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SAFE LIFTING

OF NON-CARGO LOADS

SAFE LIFTING OF NON-CARGO LOADS


A VIDEOTEL PRODUCTION

AUTHOR

Sheila Brownlee

84 NEWMAN STREET, LONDON W1T 3EU


TELEPHONE +44(0)20

7299 1800
7299 1818
mail@videotelmail.com
www.videotel.co.uk

FACSIMILE +44(0)20

SAFE LIFTING OF NON-CARGO LOADS


A VIDEOTEL PRODUCTION

THE PRODUCERS WOULD LIKE TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE ASSISTANCE OF


THE MASTER, OFFICERS AND CREW OF MS BERGE STAHL
BW Gas
Ertsoverslagbedrijf Europoort C.V. (EECV)
International Maritime Organization (IMO)
ISM Solutions Inc
The Maersk Company Ltd
Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA)
MOL Tankship Management (Europe) Ltd
Oil Companies International Marine Forum (OCIMF)
Navspec Marine Consultants
Pacific Basin Shipping (HK) Ltd
V Ships UK Ltd

PRINT AUTHOR: Sheila Brownlee


PRODUCER: Peter Wilde
WRITER/DIRECTOR: Julian Grant

WARNING
Any unauthorised copying, lending, exhibition, diffusion, sale, public performance or other exploitation of the accompanying video is
strictly prohibited and may result in prosecution.
COPYRIGHT Videotel 2007
This video and accompanying workbook training package is intended to reflect the best available techniques and practices at the time of
production. It is intended purely as comment. No responsibility is accepted by Videotel, or by any firm, corporation or organisation who
or which has been in any way concerned with the production or authorised translation, supply or sale of this video for accuracy of any
information given hereon or for any omission herefrom.

SAFE LIFTING OF NON-CARGO LOADS

VIDEOTEL PRODUCTIONS

CONTENTS
INTRODUCTION

ACCIDENTS CN HAPPEN

LIFTING EQUIPMENT

Introduction
Legal Requirements
Lifting Equipment

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


Safe Working Load
Risk Assessment
Pre-Operation Meeting
Personnel Preparation
Checking the Weight of the Load
Checking the Equipment to be Used
Test Yourself Questions

CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT


Appointing the Person in Charge of the Lift
Role of the Signaller
Code of Hand Signals
During the Lift
Some Difficult Lifting Operations
Test Yourself Questions

AFTER A LIFT
Maintenance and Testing
Record Keeping Equipment
Record Keeping Personnel Training
Storage of Lifting Equipment
Test Yourself Questions

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27
29

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TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS

34

FURTHER RESOURCES

36

APPENDICES

37

A Using Slings Correctly


B Estimating the Weight of Objects to be Lifted
C Carrying Out Risk Assessment on Board Ship
D Risk Assessment Form
E Safety Morning Meetings Introduction
F Safety Morning Meeting Form

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INTRODUCTION
Lifting heavy or awkward items is difficult and dangerous enough on land. On board ship, with
the added difficulties of limited space, it is vital that every precaution is taken to ensure the
safety of those involved in the lifting operation. Whilst most lifts take place in port, it is also
important to ensure that vessel to vessel transfers are carried out in complete safety.
Every person who operates lifting devices must have extensive knowledge of the equipment they use,
including the various types of frames, beams, slings, clamps and shackles. They must also know the
limitations of the machinery and the forces involved in each lift.

IMPORTANCE OF TRAINING
As lifting is a hazardous operation, its essential to minimise those risks by restricting lifting to properly
trained personnel.
This guide shows the correct procedures to ensure the safe use of lifting devices on board vessels,
together with the maintenance and storage of lifting equipment.
It can be used alongside the DVD for private study or as the basis for conducting a simple training
session. For further study, there is also a companion Videotel interactive Computer Based Training (CBT)
program available.

IMPORTANT: The DVD, training guide and CBT in this package can cover only a small selection
of the lifting gear and rigging solutions available to a seafarer.
The skill is to know what each piece of gear is capable of doing and the correct procedures for operating
it. Only training and experience will bring about the required knowledge to plan and execute a safe lift.

