You are on page 1of 58

A PROJECT REPORT

ON
A STUDY ON HR POLICIES OF UNION BANK OF INDIA
Submitted in partial fulfillment of requirement for the degree of

MBA-I SEM.
IN
MARKETING/ FINANCE/ HUMAN RESOURCES

UNDER THE SUPERVISION OF

MIS ANIKA SHARMA

SUBMITTED BY
TASLEEM FATIMA

TO
DEPARMTNE OF MANAGEMENT STUDIES
SWAMI VIVEKANAND UNIVERSITY, SAGAR (M.P.)
DECEMBER 2014

CERTIFICATE
This is to certify that Report entitled A STUDY ON HR POLICIES OF

UNION BANK OF INDIA which is submitted by TASLEEM FATIMA in


partial fulfillment of the requirement for the award of degree MBA. from SVN
University Sagar is a record of the candidate own work carried out my Supervision.
The matter embodied in this report is original has not been submitted for the award of
any other degree

Date

Mentor Name
(MISS ANKITASHARMA )

DECLERATION
This is to certify that Report entitled A STUDY ON HR POLICIES

OF UNION BANK OF INDIA which is submitted by me in partial


fulfillment of the requirement for the award of degree MBA from SVN
University Sagar Comprises only my original work and due acknowledgement
has been made in the text to all other material used.

NAME OF THE STUDENT


APPROVIED BY

( ANKITA SHARMA)

............................................
(H.O.D & DEAN )
SWAMI VIVEKANAND UNIVERSITY SAGAR

PREFACE
Preparing a project of this nature is an arduous task and I was fortunate
enough to get support from a large number o persons. I wish to express my deep
sense of gratitude to all those who generously helped in successful completion
of this report by sharing their invaluable time and knowledge.
It is my proud and privilege to express my deep regards to Respected
HOD Dr. Pramesh Gautam, Head of Department of Business Management,
SWAMI VIVEKANAND UNIVERSITY SAGAR for allowing me to undertake
this project.
I feel extremely exhilarated to have completed this project under the able
and inspiring guidance of Miss Priyanka chourasia he rendered me all possible
help me guidance while reviewing the manuscript in finalizing the report.
I also extend my deep regards to my teachers , family members , friends
and all those whose encouragement has infused courage in me to complete to
work successfully.
TASLEEM FATIMA
MBA III SEM.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENT
Preparing a project of this nature is an arduous task and I was fortunate
enough to get support from a large number o persons. I wish to express my deep
sense of gratitude to all those who generously helped in successful completion
of this report by sharing their invaluable time and knowledge.
It is my proud and privilege to express my deep regards to Respected,
Head of Department Dr.Pramesh Gautam, Department of Business Management
, SWAMI VIVEKANAND UNIVERSITY SAGAR for allowing me to
undertake this project.
I feel extremely exhilarated to have completed this project under the able
and inspiring guidance of He rendered me all possible help me guidance while
reviewing the manuscript in finalizing the report.
I also extend my deep regards to my teachers, family members , friends
and all those whose encouragement has infused courage in me to complete to
work successfully.

TASLEEM FASTIMA
MBA III SEM.

CONTENTS
S.NO.

CHAPTER -1

CHAPTER-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5

CHAPTER-6
CHAPTER-7
CHAPTER-8
CHAPTER-9
CHAPTER-10

PAGE
COVER PAGE
PREFACE
DECLARATION
CERTIFICATE
INTRODUCTION
HISTORY
AWARDS
RECORINISED BANK
RATIONALE OF THE STUDY
SCOPE OF THE WORK
OBJECTIVE OF THE STUDY
LITERATURE REVIEW
RESEARCH METHODOLOGY

DATA INTERPETATION
RESULT AND FINDINDS
LIMITATION
SUGGESTION
CONCLUSION
BIBLIOGRAPHY
QUESTIONNAIRE

INTRODUCTION

Introduction
Cash is the basic input needed to keep the operations of the business
going on a continuing basis; it is also the final output expected to be realized by
selling the product manufactured by the manufacturing unit. Cash is the both
the beginning and the end of the business operations.
Sometimes, it so happens that a business unit earns sufficient profit, but
in spite of this it is not able to pay its liabilities when the become due.
Therefore, a business should be always try to keep sufficient cash, neither more
nor less because shortage of cash will threaten the firms liquidity and solvency,
whereas excessive cash will not be fruitful utilized, will simply remain ideal and
affect the profitability of a concern. Effective cash management, therefore,
implies a proper balancing between the two conflicting objectives of liquidity
The management of cash also assumes importance because it is difficult
to predict cash inflows and outflows accurately and there is no perfect
coincidence between the inflows and outflows of cash giving rise to either cash
outflows exceeding inflows or cash inflows exceeding outflows. Cash flow
statement is one important tool of cash management because it throws light on
cash inflows and cash outflows of a particular period.
Meaning of Cash Flow Statement
A funds flow statement based on working capital is very useful in long-range
financial planning but this statement may conceal or exclude too much. This is

so because it does not take into considerations the movements among the
individual current assets and current liabilities i.e. it shows net change in
working capital. Moreover, this statement treats increases in receivables,
inventories and prepaid expenses and decreases in accounts payable,
outstanding expenses and bank over draft as equivalent to decrease in cash.
Likewise, decreases in receivables, inventories and prepaid expenses and
increases in creditors, bills payable, outstanding expenses and bank overdraft
are treated as equivalent to increases in cash. This is not a correct treatment
because this items do not decrease cash or make cash available.

Sundry

creditors, bills payable, outstanding expenses become payable in the next


period. Similarly, inventories and receivable make cash available in the next
period. It is quite possible that there may be sufficient working capital as
revealed by the funds flow statement and still the company may be unable to
meet its current liabilities as and when they fall due. It may be due to an
accumulation of inventories and an increase in trade debtors caused by a slow
down in collections. In such a situation, a cash flow statement is more useful
because it gives detailed information to the management about the sources of
cash inflows and outflows. A cash flow statement can be defined as a statement
which summarizes sources of cash inflows and uses of cash outflows of a firm
during a particular period of time, say a month or a year. Such a statement can
be prepaid from the data made available from comparative balance sheet, profit
and loss account and additional information.

