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OHSMS_300709

E-learning Programme for OHSMS
Module 3: Understanding OHSAS 18001:2007 Standard
(OHS Policy & Planning)

Module 3: (OHS Policy & Planning)
4.1 General requirements 
4.2 OH&S policy 
4.3 Planning
- 4.3.1 Hazard identification, risk
assessment and determining controls
- 4.3.2 Legal and other requirements
- 4.3.3 Objectives and program(s)

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4.1 General requirements 
The organization needs to define and document the scope of the OH&S
management system. 
Ensure that is implemented and truly supported throughout the organization. 
Continual improvement of the Safety management system is also required.

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the organization should be able to justify the exclusion. all activities of the organization within that scope need to be included in the OH&S management system.  Where a part of an organization is excluded from the scope of its OH&S management system.1 General requirements  Once the scope is defined. the credibility of the OH&S management system will depend upon the choice of organizational boundaries.4. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 4 .  In setting the scope.

monitoring and corrective action.  The purpose of the policy is to establish the framework for what has to be achieved before moving into the PDCA cycle of planning.4.2 OH&S policy  The organization's top management shall define and document the organization's Health & Safety policy. implementation and operation. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 5 . and lastly management review.

Implemented and Maintained  Communicated to to all persons working for or on behalf of the organization  Available to interested parties  Periodically reviewed. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 6 .4.2 OHSAS Policy  Appropriate to the nature and scale of the organisation  Include a commitment to prevention of injury and ill health and continual improvement  Commitment to comply with applicable OH&S legislation and other requirements which relates to its hazards  Documented.

4.2 OHSAS Policy
Policy linked to Safety and Health Hazards:
a) be appropriate to the nature and scale of the organization’s OH&S risks;“
(OHSAS 18001 Clause 4.2 a) 

It is clear from the above criteria, that the safety and health policy should be linked
to the safety and health hazards of the organization. 
As the Safety and Health Policy must be relevant to an organization's activities,
services and their safety and health hazards, the policy should logically only be
drafted after a review of the safety and health hazards has been undertaken. 
The organization need to ensure that policy and systems are, indeed, relevant to the
safety and health hazards observed.

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4.2 OHSAS Policy 
Commitment to Continual Improvement
The policy shall: .. include a commitment to continual improvement...”
(OHSAS 18001 4.2b) 
OHSAS 18001 defines continual improvement as: 
Recurring process of enhancing the OH & S management system, in order to
achieve improvements in overall occupational health and safety performances,
consistent with the organization’s OH & S policy 
In reality, an auditor would expect an organization to demonstrate that management
system improvements had at least the potential of improving safety and health
performance, i.e. “cosmetic” system improvements alone would not be acceptable

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4.2 OHSAS Policy
Commitment to Legal and Other Requirements
"c) includes a commitment to at least comply with applicable OH&S legislation and
with other requirements to which the organization subscribe that relate to its OH&S
hazards"
(OHSAS 18001 Clause 4.2c) 
Commitment to comply with OH&S legislation and with other requirements must be
clearly stated in the policy. 
This is to be ensured that the management system is capable of ensuring
compliance. 
There must be full management commitment to achieve compliance and is in the
progress of achieving compliance 
The system has the potential to achieve and maintain full compliance with legal and
other requirements.

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2 OH&S policy Communication of the policy: "The policy shall: ..4.“ (OHSAS 18001 Clause 4.2f)  The organization is to ensure that suppliers/sub contractors of the organization are aware of the safety and health policy and that the issues contained within it are understood. implemented and maintained.. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 10 .  f) be communicated to all persons working under the control of the organization with the intent that they are made aware of their individual OH & S obligation..

sister companies.2 OHSAS Policy  The policy shall be available to interested parties.  The policy may be published in a safety and health report or as part of the year-end financial report or displayed in a public place. Certification bodies Non-governmental organizations.  Based on the broad definition. interested parties could be: - Government Authorities.g. subsidiaries Visitors. e. Neighboring communities. Vendors.  The policy need not be actively distributed externally but must be available on request by interested parties.4. Suppliers Company corporate. ILO (International Labor Organization) Shareholder E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 11 . But the means by which the policy is made publicly available must be identified by the company and can vary from site to site. Workers Unions Customers Contractors.