SAFE LIFTING OF NON-CARGO LOADS

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ACCIDENTS CAN HAPPEN


Despite highlighting the dangers of mechanical lifting, accidents and injuries still occur
regularly. These two examples are typical of the type of accident that can happen during lifting
operations.

FATAL ACCIDENT ONBOARD A TANKER


In October 2005, a vessel arrived at a terminal in Norway to discharge a cargo of crude oil. Whilst
alongside, stores and provisions were delivered to the vessel by means of a tugboat from the terminal.
After lifting about 12 pallets, a pallet of chemicals was taken onboard. When this had been landed on
deck, crew cleared the fork pallet which was being used for the loads and the crane operator moved the
crane towards the ships side to lower it down to the tugboat.
Before the hook block and fork pallet reached the vessels rail, the hoisting wire broke and the fork pallet
and the hook block fell down and hit a chief engineer, resulting in a fatal head injury. Despite all the
efforts of the crew and a doctor who arrived within thirty minutes, the chief engineer died.
The investigation team has revealed that the hook block was hoisted all the way into the monorail garage,
causing the hoisting winch pulling force to exceed the breaking strength of the hoisting wire, resulting in
a sudden break of the wire. Not only that, but the chief engineer was checking the received stores against
invoices on deck and nobody noticed that he was moving under the fork pallet.
In addition, the wire was incorrectly terminated by means of three U-bolt clamps instead of a ferrule lock
device and two of the clamps were turned the wrong way. Tests concluded that such a termination
weakens the wires breaking strength by 20%. The wire in the broken area also had surface corrosion and
was very dry both inside and out.

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ACCIDENTS CAN HAPPEN


HEAD INJURY WHEN TRANSFERRING EQUIPMENT AT SEA
An able seaman, who was working on the deck of a 26 metre multipurpose/anchor-handling vessel, was
seriously injured while assisting with the transfer of the second of two steel wire pennants, onto his
vessel from a similar vessel.
The pennants were being transferred using the crane on board the other vessels. The two vessels were
not secured together at the time of the transfer operation because the two masters believed it was
unnecessary, as the weather was good and the sea calm. During the transfer the vessel that was sending
the pennants moved astern and separated slightly from the other vessel, causing the crane block to
swing across the deck and striking the crewman behind his ear.
The mans condition deteriorated and he was taken to hospital. After a slow recovery, he was repatriated
to his home country. At the time of the accident, the able seaman was not wearing a safety helmet,
although they were supplied and ready for use on board.
[source: MAIB Safety Digest 2/2006]

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LIFTING EQUIPMENT
INTRODUCTION
Apart from the loading and unloading of cargo, lifting equipment on board a vessel is used for a
variety of purposes. These include loading of crew possessions and provisions; engine spares;
machine tools; maintenance and machinery; and even people.

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS
It is a managements responsibility to ensure that all lifting equipment is tested and certified in
accordance with prevailing regulations. In planning a lift, the first step is to check that all associated
equipment has been appropriately load tested and certified.
The International Labour Organisation (ILO) Convention places the following duties on the employer and
master in relation to hatches and lifting gear on board ship, requiring them to ensure that:

Any lifting plant (i.e. lifting appliance plus any lifting gear) used onboard ships is of good
design, of sound construction and material and free from patent defect. It must also be fit for
purpose, properly installed or assembled and properly maintained.
A ships lifting plant is used in a safe and proper manner and is not loaded in excess of its
Safe Working Load (SWL) except for the purpose of carrying out a statutory test.

LIFTING EQUIPMENT
No lifting device should be used with any locking safety device, limit switch, overload protection
or any other device rendered inoperative. If, exceptionally, limit switches need to be isolated in
order to lower a crane to its stowage position, the utmost care should be taken to ensure the
operation is completed safely.

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LIFTING EQUIPMENT
NON-CARGO CRANES
There are almost as many types of shipboard cranes and self-loading/unloading systems as there are
ships. They can be steam, electro-hydraulic or electrically powered. Only authorised and properly trained
personnel should operate these installations.
JIB CRANE A jib crane is frequently used to lift provisions, equipment and personal belongings on or off
ships. OVERHEAD TRAVELLING CRANE This is a familiar installation in an engine room, usually
operated via a remote box with low voltage push buttons.