This statement reports cash

receipts and payments classified according to entities major activities operating,


investing and financing during the period a format that reconciles the begging
and ending cash balances. It reports a net cash inflow or net cash outflow for
each activity and for the overall business. It also reports from where cash has
come and how it has been spent.
Usefulness of Cash Flow Statement

Cash Flow Statement is very useful to the management for short


term planning due to the following reasons:(i)

Predict future cash flows. This statement is often use as an

indicator of the amount, timing and certainty of future cash flows on the basis of
what happened in the past. This approach is better than accrual basis data
presented by profit and loss account and balance sheet.
(ii)

Determine the ability to pay dividends and other commitments.

This statement indicates the sources and uses of cash under operating, investing
and financing activities, helps share holders to know whether the business can
make the payment of amount of dividends on their investments in shares and
creditors to receive interest and principal amount in time.
(iii)

Show the relationship of net income to changes in the business

cash. Generally there is direct relation between net income and cash. I net
income leads to increase in cash and wise versa. But there may be a situation
where a companys net income is high but decrease in cash balance and increase
in cash balance when net income is low. Every user is interested to know the
reasons or difference between the net income and net cash provided by
operations. The net income generally tells the progress of the business while
cash flow relates to the liquidity of business. The uses or helped to assess the
reliability of net profit with the help of this statement.
(iv) Efficiency in Cash Management.

This statement is very useful

to the management in evaluating financial policies and cash position. It will help
the management to make the reliable cash flow projections for the immediate
future and will tell surplus or deficiency of cash so that management may be
able to make plan for investment of surplus cash or to tap the sources where

from the deficiency is to be met. Thus it is an important financial tool for the
management as it helps in the efficient cash management.
(v)

Discloses Movement of Cash. Previous year cash flow statement

when compared with the budget of that year will indicate as to what extent the
resources of the enterprise were raised and applied.

Actual results when

compared with the original forecast may highlight the trend of the movement of
cash that may otherwise remain undetected,
(vi)

Discloses Success or Failure of Cash Planning.

Comparison of projected Cash flow Statement with the actual Cash flow
Statement will reveal the success or failure of cash planning and incase of
failure, necessary remedial steps can be taken to improve the position. It also
provides better measure for inter period and inter firm comparison.
(vii) Evaluate Management Decision. This statement, by providing
information relating to companies investing and financial activities, gives the
investors and creditors about cash flow information which help them evaluate
management decisions.
(viii) Enhances the Comparability of Report.

It

enhance

the

comparability of the reporting of operating performances by different


enterprises, because it eliminates the effect of using different accounting
treatments for the same transactions and events.
Limitations of Cash Flow Statement
Inspite of various uses of Cash Flow Statement, it has the following
limitations:

1.

Cash Flow Statement gives the main items of inflow and outflow

of cash only and does not show the liquidity position of the company.
2.

This statement is not a substitute of income statement which shows

both cash and non cash items. Therefore, net cash flow does not necessarily
mean net income of the business.
3.

It cannot replace funds flow statement as it cannot show the

financial position of the concern in totality.

Definitions
The following terms are used in this Statement with the meanings
specified:
(i)

Cash comprises cash on hand and demand deposits with banks.

(ii)

Cash equivalents are short term, highly liquid investments that are

readily convertible into known amounts of cash and which are subject to an
insignificant risk of changes in value.
(iii)

Cash flows are inflows and outflows of cash and cash

equivalents.
(iv)

Operating activities

are the principal revenue-producing

activities of the enterprise and other activities that are not investing or financing
activities.
(v)

Investing activities are the acquisition and disposal of long-term

assets and other investments not included in cash equivalents.


(vi)

Financing activities are activities that result in changes in the size

and composition of the owners capital (including preference share capital in


the case of a company) and borrowings of the enterprise.
(vii) Cash and Cash Equivalents Cash equivalents are held for the
purpose of meeting short-term cash commitments rather than for investment or
other purposes. For an investment to qualify as a cash equivalent, it must be

readily convertible to a known amount of cash and be subject to an


insignificant risk of changes in value. Therefore, an investment normally
qualifies as a cash equivalent only when it has a short maturity of, say, three
months or less from the date of acquisition. Investments in shares are excluded
from cash equivalents unless they are, in substance, cash equivalents; for
example, preference shares of a company acquired shortly before their
specified redemption date (provided there is only an insignificant risk of failure
of the company to repay the amount at maturity).Cash flows exclude
movements between items that constitute cash or cash equivalents because
these components are part of the cash management of an enterprise rather than
part of its operating, investing and financing activities. Cash management
includes the investment of excess cash in cash equivalents.

CLASSIFICATION OF CASH FLOWS


(i)

Cash Flows from Operating Activities


The amount of cash flows arising from operating activities is a key

indicator of the extent to which the operations of the enterprise have generated
sufficient cash flows to maintain the operating capability of the enterprise,
pay dividends, repay loans and make new investments without recourse to
external sources of financing. Information about the specific components of
historical operating cash flows is useful, in conjunction with other
information, in forecasting future operating cash flows.
Cash flows from operating activities are primarily derived from the
principal revenue-producing activities of the enterprise. Therefore, they
generally result from the transactions and other events that enter into the
determination of net profit or loss. Examples of cash flows from operating
activities are:
(a)

Cash receipts from the sale of goods and the rendering of

services;
(b)

Cash receipts from royalties, fees, commissions and other revenue;

(c)

Cash payments to suppliers for goods and services;

(d)

Cash payments to and on behalf of employees;

(e)

Cash receipts and cash payments of an insurance enterprise for

premiums and claims, annuities and other policy benefits;


(f)

Cash payments or refunds of income taxes unless they can be

specifically identified with financing and investing activities; and


(g)

Cash receipts and payments relating to futures contracts, forward

contracts, option contracts and swap contracts when the contracts are held for
dealing or trading purposes.
Some transactions, such as the sale of an item of plant, may give rise to a
gain or loss which is included in the determination of net profit or loss.
However, the cash flows relating to such transactions are cash flows from
investing activities.
An enterprise may hold securities and loans for dealing or trading
purposes, in which case they are similar to inventory acquired specifically for
resale. Therefore, cash flows arising from the purchase and sale of dealing or
trading securities are classified as operating activities. Similarly, cash
advances and loans made by financial enterprises are usually classified as
operating activities since they relate to the main revenue-producing activity of
that enterprise.

(ii)

Cash Flows from Investing Activities


The separate disclosure of cash flows arising from investing activities is

important because the cash flows represent the extent to which expenditures

have been made for resources intended to generate future income and cash
flows. Examples of cash flows arising from investing activities are:
(a)

Cash payments to acquire fixed assets (including intangibles).

