‘FOREST’ WASTES

ITS STAR POWER

‘SHRIMP BOY’ GUILTY

JURY CONVICTS RAYMOND CHOW OF CHINATOWN CRIMES

MACK MAKES
NFL HISTORY

LOCAL PAGE 3

SPORTS PAGE 11

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 17

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016 • XVI, Edition 125

U.S. hiring defies global worry
Employers hiring at robust pace, 2.65 million jobs added in 2015 but wages stay flat
By Christopher S. Rugaber
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy is
motoring ahead despite slowing global
growth that caused upheavals in financial
markets around the world this week.
Employers added a robust 292,000 jobs
last month, and the unemployment rate
stayed low at 5 percent, the Labor

Department said Friday. Job gains in the
October-December
quarter
averaged
284,000, the best three-month increase
since last January.
The strong hiring underscores the
resilience of the United States at a time of
slow global growth and financial turmoil.
Healthy consumer spending, modest gains
in home construction and an uptick in government spending should offset drags from

overseas and bolster growth this year, economists said.
The report “immediately puts to rest a lot
of the worries that the U.S. economy will
come undone due to the intensifying global
headwinds coming out of China and the
Middle East,” said Mark Vitner, an economist at Wells Fargo.
For all of 2015, employers added 2.65
million jobs, a monthly average of

221,000. That made 2015 the second-best
year for hiring since 1999, after 2014.
The unemployment rate has held at 5 percent for the past three months, despite the
solid job gains, because nearly 1 million
more Americans have begun seeking work
since September.
Wages were the one weak spot in

See ECONOMY, Page 10

School spending
plan draws praise
Despite increased spending, some
feel room for improvement exists
By Austin Walsh

Inside

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

KERRY CHAN LADDARAN/DAILY JOURNAL

Many local and state officials lauded
Gov. Jerry Brown’s most recent state
budget proposal, which aims to pump
$2. 4 billion more into the public
school system than last year.
The $122.6 billion spending deal
proposed Thursday, Jan. 7, by Brown
offers to direct $71.6 billion from the Democrats,
advocates
general fund into the state school sys- eye California’s
tem, $24 billion more than what was booming revenues
available during the depths of the Great
See page 5
Recession.
Allie Jaarsma, spokeswoman for the
San Mateo County Office of Education, cheered Brown’s elevated financial commitment to local students.
“The San Mateo County Office of Education is pleased
that Governor Brown’s proposed budget continues to allo-

Chris, John and David Marcovici, brothers and proprietors of Jack’s Restaurant share a laugh together on the patio of the San
Mateo location.

See BUDGET, Page 9

A true family-style eatery

Report: Support systems
Three brothers at center of every Jack’s Restaurant failing California children

By Kerry Chan Laddaran
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

John, David and Chris Marcovici,
three brothers with different personalities jovially poke fun at each other
when they get together. But when it
comes to their business, Jack’s
Restaurant, hospitality is a serious
topic.
“We think about how can we make a
place where people feel comfortable
for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” said
John Marcovici.
With a hard-to-miss sign on El
Camino
Real,
blazoned with
Hollywood-style light bulbs that spell
out “Jack’s,” the San Mateo location,

opened in 2014, is the third addition to
the business. The first one in Pleasant
Hill launched in 2010, followed by a
second opening in San Bruno the following year.
To the familial business partners,
running a growing chain of restaurants
takes more than providing a comfortable place with good food. It is about
extending themselves and translating
their experiences and family values
into every aspect of operations.
As teenagers growing up in
Concord, the Marcovici boys spent
most of their time working at their parent’s cafe, Eleni’s, named after their
mom. Their devotion to mom and dad
meant having a modified teenage life.

Instead of going out, friends came to
the restaurant to hang out, said John
Marcovici.
“We would to go there after hours and
drink beer, but my mom knows about it
now,” he said.
Fond of good times, good food and
great company, John Marcovici and
his brothers created Jack’s, named
after their grandfather, with the sense
of celebration at restaurants with
which they grew up. The family sold
Eleni’s in 1989.
“We’re really into having fun,” said
John Marcovici.
Inside every restaurant, pictures of

See JACK’S, Page 20

More resources, focus needed
to address areas of concern

By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Despite progress made in recent years, more should be
done to support young children across the state, especially
those born into poverty, according to a recent report.
Children Now, an education and children’s health advocacy group, released Wednesday, Jan. 6, its annual report card
gauging the overall well-being of the state’s youth population.
The report, which gauges a variety of topics from education to child welfare, found many of the support systems

See REPORT Page 20

2

FOR THE RECORD

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“Love me when I least deserve
it, because that’s when I really need it.”
— Swedish proverb

This Day in History

1916

The World War I Battle of Gallipoli
ended after eight months with an
Ottoman Empire victory as Allied
forces withdrew.

In 1 7 8 8 , Connecticut became the fifth state to ratify the U.S.
Constitution.
In 1 7 9 3 , Frenchman Jean Pierre Blanchard, using a hot-air
balloon, flew between Philadelphia and Woodbury, New
Jersey.
In 1 8 6 1 , Mississippi became the second state to secede from
the Union, the same day the Star of the West, a merchant vessel bringing reinforcements and supplies to Federal troops at
Fort Sumter, South Carolina, retreated because of artillery fire.
In 1 9 1 3 , Richard Milhous Nixon, the 37th president of the
United States, was born in Yorba Linda, California.
In 1 9 1 4 , the County of Los Angeles opened the country’s
first public defender’s office. The fraternity Phi Beta Sigma
was founded at Howard University in Washington, D.C.
In 1 9 3 1 , Bobbi Trout and Edna May Cooper broke an
endurance record for female aviators as they returned to Mines
Field in Los Angeles after flying a Curtiss Robin monoplane
continuously for 122 hours and 50 minutes.
In 1 9 4 5 , during World War II, American forces began landing
on the shores of Lingayen Gulf in the Philippines as the
Battle of Luzon got underway, resulting in an Allied victory
over Imperial Japanese forces.
In 1 9 5 7 , Anthony Eden resigned as British prime minister
for health reasons; he was succeeded by Harold Macmillan.
In 1 9 6 8 , the Surveyor 7 space probe made a soft landing on
the moon, marking the end of the American series of
unmanned explorations of the lunar surface.
In 1 9 7 2 , reclusive billionaire Howard Hughes, speaking by
telephone from the Bahamas to reporters in Hollywood, said
a purported autobiography of him by Clifford Irving was a
fake.
In 1 9 8 7 , the White House released a Jan. 1986 memorandum
prepared for President Ronald Reagan by Lt. Col. Oliver L.
North showing a link between U.S. arms sales to Iran and the
release of American hostages in Lebanon.

Birthdays

Rock musician
Jimmy Page is 72.

Actor J.K. Simmons
is 61.

Catherine, Duchess
of Cambridge, is 34.

Author Judith Krantz is 88. Football Hall-of-Famer Bart
Starr is 82. Sportscaster Dick Enberg is 81. Actress K. Callan
is 80. Folk singer Joan Baez is 75. Rockabilly singer Roy
Head is 75. Actor John Doman is 71. Singer David Johansen
(aka Buster Poindexter) is 66. Singer Crystal Gayle is 65.
Actress Imelda Staunton is 60. Nobel Peace laureate
Rigoberto Menchu is 57. Rock musician Eric Erlandson is 53.
Actress Joely Richardson is 51. Rock musician Carl Bell
(Fuel) is 49. Rock singer Steve Harwell (Smash Mouth) is 49.
Rock singer-musician Dave Matthews is 49. Actress-director
Joey Lauren Adams is 48. Actress Angela Bettis is 43.

REUTERS

The owner of the world’s largest blue sapphire — which he says is worth more than $100 million — said he is deciding
whether to auction the Sri Lankan gem or display it as an international attraction.

“T

he Hank McCune Show”
debuted on NBC in 1950 and
ran for three years. It was the
first television show to use a laugh
track.
***
The minimum wage in the United States
in 1949 was 40 cents per hour.
***
Power steering in cars became commercially available in 1951. Francis Davis
of Massachusetts invented power steering after working for the truck division
of the Pierce Arrow Motor Car
Company.
***
On Oct. 15, 1952, General Electric celebrated its 75th anniversary by giving
five shares of stock to any employee
who had a baby on that day. The company guessed there would be 13 births out
of the 226,000 employees. However,
none of the women on staff were under
age 17 or over age 65, and it was the
baby boom era. There were 189 G.E.
babies born that day.
***
TV Guide and Playboy Magazine both
debuted in 1953. Do you know who was

Lotto

THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek

Unscramble these four Jumbles,
one letter to each square,
to form four ordinary words.

Jan. 6 Powerball
2

11

47

63

62

17

HENTT

SINHIF

Check out the new, free JUST JUMBLE app

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

Jan. 8 Mega Millions
11

39

51

75

57

2
Mega number

Jan. 6 Super Lotto Plus
2

9

15

35

15

16

29

33

39

9

5

0

Daily Four
2

Daily three midday
6

37

18

from bankruptcy.
***
Jacques Cousteau (1910-1997) began
exploring the deep of the ocean in his
personal research vessel, Calypso, in
1961. The Calypso, an old minesweeper, went around the world on underwater
expeditions for the television series
“The Undersea World of Jacques
Cousteau” (1968-1976).
***
John Glenn (born 1921) made history
in 1962 as the first American astronaut
to orbit the Earth. Glenn traveled at a
speed of 17,500 mph 160 miles above
Earth in the ship Friendship 7.
***
Felipe (born 1935), Jesus (born 1942)
and Matty (born 1938) Alou were brothers and teammates on the San Francisco
Giants in 1963. That year, on Sept. 10
at the Polo Grounds in New York, the
three brothers batted consecutively in
the same game for the same team; the
only time that has happened in professional baseball.
***
Ans wer: Lucille Ball’s baby Desi Arnez
Jr. was on the cover of the first issue of
TV Guide on April 3-9, 1953. Lucille
Ball was on the cover of TV Guide 34
times throughout her career, more than
any other person. Marilyn Monroe was
pictured, fully clothed, on the cover of
the first Playboy in December 1953.
Know It All is by Kerry McArdle. It runs in
the weekend and Wednesday editions of the
Daily Journal. Questions? Comments? Email
knowitall(at)smdailyjournal.com or call 3445200 ext. 114.

Local Weather Forecast

Fantasy Five
Powerball

MIOCC

pictured on the cover of the first TV
Guide? The cover girl of the first
Playboy? See answer at end.
***
In 1954, Swanson & Sons sold 10 million TV dinners. After Thanksgiving
1953, Swanson had 270 tons of unsold
turkey and needed to do something with
it . Thus, TV dinners were invented. The
98-cent meals had turkey, corn bread
dressing, buttered peas and sweet potatoes in aluminum trays.
***
Bert Parks (1914-1992) began his long
career as host of the Miss America pageant in 1955. It was also the first year
the pageant theme song, “There She Is
Miss America,” was used. Lee
Meriweather (born 1935) was Miss
America 1955.
***
In January 1956, Elvis Presley’s (19351977) song “Heartbreak Hotel” was
released. The song sold more than 1 million copies, making it Elvis’ first gold
record.
***
Ray Romano, Matt Lauer, Donny
Osmond, Fran Drescher and Daniel DayLewis were all born in 1957.
***
The Brazilian National Soccer Team won
the 1958 World Cup for soccer.
***
In Disney’s 1959 animated movie
“Sleeping Beauty,” the girl fell into her
deep sleep when she was 16 years old.
***
“Ben-Hur” starring Charlton Heston
(born 1924) won 11 Academy Awards
in 1960, including best picture, actor
and director. The movie saved MGM

5

5

Daily three evening

Mega number

1

7

7

The Daily Derby race winners are Money Bags,
No. 11, in first place; Solid Gold, No. 10, in second
place; and Winning Spirit, No. 9, in third place.
The race time was clocked at 1:49.23.

S at urday : Rain likely in the morning...Then a chance of showers in the
afternoon. Highs in the mid 50s.
Southeast
winds
10
to
20
mph...Becoming 5 to 10 mph in the afternoon.
Saturday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy. A
slight chance of showers in the evening. Lows in the mid
40s. East winds 5 to 15 mph.
Sunday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 50s. East winds 5
to 15 mph.
Sunday ni g ht: Rain after midnight. Lows in the upper
40s. East winds 5 to 10 mph.
Mo nday : Rain. Highs in the upper 50s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. A slight chance of showers.

GEPDEL
Now arrange the circled letters
to form the surprise answer, as
suggested by the above cartoon.

Ans:
Yesterday’s

(Answers Monday)
Jumbles: ANKLE
KUDOS
DEPUTY
ANYHOW
Answer: The bread company’s top secret recipe was —
“KNEAD” TO KNOW

The San Mateo Daily Journal
1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
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LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Police reports
Gone fishin’
A person was reported missing after not
returning from a fishing trip on the
1200 block of Roble Road in Millbrae
before 9 a.m. Friday, Jan.1.

MILLBRAE
Arres t. A person was found to have an

active warrant and was arrested and booked
on the 500 block of El Camino Real before
11:50 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 7.
Ev adi ng an o fficer. Two people riding
off-road motorcycles on a city street fled the
police. One was cited and released after
attempting to flee on foot while the other
was later found at his residence and cited on
the first block of Queen Anne Court
Thursday, Jan. 7.
Hi t-and-run. A vehicle hit a parked car and
fled on the 1000 block of Magnolia Avenue
before 9 p.m. Wednesday, Jan. 6.

Obituary

Christine Corrigan

November 7th, 1965 – December 24th, 2015
Christine Corrigan formerly of Los Altos Hills passed away on
December 24, 2015 at her home in Redwood city California,
surrounded by her family and friends at the age of 50. Christine,
the third child of Sigrun and Wilfred Corrigan was born in
Phoenix, Arizona on November 7, 1965.
Christine, or as many knew her, Chris, found much joy in her
extended family and was the proud Aunt to seven nieces and
nephews. Christine, born with Down’s Syndrome, shared her
exuberant personality with numerous family and friends and was
always the first to give a loving and thankful toast at any event. Christine could bring a smile
to almost anyone and worked hard to be a great friend and housemate to her buddies at Pete’s
Place An assisted living home) where she lived for the last 15 years. Her family will remember
her uncanny knack for always bringing us together and reminding us that we all have abilities,
not disabilities
Christine moved to Los Altos in 1968 and lived in Los Altos hills until 1979 when she moved
to Santa Barbara to attend St Vincent De Pauls school for Developmentally Disabled children.
There, she fine-tuned her reading and basic living skills allowing her to move back to the Bay
Area in 1985 and live independently. She worked at various jobs before settling at the El
Camino Hospital location of the YMCA for many years and enjoyed it immensely. Christine
was a voracious movie fan, enjoyed music and dancing, loved shopping for gifts for others and
could not resist any sort of celebration in the company of family and friends.
A celebration of her life will be held at the Los Altos Hills Country Club on January 13,
2016 from 2:30-4:30pm. In lieu of flowers please consider supporting the important work
of providing care to adults with Disabilities at Kainos Home and Training Center for the
Developmentally Disabled, 3631 Jefferson Ave., Redwood City, CA 94062-3148—Tax ID
#23-7408490

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

3

Jury convicts Raymond ‘Shrimp
Boy’ Chow of Chinatown crimes
By Sudhin Thanawala
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — A one-time gang
tough nicknamed “Shrimp Boy” who insisted he had changed his ways through meditation and become a role model for wayward
youth was convicted Friday of racketeering,
murder and scores of other crimes in a major
organized crime investigation in San
Francisco’s Chinatown that also brought
down a state senator.
The conviction of Raymond “Shrimp
Boy” Chow was largely the work of an
undercover FBI agent who posed for years as
a foul-mouthed East Coast businessman
with mafia ties, as he infiltrated the fraternal
group that Chow led. The group was among
dozens of active tongs, or family associations, in Chinatown, one of the most popular and visible tourist attractions in the city.
Authorities said Chow and some other

San Francisco mayor sworn
in amid raucous demonstration
SAN FRANCISCO — San Francisco
Mayor Ed Lee was sworn in to a second full
term Friday amid a raucous demonstration
by dozens of protesters angry over a 26year-old man’s shooting death by police
last month.
Demonstrators calling for the removal of
the city’s police chief drowned out Gov.
Jerry Brown as he administered the oath of
office to Lee before hundreds of guests at
San Francisco City Hall. The protesters

members of the group
engaged in drug trafficking, money laundering
and the sale of stolen
cigarettes and top-shelf
liquors Johnny Walker
Blue
Label
and
Hennessey XO.
Jurors convicted the
56-year-old Chow of all
Raymond Chow 162 charges against
him, including racketeering, murder and conspiracy to commit murder. One of the victims was Allen Leung, the
former leader of the fraternal group, who was
shot and killed at his business in 2006 as
his wife looked on.
Chow, sporting dapper suits and a beaming smile, told jurors at his trial he
renounced his drug-dealing and gangster
ways after leaving prison in 2003 and turning to meditation.

Around the Bay

Ed Lee
old-timers alike.

booed
and
shouted
throughout the hourlong
ceremony, disrupting Lee
and other speakers and
the posting of the color
guard.
But the mayor carried
on,
praising
San
Francisco’s diversity and
vowing to keep the city a
place for newcomers and

4

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

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STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

Democrats and advocates eye
California’s booming revenue
By Juliet Williams
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SACRAMENTO — Gov. Jerry
Brown’s proposed $122. 6 billion
California budget plan would seem to
please Democratic interests by pumping billions of tax dollars generated
by the booming state economy into
public schools and universities,
health care for the poor and public
infrastructure.
Instead, Democratic legislative
leaders and advocacy groups saw what
was left out.
“A laundry list of critical needs”
remains, said Assembly Speaker Toni
Atkins, D-San Diego.
For state lawmakers from both parties and the groups that lobby them,
the general fund spending the

Democratic governor
outlined
Thursday is merely
a starting point in a
monthslong tug-ofwar over funding.
Sen.
Holly
Mitchell,
D-Los
Angeles, was upset
Jerry Brown the plan did not
increase maximum
payouts to families in the welfare-towork program, which she called
“impossibly tiny.”
Chris Hoene, executive director of
the California Budget & Policy
Center, which advocates for lowincome families, said Brown’s budget
is a “missed opportunity to use the
state’s strong revenues to boost key
public investments that help individu-

als and families advance, such as child
care and preschool, welfare-to-work
services, affordable housing, and
higher education.”
Union leaders also blasted the plan
in an email with a subject line of
“Caregivers, Seniors, and People With
Disabilities Deserve Better.”
Shamus Roller, executive director of
Housing California, a group that
backs affordable housing, said,
“Governor Brown proposed a budget
that provides no new help for the
many people struggling to stay in
their homes.”
And the Children’s Defense FundCalifornia accused the governor of
“using the threat of future recession to
justify not making critical investments of our most vulnerable children
today.”

