan Christopher,
Pat OLeary; Mike Davis New Wonders with Jay Rattman, Ricky Alexander,
Emelie Asher, Glenn Critter, Jay Lesley

Greenwich House Music School 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Camila Meza with James Francies, Linda Oh, Kendrick Scott;
Nicole Henry with Dave Cook, Ron Blake, Mark Whitfield, David Chiverton;
Gilad Hekselman with Mark Turner, Joe Martin, Marcus Gilmore; Marika Hughes with
Kyle Sanna, Fred Cash, Tony Mason, Ryan Porter; Eli Degibri with Gadi Lehavi,
Doug Weiss, Obed Calvaire
The Django at Roxy Hotel 6:20 pm $75
Gary Bartz Quartet
Cassandras Jazz Club 8, 10 pm $25
Billy Harper Quintet with Eddie Henderson, Francesca Tanksley, Corcoran Holt,
Aaron Scott
Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $38
Onaje Allan Gumbs Trio Plus with Gregory M. Jones, E.J. Strickland

BAMCaf 9 pm
Jazz In The Key Of Life: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

Rose Hall 8 pm $30-130
Intimate Moments: Fred Hersch and Friends with Anat Cohen, Julian Lage,
Stefon Harris, Sullivan Fortner The Appel Room 7, 9:30 pm $55-85
Jon Davis; Bill Charlap; Johnny ONeal

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Billy Drummonds Freedom of Ideas

Smalls 10:30 pm $20
Lizz Wright; Dee Dee Bridgewater; Indra

B.B. Kings Blues Club 7 pm $45
Matana Roberts, Nicole Mitchell, Matt Lavelle, Myra Melford; Matana Roberts, Fay Victor,
Shayna Dulberger, Qasim Naqvi The Stone 8, 10 pm $15

Jacques Schwart-Bart

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $22

Raymond Nat Turner; John Hberts Cellular Levels with Satoshi Takeishi,

Angelie Hbert; Farmers by Nature: Gerald Cleaver, Hamiet Bluiett, William Parker

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Joey Alexander Trio with Russell Hall, Sammy Miller

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Michael Mwenso and the Shakes Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
Kyoko Oyobe Quartet with Greg Osby, Michael OBrien, John Riley

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Sean McFarland
The Firehouse Space 8 pm $10
Sebastien Ammann Quartet with Ohad Talmor, Dave Ambrosio, Eric McPherson

Turtle Bay Music School 7 pm
John Chin Quintet
Flushing Town Hall 7:30 pm
Oscar Peas Crossroads with Pete Rende, Kim Cass, Rogrio Boccato;
Uri Gurvich Quartet with Leo Genovese, Peter Slavov, Francisco Mela;
Petr Cancuras Down Home with Kirk Knuffke, Brian Drye, Garth Stevenson,
Richie Barshay
Metropolitan Room 9:30 pm $20
Brooklyn Vibes Hang: Anthony Smith Quintet with Syberen Van Munster,
Kenny Pexton, Michael Blanco, Mark Ferber and guests Tyler Blanton, Tom Beckham

ShapeShifter Lab 8:15, 9:30 pm $12
Svetlana and The Delancey Five with Michela Marino Lerman

Lucilles at B.B. Kings Blues Club 8 pm $30
Rotem Sivan Trio with Haggai Cohen-Milo, Colin Stranahan

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
James Haddad Quintet with Rodney James, Sam Towse, Jonah Pomerantz,
Julius Rodriguez
Spectrum 8:30 pm
Takenori Nishiuchi
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Kuni Mikami Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
The Other Quartet: Russ Johnson, Ohad Talmor, Pete McCann, Mark Ferber

SEEDS 9 pm
Kurt Ellings PassionWorld
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Jorge Roeder/Miguel Zenn
Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley, Brian Blade

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Maceo Parker
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Enrico Pieranunzi Quintet with Seamus Blake, Diego Urcola, Ben Street, Adam Cruz

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Yuto Kanazawa
Silvana 6 pm
Oneway
Shrine 6 pm

Saturday, January 16
Winter JazzfestECM @ Winter Jazzfest: Michael Formanek Ensemble Kolossus with

Loren Stillman, Oscar Noriega, Chris Speed, Brian Settles, Tim Berne, Dave Ballou,
Ralph Alessi, Shane Endsley, Kirk Knuffke, Alan Ferber, Jacob Garchik, Ben Gerstein,
Jeff Nelson, Patricia Brennan, Mary Halvorson, Kris Davis, Tomas Fujiwara,
Mark Helias; Theo Bleckmann Elegy with Shai Maestro, Ben Monder, Chris Tordini,
John Hollenbeck; Chris Potter Quartet with David Virelles, Joe Martin, Marcus Gilmore;
Tim Bernes Sideshow with Ralph Alessi, Matt Mitchell, John Hbert, Dan Weiss;
Ralph Alessi Quartet with David Virelles, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits;
Ethan Iverson/Mark Turner
New School Tishman Auditorium 6 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Don Byron Quartet with Arun Ortiz, Cameron Brown, Bruce Cox;
Ibrahim Maalouf with Mark Turner, Larry Grenadier, Clarence Penn; Henry Butler,
Steven Bernstein and The Hot 9 with Curtis Fowlkes, Mazz Swift, Doug Wieselman,
Peter Apfelbaum, Erik Lawrence, Matt Munisteri, Brad Jones, Donald Edwards;
Oliver Lake, Graham Haynes, Joe Fonda, Barry Altschul; Monty Alexander and
The Harlem Kingston Express with Hassan Shakur, Obed Calvaire, Andy Bassford,
Joshua Thomas, Karl Wright
New School Auditorium 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Sofia Rei with Josh Deutsch, Eric Kurimski, J.C. Maillard, Jorge Roeder,
Franco Pinna; Vector Families: Dave King, Anthony Cox, Dean Granros,
Brandon Wozniak; Rez Abbasis Junction with Mark Shim, Ben Stivers,
Kenny Grohowski; Brandon Seabrook Power Plant with Tom Blancarte,
Jared Seabrook
New School Glass Box Theater 6:40 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Reid Anderson with Andrew DAngelo, Bill McHenry; Jim Black Trio
with Elias Stemeseder, Thomas Morgan; Will Calhoun Celebrating Elvin Jones with
Gerald Cannon, Antoine Roney. Keyon Harrold, Rick Germanson;
Shai Maestro Trio with Jorge Roeder, Ziv Ravitz; Ohad Talmor Large Ensemble with
Chet Doxas, Anna Webber, Oscar Noriega, Christoph Knoche, Josh Sinton,
Shane Endsley, Russ Johnson, Sam Hoyt, Justin Mullens, Alan Ferber, Jacob Garchik,
Brian Drye, Max Seigel, Matt Mitchell, Pete McCann, Matt Pavolka, Dan Weiss

New School 5th Floor Theater 7 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Jos James with Takeshi Obhayashi, Solomon Dorsey, Nate Smith;
Takuya Kuroda with Corey King, Leo Genovese, Rashaan Carter, Adam Jackson;
GoGo Penguin: Chris Illingworth, Nick Blacka, Rob Turner

Le Poisson Rouge 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Grgoire Maret and The Inner Voices with Shedrick Mitchell,
Marcus Baylor and guest Jean Baylor; No BS! Brass Band: Reggie Pace, Bryan Hooten,
John Hulley, Reggie Chapman, Dillard Watt, Sam Koff, Marcus Tenney, Taylor Barnett,
Rob Quallich, David Hood, Stefan Demetriadis, Lance Koehler; Kris Bowers with
Adam Agati, Burniss Earl Travis; Cory Henrys The Revival with Nathaniel Townsley,
Burniss Earl Travis; Sun Ra Arkestra directed by Marshall Allen with James Stewart,
Terry Larson, Danny Thompson, Cecil Brooks, Dave Davies, Tyler Mitchell,
Tara Middleton, Elson Nascimento, Dave Hotep, George Burton, Atakatune,
Wayne Smith, Terry Adams
Judson Church 6:40 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Mivos; Frank Catalano with Jimmy Chamberlin, Theo Hill, Deen Anbar,
John Benitez; Amir ElSaffars Two Rivers with Nasheet Waits, Zafer Tawil,
Tareq Abboushi, Ole Mathisen, Carlo DeRosa; Holler and Bam: Toshi Reagon,
Allison Miller, Alex Nolan, Rachel Eckroth, Everett Bradley, Ganessa James,
Stephanie McKay, Marcelle Davies Lashley; Julian Lage Trio with Scott Colley,
Kenny Wollesen
Subculture 7 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Kaki King; Cyrus Chestnuts African Reflections with
Steven Carrington, Eric Wheeler, Chris Beck; Fabian Almazans Rhizome with Linda Oh,
Henry Cole, Megan Gould, Tomoko Omura, Karen Waltuch, Noah Hoffeld;
Dawn of Midi: Aakaash Israni, Amino Belyamani, Qasim Naqvi

The Greene Space 7 pm $75

48 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Winter Jazzfest: Freelance: Smithsoneon, Chad Selph, Yasser Tejeda, Craig Hill,

Justin Tyson, David Ginyard; Maurice Brown with Chelsea Baratz, Solomon Dorsey,
Josh Connelly, Warren Fields, Joe Blaxx; Lakecia Benjamin with Nicole Phifer,
Jonathon Powell, Corey Bernhard, Solomon Dorsey, Jamieson Ledonio, Eric Brown;
Al Strong with Blu Thompson, J.C. Martin, Jonathan Edward Thomas, Rashaan Carter,
Jeremy Bean Clemons, Brevan Hampden; Ben Williams and Sound Effect with
Christian Sands, Marcus Strickland, Matt Stevens , John Davis, Bendji Alliance;
Theo Croker with Kassa Overall, Anthony Ware, Michael King, Eric Wheeler,
Ben Munson
The Bitter End 7 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Meklit with Sam Bevan, Lorca Hart, Marco Peris, Jonathan Finlayson,
Ernest Stuart; Tongues in Trees: Samita Sinha, Grey Mcmurray, Sunny Jain;
Jay Rodriguez Evolutions with Reut Regev, Carolyn Leonhart, Angel Rogers,
Josh Werner, Pablo Vergara, Billy Kilson, Nappy G;
Chris Washburnes Acid Mambo Project with John Walsh, Ole Mathisen,
Hector Martignon, Leo Traversa, Vince Cherico, Oreste Abrantes

Zinc Bar 7:40 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Christian Sands; Michael Mwenso and Brianna Thomas
Louis & Ella Tribute; Rhythm Future Quartet: Jason Anick, Olli Soikkeli, Vinny Raniolo,
Greg Loughman; Tatiana Eva-Marie Avalon Jazz Band with Adrien Chevalier,
Olli Soikkeli, Vinny Raniolo; Gordon Aus Grand St Stompers with Dennis Lichtman,
Matt Musselman, Nick Russo, Rob Adkins, Kevin Dorn, Molly Ryan, Tamar Korn

Greenwich House Music School 6:20 pm $75
Winter Jazzfest: Emile Parisien Quartet with Ivan Gelugne, Julien Touery,
Julien Loutelier; Vronique Hermann Sambin and Xavier Richardeau with
Samuel Hubert, Romain Sarron; Thiefs: David Frazie, Christophe Panzani, Keith Witty;
Samy Daussat Serge Gainsbourg Tribute with Stphane Cochet, Claudius Dupont,
Vanina De Franco; Sylvain Rifflet Mechanics with Benjamin Flament, Philippe Gordiani,
Jocelyn Mienniel
The Django at Roxy Hotel 7 pm $75
Harlem Jazz Parlor Festival: Craig Harris We Be Three with Calvin Jones,
Khalil Kwame Bell
Harlem Safe House Jazz Parlor 7 pm $25
Sam Newsome/Andrew Cyrille
Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Brandon Ross/Stomu Takeishi Duo; Myra Melford/Ben Goldberg Duo

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $22
Matana Roberts, Jessica Pavone, On Davis, Daniel Carter, Latasha Diggs;
Matana Roberts, Amirtha Kidambi, Eliot Krimsky

The Stone 8, 10 pm $15
Sonelius Smith Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Patricia Nicholson/William Parker; JD Parrans Harlem Reunion with
Shayshahn MacPherson, Baba Donn Eaton, Alexi Marcelo, Larry Roland;
Michael Foster The Ghost with Henry Fraser, Connor Baker

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Bill Coles Untempered Ensemble with Warren Smith, Joseph Daley,
Ras Moshe Burnett, Lisette Santiago

The Brooklyn Commons 7, 8 pm $11
Gene Lakes Funk All-Stars with Billy Grant, Kelton Cooper, Lenny Underwood,
Devone Allison, Nick Rolfe, Kim Lake, Vinia Mojica and guests