These payments include those relating to capitalized research and development


costs and self-constructed fixed assets;
(b)

Cash receipts from disposal of fixed assets (including

intangibles);
(c)

Cash payments to acquire shares, warrants or debt instruments of

other enterprises and interests in joint ventures (other than payments for
those instruments considered to be cash equivalents and those held for dealing
or trading purposes);
(d)

Cash receipts from disposal of shares, warrants or debt

instruments of other enterprises and interests in joint ventures (other than


receipts from those instruments considered to be cash equivalents and those
held for dealing or trading purposes);
(e)

Cash advances and loans made to third parties (other than advances

and loans made by a financial enterprise);


(f)

Cash receipts from the repayment of advances and loans made to

third parties (other than advances and loans of a financial enterprise);


(g)

Cash payments for futures contracts, forward contracts, option

contracts and swap contracts except when the contracts are held for dealing or
trading purposes, or the payments are classified as financing activities; and

(h)

Cash receipts from futures contracts, forward contracts, option

contracts and swap contracts except when the contracts are held for dealing or
trading purposes, or the receipts are classified as financing activities.
When a contract is accounted for as a hedge of an identifiable position, the
cash flows of the contract are classified in the same manner as the cash flows
of the position being hedged.

Financing Activities
The separate disclosure of cash flows arising from financing activities is
important because it is useful in predicting claims on future cash flows by
providers of funds (both capital and borrowings) to the enterprise. Examples
of cash flows arising from financing activities are:

(a)

Cash proceeds from issuing shares or other similar

instruments;
(b)

Cash proceeds from issuing debentures, loans, notes, bonds, and

other short or long term borrowings;


(c)

Cash repayments of amounts borrowed.

(d)

Cash payments to redeem preference shares and

(e)

Payment of dividend.

Preparation 0f cash flow statement

An organization should prepare a cash flow statement according to


according to Account standard-3. The following basic information are required
for the preparation for the cash flow statement:
(1) Comparative Balance Sheets. Balance sheets at the beginning and at the
end of the accounting period are required to indicate to indicate the
amount of changes that have taken place in assets and liabilities and
capital.
(2) Profit and loss account. This account of the current period enables to
determine the amount of cash provided by or used in operating activities
during the accounting period after making adjustments for non cash
current assets and current liabilities.
(3) Additional data. In addition to the above statements, additional data are
collected to determine how cash has been provided or used e.g. sale or
purchase of asset for cash.
This statement is prepared in three stages as given below :
1. Net profit before taxation and extra ordinary items.
2. Cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities.
3. Cash flow statement
These are discussed one by one
1. Net profit before taxation and extraordinary items. This will not be equal to
the net profit as reported in the profit and loss account. It is so because of
taxation and certain non operating items (e.g., loss or profit on sale of fixed
assets, dividend received or paid, amount transferred to general, provision for
taxation, fictitious assets written of f etc.) charged to the profit and loss
account . Tax paid and non-operating items are adjusted to the figure of profit or
loss in order to get the net profit before taxation and extraordinary items.
2. Cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities. Net profit
before taxation and extraordinary items is further adjusted with reference to

depreciation in order to get the figure of operating profit before working capital
changes. This figure is further adjusted for changes in current assets (except
cash)/bank balance), current liabilities and tax paid deducted to get the amount
of net cash provided or used by operating activities. All the increases in current
assets except cash and decreases in current liabilities decrease cash. It is so
because increase in debtors takes place as current sales are greater than cash
collections; inventories increase when the current cost of goods purchased is
more than the current cost of goods sold leading to reduction in cash. Increase
in prepaid expenses reduces cash from operations because more cash is paid
than is required for their current services.

Likewise, decrease in current

liabilities reduces cash from operations because decrease in current liabilities


takes place when they are paid in cash. Similarly all decreases in current assets
except cash and increases in current liabilities increase cash from operations.
Creditors would increase because current purchases are more than the cash paid
to them during the current period. Decrease in prepaid expenses indicates that
less payment has been made for services than are currently used, i.e., some cash
has been saved causing an increase in cash from operations.
Changes in fixed assets and fixed liabilities have not been adjusted as
these are shown separately in the cash flow statement. It is so because current
assets (i.e., debtors as a result of credit sales, inventories as a result of purchases
and sales and prepaid expenses caused by operating expenses) and current
liabilities (i.e., creditors because of credit purchases and outstanding expenses
caused by non-payment of some of the expenses of the current period) are
directly related to operations.

Reporting Cash Flows from Operating Activities.

An enterprise should report cash flows from operating activities using


either:
(a)

the direct method, whereby major classes of gross cash receipts and
gross cash payments are disclosed; or

(b)

the indirect method, whereby net profit or loss is adjusted for the
effects of transactions of a non-cash nature, any deferrals or accruals
of past or future operating cash receipts or payments, and items of
income or expense associated with investing or financing cash flows.

The direct method provides information which may be useful in


estimating future cash flows and which is not available under the indirect
method and is, therefore, considered more appropriate than the indirect
method. Under the direct method, information about major classes of gross
cash receipts and gross cash payments may be obtained either:
(a) from the accounting records of the enterprise; or
(b) by adjusting sales, cost of sales (interest and similar income and
interest expense and similar charges for a financial enterprise) and
other items in the statement of profit and loss for:
i)

changes during the period in inventories and operating


receivables and payables;

ii)

other non-cash items; and

iii)

other items for which the cash effects are investing or financing
cash flows

Under the indirect method, the net cash flow from operating
activities is determined by adjusting net profit or loss for the effects of:
(a) changes during the period in inventories and operating receivables and
payables;
(b)

non-cash items such as depreciation, provisions, deferred taxes, and


unrealized foreign exchange gains and losses; and
all other items for which the cash effects are investing or financing cash

(c)

flows.
Alternatively, the net cash flow from operating activities may be presented
under the indirect method by showing the operating revenues and expenses
excluding non-cash items disclosed in the statement of profit and loss and the
changes during the period in inventories and operating receivables and
payables.

Reporting Cash Flows from Investing and Financing Activities


An enterprise should report separately major classes of gross cash
receipts and gross cash payments arising from investing and financing
activities, except to the extent that cash flows described in paragraphs 22 and
24 are reported on a net basis.

Reporting Cash Flows on a Net Basis


Cash flows arising from the following operating, investing or financing
activities may be reported on a net basis:
(a)

cash receipts and payments on behalf of customers when the cash flows

reflect the activities of the customer rather than those of the enterprise;
and
(b)

cash receipts and payments for items in which the turnover is quick, the
amounts are large, and the maturities are short.