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5

Around the state
As rain pummels California,
some see a way to fight drought
SAN DIEGO — Much of the torrential rain that fell on
Southern California this week flowed right into the ocean,
just like it did before the state’s epic drought.
That seemed like a good idea for many years, as storm
drains provided a crucial defense against flooding. But with
California entering what may be a fifth year of drought,
water agencies slowly are moving to capture and store more
of this precious resource.
“That was the 19th, 20th century thinking: ‘Let’s get that
water out of here as fast as possible,”’ said Deborah
Bloome, senior director of policy at TreePeople, a nonprofit group that is working to increase rain capture in the Los
Angeles area.
Now, people are more likely to see a rapidly disappearing flood — nearly 3 inches fell on much of
Southern California this week — as a wasted opportunity.
The State Water Resources Control Board approved a
broad plan Wednesday for capturing more rain.
The regulator is launching a road show this month to
explain how it will dole out $200 million for projects to
collect rain, part of a $7.5 billion water bond voters
approved in November 2014.

6

LOCAL

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

REGIONAL
GOVERNMENT
• The San Mateo Co unty
Tra n s p o rt a t i o n
Autho ri ty swore in three of
four directors at its board
meeting Jan. 7. The TA also
elected its chair and vice
chair for this year.
Two of the directors were reappointed after previously serving on the TA Bo ard. Two others join
the board as new directors.
Do n Ho rs l ey , who will be sworn in Feb. 4, and
Mary Ann Ni hart are the two returning board
members. Horsley, a member of the San Mateo
Co unty Bo ard o f Superv i s o rs , was reappointed to represent that body on the TA Board. Nihart,
a Pacifica councilwoman, was re-elected by the
Ci ty Sel ecti o n Co mmi ttee to the TA Board as
a representative for Ci ti es -at-Larg e o f San
Mateo Co unty . In 2015, she served the final
year of a term vacated by Nao mi Patri dg e.
The two new directors joining the TA Board are
Ken Ibarra and Maureen Fres chet. Ibarra, a
San Bruno councilman, was elected by the City
Selection Committee to represent No rt h e rn
Judi ci al Ci ti es . Freschet, a San Mateo councilwoman, was appointed by the City Selection

Committee to represent Ce n t ral Judi c i al
Ci ti es .
Caro l e Gro o m was elected as chair of the board
for this year, and Horsley was elected as vice chair.
The TA is governed by a seven-person board of
elected officials. Four members represent cities of
San Mateo County, two members represent the
county’s Board of Supervisors, and one member
represents the S an Mat e o Co un t y Tran s i t
Di s tri ct. Board members serve two-year terms.
The TA administers Meas ure A, the 2004 voterapproved half-cent sales tax that is dedicated
toward transportation and infrastructure improvement projects in San Mateo County.

CITY
GOVERNMENT
• The Burl i ng ame Pl anni ng Co mmi s s i o n is
set to review the proposed construction of a threestory building at 988 Howard Ave., the former
home to the Ol de Eng l i s h Garag e auto shop.
The project aims to build 15,352 square feet of
office and retail space near the intersection of
Howard Avenue and East Lane.
The Burlingame Planning Commission meets 7
p.m. Monday, Jan. 11 in the council chambers,
501 Primrose Road.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Travelers from West
Africa no longer monitored
as Ebola outbreak ends
The California Department of
Public Health is no longer monitoring travelers returning from countries in West Africa for symptoms of
the Ebola virus disease, Health officials announced this week.
Citing an end the outbreaks of the
disease in Liberia, Sierra Leone and
Guinea, health officials said travelers coming back to California no
longer need to check in with health
departments for monitoring. The
CDHP said the Ebola Monitoring
Program began on Oct. 12, 2014,
after the West African outbreak that
began in December 2013.

Portions of Golden
Gate Recreation Area closing
Some areas in the Golden Gate
National Recreation Area will close
temporarily due heavy winter
storms, National Park Service officials said Friday.
Tennessee Valley Beach and the

Local briefs
North Beach Access Trail at Fort
Funston have already closed due to
increased pressures on the dam
behind Tennessee Valley and highly
unstable cliffs at Fort Funston
North, according to park officials.
The beach will close intermittently during the winter season, but the
Tennessee Valley Trail will remain
open other than beach access. The
Fort Funston trail is expected to
remain closed this winter.
Additionally, park officials said
the Hawk and Haypress campgrounds in the Marin Headlands
Walk-In Campgrounds will be
closed from Jan. 15 to March 31 as
a proactive measure, as falling trees
and limbs are a safety concern during high winds. Park officials said
that the safety of park visitors and
staff is their highest priority, and
visitors are advised to exercise caution when visiting the park.
Visitors are encouraged to visit
the
parks
website
at
www.nps.gov.goga for any park
alerts.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

Debate over women in
combat continues to roil
By Lolita C. Baldor

“If the answer to that is no,
clearly don’t do it. If the answer to that
is, it shouldn’t hurt, I would suggest that
we shouldn’t do it, because it might hurt.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A top Marine general predicted Friday that the Defense
Department’s vows to maintain the
same standards for women and men in
combat jobs won’t last, saying the
military will eventually be pressured
to lower the qualifications so more
women can serve in jobs like the
Marine infantry.
The public comments by Gen. John
Kelly, head of U. S. Southern
Command, underscored how strongly
the Marines opposed Defense
Secretary Ash Carter’s plans to fully
integrate women into all combat jobs,
including the Marine Corps and special operations forces like Navy
SEALs and Army Green Berets. A new,
high-level disagreement is erupting
over whether the Marine Corps must

— Gen. John Kelly

also fully integrate its 12-week recruit
training program at Parris Island in
South Carolina.
“They’re saying we are not going to
change any standards, ” Kelly told
reporters at the Pentagon. “There will
be great pressure, whether it’s 12
months from now, four years from
now, because the question will be
asked whether we’ve let women into
these other roles, why aren’t they
staying in those other roles? Why
aren’t they advancing as infantry people?”

Kelly, who has been a Marine for 45
years and served three tours in Iraq,
said the sole basis for change in the
military should be whether the change
will make units more lethal.
“If the answer to that is no, clearly
don’t do it. If the answer to that is, it
shouldn’t hurt, I would suggest that we
shouldn’t do it, because it might hurt,”
Kelly said.
Carter in December ordered all combat jobs open to women, but also
vowed that no standards would be lowered to make way for women.

Clinton’s request for secure fax Plan B sparks accusations
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Hillary Clinton’s
request in 2011 that a document be
emailed to her instead of sent by secure
fax emerged as the latest political uproar
over her private email account Friday, as
a top Republican senator accused her of
ordering
classified
information
scrubbed. It wasn’t clear if any information in the document was classified to
begin with.

The June 17,
2011,
exchange
focused on a set of
“talking points” on
an unspecified subject that Clinton had
waited for since the
previous evening.
After senior adviser
Jake
Sullivan
Hillary Clinton emailed her about
“issues sending secure fax,” Clinton

suggested he turn it “into nonpaper
w/no identifying heading and send nonsecure.”
Nonpaper refers to an informal document, without official markings like letterhead or logos, not saved for records.
Although the State Department said a
review showed the document never was
sent to Clinton by email, and instead
apparently by secure fax, after all,
Republicans quickly jumped on the passage.

Reports of sexual assaults spike at military academies
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Reports of sexual
assaults at the three major military
academies surged in the 2014-15
school year, led by the Air Force
Academy, where the number nearly
doubled, the Defense Department said
Friday.

More

Complaints of sexual harassment
also spiked, the department said.
Pentagon officials said the sharp
increases were due largely to students’
growing confidence in the reporting
system and expanded awareness programs, but the announcement raised
nagging questions about whether sexual misconduct is rising at the schools.

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“I think it’s appropriate for people
to feel frustrated about hearing this in
the news. Bottom line is that if this
were an easy problem, we would have
solved it years ago, ” said Nate
Galbreath, the senior executive adviser
for the Pentagon’s sexual assault prevention office. “Unfortunately, this is
a very hard problem to solve.”

7

Around the nation
Ted Cruz’s outsider claims
belie his political insider past
HUMBOLDT, Iowa — Ted Cruz relishes his role as
Washington insurgent and tea party agitator, but today’s
political outsider built much of his career
around being a GOP insider — thriving
in powerful circles he now says he’d like
to dismantle.
A Princeton graduate and Harvardtrained attorney, Cruz clerked for Chief
Justice William Rehnquist at the Supreme
Court — the very court he now accuses of
“judicial tyranny.” While working as a
Washington lawyer in 1998, Cruz repreTed Cruz
sented one of his future Capitol Hill
nemeses, John Boehner.
He helped get George W. Bush elected president in 2000
— before the Bush White House enraged conservative
activists by running up federal deficits.
His first political appointment back home came in 2003.
Texas’ then-Attorney General Greg Abbott saw in Cruz a
hungry young attorney who would enforce his own vision
for conservative legal governance, luring him back from
Washington to be state solicitor general.

FBI says refugees used social
media to plan fight in Syria
SACRAMENTO — An Iraqi man bragged about his experience fighting in Syria and the skills he developed as a
teenage insurgent as he urged a fellow Iraqi refugee in the
U.S. to join him in what both hoped would be martyrdom,
according to documents filed in federal court.
Aws Mohammed Younis Al-Jayab, 23, of Sacramento,
described his experience fighting against Syrian government soldiers in heroic terms and promised in 2013 he
would train Omar Faraj Saeed Al Hardan, of Houston, in how
to use weapons and sneak into Syria to join the fight,
according to an FBI affidavit unsealed in federal court in
Sacramento.
The two Iraqi-born Palestinians used social media to discuss their plans, according to federal authorities. The communications provided the link that led to terrorism-related
charges against the men this week.

West Virginia attorney
general sues drug wholesaler
CHARLESTON, W.Va. — West Virginia’s attorney general has accused one of the nation’s largest pharmaceutical
drug wholesalers of flooding the state with tens of millions
of prescription pills in violation of state law.
Attorney General Patrick Morrisey on Friday announced a
lawsuit against San Francisco-based McKesson Corp.
Among other things, the lawsuit alleges violations of state
consumer protection laws and the Uniform Controlled
Substances Act.

8

LOCAL/NATION/WORLD

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

Benghazi panel Republican
‘hopeful’ Clinton is charged
By Matthew Daly
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A Republican member
of the House Benghazi committee says he is
“hopeful” the Justice Department will bring
charges against Democratic presidential
candidate Hillary Clinton for having classified information on her private email server.
Rep. Mike Pompeo of Kansas said there is
increasing evidence that “an enormous
amount of information” on Clinton’s private server is classified.
“It was classified when it was on her server, and it was classified when it was sent,”
Pompeo told conservative radio host Lars
Larson on Thursday.
Pompeo said he is “anxious” for the
Justice Department and FBI to make a determination on whether to bring charges
against Clinton as quickly as possible. If
charges are made, a grand jury will determine
whether to indict.
“I think that there is only one answer that

can be reached, and I am
hopeful that will be the
outcome that the FBI
achieves,” said Pompeo,
who also serves on the
House
Intelligence
Committee.
“These are just facts,”
Pompeo added. “We’ve all
Mike Pompeo seen the reports of the
classified information on
her server. It could not and should not have
been lawfully handled in the way that she did
it.”
Pompeo’s comments came as the panel
interviewed former Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta behind closed doors Friday for nearly six hours. Panetta endorsed Clinton’s
presidential bid on Thursday.
Pompeo’s remarks are the latest by a congressional Republican suggesting an unfavorable judgment against Clinton before
the committee or the FBI concludes their
respective investigations.

An Islamic State affiliate
claims credit for Libya attack
CAIRO — An Islamic State affiliate in
eastern Libya claimed responsibility for a
suicide truck bomb attack targeting a police
base in the town of Zliten that authorities
said killed at least 60 policemen and wounded around 200.
In a statement posted on the Twitter
accounts of IS sympathizers several hours
after Thursday’s attack, the group calling
itself the IS Barqa Province said it was carried out by Abu al-Abbas al-Muhajir, who
detonated his explosive-laden truck among
the Libyan border police at the base.
The last name, al-Muhajir, implies that
the attacker was not Libyan.
Earlier on Thursday, the IS-affiliated
Aamaq News Agency also claimed the attack
was carried out by the extremist group’s
Barqa Province affiliate.
The U.N. Security Council late Friday
strongly condemned “the terrorist attack” in
Zliten. It also condemned recent attacks on
Libya’s oil infrastructure by a group claiming allegiance to IS.
Libya slid into chaos following the 2011
toppling and killing of longtime dictator
Moammar Gadhafi.

Two plead not guilty to
Half Moon Bay murder
Two men pleaded not guilty Thursday
to a murder charge stemming from the
fatal shooting of a 21-year-old man in
Half Moon Bay in August.
Armando Carranza, 35, and Abraham
Ramirez Arroyo, 19, face murder charges
with gang enhancements and a charge of
evading police in the fatal shooting of
Felix Garduno-Vega at an apartment
complex in the 400 block of Oak
Avenue on Aug. 29, according to San
Mateo County prosecutors.
Sheriff’s officials said the shooting
occurred after Carranza and Arroyo, both
allegedly members of a Sureños gang,
went to a house party around 8:30 p.m.
where they summoned the victim outside.
After a verbal argument between
Carranza and Garduno-Vega, sheriff’s
officials said Arroyo shot him twice
with a .380 handgun before fleeing in
Carranza’s vehicle.
On Sept. 1, the Sheriff’s Office reported the arrest of Carranza, a Hayward resident, after he surrendered to deputies.
Arroyo, a Redwood City resident, was
arrested by sheriff’s detectives on Sept.
8 in Ivanhoe in Tulare County.
According to sheriff’s officials, the
murder weapon was found in a car Arroyo
allegedly abandoned after a police pursuit.

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THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the world
Prosecutor: Paris fugitive hid
out in suspected bomb factory
BRUSSELS — Belgian prosecutors on
Friday revealed new details about the biggest
mystery in the Paris attacks: What happened
to fugitive Salah Abdeslam after he ditched
his car and explosive vest?
After slipping through a police dragnet,
they said, he apparently hid out in the same
Brussels apartment that served as the killers’
bomb factory.
“We found material to make explosives, we
found traces of explosives and we found three
belts. So you don’t have to be Sherlock
Holmes to make the right deduction,” Belgian
Federal Prosecutor Eric Van der Sypt told the
Associated Press.
Also discovered during a Dec. 10 police
search of the third-floor residence on the Rue
Henri Berge: one of 26-year-old Abdeslam’s
fingerprints, the Federal Prosecutor’s Office
announced in a statement.
A Brussels native whose older brother,
Brahim, was one of the Paris suicide bombers,
Abdeslam is believed to have played a key
logistical role in the Nov. 13 carnage in
which 130 people lost their lives.

Local briefs
Both Carranza and Arroyo are scheduled to return San Mateo County
Superior Court on April 18 for a preliminary hearing. They remain in custody
without bail.

Not guilty plea in San
Mateo baseball bat murder
A San Mateo woman charged with
murdering her 66-year-old neighbor
with a baseball bat
is set to stand trial in
May, San Mateo
County prosecutors
said Friday.
Brenda Martinez,
40, is charged with
one count of murder
with an enhancement for use of a
Brenda
deadly weapon after
Martinez
an argument that
occurred on the first block of North
Claremont Street.
According to prosecutors, Martinez
turned herself in to the San Mateo police
around 8:30 p.m. on July 4, shortly
after the killing of San Mateo resident
Ellen Mackay.
Martinez told investigators that she
hit Mackay numerous times in the head
with a baseball bat after the two women
had a verbal argument.

San Mateo police said they responded
to the home and pronounced Mackay
dead at the scene.
Prosecutors said that after the incident
Martinez told police she began to flee,
but instead decided to turn herself into
authorities.
Martinez is scheduled to appear in
court again on March 8, for a pretrial
conference, and on May 2 for a jury
trial, prosecutors said. She remains in
custody and is being held without bail.

Police warn of latest phone scam
San Mateo police are warning residents of a new phone scam in which an
automated message is being left on
answering machines and voice mail
with a female’s voice claiming to be an
IRS agent and that she is providing a
final notice of a lawsuit by the tax
agency to claim unpaid money.
The callback number is so far untraceable and may actually route elsewhere
overseas, according to police.
The IRS continues to warn consumers
to guard against scam phone calls from
thieves intent on stealing their money
or their identity. Criminals pose as the
IRS to trick victims out of their money
or personal information, according to
police.
Go to irs.gov/uac/IRS-Urges-Publicto-Stay-Alert-for-Scam-Phone-Calls for
helpful tips on these calls and to report
them.

LOCAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

BUDGET
Continued from page 1
cate funding to implement the Local
Control Funding Formula initiated in
2013-14,” she said in an email. “His
support of established programs is
invaluable, and the one-time funding he
is awarding to critical investments,
including professional development for
teachers, will help our schools better
serve every student in San Mateo
County.”
Many of those sentiments were
echoed by state Superintendent Tom
Torlakson, in a prepared statement.
“This is a good news budget for our
students, teachers, parents, communities and businesses,” he said. “The governor is continuing to devote more revenues to high-quality learning that prepares children for 21st century careers
and college, including an additional
investment of $300 million in career
technical education that emphasizes
hands on learning.”
Liz McManus, deputy superintendent
in the San Mateo Union High School
District, also expressed broad support
for Brown’s budget plan in an email.
“I applaud Governor Brown for his
2016-17 budget proposal. He continues
to maintain fiscal prudence, invest in
education, address the state infrastructure and climate change and address
poverty,” she said in an email. “With
all of the competing interests and so
many needs of such a large state, he prioritizes the state resources responsibly
as well as effectively.”
Improved financial footing for
schools was made possible through
increased tax revenue the state is
expected to collect, as the economy has
continued to hum across California, and
especially locally throughout the Bay
Area.
The education spending hike is realized on a per pupil basis to the tune of

$368 more than last year, which brings
the total amount to $10,591 per student
for the coming year.
Legislators are set to spend the coming months debating the details of the
spending plan, as Brown is required to
formally sign the budget in June.
Though many were optimistic regarding the proposed spending plan, some
felt room for improvement remains.
State Sen. Jerry Hill, D- San Mateo,
said though he appreciates Brown’s
commitment to funding education, he
would like to see California’s spending
levels become more competitive with
other states.
“This is increasing spending again,
which is great news, but it is still not
enough,” said Hill. “This doesn’t bring
us close to the top of other states, and
we need to continue toward the goal of
reaching that. But we are going in the
right direction.”
Hill also expressed his support for
the Local Control Funding Formula in
allowing districts to direct the funding
they receive from the state to areas of
need.
Ted Lempert, president of advocacy
group Children Now, took a more hardline stance in expressing his frustrations with Brown’s spending proposal.
“The economy is stronger and the
budget is in a much better situation.
This is the chance to make kids a priority and invest in so many programs for
kids but, in general, the budget proposal failed to do that,” he said.
Lempert, who is also a member of the
San Mateo County Board of Education,
said he would have preferred Brown
show a greater financial commitment to
early education and preschool programs, especially serving those coming from underprivileged families.
He said he plans to spend the months
up until the budget deadline lobbying in
favor of increased state funding which
would pave the way for all California
children to have access to preschool.
More money should also be set aside

to benefit health and welfare programs
designed to support children who suffered traumatic experiences at home,
said Lempert.
The silver lining to be found is there
will be months of negotiations which
could lead to additional services for
children receiving funding, said
Lempert.
“This is just the beginning,” he said.
In the historically cash-strapped San
Bruno Park Elementary School District,
officials are largely pleased with the
financial projections coming from the
state.
Sean McGinn, the district’s associate
superintendent of Business Services,
said he expects the additional state
money will help the district offer raises
to teachers and classified staff.
“The number one priority I have at
my desk is figuring out how that will
happen,” McGinn said, of offering pay
hikes to district staff. “There is that
opportunity because the budget is getting better.”
District teachers threatened striking
last year amidst a round of contentious
budget negotiations, due to frustrations
stemming from not having received a
pay raise in nearly a decade.
The budget situation got so bleak
officials were forced to consider shutting down a district school or sharing
principals between sites, until a last
minute influx of money from the state
allowed officials a chance to offer raises
and back away from the program trimming.
McGinn said the improved financial
footing has allowed the district to
begin planning for the future, and preserving lasting funds from which officials can draw to offer raises in coming
years.
He said officials are committed to
bringing salaries in the district to a
level competitive with the rest of San
Mateo County.
“We want to be normal, and we are
getting there,” he said.