ShapeShifter Lab 8 pm $12
The Music of Rosemary & Mel Torme: Roseanna Vitro, Pete McGuinness, Mark Soskin,
Dean Johnson, Anthony Pinciotti Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Adi Meyerson Quintet; Marquis Hill Quintet with Christopher McBride, Joshua Ramos,
Justin Thomas, Makaya McCraven; Greg Glassman Jam
Fat Cat 7, 10 pm 1:30 am

Valerie Kuehne Project; Premature Burial: Matt Nelson, Peter Evans, Dan Peck;
Stephen Gauci solo
New Revolution Arts 8, 9, 10 pm
Buyu Ambroise
Sistas Place 9, 10:30 pm $20
Alex Lore Trio with Desmond White, Colin Stranahan

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Lori Bell Quartet with Jason Yeager, Danny Weller, Danny Levine

The Drawing Room 7, 8:30 pm $20
Itamar Borochov; Becca Stevens Rockwood Music Hall Stage 3 8:30, 10 pm $10-15
Brad Farbermans Middle Blue with Jeremy Danneman, Matt Brandau, Tim Kuhl

Troost 8:30 pm
Daniel Bennett Group; Sein Oh Trio

Tomi Jazz 8, 11 pm $10
Gary Bartz Quartet
Cassandras Jazz Club 8, 10 pm $25
Billy Harper Quintet with Keyon Harrold, Francesca Tanksley, Corcoran Holt,
Aaron Scott
Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $38
Onaje Allan Gumbs and New Vintage

BAMCaf 9 pm
Jazz In The Key Of Life: Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra

Rose Hall 8 pm $30-130
Intimate Moments: Fred Hersch and Friends with Anat Cohen, Julian Lage,
Stefon Harris, Sullivan Fortner The Appel Room 7, 9:30 pm $55-85
Spike Wilner; Bill Charlap; Anthony Wonsey

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Joey G-Clef Cavaseno Quartet; Billy Drummonds Freedom of Ideas; Brooklyn Circle

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1:30 am $20
Joey Alexander Trio with Russell Hall, Sammy Miller

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $45
Michael Mwenso and the Shakes Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $20
The Other Quartet: Russ Johnson, Ohad Talmor, Pete McCann, Mark Ferber

SEEDS 9 pm
Jane Monheit
Birdland 6 pm $30
Kurt Ellings PassionWorld
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $40
Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley, Brian Blade

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Maceo Parker
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Enrico Pieranunzi Quintet with Seamus Blake, Diego Urcola, Ben Street, Adam Cruz

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Marika Hughes
Barbs 6 pm $10
Pamela Hamilton
Silvana 6 pm
Jocelyn Shannon
Shrine 6 pm
Hilliard Greene solo
Tompkins Square Library 3 pm

Winter Jazzfest: ROVAs Electric Ascension: Larry Ochs, Bruce Ackley, Jon Raskin,
Steve Adams and guests Nels Cline, Zeena Parkins, Nate Wooley, Ikue Mori,
Trevor Dunn, Gerald Cleaver, Charles Burnham, Jason Kao Hwang; Julian Lage solo

Le Poisson Rouge 6 pm $30
Miguel Zenn Quartet
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Dirty Dozen Brass Band
Brooklyn Bowl 8 pm $15
Harlem Jazz Parlor Festival: Bob Stewart Front Line Horns with Curtis Stewart,
Jerome Harris, Randall Haywood, Nick Finzer

Harlem Safe House Jazz Parlor 7 pm $25
Ibrahim Maalouf
Drom 9 pm $15
Matana Roberts, Liberty Ellman, Mike Pride; Matana Roberts, Tomeka Reid,
Jason Moran, Ryan Sawyer
The Stone 8, 10 pm $15
Andrew Rathbun; Jessica Ackerley Trio with Mat Muntz, Tyshawn Sorey

ShapeShifter Lab 8:15, 9:30 pm $10
Tom Guarnas Wishing Stones Project with Linda Oh, Jon Cowherd, E.J. Strickland;
Stephan Crump Rhombal with Ellery Eskelin, Adam OFarrill, Tyshawn Sorey

Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Diego Figueiredo
Mezzrow 9:30 pm $20
Terry Waldos Gotham City Band; Ark Ovrutski; Brandon Lewis/Renee Cruz Jam

Fat Cat 6, 8:30 pm 1 am
Rhythm Future Quartet: Jason Anick, Olli Soikkeli, Vinny Raniolo, Greg Loughman

Rockwood Music Hall Stage 3 8:30 pm $10
Solo Night: John Lutz, David Aaron, Kali Z. Fasteau, Dikko Faust, Allan Andre,
Constance Cooper, Frank Keeley Stan Nishimura, Stephen Gauci, Welf Dorr,
Blaise Siwula, Ras Moshe
ABC No-Rio 7 pm $5
The New York Jazzharmonic Trio: Jay Rattman, Chris Ziemba, Ron Wasserman and
guests Jim Saporito, Harrison Hollingsworth

Symphony Space Bar Thalia 7 pm
Ken Kobayashi
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Billy Harper Quintet with Freddie Hendrix, Francesca Tanksley, Corcoran Holt,
Aaron Scott
Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $38
Joey Alexander Trio with Russell Hall, Sammy Miller

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Still Dreaming: Joshua Redman, Ron Miles, Scott Colley, Brian Blade

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Maceo Parker
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Enrico Pieranunzi Quintet with Seamus Blake, Diego Urcola, Ben Street, Adam Cruz

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Karrin Allyson
Birdland 6 pm $30
Soundpainting Workshop
The Firehouse Space 6 pm $10
Andrea Caruso
Silvana 6 pm
Roosevelt Andre Credit
Saint Peters 5 pm
Cedar Walton Tribute: David Hazeltine, Vincent Herring, David Williams, Willie Jones III

The West End Lounge 4 pm $25

Paul Jones Short History Band with Alex LoRe, Matt Davis, Sullivan Fortner,
Johannes Felscher; Jeremy Powell Quintet with Jonathan Powell, Vitor Conalves,
Sam Trapchak, Allan Mednard Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Nathan Pape/Patrick Breiner; Jean Rohe

Delroys Cafe and Wine Bar 9, 10 pm $10
Sergej Avanesov
Silvana 6 pm
Xinlu Chen
Shrine 6 pm

John Zorns Bagatelles: Uri Caine Trio with Mark Helias, Clarence Penn

The Stone 3 pm
Lori Bell Quartet with Jason Yeager, Danny Weller, Danny Levine

Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast 3 pm $20
Lisa Hilton and Friends with J.D. Allen, Ingrid Jensen, Ben Williams, Rudy Royston

Weill Recital Hall 2 pm $30
Spanglish Fly; Ola Fresca; Zemog El Gallo Beuno

Subrosa 2 pm $10
Marquis Hill Quintet with Christopher McBride, Joshua Ramos, Justin Thomas,
Makaya McCraven
Mintons 12 pm $10
Allison Adams Tucker with Mike Moreno, Chico Pinheiro, Lori Bell, Matt Aronoff,
Mauricio Zottarelli
Blue Note 11:30 am 1:30 pm $35
Roz Corral Trio with Freddie Bryant, Paul Gill

North Square Lounge 12:30, 2 pm

Tuesday, January 19
ROVAZorn Quintet: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams, Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin, John Zorn;
ROVA Plays the Music of Berne, Carter, Curran, Smith, Zorn: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams,
Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin
The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Valerie Capers
Mezzrow 7:30 pm
Donny McCaslin Quartet with Jason Lindner, Nate Wood, Mark Guiliana

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jaleel Shaw Quartet with Lawrence Fields, Linda Oh, Joe Dyson

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Stacy Kent
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $50
Jon Irabagon Quartet with Luis Perdomo, Yasushi Nakamura, Rudy Royston

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Gene Bertoncini/Mark Mollica Bloomingdale School of Music 7 pm
Eric Legnini Trio with Thomas Bramerie; Hugh Coltman with Thomas Naim,
Gael Rakotondrabe, Christophe Mink, Raphael Chassin

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Cristian Amigos Deep Ecology Trio with JD Parran, Andrew Drury;
Tomas Fujiwara/Taylor Ho Bynum; Kirk Knuffke/Whit Dickey

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
James Carney Quartet; Noah Garabedians Big Butter And The Egg Men

Korzo 9, 10:30 pm
Jeff Platzs Neu Cabal with Daniel Carter, Ras Moshe, Dmitry Ishenko,
Dalius Naujokaitis; Matt Lavelles 12 Houses with Stephanie Griffin, Mary Cherney,
Jack DeSalvo, Tom Cabrera
ShapeShifter Lab 7, 8:15 pm $10
Sami Stevens, Caroline Davis, Marta Sanchez, Scott Colberg

The Piano Room 7:30 pm $10
Caroline Davis Trio with Will Slater, Jay Sawyer; Greg Skaff Trio with Ugonna Okegwo,
Jonathan Barber
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Spike Wilner Trio; Smalls Legacy Band

Smalls 7:30, 9:30 pm $20
Saul Rubin Zebtet
Fat Cat 7 pm
Logan Evan Thomas solo
Jazz at Kitano 8 pm
Patricia Wichmann
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Maldataskull; Brad Myers
Shrine 6, 8 pm
Andrew Schiller
Silvana 6 pm

Monday, January 18
Rudresh Mahanthappas Bird Calls with Adam OFarrill, Matt Mitchell, Franois Moutin,
Rudy Royston
Joes Pub 9:30 pm $20
Harlem Jazz Parlor Festival: Tuba Trio Chronicles: Joseph Daley, Warren Smith,
Scott Robinson
Harlem Safe House Jazz Parlor 7 pm $25
George Braith; Billy Kaye Jam Fat Cat 9 pm 12:30 am
Andy Milne, Benot Delbecq and guests

Greenwich House Music School 8 pm $15
NYC South American Music Festival: Cyro Baptista and Banquet of the Spirits;
Los Crema Paraiso; Xi.Me.Na; Gregorio Uribe Big Band;
Chuo: Sofia Tosello/Franco Pinna; Juancho Herrera; Sofia Rei

Drom 7:30 pm
Hill Greene/Ratzo Harris; Henry Grimes/Melanie Dyer; L. Mixashawn Rozie/Bill Arnold

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
New Century Jazz Quintet: Benny Benack III, Tim Green, Takeshi Ohbayashi,
Yasushi Nakamura, Ulysses Owens, Jr.

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Trio Bajadelphia: Ivan Trujillo, Edwin Montes, Flandrew Fleisenberg; Tomeka Reid,
Ingrid Laubrock, Andrew Drury Soup & Sound 7 pm $20
John Merrill; Peter Bernstein
Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm $20
Matt Baker; Igor Butman; Allan Harris; The Royal Bopsters; Carlos Averhoff, Jr.;
David Weiss Point of Departure; Sammy Figueroa

Gin Fizz Harlem 7 pm
Ariacne Trujillo Quintet
Subrosa 8, 10 pm $12
Elias Meister/Rita Maria Quintet with Yago Vazquez, Ziv Ravitz; The Bumper Jacksons:
Jess Eliot Mhyre, Chris Ousley, Alex Laquement, Dan Samuels, David Hadley

Rockwood Music Hall Stage 3 8:30, 10 pm $10
Kyle Moffatt Trio with Brad Whitely, Peter Traunmueller; Marianne Solivan Trio with
Gene Bertoncini, Matthew Parrish Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12

Photography donated by Brian Wilder. Musician photos: photography by Bradley Smith.