Examples of cash receipts and payments referred to in paragraph 22(a)


are:
(a)

the acceptance and repayment of demand deposits by a bank;

(b)

funds held for customers by an investment enterprise; and


c) rents collected on behalf of, and paid over to, the owners of

properties

Examples of cash receipts and payments referred to in paragraph 22(b) are


advances made for, and the repayments of:
(a)

principal amounts relating to credit card customers;

(b)

the purchase and sale of investments; and

(c)

other short-term borrowings, for example, those which have a


maturity period of three months or less.

Cash flows arising from each of the following activities of a financial enterprise
may be reported on a net basis:
(a)

cash receipts and payments for the acceptance and repayment of


deposits with a fixed maturity date;

(b)

the placement of deposits with and withdrawal of deposits from other


financial enterprises; and

cash advances and loans made to customers and the repayment of those
advances and loans
Special items
1 Foreign Currency Cash Flows
Cash flows arising from transactions in a foreign currency should be
recorded in an enterprises reporting currency by applying to the foreign currency
amount the exchange rate between the reporting currency and the foreign
currency at the date of the cash flow. A rate that approximates the actual rate
may be used if the result is substantially the same as would arise if the rates at
the dates of the cash flows were used. The effect of changes in exchange rates
on cash and cash equivalents held in a foreign currency should be reported as a
separate part of the reconciliation of the changes in cash and cash equivalents
during the period.
Cash flows denominated in foreign currency are reported in a manner
consistent with Accounting Standard (AS) 11, Accounting for the Effects of
Changes in Foreign Exchange Rates 4. This permits the use of an exchange rate
that approximates the actual rate. For example, a weighted average exchange
rate for a period may be used for recording foreign currency transactions.
Unrealized gains and losses arising from changes in foreign exchange
rates are not cash flows. However, the effect of exchange rate changes on cash
and cash equivalents held or due in a foreign currency is reported in the cash
flow statement in order to reconcile cash and cash equivalents at the
beginning and the end of the period. This amount is presented separately from

cash flows from operating, investing and financing activities and


includes the differences, if any, had those cash flows been reported at the endof-period exchange rates
2 Extraordinary Items
The cash flows associated with extraordinary items should be classified as
arising from operating, investing or financing activities as appropriate and
separately disclosed.
The cash flows associated with extraordinary items are disclosed
separately as arising from operating, investing or financing activities in the
cash flow statement, to enable users to understand their nature and effect on the
present and future cash flows of the enterprise. These disclosures are in addition
to the separate disclosures of the nature and amount of extraordinary items
required by Accounting Standard (AS) 5, Net Profit or Loss for the Period,
Prior Period Items and Changes in Accounting Policies
3

Interest and Dividends


Cash flows from interest and dividends received and paid should each be

disclosed separately. Cash flows arising from interest paid and interest and
dividends received in the case of a financial enterprise should be classified as
cash flows arising from operating activities. In the case of other enterprises, cash
flows arising from interest paid should be classified as cash flows from
financing activities while interest and dividends received should be classified
as cash flows from investing activities. Dividends paid should be classified as
cash flows from financing activities.
The total amount of interest paid during the period is disclosed in the
cash flow statement whether it has been recognized as an expense in the

statement of profit and loss or capitalized in accordance with Accounting


Standard (AS) 10, Accounting for Fixed Assets.
Interest paid and interest and dividends received are usually classified as
operating cash flows for a financial enterprise. However, there is no
consensus on the classification of these cash flows for other
enterprises. Some argue that interest paid and interest and dividends
received may be classified as operating cash flows because they enter
into the determination of net profit or loss. However, it is more
appropriate that interest paid and interest and dividends received are
classified as financing cash flows and investing cash flows respectively,
because they are cost of obtaining financial resources or returns on
investments.
Some argue that dividends paid may be classified as a component of cash
flows from operating activities in order to assist users to determine the ability of
an enterprise to pay dividends out of operating cash flows. However, it is
considered more appropriate that dividends paid should be classified as cash
flows from financing activities because they are cost of obtaining financial
resources.

Taxes on Income
Cash flows arising from taxes on income should be separately

disclosed and should be classified as cash flows from operating activities unless
they can be specifically identified with financing and investing activities.

Taxes on income arise on transactions that give rise to cash flows that are
classified as operating, investing or financing activities in a cash flow
statement. While tax expense may be readily identifiable with investing or
financing activities, the related tax cash flows are often impracticable to
identify and may arise in a different period from the cash flows of the
underlying transactions. Therefore, taxes paid are usually classified as cash
flows from operating activities. However, when it is practicable to identify the
tax cash flow with an individual transaction that gives rise to cash flows that
are classified as investing or financing activities, the tax cash flow is classified
as an investing or financing activity as appropriate. When tax cash flow are
allocated over more than one class of activity, the total amount of taxes paid
is disclosed

5. Investments in Subsidiaries, Associates and Joint Ventures


When accounting for an investment in an associate or a subsidiary or a
joint venture, an investor restricts its reporting in the cash flow statement to
the cash flows between itself and the investee/joint venture, for example, cash
flows relating to dividends and advances.

6 Acquisitions and Disposals of Subsidiaries and Other Business Units


The aggregate cash flows arising from acquisitions and from
disposals of subsidiaries or other business units should be presented
separately and classified as investing activities.

An enterprise should disclose, in aggregate, in respect of both acquisition


and disposal of subsidiaries or other business units during the period each of
the following:
(a)

the total purchase or disposal consideration; and

(b)

the portion of the purchase or disposal consideration discharged by


means of cash and cash equivalents.

The separate presentation of the cash flow effects of acquisitions and


disposals of subsidiaries and other business units as single line items helps to
distinguish those cash flows from other cash flows. The cash flow effects of
disposals are not deducted from those of acquisitions.

7 Non-cash Transactions
Investing and financing transactions that do not require the use of cash or
cash equivalents should be excluded from a cash flow statement. Such
transactions should be disclosed elsewhere in the financial statements in a way
that provides all the relevant information about these investing and financing
activities
Many investing and financing activities do not have a direct impact on current
cash flows although they do affect the capital and asset structure of an
enterprise. The exclusion of non-cash transactions from the cash flow
statement is consistent with the objective of a cash flow statement as these
items do not involve cash flows in the current period. Examples of non-cash
transactions are:
(a)

the acquisition of assets by assuming directly related liabilities;

(b)

the acquisition of an enterprise by means of issue of shares; and

(c)

the conversion of debt to equity.