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

9

Obituary
Richard (Rick) Gary Yee
Richard (Rick) Gary Yee, born June 28, 1956, in San
Mateo, died Dec. 28, 2015, peacefully surrounded by his
family, friends and fellow fraternity of
firefighters after battling cancer.
After graduating from Hillsdale High
School in 1974, Rick obtained his fire
science degree at the College of San
Mateo. His career started at the NASA
Ames Moffett Field Fire Department and
the Daly City Fire Department. He was
hired by the San Mateo Fire Department
in 1978 where he worked for 20 years. Rick also worked
as a fireman at the Bay Meadows race track.
Rick enjoyed cooking, camping, fishing, traveling,
gardening and working out at the gym.  
Rick is survived by his wife of 31 years Cyndi; his parents, Richard and Jean Yee; sisters Diana (Jerry) and
Carolyn (Robin); brother Robert (Margaret); nephew
Kevin (Yuki); nieces Lisa, Alana and Jaimie; grandnephews Jake and Kian; Mother-in-law Carol
(Armbruster) Nolawski and stepfather Bob Nolawski of
Sun Lakes, Arizona.
“Rick will be missed for his contagious smile and loving heart for all those he touched. A very special thank
you to the San Mateo firefighters for their continuous
love and support.”
Memorial services will be 10:30 a.m. Monday, Jan. 11,
at St. Bartholomew Catholic Church, 300 Alameda de las
Pulgas in San Mateo.

10

BUSINESS

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Market drops, ending worst week since 2011
By Marley Jay
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Dow
16,346.45 -167.65 10-Yr Bond 2.13 -0.02
Nasdaq 4,643.63 -45.79 Oil (per barrel) 32.92
S&P 500 1,922.03 -21.06 Gold
1,103.60

Big movers
Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Friday on the New York
Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq stock market:
NYSE
The Container Store Group Inc., down $2.96 to $4.22
The storage products retailer reported a surprise third-quarter loss and
disappointing sales.
Gap Inc., down $3.83 to $22.91
The retailer’s sales slumped in December deeper than analysts expected.
The sluggishness included its Old Navy brand, which had been a bright
spot for Gap.
Ford Motor Co., down 16 cents to $12.54
The automaker said it sold 1.1 million vehicles in China last year, a record.
It also set a record in monthly December with almost 125,000 vehicles
sold.
Synergy Resources Corp., down 58 cents to $6.58
The oil and gas company’s fiscal first-quarter results fell short of analyst
projections.
Time Warner Inc., up 97 cents to $71.17
The company said it renewed the contract of CEO Jeff Bewkes for three
more years.
American Eagle Outfitters Inc., down $2.64 to $13.24
The teen retailer reported disappointing sales for the fourth quarter.
Nasdaq
Cirrus Logic Inc., up $1 to $27.80
The chipmaker’s shares were boosted by an analyst upgrade.
WD-40 Co., up $3.01 to $97.59
The maintenance and cleaning product company raised its profit forecasts
after it reported fiscal first-quarter results.

ECONOMY
Continued from page 1
December, as average pay slipped a penny to
$25.24 an hour. Hourly pay has risen 2.5
percent in the past year, only the second
time since the Great Recession ended in mid2009 that it’s reached that level. Yet pay
growth remains below the roughly 3.5 percent pace typical of a healthy economy.
The U.S. “is uniquely positioned among
the major industrial economies to withstand
a global slowdown,” Vitner said.
Global trade accounts for just about 30
percent of U.S. economic activity, one of
the lowest such percentages in the world,
according to Patrick O’Keefe, director of
economic research at the consulting firm
CohnReznick.
A resilient U.S. economy will probably
help some other countries by drawing in
more imports, especially as a higher-valued
dollar holds down the prices of foreign

NEW YORK — A wave of late selling
pummeled U. S. stocks Friday and
pushed the market to its worst week in
four years.
The dismal start to the new year
comes as investors worry that China’s
huge economy is slowing down. That
has helped send the price of oil plunging to its lowest level since 2004, the
latest blow to U.S. energy companies.
Industrial and technology companies such as Boeing and Apple that do
a lot of business in China have also
fallen sharply this week. Mining companies such as Freeport-McMoRan
plunged as copper prices have fallen.
China is a major importer of copper.
Stocks started the day higher, driven
in part by news of an encouraging
burst in hiring last month by U.S.
employers. China’s stock market also
rose 2 percent overnight, recovering
somewhat after steep drops earlier in
the week triggered trading halts.
Indexes wavered between small
gains and losses for most of the day,
but took a decisive turn lower in the
last hour of trading. That made this the
worst week since September 2011,
when the market was roiled by the
fight over the U.S. debt ceiling and
Standard & Poor’s move to cut the

goods. The World Bank said this week that
Mexico and emerging markets in Central
America should fare better than the rest of
South America because of their proximity to
the healthier U.S. economy.
Still, the effect could be limited if
Americans’ spending remains concentrated
in services — from restaurants to health care
— rather than factory goods.
At the same time, Friday’s solid jobs
report could make it more likely that the
Federal Reserve will further raise rates after
announcing its first increase in nearly a
decade last month. Steady hiring would
reduce the supply of people seeking jobs,
which could lead to higher pay and possibly
help lift inflation closer to the Fed’s 2 percent target.
Many economists expect the Fed to raise
its benchmark rate three times this year.
Stuart Hoffman, chief economist at PNC
Financial Services, said the robust jobs data
means the next increase will probably be in
March.
The jobs report contained no signs of
inflation. That led other economists such as

credit rating of the U.S. government.
The Dow Jones industrial average
dropped 167.65 points, or 1 percent,
to 16,346.45. The Standard & Poor’s
500 index fell 21.06 points, or 1.1
percent, to 1, 922. 03. The Nasdaq
composite index shed 45.80 points,
or 1 percent, to 4,643.63.
The Dow and S&P 500 are each down
about 6 percent for the week. The
Nasdaq composite fell even more, 7.3
percent. That index is heavily weighted with technology and biotech companies, both of which were high-fliers
last year.
The largest losses on Friday went to
financial stocks. JPMorgan Chase
lost $1.35, or 2.2 percent, to $58.92
and Citigroup fell $1.43, or 3 percent,
to $46. 13. Health care stocks
slumped, led by drug companies.
Energy stocks also skidded as the
price of oil, already at decade lows,
continued to fall.
European stocks also rose early in
the day, but couldn’t hang on. The
FTSE 100 index of leading British
shares declined 0. 7 percent while
Germany’s DAX lost 1.3 percent. The
CAC-40 in France slid 1.6 percent.
The same pattern held in the U.S. In
its monthly jobs report, released
before the stock market opened, the
Labor Department said U.S. employers added 292,000 jobs in December,

Alan Levenson at T. Rowe Price to say that
Fed officials may need to see prices climb
more before raising rates again.
Signs emerged this week that China’s
economy may be slowing more than expected. Its manufacturing activity shrank last
month for the 10th month in a row. And
China’s central bank let its currency, the
yuan, weaken, a move that could help its
exporters.
That attempt to boost growth was interpreted as another sign of sluggishness.
China’s stock markets plunged, as did most
others around the world, including in the
U.S. Oil prices fell to nearly a 12-year low
Thursday, as markets anticipated that China
will use less oil.
Those headwinds could create longer-term
problems for the American economy. Lower
stock prices may cause American consumers
to spend less. Faltering economies overseas, as well as a strong dollar, have cut into
manufacturing exports, which fell to a fouryear low in November. And cheaper oil has
already caused sharp cutbacks in U.S.
drilling jobs. Those layoffs may continue if

far more than economists had forecast.
That’s the latest sign the U.S. economy is still growing. On average
employers added 284,000 jobs per
month in the fourth quarter, the best
rate in a year.
Michael Fredericks, portfolio manager for BlackRock Multi-Asset
Income Fund, said the labor market is
healthy and wages could improve this
month. “These are unusually strong
job creation numbers,” he said.
Fredericks said the low wage growth
and limited inflation will make the
Federal Reserve proceed cautiously as
it raises interest rates. In December
the Fed raised rates for the first time in
nine years, but interest rates are still
very low.
Throughout the week, worries about
China’s economy and shocks to its
markets have canceled out positive
news from the U.S. and Europe. While
China’s economy is still growing,
that growth isn’t as fast as it has been.
That could hurt sales of everything
from iPhones to oil and heavy
machinery.
Oil prices also lost ground. U.S.
crude fell 11 cents to close at $33.16 a
barrel in New York and Brent crude, a
benchmark for international oils,
declined 20 cents to $33.55 a barrel in
London.

oil prices stay low.
Yet manufacturing makes up less than onetenth of U.S. employment. The American
economy is much more focused on services.
“People are consuming things that aren’t
things, like data plans, restaurant meals,
health care and entertainment,” Kevin
Logan, chief U.S. economist at HSBC bank,
said. “The international turmoil can be
shrugged off to some extent.”
Hiring in industries that focus on domestic, rather than overseas, demand ramped up
in December. Construction added 45,000
jobs, likely in part because of unusually
warm weather. Restaurants and bars added
nearly 37,000.
Slim Chickens, a restaurant chain in
Fayetteville, Arkansas with 30 locations,
plans to open 20 restaurants this year, creating about 800 jobs. But Chief Operating
Officer Sam Rothschild said it’s become
harder to find workers, particularly in places
where unemployment has fallen as low as 2
percent, as in parts of Nebraska and
Oklahoma. The company raised pay as much
as 10 percent last year in those areas.

ALWAYS BE PREPARED: SEVERAL PLAYERS SIGNED DURING THE SEASON NOW STARTING IN THE PLAYOFFS >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 13, Alabama showing
no signs of slowing down
Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

Raiders’ Mack makes All-Pro history
By Barry Wilner
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — Khalil Mack has made AllPro history.
Mack’s versatility and relentlessness
earned him selection at two positions on the
2015 Associated Press All-Pro Team, an NFL
first. The second-year Oakland Raiders defensive end and outside linebacker drew enough
support Friday from a panel of 50 media members who regularly cover the league to make
the squad both spots.

Others,
including
Houston’s J.J. Watt last
year, have been chosen
first team at one position
and second at another.
Watt was a unanimous
pick at defensive end for
this season’s team, as was
Minnesota running back
Adrian Peterson.
Khalil Mack
“I do whatever I can to
help the team win. I’m a team guy,” said
Mack, who had 15 1/2 sacks (five in one

game), behind only Watt in the league.
“Whether it’s dropping in coverage or rushing
the passer. I can do either. I think they (voters) saw that.”
What the voters also saw was the superb
work by the Carolina Panthers.
Carolina, with an NFL-best 15-1 record, had
the most All-Pros with six: quarterback Cam
Newton, fullback Mike Tolbert, center Ryan
Kalil, linebackers Luke Kuechly and Thomas
Davis, and cornerback Josh Norman. Kuechly
led the Panthers contingent with 49 votes.
“He has fulfilled everything we thought he

could be,” Panthers general manager Dave
Gettleman said of Newton. “And he’s just had
a great year. Again, the franchise quarterbacks
make everybody better — that’s what they
do.”
Newton was especially happy to join
Kuechly on the team; the linebacker has made
it in three of his four pro seasons.
“That’s big, man,” Newton said, adding
with a laugh, “I’m just trying to be like Luke
Kuechly man, that’s it — Captain America,
man. He sets the tone.”

See ALL-PRO, Page 16

Mills wins wild one
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Never leave a Mills-Aragon boys’ basketball game early when it’s played in San
Mateo. There is a good chance you will miss
something spectacular.
Mills jumped out to 13-0 lead in the first
quarter, but Aragon battled all the way back,
tied the game at 45 on a Devin Grant layup
and took the lead when Davion Cox stole
the ball near midcourt and went in for an
uncontested layup with 28 seconds to play
to put the Dons up 47-45.
That’s when deja vu set in again.
Two years ago, it was Mills’ Robert
Noland who hit the dagger shot with under
five seconds to play to beat Aragon. Friday
night, it was Brandon Matsuno who ripped
the hearts out of the Dons and their fans.
With the game clocking winding down
and the Vikings trailing 47-45, Matsuno
received a pass at the top of the 3-point arc,
took a dribble to his right and hoisted an
off-balance 3-point attempt.
Nothing but net with 6.3 seconds to play
to give Mills a 48-47 victory.
“The play was for Nick (Brouqua), our forward,” Matsuno said. “The second option
was me. I just turned the ball over (at the
other end of the court) and I needed to do
something for my team.”
Matsuno finished tied for team-high scoring honors with 17 points, hitting four 3pointers along the way. Cole Brouqua also
finished with 17 points for the Vikings.
Aragon was led by Jaime Llamas, who
scored 14 points and also drained four 3s.
He was the only Don to score in double figures.
While the game came down to a couple of
big baskets for each team, the game was
really won at the free throw line. Mills (1-1
PAL South, 4-9 overall) connected on 13 of
18 attempts from the line, while Aragon (02, 4-10) was just 6 for 16. With the game
tight in the fourth quarter, the Dons missed
five straight free throws.
It was apropos Aragon struggled at the

See MILLS, Page 14

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

M-A’s Ethan Oro, left, is congratulated by Quinn
Rowland following Oro’s second goal in the
Bears’ 2-1 win over Hillsdale Friday.

M-A tops Hillsdale
By Nathan Mollat
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Hillsdale boys’ soccer coach Chris Rodman
said his main goal was to slow down MenloAtherton’s Kyle Smith when the Bears visited
the Knights in a Peninsula Athletic League Bay
Division contest Friday.
Smith, the defending Daily Journal Boys’
Soccer Player of the Year, had a couple of good
looks but came up empty.
Fortunately for M-A, the Bears are more than
a one-man team. And the one segment of the
game that has been Hillsdale’s bugaboo — set
pieces — came back to haunt the Knights as
Ethan Oro scored off a couple of free kicks for
M-A in a 2-1 victory.
“We try to move the ball around and that
opens up opportunities for everyone,” said
Oro, a senior midfielder. “I was fortunate to get
the opportunities today.”
Oro scored right before the first-half whistle
on a seeing-eye shot through traffic and then
scored the game winner in 57th minute when
he rocketed a shot into the net off a free kick
NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL from 26 yards out.

Mills’ Brandon Matsuno drives to the basket in the first half of the Vikings’ 48-47 win over
Aragon. It was Matsuno’s 3-pointer with 6.5 seconds to play that proved to be the difference.

See SOCCER, Page 14

Thompson leads Warriors to win over Blazers
By Anne M. Peterson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PORTLAND, Ore. — Klay Thompson
scored 36 points, making seven 3-pointers,
and the Golden State Warriors beat the
Portland Trail Blazers 128-108 on Friday
night for their fifth straight victory.
Reigning league MVP Stephen Curry
added 26 points and nine assists in three
quarters for the Warriors (34-2), who led by
as many as 25 points and made 18 3-point-

Warriors 128, Blazers 108
ers. Draymond Green finished with 11
points, 13 rebounds and 10 assists for his
eighth triple-double of the season.
Curry started despite continued soreness
from a bruised left shin that kept him out of
a pair of games late last month. He aggravated the injury again when he crashed into
Roy Hibbert on Tuesday night and sat out
the fourth quarter of Golden State’s 109-98
victory at the Los Angeles Lakers.

Damian Lillard had a
season-high 40 points
and 10 assists for
Portland, which dropped
its third straight.
The Warriors remained
unbeaten since a 114-91
defeat at Dallas on Dec.
30.
Klay Thompson Portland was coming
off a 109-98 loss at
home to the Los Angeles Clippers on

Wednesday. The loss was notable because
starter CJ McCollum was mistakenly left off
the active roster turned in before the game
and was forced to sit out.
The Warriors jumped out to a 12-2 lead at
the start while Portland missed its first nine
shots from the field. There was a brief tense
moment when Curry collided with Noah
Vonleh and came up gingerly.
Green’s fast-break dunk put the Warriors

See WARRIORS, Page 15

12

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

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Local sports roundup

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

13

Boys’ soccer

From ‘street’ to starting playoffs

San Mateo 4, Capuchino 1

By Howard Fendrich

The Bearcats scored three times in the first half and added
another in the second to cruise past the Mustangs in a PAL
Ocean Division matchup.
Emilio Morales scored twice to lead San Mateo (2-0 PAL
Ocean, 4-2-2 overall). His first was unassisted and Obemar
Salazar supplied the assist on Morales’ second strike.
Jose Millan opened the scoring for the Bearcats by converting a penalty kick, while Aaron Baca closed the scoring off an
assist from Erick Sandoval.

Aragon 2, Carlmont 0
The Dons picked up their first Bay Division win of the season with a shutout of the Scots.
Aragon improves to 1-0-1 with the victory, while Carlmont
drops to 1-1 in league play.

Girls’ basketball
Mills 47, Aragon 41
Aubrie Businger scored 17 points and pulled down 11
rebounds to lead the Vikings past the Dons.
Zellie Zshornak added 11 points for Mills (2-0 PAL South, 76 overall).
Aragon fell to 1-1 in league play and 5-7 overall.

South City 52, Terra Nova 37
The Warriors (2-0 PAL North,6-5 overall) rode a big start to
their second straight win. South City outscored Terra Nova (01, 4-7) 16-4 to start the first half and never looked back.
A pair of underclassmen tabbed double-doubles, as sophomore Nevaeh Miller totaled a team-high 12 points with 11
rebounds and freshman Becca Tasi added 11 points and 12
rebounds.

Carlmont 43, Woodside 18
The Scots had nine players get in the scoring column to beat
the Wildcats.
Alexa Bayangos led Carlmont (1-1 PAL South, 8-6 overall)
with 10 points. Woodside (0-2) was led by Zaire Williams, who
finished with eight points.