Years ago, they pioneered the art of jazz / But many signed unfair contracts and got taken for everything they were worth / They are
our elderly jazz musicians / Today, many of them live in shelters or are homeless because they cant afford to pay rent / We help these
talented people find affordable housing, and work to help pay for it / But we need you to help us do it / After all theyve given us, its time
to give them something back: their dignity / To learn more or to make a donation, call 1-800-JFA-JAMS or visit www.jazzfoundation.org

Job # & CC: JAZZ2282FP

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49

Wednesday, January 20
ROVA: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams, Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin and guests Nels Cline,
Trevor Dunn, Allison Miller; ROVA: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams, Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Matthew Shipp Trio with Michael Bisio, Newman Taylor Baker

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Sammy Miller and the Congregation

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $5
Anas Maviel/Sam Yulsman; Rob Brown Trio with Todd Nicholson, Juan Pablo Carletti;
CENTO: Andrea Wolper, Ken Filiano, Michael T.A. Thompson

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Lafayette Harris solo; Philippe Leoge; Sarah Slonim

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Alex LoRe Quartet; Marquis Hill Quintet with Christopher McBride, Joshua Ramos,
Justin Thomas, Makaya McCraven; Aaron Seeber

Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1:30 am $20
Raphael Dlugoff Trio +1; Don Hahn/Mike Camacho Band; Ned Goold Jam

Fat Cat 7, 9 pm 12:30 am
Carlos Averhoff, Jr. Quartet with Santiago Bosch, Edward Perez, Fabio Rojas

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Deanna Witkowski Trio with Michael OBrien, Scott Latzky

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Gold Sparkle: Charlie Waters/Andrew Barker; Jonah Rosenbergs Fabio Trio with
James Ilgenfritz, Kevin Shea
Rye 9, 10:15 pm
Joo Lencastre Trio with Jacob Sacks, Eivind Opsvik

SEEDS 10:30 pm
The Bebop ArrangersTadd Dameron, Gil Fuller, and Chico OFarrill:
Juilliard Jazz Orchestra with guest Jimmy Heath

Juilliard School Peter Jay Sharp Theater 7:30 pm
Nicolas Letman-Burtinovic, Douglas Bradford, Nick Anderson

Bar Chord 9 pm
Dorian Devins; Cristobal Gomez Tomi Jazz 8, 11 pm
Donny McCaslin Quartet with Jason Lindner, Nate Wood, Mark Guiliana

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jaleel Shaw Quartet with Lawrence Fields, Linda Oh, Joe Dyson

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Stacy Kent
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $50
Jon Irabagon Trio with Mary Halvorson, Nasheet Waits

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Eric Comstock/Barbara Fasano Saint Peters 1 pm $10

Thursday, January 21
European Windows 1Steve Lacys Saxophone Special: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams,

Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin, Eyal Maoz, Chuck Bettis; European Windows 2ROVA plays
John Butcher, Lindsay Cooper, Fred Frith, Barry Guy: Bruce Ackley Steve Adams,
Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin
The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
American SingbookIs That All There Is? Remembering Peggy Lee: Jane Monheit,
Rebecca Parris, Spencer Day, Nellie McKay, Barb Jungr, Mike Renzi

The Appel Room 8:30 pm $50-250
John Abercrombie Quartet with Chris Cheek, Jared Gold, Adam Nussbaum

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ren Marie with John Chin, Elias Bailey, Quentin Baxter

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Sammy Miller Congregation Big Band

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
John Menegon Quartet Tribute to Charlie Haden with Frank Kimbrough, Joel Frahm,
Steve Williams
Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Edmar Castaeda
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $30-40
James Brandon Lewis/Michael Bisio; Michael T.A. Thompson Trio with Ken Filiano,
Rod Williams; Lewis Barnes Quartet with Connie Crothers, Michael Bisio, Warren Smith

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Benot Delbecq Quartet with Mark Turner, John Hbert, Gerald Cleaver;
Thomas Morgan Trio with Pete Rende, Dan Weiss

Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Joo Lencastre Trio with Jacob Sacks, Eivind Opsvik

The Firehouse Space 8 pm $10
Adam Larson Quintet with Matthew Stevens, Taylor Eigsti, Matt Penman,
Jimmy Macbride
The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
Kalia Vandever with Jeremy Corren, Tyshawn Sorey

ShapeShifter Lab 8:15 pm $10
Yuto Kanazawa Trio with Zack Westfall, Ray Belli; Nick Brust Trio with Tuomo Uusitalo,
James Robbins
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Spike Wilner solo; Willerm Delisfort; Theo Hill

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Point of Departure
Fat Cat 10 pm
Maria Guida/Mark Soskin
Rockwood Music Hall Stage 3 7 pm $10
Scot Albertson/Flip Peters
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
John Long Duo
Cleopatras Needle 7 pm
Alan Ferber Nonet; Marquis Hill Quintet with Christopher McBride, Joshua Ramos,
Justin Thomas, Makaya McCraven Smalls 7:30, 10:30 pm 1 am $20
Carlos Averhoff, Jr. Quartet with Santiago Bosch, Edward Perez, Fabio Rojas

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Donny McCaslin Quartet with Jason Lindner, Nate Wood, Mark Guiliana

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Stacy Kent
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $50
Silver Spruce Trio
Silvana 6 pm
Mike Richards
Shrine 6 pm

Friday, January 22
ROVA: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams, Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin and guests Tom Rainey,
Michael Sarin
The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Jimmy Cobb Birthday Celebration with Peter Bernstein, George Cables, John Webber

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
Gary Bartz Quartet
Cassandras Jazz Club 8, 10 pm $25
Henry Butler Trio with Brad Jones, Adrian Harpham

Iridium 8, 10 pm $27.50
Jon Davis; Andy Bey; Johnny ONeal

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Ras Moshe Music Now! Unit with Bill Cole, Larry Roland, Charles Downs;
Tony Malabys Apparitions Trio with Billy Mintz, Randy Peterson; Angelica Sanchez Trio
with Brandon Ross, Chad Taylor Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Gene Bertoncini/Mike Mainieri Trio with Ike Sturm

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30

Jen Shyu; Sara Serpa/Andr Matos with Pete Rende, Billy Mintz

Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Ben Wendel Group with Taylor Eigsti, Aaron Parks, Matt Brewer, Eric Harland

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $22
Kavitah Shah
Rubin Museum 7 pm $20
Yoni Kretzmer, Jason Ajemian, Devin Gray and guest Herb Robertson;
Gordon Beeferman Group
The Firehouse Space 8, 9 pm $15
Sebastian Noelle Trio with Thomson Kneeland, Jochen Rueckert

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Jack Kleinsinger Presents Highlights in Jazz: Benny Benack III, Matt Baker,
Devin Starks, Kosta Galanopoulos Metropolitan Room 7 pm $25
Gelsey Bell/Biba Bell; Gelsey Bell/John King

Roulette 8 pm $25
Alex Levine
Ibeam Brooklyn 8:30 pm $15
Camille Gainer Jones
Ginn Fizz Harlem 9, 10:30 pm $10
Kuni Mikami Trio
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Yaacov Mayman Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
John Abercrombie Quartet with Chris Cheek, Jared Gold, Adam Nussbaum

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ren Marie with John Chin, Elias Bailey, Quentin Baxter

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Sammy Miller Congregation
Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $10
Edmar Castaeda
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $30-40
Donny McCaslin Quartet with Jason Lindner, Nate Wood, Mark Guiliana

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Stacy Kent
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $50
Orange Julius and The Big Beat Silvana 6 pm
Andre Carvalho
Shrine 6 pm

Saturday, January 23
ROVA Saxophone Octet: Ellery Eskelin, Marty Ehrlich, Vinny Golia, Jon Irabagon,
Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams, Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Rez Abbasis Invocation with Vijay Iyer, Rudresh Mahanthappa, Elizabeth Means,
Johannes Weidenmueller, Dan Weiss

Asia Society 8 pm $30
Kevin Hays/Lionel Loueke Duo Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Joe Morris/Yasmine Azaiez; Patricia Parkers Revolution Resurrection Quintet with
Jason Jordan, Jason Kao Hwang, Michael T.A. Thompson; Jessica and Tony Jones
with guest Raymond Nat Turner Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Jesse Stacken Quartet with Tony Malaby, Sean Conly, Tom Rainey

Greenwich House Music School 8 pm $15
Andrea Parkins
Ibeam Brooklyn 8:30 pm $15
Aubrey Johnson Quintet with Tomoko Omura, Michael Sachs, Matt Aronoff,
Jeremy Noller; Leala Cyr Group with Hailey Niswanger, Elias Meister,
Francesco Marcocci, Sheldon Thwaites

Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Will Terrill; Greg Glassman Jam Fat Cat 10 pm 1:30 am
Tessa Souter
Symphony Space Bar Thalia 7 pm
Brandon Sanders
Sistas Place 9, 10:30 pm $20
Die Trommel Fatale: Brandon Seabrook, Marika Hughes, Eivind Opsvik, Chuck Bettis,
Dave Treut, Sam Ospovat
Barbs 7 pm $10
Holy Crow Jazz Band; Sweet Megg and the Wayfarers

Joes Pub 9:30 pm $15
Mike Rood Trio with Sam Minaie, Tommy Crane

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
John Minnock
Metropolitan Room 9:30 pm $20
The Standard Procedures; Paul Lee Trio

Tomi Jazz 8, 11 pm $10
Justin Lees Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Benji Kaplan
Silvana 8 pm
Jimmy Cobb Birthday Celebration with Peter Bernstein, George Cables, John Webber

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
Gary Bartz Quartet
Cassandras Jazz Club 8, 10 pm $25
Henry Butler Trio with Brad Jones, Adrian Harpham

Iridium 8, 10 pm $27.50
Spike Wilner; Andy Bey; Anthony Wonsey

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Ben Wendel Group with Taylor Eigsti, Aaron Parks, Matt Brewer, Eric Harland

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $22
John Abercrombie Quartet with Chris Cheek, Jared Gold, Adam Nussbaum

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ren Marie with John Chin, Elias Bailey, Quentin Baxter

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $45
Sammy Miller Congregation Big Band

Dizzys Club 11:30 pm $20
Edmar Castaeda
Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $30-40
Donny McCaslin Quartet with Jason Lindner, Nate Wood, Mark Guiliana

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Barbara Carroll
Birdland 6 pm $30
Stacy Kent
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $50
Marika Hughes
Barbs 6 pm $10
James Labrosse Collective
Shrine 6 pm

Sunday, January 24
ROVA: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams, Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin and guests Ava Mendoza,
Andrea Parkins, Ken Filiano, Mike Lockwood; ROVA: Bruce Ackley, Steve Adams,
Larry Ochs, Jon Raskin
The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
John Zorns Commedia dellarte Guggenheim Museum 9 pm $20
NBB Collective: Andrew Bemkey, Todd Nicholson, Newman Taylor-Baker;
Warren Smith Trio with Andrew Lamb, Larry Roland;
William Parkers Little Huey Orchestra

Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 7, 8, 9 pm $11-22
Ole Mathisen Outlier Ensemble with Julian Pollack, Marko Djordjevic;
Take Off Collective: Ole Mathisen, Matthew Garrison, Marko Djordjevic

ShapeShifter Lab 8:15, 9:30 pm $12
Gene Bertoncini
The Drawing Room 7 pm $20
Grant Stewart
Mezzrow 9:30 pm $20
Johnny ONeal Trio
Smalls 7:30 pm $20
Terry Waldos Gotham City Band; Asaf Yuria Quintet; Brandon Lewis/Renee Cruz Jam

Fat Cat 6, 8:30 pm 1 am
Asaran Earth Trio: Anne Boccato, Astrid Kuljanic, Artemisz Polonyi;
Alice Ricciardi/Pietro Lussu
Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Scot Albertson/Dan Furman
Scholes Street Studio 7 pm $15
Walker Storz Ensemble; Rocco John Iacovone Ensemble

ABC No-Rio 7 pm $5

50 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

Beat Kaestli Trio


Yoshiki Miura Trio

Rue B 8:30 pm
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Jimmy Cobb Birthday Celebration with Peter Bernstein, George Cables, John Webber

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
John Abercrombie Quartet with Chris Cheek, Jared Gold, Adam Nussbaum

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ren Marie with John Chin, Elias Bailey, Quentin Baxter

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
Donny McCaslin Quartet with Jason Lindner, Nate Wood, Mark Guiliana

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Alvaro Domene/Briggan Krauss Downtown Music Gallery 6 pm
David Love Organ Trio
Silvana 6 pm
Todd Neufeld with Thomas Morgan, Rema Hasumi

Barbs 5 pm
Chris Dingmans Waking Dreams Saint Peters 5 pm
John Zorns Bagatelles: John Medeski/Kenny Wollesen

The Stone 3 pm $20
Ralph Lalama NYU Ensemble Blue Note 11:30 am 1:30 pm $35
Ed Laub/Gene Bertoncini Duo North Square Lounge 12:30, 2 pm

Monday, January 25
Mino Cinelu; McCoy Tyner
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Ramn Valle Trio with Omar Rodriguez Calvo, Liber Torriente


Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Tony Malaby/Carlo Costa
Delroys Cafe and Wine Bar 10 pm $10
Robby Ameen and The Days in the Night Band with Bob Franceschini, Troy Roberts,
Manuel Valera, Yunior Terry
Subrosa 8, 10 pm $10
Annie Chen Septet with David Smith, Alex LoRe, Rafal Sarnecki, Glenn Zaleski,
Desmond White, Jerad Lippi; Rafal Sarnecki Sextet with Bogna Kiciska, Lucas Pino,
Glenn Zaleski, Rick Rosato, Jerad Lippi

ShapeShifter Lab 8:15, 9:30 pm $12
John Merrill; Jeremy Manasia; Sacha Perry

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am $20
Julia Patinella/Andreas Arnold Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Paul Ju Bong Lee Trio with Wallace Stelzer, Colin Hinton; Deborah Latz Trio with
Koran Agan, Ray Parer
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Jyun Miyake Trio
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Ben Charnley; Liberte Big Band Shrine 6, 8 pm