RATIONAL OF THE STUDY


The study is global in scope, since many of the risks involved are global or regional in nature.
For this study, stress is defined as a situation where private sector proponents have exited, or
are contemplating exit from a project. Information on stress was derived from the World
Bank's Private Participation in Infrastructure (PPI) dataset, which was used as the source for
much of the data used in the estimation. This global dataset contains project-specific
information on a large number of projects classifiable as PPP, including the total value of
investment, sector, sub-sector, type of transaction, and multilateral participation. It covers
projects which achieved financial closure from 1984 up to the present. The data is crosssectional, with projects classified according to their current status (i.e., whether they are
operational, distressed, canceled, or concluded). Although the data is cross-sectional, it
contains temporal information that can also be used in analysis. Because the sample period
spans the emergence of PPP in the late 1980s, through the Asian and Argentine crisis, and
beyond, the sample includes many projects that have undergone the most tumultuous
experiences in PPP, as well as the periods of consolidation that followed. The PPI dataset is
augmented by country-specific macroeconomic data and, where available, additional projectspecific data such as country growth and exchange rate information.
Analyzing and addressing stress also helps stakeholders enhance PPP's attractiveness as an
investment, by minimizing the fiscal and social impacts of poorly designed and managed
projects.

SCOPE OF THE STUDY

Scope
1.

An enterprise should prepare a cash flow statement and should

present it for each period for which financial statements are presented.
2.

Users of an enterprises financial statements are interested in how

the enterprise generates and uses cash and cash equivalents. This is the case
regardless of the nature of the enterprises activities and irrespective of
whether cash can be viewed as the product of the enterprise, as may be the case
with a financial enterprise. Enterprises need cash for essentially the same
reasons, however different their principal revenue-producing activities might be.
They need cash to conduct their operations, to pay their obligations, and to
provide returns to their investors.

OBJECTIVE OF STUDY
Objectives
Information about the cash flows of an enterprise is useful in providing
users of financial statements with a basis to assess the ability of the
enterprise to generate cash and cash equivalents and the needs of the
enterprise to utilize those cash flows. The economic decisions that are taken
by users require an evaluation of the ability of an enterprise to generate cash
and cash equivalents and the timing and certainty of their generation.
The Statement deals with the provision of information about the historical
changes in cash and cash equivalents of an enterprise by means of a cash flow
statement which classifies cash flows during the period from operating, investing
and financing activities.

LITERATURE REVIEW
LITERATURE REVIEWCustomer satisfaction is an important theoretical as well as practical issue for most marketers
and consumer researchers (10). Customer satisfaction can be considered the essence of
success in todays highly competitive world of business. Thus the significance of customer
satisfaction and customer retention in strategy development for a market oriented and
customer focused firm can not be overstated. Consequently, customer satisfaction is
increasingly becoming a corporate goal as more and more companies strive for quality in
their product and services (11). Customer satisfaction is the feeling or attitude of a customer
towards a product or services after it has been used and is generally described as a full
meeting of ones expectations (12). Customer satisfaction is a major outcome of marketing
activity whereby it serves as a link between the various stages of consumer buying behavior.
For instance, if customers are satisfied with particular service offering after its use, then they
are likely to engage in repeat purchase and try line extensions (13).A study conducted by
Levesque and McDougall (14) confirmed and reinforced the idea that unsatisfactory customer
service leads to a drop in customer satisfaction and willingness to recommend the service to a
friend. This would in turn lead to an increase in the rate of switching by customers.
There can be potentially many antecedents of customer satisfaction as the dimensions
underlying satisfaction judgment are global rather than specific (15). However, some argue
that customers develop norms for product performance based on general product experiences,
and these, rather than expectations from a brands performance, determine the confirmation
/disconfirmation process (16). More recent work has argued that in addition to the cognitive
components, satisfaction judgments are also dependent upon affective components as both
coexist and make independent contributions to the satisfaction judgments (17).
Researchers have established some of the key antecedents of customer satisfaction in retail
banking with respect to customer satisfaction in the competitive world of business as well as
the key antecedents to the formation of overall customer satisfaction (18). The bottom line is
that organizations will always be attentive to maximizing profits and their success will be
determined by how they manage customer relationships. Marketing has taken some initial

steps to place the customer at the center of its efforts, such as information sharing in customer
service channels, sales force automation and target market segmentation. Customer
profitability management requires a multi-level marketing return on investment analysis
covering a series of marketing activities that can be integrated and optimized for a customer
or customer segment (19).
Customer satisfaction, a business term, is a measure of how products and services supplied by
a company meet or surpass customer expectation. It is seen as a key performance indicator
within business and is part of the four perspectives of a Balanced Scorecard.
In a competitive marketplace where businesses compete for customers, customer satisfaction
is seen as a key differentiator and increasingly has become a key element of business strategy.
There is a substantial body of empirical literature that establishes the benefits of customer
satisfaction for firms.
Organizations need to retain existing customers while targeting non-customer. Measuring
customer satisfaction provides an indication of how successful the organization is at
providing products and/or services to the marketplace.
Customer satisfaction is an abstract concept and the actual manifestation of the state of
satisfaction will vary from person to person and product/service to product/service. The state
of satisfaction depends on a number of both psychological and physical variables which
correlate with satisfaction behaviors such as return and recommend rate. The level of
satisfaction can also vary depending on other factors the customer, such as other products
against which the customer can compare the organization's products.

RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
According to Green and Tall A research design is the specification of the methods and
procedures for acquiring the information needed. It is the overall operational pattern or
framework of the project that stipulates which information is to be collected, from where it is
to be collected and by what procedures
This research process based on primary data analysis and secondary data analysis will be
clearly defined to meet the objectives of the study.

I chose the primary sources to get the data. A questionnaire was designed in
accordance with our mentor in Shirts. I chose a sample of about 30 corporate
customers

I collected some data from the secondary sources like published Company documents,
internet etc.

Research Design
A research design is the arrangement of conditions for collections and analysis of data in a
manner that aims to combine relevance to the research purpose with economy in procedures.
It is a descriptive cross sectional design .It is the conceptual structure with in which research
is conducted; it constitutes the blueprint for the collection, measurement and analysis of data.
It is needed because it facilitates the smooth sailing of the various research operations,
thereby making research as efficient as possible yielding maximal information with minimal
expenditure of effort, time and money.
In the preliminary stage, my research stage constituted of exploratory study by which it is
clear that the existence of the problem is obvious .So, I can directly head for the conclusive
research.
Sampling Plan
Sampling plan is a distinct phase of research process. In this stage I have to determine who
is to be sampled, how large should be the needed sample and how sampling unit is to be
selected.
Population
In my research, I have defined my population as a complete set of customers of Sagar City.