Menlo School 54, Eastside College Prep 48
Olivia Pellarin’s double-double led the Knights to the win
over ECP.
Pellarin scored 15 points, pulled down 12 rebounds and
blocked five shots for Menlo (1-0 WBAL, 9-3 overall). Sam
Erisman scored a game-high 21 points for the Knights, while
Hannah Paye chipped in with 11.

Mercy-Burlingame 61, Crystal Springs 34
The Crusaders cruised to the WBAL Skyline Division win
over the Gryphons.
Marena Kibblewhite scored a game-high 18 points to lead
Mercy, while Deirdre Bonitz added 13. Kesaia Langi came up
with five steals for the Crusaders.

Menlo-Atherton 83, Sequoia 53
The Bears had four players score in doubles figures as they
ran past the Cherokees.
Delilah Kline led all scorers with 17 points, while teammate
Ofa Sili was right behind her 16 points. Megan Sparrow added
14 and Greer Hoyem had 12 for M-A (2-0 PAL South).
Sequoia (1-1) got 16 points from Mia Woo, Alyssa Albin
added 12 and Jada Herbert finished with 10 for the Cherokees.

Hillsdale 48, San Mateo 38
Emily Nepomuceno scored a game-high 17 points and
Lauren Izumi added 15 as the Knights got past the Bearcats.

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ASHBURN, Va. — A veteran of more than 50 starts in his
first four NFL seasons, linebacker Mason Foster spent most
of September as a free agent. He was in limbo, sleeping on
the futon of his college roommate and best friend, an assistant strength and conditioning coach at the University of
South Dakota.
Foster was waiting for a phone call from a team. He had
been cut by the Bears about a week before the start of the
regular season; a couple of days later, a cousin helped load
up a truck and make the 7-hour drive from Chicago to
Vermillion, South Dakota.
“I was confident the opportunity would come. But it’s
tough. You’re just sitting there. I sat there for weeks, watching games,” Foster said. “My friend wrote up a workout plan
for me and let me stay on his couch and we just worked out
the whole time. I wanted to play meaningful games and help
a team. And it’s all happening.”
Late in September, he got that call — from the
Washington Redskins, who signed him after a tryout. And
now Foster is a starting middle linebacker for the NFC East
champions as they enter the playoffs, hosting the Green
Bay Packers on Sunday.
His story is not unique. For all of the time and money
teams invest in trying to figure out which college players to
draft or which big-name free agents to add in the offseason,
sometimes key playoff contributions come from guys who
arrive “off the street,” in the league’s lingo.
A year ago, for example, Chris Matthews got cut at the
end of training camp by Seattle and was available to anyone
in need of a receiver. Eventually, Matthews made his way
back to the Seahawks and made a mark down the stretch,
recovering an onside kick in the NFC championship game,
then catching four passes for 109 yards and a touchdown in
the Super Bowl.
Scan the rosters of the 12 postseason teams, and there are

plenty of players brought in late, often because of injuries
that prompted a GM to seek help.
The NFC’s No. 1 seed, Carolina, picked up starting cornerback Robert McClain and nickel back Cortland
Finnegan after Charles Tillman and Bene Benwikere were
sidelined.
“They’re veterans, and that’s the biggest thing,” Panthers
coach Ron Rivera said. “If we were talking about playing
two straight-off-the-street rookies, yeah, there would be
some concern.”
Shiloh Keo — signed by Denver after he made a Twitter
plea — filled in because of four injured safeties and made a
late interception in a Week 17 victory that clinched the
AFC’s No. 1 seed for the Broncos.
“He’s a great example of: If you think you can play, hang
in there,” said Denver coach Gary Kubiak, whose team
signed offensive lineman Tyler Columbus about 48 hours
after he was released by Atlanta.
After losing running backs Dion James and LeGarrette
Blount — himself a street free agent last season — to
injuries, New England brought in Steven Jackson, who initially told coach Bill Belichick he didn’t think he was in
good enough shape. Pittsburgh added Chris Boswell in
early October, their fourth kicker of the season, and all he
did was go 29 of 32 on field-goal attempts and 26 of 27 on
extra points. Houston used a pair of midseason pickups at
quarterback on the way to an AFC South title, Brandon
Weeden and T.J. Yates.
Arizona, the NFC’s No. 2 seed, added pass rusher extraordinaire Dwight Freeney, safety D.J. Swearinger and defensive tackle Red Bryant along the way.
Freeney was close to retiring for good when the Cardinals
called in mid-October after the team’s best outside rusher
was injured; by December, he was earning $100,000 in
incentive pay per sack.
“Two months ago, I didn’t know if I was going to play,”
Freeney said. “But the things we’re going through now is
why I decided to come back.”

’Bama showing no signs of slowing
By John Zenor
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — The five-star recruits keep rolling
into Alabama, replenishing the roster every time the NFL
prospects funnel out.
Sounds simple, right? Alabama’s formula for success goes
way beyond that revolving door of talent but it’s a pretty
good starting point. Nick Saban and the Crimson Tide show
no signs of slowing down either on the field or on the
recruiting trail in a program where anything short of a
national title is all but treated as a failure.
“They just have outstanding players and they’re supremely coached,” said Gene Stallings, who coached Alabama to
the 1992 national championship. “That’s a tough combination to beat.”
It is indeed. Ask Auburn, Michigan State, Notre Dame,
LSU and just about anybody else who’s had to try since
Saban’s run of domination began in 2008, his second season in Tuscaloosa.
Look beyond the question of whether Saban can bring a
fourth national title back to Tuscaloosa in Monday night’s
game with Clemson. The more notable topic might be,
when will this annual run of title contention end already?
That may depend on how much longer the 64-year-old
Saban sticks around.
It’s been two years since he won a national champi-

onship, after all. It only seems like an eternity for a program that had collected three of four through 2012 while
going 97-12 over the last eight seasons, easily the most
wins in the FBS during that span. Boise State is second with
90.
Saban does have the task each season of battling the big
heads and stamping down any sense of entitlement among
his players. Sometimes, he’s more successful — like this
season — than others.
“Whatever has been accomplished in the past certainly
doesn’t have anything to do with what the future holds,”
Saban said. “The future is really in front of our team and our
players all the time.”
He sticks to his famed “Process” — a blend of fundamentals, focus and psychology covering everything from
recruiting to offseason conditioning. It’s worked for three
national titles at Alabama and the 2003 crown at LSU.
With a win over the Tigers, Saban could join fellow
Alabama icon Bear Bryant as the only major college coach
to win five national titles.

14

SPORTS

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

MILLS
Continued from page 11
line, considering the Dons literally could
not make a shot in the first nine minutes of
the game. Aragon was 0 for 11 from the field
in the first quarter and did not make its first
field goal until the 6:55 mark of the second
when Jaime Llamas drained a 3-pointer.
Mills, meanwhile, came out on fire as the
Vikings scored the first 13 points of the
game. Cole Brouqua scored the first two
buckets on layups and Morgan Lou added a
third layup on a fastbreak. Nick Brouqua
slashed to the hoop for a bucket, Matsuno

nailed a 3 and then converted a pair of free
throws to put Mills up 13-0.
Aragon finally got on the scoreboard with
43 seconds left in the opening period when
Andrei Parala hit a pair of free throws.
In the second quarter, however, it seemed
the teams changed uniforms. Suddenly, it
was Mills that could not buy a basket.
Aragon, meanwhile, came charging back.
“You can’t keep up that sort of pace with a
team that is even with you,” said Mills
coach Rick Hanson.
Aragon cut its deficit to eight points, 1810, when Nevan Samadhana scored off dribble and that ignited a 15-6 run. Samadhana
followed that with a pair of free throws and
Llamas hit his second 3-pointer of the quar-

ter. Samadhana scored again on a drive to
the basket to cut the Mills lead to 20-17
with 2:09 to play in the half and tied the
game at 20 when Cox stole the ball off a
Mills inbound and scored a layup.
Mills hit four straight free throws, but
Aragon’s Ben Solomon hit a 3 with two seconds left to cut the Vikings’ lead to one, 2423 at halftime.
Mills outscored Aragon 11-7 in the third
quarter, pushing its lead to five, 35-30,
going into the fourth quarter.
Cole Brouqua pushed the Vikings’ lead to
seven, 37-30, by scoring the first bucket of
the final period, but a tip-in from Aragon’s
Kimon Economou and a 3 from Llamas got
the Dons back to two points, 37-35.

A 3 from Matusuno pushed Mills’ lead to
six, 42-36, with 4:48 to play and the
Vikings led by eight after Cole Brouqua hit
a pair of free throws with 3:42 to go.

SOCCER

keeper and trickled in to tie the score at 1 just
before halftime.
In the second half, the Bears applied heavy
pressure throughout the final 40 minutes.
Hillsdale goalkeeper Arturo Gonzalez has
been battling through an ankle injury this
season and it prevented him from clearing the
ball out of his defensive end on goal kicks.
His short passes to the edges of the penalty
area allowed the M-A offense to lock the
Knights into their own end and it eventually
paid off with the Bears’ second goal of the
game.
The go-ahead score was triggered by a M-A
free kick near midfield. M-A’s Patrick Quinn
sent the ball toward the box where a Hillsdale
defender knocked it down with his arm, giving the Bears another free kick from 26 yards
out.
Both Gallo and Oro stood over the ball and,
when the referee blew his whistle to start play,
Gallo ran a dummy over the ball and Oro came
on and whipped his right foot through the
ball, hammering it around the defensive wall
and into the net in the 57th minute.
“Most goals are scored on set pieces,” said
M-A coach Leo Krupnik. “It’s a weapon we
work on.”
A few minutes later, Oro had a chance to get
the hat trick, but his shot was parried away by
Gonzalez.
“Overall, I’m happy with the win,” Krupnik
said. “But not happy with the way we played
the game.”
For a building Hillsdale squad, Rodman was
happy to see his team compete with the
defending champs and actually have a chance
to win.
“Hats off to M-A. They’re a great team,”
Rodman said. “We gave them a good fight.”

Continued from page 11

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“One of our goals was not to allow any set
pieces (for goals),” Rodman said. “Two set
pieces, two mental lapses. Ball game.”
The game started out fairly even, with neither team really gaining any sustained possession of the ball. But as the first half wore
on, Hillsdale struggled to consistently string
passes together and M-A (2-0 PAL Bay, 6-1
overall) gradually started to take control.
“We like to keep possession and try to keep
[the pace] slow,” Rodman said. “Today, we
kind of got into [M-A’s] flow.”
M-A had a couple of chances on counterattacks, but the Hillsdale defense remained
strong.
And despite wanting to keep possession, it
was a counterattack that led to Hillsdale (1-1,
1-4) taking a 1-0 lead in the 35th minute.
Senior striker Austin Mah received a ball near
midfield and carried it into the M-A penalty
box, winning a 50-50 challenge against a
Bears’ defender just outside the box. Mah laid
the ball off to Evan Snodgrass at the top of the
penalty area, who then sent a short diagonal
pass into space. Ben Nestor ran on to it and
blasted a shot high into the upper left corner
to put the Knights up 1-0.
It was a short-lived lead, however, as the
Bears knotted the score in the 39th minute off
a free kick, which was essentially a corner
kick. Alex Gallo sent a cross to the top of the
Hillsdale penalty box, where it was flicked on
by Smith. Oro rose high for a header, with the
ball eventually falling to his feet. His shot
through traffic got past the Hillsdale goal-

That’s when Aragon made its final push,
going on a 11-4 run to end the game. Llamas
hit his fourth 3 of the game to cut the Dons’
deficit to 44-39. Solomon hit a layup and
Economou converted a reverse layup to
close to 44-43 with 2:09 to play. Grant’s
layup with 43 seconds left tied the score at
45, the first tie since the game was 20-all.
Cox followed that with the steal and layup
with 28 seconds to play to set up the final
dramatic seconds.
“This is huge,” Matsuno said of the win.
“This gets our season back on track.”

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Sports briefs
Former Cardinals executive
pleads guilty to hacking Astros
HOUSTON — The former scouting
director of the St. Louis Cardinals has
pleaded guilty in federal court to hacking the Houston Astros’ player personnel database.
Christopher Correa pleaded guilty
Friday to five counts of unauthorized
access of a protected computer, access
authorities said dated back several
years. The 35-year-old Correa was the
Cardinals’ director of baseball development until he was fired last summer.
Cardinals Chairman Bill DeWitt Jr.
had blamed the alleged hack on “roguish behavior” by a handful of individuals. No one else was charged.
The data breach was first reported in
June 2014 when Astros general manager Jeff Luhnow told reporters the
team had been the victim of hackers
who accessed servers and published
online months of internal trade talks.
Luhnow is a former employee with the
Cardinals.

Donated Augusta National
member green jacket sold
HOUSTON — An Augusta National
Golf Club green jacket from the 1960s
donated to a Houston charity in a bundle of clothes has sold for thousands of
dollars to a Pennsylvania car dealer.

The Guild Shop sold the jacket
Friday following media stories about
the highly collectible item.
Shop executive director Gaye
Jackson declined to name the jacket’s
owner, the buyer or selling price.
She’d been advised that the jacket
would likely go at auction for
$18,000. Jackson says the sale “met
expectations.”
Current Augusta National custom is
that member green jackets don’t leave
the property. New Jersey-based
GreenJacketAuctions. com in 2013
sold a jacket, belonging to 1934
Masters champion Horton Smith, for
$682,000.

Messi set to get fifth FIFA best
player prize, end Ronaldo run
GENEVA — Lionel Messi is favored
to win the FIFA Ballon d’Or on
Monday, ending Cristiano Ronaldo’s
two-year hold on soccer’s top individual prize.
Messi already has a 4-3 lead in their
career duel for the annual FIFA prize
but has recently been eclipsed by his
great rival.
That changed in 2015 when Messi
inspired Barcelona to regain the
Champions League title among five
major trophies to none for Real
Madrid, despite Ronaldo’s relentless
goal-scoring pace.
Barcelona’s dominance also helped
Brazil star Neymar earn a place on the
three-man shortlist for the first time.

WARRIORS
Continued from page 11
up 24-9 and Thompson had five 3-pointers and 19 points in the
opening quarter as Golden State led 38-21.
The Warriors led 74-52 at the break, but Portland opened the
third quarter with a 12-4 to cut the margin to 78-65. The threat
was short-lived and Golden State stretched the lead to 90-67 after
Brandon Rush’s 3-pointer.
It was Thompson’s third straight game with 30 or more points.
Rush had a season-high 20 points.

Tip-ins
Warri o rs : Interim coach Luke Walton said he met with his
Hall of Fame dad Bill for about an hour before the game. The elder
Walton, a broadcaster, is in Oregon for the California-Oregon

The Catalan club can sweep the
men’s honors with Luis Enrique heading the coaches’ shortlist after becoming European champion and winning
the Spanish league and cup, European
Super Cup and Club World Cup.
Messi can also win the Puskas Award
— a fans’ online vote for best goal —
for his solo slalom through the
Athletic Bilbao defense to score in the
Spanish cup final.

Americans win
World Cup bobsled title
LAKE PLACID, N. Y. — Jamie
Greubel-Poser and Cherelle Garrett of
the United States posted the fastest
time in both runs Friday to win the
gold medal in a women’s World Cup
bobsled race at Mount Van
Hoevenberg.
Greubel-Poser and Garrett finished
their two runs in 1 minute, 53.48 seconds. Reigning Olympic champion
Kaillie Humphries and Melissa
Lotholz of Canada were second in
1:53. 91, and Austria’s Christina
Hengster and Sanne Monique Dekker
were third in 1:54.30.
It was Greubel-Poser’s second win of
the season and third overall. She
closed within 10 points of Humphries
for the overall series lead, with four of
the eight races on the World Cup
schedule for the season now complete.
The two-man bobsled event will be
completed later Friday.

State game on Saturday. Bill Walton was on the Blazers’ NBA
championship team in 1977. ... Forward James Michael McAdoo
is sitting out two games because of a toe injury.
Trai l Bl azers : Portland is one of the few teams that knows
what it’s like to beat Golden State. The Trail Blazers beat the
Warriors 118-101 in the preseason despite 30 points from Curry.

Kerr in Portland
Coach Steve Kerr, who is on a leave of absence following offseason back surgery, has recently been traveling with the team
and was in Portland. Luke Walton laughed before the game when
it was suggested he was wearing an earpiece during games and
taking Kerr’s instructions.
“It’s a part of what makes it so great to work for Steve as an
assistant: He trusts us,” Walton said.

Up next
Warri o rs : Visit Sacramento on Saturday night.

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

15

NFL PLAYOFF GLANCE
Wild-card Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 9
Kansas City (11-5) at Houston (9-7), 1:35
p.m. (ABC/ESPN)
Pittsburgh (10-6) at Cincinnati (12-4), 5:15
p.m. (CBS)
Sunday, Jan. 10
Seattle (10-6) at Minnesota (11-5), 10 a.m.
(NBC)
Green Bay (10-6) at Washington (9-7), 1:30
p.m. (FOX)

Divisional Playoffs
Saturday, Jan. 16
Cincinnati, Houston or Kansas City at New
England (12-4), 1:35 (CBS)
Minnesota, Washington or Green Bay at
Arizona (13-3), 5:15 p.m. (NBC)
Sunday, Jan. 17
Seattle, Green Bay or Washington at Carolina (15-1), 10:05 a.m. (FOX)

Pittsburgh, Kansas City or Houston at Denver (12-4), 1:30 p.m. (CBS)

Conference
Championships
Sunday, Jan. 24
AFC, 12:05 p.m. (CBS)
NFC, 3:40 p.m. (FOX)

Pro Bowl
Sunday, Jan. 31
At Honolulu
Team Rice vs. Team Irvin, 7 p.m. (ESPN)

Super Bowl
Sunday, Feb. 7
At Santa Clara, Calif.
TBD, 3:30 p.m. (CBS)

WHAT’S ON TAP

TRANSACTIONS

SATURDAY
Girls’ soccer
Valley Christian at Notre Dame-Belmont,
11 a.m.
Boys’ soccer
Valley Christian at Serra, 11 a.m.
Girls’ basketball
Presentation at Notre Dame-Belmont, 6:30
p.m.

NBA
MEMPHIS GRIZZLIES — Signed G Elliot
Williams to a 10-day contract. Recalled Fs
James Ennis and Jarell Martin from Iowa
(NBADL).
PHOENIX SUNS — Signed GLorenzo
Brown to a 10-day contract.
NFL
MIAMI DOLPHINS — Signed DB Damarr
Aultman to a reserve/future contract.