long term respiratory illness.  We are committed to reduce loss time accidents. We shall purchase materials and services that meet relevant safety standards.  We will prevent injury and occupation related illness to personnel associated with our operations and prevent loss to property and continually improve our performance in safety concerns.OHSAS Policy Example We at Beta Corporation affirm that we:  We will adopt and implement all applicable rules and regulations and good industry practices relevant to the leather industry and will be committed to it.  Our subcontractors will follow all safety norms.  We shall communicate to our employees and all other concerned on all OHS hazards and motivate them for active participation. hearing problems and skin related illness. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 12 .

g.e.Terms & Definitions: Hazard “Source.6 Sources . Examples include: .” OHSAS 18001. clause 3. working at heights .Situations .g. radiation or energy sources . manual lifting E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 13 .Sources – e. moving machinery. situation or act with a potential for harm in terms of injury or ill health or a combination of these.Acts – e. situations or acts with potential for harm may arise from an organization’s activities.g.

situations or acts (or a combination of these).Hazard identification “Process of recognising that a hazard exists and defining its characteristics. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 14 .7 Hazard identification is required to determine proactively all sources. with a potential for harm in terms of human injury or ill health.” OHSAS 18001. arising from an organization’s activities. clause 3.

” Control includes both prevention of accidents and minimization of losses when accidents occur. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 15 .Safety “Control of accidental loss.

8 of OHSAS 18001:2007 E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 16 .Ill health “Identifiable. adverse physical or mental condition arising from and/or made worse by a work activity and/or workrelated situation” Clause 3.

” OHSAS 18001. clause 3.21 E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 17 .Risk “Combination of the likelihood of an occurrence of a hazardous event or exposure ('s) and the severity of injury or ill health that can be caused by the event or exposure (s).

Human behavior. and determining the necessary controls.Activities of all personnel having access to the workplace (including subcontractors and visitors).Infrastructure. . .1 Planning for Hazard identification. risk assessment and determine controls  "The organization shall establish and maintain procedures for the ongoing identification of hazards. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 18 . the assessment of risks.4. These shall include: . whether provided by the organization or others…….3.Routine and non-routine activities. capabilities and other human factors . equipment and material at the work place.

The hazard identification and risk assessment shall take into account. equipment and materials at the work place.3..1 Planning for Hazard Identification.  Identifying hazards originating outside the workplace capable of adversely affecting the health & safety of persons under the control of the organization within the work place. risk assessment and determine controls  Contractors and Visitors  ".4. whether provided by the organization or others” E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 19 ."  “infrastructure..

4.  Hazard identification is to determine proactively all sources. arising from an organization’s activities.1 Planning for Hazard Identification. risk assessment and determine controls  Hazard identification and the assessment of significance is the key to the whole system as it is the impacts of significant risks that need to be managed. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 20 .3. situations or acts (or a combination of these). with a potential for harm in terms of human injury or ill health.

Chemical. such as Physical. Biological and Psychosocial hazards.  It is required for the organization to establish specific hazard identification tools and techniques that are relevant to the scope of the organization. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 21 .Hazard Identification  Hazard identification is to consider the different types of hazards in the workplace.

Types of Hazards Chemical  Physical  Biological  Ergonomic Physiological Psychological E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 22 .

Source of Hazards Chemical   Explosives   Corrosives  Flammable liquids  Toxic chemicals  Oxidizing materials  Dangerous gases   E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 23 Physical Noise Vibration Temperature Radiation  Ionizing  Non-ionizing  Infrared  Ultraviolet  Microwave  Laser .

Sources of Health Hazards Airborne Particulates  Dusts  Fumes  Smokes  Aerosols  Mists  Gases  Vapours Biological  Bacteria  Fungi  Moulds  Mites  Insects  Plants  Viruses E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 24 .

rest cycles E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 25 .Health Hazards: Ergonomics Physiological factors .Fatigue   Psychological factors - Monotony Personal relationships Work .Cumulative Trauma Disorders .Lifting .

 Input from employees and other interested parties  Applicable legal & other requirements E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 26 .Examples: Sources of information/input for Hazard Identification  Occupational health & safety monitoring data  Occupational exposure and health assessments  Records of incidents (Near miss as well as accidents)  Reports from previous audits. assessments or reviews.

E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 27 .Examples: Sources of Information/Input for Hazard Identification  Information from employee OH&S consultations  Process review and improvement activities in the workplace  Information on best practice and/or typical hazards in similar organizations.  Reports of incidents that have occurred in similar organizations.