HOISTS
Hoists can also be found in many forms. There are chain, wire and rope hoists, all of which can be
powered or manually operated.

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LIFTING EQUIPMENT
SHACKLES, CLAMPS AND SLINGS
In many lifting operations, shackles and clamps will be applied as the slings are attached to the item to
be lifted and the lifting block. Only undamaged shackles and clamps should be used and in accordance
with manufacturer's instructions. Any misuse of these items can result in the slings parting from the
hook or the eyebolt, leading to damage or injury.

Slings come in various configurations single, double, three-legged or four employing ropes, steel
wires and chains. Each sling will be terminated in a simple eye or thimble, link, hook or clamp. Before
use, each sling must be checked to ensure that it is in good condition, fit for the intended application and
that the terminations are undamaged.

IMPORTANT: All slings should be colour-coded


with a non-removable tag showing the Safe
Working Load (SWL). Wire slings and cables
must have the SWL stamped on them.

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LIFTING EQUIPMENT
PERSONNEL LIFTING BASKET
A personnel lifting basket, or net, is sometimes used when transferring personnel from quayside or boat.
Great care and attention should be taken when lifting people by this method. It is important that everyone
involved in the lift is focused and concentrated on the total operation from start to finish. Correct safety
procedures and the appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) must be adhered to at all times.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


If accidents are to be avoided, every lifting operation must be carefully planned, involving every element in
the lift, namely:

SAFE WORKING LOAD (SWL) OF THE EQUIPMENT and choice of equipment for the lift
RISK ASSESSMENT to assess the risks involved
PRE-OPERATION MEETING to ensure everybody knows their role in the lift
PERSONNEL PREPARATION to make sure all personnel are prepared, briefed and wearing
the appropriate PPE
CHECKING THE WEIGHT OF THE LOAD to ensure that the SWL is not going to be exceeded
CHECKING THE EQUIPMENT TO BE USED to ensure that it is fit for purpose

SAFE WORKING LOAD (SWL)


When preparing for a lifting operation, its vital that crew members understand the Safe Working Load
(SWL) of each piece of lifting equipment.
SWL must never be exceeded on any piece of lifting equipment, except as part of an equipment test
required by regulation - and then only under strict conditions, including supervision by a competent
person.
When considering SWL, you must take into account factors that might reduce the SWL on any piece of
equipment.

IMPORTANCE OF MARKING SWL ON EACH PIECE OF LIFTING EQUIPMENT


Each lifting appliance and item of lifting gear carried must be clearly marked with its SWL and a means
of identification. Where such marking is not reasonably practicable, the SWL should otherwise be readily
ascertainable.
Each piece of equipment should also have a certificate for five years and any repair or maintenance work
that has been carried out must be recorded in either the chain register log or the ships planned
maintenance system. There should also be an annual examination by a competent person.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


Where a lifting appliance is normally used with a specific removable attachment such as a clamp or
spreader, the marking of the SWL or rated capacity should specify whether the weight of that attachment
is included.

Each item of lifting gear that weighs a significant proportion of its own SWL should be clearly
marked with its weight.

CRANES
Where the SWL of a crane varies with its operating radius, it is required to be fitted with an accurate
indicator, clearly visible to the driver, showing the radius of the load lifting attachment at any time and
the safe working load corresponding to that radius.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


MULTI-LEGGED SLING ASSEMBLIES
The marks should specify the safe working load at an included angle of up to 90 between:

A Opposite legs in a case of two-legged springs


B Adjacent legs in the case of three-legged springs
C Diagonally opposite legs in the case of four-legged springs. There may be a further mark of a
safe working load up to a maximum such angle of 120

SLINGS (SUPPLIED IN BATCHES)


A batch mark which is the same on each sling of that batch should be used as a means of identification
where each sling does not have a separate individual mark of identification.
When using slings, it is important to understand the correct sling arrangements to work with in
conjunction with SWL.
Manufacturers of lifting equipment provide a table of data to help in the choice of a higher rated sling for
a given angle of application.
For example, a sling employed at 10 from the vertical will be able to lift only 80% of its rated weight. At
20, it may only lift 50% of its rated weight.
For a fuller explanation and guide to selecting and using slings, please see Appendix A: Using Slings
Correctly.