Tuesday, January 26
Roy Haynes
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Mack Avenue SuperBand: Gary Burton, Christian McBride, Tia Fuller, Sean Jones,

Christian Sands, Carl Allen


Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $45
Craig Taborn, Chris Speed, Dave King, Chris Lightcap

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Billy Childs Reimagining Lauro Nyro with Becca Stevens, Alicia Olatuja, Bob Sheppard,
Peter Sprague, Carol Robbins, Carlitos del Puerto, Billy Kilson, Parker String Quartet

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet with Gary Versace, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Emilio Solla y La Inestable de Brooklyn with John Ellis, Tim Armacost, Alex Norris,
Ryan Keberle, Meg Okura, Julien Labro, Jorge Roeder, Eric Doob

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Dave Chamberlains Band of Bones with guests Steve Turre, Steve Davis

NYC Bahai Center 8, 9:30 pm $15
Mat Maneri, Lucian Ban, Thomas Morgan, Gerald Cleaver;
Simon Jermyns Trot A Mouse with Ingrid Laubrock, Mat Maneri, Tom Rainey

Korzo 9, 10:30 pm
Carl Winther, Johnny man, Anders Mogensen

ShapeShifter Lab 8:15 pm $10
Tobias Meinhart Quintet with Ingrid Jensen, Yago Vazquez, Joe Martin, Jesse Simpson

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
The Westerlies: Riley Mulherkar, Zubin Hensler, Andy Clausen, Willem de Koch;
Dan Rufolo Trio with Marty Kenney, Philippe Lemm

Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
Amos Hoffman
Mezzrow 7:30 pm
Spike Wilner Trio; Lucas Pino Nonet

Smalls 7:30, 9:30 pm $20
Saul Rubin Zebtet; Itai Kriss Gato Gordo; John Benitez Latin Bop

Fat Cat 7, 9 pm 12:30 am
Bobby Katz Trio with Jeff Dingler, Tim Rachbach; Michael Vitali Trio with Justin Wert,
Yukua Tadano
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Logan Evan Thomas solo
Jazz at Kitano 8 pm
Payton Kerkes; Koji Yoneyama Trio

Tomi Jazz 8, 11 pm

deanna witkowski
Deanna Witkowski, piano
Michael O'Brien, bass
Scott Latzky, drums

TRIO

Wed, Jan 20 at 8 and 10 pm


Jazz at Kitano
66 Park Ave at 38th St
212-885-7119
Sat, Jan 16 at 2 pm
Sun, Jan 17 at 9 am and 5:30 pm
Arts Presenters Conference at NY Hilton Midtown
New York Suite, fourth floor
Sat, Jan 9 at 5 pm
Jazz Education Network Conference
Galt House Hotel, LeJENds Stage
Louisville, KY

deannajazz.com

GRAND GRACE
Christophe Schweizer Trombone
Wanja Slavin Alto Saxophone
Oliver Potratz Bass
Christian Lillinger Drums

between the lines

OPUS
Christophe Schweizer Trombone
David Binney Alto Saxophone
Jacob Sacks Piano
Zack Lober Bass
Dan Weiss Drums

COCOA
Christophe Schweizer Trombone
David Binney Alto Saxophone
Jacob Sacks Piano
Hans Glawischnig Bass
Dan Weiss Drums

Wednesday, January 27
A Bash for Bucky90th Birthday Celebration for Bucky Pizzarelli with John Pizzarelli,
Barbara Carroll, Russ Kassoff, Ken Peplowski, Harry Allen, Aaron Weinstein,
Russell Malone, Jay Leonhart, Tony Tedesco

92nd Street Y 7:30 pm $82
Buster Williams Something More with Steve Wilson, Renee Rosnes, Lenny White

Iridium 8, 10 pm $27.50
Giacomo Gates with Grant Stewart, John di Martino, Ed Howard, Alvester Garnett

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Craig Taborn/Val Jeanty; Craig Taborn, MR, Ches Smith

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Calixto Oviedo with Dennis Hernandes, Bob Franceschini, Cesar Orozco,
Yosmel Montejo, Robert Quintero Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Erika Matsuo and Quartet with Helio Alves, Juancho Herrera, Ben Zwerin, Keita Ogawa

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Jochen Reuckert Quartet with Mark Turner, Mike Moreno, Orlando Le Fleming

Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Bloodmist: Jeremiah Cymerman, Toby Driver, Mario Diaz de Leon; Andrew Hock

Roulette 8 pm $25
Kate Gentile 4tet with Matt Mitchell, Adam Hopkins; Peyton Pleninger Four with
Alex Levine, Louis De Mieulle, Chris Carroll

SEEDS 8:30, 10 pm
Brandon Lopez Quartet with Matt Nelson, Andria Nicodemou, Gerald Cleaver;
Chris Hoffman Trio with Adam Hopkins, Craig Weinrib

Rye 9, 10:15 pm
Lafayette Harris solo; Mike Longo; Sarah Slonim

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Raphael Dlugoff Trio +1; Bruce Williams; Ned Goold Jam

Fat Cat 7, 9 pm 12:30 am
Yuki Shibata Trio
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Erica Seguine/Shannon Baker Jazz Orchestra; Dor Sagi Quartet

Shrine 6, 8 pm
Roy Haynes
Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Mack Avenue SuperBand: Gary Burton, Christian McBride, Tia Fuller, Sean Jones,
Christian Sands, Carl Allen
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $45
Billy Childs Reimagining Lauro Nyro with Becca Stevens, Alicia Olatuja, Bob Sheppard,
Peter Sprague, Carol Robbins, Carlitos del Puerto, Billy Kilson, Parker String Quartet

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet with Gary Versace, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Emilio Solla y La Inestable de Brooklyn with John Ellis, Tim Armacost, Alex Norris,
Ryan Keberle, Meg Okura, Julien Labro, Jorge Roeder, Eric Doob

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Maldataskull
Silvana 6 pm
Stacy Sullivan/Jon Weber Marian McPartland Tribute

Saint Peters 1 pm $10

Thursday, January 28
Our Love is Here To StayThe George Gershwin Songbook:
Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Rose Hall 8 pm $30-130
The Great American Songbook Part 1Honoring Richard Rodgers:
Ken Peplowski Quintet with Terell Stafford, Ehud Asherie, David Wong, Aaron Kimmel

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
Craig Taborn/Diego Barber; Craig Taborn, Ches Smith, Matt Mitchell, Mat Maneri

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
David Benoit with Jane Monheit Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Bill Crow/Flip Peters
DiMenna Center 8 pm $15
Spike Wilner solo; Ethan Iverson; Theo Hill

Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12 am
Ugonna Okegwo Quartet
Fat Cat 10 pm
Rudy Royston
The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $15
Patrick Cornelius Quartet with Frank Kimbrough, Yasushi Nakamura, Billy Drummond

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $15
Gutbucket
ShapeShifter Lab 8:15 pm
Jason Ennis with Michael OBrien, Yayo Serka; Eduardo Belo Group with
Sergio Krakowski, Livio Almeida, Alejandro Aviles, Dan Pugach

Cornelia Street Caf 8, 9:30 pm $10
MSM Chamber Jazz Ensemble Manhattan School of Music Borden Auditorium 7:30 pm
Carlos Abadie Quintet
Smalls 10:30 pm $20
Gioel Severini Trio with Shin Sakaino, Kazuiro Odagiri; Steve Picataggio Trio with
Daan Kleijn, Luke Sellick
Bar Next Door 6:30, 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Senri Oe
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Lluis Capdevila Duo
Cleopatras Needle 7 pm
Buster Williams Something More with Steve Wilson, Renee Rosnes, Lenny White

Iridium 8, 10 pm $27.50
Giacomo Gates with Grant Stewart, John di Martino, Ed Howard, Alvester Garnett

Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $12
Mack Avenue SuperBand: Gary Burton, Christian McBride, Tia Fuller, Sean Jones,
Christian Sands, Carl Allen
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $45
Billy Childs Reimagining Lauro Nyro with Becca Stevens, Alicia Olatuja, Bob Sheppard,
Peter Sprague, Carol Robbins, Carlitos del Puerto, Billy Kilson, Parker String Quartet

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet with Gary Versace, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
The Guindonian Hand
Silvana 6 pm
Glenn White Project
Shrine 6 pm

Friday, January 29
Jacky Terrasson Quintet with Chris Turner, Ben Williams, Justin Faulkner,
Mauricio Herrera
Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
Charles Lloyd and The Marvels with Bill Frisell, Greg Leisz, Reuben Rogers,
Eric Harland
The Appel Room 7, 9:30 pm $55-85
A Tribute to the Great Sidemen of Latin Jazz: Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra with guests

Symphony Space Peter Jay Sharp Theatre 8 pm $20-40
Rufus Reid Trio with Glenn Zaleski, Kenneth Salters

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Kenny Garrett Band
Iridium 8, 10 pm $35
Jimmy Greene Quartet with Renee Rosnes, John Patitucci, Jeff Tain Watts

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Gabriel Alegra Afro-Peruvian Sextet

Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
The Jazz Gallery 20th Anniversary Series: Darcy James Argues Secret Society

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Craig Taborn Trio with Thomas Morgan, Gerald Cleaver

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Jon Davis; ELEW; Johnny ONeal Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20
Jo Lawry with Alan Hampton, Will Vinson, Nate Wood

National Sawdust 10 pm $25
Rubens Salles Group with John Clark, Michel Gentile, Leco Reis, Kenny Grohowski;
Rogrio Boccato After Bossa Nova Project with Nando Michelin, Dan Blake,
Jay Anderson
Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10

Joo Lencastre Trio with Leo Genovese, Dave Ambrosio



Ibeam Brooklyn 8:30 pm $10
Gato Loco
Joes Pub 11:30 pm $14
Kendra Shank Trio with Dean Johnson

55Bar 6, 7:45 pm
Aimee Norwich; Sandra Sprecher/Bonnie Kane

The Firehouse Space 8, 9:30 pm $10
Alex Wintz Trio with Tamir Schmerling, Mark Whitfield, Jr.

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Takenori Nishiuchi
Tomi Jazz 9 pm $10
Ben Paterson Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Our Love is Here To StayThe George Gershwin Songbook:
Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Rose Hall 8 pm $30-130
The Great American Songbook Part 1Honoring Harold Arlen:
Ken Peplowski Quintet with Terell Stafford, Ehud Asherie, David Wong, Aaron Kimmel

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $40
David Benoit with Jane Monheit Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Mack Avenue SuperBand: Gary Burton, Christian McBride, Tia Fuller, Sean Jones,
Christian Sands, Carl Allen
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $45
Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet with Gary Versace, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Jacob Varmus Septet
Silvana 6 pm
Claudio Lima Quartet
Shrine 6 pm

Saturday, January 30
Farmers By Nature: Craig Taborn, William Parker, Gerald Cleaver

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Stefon Harris and Sonic Creed with Elena Ayodele Pinderhughes, Mike Moreno,
James Francies, Joshua Crumbly, Jonathan Pinson

Miller Theatre 8 pm $20-30
Emilie Lesbros solo; Dre Hocevar Large Ensemble with Jeff Snyder,
Aaron Larson Tevis, Bryan Qu, Jeremy Corren, Zack Clarke, Lester St.louis,
Henry Fraser; Charmaine Lee
ShapeShifter Lab 7, 8, 9 pm
Stafford Hunter Quintet; Greg Glassman Jam

Fat Cat 10 pm 1:30 am
Billy Newman Quintet with Ben Holmes, Michal Attias, Leco Reis;
Livio Almeida Quintet with Adam OFarrill, Michael OBrien, Zack OFarrill

Cornelia Street Caf 9, 10:30 pm $10
Tom Dempsey Trio with Pat Bianchi, Vince Ector

Bar Next Door 7:30, 9:30, 11:30 pm $12
Cyril Greene
Sistas Place 9, 10:30 pm $20
Yuko Ito Trio; Yusuke Seki
Tomi Jazz 8, 11 pm $10
Kevin Hill Trio
Cleopatras Needle 8 pm
Jacky Terrasson Quintet with Chris Turner, Ben Williams, Justin Faulkner,
Mauricio Herrera
Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
Charles Lloyd and The Marvels with Bill Frisell, Greg Leisz, Reuben Rogers,
Eric Harland
The Appel Room 7, 9:30 pm $55-85
A Tribute to the Great Sidemen of Latin Jazz: Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra with guests

Symphony Space Peter Jay Sharp Theatre 8 pm $20-40
Rufus Reid Trio with Glenn Zaleski, Kenneth Salters

Jazz at Kitano 8, 10 pm $30
Kenny Garrett Band
Iridium 8, 10 pm $35
Jimmy Greene Quartet with Renee Rosnes, John Patitucci, Jeff Tain Watts

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Gabriel Alegra Afro-Peruvian Sextet