. vehicle routing). pedestrian walkways. - E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 28 . processes and activities of the organization. sub-products). toxicology and other OH&S data. material safety data sheets. wastes. products.Equipment specifications . including Workplace design.Examples: Sources of information/input for Hazard Identification  Information on the facilities. Process Flowcharts and operations manuals Inventories of hazardous materials (raw materials.g.Product specifications. chemicals. site plan (s). Traffic plans (e.

non-scheduled maintenance.Examples: Sources of information/input for Hazard Identification  Routine activities & situations (regular activities & situations): . periodic. or emergency) activities and situations. plant or equipment startups/shut-downs etc.Examples: Operation of production equipment. occasional.Examples: Facilities or equipment cleaning. Scheduled maintenance. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 29 .g.  Non-routine (e. . Temporary process modifications.

g.Examples: Sources of information/input for Hazard Identification  Hazards which occur or originate outside the workplace that can have an impact on individuals within the workplace (e. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 30 . releases of toxic materials from neighbouring operations).

. Visitors.Hazards arising from the use of products or services supplied to the organization by them. . and Employees and the hazards and risks arising from their activities.Customers.Their degree of familiarity with the workplace. e. Service Contractors. . Delivery Personnel.g. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 31 .Examples: Sources of information/input for Hazard Identification  Hazard identification considering all persons having access to the workplace. and their behaviour.

E. failure to use handrail on a stair case. physical work. judging. attitude: These might lead to unsafe acts & behaviours. work patterns: This is required to be suitable to the individual capabilities. Human Limitations: The nature of the job: Workplace layout. work load. including thinking. air quality: May lead to hazards such as operator stress. Switch of a machine located at a height beyond ‘reach’ of an operator of short height. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 32 . habits. ‘Strength’ varies widely : strength is different for 18 and 79 years old etc. remembering. lighting. and problem solving Physiological capabilities: Biomechanical. anthropometrics/ physical variation of people: E. Work environment: Heat. operator information.g. Failure to use personnel protective equipments. noise.g.Examples: Sources of information/input for Hazard Identification Human factors Human capabilities: Psychological capabilities: Mental processes involved in gaining knowledge and comprehension. Human behaviour: Temperament. knowing.

visitors and any other person in the work place. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 33 .  The assessment process will also include all facilities provided by contractors or supplied by others.12)  The activities of contractors and visitors on site need to be assessed. factors and hazards on contractors and visitors activities and vice-versa (i.“ (OHSAS 18001.4.e. The impact of on-site conditions. the risk and hazards of contractor and visitors activities on the site) must be identified and assessed.3. OHSAS 18001 defines occupational health and safety as: "Conditions and factors that affect or could affect the health and safety of employee or other workers including temporary workers and contractor personnel. risk assessment and determine controls  Furthermore.1 Planning for Hazard Identification. The responsibility for all work activities on-site is placed on the organization which is the occupier of the site. 3.

Critical success factors for Hazard Identification  Inputs from people who have knowledge of its processes. tasks or systems  Observations of behaviour and work practices and analyses of the underlying causes of unsafe behaviour.  Benchmarking  Interviews and Surveys  Safety Tours and Inspections E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 34 .

 Hazard identification is to be conducted by a person(s) with competence in relevant hazard identification methodologies and techniques and appropriate knowledge of the work activity.  Workflow and process analysis. including their potential for creating unsafe behaviour.Critical success factors for Hazard Identification  Incident reviews and subsequent analyses  Monitoring and assessment of hazardous exposures (chemical and physical agents). E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 35 .

this would mean the identification of (all) hazards and the evaluation of each risk for : .Implementation of control and review adequacy of control .Systematic and Comprehensive Process E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 36 .3. .4. For safety and health management.1 Planning for Hazard Identification. Risk Assessment and determine controls  The organization is to ensure Identification and evaluation of all possible outcomes associated with all the organization’s activities.Development of controls to eliminate or reduce the risks.

Risk Management Fundamentals Risk Management Risk Assessment Risk Analysis Source Identification Risk Estimation Risk Evaluation Risk Treatment Risk Avoidance Risk Optimization Risk Transfer Risk Retention Risk Acceptance E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 37 .

determination of risk hazard analysis. determination of consequences and significance Risk Control control measures for significant risk Update and review 3 4 5 control measures E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 1 Module 3 38 .Risk Management Process Risk Management process include the following five activities: Hazard identification methodology establish and maintain procedure Hazard Identification 2 inventory of all hazards Risk assessment .

