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INTELLIGENT TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

TELECOMMUNICATIONS STRATEGY
Infrastructure Affairs

Roads Design Department

Version 1.0

December 2014

ITS Telecommunications Strategy

Local roads connections:

Distribution nodes will need to be provided with at interface points with local roads projects
to allow for connectivity of these projects to EXW scheme’s WAN for backhaul to the
operations centres.

5.3.2 Local roads schemes
The number and type of cable will be identical to the Expressway schemes; in this case all four cables
will be individually ducted along the median of the road where applicable.
Ducting within local roads schemes shall be designed to extend the WAN as far as possible through
the local roads projects. Considerations should be made to design that ducting through local roads
projects to provide a duct route between any adjacent EXW schemes that may be located at the
project boundaries. In such situations, various local roads projects will need to co-ordinate to
provide a continuous duct run through adjacent projects to connect binding EXW schemes. The
purpose of this shall be to provide connectivity to various EXW schemes and allow for the staging
and resilience of the overall WAN network design.
5.3.3 Interfaces
The interface point with other schemes shall be the WAN GME, either at the end of scheme or as a
mid-point interface within the scheme at major intersections.
A given scheme will always be terminated at least by a couple of diagonally opposed WAN GMEs
matching the adjacent ones (see figures 15 and 17 for more detail).
5.3.4 Network switch topology
The network switch layout presented serves as a model. However, the final layout depends on the
detailed design for the particular scheme and on the required number of ITS LAN rings to be
deployed based on RSTP convergence and switch recovery times.
For further guidance on the overall network topology, refer to the following drawings featured in
Appendix D:






5.4

Figure 11: Proposed routing for Centre to Centre communications
Figure 12: High level topology for the ITS telecommunications Network
Figure 13: Fibre pathing for ITS LAN and PC WAN (Expressway schemes)
Figure 14: Fibre schematic for ITS LAN and PC WAN (Expressway schemes)
Figure 15: Fibre pathing for ITS LAN and PC WAN (Local Roads schemes)
Figure 16: Fibre schematic for ITS LAN and PC WAN (Local Roads schemes)
Figure 17: Network switch topology model

Deployment considerations (constructability)

This document is intended as a framework for all ITS designers to follow for designing the ITS LAN
telecommunications network and WAN requirements for EXW and LRDP ITS schemes.
A re-evaluation has been required for fibre allocation, chamber sizes and cable slack required at
GMEs, duct branches from the backbone duct network and the interfacing at the limits of work for
each scheme.

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ITS Telecommunications Strategy

5.4.1 Fibre optic core allocation and splicing
Specifically, this document introduces the
telecommunications design:




following

major

changes

within

the

ITS

Splicing of fibre is shifted from ITS splice chambers to within the ITS GMEs (located at the
Access Nodes)
Splicing within Access Nodes consists of 48 fibres being present, 24 fibres spliced through
and 24 fibre pigtails laid up within the enclosure
Underground splicing occurs only for tunnel, pole mount or access enclosures which are not
located along the local ITS backbone network by means of a 12 SM fibre optic drop cable
An additional 96 strand WAN trunk cable is introduced to accommodate scheme to scheme,
scheme to centre, and centre to centre fibre connections
48 fibres from the WAN trunk are presented in Distribution Nodes with the remaining 48
coiled and laid up for future use.

For further detail, refer to Figure 18 in Appendix D which presents a guideline for the fibre core
allocation for ITS LAN and PC WAN.
5.4.2 Fibre optic cable slack
The following recommendations shall be followed when accounting for the amount of slack provided
in the fibre optic trunk or drop cables. The existing specification or standard applies where a
recommendation is not given.






For Access Node GMEs placed along the backbone duct network, 10m of slack in the ITS fibre
optic trunk cable shall be provided within the Draw chamber directly adjacent the GME in
either direction (i.e. going into and out of the GME). An additional 2m fibre optic slack cable
shall be provided within the GME
For Access Node GMEs not on the backbone duct network, 10m of slack in the fibre optic
drop cable shall be provided within the ITS chamber in either direction i.e. going into and out
of the GME
2m of slack ITS trunk or drop cable (as applicable) shall be provided before and after the
fibre optic patch panel within all Access Node GMEs
60m of slack in both the WAN and ITS fibre optic trunk cable shall be provided within the
Draw chamber outside all Distribution Node GMEs at the project extents
2m of slack in both the WAN and ITS fibre optic trunk cables shall be provided in draw
chambers that are pass-through. A pass-through chamber is defined as one with no direct
connection to ITS devices or GMEs
10m of slack in both the WAN and ITS fibre optic trunk cables shall be provided in any
chambers that involve a change in direction greater than 22.5 degrees
30 m of slack on each direction (total 60m) shall be provided for the WAN fibre optic trunk
cable, within the draw chambers at major arterial or expressway intersections where the
Limit of Work with the intersecting roadway is shared with an adjacent EXW scheme.

5.4.3 Chamber types
The current Ashghal Civil & Structural Standards for ITS call out 3 types of chambers:


ITS Chambers (1m x 1m external)
Splice Chambers (1.4m by 1.4m external)
Draw Chambers (1.2m x 2.4m external)

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ITS Telecommunications Strategy

It is recommended that the following strategy should be used to evaluate the type of chamber that
needs to be deployed at a given location. The existing specification or standard applies where a
recommendation is not given.






Chambers used at extents of Limit of Works shall be Draw Chambers to accommodate the
presence and slack requirements of Distribution nodes described before
Chambers used exclusively for pass-through of cable along the backbone duct network shall
be Draw Chambers to facilitate easy hauling of cables
Chambers used for change in direction of backbone duct network shall be Draw Chambers to
accommodate the bend radius for fibre optic cables during a change in direction
Chambers placed outside all Access Node GMEs along the backbone duct network shall be
Draw Chambers to accommodate for the slack provided in the fibre optic trunk cables
Chambers placed outside all Distribution Node GMEs shall be Draw Chambers to
accommodate for the slack provided in the fibre optic trunk cable
Chambers placed outside all Access Node GMEs that are not along the backbone duct
network shall be ITS Chambers to accommodate for the slack in the drop cables
Chambers placed outside poles or structures supporting ducting between GMEs and end
field devices shall be ITS Chambers.

5.4.4 Duct deployment and allocation
The ducts are placed in a stack incorporating the following types of cables:



ITS LAN
WAN
SCADA
POWER

Power cables shall always be located at the bottom of the stack.
For further detail on the duct allocation and placement in stacks and chambers for Expressway
schemes and Local Roads schemes, refer to Figure 19 in Appendix D.
5.4.5 Cable routing at road junctions
At road junctions, WAN and ITS cables are not to follow the same path: the WAN cable shall always
follow a path as straight as possible (consider using directional drilling).
The reason for this is that the optical signal on the ITS looping path is regenerated in the Access
Nodes switches; the optical signal on the WAN can only be regenerated in the Distribution Nodes
either at both ends of the scheme or at mid-point presentations where access to the WAN is
required.
Therefore, the WAN cable shall not be either over bent nor cut or spliced at intersections in order to
minimise attenuation due to insertion losses such as splices or connectors and excessive bend
radius. Otherwise, losses propagate across adjacent schemes compromising the overall optical link
budget.
Additionally, the straight path reduces pulling resistance and stress for the cable taking into account
the length of fibre cable reels (around 5-6 km).

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ITS Telecommunications Strategy

SPECIMEN STANDARD

Figure 20 Duct routing layouts

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