Sample Survey
As compared to census study, a sample study has been conducted by us because of:
Wide range of population, it was impossible to cover the whole population
Time and money constraints.
Sample Unit
In this survey I took the list of customers from the dealers of Shirts
Sampling Technique
Sampling technique implies the method of choosing the sample items, the two methods of
selecting sample are:
Probability method.
Non-probability method.
Probability method is those in which every item of the universe has an equal chance of the
inclusion in the sample. Non-probability methods are those that do not provide every item
in the universe with known cause of being included in the sampl
DATA SOURCES
Research is totally based on primary data. Secondary data can be used only for the
reference. Research has been done by primary data collection, and primary data has been
collected by interacting with various people. The secondary data has been collected
through various journals and websites and some special publications of BIRLA.
SAMPLING
i.

Sampling Procedure

ii.

The sample is selected in a random way, irrespective of them being investor or not or
availing the services or not. It was collected through mails and personal visits to the
known persons, by formal and informal talks and through filling up the questionnaire
prepared. The data has been analyzed by using the measures of central tendencies like
mean, median, mode. The group has been selected and the analysis has been done on the
basis statistical tools available.
Sample Size
The sample size of my project is limited to 200 only. Out of which only 135 people
attempted all the questions. Other 65 not investing in MFs attempted only 2 questions.

iii.

Sample Design
Data has been presented with the help of bar graph, pie charts, line graphs etc.

ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DATA


4.1 TABLE SHOWING DIVIDEND PAYOUT RATIO
NET PROFIT
Particulars
Dividend

Mar '06

Mar '07

Mar '08

Mar '09

Mar '10

Rs. In crores
29.85

24.20

17.04

17.11

15.66

Payout Ratio
Net Profit

Interpretation:The dividend payout ratio net profit is constantly decreasing year by year. In
the year 2006 it was 29.85 crores while in the year 2009 it has decreased to
24.20 crores, but it has gradually decreased to 17.04 crores in 2007 and stays
constant in 2009 with 17.11 crores but again it is decreased to 15.66 in 2010.
This shows that the dividend payout ratio net profit was decreasing during those
years.

4.1.1GRAPH SHOWING DIVIDEND PAYOUT RATIO NET PROFIT

Inference:
From the above graph it clear shows that the net profit of dividend payout ratio
is decreasing gradually.

4.2 TABLE SHOWING DIVIDEND PAYOUT RATIO CASH PROFIT


Particulars

Mar '06

Mar '07

Mar '08

Mar '09

Mar '10

Dividend

26.47

21.95

15.87

15.85

14.54

Payout
Ratio Cash
Profit

INTERPRETATION :
The cash profit dividend payout ratio is also decreasing year by year . In the
year 2006 it was 26.47 crores and it has gradually decreased to 21.95 crores in
2007 and again gradually decreases as it was decreased in the previous year , it
has decreased to 15.87 crores in 2008 and stays constant with 15.85 crores in
2009 and again it has just decreased to 14.54 crores in 2010. This shows that the
cash profit dividend payout ratio has only decreased and never increased during
these 5 years

4.2.1 GRAPH SHOWING THE CASH PROFIT OF DIVIDEND PAYOUT RATIO

Inference:
From the above graph it clear shows that the cash profit of dividend payout ratio
is decreasing gradually for the following years.

4.3 TABLE SHOWING EARNING RETENTION RATIO

Particulars
Earning
Retention
Ratio

Mar '06
70.11

Mar '07
75.82

Mar '08
82.97

Mar '09
82.80

Mar '10
84.35

INTERPRETATION
The earning retention ratio was 70.11 crores during the year 2006 and has
increased to 75.82 crores in 2007 and again gradually increases in the year 2008
with 82.97 crores and stays constant in the next year 82.80 and again it has just
increased to 84.35 in 2010. This shows that earning retention ratio has increased
year by year. The increase in earning retention ratio is good for the bank

4.3.1 GRAPH SHOWING EARNING RETENTION RATIO

Inference:

From the above graph it clear shows that the earning retention ratio is increasing
gradually.

4.4 TABLE SHOWING CASH EARNING RETENTION RATIO

particular
s
Cash

Mar '06

Mar '07

Mar '08

Mar '09

Mar '10

73.49

78.06

84.13

84.07

85.47

Earning
Retention
Ratio

INTERPRETATION :

The cash earning retention ratio is constantly increasing year by year . the cash
earning retention ratio was 73.49 crores in 2006 . in the year 2007 it is increased
to 84.13 crores and again it is increased in the next year as it is increased in the
previous year to 84.13 crores in 2008 and remains constant in the next year
with 84.13 crores in 2009 and in the year 2010 it is just increased to 85.47
crores this shows that the cash earning retention ratio is only increased and
not decreased during thoese 5 years

4.4.1 GRAPH SHOWING CASH EARNING RETENTION RATIO

Inference:
From the above graph it clear shows that the cash earning retention ratio is
increasing gradually.

4.5. TABLE SHOWING ADJUSTED CASH FLOW TIMES

Particulars
AdjustedCa

Mar '06
97.44

Mar '07
91.38

Mar '08
69.74

Mar '09
74.82

Mar '10
76.06

sh Flow
Times

INTERPRETATION :
The adjusted cash flow times is constantly

decreasing year by year . the

adjusted cash flow times was 97.44 crores in 2006 and in the year 2007 it is just
decreased to 91.38 crores . in the year 2008 it is gradually decreased to 69.74
crores but only from 2009 it has started increasing , it is increased to 74.82
crores in 2009 . in the year 2010 again it is just increased to 76.06 crores

4.5.1 GRAPH SHOWING ADJUSTED CASH FLOW TIMES

Inference:
From the above graph it is inferred that the adjusted cash flow times
were fluctuating during these years

4.6 TABLE SHOWING EARNINGS PER SHARE

particulars
Earnings
Per Share

Mar '06
13.37

Mar '07
16.74

Mar '08
27.46

Mar '09
34.18

Mar '10
41.08

INTERPRETATION :
The earning per share is constantly increasing year by year. The earning per
share was 13.37 crores in 2006 and in the year 2007 it is just increased to 16.74
crores . in the year 2008 it is gradually increased to 27.46 crores . in the year
2009 it is increased to 34.18 crores and again it is increased in 2010 as it was
increased in previous year , it is increase to 34.18 crores by 2010 . this shows
that the earning per share is only increasing and has never decreased during
those 5 year

4.6.1 GRAPH SHOWING EARNINGS PER SHARE

Inference:
From the above graph it clear shows that the earnings per share is increasing
gradually.