16

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

ALL-PRO
Continued from page 11
Five teams — New England, Pittsburgh,
Cincinnati, Arizona and St. Louis — had two
All-Pros each. Steelers receiver Antonio
Brown drew 49 votes; teammate David
DeCastro made it at guard.
The Patriots were tight end Rob
Gronkowski and kicker Stephen Gostkowski.
From Cincinnati, it was DT Geno Atkins and
OT Andrew Whitworth. Arizona, in a measure
of the strength of its secondary, had cornerback Patrick Peterson and safety Tyrann
Mathieu. St. Louis’ All-Pros were DT Aaron
Donald and punter Johnny Hekker.
One rookie, Seattle kick returner Tyler
Lockett, was selected.
“It means a lot,” Lockett said. “There are a
lot of great players who come in to the NFL
and do an exceptional job and have a great
career, but they’re never able to make it on the
All-Pro team. It’s nothing that they did, just
other players may have had a better season. To
be a rookie to be able to come in, it’s a crazy
experience and a crazy accolade to have.”

SPORTS
NFL All-Pro team
FIRST TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback—Cam Newton, Carolina
Running Backs—Adrian Peterson, Minnesota; Doug Martin,
Tampa Bay
Fullback—Mike Tolbert, Carolina
Tight End—Rob Gronkowski, New England
Wide Receivers—Antonio Brown, Pittsburgh; Julio Jones, Atlanta
Tackles—Joe Thomas, Cleveland; Andrew Whitworth, Cincinnati
Guards—Marshal Yanda, Baltimore; David DeCastro, Pittsburgh
Center—Ryan Kalil, Carolina
Placekicker—Stephen Gostkowski, New England
Kick Returner—Tyler Lockett, Seattle
DEFENSE
Ends—J.J. Watt, Houston; Khalil Mack, Oakland
Tackles—Aaron Donald, St. Louis; Geno Atkins, Cincinnati
Outside Linebackers—Von Miller, Denver; Khalil Mack, Oakland,
and Thomas Davis, Carolina
Inside Linebacker—Luke Kuechly, Carolina; NaVorro Bowman,
San Francisco
Cornerbacks—Josh Norman, Carolina; Patrick Peterson, Arizona
Safeties—Tyrann Mathieu, Arizona; Eric Berry, Kansas City
Punter—Johnny Hekker, St. Louis
SECOND TEAM
OFFENSE
Quarterback—Carson Palmer, Arizona

Running Backs—Todd Gurley, St. Louis; Devonta Freeman, Atlanta
Fullback—Pat DiMarco, Atlanta
Tight End—Greg Olsen, Carolina
Wide Receivers—Brandon Marshall, New York Jets; DeAndre
Hopkins, Houston, and Odell Beckham Jr., New York Giants
Tackles—Tyron Smith, Dallas; Trent Williams, Washington
Guards—Josh Sitton, Green Bay; Mike Iupati, Arizona, and Zach
Martin, Dallas
Center—Travis Frederick, Dallas
Placekicker—Dan Bailey, Dallas
Kick Returner—Cordarrelle Patterson, Minnesota

In all, 15 NFC players and 12 from the AFC
were chosen.

NaVorro Bowman, and Kansas City S Eric
Berry.

The other All-Pros: Tampa Bay RB Doug
Martin, Atlanta WR Julio Jones, Cleveland
OT Joe Thomas, Baltimore G Marshal Yanda,
Denver OLB Von Miller, San Francisco ILB

For Berry, 2015 was a particularly special
season. He was diagnosed with lymphoma and
this time a year ago was undergoing
chemotherapy. He returned in spectacular

DEFENSE
Ends—Muhammad Wilkerson, New York Jets; Ezekiel Ansah, Detroit
Tackles—Kawann Short, Carolina; Fletcher Cox, Philadelphia
Outside Linebacker—Jamie Collins, New England
Inside Linebackers—Bobby Wagner, Seattle; Derrick Johnson,
Kansas City
Cornerbacks—Richard Sherman, Seattle; Chris Harris Jr., Denver,
and Marcus Peters, Kansas City
Safeties—Reggie Nelson, Cincinnati; Charles Woodson, Oakland
Punter—Sam Koch, Baltimore

THE DAILY JOURNAL
fashion, helping the Chiefs win their final 10
games this season to make the playoffs.
“It’s an incredible honor. It means a lot to
me,” said Berry, who also made the 2013
team. “Football’s a team game, so I have to
give credit to those guys around me as well.
We’ve been hungry from the get-go. I don’t
know how to explain it, but I think you see it
throughout our play. I think our play speaks
for itself.”
Bowman is another player coming off a
courageous comeback from a major knee
injury sustained in the 2013 NFC title game.
He only returned to the field this season after
being an All-Pro in 2011, ‘12 and ‘13.
Newcomers to the team along with Mack
and Lockett are Newton, Norman and Davis
among the Panthers, plus Jones, Whitworth,
Martin, DeCastro, Donald and Mathieu.
“That’s another goal check off my list,”
Norman said. “It really is. It went from Pro
Bowl to All-Pro to hopefully Defensive Player
of the Year. Sheesh.
“That is all personal goals, though. The
Super Bowl is the granddaddy of them all. I’m
working so hard toward that right now. All of
these other accolades will fall into place.”

Muesum
gotta see ‘um
The
Carnegie Museum
of Natural History

SEE PAGE 19

Author of ‘Game
of Thrones’ missed
his book deadline
By Verna Dobnik
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Forgettable horror ‘The
Forest’ wastes star power
By Lindsey Bahr
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

The January movie has long
had a reputation for being
among
the
worst
that
Hollywood has to offer, as
though everyone collectively
acknowledges that they need a
month to catch up on the glut of
prestige offerings and awards
hopefuls that hit at the end of
December. There are always

exceptions of course, but unfortunately “The Forest,” a rotten
horror film about twin sisters
and the spooky Japanese woods
where people go to kill themselves, is not one of them.
It’s rife with unbearable dialogue, cheap jump scares, and
far too familiar imagery which
makes the whole experience
instantly forgettable.
The story starts when Sara
(Natalie Dormer), a young,

wealthy professional living with
a blandly handsome husband
(Eoin Macken), discovers that
her expat twin sister has disappeared in a forest in Japan. This
isn’t any forest, though. It’s
Aokigahara, also known as the
suicide forest. Everyone she
talks to assures her that her sister is definitely dead by now.
But Sara knows better. In “The
See FOREST, Page 18

NEW YORK — For fans of George
R.R. Martin, winter is not coming
— at least not
right away.
The “Game of
Thrones” author
says he missed a
Dec. 31 deadline
to finish “The
Winds
of
Winter,”
the
George R.R. sixth book in
his popular fanMartin
tasy series. That
means the next HBO season based
on the novel will start airing in
April, before the book is published.
The words “you won’t like it”
appeared Saturday on Martin’s
blog, reporting that “the book’s
not done. ... I tried, I promise you. I
failed.”
Martin says he is working with
HBO to ensure the show reflects the
next installment of the “A Song of
Ice and Fire” books — in which
characters warn of impending doom
with the phrase “Winter is coming.”
With hundreds of pages and
dozens of chapters written, Martin
said he estimates it will still take
months more if the writing goes
well.
“You can blame my travels or my
blog posts or the distractions of
other projects and the Cocteau and
whatever, but maybe all that had an
impact,” he wrote, referring to the
single-screen Jean Cocteau Cinema
he purchased and fixed up in Santa
Fe, New Mexico, where he lives.
“For months now I have wanted
nothing so much as to be able to
say, ‘I have completed and delivered
The Winds of Winter’ on or before
the last day of 2015,” the 67-yearold author blogged.
The truth is “sometimes the writing goes well and sometimes it
doesn’t, and that was true for me
even when I was in my 20s,” he
wrote.
Messages left at Martin’s office
and the cinema were not immediately returned.

Ways to improve your odds for record $800M Powerball
By Scott McFetridge
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DES MOINES, Iowa — The
record-breaking $800 million
Powerball jackpot is the stuff of
dreams, but it all boils down to
math. From the huge prize to the
enormous odds against winning
it, Saturday night’s drawing is a
numbers game that gives players
good reason to brush up on their
algebra, maybe as they stand in
line to buy a ticket. A look at some
of the statistics:

THE MOST
IMPORTANT NUMBERS
For those who match all five
white balls and the red Powerball,
the key numbers are the $800 million jackpot, paid out over 30
years or as an immediate $428.4
million in cash. Those figures are
before federal and state taxes,
which will eat up roughly half of
the cash-option prize.

THE ODDS
Ticket holders have a 1 in 292.2

million chance of winning. To put
that in perspective, the odds of
hitting the jackpot are about the
same as your odds of flipping a
quarter and getting heads 28 times
in
a
row,
said
Jeffrey
Miecznikowski, associate professor of biostatistics at the
University at Buffalo.
“The probability is so small,
dare
say
impossible, ”
Miecznikowski said. “It’s like trying to count electrons or drops of
water in the ocean or grains of
sand in the world. We just can’t

imagine these types of things.”

WHEN WILL SOMEONE WIN?
No one has won the Powerball
jackpot since early November,
which is why the prize has grown
so large. The bigger prize entices
more people to buy tickets, and
that drives up the jackpot. The
increased ticket sales also make it
more likely there will be a winner,
simply because all those extra
tickets mean more number combinations are covered.

DOES MATH OFFER ANY
HINTS TO IMPROVE THE ODDS?
Scott A. Norris, an assistant
professor of mathematics at
Southern Methodist University,
said there’s no trick to playing the
lottery, but your tiny odds of winning are a bit better if you let the
computer pick rather than choosing yourself. That’s because when
people use birthdates or other
favorite figures, they generally
choose numbers 31 or below. That

See LOTTO, Page 18

18

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

Sunday news shows
ABC’s ‘This Week’ 8 a.m.
Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio; Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.; White House
chief of staff Denis McDonough.

NBC’s ‘Meet the Press’ 8 a.m.
McDonough; Republican presidential candidate Donald
Trump.

CBS’ ‘Face the Nation’ 8:30 a.m.
House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis.; Republican presidential
candidates Chris Christie and Rand Paul.

CNN’s ‘State of the Union’ 3 p.m.
McDonough; Republican presidential candidate Ted
Cruz.

‘Fox News Sunday’ 8 a.m.
Trump, McDonough.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

FOREST
Continued from page 17
Forest” being a twin means that you
have a spidey sense that your other
half is around and living. There’s a
buzz, or something, and one time
when Jess (also played by Dormer)
took too many pills, the hum stopped.
That’s Sara knew something was
wrong and knew to call the police to
check on her. Fine, whatever.
So Sara hops on a plane to Japan to
search for Jess in the spooky suicide
forest. Her dreams and eventually
visions get creepier the closer she
gets. There some elderly Japanese
women around to warn her not to go
into the forest, too — it’s haunted by
the spirits of the dead, she’s too sad,
and it’s too dangerous.
Thankfully that night at the bar, she
meets a handsome American travel

LOTTO
Continued from page 17
ignores the fact that there are 69 numbered balls.

HOW MUCH DOES BUYING
MULTIPLE TICKETS HELP?
Your odds increase with additional
tickets, but it’s important to keep in
mind how small they are to begin with.
If you have a 1 in 292. 2 million
chance of winning with one ticket,
you have 10 times the odds if you buy
10 tickets. Yet the probability is still
incredibly small.
“The odds are so astronomically
small that even 100 times that number
is exceedingly unlikely to win, ”
Norris said. “It’s probably still not

writer from Australia, Aiden (Taylor
Kinney) who offers to let her accompany him and a park ranger, Michi
(Yukiyoshi Ozawa) into the forest.
Michi does “off the books” treks
through the woods to try to save people from killing themselves. And, of
course, there things go crazy, especially after Sara decides to stay overnight.
This forest apparently really is popular among suicidal people — so much
so that there’s a sign at the entrance
urging visitors to think of their families. That fact on its own is truly horrifying and possibly worthy of a cinematic interpretation of why that is.
Here, it’s exploited for an unimaginative mishmash of silly horror objectives. For example, not only will the
forest bring out any latent sadness, but
the spirits there are also angry, vindictive and restless. And beware the
bruised and battered Japanese girls
wandering around in school uniforms.
Even Sara, a happy, well-adjusted
going to happen if you buy a hundred
tickets or a thousand tickets or even a
million tickets.”
If you have extra cash and are thinking of buying all possible number
combinations, that is allowed, but it
wouldn’t be very smart. At $2 a ticket,
the strategy would cost about $584
million, and when taxes are subtracted,
you’d end up losing money.
And if someone else had the winning
numbers, you’d need to split the prize.
You’d make back some of that money
by smaller prizes paid for matching
three, four or five of the balls plus the
Powerball, but chances are it still
wouldn’t be a good bet.

WHAT TO DO
WITH THE WINNINGS
Despite the odds, someone will
eventually win the prize. What then?
Is it better to take the money as an

THE DAILY JOURNAL
adult with a horrific trauma in her past,
is not immune to the powers of the suicide forest. A character’s descent into
madness can be the stuff of cinematic
gold, but this is both ridiculous and, at
times, needlessly confusing.
Director Jason Zada in his feature
debut shows some stylistic flair, but
resorts to far too many scary movie
clichés to make this a fun watch,
including the requisite score laced with
creepy little girls singing off in the
distance.
Dormer, who is such a standout as
the feisty Margaery Tyrell on “Game of
Thrones,” manages to infuse a few
moments with humor and zest, but Sara
never really comes to life as a full character. It’s hard to tell whether that’s a
problem with the writing or the performance. Kinney’s Aiden is similarly
unremarkable.
Save yourself, and your money from
“The Forest,” it’s pretty bad, even for a
January release.
annuity or in cash?
Olivia S. Mitchell, a professor of
Insurance and risk management at the
Wharton School at the University of
Pennsylvania, said to avoid the risk of
overspending or an investment
mishap, a safe option would be to take
the annuity, guaranteeing a huge annual payout for three decades.
“We know the average American is
quite financially illiterate,” Mitchell
said.
For those who want to invest the
money themselves, Mitchell suggested setting aside part of the cash option
to buy their own annuity that would
give them a guaranteed income in case
the return on the money they do invest
comes up short.
“That way, you still might not beat
what the state pays,” she said. “But on
the other hand, you’ve protected your
basic consumption needs.”

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

19

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL
SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

DINOS AURS IN THEIR
TIME: JURASSIC CELEBRITIES AT THE CARNEGIE
MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY
IN
PITTS B URGH.
Superstar dinosaurs reside at the
Carnegie Museum of Natural
History
in
Pittsburgh,
Pennsylvania. The museum, home
to one of the world’s finest collections of dinosaurs and other fossils, houses an exceptional gathering of “holotype” dinosaurs, the
specimens that forever define a
species. Among these are the
world’s first specimen of a tyrannosaurus rex; the 84-foot-long
diplodocus carnegii (the founding
specimen of the museum collection); and a recent addition — an
oviraptorosaur
named Anzu
wyliei, tapped as one of the “Top
10 New Species” discovered in
2014.
MAKING HIS TORY WITH
DIPLODOCUS . The museum’s
association with famous fossils
dates back to shortly after its
1895 founding by Pittsburghbased
industrialist
Andrew
Carnegie. Carnegie wanted a
dinosaur for his new museum and
told his staff to spare no expense
in finding one. His money produced results, and on July 4, 1899,
museum scientists, digging in
Wyoming, unearthed the fossil
remains of diplodocus, one of the
largest dinosaurs ever discovered.
In honor of Carnegie, the specimen was given the scientific name
diplodocus carnegii, but over the
years it has become more familiarly known as “Dippy.” It continues
to hold a place of honor in the
museum’s main gallery, where it is

a favorite with visitors.
A KING AS KS FOR A
DINOSAUR. Word of the museum’s 1899 discovery spread rapidly and Carnegie was soon inundated with requests from museums
that wanted a dinosaur of their
own. In 1902, English King
Edward VII personally asked
Carnegie for a diplodocus for the
British Museum. Carnegie accommodated the king by sending a
plaster copy, which was installed
in London in 1905. During the
next 25 years replicas of
Pittsburgh’s diplodocus were
installed in Berlin, Germany;
Paris, France; Vienna, Austria;
Bologna, Italy; St. Petersburg,
Russia; La Plata, Argentina;
Madrid, Spain; and Mexico City,
Mexico. For many people, Dippy
was the first dinosaur they had
ever seen and was, for a while, the
most famous dinosaur in the
world.
THE AGE OF DINOSAURS
ON VIEW. What began in 1899
with the discovery of diplodocus
carnegii eventually led to the
museum’s current “Dinosaurs in
Their Time,” the first permanent
exhibition in the world to feature
scientifically accurate environments spanning the Age of
Dinosaurs —arranged chronologically and filled with actively
posed original fossil specimens.
Nineteen freestanding dinosaur
skeletons are placed in the ancient
ecosystems in which they lived.
Matthew C. Lamanna, Ph.D. assistant curator, section of vertebrate
paleontology,
said:
“The
‘Dinosaurs in Their Time’ exhibition at Carnegie Museum of
Natural History is one of the only
places in the world where one can
see real fossil dinosaur skeletons
displayed in scientifically accu-

rate representations of their
respective environments. In
‘Dinosaurs in Their Time, ’
dinosaurs are shown alongside
plants and other animals that are
known from fossils from the same
ancient ecosystems. Put simply,
in ‘Dinosaurs in Their Time, ’
whenever two species are exhibited together, they actually lived
together. ‘Dinosaurs in Their
Time’ features real fossil skeletons
of such famous dinosaurs as tyrannosaurus rex, apatosaurus louisae,
diplodocus carnegii, stegosaurus,
and allosaurus. The T. rex,
diplodocus and apatosaurus skeletons on display are the type, or
name-bearing, specimens of their
respective species. All told, some
230 objects are on display,
approximately three-quarters of
which are original fossils.”
MUS EUM PARTICULARS :
The Carnegie Museum of Natural
History, located at 4400 Forbes
Ave., Pittsburgh, is adjacent to the
University of Pittsburgh. In 1999,
to pay tribute to the 100th
anniversary of the Diplodocus discovery, the Carnegie created a lifesize fiberglass sculpture of Dippy,
its most iconic specimen. The
sculpture, which weighs 3, 000
pounds, stands 22 feet tall and
measures 84 feet in length, may be
seen near the front entrance of the
museum. For more information
visit http://carnegiemnh. org or
call (412) 622-3131.
WANT TO LEARN MORE?
The tale of Andrew Carnegie’s
dinosaur is told in Tom Rea’s book
Bone Wars: The Excavation and
Celebrity of Andrew Carnegie’s
Dinosaur. For the bigger picture of
the search for dinosaurs in the late
19th century American West, check
out The Gilded Dinosaur by Mark
Jaffe, which tells of the heated pro-

SUSAN COHN/DAILY JOURNAL

The Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh, Penn., holds the
world’s largest collection of Jurassic dinosaurs. Curator Matthew C. Lamanna,
Ph.D. (left) stands with a visitor next to the museum’s first and most famous
dinosaur skeleton, diplodocus carnegii, discovered in 1899.
fessional rivalry between early
dinosaur hunters Edward Drinker
Cope (of the Academy of Natural
Sciences in Philadelphia) and
Othniel Charles Marsh (of the
Peabody Museum of Natural History
at Yale). Their obsessive feud ultimately led to their mutual social and
financial ruin but immeasurably
enriched American museums.