Club Bonafide 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
The Jazz Gallery 20th Anniversary Series: Darcy James Argues Secret Society

The Jazz Gallery 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
Spike Wilner; ELEW; Anthony Wonsey
Mezzrow 7:30, 9:30 pm 12:30 am $20

Our Love is Here To StayThe George Gershwin Songbook:
Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra Rose Hall 8 pm $30-130
The Great American Songbook Part 1The New Standards:
Ken Peplowski Quintet with Houston Person, Ehud Asherie, David Wong,
Aaron Kimmel
Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $45
David Benoit with Jane Monheit Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Barbara Carroll
Birdland 6 pm $30
Mack Avenue SuperBand: Gary Burton, Christian McBride, Tia Fuller, Sean Jones,
Christian Sands, Carl Allen
Birdland 8:30, 11 pm $45
Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet with Gary Versace, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Marika Hughes
Barbs 6 pm $10
Alex Hamburger
Silvana 6 pm

Sunday, January 31
Craig Taborn/Dan Weiss; Craig Taborn/Mat Maneri

The Stone 8, 10 pm $20
Arthur Vint and Associates with Yvonnick Prene, Blanca Gonzalez, Rich Perry,
Andrew Halchak, Tony Scherr, Jon Cowherd, Ian Stapp

Rockwood Music Hall Stage 2 8 pm $10
Faur at Play: Louise Rogers/Mark Kross

Spectrum 7 pm
Salvatore Macchia/Jazer Giles; Lena Bloch, Russ Lossing, Billy Mintz

Scholes Street Studio 7, 8:30 pm
Cheryl Pyle Ensemble; David Grollman/Sam Weinberg

ABC No-Rio 7 pm $5
Tardo Hammer
Mezzrow 9:30 pm $20
Ned Goold Quartet
Smalls 10:30 pm $20
Terry Waldos Gotham City Band; Richie Vitale Nonet; Brandon Lewis/Renee Cruz Jam

Fat Cat 6, 8:30 pm 1 am
Arthur Kampela
Cornelia Street Caf 8 pm $10
Kengo Yamada
Tomi Jazz 8 pm
Jacky Terrasson Quintet with Chris Turner, Ben Williams, Justin Faulkner,
Mauricio Herrera
Smoke 7, 9, 10:30 pm $40
Kenny Garrett Band
Iridium 8, 10 pm $35
Jimmy Greene Quartet with Renee Rosnes, John Patitucci, Jeff Tain Watts

Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $30
The Great American Songbook Part 1Audience Pick: Ken Peplowski Quintet with
Terell Stafford, Ehud Asherie, David Wong, Aaron Kimmel

Dizzys Club 7:30, 9:30 pm $35
David Benoit with Jane Monheit Blue Note 8, 10:30 pm $45
Ralph Alessi Baida Quartet with Gary Versace, Drew Gress, Nasheet Waits

Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $30
Ike Sturm + Evergreen with Ingrid Jensen

Saint Peters 5 pm
Ana Isma Veil solo
Downtown Music Gallery 6 pm
John Zorns Bagatelles: Craig Taborn solo

The Stone 3 pm $20
Peter and Will Anderson Quintet with Jeb Patton, David Wong, Phil Stewart

Blue Note 11:30 am 1:30 pm $35
Roz Corral Trio with Saul Rubin, Alex Gressel

North Square Lounge 12:30, 2 pm

52 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

RE G U L AR ENGAGE MENTS
M O N D AY
Richard Clements and guests 11th Street Bar 9 pm
Orrin Evans Captain Black Band Smoke 7, 9 pm $9
Joel Forrester solo
Brandy Library 8 pm
Vince Giordanos Nighthawks Iguana 8 pm (ALSOTUE)
Grove Street Stompers
Arthurs Tavern 7 pm
Patience Higgins Band with Lady Cantrese Nabe Harlem 7 pm
Jazz Foundation of American Jam Session Local 802 7 pm
Arthur Kell and Friends
Bar Lunatico 8:30 pm
Mingus Big Band
Jazz Standard 7:30, 9:30 pm $25
Renaud Penant Trio
Analogue 7:30 pm
Earl Rose solo; Earl Rose Trio Bemelmans Bar 5:30, 9 pm
Stan Rubin All-Stars
Charley Os 8:30 pm
Smoke Jam Session
Smoke 10:30 pm
Svetlana and the Delancey 5 The Back Room 8:30 pm
Swingadelic
Swing 46 8:30 pm
Gracie Terzian
Bar Hugo 6 pm
Vanguard Jazz Orchestra Village Vanguard 8:30, 10:30 pm $25
James Zeller Duo
Spasso 7 pm (ALSO SUN)

T U E S D AY
Orrin Evans Evolution Series Jam Session Zinc Bar 11 pm
Irving Fields
Ninos Tuscany 7 pm (ALSO WED-SUN)
George Gee Orchestra
Swing 46 8:30 pm
Earl Rose; Chris Gillespie Bemelmans Bar 5:30, 9:30 pm (ALSO WED-SAT)
Loston Harris
Caf Carlyle 9:30 pm $20 (ALSO WED-SAT)
Art Hirahara Trio
Arturos 8 pm
Yuichi Hirakawa Trio
Arthurs Tavern 7, 8:30 pm
Mike LeDonne Quartet; Emmet Cohen Band Smoke 7, 9, 10:30, 11:30 pm
Monas Hot Four Jam Session Monas 11 pm
Annie Ross
The Metropolitan Room 9:30 pm $25
Diego Voglino Jam Session The Fifth Estate 10 pm

W E D N E S D AY
Astoria Jazz Composers Workshop Waltz-Astoria 6 pm
Rick Bogart Trio
Lybane 9:30 pm (ALSO FRI)
Rob Duguays Low Key Trio Turnmill NYC 11 pm
Jeanne Gies with Howard Alden and Friends Joe Gs 6:30 pm
Martin Kelleys Affinity
John Brown Smoke House 5:30 pm
Mark Kross and Louise Rogers WaHi Jazz Jam Le Chile 8 pm
Les Kurtz Trio
Cleopatras Needle 7 pm
Jonathan Kreisberg Trio Bar Next Door 8:30, 10:30 pm $12
Ron McClure solo piano McDonalds 12 pm (ALSO SAT)
David Ostwalds Louis Armstrong Centennial Band Birdland 5:30 pm $20
Saul Rubin Vocalist Series Zebs 8 pm $10
Stan Rubin Orchestra
Swing 46 8:30 pm
Eve Silber
Arthurs Tavern 7 pm
Donald Smith and Friends Cassandras Jazz and Gallery 8, 10 pm $10
Reggie Woods with Greg Lewis Organ Monk Sapphire NYC 8 pm
Bill Wurtzel/Mike Gari
American Folk Art Museum Lincoln Square 2 pm

T H U R S D AY
Marc Carys The Harlem Sessions Gin Fizz Harlem 10 pm $10
Sedric Choukroun
Brasserie Jullien 7:30 pm (ALSOFRI, SAT)
Dr. Dwight Dickerson
Cassandras Jazz and Gallery 8 pm $5
Joel Forrester/Christina Clare Vespa 7:30, 9 pm
Craig Harris and the Harlem Night Songs Big Band MIST 9, 10:30 pm $15
Jazz Jam Session
American Legion Post 7:30 pm
Kazu Trio
Cleopatras Needle 11:30 pm
Martin Kelleys Affinity
Domaine Wine Bar 8:30 pm
Lapis Luna Quintet
The Plaza Hotel Rose Club 8:30 pm
Curtis Lundy Jam Session Shells Bistro 9 pm
Sol Yaged
Grata 8 pm
Eri Yamamoto Trio
Arthurs Tavern 7 pm (ALSOFRI-SAT)

F R I D AY
Scot Albertson
Parnells 8 pm (ALSO SAT)
Gene Bertoncini
Ryans Daughter 8 pm
Birdland Big Band
Birdland 5:15 pm $25
Rick Bogart Trio
New York Yankees Steakhouse 5 pm
The Crooked Trio: Oscar Noriega, Brian Drye, Ari Folman-Cohen Barbs 5 pm
Day One Trio
Prime and Beyond Restaurant 9 pm (ALSO SAT)
Gerry Eastman Quartet
Williamsburg Music Center 10 pm
John Farnsworth Quartet Smoke 11:45 pm 12:45 am
Finkel/Kasuga/Tanaka/Solow San Martin Restaurant 12 pm $10
Sandy Jordan and Friends ABC Chinese Restaurant 8 pm
Bernard Linnette Jam Session University of the Streets 11:30 pm
Frank Owens Open Mic
The Annex at Hamilton House 7 pm $10
Richard Russo Quartet
Capital Grille 6:30 pm
Bill Saxton and the Harlem Bebop Band Bills Place 9, 11 pm $15 (ALSO SAT)
Joanna Sternberg Trio
Cleopatras Needle 12:30 am

S AT U R D AY
Rob Anderson Jam Session University of the Streets 10 pm
Rick Bogart Trio
Broadway Thai 7:30 pm (ALSO SUN)
The Candy Shop Boys
Duane Park 8, 10:30 pm
Curtis Lundy Trio with guests Shells Bistro 9 pm
Jonathan Moritz/Chris Welcome/Shayna Dulberger The Graham 1 pm
Ruben Steijn.Sharik Hasan/Andrea Veneziani Farafina Caf & Lounge 8:30 pm
Nabuko and Friends
Nabe Harlem 12 pm
Johnny ONeal and Friends Smoke 11:45 pm 12:45 am
James Zeller Trio
Spasso 1pm

S U N D AY
Avalon Jazz Quartet
The Lambs Club 11 am
Rick Bogart Trio
New York Yankees Steakhouse 12 pm
The Candy Shop Boys
The Rum House 9:30 pm
Creole Cooking Jazz Band; Stew Cutler and Friends Arthurs Tavern 7, 10 pm
Glenn Crytzer Group
Pegu Club 6:30 pm
JaRon Eames/Emme Kemp The Downtown Club 2 pm $20
The EarRegulars with Jon-Erik Kellso The Ear Inn 8 pm
Marjorie Eliot/Rudell Drears/Sedric Choukroun Parlor Entertainment 4 pm
Broc Hempel/Sam Trapchak/Christian Coleman Trio Dominies Astoria 9 pm
Ian Hendrickson-Smith
The Strand Smokehouse 7 pm
Jazz Brunch
Harlem Besame Latino Soul Lounge 1:30 pm
Bob Kindred Group; Junior Mance Trio Caf Loup 12:30, 6:30 pm
Peter Mazza Trio
Bar Next Door 8, 10 pm $12
Tony Middleton Trio
Jazz at Kitano 11 am $35
The Mintons Players
Mintons 12, 1:30, 3 pm $10-20
Arturo OFarrill Afro Latin Jazz Orchestra Birdland 9, 11 pm $30
Earl Rose solo; Tony DeSare Bemelmans Bar 5:30, 9 pm
Lu Reid Jam Session
Shrine 4 pm
Annette St. John; Wilerm Delisfort Quartet Smoke 11:30 am 11:45 pm
Ryo Sasaki Trio
Analogue 7 pm