IMPORTANCE OF SHARING THE INFORMATION WITH THE BOAT CREW/ QUAYSIDE


WORKERS ON THE LOAD TO BE LIFTED
In any lifting operation involving third parties, such as other vessel or quayside staff, it is important to find
out the weight of the item(s) to be lifted in order to ensure that the correct SWL of lifting equipment is
selected.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


RISK ASSESSMENT
Risk assessment is the first step to a safe lifting operation (see also Appendices C and D for more
information). A risk assessment must be carried out for any lifting procedure and should be held on file
on-board. Any risk assessment should include:

EQUIPMENT to ensure that any equipment to be used is undamaged and in safe condition.
MAINTENANCE to ensure the equipment has been properly maintained and that
maintenance records are correct and up-to-date.
PERSONNEL to ensure that the personnel to be employed in the lifting operation are fully
trained and know what they are doing.
SWL to ensure the equipment to be used is fit to lift the weight of the load (see Section 4.1
Safe Working Load (SWL)).
EXTERNAL CONDITIONS to take into account factors such as weather and sea condition.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


PRE-OPERATION (OR TOOLBOX) MEETING
Any lifting operations must be discussed beforehand, usually in a morning safety or toolbox meeting, to
discuss whether risk criteria will be met and to plan the lift in detail.
If lifting on deck, those present should include the chief officer, the bosun and ideally a senior engineer
to ensure that the necessary power is available for the lift.
If the lifting is to be carried out in the engine room, a senior engineer and fitter will be involved.
After the meeting everybody involved in the lift must be briefed to ensure that they are familiar with the
environment in which they are going to carry out the lift.

PERSONNEL PREPARATION
Before the lift, the personnel involved should not only be trained to carry out the operation, they should
be suitably protected and have a valid permit to work if one is needed.
Everyone involved in the lift should have the right Personal Protection Equipment, which must include:
hard hat, gloves, goggles, boiler suit and safety shoes. Additionally, for lifting operations in noisy areas,
such as the engine room, ear protectors must also be worn.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


CHECKING THE WEIGHT OF THE LOAD
In order to judge the safety of any lift, its necessary to ascertain the weight of the load to be lifted. Check
labels or documentation for the weight or, if this is not possible, estimate the weight and over-estimate,
to be on the safe side.
If lifting from a barge, or other place, where you cannot check the weight yourself, get the weight of the
load from the agent or shiphandler before you commence the lift.
For further information on estimating the weight of a load, see Appendix B.
In planning a lift, it is vitally important that only the slings with the correct load rating and with the right
terminations are used in each lift. You should check the latest available information from manufacturers'
recommendations and requirements, company policies and procedures or other regulatory requirements.

CHECKING THE EQUIPMENT TO BE USED


Having checked the weight of the load to be lifted, you must ensure that the lifting equipment including
slings must have the correct SWL for lifting that particular load.
Finally, its important to ensure that the lifting gear thats being used is securely anchored; in working
order; adequately ballasted or counterbalanced; ropes attached; and is tested and certified.
Any shackles, clamps or other ancillary items must be undamaged and the proposed use must fall within
the manufacturers instructions.
Any slings that are used should be in good condition, fit for the intended use, have undamaged ends and
fittings and must be used properly.

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PREPARING FOR A LIFT


TEST YOURSELF
Check on your knowledge of safe lifting of non-cargo loads so far by answering the questions below.
For answers see TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS on page 30.