 Be able to assess the risk accurately and identify the significant (or unacceptable) risks. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 39 .  Be able to develop the most cost-effective control measures which eliminate and minimize all of the risks to an acceptable level. accidents. emergency situations.Purpose of Risk Management  Risk management process should be able to identify all loss exposures and to foresee all possible events (incidents. etc) and their consequences.

Risk Assessment “Process of evaluating the risk(s). arising from a hazard(s). what can go wrong?  How bad can it be?  How likely (or probable) is it going to happen?  Can we accept it? E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 40 . clause 3.” OHSAS 18001.22 A risk assessment process is simply a structured and systematic way of asking the following questions:  What are the possible outcomes? Or. taking into account the adequacy of any existing controls. and deciding whether or not the risk(s) is acceptable.

cancer. falls  Severity -  Lifting and handling hazards . irritation .cuts.SEVERE. fatal injury.M AJOR . bruises. multiple fracture  Operation hazards  Dismantling  Maintenance. deafness. repair  Commissioning  Fire and explosion  Vehicle   Violence Likelihood -  Inhalation  Eye damage hazards  Skin contact  Electric shocks  Contractor’s etc …………... concussion . E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Injuries Module 3 41 number of personnel exposed frequency and duration of exposure failure and shutdown unsafe acts being performed .poisoning.Examples: HAZARDS RISKS  Slips. lung disorders .fractures ...burns.MINOR .

 Different methods may be deployed depending on individual hazards e. nature and size.g. time.Hazard identification & Risk Assessment Methodology  Methodologies for Hazard identification & risk assessment vary greatly across industries. an assessment of long term exposure to chemicals can need a different method than that taken for equipment safety or for assessing an office workstation. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 42 . complexity. ranging from simple assessments to complex quantitative analyses with extensive documentation. cost and availability of reliable data.  Appropriate methodologies are to be chosen for each organization based on its scope. and considering needs in terms of detail.

Prepare risk reduction program E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 43 .Prepare Procedure Identify Hazards Evaluate Risk Occurrences Extreme risk Severity High risk Moderate risk Low risk Establish significant risks .

E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 44 . visitors.  Security arrangements  Human capabilities. contractors. prepared for hazardous tasks. the public) who might be affected by hazardous work.  Proximity of other personnel (e. systems of work and/or permit-to-work procedures. cleaners.  Toxicological data.  Details of any work instructions. behaviour. training and experience of those who normally and/or occasionally carry out hazardous tasks. competence.g.Examples: Inputs for risk assessment  Details of location (s) where work is carried out  Proximity and scope for hazardous interaction between — activities in the workplace. epidemiological data and other health related information.

etc.Examples of risk assessment inputs  Manufacturers’ or suppliers’ instructions for operation and maintenance of equipment and facilities  The availability and use of control measures : e. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 45 . or other process failures. emergency escape routes (including signage). and external emergency support.  Details of access to.g.  Environmental conditions affecting the workplace  The potential for failure of plant and machinery components and safety devices or for their degradation from exposure to the elements or process materials.g. etc. personal protective equipment (PPE).  Abnormal conditions : e. for ventilation. emergency escape plans. the potential interruption of utility — services such as electricity and water. emergency equipment. emergency communication facilities. and adequacy/condition of emergency procedures. — guarding.

 Findings of any existing assessments relating to hazardous work activity. use of specific risk assessment methods. contractors. e.  The duration and frequency at which tasks are carried out  The accuracy and reliability of the data available for the risk assessment. etc.). or permissible exposure levels.  The potential for a failure to induce associated failures or disabling of control measures.Examples of risk assessment inputs  Monitoring data related to incidents associated with specific work activities. sampling methods to determine exposure.g.g. visitors.  Details of previous unsafe acts either by the individuals performing the activity or by others (e.  Risk assessment should be conducted by a person(s) with competence in relevant risk assessment methodologies and techniques and appropriate knowledge of the work activity.  Any legal and other requirements which prescribe how the risk assessment has to be performed or what constitutes an acceptable risk. adjacent personnel. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 46 .

Some Examples of Risk Assessment Methodologies  “What if” Analysis  Risk Matrix  HAZOP (Hazard and operability Studies)  FMEA/FMECA (Failure Modes. Effects and Criticality Analysis)  FTA (Fault Tree Analysis)  ETA (Event Tree Analysis)  Quantitative techniques E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 47 .

T.)  Group Risk Assessment  What If Technique  Checklist  Simple Risk Assessment Time E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 48 . Time involvement  Event Modeling SS TT RR UU CC TT UU RR EE  Hazop  FMEA  Fault Tree  Potential Problem Analysis (K.Risk Assessment Methodologies vs.