CLUB DIRECTORY
11th Street Bar 510 E. 11th Street
(212-982-3929) Subway: L to 1st Avenue www.11thstbar.com
440Gallery 440 Sixth Avenue, Brooklyn
(718-499-3844) Subway: F, G to Seventh Avenue www.440gallery.com
5C Caf 68 Avenue C
(212-477-5993) Subway: F, V to Second Avenue 5ccc.com
55Bar 55 Christopher Street (212-929-9883)
Subway: 1 to Christopher Street www.55bar.com
92nd Street Y Lexington Avenue at 92nd Street
(212-415-5500) Subway: 6 to 96th Street www.92y.org
ABC Chinese Restaurant 34 Pell Street
(212-346-9890) Subway: J to Chambers Street
ABC - No Rio 156 Rivington Street (212-254-3697)
Subway: F to Second Avenue, J,M,Z to Delancey Street www.abcnorio.org
American Folk Art Museum 45 W 53rd Street (212-265-1040)
Subway: E to 53rd Street www.folkartmuseum.org
American Legion Post 248 West 132nd Street
(212-283-9701) Subway: 2, 3 to 135th Street www.legion.org
An Beal Bocht Caf 445 W. 238th Street
Subway: 1 to 238th Street www.LindasJazzNights.com
Analogue 19 West 8th Street (212-432-0200)
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, M to W. 4th Street www.analoguenyc.com
The Annex at Hargrove House 111 W. 71st Street (between Columbus and
Amsterdam Avenues) Subway: 1, 2, 3 to 72nd Street
The Appel Room Broadway at 60th Street, 5th floor (212-258-9800)
Subway: 1, 2, 3, 9, A, C, E, B, D, F to Columbus Circle www.jalc.org
Arthurs Tavern 57 Grove Street (212-675-6879)
Subway: 1 to Christopher Street www.arthurstavernnyc.com
Arturos 106 W. Houston Street (at Thompson Street)
(212-677-3820) Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, M to W. 4th Street
Asia Society 725 Park Avenue
(212-288-6400) Subway: 6 to 68th Street www.asiasociety.org
BAMCaf 30 Lafayette Avenue (718-636-4139) Subway: M, N, R, W to
Pacific Street; Q, 1, 2, 4, 5 to Atlantic Avenue www.bam.org
B.B. Kings Blues Club 237 W. 42nd Street (212-997-2144)
Subway: 1, 2, 3, 7 to 42nd Street/Times Square www.bbkingblues.com
The Back Room 102 Norfolk Street
(212-228-5098) Subway: F to Delancey Street; J, M, Z to Essex Street
www.backroomnyc.com
Bar Chord 1008 Cortelyou Road
(347-240-6033) Subway: Q to Cortelyou Road www.barchordnyc.com
Bar Hugo 525 Greenwich Street
(212-608-4848) Subway: C, E to Spring Street www.hotelhugony.com
Bar Lunatico 486 Halsey Street
(917-495-9473) Subway: C to Kingston-Throop Avenues
Bar Next Door 129 MacDougal Street (212-529-5945)
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, M to W. 4th Street www.lalanternacaffe.com
Barbs 376 9th Street at 6th Avenue, Brooklyn (718-965-9177)
Subway: F to 7th Avenue www.barbesbrooklyn.com
Baruch Performing Arts Center 17 Lexington Avenue at 23rd Street
(646-312-3924) Subway: 6 to 23rd Street www.baruch.cuny.edu/bpac
Bemelmans Bar 35 E. 76th Street (212-744-1600)
Subway: 6 to 77th Street www.thecarlyle.com
Bills Place 148 W. 133rd Street (between Lenox and 7th Avenues)
(212-281-0777) Subway: 2, 3 to 125th Street
Birdland 315 W. 44th Street (212-581-3080)
Subway: A, C, E, to 42nd Street www.birdlandjazz.com
The Bitter End 147 Bleecker Street between Thompson and LaGuardia
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, V to W. 4th Street
Bloomingdale School of Music 323 West 108th Street
(212-663-6021) Subway: 1 to Cathedral Parkway www.bsmny.org
Blue Note 131 W. 3rd Street at 6th Avenue (212-475-8592)
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, M to W. 4th Street www.bluenotejazz.com
Borden Auditorium Broadway and 122nd Street
(212-749-2802 ext. 4428) Subway: 1 to 116th Street www.msmnyc.edu
Brandy Library 25 N. Moore Street
(212-226-5545) Subway: 1 to Franklin Street
Broadway Thai 241 West 51st Street
(212-226-4565) Subway: 1, C, E to 50th Street www.tomandtoon.com
Brooklyn Bowl 61 Wythe Avenue (718-963-3369)
Subway: L to Bedford Avenue www.brooklynbowl.com
The Brooklyn Commons 388 Atlantic Avenue
Subway: A, C, G to Hoyt/Schermerhorn Streets
Caf Carlyle 35 E. 76th Street (212-744-1600)
Subway: 6 to 77th Street www.thecarlyle.com
Caf Loup 105 W. 13th Street between Sixth and Seventh Avenues
(212-255-4746) Subway: F to 14th Street www.cafeloupnyc.com
Caf Noctambulo at Pangea 178 Second Avenue
(212-995-0900) Subway: L to First Avenue www.pangeanyc.com
Caffe Vivaldi 32 Jones Street Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, Q, V
to W. 4th Street-Washington Square www.caffevivaldi.com
Capital Grille 120 Broadway
(212-374-1811) Subway: 2, 3, 4, 5 to Wall Street www.thecapitalgrille.com
Cassandras Jazz and Gallery 2256 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Boulevard
(917-435-2250) Subway: 2, 3 to 135th Street www.cassandrasjazz.com
Charley Os 1611 Broadway at 49th Street
(212-246-1960) Subway: N, R, W to 49th Street
City Winery 155 Varick Street
(212-608-0555) Subway: 1 to Houston Street www.citywinery.com
Clemente Soto Velez Cultural Center 107 Suffolk Street
Subway: F, J, M, Z to Delancey Street www.csvcenter.com
Cleopatras Needle 2485 Broadway (212-769-6969)
Subway: 1, 2, 3 to 96th Street www.cleopatrasneedleny.com
Club Bonafide 212 E. 52nd Street (646-918-6189) Subway: 6 to 51st Street;
E, V to 53rd Street www.clubbonafide.com
Cornelia Street Caf 29 Cornelia Street
(212-989-9319) Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, M to W. 4th Street
www.corneliastreetcaf.com
Delroys Caf and Wine Bar 65 Fenimore Street
Subway: Q to Parkside Avenue www.facebook.com/65fenmusicseries
The DiMenna Center 450 West 37th Street
(212-594-6100) Subway: A, C, E to 34h Street-Penn Station
www.dimennacenter.org
Dizzys Club Broadway at 60th Street, 5th Floor (212-258-9800)
Subway:1, 2, 3, A, C, E, B, D, F to Columbus Circle www.jalc.org
The Django at Roxy Hotel 2 Sixth Avenue
(212-519-6600) Subway: A, C, E to Canal Street; 1 to Franklin Street
www.roxyhotelnyc.com
Domaine Wine Bar 50-04 Vernon Boulevard (718-784-2350)
Subway: 7 to Vernon Boulevard-Jackson Avenue www.domainewinebar.com
Dominies Astoria 34-07 30th Avenue Subway: N, Q to 30th Avenue
The Downtown Club 240 E. 123rd Street
(212-868-4444) Subway: 4, 5, 6 to 125th Street
Downtown Music Gallery 13 Monroe Street (212-473-0043)
Subway: F to East Broadway www.downtownmusicgallery.com
The Drawing Room 56 Willoughby Street #3 (917-648-1847)
Subway: A, C, F to Jay Street/Metrotech www.drawingroommusic.com
Drom 85 Avenue A (212-777-1157)
Subway: F to Second Avenue www.dromnyc.com
The Ear Inn 326 Spring Street at Greenwich Street (212-246-5074)
Subway: C, E to Spring Street www.earinn.com

Farafina Caf & Lounge Harlem 1813 Amsterdam Avenue (212-281-2445)


Subway: 1 to 145th Street www.farafinacafeloungeharlem.com
Fat Cat 75 Christopher Street at 7th Avenue (212-675-6056)
Subway: 1 to Christopher Street/Sheridan Square www.fatcatmusic.org
Feinsteins/54 Below 254 West 54th Street
(646-476-3551) Subway: N, Q, R to 57th Street; B, D, E to Seventh Avenue
www.54below.com
The Fifth Estate 506 5th Avenue, Brooklyn
(718-840-0089) Subway: F to 4th Avenue www.fifthestatebar.com
The Firehouse Space 246 Frost Street
Subway: L to Graham Avenue www.thefirehousespace.org
Flushing Town Hall 137-35 Northern Boulevard, Flushing
(718-463-7700) Subway: 7 to Main Street www.flushingtownhall.org
The Garage 99 Seventh Avenue South (212-645-0600)
Subway: 1 to Christopher Street www.garagerest.com
Gin Fizz Harlem 308 Malcolm X Boulevard at 125th Street
(212-289-2220) Subway: 2, 3 to 125th Street www.ginfizzharlem.com
Ginnys Supper Club at Red Rooster Harlem 310 Malcolm X Boulevard
(212-792-9001) Subway: 2, 3 to 125th Street www.ginnyssupperclub.com
The Graham 190 Graham Ave (718-388-4682)
Subway: L to Montrose Avenue www.thegrahambrooklyn.com
The Grange 1635 Amsterdam Avenue
(212-491-1635) Subway: 1 to 137th Street www.thegrangebarnyc-hub.com
Grata 1076 1st Avenue (212-842-0007)
Subway: 4, 5, 6, N, Q, R to 59th Street www.gratanyc.com
The Greene Space 44 Charlton Street
(646-829-4400) Subway: 1 to Houston Street www.thegreenespace.org
Greenwich House Music School 46 Barrow Street
(212-242-4770) Subway: 1 to Christopher Street www.greenwichhouse.org
Guggenheim Museum 1071 Fifth Avenue at 89th Street
(212-423-3500) Subway: 4, 5, 6 to 86th Street www.guggenheim.org
Happylucky no.1 734 Nostrand Avenue
(347-295-0961) Subway: 2, 3, 4, 5 to Franklin Avenue
Harlem Besame Latino Soul Lounge 2070 Adam Clayton Powell, Jr. Blvd.
Subway: 2, 3 to 125th Street www.harlembesame.com
Harlem Safe House Jazz Parlor 27 Mount Morris Park West
(between W. 122nd and 123rd Streets) (212-662-7779)
Subway: 2, 3 to 125th Street www.welcometoharlem.com
Ibeam Brooklyn 168 7th Street between Second and Third Avenues
Subway: F to 4th Avenue www.ibeambrooklyn.com
Iguana 240 West 54th Street (212-765-5454)
Subway: B, D, E, N, Q, R to Seventh Avenue www.iguananyc.com
Indian Road Caf 600 West 218th Street @ Indian Road
(212-942-7451) Subway: 1 to 215th Street www.indianroadcafe.com
Inkwell Caf 408 Rogers Avenue between Lefferts and Sterling
Subway: 5 to Sterling Street www.plgarts.org
Iridium 1650 Broadway at 51st Street (212-582-2121)
Subway: 1,2 to 50th Street www.theiridium.com
JACK 505 Waverly Avenue
(718-388-2251) Subway: C to Clinton-Washington Avenue www.jackny.org
Jazz 966 966 Fulton Street
(718-638-6910) Subway: C to Clinton Street www.jazz966.com
Jazz at Kitano 66 Park Avenue at 38th Street (212-885-7000)
Subway: 4, 5, 6, 7, S to Grand Central www.kitano.com
The Jazz Gallery 1160 Broadway, 5th floor (212-242-1063)
Subway:N, R to 28th Street www.jazzgallery.org
Jazz Standard 116 E. 27th between Park and Lexington Avenue
(212-576-2232) Subway:6 to 28th Street www.jazzstandard.net
Joe Gs 244 W. 56th Street (212-765-3160)
Subway: 1, 2, 3, A, C, E, B, D, F to Columbus Circle
Joes Pub at the Public Theater 425 Lafayette Street (212-539-8770)
Subway: N, R to 8th Street-NYU; 6 to Astor Place www.joespub.com
John Brown Smokehouse 10-43 44th Drive, Queens (347-617-1120)
Subway: 7, E, M to Court Square www.johnbrownseriousbbq.com
Judson Memorial Church 55 Washington Square South
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, V to W. 4th Street
Juilliard School Peter Jay Sharp Theater 155 W. 65th Street
(212-769-7406) Subway: 1 to 66th Street www.juilliard.edu
Knickerbocker Bar & Grill 33 University Place at 9th Street (212-228-8490)
Subway: N, R to 8th Street-NYU www.knickerbockerbarandgrill.com
Korzo 667 5th Avenue Brooklyn (718-285-9425) Subway: R to Prospect Avenue
www.facebook.com/konceptions
The Lambs Club 132 W. 44th Street
212-997-5262 Subway: A, C, E, to 42nd Street www.thelambsclub.com
Le Chile 839 W. 181st Street
(212-740-3111) Subway: A to 181st Street www.lecheilenyc.com
Le Poisson Rouge 158 Bleecker Street (212-228-4854)
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, V to W. 4th Street www.lepoissonrouge.com
Littlefield 622 Degraw Street (718-855-3388)
Subway: M, R to Union Street www.littlefieldnyc.com
Local 802 322 W. 48th Street between Eighth and Ninth Avenues
(212-245-4802) Subway: C to 50th Street www.jazzfoundation.org
Lybane 709 8th Avenue (212-582-2012)
Subway: A, C, E to 42nd Street-Port Authority www.lybane.com
McDonalds 160 Broadway between Maiden Lane and Liberty Street
(212-385-2063) Subway: 4, 5 to Fulton Street www.mcdonalds.com
Mehanata Bulgarian Bar 113 Ludlow Street
(212-625-0981) Subway: F to Delancey Street www.mehanata.com
Metropolitan Room 34 W. 22nd Street (212-206-0440)
Subway: N, R to 23rd Street www.metropolitanroom.com
Mezzrow 163 W. 10th Street Subway: 1, 2, 3 to 14th Street
www.mezzrow.com
Mintons 206 West 118th Street (212-243-2222)
Subway: B, C to 116th Street www.mintonsharlem.com
Monas 224 Avenue B Subway: L to First Avenue
Muchmores 2 Havemeyer Street
(718-576-3222) Subway: L to Bedford Avenue
NYC Bahai Center 53 E. 11th Street (212-222-5159)
Subway:4, 5, 6, N, R to 14th Street-Union Square www.bahainyc.org
Nabe Harlem 2367 Frederick Douglass Boulevard
(646-370-4008) Subway: A, B, C, D to 125th Street
www.nabeunderground.com
National Sawdust 80 N. 6th Street
(646-779-8455 Subway: L to Bedford Avenue www.nationalsawdust.org
The New School 66 West 12th Street
(212-229-5600) Subway: F, V to 14th Street www.newschool.edu
New Revolution Arts 7 Stanhope Street
Subway: J to Kosciuszko Street
www.jazzrightnow.com/new-revolution-arts-series
New York Yankees Steakhouse 7 W. 51st Street (646-307-7910)
Subway: E, M to Fifth Avenue/53rd Street www.nyysteak.com
Ninos Tuscany 117 W. 58th Street (212-757-8630)
Subway:1, 2, 3, A, C, E, B, D, F to Columbus Circle www.ninostuscany.com
North Square Lounge 103 Waverly Place (212-254-1200)
Subway: A, B, C, E, F to West 4th Street www.northsquareny.com
Nublu 62 Avenue C between 4th and 5th Streets
(212-979-9925) Subway: F, V to Second Avenue www.nublu.net
Parlor Entertainment 555 Edgecombe Ave. #3F
(212-781-6595) Subway: C to 155th Street www.parlorentertainment.com
Parnells 350 East 53rd Street #1(212-753-1761)
Subway: E, M to Lexington Avenue/53 Street www.parnellsny.com