1 WHAT DOES SWL STAND FOR?


a Short Working Life
b Safe Working Load
c Soft

2 WHICH OF THESE THREE STATEMENTS IS CORRECT:


a SWL must never be exceeded on any piece of lifting equipment
b Its OK as long as you dont exceed the SWL by more than 10%
c SWL can be exceeded if the person in charge of the lift gives you the authority to do so

3 EACH PIECE OF EQUIPMENT FOR LIFTING MUST HAVE A CERTIFICATE.


HOW LONG SHOULD THAT CERTIFICATE BE FOR:
a One year
b Three years
c Five years

4 WHEN USING SLINGS TO LIFT LOADS, WHICH OF THESE STATEMENTS IS CORRECT:


a SWL is not affected by the angle at which slings are used
b You must increase the SWL rating of slings if lifting takes place at different angles

5 WHEN CARRYING OUT RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LIFTING A LOAD,


WHICH OF THESE SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THAT RISK ASSESSMENT:
(you may choose more than one answer)
a Personnel
b Condition of lifting equipment
c Safe Working Load
d Weather conditions
e Sea conditions

6 WHAT PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT SHOULD THOSE INVOLVED


IN A LIFT BE WEARING:
(you may choose more than one answer)
a Hard hat
b Gloves
c Goggles
d Boiler suit
e Safety shoes or boots

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CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT


Before carrying out any lift, you must make sure you have a valid permit to work if one is needed and that
you keep a proper record of the operation.
Next, check that the weather and sea conditions are good enough to allow for a safe lift.
Make sure that any crew involved have been properly trained and, most importantly, that they have no
other duties while the lift is going on.
The number of people involved will vary depending on the load and complexity of the lift, but should be a
recommended minimum of four: one person in charge of the total operation the team leader; one
suitably trained and authorised to operate the lifting equipment; one to signal to the operator and one to
guide the load up and down.

APPOINTING THE PERSON IN CHARGE OF THE LIFT


One person should be appointed as the team leader in any lifting operation. It is his/her responsibility to
ensure communication with others involved in the lift.
The crane and equipment operator should have no other duties which might interfere with his primary
task. He should be in a proper and protected position, facing controls and, so far as is practicable, with a
clear view of the whole operation.
The operator should check safety devices fitted to lifting appliances before work starts and at regular
intervals thereafter to ensure that they are working properly.
The controls of lifting appliances should be permanently and legibly marked with their function and their
operating directions shown by arrows or other simple means, indicating the position or direction of
movement for hoisting or lowering, slewing or luffing, etc.
Make-shift extensions should not be fitted to controls nor any unauthorised alterations made to them.
Foot-operated controls should have slip resistant surfaces.

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CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT

Where the operator of the lifting appliance does not have a clear view of the whole of the path of travel of
any load carried by that appliance, appropriate precautions should be taken to prevent danger.
Generally, this requirement is met by using a competent and properly trained signaller designated to give
instructions to the operator. A signaller includes any person who gives directional instructions to an
operator while they are moving a load, whether by manual signals, by radio or otherwise.

ROLE OF THE SIGNALLER


The signaller should be clearly identifiable for instance, wearing a different coloured hard hat or
reflective garment and have a clear view of the total lifting operation if possible.
He should be able to communicate clearly and unambiguously with the other personnel involved in the
lift, including the main crane/lift operator.
Where necessary, additional signallers should be employed to give instructions to the first signaller.
Every signaller should be in a position that is both safe and in plain view of the person to whom they are
signaling.
Communication can be either by walkie-talkie or by hand signals.

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CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT

Walkie-talkie communication is valuable but it is open to problems such as imperfect reception,


background noise and misunderstandings caused by language differences - especially when more than
one nationality is involved in the lifting.
Hand signals agreed in advance and understood by all concerned in the operation are less susceptible to
misunderstanding.

CODE OF HAND SIGNALS


Please use the next four pages to photocopy in order to train crew members involved in lifting in the
correct use of hand signals.
Crew members must use a recognised system of hand signals like the IMO system. The most common
hand signals are displayed on the following pages.
Note: The following sets of coded signals are examples of those implemented by the EU Directive 92/58/EEC,
but where there are accepted national signals in common use (as indicated *) these too are acceptable. See
paragraph 21.2.15).