Susan Cohn is a member of the
North American Travel Journalists
Association, Bay Area Travel
Writers, and the International
Food, Wine & Travel Writers
Association. She may be reached
at susan@smdailyjournal. com.
More of her stories may be found
at http://ifwtwa.org/author/susancohn.

Whaling museum gears up for
‘Moby-Dick’ reading marathon
By Mark Pratt
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BOSTON — “Moby-Dick” fans from around the world are
getting ready for their own grueling quest — a marathon
reading of Herman Melville’s classic.
The New Bedford Whaling Museum this weekend is holding its 20th annual nonstop reading of the seminal man vs.
whale novel, with a few new twists to mark the anniversary.
What started with just “a couple of die-hards and some
grog,” according to museum president and CEO James
Russell, has grown into a four-day event that culminates in
a cover-to-cover, 25-hour reading of the book aloud by
about 150 volunteers. Hundreds attend the live event, and
thousands more watch a live stream.
The event has become so popular that this year’s reading
spots were snapped up within an hour.
“This is my favorite museum event of the year,” Russell
said. “It touches on so many dimensions: the literary experience, the physical works of art, the theatrical performance, the workshops and focus groups.”
The readers are teenagers and nonagenarians. They
include Melville scholars and Melville descendants. They
come from across the country and overseas. This year’s
celebrity reader, who traditionally kicks things off by reading what has been called the most famous opening line in
literature, “Call me Ishmael,” is award-winning author
Nathaniel Philbrick.
Portions will be read in foreign languages including
Spanish, French and Dutch.
The reading starts at noon Saturday and moves through
different galleries of the museum, even at one pointing
sailing up the cobblestone street to the Seamen’s Bethel —
the Whaleman’s Chapel in the novel.
New for this year are a four-hour reading of a Portuguese
adaptation of “Moby-Dick,” and a two-hour children’s version, read by kids ages 8 to 12.
Philbrick, who wrote “In the Heart of the Sea,” which
won the National Book Award for nonfiction and was made
into a movie of the same name, called it an honor to get
things started.
“It’s written with such force and complexity and beautiful
language,” he said.

Baptist

Church of Christ

PILGRIM BAPTIST CHURCH
Dr. Larry Wayne Ellis, Pastor

CHURCH OF CHRIST
525 South Bayshore Blvd. SM
650-343-4997
Bible School 9:45am
Services 11:00am and
2:00pm
Wednesday Bible Study 7:00pm
Minister J.S. Oxendine
www.church-of-christ.org/cocsm

(650) 343-5415

217 North Grant Street, San Mateo
Sunday Worship Services 8 & 11 am
Sunday School 9:30 am
Wednesday Worship 7pm

www.pilgrimbcsm.org
LISTEN TO OUR
RADIO BROADCAST!
(KFAX 1100 on the AM Dial)
4:30 a.m.at 5:30 PM

Lutheran
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN
CHURCH AND SCHOOL
(WELS)

Buddhist
SAN MATEO
BUDDHIST TEMPLE
Jodo Shinshu Buddhist
(Pure Land Buddhism)

2600 Ralston Ave., Belmont,
(650) 593-3361
Sunday Schedule: Sunday
School / Adult Bible Class,
9:15am; Worship, 10:30am

2 So. Claremont St.
San Mateo

(650) 342-2541

Church of the Highlands

Sunday English Service &
Dharma School - 9:30 AM

“A community of caring Christians”

Reverend Henry Adams
www.sanmateobuddhisttemple.org

1900 Monterey Drive (corner Sneath Lane) San Bruno

A FAMILY SHARING HOPE IN CHRIST

HOPE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH

(650)873-4095

Hope Lutheran Preschool
admits students of any race, color and national or ethnic origin.

Adult Worship Services:
Friday: 7:30 pm (singles)
Saturday: 7:00 pm
Sun 7, 8:30, 10, & 11:30 am, 5 pm
Youth Worship Service:
For high school & young college
Sunday at 10:00 am
Sunday School:
For adults & children of all ages
Sunday at 10:00 am

Call (650) 349-0100

Donald Sheley, Founding Pastor
Leighton Sheley, Senior Pastor

600 W. 42nd Ave., San Mateo
Worship Service
Sunday School

10:00 AM
11:00 AM

License No. 410500322.

HopeLutheranSanMateo.org

20

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

REPORT
Continued from page 1

WEEKEND JOURNAL
with addressing the myriad issues identified in the report, Lempert noted
Comment on
there is a silver lining that can be
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com found.

designed to benefit California children
are lacking.
Ted Lempert, president of Children
Now, said policy makers and concerned
communities must work together to
correct the flaws found in the report.
“Folks need to understand how many
kids in our county, and statewide,
aren’t getting the help they need, and
are suffering,” he said. “We can do
something about that.”
Lempert, who also serves on the San
Mateo County Board of Education, said
to address the issue he would like to see
more state resources channeled to
health and welfare services.
“If you make kids truly the priority,
there are the dollars to do this,” he
said.
In the report, Lempert calls for more
services designed to aid the state’s
most vulnerable children.
“It’s time to put more of our
resources to work for kids, by investing in quality programs to help lift
them out of poverty and set them on
the road to success,” he said.
Of particular concern, the report
cites a lack of work being done to
address the issues of children who have
suffered abuse and neglect or witnessed
violence in their homes.
These traumatic events can create
scars that last a lifetime, and if not
addressed in a child’s formative years,
may grow into larger issues such as
depression or other mental health
problems, per the report.
The issue of childhood trauma treatment received a D- letter grade, the
lowest included in the report, indicating much more must be done in the way
of building relationships between families and care services, and promoting
trauma prevention, particularly in lowincome communities.

A prime example of the work that
can be done to reduce traumatic experiences for children is found through a
collaboration between the University
of California at San Francisco and the
San Francisco Unified School District,
according to the report.
Students in the district are provided
with emotional support and education
programs which teach them how to
manage their emotions, resulting in an
89 percent drop in suspension rates at
a district school.
Lempert said local children, as well
as those across California, are in need
of protection from traumatic and damaging experiences.
“So many kids around San Mateo
County, and the state, are facing
intense stress daily, and it is undermining their health,” he said. “We need to
focus on that. It is not tolerable.”
Locally, Lempert celebrated the work
of organizations such as the Big Lift,
which provides support for underprivileged children in San Mateo County to
get services that may not be available
in other areas.
“We are making some really important strides in the county, and that
should be applauded,” he said. “The
state has a major role in this too and
we’ll all need to be doubling our efforts
because there is so much that has to be
done.”
He noted the substantial amount of
work required to rally support in a state
as large as California, because there
are so many competing interests for a
relatively small pool of resources
compared to the substantial demand.
“Because the size of the state, getting consensus and direction is
tough,” he said.
Yet despite the challenges associated

JACK’S

State University and became a public
speaking teacher.
David Marcovici, became a chef,
working at several East Bay restaurants while Chris Marcovici was in
Los Angeles managing events promotions.
Reuniting and becoming partners
felt natural, said John Marcovici.
Their differences complement each
other and contribute to the whole business. David Marcovici originated the
menu and now oversees the kitchen,
and John Marcovici handles daily
operations and human resources with
Chris Marcovici. Their parents are not
involved with the business, but their
influence touches Jack’s restaurants in
many ways.
As a family of Greek descent, the
menu includes recipes from their
mom’s kitchen and dishes with flavors

Continued from page 1
the family line the walls, giving customers a glimpse into the lives of the
restaurateurs. The casual ambiance
with modern furnishings, cozy booths
and dark tables are supposed to make
customers feel like they are gathering
at someone’s home.
“We like high energy, a sense of
community, an open floor plan and
an active bar with cool lights and
illuminated bar tops, ” said John
Marcovici.
Prior to Jack’s, the brothers
explored their own paths and had different careers. John Marcovici got a
master’s degree from San Francisco

Each grade issued in the report either
held steady from the year prior, or
improved, indicating progress is
being made on a variety of important
fronts.
“Even though the grades are bad,
they are going up slightly, ” said
Lempert.
Many of the letter grades issued in
the report languish between the B on
the high end and down to a D, but there
are no F grades.
The one A- grade included in the
report is assigned to health insurance,
which is identified as one of the state’s
most successful efforts to address a
prevailing need.
According to the report, an estimated 95 percent of California’s children
had health coverage last year, and even
more have been granted access under
the state’s decision to offer insurance
to all income-eligible families, regardless of immigration status.
Lempert said the ability to effectively address a demand as significant as
health insurance to such a wide swath
of the state’s children should breed
confidence that the other areas of need
can be improved in a similar fashion.
“When policy makers really focus
on something and set a goal and put
money behind it, it can get done,” he
said.
He said he believes grades across the
board can continue to be pushed
upward, through the concerted effort of
state and local communities, as well as
legislators.
“There is a lot to be done, it could
seem overwhelming, but they can all
be done,” he said.
V
i
s
i
t
childrennow.org/files/6214/5192/88
1
6
/
C
N
2016CAChildrensReportCard. pdf to
view the report in its entirety.

familiar to kitchens from all types of
families.
Pot roast, burgers, pasta, Asian
chicken salads, hummus and pita, are
included in the extensive menu that
John Marcovici calls American contemporary comfort food.
Besides classic American staples,
“it’s ethnic dishes that have become
American. It’s tried, true and accessible,” John Marcovici said.
“Hospitality industry is our passion,
we love our guests and our staff is family. That makes Jack’s what it is,” said
John Marcovici.
While business grows, so does the
family. As John Marcovici celebrates
the birth of his third child, Yianni, and
Chris Marcovici welcomes a new baby
boy, the brothers complete designs for
a fourth location. It is expected to
break ground in Newark by next year.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Calendar
SATURDAY, JAN. 9
What You Need to Know about
Divorce. 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. 800
Foster City Blvd., Foster City. Offered
by Collaborative Practice of San
Mateo. For more information email
barbaraseifer@gmail.com.
Overeaters Anonymous. 10:15 a.m.
to noon. 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Overeaters Anonymous meets every
saturday. For more information call
591-0341.
American Association of Retired
Persons San Bruno Chapter
Meeting. 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. 1555
Crystal Springs Road, San Bruno.
Coffee and doughnuts will be provided. For more information call 5834499.
Rose Pruning Demonstration.
10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. San Mateo
Garden Center, 605 Parkside Way,
San Mateo. Free pruning advice outside in the rose garden by members
of the San Mateo County Rose
Society, open to the public. For more
information contact 342-4956.
Very First Concerts: Plus One.
10:30 a.m., 11:15 a.m. and noon. San
Mateo Public Library Main Branch,
55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo. Listen to
the difference between duos, trios
and more. Open your ears and listen
to the music change as we start
adding players one by one. Free for
all ages. For more information contact (415) 692-3367.
Tai Chi. 10:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. 610
Elm St., San Carlos. Tai Chi is offered
for adults. For more information call
591-0341.
San Mateo on Ice. Fitzgerald Ball
Field in Central Park, Fifth Avenue
and El Camino Real, San Mateo.
Noon to 10 p.m. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor ice
rink features 9,000 square feet of real
ice and is the largest outdoor skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per person for all day skating with free skate
rental. For more information visit
sanmateoonice.com.
Pleasures of the Palate: A
Celebration of Food in Art. 1 p.m.
SMCCD Board Room, SMCCD Board
Room, 3401 CSM Drive. See and hear
how artists from many eras depict
food in art. Free and open to the
public. For more information call
458-3073.
Origami Time. 1 p.m. Reach and
Teach, 144 W. 25th Ave., San Mateo.
Learn some new folds and share
some of yours. All ages and experience levels welcome. Free. For more
information
email
craig@reachandteach.com.
CSM Fine Arts Club Exhibition. 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. Twin Pines Manor
Gallery, 10 Twin Pines Lane, Belmont.
Meet the 15 artists and view this collection of oil, acrylic, watercolor, pastel and pen and ink paintings. Free
admission, wheelchair accessible,
light refreshments. Exhibit runs
through Jan. 30 and the gallery is
open Wednesday through Sunday
from noon to 4 p.m. For more information
email
asevans2002@aol.com.
Centenary Celebration of Billie
Holiday and Frank Sinatra. 7:30
p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Menlo-Atherton
High School (Performing Arts
Center), 555 Middlefield Road,
Atherton. Presented by the
Montclair Women’s Big Band, an
ensemble of the best jazz women,
and featuring vocalist Kenny
Washington. Tickets range from $15
for students to $40 general admission. Free parking. For more information contact 345-9543.
‘Legislate This!’ South Bay Show. A
saucy variety show fundraising for
Planned Parenthood Mar Monte
while celebrating the freedom to
control our bodies. Featuring a variety acts by talented Bay Area performers. Tickets are $15 presale and
$20 at the door, for adults ages 21
and over. For more information and
to purchase tickets visit legislatethissouthbay.brownpapertickets.com/.
SUNDAY, JAN. 10
‘Fighting the Bite’ exhibit opens.
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. The San Mateo
County History Museum presents an
exhibit about the fight to free the
Peninsula of mosquitos. Exhibit runs
through April 10. For more information go to www.historysmc.org.
San Mateo on Ice. Noon to 9 p.m.
Fitzgerald Ball Field in Central
Park, Fifth Avenue and El Camino
Real, San Mateo. Located in San
Mateo’s Central Park, the outdoor ice
rink features 9,000 square feet of real
ice and is the largest outdoor skating rink in the Bay Area. $15 per person for all day skating with free skate
rental. For more information visit
sanmateoonice.com.
Meditation at the Library with
Pablo Gonzalez. 2:30 p.m. South
San Francisco Main Library, 840 W.

Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
This session will focus on insight
meditation, a practice based on
awareness of the present moment.
After basic instruction is provided,
there will be a 20 minute silent meditation session followed by a discussion on meditation. Participants are
recommended to wear comfortable
clothing and bring along a cushion
or pillow. For more information call
829-3860.
Jill Soble and Kasim Sulton Shows.
7 p.m. to 10 p.m. Club Fox, 2209
Broadway, Redwood City. Jill Sobule
and Kasim Sulton solo shows double
bill live at Club Fox. For ages 21 and
over, only $20. For more information
call (877) 435-9849.
MONDAY, JAN. 11
Adobe Illustrator Basics. 1 p.m.
South San Francisco Main Library
(Collaboration Room), 840 W. Orange
Ave.,
South
San
Francisco.
Participants will learn the basics of
this popular graphic design software. Due to space limitations, a
maximum of four participants can
attend each session. For more information call 829-3860. To register visit
http://bit.ly/1RazeRx.
Paws for Tales. 4 p.m. San Mateo
Public Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San
Mateo. Children ages five and up can
improve their reading skills by reading out loud to a therapy dog and
make a new four-legged friend. The
dogs and handlers are from the
Peninsula Humane Society and the
SPCA Pet Assisted Therapy program. Sign up is required. For more
information or appointment call
522-7838.
TUESDAY, JAN. 12
Managing
Stress
Through
Meditation. 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m.
150 San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay.
Join Linda Romano to learn basic
skills for developing a meditation
practice at home. For more information and to preregister visit
www.Newleafhalfmoonbay.eventbri
te.com.
LibLab
MakerSpace
Programming: Textile Tuesdays.
Noon to 2 p.m. South San Francisco
Main Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. Featuring the
library’s new sewing lab. This session
will be focused on decorative pillows. For more information call 8293860.
Secrets of Success. 12:15 p.m. 1100
El Camino Real, Millbrae. The
Millbrae Rotary Club welcomes all
visitors to meet and hear magician
Mike Toy present his talk on lessons
from the world of entertainment.
Lunch included. Tickets will be $25.
For more information and to RSVP
call 873-5298.
Healthy Living Workshop. 1 p.m. to
2 p.m. Peninsula Family YMCA, 1877
South Grant St., San Mateo. Healthy
refreshments will be served. Class is
free to residents of San Mateo, Foster
City, Burlingame, Hillsborough,
Millbrae and San Bruno, however,
space is limited and registration is
required. You do not need to be a
member of the YMCA to participate.
For more information and to register
call 697-6900.
Documentary Club: 20 Feet From
Stardom. 6:30 p.m. Join us every
second Tuesday of the month for
Documentary Club. This month’s film
is ‘20 Feet From Stardom.’
Refreshments and popcorn will be
served. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.
Lawyers in the Library. 7 p.m. to 9
p.m. 610 Elm St., San Carlos.
Registrants get a free 15 minute consultation with an attorney. Lawyer’s
legal expertise may vary from
month to month. For more information call 591-0341.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 13
Computer Coach. 10:30 a.m.
Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda de
Las Pulgas, Belmont. One-on-one
help with your technology needs.
No registration required. For more
information
contact
belmont@smcl.org.
Canadian Women’s Club Luncheon
and Speaker. 11 a.m. Basque
Cultural Center, 599 Railroad Ave.,
South San Francisco. Jolie Velazquez
from the World War I Historical
Association speaker’s bureau will
present ‘What Did You Do in the
Great War, Mommy?’ $38 per person
and free parking. RSVP at www.canadianwomensclub.org or contact
Vicepresident@canadianwomensclub.org.
Career and Resume Series:
LinkedIn Part One. 1 p.m. 840 W.
Orange Ave., South San Francisco.
Learn the basics of setting up a profile, finding contacts and work
opportunities and using the site’s
resources to find vocational inspiration and job hunting tips. For more
information call 829-3860.
For more events visit
smdailyjournal.com, click Calendar.

COMICS/GAMES

THE DAILY JOURNAL

DILBERT®

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

21

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Lady’s honorific
5 Crow sound
8 Brick oven
12 Purina rival
13 Ms. Thurman
14 Garfield’s victim
15 Acorn, to an oak
16 Stymies
18 Put the whammy on
20 Meadow
21 Coast Guard off.
22 Shore leave
25 Total
28 Beavers’ young
29 Heavy-metal band
33 Different
35 Courtroom event
36 Shaman’s findings
37 Lama’s chant
38 Salamander
39 Pirates’ base
41 Oater answer
42 Apollo’s priestesses
45 Gore and Capone

GET FUZZY®

48
49
53
56
57
58
59
60
61
62

PC button
Anvil user
Crack a code
Theater award
Culture dish goo
NASA counterpart
Deborah of films
Brother, perhaps
Compass pt.
Alimony getters

DOWN
1 Crush
2 Helm position
3 Triangle tip
4 Mannequin
5 Young bear
6 Talisman
7 Thin cookies
8 RV haven
9 Like some chatter
10 Mane possessor
11 Monster’s loch
17 — chance!
19 Levees

23
24
25
26
27
30
31
32
34
35
37
39
40
43
44
45
46
47
50
51
52
54
55

Compete at an auction
Knitter’s need
The Bard of —
Noblewoman
Sketched
— slicker
Show nerve
Peal of thunder
Crazy about
Weight deductions
Wire measure
Mascara target
Public —
Gym iteration
Fire sign
Mr. Sandler
Toy block brand
Read quickly
Mountain goat
Poop out
Towel word
Annoy
— Dawn Chong

1-9-16

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



SATURDAY, JANUARY 9, 2016
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — Opportunity is
apparent if you are ready to take action. Don’t
get hung up dealing with someone else’s problem
or responsibility when you should be following
your dream.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — You should set your
plan in motion and keep the momentum going. A
practical and beneficial improvement to your health or
appearance will lift your spirits.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Discuss your plans
with someone who has experienced what you are up
against. Don’t rely on someone who has not been

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

FRIDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

helpful in the past. Avoid people who are indulgent
or impractical.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Keep a close watch
over what everyone else is doing. It’s important
to avoid any surprises that could leave you in
an unsavory predicament. Pay attention to your
appearance and your loved ones.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Attending cultural
events or family or friendly gatherings will lead
to a connection with someone who wants to
collaborate with you.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Take care of
relationship matters before it’s too late. It’s important
that you are on the same page as the person you
want to head into the future with.