Pegu Club 77 W. Houston Street (212-473-7348)


Subway: B, D, F, M to Broadway-Lafayette www.peguclub.com
The Piano Room 14 Christopher Street
(917-428-4575) Subway: 1 to Christopher Street
www.dominiquebistro.nyc/the-piano-room
The Plaza Hotel Rose Club Fifth Avenue at Central Park South
(212-759-3000) Subway: N, Q, R to Fifth Avenue www.fairmont.com
Prime and Beyond Restaurant 90 East 10th Street
(212-505-0033) Subway: 6 to Astor Place www.primeandbeyond.com
Prospect Range 1226 Prospect Avenue
Subway: F to Fort Hamilton Parkway www.prospectrange.com
Quakers Friends Meeting House 15 Rutherford Place
(15th Street between Second and Third Avenues)
Subway: 4, 5, 6, N, R, L to 14th Street/Union Square
The Rainbow Room 30 Rockefeller Plaza
(212) 632-5000 Subway: B, D, F, M to 47-50th StreetsRockefeller Center
www.rainbowroom.com
Rendall Memorial Presbyterian Church 59 W. 137th Street #61
(212-283-2928) Subway: 2, 3 to 135th Street
Rockwood Music Hall 196 Allen Street (212-477-4155)
Subway: F, V to Second Avenue www.rockwoodmusichall.com
Rose Hall Broadway at 60th Street, 5th floor
(212-258-9800) Subway: 1, 2, 3, 9, A, C, E, B, D, F to Columbus Circle
www.jalc.org
Roulette 509 Atlantic Avenue
(212-219-8242) Subway: 2, 3, 4, 5 to Atlantic Avenue www.roulette.org
Rubin Museum 150 West 17th Street
(212-620-5000) Subway: A, C, E to 14th Street www.rmanyc.org
Rue B 188 Avenue B
(212-358-1700) Subway: L to First Avenue www.ruebnyc188.com
The Rum House 228 W. 47th Street
(646-490-6924) Subway: N, Q, R to 49th Street www.edisonrumhouse.com
Ryans Daughter 350 E 85th Street
(212-628-2613) Subway: 4, 5, 6 to 86th Street www.ryansdaughternyc.com
Rye 247 S. 1st Street (718-218-8047) Subway: G to Metropolitan Avenue
www.ryerestaurant.com
St. John Lutheran Church 81 Christopher Street (
212-242-5737) Subway: 1 to Christopher Street www.stjohnsnyc.org
Saint Peters Church 619 Lexington Avenue at 54th Street
(212-935-2200) Subway:6 to 51st Street www.saintpeters.org
Sankofa Aban Bed & Breakfast 107 Macon Street
(917-704-9237) Subway: A, C to Nostrand Avenue
www.sankofaaban.com
San Martin Restaurant 143 E. 49 Street between Lexington and Park
Avenues (212-832-0888) Subway: 6 to 51st Street
Sapphire NYC 333 E. 60th Street (212-421-3600)
Subway: 4, 5, 6, N, Q, R to 59th Street www.nysapphire.com
Scholes Street Studio 375 Lorimer Street
(718-964-8763) Subway: L to Lorimer Street; G to Broadway
www.scholesstreetstudio.com
SEEDS 617 Vanderbilt Avenue Subway: 2, 3, 4 to Grand Army Plaza
www.seedsbrooklyn.org
ShapeShifter Lab 18 Whitwell Place
(646-820-9452) Subway: R to Union Street www.shapeshifterlab.com
Showmans 375 W. 125th Street at Morningside) (212-864-8941)
Subway: A, B, C, D to 125th Street www.showmansjazz.webs.com
Shrine 2271 Adam Clayton Powell Boulevard (212-690-7807)
Subway: B, 2, 3 to 135th Street www.shrinenyc.com
Silvana 300 West 116th Street
(646-692-4935) Subway: B, C, to 116th Street
Sistas Place 456 Nostrand Avenue at Jefferson Avenue, Brooklyn
(718-398-1766) Subway: A to Nostrand Avenue www.sistasplace.org
Smalls 183 W 10th Street at Seventh Avenue (212-252-5091)
Subway: 1,2,3 to 14th Street www.smallsjazzclub.com
Smoke 2751 Broadway between 105th and 106th Streets
(212-864-6662) Subway: 1 to 103rd Street www.smokejazz.com
Soup & Sound 292 Lefferts Avenue (between Nostrand and Rogers
Avenues) Subway: 2 to Sterling Street
Spasso 551 Hudson Street
(212-858-3838) Subway: 1 to Christopher Street www.spassonyc.com
Spectrum 121 Ludlow Street, 2nd floor
Subway: F to Delancey Street www.spectrumnyc.com
The Stone Avenue C and 2nd Street
Subway:F to Second Avenue www.thestonenyc.com
The Strand Smokehouse 25-27 Broadway, Queens (718-440-3231)
Subway: N, Q to Broadway www.thestrandsmokehouse.com
SubCulture 45 Bleecker Street
(212-533-5470) Subway: 6 to Bleecker Street
www.subculturenewyork.com
Subrosa 63 Gansevoort Street (212-997-4555)
Subway: 1, 2, 3 to 14th Street; L to Eighth Avenue www.subrosanyc.com
Swing 46 349 W. 46th Street (646-322-4051)
Subway:A, C, E to 42nd Street www.swing46.com
Symphony Space Leonard Nimoy Thalia, Peter Jay Sharpe Theatre
and Bar Thalia 2537 Broadway at 95th Street (212-864-5400)
Subway: 1, 2, 3 to 96th Street www.symphonyspace.org
Terraza 7 40-19 Gleane Street (718-803-9602)
Subway: 7 to 82nd Street/Jackson Heights www.terrazacafe.com
Threes Brewing 333 Douglass Street
(718-522-2110) Subway: R to Union Street www.threesbrewing.com
Tomi Jazz 239 E. 53rd Street
(646-497-1254) Subway: 6 to 51st Street www.tomijazz.com
Tompkins Square Library 10th Street and Avenue B
(212-925-5256) Subway: L to 1st Avenue; F, V to Second Avenue
Troost 1011 Manhattan Avenue
(347-889-6761) Subway: G to Greenpoint Avenue www.troostny.com
Turnmill NYC 119 East 27th Street
(646-524-6060) Subway: 6 to 27th Street www.turnmillnyc.com
Turtle Bay Music School 244 East 52nd Street Subway: 6 to 51st Street
University of the Streets 2381 Belmont Avenue, 2nd Floor (212-254-9300)
Subway: B, D to 182-183 Streets www.universityofthestreets.org
Vespa 1625 2nd Avenue (212) 472-2050
Subway: 4, 5, 6 to 86th Street www.vespaitalianorestaurant.com
Village Vanguard 178 Seventh Avenue South at 11th Street
(212-255-4037) Subway:1, 2, 3 to 14th Street
www.villagevanguard.com
Walkers 16 North Moore Street (212-941-0142) Subway: A, C, E to Canal Street
Waltz-Astoria 23-14 Ditmars Boulevard (718-95-MUSIC)
Subway: N, R to Ditmars Blvd-Astoria www.Waltz-Astoria.com
Webster Hall 125 E. 11th Street
(212-353-1600) Subway: 6 to 14th Street-Union Square
Weill Recital Hall (at Carnegie Hall) 154 W. 57th Street at Seventh Avenue
(212-247-7800) Subway: N, R to 57th Street www.carnegiehall.org
The West End Lounge 955 West End Avenue at West 107th Street
(212-531-4759) Subway: 1 to 110th Street www.thewestendlounge.com
Williamsburg Music Center 367 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, NY
(718-384-1654) Subway: L to Bedford Avenue
Zebs 223 W. 28th Street
212-695-8081 Subway: 1 to 28th Street www.zebulonsoundandlight.com
Zinc Bar 82 W. 3rd Street (212-477-8337)
Subway: A, B, C, D, E, F, M to W. 4th Street www.zincbar.com

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

53

THE GET UP AND DANCE


MUSICAL CELEBRATION!

(INTERVIEW CONTINUED FROM PAGE 6)

TNYCJR: She didnt mind the liberties you took?

JT: Lets seeOh, I asked Ben Williams who he likes,


like five or six years ago and he said, Man! Justin
Faulkner. Hes a bad motherfucker (Laughs). So I
called Justin and sure enough it worked. You know
especially when youre playing trio, if those two guys
get along, Im free, free to fly.

JT: No, no, no, no, noHey, honestly, I had to take


liberties with it (laughs). And Amy was just a
tremendous artist. I think she was a tremendous artist
that unfortunately left us way too soon. So it [Rehab]
was just a way of paying tribute to her talent.
I remember seeing on YouTube a version of Body and
Soul with her and Tony Bennett and the way she
phrases is just heartripping, breaking. I think she was
amazing.

TNYCJR: Youve expanded the trio for this gig, adding


the Cuban conguero Mauricio Herrera.

Starring Bob Baldori


and Arthur MIGLIAZZA

Sets the stage

ON FIRE
-NY THEATER PIZAZZ

breathtaking
-Theater Scene

explosively
memorable
-The knockturnal

JT: Mauricio was actually recommended to me by a


friend in Paris who is a drummer from Cuba and I told
him I was looking for a percussionist in New York and
he said call Mauricio, hes a good friend of mine. I just
love Mauricio because he just brings more things to the
table, but on top of that hes a very, very musical
percussionist.
TNYCJR: And finally, youre also going to have a
vocalistChris Turner.
JT: My manager Karen Kennedy told me about Chris.
What happened was about a year and half ago I was
supposed to do a gig at Dizzys Club with Sly Johnson,
the singer [and beatboxer] whos on my latest album,
Take This, and he broke his knee and was unable to travel
and perform. So I asked around who could fill his shoes
and Karen recommended Chris, who is not so much of a
beatboxer, but a great singer with a great sense of
improvisation. Because I didnt just want a singer, it had
to be like a singer/instrumental voice. And I just love the
way he just blends into the sound of the band.
TNYCJR: Speaking of singers, youve worked with
Charles Aznavour. Considering your French lineage
Id imagine that the experience must have been
something special for you.
JT: Hes regarded like the French Sinatra. Hes like big,
big time over there. And, of course, it was fantastic to
be able to play with him, not only for the musical thing,
but just to be part of that thing for a minute.