4.7 TABLE SHOWING NET CASH FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

particulars

Mar '06

Mar '07

Mar '08

Mar '09

Mar '10

Net Cash
From
Operating

-1124.99

1956.28

1930.64

5599.13

-505.07

Activities

INTERPRETATION:
The netcash from operating activities was -1124.99 crores in the year 2006 and
the bank was not in good position during that year. Later in the year 2007 there
was some improvement , like it is increased to 1956.28 crores and there was no
big changes in 2007 as it is just decreased to 1930.64 crores but it is gradually
increased to 5599.13 in 2009 . in the year 2010 it is totally decreased to -505.97
crores. This shows that the bank is facing problem in operating activities.

4.7.1 GRAPH SHOWING NET CASH FROM OPERATING ACTIVITIES

INFERENCE
From the above graph it is inferred that the net cash from operating
activities of the bank is not good and were fluctuating during these
years.

FINDINGS
1. The dividend payout ratio net profit is constantly decreasing year by year. In
the year 2006 it was 29.85 crores while in the year 2009 it has decreased to
24.20 crores, but it has gradually decreased to 17.04 crores in 2007 and was
constant during the year 2009 with 17.11 crores but again it is decreased to
15.66 in 2010. This shows that the dividend payout ratio net profit has only
decreased and it has never increased during those years.
2. The cash profit dividend payout ratio is also decreasing year by year . In the
year 2006 it was 26.47 crores and it has gradually decreased to 21.95 crores in
2007 and again gradually decreases as it was decreased in the previous year , it
has decreased to 15.87 crores in 2008 and stays constant with 15.85 crores in
2009 and again it has just decreased to 14.54 crores in 2010. This shows that the
cash profit dividend payout ratio has only decreased and never increased during
3. The earning retention ratio was 70.11 crores during the year 2006 and has
increased to 75.82 crores in 2007 and again gradually increases in the year 2008
with 82.97 crores and stays constant in the next year 82.80 and again it has just
increased to 84.35 in 2010. This shows that earning retention ratio has increased
year by year. The increase in earning retention ratio is good for the bank
4. The cash earning retention ratio is constantly increasing year by year . the
cash earning retention ratio was 73.49 crores in 2006 . in the year 2007 it is
increased to 84.13 crores and again it is increased in the next year as it is
increased in the previous year to 84.13 crores in 2008 and remains constant in
the next year with 84.13 crores in 2009 and in the year 2010 it is just increased
to 85.47 crores this shows that the cash earning retention ratio is only
increased and not decreased during thoese 5 years
5. The adjusted cash flow times is constantly decreasing year by year . the
adjusted cash flow times was 97.44 crores in 2006 and in the year 2007 it is just
decreased to 91.38 crores . in the year 2008 it is gradually decreased to 69.74
crores but only from 2009 it has started increasing , it is increased to 74.82
crores in 2009 . in the year 2010 again it is just increased to 76.06 crores.
6. The earning per share is constantly increasing year by year. The earning per
share was 13.37 crores in 2006 and in the year 2007 it is just increased to 16.74

crores . in the year 2008 it is gradually increased to 27.46 crores . in the year
2009 it is increased to 34.18 crores and again it is increased in 2010 as it was
increased in previous year , it is increase to 34.18 crores by 2010 . this shows
that the earning per share is only increasing and has never decreased during
those 5 years
7. The net cash from operating activities was -1124.99 crores in the year 2006
and the bank was not in good position during that year. Later in the year 2007
there was some improvement , like it is increased to 1956.28 crores and there
was no big changes in 2007 as it is just decreased to 1930.64 crores but it is
gradually increased to 5599.13 in 2009 . in the year 2010 it is totally decreased
to -505.97 crores. This shows that the bank is facing problem in operating
activities.
8. The net cash from investing activities was -53.87 crores in 2006 and It is just
decreased to -101.33 crores in 2007. In the year 2008 it is again decreased to
-209.32 crores and again it is decreased in the next year as it was decreased in
previous year to -309.76 crores in 2009. Only in the year 2010 it has increased
to -200.43 crores and this shows that there were no improvements during these
5 years.
9.The net cash from financing activities was 997.41 crores during the year 2006
and was gradually decreased to 180.98 crores in 2007 and again it has decreased
to -49.92 crores in 2008 but only in 2009 it is increased to 597.72 crores and
again it has just decreased to 497.26 crores . during the 5 years there were ups
and downs in the net cash from financing activities but at last it has only
decreased from 997.41 to 497.26

10.The net cash and cash equivalents were increased and decreased in the last 5
years . in the year 2006 it is -181.45 crores and it has increased to 2035.93
crores in 2007 and it is just decreased to 1671.40 crores but in the next year
2009 it has gradually increased to 5887.09 cores and finally it is gradually
decreased to -208.24 crores in the last year 2010. This shows that the bank was
good in . the middle years and there were no improvement during those 5 years
11.The opening cash and cash equivalents was 6571.97 crores in the year 2006
and it is just decreased to 6390.51 crores in 2007 . in the year 2008 it is
increased to 8426.44 crores and again it is increased to 10097.84 crores but it

is gradually increased to 15984.93 crores in the year 2010. This shows that the
opening cash and cash equivalents has only increased during those 5 years.
12.The closing cash and cash equivalents was 6390.52 crores in 2006. And it is
increased to 8426.44 crores in 2007 and again in the year 2008 it is increased to
10097.84 crores. In the year 2009 it is gradually increased to 15984.93 crores
and it is just decreased to 15776.69 crores by the year 2010. This shows that the
closing cash and cash equivalents is only increased during these years.

SUGGESTION

1. The dividend payout ratio should be maintained as the shareholders would prefer to
invest only if the dividend payout increases.
2. The EPS is increasing for the bank on yearly basis. So, the bank should maintain the
EPS so that the holders are retained by the bank.
3.