1-9-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Try something different
and share your likes and dislikes with someone you
enjoy being with. You can base changes that you make
to your home on the information you share.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Take care of personal
business or make plans to do something with your
children or pet. Set new ground rules in order to
improve an important relationship.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Make plans to do
something you enjoy. Participating in everything that
comes your way will lead to an unexpected opportunity
that expands your awareness and knowledge.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — You’ll be riled if things
don’t go your way. Don’t make matters worse by
withholding information. Reveal your concerns so that

you can move on and enjoy your day.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Short trips to a place
that offers fun activities or entertainment will revitalize
you. If you join in and share information with the
people you encounter, something good will transpire.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — Putting in a little
extra time pumping up your resume or checking out
online job prospects will encourage you to reach for
higher goals. Self-improvement projects will pay off.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

22

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

104 Training
TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

110 Employment

CAREGIVERS NEEDED

NEW YEAR – NEW CAREER

Become a Home Care Professional
t/P&YQFSJFODF/FDFTTBSZ
t5SBJOJOH1SPWJEFE
t'515oFYDFMMFOU'5CFOFöUT
Evenings/weekends/vehicle/driving required

Call or come in TODAY!

(650) 458-2200
www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. 115 San Mateo, CA 94402

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.

ACCOUNTING FIRM in San Bruno is
looking for a detail oriented tax preparer
for this season; possibly long term.
Please call Beatriz at 650-624-9583
AMERICAN GUARD SERvICES is hiring school crossing guards p/t in San
Carlos! Must have transportation & complete Live Scan & Background. Call (510)
895-9245 for information & to apply.

CAREGIvERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
hOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273
hOUSE ClEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.
MCKEE FOODS Corporation sells Little
Debbie® snacks to independent wholesale distributors. No minimum purchase
requirements. For information, call Joe
Kusler at 408-375-1596

For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

DRIvERS WANTED
San Mateo Daily Journal
Newspaper Delivery Routes to businesses and newsracks, and some apartment buildings. (No residential
houses.)
CuRRENT CONTRACT POSITIONS FOR:
REDWOOD CITY
MENlO PARK
BURlINGAME
Early mornings, six days per week, Monday through
Saturday. 2 to 4 hour routes.
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m.
Pay dependent on route size.
Call 650-344-5200 x121
or email resume to info@smdailyjournal.com

110 Employment
JOB TITlE:

Sales Operations
Manager

Job Location: Belmont, CA
Requirements: MS or equiv. in
Bus.Mgmt, Finance,
Statistics, etc. + 2 yrs.
exp. reqd. (or BS + 5).
Exp. w/ Mgmt Consulting,
Bus/growth Strategy
Analytics, Cloud-based
applications (Anaplan,
Tableau, Aviso &
Salesforce.com) &
Financial/Cost
Modeling reqd.
Mail Resume: RingCentral, Inc.
Attn: hR Dept.
20 Davis Drive,
Belmont, CA 94002

NENA BEAUTY
SAlON
gRAND OPENINg
523 LINDEN AvE
SO. SAN FRANCISCO
94080

NOW hIRING!
Licensed Stylists
and Barbers
4 seats available
Manicure and Pedicure
One Table Available
***

(650) 219-5163
(650) 270-3151
(650) 703-2626

110 Employment

110 Employment

NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNAlISM
The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.
College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 800 S. Claremont St #210,
San Mateo CA 94402.

127 Elderly Care
FAMIlY RESOURCE
GUIDE

RESTAURANT -

All Positions
Experienced Cooks
(and Pizza Cooks)
Will train. but experience pays more.
Day and night shifts, 7 days a week.

Apply in person

1690 El Camino, San Bruno
1250-B, El Camino, Belmont
2727-h El Camino, San Mateo

SAlES/MARKETING
INTERNShIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com
TWO DISh WAShER/ JANITORIAl
POSITIONS AvAILABLE STARTINg AT
$14 AN hOuR PART TIME: LuNCh
AND DINNER ShIFTS. CALL MRS. ENDO (650) 218-3161. vALID W-4 INFORMATION REquIRED.

The San Mateo Daily Journal’s
twice-a-week resource guide for
children and families.

Every Tuesday & Weekend
Look for it in today’s paper to
find information on family
resources in the local area,
including childcare.

170 Opportunities
lIMO BUSINESS, On Time Limo Shuttle. Includes 2 Town Cars, customer and
client lists. $60,000. (650)342-6342

203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267498
The following person is doing business
as: Elements Salon, 75 Washington St,
DALY CITY, CA 94014. Registered Owner: Aleen L. Brosamle, 1191 Compass
Lane #209, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Aleen L. Brosamle/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/14/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/15, 12/26/15, 01/02/16, 01/09/16

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

294 Baby Stuff

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267457
The following person is doing business
as: Noma’s Auto Repair, 435 Dumbarton
Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered Owner: Norbert Matzke, 810 W.
grant Pl., SAN MATEO, CA 94402. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Norbert Matzke/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/08/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/15, 12/26/15, 01/02/16, 01/09/16

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267471
The following person is doing business
as: BonBon Spa, 947 El Camino Real,
SOuTh SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: 1) Dominic Nguyen,
713 Spruce Ave, SOuTh SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080 2) Ai Bui, 152 Apollo
St, SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94124 . The
business is conducted by a general Partnership. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Dominic Nguyen/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/09/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/16, 01/16/16, 01/23/16, 01/30/16)

GRACO DOUBlE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267423
The following person is doing business
as: T & K Real Estate Investment, 323
gardenside Ave, SOuTh SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. Registered Owner(s):
1) huiqing Yang 2) Jianhui Tan, same
address. The business is conducted by a
Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/huiqing Yang/Tianhui Tan/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/03/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/15, 12/26/15, 01/02/16, 01/09/16
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267476
The following person is doing business
as: Berube Company, 1700 S. El Camino
Real, SAN MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner(s): Michael Berube, 40 Pajo
Del Arroyo, PORTOLA vALLEY, CA
94028. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
10/06/2005
/s/Michael Berube/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/10/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
12/19/15, 12/26/15, 01/02/16, 01/09/16
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267548
The following person is doing business
as: Masterminds Djs, 1501 hillside Drive,
BuRLINgAME, CA 94010. Registered
Owner: Frank Flores, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Frank Flores/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/16, 01/16/16, 01/23/16, 01/30/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT M-267547
The following person is doing business
as: Purrrfect Pals, 1501 hillside Drive,
BuRLINgAME, CA 94010. Registered
Owner: Cassandra Flores, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Cassandra Flores/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/18/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/16, 01/16/16, 01/23/16, 01/30/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267579
The following person is doing business
as: barre3 San Mateo, 116 S. B Street,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. Registered
Owner: Bohemian Warrior Company,
CA. The business is conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Matthew Bartus/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 12/23/2015. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/16, 01/16/16, 01/23/16, 01/30/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267731
The following person is doing business
as: go Local Travels, 200 Avila Rd, SAN
MATEO, CA 94402. Registered Owner:
Armita Ostowari, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Armita Ostowari/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/07/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
01/09/16, 01/16/16, 01/23/16, 01/30/16)

210 lost & Found
FOUND: lADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
gary @ (650)347-2301
FOUND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940

Books
16 BOOKS on history of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
FREE 30 volume 1999 Americana Encyclopedia. Excellent condition Call 650349-2945 to pick up.
NIChOlAS SPARKS hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
qUAlITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& uS history and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502
STEPhEN KING hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

Over the hedge

Over the hedge

ClASSIC lAMBORGhINI Countach
Print, Perfect for garage, Size medium
framed, good condition, $25. 510-6840187

296 Appliances
AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTu w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. Lg
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898
ChEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487
ElECTRIC FIREPlACE on wheels in
walnut casing made by the Amish exl.
cond. $99. 650-592-2648
ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395
JACK lAlANE juicer $25 or best offer.
650-593-0893.

298 Collectibles

302 Antiques

303 Electronics

RIvAl 11/2 quart ice cream maker
(New) $20.(650)756-9516.

STAR Wars hong Kong exclusive, mint
Pote Snitkin 4” green card action figure.
$20 650-518-6614

BEAUTIFUl AND UNIqUE victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCEllENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.

PIONEER hOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

STAR WARS Lando Calrissian 4” orange card action figure, autographed by
Billy Dee Williams. $50 Steve 650-5186614

MAhOGANY ANTIqUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

TOYOTA BAJA 1000 Truck Model, Diecast By Auto Art, 1:18 Scale, good condition,$80. 510-684-0187

OlD COFFEE grinder with glass jar.
$40. (650)596-0513

ShARK FlOOR steamer,exc condition
$45 (650) 756-9516.

2 BIKES for kids $60. Will email pictures
upon request (650) 537-1095

lOST SMAll gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Over the hedge

295 Art

lOST - MY COllAPSIBlE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

lOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061

Tundra

BOB TAlBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

UPRIGhT vACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

lOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.

Tundra

SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

lOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012

lOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

Tundra

23

297 Bicycles

ADUlT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356
MAGNA-GlACIERPOINT 26" 15 speed.
hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00
San Mateo 650-255-3514.

298 Collectibles
1920'S AqUA glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048
1940 vINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833
BMW FORMUlA 1 Model, Diecast by
Mini Champs,1:43 Scale, good condition, $80. 510-684-0187
ChERIShED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691
ElvIS SPEAKS To You, 78 RPM, Rainbow Records(1956), good condition,$20
,650-591-9769 San Carlos
GEOFFREY BEENE Jacket, unused, unworn, tags , pink, small, sleeveless, zippers, paid $88, $15, (650) 578-9208
JOE MONTANA front page, SF Chronicle, Super Bowl XvI Win issue, $10, 650591-9769 San Carlos
lENNOX RED Rose, unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

PORTABlE AC/DC Altec Lansing
speaker system for IPods/audio sources.
great for travel. $15. 650-654-9252
SONY DhG-hDD250 DvR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

299 Computers

OlD vINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

MONITOR FOR computer. Kogi - 15".
Model L5qX. $25. (650)592-5864.

PAIR OF beautiful candalabras . Marble
and brass. $90. (650)697-7862

vINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469

RECORDABlE CD-R 74, Sealed, unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

vINTAGE MIlK Crates, Bell Brook Dairy
San Francisco, Classic 1960 style, good
condition, $35. 510-684-0187

vINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469

300 Toys

303 Electronics

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

46” MITSUBIShI Projector Tv, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

AMERICAN GIRl 18” doll, “Jessica”,
blond/blue. new in box, $65 (505)-2281480 local.
lARGE STUFFED ANIMALS - $4 each
great for Christmas & Kids (650) 9523500
lEGOS; GIANT size box; mixed pieces.
$80/OBO. (650)345-1347
STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614
STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Luke Skywalker (Ceremonial) $10 Steve 650-518-6614
STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg
ThOMAS TRAIN set by Tomy (plastic).
Includes track, tunnel, bridge, roundhouse, trains. $20/OBO. (650)345-1347

RENO SIlvER lEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

ThOMAS TRAINS, over 20 trains, lots of
track, water tower, bridge, tunnel.
$80/OBO. (650)345-1347

SANDY SCOTT Etching. Artists proof.
"Opening Day at Cattail Marsh". Retriever holding pheasant. $99. 650-654-9252.

ThOMAS/BRIO TRAIN table, $30/OBO.
Phone (650)345-1347

302 Antiques

SChIllER hIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276

ANTIqUE ITAlIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002

STAR WARS C-3PO mint pair, green tint
(Japan), gold (u.S.) 4” action figures.
$89 650-518-6614

ANTIqUE OAK hamper (never used),
new condition. $55.00 OBO. Pls call
650-345-9036

ThE SAN Bruno Planning Commission will meet Tuesday,
January 19 at 7:00 p.m., at the Senior Center, 1555 Crystal
Springs Road, San Bruno, CA and take action on the following
items. All interested persons are invited to attend.
460 hazel Avenue. Request for a use Permit to allow the construction of a 111 sq. ft., two-story addition at the north side of
the building, resulting in a gross floor area of 2,935 sq. ft.
where 2,750 sq. ft. is allowed and providing only one (1) parking space for the expansion of a residence that is greater than
1,825 sq. ft. per Sections 12.200.030.B.2. and 12.200.080.A.2.
of the SBMC UP-15-025.
1250 Grundy lane. Request for an amendment to a Development Plan, a Planned Development Permit, and an Architectural Review Permit to allow the construction of a new 67,586
square foot, three-story, office building with 215 parking
spaces per Chapter 12.136, 12.96.190, and 12.108 of the
SBMC, and the adoption of a Mitigated Negative Declaration.
PD12-001, PDP12-002, AR16-002. Recommended Environmental Determination: In accordance with the California Environmental quality Act (CEqA), the City contracted with an Environmental Consultant for the preparation of a draft Initial
Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration.
The draft Initial
Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration included a traffic study,
and analysis of the required elements (air quality, noise, public
services, etc.). The draft Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration was open for public review for one month from November 24, 2015 to December 23, 2015, per CEqA requirements.
The draft Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration determined that the proposed project would not have a significant
effect on the environment with the implementation of mitigation
measures.
Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal, January 9, 2016.

BAzOOKA SPEAKER Bass tube 20
longx10 wide round never used in box
$75.0 (650)992-4544
COMPlETE COlOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

SONY PROJECTION Tv 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

vINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
vINTAGE zENITh radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469
vINTAGE zENITh radio, model yrb-791 1948, $ 70. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
ANTIqUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324

DvD/CD Player remote never used in
box $45. (650)992-4544

ANTIqUE MAhOGONY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529

ElECTRONIC TYPEWRITER good
condition $50., (650)878-9542

ANTIqUE MOhAGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.

FIRST AlERT CO600 Carbon Monoxide
Plug-In Alarm. Simple to use, New in
pkg. $18 (650) 952-3500

BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319

GARMIN NUvI260 gPS Navigator, bean
bag dash mount, charging cable, car
charger $25 (650) 952-3500
hOME ThEATER system receiver KLh"
DvD/CD Player remote 6 spks. ex/con
$70. (650)992-4544
JvC EvERIO Camcorder, new in box
user guide accessories. $75/best offer.
(650)520-7045
KENWOOD STEREO receiver deck,with
CD Player rermote 4 spks. exc/con. $55.
(650)992-4544
lEFT-hAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROlA BRAvO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8gB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
ONKYO Av Receiver hT-R570 .Digital
Surround, hDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OPTIMUS h36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324

BRASS / METAl ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Rugs, Pictures, Mirrors. Four shelf. $200.
(650) 343-0631
BROWN REClINER, $75 Excellent Condition. (650) 315-2319
BROWN WOODEN bookshelf h 3'4"X W
3'6"X D 10" with 3 shelves $25.00 call
650-592-2648
ChAIRS - Two oversized saucer (moon)
chairs. Black. $30 each. (650)5925864.
ChAIRS 2 Blue good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644
ChIlD’S TABlE (Fisher Price) and Two
Chairs. Like New. $35. (650) 574-7743.
COFFEE TABlE @ end table very nice
condition $80. 650 697 7862
COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465
COMPUTER SWIvEl ChAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409
DINING ROOM table – good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

lEGAl NOTICES
Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

24

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

304 Furniture

306 housewares

310 Misc. For Sale

CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222

lIGhT OAK Cabinet, 6 ft tall, 3 ft wide, 2
ft deep, door at the bottom. $150.
(650) 871-5524.

ROCKING ChAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762

WhITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184

"MOThER-IN-lAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.

DINETTE TABlE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

lOvE SEAT, upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

COMPlETE SET OF ChINA - Windsor
garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630

DINING/CONF. TABlE Clear glass
apprx. 54”x36”x3/8”. Beveled edges &
corners. FREE. 650-348-5718
DRUM TABlE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
ESPRESSO TABlE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021
FUll SIzED mattress with metal type
frame $35. (650)580-6324
FUTON COUCh into double bed, linens
D41"xW60"xh34" 415-509-8000 $99
GlASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395
INFINITY FlOOR speakers h 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
lAWN ChAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038
lAzY BOY Recliner. Fine condition. Maroon. $80. (650) 271-4539.

TABlE lAMP w/ hand painted rose design. $25.00 Pls call 650-345-9036

MAPlE COFFEE table. Excellent Condition $75.00 (650)593-1780

TABlE, hD. 2'x4'. pair of folding legs at
each end. Laminate top. Perfect.
$60.(650)591-4141

MAPlE lAMP table with tiffany shade
$95.00 (650)593-1780

TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429

OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429

TEAK-vENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344

OAK SIX ShELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN ChAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
RATTAN SIX Drawer Brown Dresser;
glass top and Mirror attachment;
5 ft long. $200. (650) 871-5524.
REClINING SWIvEl chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858

TEAK-vENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344
TWIN MATTRESS with 3 drawers wood
frame, exc condition $85. Daly City (650)
756-9516.
UPhOlSTERED BROWN recliner , excellent condition. FREE. (650)347-6875
vINTAGE LARgE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280
WAlNUT ChEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429
WhITE BOOKCASE :h 72" x W 30" x D
12" exc condition $30. (650)756-9516.