Risks.3.1 A practical way to evaluate. Products.Group Risk Assessments A Semi-Quantitative Approach to OH&S 4... and Services Work Situations Processes Loss Exposures. Activities. Hazards E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 49 .

Know the residual risks E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 50 . State probability explanation and rating 6. State impact explanation and rating 5. Plan risk controls 8. Determine risk level 7. Define system / scope 2.Steps for Group Risk Assessments 1. Identify item(s) 3. List concern(s) 4.

Group Risk Assessments Identify All Loss Exposures  Planned Inspections  Group Meetings  Accident Investigations and Analyses  Employee Surveys  OHS Management System Audits  Hazard Surveys  Other Activities E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 51 .

First aid Release within limits Minor spill/ emission E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 52 Stoppage half day Medium damage Multiple complaint Stoppage 1 day Customer complaint ♦ Stoppage half day ♦ Medium damage ♦ Stoppage less than one hr. ♦ Low damage .5x5 Model I M P A C T 5 Extreme risk cannot accept 4 High risk must act 3 Moderate risk must ensure controls 2 Low risk 1 1 2 3 4 5 LIKELIHOOD Likelihood IMPACT Finan.0 M Serious injury Major spill 2 > Rs 100 K 1 < Rs 10000 Off site treatment Minor injury. Loss Injury/ Ill health Environment Production Permanent ecological damage ♦ Stoppage >1 day ♦ High damage Will happen daily to weekly ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ Will happen many times in a month Will happen once every week Will happen every month Unlikely 5 > Rs 50 M Multiple fatality 4 > Rs 10 M Single fatality Disability 3 > Rs 1.

 Engineering controls – e. equipment inspections.g. warning sirens/lights..HERARCHY OF CONTROLS  Elimination – e. tagging and work permits. machine guarding.g. and/or administrative controls – e. substitute a less hazardous material or reduce the system energy such as lower the force. modify a design to eliminate the hazard. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 53 . etc. introduce mechanical lifting devices to eliminate the manual handling hazard  Substitution – e. install ventilation systems. etc. respirators and gloves. etc.g.g. photo-luminescent signs. amperage. safety signs. temperature. pressure.  Signage. safety glasses. markings for pedestrian walkways.g. warnings. interlocks. hazardous area marking. e. access controls. face shields. alarms. sound enclosures. safety harnesses and lanyards. hearing protection.g.  Personal protective equipment (PPE) – e. safety procedures.

 Risk assessment need not be a periodical “once a year” affair.  Additional risk assessments may need to be carried to further evaluate high risk hazards or evaluate the effectiveness of proposed risk control measures. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 54 .Review & Update  The organization should define the nature.  There may also be legal or other requirements for periodic review and update of risk assessment studies. preliminary risk analysis may need to be carried out before conceptual design stage. schedule and timing for review. risk assessment and risk control that it uses or plans to use.  They could also be part of a "management of change" system put in place to review changes to technology. facility and even responsibilities. Similarly. scope and methodology for any form of hazard identification.

management of change is also an explicit requirement for safety management systems implemented to comply with the Seveso II Directive (see Annex III of EU Council Directive 96/82/EC). however. Occupational Health and Safety Management System standard – ANSI/AIHA Z10-2005. This addition was an explicit request of the American Industrial Hygiene Association for purposes of aligning OHSAS 18001 with the U. “management of change” is not a defined term in OHSAS 18001:2007.  In addition.1 of OHSAS 18001 in the 2007 revision of the standard. It is. vital to an effective OH&S management system. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 55 .  Explicit requirements for management of change were added into section 4.3.S.Management Of Change  Although it is often used as a term of art in the safety field.

the OH&S management system or its activities. processes and activities.  In addition. including temporary changes.Management of Change  The following requirements related to management of change were added in section 4.6: E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 56 . prior to the introduction of such changes. the organization shall identify the OH&S hazards and risks associated with changes in the organization.1:  The procedures for hazard identification and risk assessment shall take into account:  g) changes or proposed changes in the organization.4. h) modifications to the OH&S management system. reference to Management of Change was also included in section 4. and their impacts on operations. For the management of change.….3. its activities or materials.

procedures) E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 57 . infrastructure.g. software)  Material changes (e. personnel or staffing changes)  Activity changes (e. packaging)  Changes to the OH&S management system (e.g. the changes that need to be addressed include:  Organizational changes (e. equipment. changes to processes.g. new chemicals.g.What is Change?  Identification of the hazards associated with “change”  Assessment of the risks associated with “change”  Consideration of OH&S hazards and risks prior to the introduction of the “change”  Implementation of the controls needed to address the hazards and risks associated with the “change”  For purposes of management of change within an OH&S management system.