The adjusted cash flow is decreasing for the past few years and this cash flow is
considered as operating or working capital of any bank. But the cash flow is neither
stable nor increasing as it is fluctuating the adjusted cash flow should be maintained

and the cash flow should be planned in such a way that the cash flow should increase
on a yearly basis.
4. Net Cash is the cash that is reserved in the bank for any investing or financing
activities. The cash should be increasing in any business to maintain it sound and
healthy bank. The Net cash should increase on a yearly basis and the net cash is the
life blood of any company or bank for diversification or expansion of it respectively.
5. Opening cash and cash equivalent is the initial investment or opening balance of any
business. But in this case it is for bank, so as per that the opening cash is increasing
for bank and this should be maintained as this will have a drastic impact on the
balance and the bank should also keep up this performance to improve in positive
direction.
6. Closing cash and cash equivalent is the closing balance or net balance available at the
end of the year. The closing cash was increasing substantially for all the years except
for the year 2010 as the balance has pitched down this should be maintained and
focused for better closing balance at the end of each year. The closing balance should
be looked for positive increase as it decreased when compared to other years.

Risk Management strategies of Union Bank of India must be revised.

Bank must try to reduce its Net and Gross NPA.


Bank must try to improve its Capital Adequacy Ratio.
Bank must do proper investigation before lending.
Bank must do pre and post monitoring of Loans.
Credit worthiness must be checked before giving loans.
Bank must not try to take financial risk

CONCLUSIONS

The process of financial risk management is an ongoing one.Strategies need


to be implemented and refined as the market and requirements change.
Refinements may reflect changing expectations about market rates, changes
to the business environment, or changing international political conditions, for
example. In general, the process can be summarized as follows:
Identify and prioritize key financial risks.
Determine an appropriate level of risk tolerance.
Implement risk management strategy in accordance with policy.
Measure, report, monitor, and refine as needed. Risk management needs to
be looked at as an organizational approach, as management of risks
independently cannot have the desired effect over the long term. In this project
I have analyzed the risk management process of Union Bank of India. It was
found that Net and Gross NPA of the bank is increasing which is not good for
the bank. Thus we can say that Bank must improve its risk management
strategies

Credit Appraisal is a process of appraising the credit worthiness of loan


applicants.
The funds of depositors i.e general public are mobilized by means of
such advance / investment.
Thus it extremely important for the lender bank to assess the risk
associated with credit, thereby ensure the security for the funds
deposited by the depositors.
In UBI the credit appraisal is done by thorough study of the project
which involves Following.
1) Evaluation of Management: A detailed study about the promoters is
carried out in order to ensure promoters are experienced in the line of
business and are capable to implement and run the project
2) Technical Feasibility: A detailed study about the technical aspects is
done to determine the technical soundness of the project
3) Financial Viability: A detailed study relating to financial viability of the
project is done; thereby ensuring that project will generate sufficient
surplus to repay the lan installment and interest
4) Risk analysis: It determines the risk associated with the project this
is done by performing a Sensitivity analysis and Credit Rating. With
Sensitivity Analysis the projects capacity to service debts under
worsened conditions is determined. Credit rating, provides rating for
various parameters like management, financial, market and so, thereby
determine the credit worthiness of the borrower
5) It is on the basis of the credit risk level, collateral securities to be
given by the borrower are determined. This shows Union Bank of India
has sound system for credit appraisal

BIBLIOGRAPHY

Books : Management Accounting-Principles and Practice.,


By Sharma R.K & Gupta Shashi K Eighth Edition, Kalyani
Publishers, New Delhi.
Financial Management and Policy,
Bhalla V.K
Edition, Annual Publications, New Delhi.

By
First

Management Accounting and Financial Control,


By Maheshwari S.N
Thirteen Edition,
Sultan Chand & Sons, New Delhi(2002).
Research Methodology-Methods & Techniques,
By Kothari C.R
Second Edition, Vishwa Prakashan Delhi (1990).
Management of Working Capital,
Gupta Sunita.
First Edition, New Century
Publications, New Delhi(2003).

By

Cost and Financial Analysis,


- By
Jain.S.P. & Narang.K.L.
Third Revised Edition, Kalyani
Publishers, New Delhi.
Management Accounting,
By MN Arora
Publications, New Delhi(2003).

First Edition, New Century

Cost and Financial Analysis,


- By
Jawaharlal
Third Edition, Himalaya
Publishers, New Delh

Websites: www.unionbankofindia.com
www.scribd.com

QUESTIONNAIRE
Name of Customer _______________
Mobile No.______________
Name of the bank and type of account_______________________________________
Please answer the questions and tick at the place that matches your opinion.
(A)
Mobile Banking
(b)
Tele Banking.
How would you describe your views about Customer Service Representatives? Please tick in
The appropriate column.
(1: Very Dissatisfied/2: Dissatisfied/3: Satisfied/4: Very satisfied/5: Highly Satisfied), specify
the Reason if not using the service
Call answering time
Flawless/correct operations.

Understanding and replying queries correctly


Communication skills/positive approach
General assessment about the service
Branch Banking
How would you describe your views about Branch Banking? Please tick in the appropriate
column.
(1: Very Dissatisfied/2: Dissatisfied/3: Satisfied/4: Very satisfied/5: Highly Satisfied)
Behavior of the staff
Time taken to process the transaction
Working Hours
General assessment about the services provided by the branch
Internet Banking
How would you describe your views about Internet Banking services? Please tick in the
appropriate column.
(1: Very Dissatisfied/2: Dissatisfied/3: Satisfied/4: Very satisfied/5: Highly Satisfied), specify
the reason if not using the service.
Page setup/Menu flow
Ease of use/navigation
Speed of page loading
Variety of transactions
General assessment about the service
ATM Banking
How would you describe your views about ATM Banking services? Please tick in the
appropriate column.
(1: Very Dissatisfied/2: Dissatisfied/3: Satisfied/4: Very satisfied/5: Highly Satisfied.
Reason if not using the service
ATM network distribution
Continuous service
Variety of transactions
Easy of screen use
General assessment about the service
The overall experience of customer ranged from good to satisfactory while opening an
account in any of five banks
Scale 1-7
Demographic profile of the customers
Demographics
1. Gender
Male
Female
2. Marital status
Married
Unmarried
Other
3. Monthly Family income
Less than Rs10000
Rs10000-20000
Rs20000-30000
Rs30000-40000
More than 40000
4. Age
Below 25 years
25-35 years

35-45 years
Above 55 years
5. Education
Secondary
Undergraduate
Post Graduate
6. Occupation
Home maker
Self employed
Students

45-55 years

Higher secondary
Graduate

Service
Retired