Elektra Theatre in the Heart of Broadway


300 W. 43rd @ 8th Ave
Wed, Thurs, Fri 8PM & Sat 8:30PM
866-811-4111 BOOGIESTOMP.COM

JT: We met at a 25th Anniversary of the Monk


Competition when they were having a celebration and
a concert at the Kennedy Center where they invited all
of the alumni, all the laureates, all the people who had
won the competition. I was there the day before for a
rehearsal and I remember very clearly walking towards
the rehearsal room and hearing someoneI didnt
have any idea who it was and it was like Damn! This
woman sounds really good. And I thought for sure
that it was someone who was 50 years old, something
like that because it sounded so mature. I walked into
this room a saw this woman and she was like in her 20s
and sounded killin and reminded me of Betty and had
such a strong identity. It was just love at first sight.
I told her after the concert how much I enjoyed what
she had done and a few months later I called her to
invite her on my CD Gouache. And now shes big time.
Im so happy for her. v
For more information, visit jackyterrasson.com. Terrasson
is at Smoke Jan. 29th-31st. See Calendar.
Recommended Listening:
Ray BrownTwo Bass Hits (Capri, 1991)
Jacky TerrassonEponymous (Blue Note, 1994)
Jacky TerrassonWhat It Is (Blue Note, 1998)
Stefon Harris/Jacky TerrassonKindred (Blue Note, 2001)
Jacky TerrassonPush (Concord, 2009)
Jacky TerrassonTake This (Impulse!, 2014)

TNYCJR: Recently you seem to have branched out into


Latin music, from both Cuba and Spain.
JT: I think the addition of percussion certainly
contributed a little bit to that. And also because I
honestly do not only listen to jazz; I listen to other
kinds of music, some a little more poppish, some a
little more Cuban, and Im still very much influenced
by different styles. And when I like something it kind
of comes out that way.
TNYCJR: Your repertoire includes songs by Justin
Bieber and Amy Winehouse. Are these things that seep
in from your everyday living. Do you have children?

jazz, blues, swing, stride,


rhythm & blues, and rock n' roll

TNYCJR: How did you come to have Ccile McLorin


Salvant as a guest on your previous album?

JT: Yes, my son is 17 and my daughter is 14, so thats


why exactly. I play the things that are in my life every
day. So a few years ago when my daughter was 11 and
playing that [Baby] song, like millions of other little
girlsYou know, Oh Justin Bieber, Justin Bieber, hes
just so fantastic, hes so cute And I remember
hearing that song six thousand fucking times and so
one day I just said, Okay I got it; Im going to do it for
you. (laughs)
TNYCJR: So it was a request?
JT: No, no it was not request, but I just heard it so
many times I thought it would be kind of funny. So my
daughter was just so in love with Justin Bieber that I
figured I was going to surprise her and record that
song. I remember the first time I performed it live for
her and she was blushing and having so much fun.

54 JANUARY 2016 | THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD

(LABEL CONTINUED FROM PAGE 11)


our focus became for the physical releases to have the
correct version of all artwork. Digital downloads,
which are 24-bit-transfers from the original master
tapes, include scans of the original covers plus barebones label copy in PDF form. Kellersmann has been in
touch with a few living musicians whose LPs have
been included in the reissue program such as
Alexander, Dauner and Khn. All say theyre impressed
and gratified by the program.

With MPS also emphasizing new materialalbums
by singer Malia and a DJ Gilles Peterson compilation
will soon be availablethe likelihood is that few if any
of the downloads will be transmogrified into physical
product and then probably as LPs rather than CDs, he
declares. But of course if we see that some of the
nuggets have never been released on CD, the chances
are high for releasing CD versions, Kellersmann
confirms.

Meanwhile, the next group of digital downloads
scheduled for early 2016 will include sessions by
pianists Martial Solal and Eugen Cicero, bandleader/
pianist George Gruntz, guitarist and Dave Pike
associate Volker Kriegel and one from Cecil Taylor. v
For more information, visit mps-music.com. Artists
performing this month include Monty Alexander at Quaker
Friends Meeting Hall Jan. 14th and New School Auditorium
Jan. 16th, both as part of Winter Jazzfest, and Joanne
Brackeen at Mezzrow Jan. 8th-9th. See Calendar.

(DR JAZZ FEST CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13)

More information, visit drjazzfestival.com

(WE JAZZ CONTINUED FROM PAGE 13)


an expressive lyricism and extends it with a host of
alternate techniques, finding new voiceshuman or
mechanical, sometimes multiphonicin the trumpets
tubing.

The next night Pohjola presented his quartet at the
Andorra movie theatre, the band surrounded on stage
by period furnishings illuminated by table lamps. The
recent Bullhorn (Edition) has introduced the band to a
wider circle of listeners and its consummately lyrical
work moves from reflection to subtle Latin beats and
sudden vibrant explosions. Members of the longstanding group appeared elsewhere in the festival:
pianist Aki Rissanen later turned in his luminously
harmonic approach to explore almost ambient

PHOTO BY JOE MARTINEZ

expression is a tricky thing. It also happens to be BGJIs


speciality.

The 19th Annual Dominican Jazz Festival opened
with the Big Band Conservatory of Santo Domingo in
Santiago the first night and Sosa the second. The
large-group ensemble featured bright, horn-centric
dance tunes under the baton of bandleader and
composer Javier Vargas, with standout solos from
visiting U.S. musicians: trombonist Jason Camelio,
guitarist Jim Kelly and saxophonist Jim Odgren, all
professors at the Berklee College of Music. Dr. Scrates
Garca, a Dominican native who teaches at University
of Northern Colorado, contributed two numbers:
Homage to Tavito, a merengue arranged for five
saxophones featuring a transcribed solo by saxophone
legend Tavito Vsquez, and From Across the Street,
a composition using AfroDominican rhythms typically
played on palos or atabales to enhance the big band
sound. Cross-cultural hybrids like these compositions
lie at the heart of jazz expression and international jazz
festivals are one of the few places where North
Americans can hear these fascinating Latin-based
musical forms live. (Sosa artist Adolfo Faringthon,
whose designs provided a visual through-line for the
festival, also deserves acknowledgment for his vibrant,
nature-themed logo and set pieces.)

Most of the musicians at the festival cross over
readily, however, no matter their country of origin. For
instance, in his set on day three, Grammy-winning
saxophonist from Puerto Rico David Snchez moved
effortlessly from riffing on congas in one tune to a
sinuous modern jazz solo on his horn in the next. On
day four, Dominican-born pianist Josean Jacobo, an
expert in AfroDominican rhythms, played one of the
most straightahead sets of the festival, and bassist John
Patitucci, whose playing has wide appeal throughout
Latin America, riled up the audience with tunes like
his Messiaens Gumbo, an extended funk jazz piece
that most likely raised his profile in the DR a few
notches. These borderless musiciansknowingly or
unknowinglyare largely responsible for the crosspollination of musical ideas from one locale to another
and festivals like the DR Jazz Fest go a long way to
foster a truly international music community.

On day five, Cuban powerhouse percussionist and
singer Pedrito Martnez closed the festival with a
dance set so magnetic both he and the audience were
reluctant to let it end. As the dancing continued toward
midnight, Martnez bassist, New York-based lvaro
Benavides, jokingly asked who would take the band to
the airport the next day to catch their flight. A slew of
hands shot up and so Martnez, the master rumbero,
played another tune and, with a characteristic grin,
ushered in Constitution Day, a holiday commemorating
the birth of the Dominican Republic as a nation. v

electronics with a heavily supplemented Yamaha


electric grand; the team of Teppo Mkynen and bassist
Antti Ltjnen were almost ubiquitous, working
equally effectively in Teddys West Coasters and the
funk-driven Timo Lassy Band.

Tenor saxophonist Jussi Kannaste made a guest
appearance with Pohjolas quartet. Its an apt pairing,
for Kannaste plays with rare degrees of invention,
intensity and control and manages to sound like
himself whatever the context (the night before, in an
event outside the bounds of We Jazz, Pohjola and
Kannaste contributed tremendously to an outside big
band, Mikko Innanens 10+). Later that night, next
door in the Dubrovnik Lounge, Kannaste soared with
drummer Jaska Lukkarinens trio (Ltjnen played
bass) in an extended set freely exploring the
compositions of Valtteri Pyhnen.

Some festival events inhabited very small spaces.
A series at Kahvila Svy, a tiny coffee house, climaxed
with an appearance by tenor saxophonist-flutist Juhani
Aaltonen on the eve of his 80th birthday. Aaltonen is
clearly deeply inspired by early 60s Coltrane, but
brought his own lighter sound to extended
improvisations propelled by Ulf Krokfors driving bass
and Reiska Laines rolling drums. The veterans found
their own levels of freedom and passion, creating
music that was magisterial, lyrical and convulsive,
sometimes by turn, sometimes all at once. Aaltonen
concluded with an unaccompanied Amazing Grace,
infusing it with the very quality it celebrates.

While all of those venues are well within the range
of the probable, Matti Nives took it further. Pianist
Joonas Haavisto presented five duo performances
seated at his grand piano in a one-room apartment that
seemed around 250 square feet. While some of the
duos matched Haavisto with more swing and boporiented musicians, his own work is more distinctly
contemporary, aligned with stylists like Keith Jarrett
and Brad Mehldau. His duet with his regular triopartner Ltjnen was a rare opportunity for the bassist
to come to the fore, and the intimacy of the room
heightened the close conversation, whether the subject
was a Haavisto original or a Monk tune. The
performance also made it a tie for most appearances in
We Jazz; while Haavisto played five duets in his
apartment, Ltjnen played in five different groups,
including the opening and closing bands.

The most unusual programming, though, was
undoubtedly the Invitation Quintet. One musician
invited another and so on, the choices then mixed by
We Jazz staff so even the musicians wouldnt know the
order of appearance: the site of the collective
improvisation was the citys culture tram, which
started out with an audience and a single musician,
picking up the rest of the band at successive stops. Was
it a musical success? Sometimesespecially when
saxophonist Jukka Perko brought an intense focus
and, given the strangeness of the concept, that seems
like a significant achievement. True to the
environmental emphasis, it drew from the rumble,
rattle and screech of the trams steel wheels and track
as much as it did from the musicians.

The festivals finale was a celebration of the vigor
of the Helsinki jazz scene, with a crowd gathered at
Tavastia, Helsinkis biggest rock club, to cheer tenor
saxophonist Timo Lassy with his quintet and guests as
they worked far into the contemporary possibilities of
soul jazz. With solid, riffing support, Lassy poured out
fluid, vocalic, subtly accented, rhythmically acute
lines, with an immediacy and commitment that
suggested Don Wilkerson or Stanley Turrentine had
arrived on stage.

Whats next for We Jazz? We hope that further
integration of Helsinkis distinctive urban landscape is
in the offing. Its a concept that can only grow and
spread. v

MONTY
ALEXANDER

fred hersch & friends:


intimate moments
JAN 1516 7PM & 9:30PM
Featuring pianists Fred Hersch and Sullivan Fortner,
clarinetist Anat Cohen, guitarist Julian Lage, and
vibraphonist Stefon Harris

jazz in the key of life


JAN 1516 8PM
Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis
and music director Vincent Gardner play the music of
Stevie Wonder, Donny Hathaway, and more

our love is here to stay: the


george gershwin songbook
JAN 2830 8PM
Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis
and music directors Victor Goines and Chris Crenshaw

charles lloyd & the marvels


featuring bill frisell
JAN 2930 7PM & 9:30PM
NEA Jazz Master saxophonist Charles Lloyd with
guitarist Bill Frisell, drummer Eric Harland, pedal steel
guitarist Greg Leisz, and bassist Reuben Rogers

monty alexander & friends:


frank sinatra at 100 with
special guest kurt elling
FEB 1213 8PM
Pianist Monty Alexander and special guest vocalist
Kurt Elling

jazz at
lincoln center
jazz.org

Venue Frederick P. Rose Hall


Box Office Broadway at 60th, Ground Fl.
CenterCharge 212-721-6500

For more information, visit wejazz.fi

THE NEW YORK CITY JAZZ RECORD | JANUARY 2016

55

ROVA

38-Year Retrospective NYC


January 17 24, 2016

The Stone Residency


January 19 24, 8pm & 10pm
The Stone Avenue C at 2nd Street
Rova + Guests:
John Zorn
Nels Cline
Trevor Dunn
Allison Miller
Eyal Maoz

Channeling Coltrane

Chuck Bettis

Rovas Electric Ascension

Michael Sarin

Charles Burnham
Gerald Cleaver
Nels Cline
Trevor Dunn
Jason Kao Hwang
Ikue Mori
Zeena Parkins
Nate Wooley
Larry Ochs
Steve Adams
Jon Raskin
Bruce Ackley

Sunday, January 17, 6pm


as part of 2016 Winter JazzFest

Le Poisson Rouge
155 Bleecker Street
More information: bit.ly/rova-coltrane

Tom Rainey
Ellery Eskelin
Marty Ehrlich
Vinny Golia
Jon Irabagon
Ken Filiano
Mike Lockwood
Ava Mendoza
Andrea Parkins

Compositions by:
John Carter
Alvin Curran
John Zorn
Wadada Leo Smith
Steve Lacy
John Butcher
Lindsay Cooper
Fred Frith
Barry Guy
John Coltrane
Tim Berne
Nels Cline
Larry Ochs
Steve Adams
Jon Raskin
Bruce Ackley

Bring your ticket from the LPR Electric Ascension show


to any one 10pm Stone concert to get in for free.
Complete details for all Stone sets:
rova.org/upcoming.aspx