As per U. as elsewhere. create conditions that may lead to injuries. if not properly managed. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board (CSB)  “In industry.csb.S.gov/ and enter “management of change” as your search term at the link “Search this Site.” E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 58 . property damage or even death.Why Management of Change?  Ineffective management of change is one of the leading causes of serious incidents. go to the CSB web site at http://www. To check it out.”  Ineffective management of change is one of the major contributing factors in many of the incident investigations conducted by the CSB. change often brings progress. But it can also increase risks that.

 The organization shall ensure that these applicable legal requirements and other requirements to which the organization subscribes are taken into account in establishing.Legal and other requirements  The organization shall establish and maintain a procedure(s) for identifying and accessing the legal and other OH&S requirements that are applicable to it.  It shall communicate relevant information on legal and other requirements to personnel working for or on its behalf. implementing and maintaining its OH & S management system. and other relevant interested parties. E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 59 .  The organization shall keep this information unto date.

3.Information shall be updated & also be communicated to the personnel working for or on its behalf and other relevant interested parties E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 60 .2 and other related clauses  Basically. OH & S system is to include .2 Legal and other requirements  Analysis of the requirements of Clause 4. implementing and maintaining the OH & S system. .These legal and other requirements are taken into consideration while establishing. To do so effectively.4. the OH & S MANAGEMENT SYSTEM must be capable of ensuring compliance to legal and other requirements.There should be procedure for identifying and assessing legal and other requirements .3.

technical options . operational and business requirements . .financial. implement and maintain a program (s) for achieving its objectives .hazards and risks .Means and time frame by which the objectives are to be achieved.views of other parties  Establish.4.3. .These program (s) should be reviewed at planned intervals E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 61 .3 Objectives & Program (s)  Objectives to be established and documented at each relevant function and level & should consider .Designation of responsibility and authority for achieving objectives.legal and other requirements .

Time-bound E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 62 .4.Relevant .  The Objectives need to be supported by a plan or program setting out what is to be done.M.3 Objectives and program (s)  Objectives and targets must be documented and consistent with policy and the identified significant risks.Achievable . by whom and in what time frame.R.Specific .  Employees responsible for achieving objectives and targets need to been involved in their development so as to ensure understanding and reality. This is the OH & S Management program.  Objectives and targets must be measurable (S. Objectives need to be set (cascaded down) to all appropriate levels of the organization. and reviewed and revised where necessary: .Measurable .T).A.3.

Specific The content of objectives can be of the following type:  Risk reduction objectives  System improvement objectives  Monitoring objectives  Proactive Objectives  Reactive Objectives E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 63 . Quantitative  Proactive vs.Types of Objectives Objectives can be:  Qualitative vs. Réactive  Broad vs.

 The plant A will reduce the number of LTI (Lost-Time Incidents) 17 cases in 2006.” E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 64 . by 20% from System objectives:  “The Administration Department will provide “Emergency Response.”  “The Human Resource Department will implement a company-wide hazard reporting system and a reward scheme by end of 2007. Hazards awareness course” to all office personnel by June 2007.Examples of objectives Risk reduction objectives  The Maintenance Department will replace all the faulty pressure gauges in the tank yard to prevent a recurrence of tank collapse by the 3rd quarter of 2007.

” Proactive objectives:  “The Inspection Section will send all technicians for the general safety and health inspection course by mid-2007.”  “The maintenance workshop will reduce property damage by $100. 00 for 2007.” E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 65 .Examples of objectives Monitoring objectives:  “The Purchase Manager will monitor the development and availability of new personal protective equipment for the safe removal and disposal of asbestos for our asbestos-disposal workers.” Reactive objectives:  “The production department to decrease the accident frequency rate by 20% for this year 2007.”  “All department heads will implement a weekly department safety briefing and by end August 2007.

E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 66 .Policy Objectives / Program Policy: To minimize injuries and illnesses to employees Objective: To reduce the LTA rate by half over the next two fiscal years. Program: To reduce the number of back injuries in Shipping and receiving Dept. by 20% for fiscal year 2010.

E-learning of OHSMS 30 July 2009 Module 3 67 .