WOOD - wall unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311
WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65. (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOOD WAll unit, 7 upper and lower
cabinets, 90" wide x 72" high. FREE .
(650)347-6875
WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

306 housewares
BED SPREAD (queen size), flower design, never used. $22. Pls call
650-345-9036
ChRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield
Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026
PRE-lIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis

ACROSS
1 Directive to a
dealer
6 Adds liberally
13 Sustain
15 Apple bug?
16 Strength in
numbers?
18 Blubber
19 What “this love
is,” in a Taylor
Swift title
20 Shades go-with
21 Shepherd’s
dishes?
24 Fruit trees
25 __ cut: fabric
design technique
26 Birch of Indiana
28 Unkempt abode
29 Umbrian tourist
town
32 Salisbury smooch
34 Beats the rap
40 __ Accords:
Israel/PLO
agreements
41 Acorn bearer
42 Ad follower
45 Some 55-Across
works
47 Smidge
48 Mocks
50 Blockers’ targets
53 Dodges
55 Joan of art
56 __ Dome: Lucas
Oil Stadium
predecessor
58 Best Actress the
year before Kate
Winslet
61 Dizzy with delight
62 Neptune, e.g.
63 Gently passes
64 Simmers
DOWN
1 Drill cadence
syllables
2 Swear words
3 “If I Can’t Love
Her” singer, in a
1994 musical
4 Hip
5 Literature
Nobelist who
won two
posthumous
Tony Awards

6 __ lane
7 Spanish 101 word
8 Vitalize
9 Calls or cells
10 “Like I care”
11 Kevin of “Shark
Tank”
12 “Drat!”
14 Support spec of a
sort
15 Really
enlightened
17 Salt Lake daily
22 Sale warning
23 Harmonize
25 Snare
27 Shooter’s target
30 Jack of “Barney
Miller”
31 Logician’s words
33 Sporty VW
35 Cheeky
36 From 2009
through Sep.
2015, it paid
$143 billion in
dividends to the
U.S. Treasury
37 Concern for
some
bodybuilders
38 Issues a mea
culpa

39 Squeak (out)
42 Museo de la
Revolución city
43 “Ring Cycle”
quartet
44 Color similar to
crimson
46 Narrow shore
point
48 Portrayer of
Django and Ray
49 Throws below

51 “Gunfight at the
O.K. Corral”
screenwriter
52 Spherical
extremities
54 Snoot
57 Tosses in
59 Playing hard to
get
60 Pull-up
beneficiary,
briefly

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

xwordeditor@aol.com

By Mary Lou Guizzo and Jeff Chen
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

01/09/16

01/09/16

SOlID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483
TABlEClOTh, UNUSED in original box,
Royal Blue and white 47x47, great gift,
$10.00, (650) 578-9208.

308 Tools
BOSTITCh 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269
ClICKER TORqUE Wrench, 20-150 lbs,
1/2", new, $25, 650-595-3933
CRAFTMAN RADIAl SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908
ElECTRICAl CORD for Clothes
Dryer. New, $7.00. Call 650-345-9036
GAME "BEAT ThE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
hARlEY DAvIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720
lIONEl ChRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537
lIONEl ChRISTMAS holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537

CRAFTSMAN 3/4 horse power 3,450
RPM $60 (650)347-5373

lIONEl ENGINE #221 ‘Rio grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

lIONEl WESTERN union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269

RMT ChRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537

CRAFTSMAN RADIAl Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517

SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709

DEWAlT DRIll/FlAShlIGhT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.
hEAvY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less handle $5. (650)368-0748
NEW ShUR GRIP SZ327 Snow Cables
+ tentioners $25, 650-595-3933
PUllEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342
ShOPSMITh MARK v 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585
vINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517
WIllIAMS #1191 ChROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.
WIllIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.
WIzARD STAINED glass grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

310 Misc. For Sale
INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133

STAR TREK vCR tape Colombia house,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO lUMINOvA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393
UlTRASONIC JEWElRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
vASE WITh flowers 2 piece good for the
holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
vINTAGE WhITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

311 Musical Instruments
BAlDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598
GUlBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461
hAIlUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
MONARCh UPRIGhT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

311 Musical Instruments

316 Clothes

318 Sports Equipment

hAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172

MAN’S SUIT, perfect condition. Jacket
size 42, pants 32/32. Only $35. Call
650-345-9036

IN-GROUND BASKETBAll hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270

UPRIGhT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.

PARIS hIlTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648

lADIES MCGREGOR golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104

SUNGlASSSES UNISEX TOMS Lobamba S007 w/ Tortoise Frames. Polarized lenses 100% uvA/uvB NEW
$65.(650)591-6596

POWER PlUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

312 Pets & Animals

vElvET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

AIRlINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.

TREADMIll BY PRO-FORM. (hardly
used). 10% incline, 2.5 hP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

vEST, BROWN Leather , Size 42 Regular, Like New, $25 (650) 875-1708

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402

vINTAGE 1970’S grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

vINTAGE ENGlISh ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

FRENCh BUllDOG puppies. Many
colors.
AKC Registration. Call
(415)596-0538.

317 Building Materials

vINTAGE GOlF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

WURlITzER PIANO, console, 40” high,
light brown, good condition. $490.
(650)593-7001
YAMAhA PIANO, upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

ONE KENNEl Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066
PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084
PET CARRIER, brown ,very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

315 Wanted to Buy

WE BUY
gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & honest values

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957
400 Broadway - Millbrae

650-697-2685

32 PAvING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno
CUlTURED MARBlE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041
EXTERIOR BRASS lanterns 20" 2 NEW,
both $30. (650)574-4439
INTERIOR DOORS, 8, free.
call 573-7381.
ShUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891
WhITE DOUBlE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call halim @ (650) 6785133.

318 Sports Equipment
ATOMIC SKI bag -- 215 cm. Lightly
used, great condition. $15. (650) 5730556.
BUCK TACTICAl folding knife, Masonic
logo, NEW $19, 650-595-3933

316 Clothes
BlACK lEAThER belt, wide, non-slip,
43" middle hole, $2, 650-595-3933
hATS, BRAND New, Nascar Racing,
San Francisco 49ers and giants, excellent condition, $10. 510-684-0187
lADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648

DElUXE OvER the door chin up bar; excellent shape; $10; 650-591-9769 San
Carlos

Garage Sales

$99

SOCCER BAllS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347

WOMEN'S lADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955

lEAThER JACKET, New Dark Brown ,
Italian style, Size L $49 (650) 875-1708

GOlF ClUBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395

Carpets

Cleaning

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.

CARPET RuNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

345 Medical Equipment
ADUlT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935

630 Trucks & SUv’s
DODGE ‘01 DuRANgO, v-8 Suv, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298
lEXUS ‘01 RX300. Only 130,000 miles
4wd $6900. (650)342-6342

AA SMOG
Complete Repair & Service
$29.75 plus certificate fee
(most cars)

869 California Drive .
Burlingame

(650) 340-0492

DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition unisex Eu40 $55 (650)357-7484

Call (650)344-5200

Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

379 Open houses

OPEN hOUSE
lISTINGS
List your Open house
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

BATh TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149

Call (650)344-5200

MOTORCYClE SADDlEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

440 Apartments
SAN MATEO, Completely remodeled
new, 2 bdrm 1 bath Laurelwood.. $2,900.
(650)342-6342

470 Rooms

670 Auto Service
MENlO AThERTON
AUTO REPAIR
WE SMOg ALL CARS
1279 El Camino Real

Menlo Park

650 -273-5120

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto
Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670 Auto Parts
BRIDGESTONE TURANzA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222

ChEvY ‘10 hhR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

BRIDGESTONE TURANzA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222

ChEvY hhR ‘08 - grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.

NEvER
MOUNTED
new Metzeler
120/70ZR-18 tire $50, 650-595-3933

DODGE
‘99 van, good Condition,
$4,200 OBO (650)481-5296
FORD ‘98 Mustang. gT Convertible.
Summer fun car. green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.

qUICKIE WhEElChAIR - Removable
arms for transferring standard size.
$350.00. (650) 345-3017

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
BMW ‘03 F650 gS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003

Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!

BATh ChAIR lIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.

Concrete

620 Automobiles
‘09 MERCURY Marquis, v8, 4 door,
11,000 miles, white, runs like new.
$16,000 obo (650) 726-9610

Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

335 Rugs

GOlF BAllS-15 dozen. All Brands: Titeslist, Taylor Made, Callaway. $5 per
dozen. (650)345-3840.

lEAThER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708

Make money, make room!

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond. $8.
Call (650) 591-4553, days only.

GOlF ClUB, Superstick,this collapsible
single club adjusts to 1-9,$20,San Carlos
(650)591-9769

GARAGE SAlES
ESTATE SAlES

25

lEXUS ‘99 ES2300,
$5,200. (650)302-5523

white,

119K.

TOYOTA AvAlON ‘08 $10,000. 95K
Miles. Leather, A/C. One Owner.
Ed @ (415) 310-2457.

NEW CONTINENTAl Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222
SET OF cable chains for 14-17in tires
$20 650-766-4858
ShOP MANUAlS for gM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

680 Autos Wanted

hIP hOUSING
Non-Profit home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

FORD ‘63 thunderbird hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Concrete

Construction

Construction

625 Classic Cars

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN
Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

(650)533-0187
Lic# 947476

Construction

MENA
PlASTERING
Michaella's home Cleaning
Detailed Oriented Professional

Cleaning

Repeat Job Warranty

ANGIE’S ClEANING &
POWERWAShING

Scrub to the Deepest Corners!

Move in/out; Post Construction;
Commercial & Residential;
Carpet Cleaning; Powerwashing

650.918.0354
www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

Carpentry
Interior
Foundation Work
Exterior
Window Repair Lath & Plaster
35 years experience CA#625577

Call(415)420-6362

Beat any PRICE!

(650)984-0903

O’SUllIvAN
CONSTRUCTION
• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596

Decks & Fences

MARSh FENCE
& DECK CO.
State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

26

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Electricians

handy help

All ElECTRICAl
SERvICE

CONTRERAS hANDYMAN
SERvICES
• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs

Free Estimates

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

ELECTRIC SERvICE gROuP

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

Gardening

SENIOR hANDYMAN
“Specializing in any size project”

CAll NOW FOR
WINTER lAWN
MAINTENANCE

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

hauling

hauling

hvAC

Plumbing

AAA RATED!

INDEPENDENT
hAUlERS

$40 & UP
hAUl
Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Free Estimates
A+ BBB Rating

(650)341-7482

Retired Licensed Contractor

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

650-201-6854

ChAINEY hAUlING

Call Robert
STERlING GARDENS
650-703-3831
lic #751832

ThE vIllAGE
CONTRACTOR
Licensed general and
Painting Contractor

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

COMPlETE
GARDENING
SERvICES

Lic#979435

(650)701-6072

Rain gutter Service, Yard
Clean-ups and more!
Call Jose:

(650) 315-4011

Junk & Debris Clean Up
Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

SEASONAL LAWN

MAINTENANCE
Roofing

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

WESTBAY hANDYMAN
SERvICES
*painting *plumbing *Flooring
*bathroom & kitchen
*remodeling
No job too small

Flooring

landscaping

(650) 773-5941

SPECIAlS
AS lOW AS $2.50/sf.

License #931457

(650) 591-8291
Painting

GUTTER

See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial

Call for Free Estimate

Gutter Cleaning

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery

REED
ROOFERS

CRAIG’S PAINTING
Residential & Commercial
Interior & Exterior
10-year guarantee
craigspainting.com

CLEANING

housecleaning

Free Estimates

(650) 553-9653

CONSUElOS hOUSE
ClEANING

Lic#857741

Bi-Weekly/Once a Month,
Moving In & Out
28 yrs. in Business

JON lA MOTTE

PAINTING

Free Estimates, 15% off First visit

(650)219-4066

Interior & Exterior
quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates

Lic#1211534

hauling

(650)368-8861

PENINSUlA
ClEANING
RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

bondEd
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771

ChEAP
hAUlING!

Lic #514269

Tree Service

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

NECK OF ThE WOODS
Tree Service

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975

Light moving!
haul Debris!
650-583-6700

Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

Certified Arborist
WC 1714
Eddie Farquharson
Owner-Operator-Climber
State Lic. 638340
650 366-9801

TheNeckOfTheWoods.com

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

Hillside Tree
SUNNY BAY PAINTING CO.

Become a Master Composter or
Master Resource Conservationist!
San Mateo County’s RecycleWorks Volunteer Academy is
offering no-cost 8-week courses on sustainability to San
Mateo County community members. A 40-hour volunteer
commitment is asked from participants.

Master Resource Conservation Course
Jan 20th-Mar 9th, 2016, Wed evenings, 6-9pm, Burlingame
Topics: Water, Energy, Solid Waste and Green Building

Master Compost and Solid Waste Course
Feb 9th-Mar 29th, 2016, Tues evenings, 6-9pm, San Carlos
Topics: Home Composting and Solid Waste Management

A sweet treat for you.
FREE BUNDTLET*
*Individual Size

with order of an 8” or 10” cake
Millbrae/Burlingame

140 South El Camino Real
650-552-9625

San Carlos
864 Laurel Street
650-592-1600

Expires 1/31/16. Limit one offer per guest. Cannot be combined with any other offer. Redeemable only at bakeries listed.
Must be claimed in-store during normal business hours. Photocopies not accepted. No cash value.

nothingbundtcakes.com

www.recycleworks.org/sustainability/rva.html
RecycleWorks@smcgov.org
1-888-442-2666

Residential Commercial
Interior Exterior
Water Damage, Fences,
Decks, Stain Work
Free Estimates
CA lic 982576
(415)828-9484

Service
LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Plumbing
MEYER PlUMBING SUPPlY
Toilets, Sinks, vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.
2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo
650-350-1960

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TIlE
LIC.# 955492 & gRANITE DESIgNINg
Kitchen
Marble
Bathroom
Natural Stone
Floors
Porcelain
Fireplace
Custom
Entryway
granite Work
Resealers
Fabrication &
Ceramic Tile
Installation
CALL(650)784-3079
cubiasmario609@yahoo.com

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

27

Cemetery

Food

Fitness

health & Medical

Massage Therapy

Seniors

lASTING
IMPRESSIONS
ARE OuR FIRST
PRIORITY

BRUNCh EvERY

lOSE WEIGhT

SUNDAY

SKIN TASTIC
MEDICAl lASER

FUll BODY MASSAGE

Omelette Station, Carving Station
$24.95 / adult $9.95 /Child

In Just 10 Weeks !
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

Belbien Day Spa

& holiday Inn SFO Airport
275 So Airport blvd.
South San Francisco

Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology

www. SanBrunoMartialArts.com

AFFORDABlE
24-hour Assisted living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate villa
Burlingame villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

Cypress Lawn
1370 El Camino Real
Colma
(650)755-0580
www.cypresslawn.com
Dental Services
COMPlETE IMPlANT
Dentistry Under One Roof
Same day treatment
Evening & Saturday appts available
Peninsula Dental Implant Center
1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

houlihans

CROWNE PlAzA
Foster City-San Mateo

Safe, Painless, Long Lasting

Maui Whitening
650.508.8669
1217 Laurel St., San Carlos
(Between greenwood & howard)
www.mauiwhitening.com

I - SMIlE
Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain view

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

MIllBRAE SMIlE CENTER

valerie de leon, DDS
Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

(650)697-9000
15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

CAlIFORNIA
STOOlS*BAR*DINETTES

(650) 295-6123

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

(650)591-3900

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIvERY

GET hAPPY!
happy hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050

NOThING BUNDTCAKES
Make Life Sweeter

health & Medical

BACK, lEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?
Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

*864 Laurel Street, San Carlos

650.592.1600

*140 So. El Camino Real, Millbrae

650.552.9625

PANChO vIllA
TAqUERIA
Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo

A touch of Europe
1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

SlEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental
Insurance

AFFORDABlE
hEAlTh INSURANCE
www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

(650)583-2273

Call (650)579-1500
for simply better banking

www.russodentalcare.com

unitedamericanbank.com

GRAND
OPENING

MORE ThAN JUST A TAX RETURN

(650)556-9888
633 veterans Blvd #C
Redwood City

visit: Belmonttax.com for details

Relaxing & healing
Massage
39 N. San Mateo Dr. #1,
San Mateo

(650)557-2286
Free parking behind bldg

Music
Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

Bronstein Music

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.

lEGAl

bronsteinmusic.com

DOCUMENTS PLUS

579-7774
1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, lDA #11

KAY'S hEAlTh
& BEAUTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

(650)697-6868

(650)588-2502
Real Estate loans
REAl ESTATE lOANS
We Fund Bank Turndowns!
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28

WORLD

Weekend • Jan. 9-10, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Mexican president:
Drug lord ‘El Chapo’
Guzman recaptured
By E. Eduardo Castillo
and Mark Stevenson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MEXICO CITY — The world’s
most-wanted drug lord was captured for a third time in a daring
raid by Mexican marines Friday,
six months after he tunneled out of
a maximum security prison in a
made-for-Hollywood escape that
deeply embarrassed the government and strained ties with the
United States.
Mexican President Enrique Pena
Nieto announced the capture of
Joaquin “El Chapo” Guzman using
his Twitter account: “mission
accomplished: we have him.”
Few had thought Guzman would
be taken alive, and few now
believe Mexico will want to try to
hold him a third time in Mexican
prisons. He escaped from maximum-security facilities in 2001
and on July 11, 2015, the second
breakout especially humiliating
for the Pena Nieto administration,
which only held him for less than
18 months.
The capture had top Mexican
officials at a Foreign Ministry
event gleefully embracing and
breaking into a spontaneous rendition of the national anthem after
Interior Secretary Miguel Osorio
Chong delivered the news.
No sooner than Guzman was

ap p reh en ded,
calls started for
his immediate
extradition to
the
U. S. ,
including from
a Republican
p r e s i de n t i a l
can di dat e,
Florida Sen.
Joaquin
Mark Rubio.
Guzman
“Given that
‘El Chapo’ has already escaped
from Mexican prison twice, this
third opportunity to bring him to
justice cannot be squandered, ”
Rubio said.
According to the U.S. Justice
Department, the U.S. submitted
full extradition requests after he
was arrested in February 2014. But
Guzman’s lawyers already filed
appeals on those and were granted
injunctions that could substantially delay the process.
Mexico said after the first capture of the cartel boss that he
would be tried in his home country
first, with officials promising
they would hang on to him. After
his escape in July, the talk on
Friday about keeping and trying
Guzman almost as a matter of
national pride wasn’t so overt.
Pena Nieto gave a brief live
message Friday afternoon that
focused heavily on touting the
competency of his administra-

REUTERS

Mexican soldiers stand guard atop a vehicle on a street awaiting the arrrival of recaptured drug lord Joaquin ‘El
Chapo’ Guzman at the Navy's airstrip in Mexico City, Mexico.
tion, which has suffered a series of
embarrassments and scandals in
the first half of his presidency.
“The arrest of today is very
important for the government of
Mexico. It shows that the public
can have confidence in its institutions, ”
Pena
Nieto
said.
“Mexicans can count on a government decided and determined to
build a better country.”
Guzman was apprehended after a
shootout between gunmen and
Mexican marines in Los Mochis, a
seaside city in Guzman’s home
state of Sinaloa, said a federal offi-

cial who spoke on condition of
anonymity because he was not
authorized to be quoted by name.
He said Guzman was taken alive
and was not wounded.
Five people were killed and one
Mexican marine wounded in the
clash at a house in an upscale
neighborhood of Los Mochis.
It was unclear if Guzman was
there or nearby when the raid was
underway. A law enforcement official who was not authorized to be
quoted by name said Guzman was
captured at a motel on the outskirts of Los Mochis.

That official said Friday’s raid on
the house was related to the later
capture of Guzman at the hotel.
Guzman may have been at the house
and fled while his gunmen and
bodyguards provided covering fire
from the house, the official said.
Marines checked the storm drain
system, though it was unclear if
Guzman had once again fled
through the drains. In 2014, he
escaped capture by fleeing
through a network of interconnected tunnels in the drainage system under Culiacan, the Sinaloa
state capital.