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GENERAL HAND SIGNALS

START
Attention
Start of command

Both arms are extended horizontally with the


palms facing forward

TAKING THE STRAIN or


INCHING THE LOAD

The right arm points upwards with the palm facing


forwards. The fingers clenched and then unclenched

STOP
Interruption
End of movement

The right arm points upwards with the palm


facing forwards

END
of the operation
(operations cease)

Both hands are clasped at chest height

or

Both arms extended at 45 downwards and lower


arms crossed back and forth sharply across torso

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VERTICAL MOVEMENTS

RAISE

The right arm points upwards with the palm


facing forward and slowly makes a circle

LOWER

The right arm points downwards with the palm


facing inwards and slowly makes a circle

DERRICKING THE JIB

Signal with one hand. Other hand on head

TELESCOPING THE JIB

Signal with one hand. Other hand on head

VERTICAL DISTANCE

The hands indicate the relevant distance

JIB UP

JIB DOWN

*
EXTEND JIB

RETRACT JIB

JIB UP

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HORIZONTAL MOVEMENTS

MOVE FORWARDS
(travel to me)

Both arms are bent with the palms facing upwards


and the forearms make slow movements towards
the body

MOVE BACKWARDS
(travel from me)

Both arms are bent with the palms facing


downwards and the forearms make slow
movements away from the body

RIGHT
to the signalmans
(in the direction indicated)

The right arm is extended more or less horizontally


with the palm facing downwards and slowly makes
small movements to the right

LEFT
to the signalmans
(in the direction indicated)

The left arm is extended more or less horizontally


with the palm facing downwards and slowly makes
small movements to the left

HORIZONTAL DISTANCE

The hands indicate the relevant distance

SLEWING

Both arms close to side extending one arm 90


from elbow

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DANGER

DANGER
EMERGENCY STOP

Both arms point upwards with the palms facing


forwards

SECURE
Secure the load

Both arms are crossed closely tothe chest with


hands clenched

TWISTLOCKS
Twistlocks on/off

The left arm points upwards. Rotate wrist of left


hand clockwise signalling twist on, and
anticlockwise for signalling twist off

OTHER

OPERATING INSTRUCTIONS

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QUICK

All movements faster

SLOW

All movements slower

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DURING THE LIFT
Loads should, if possible, not be lifted over other people or access ways, and personnel should avoid
passing under a load thats being lifted. Areas where the lifting is taking place should be marked by
barrier tape and other personnel should be prohibited from entering.

No person should be lifted by lifting plant except where the plant has been specifically designed, adapted
or equipped for that purpose. In addition, nobody should be allowed access to the lifting area other than
those involved in the lift.
All loads should be properly slung and properly attached to lifting gear, and all gear properly attached to
appliances. Great care should be taken in freeing any load thats become stuck.

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Make sure the contents - drums, spares etc are secure, they could drop off the pallet during lifting and
swinging of the load. It is also recommended to place an additional net sling (safety net) under the pallet,
especially while lifting light and loose stores on the pallet, which may shift or fall from the pallet during
the swing.

Best practice is to raise the load slightly and stop the lift. The centre of gravity of the load can then be reassessed and judgement made whether to continue the lift.
The use of lifting appliances to drag heavy loads with the fall at an angle to the vertical is inadvisable.
This is because the friction and other factors involved and should only take place in exceptional
circumstances where:

The angle is small


There is ample margin between the loads handled and the safe working load of the appliance
Particular care is taken
In all other cases, winches should be used instead.
Any lifts by two or more appliances simultaneously can create hazardous situations. They should only be
carried out where unavoidable and properly conducted under the close supervision of a responsible
person, after thorough planning of the operation.
Lifting appliances should not be used in a manner likely to subject them to excessive over-turning
moments.
Ropes, chains and slings should not be knotted.
Lifting gear should not be passed around edges liable to cause damage without appropriate packing.
Where a particular type of load is normally lifted by special gear, such as plate clamps, other
arrangements should only be substituted if they are equally safe.
The manner of use of natural and man-made fibre ropes, magnetic and vacuum lifting devices and other
gear should take proper account of the particular limitations of the gear and the nature of the load to be
lifted.

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Wire ropes should be clean, regularly inspected and treated with suitable lubricants. These should be
thoroughly applied so as to prevent internal corrosion as well as corrosion on the outside. The ropes
should never be allowed to dry out.

Lifting operations should be stopped if wind or sea conditions make it unsafe to continue them.
Before any attempt is made to free equipment that has become jammed under load, precautions should
be taken to guard against sudden or unexpected freeing. Others not directly engaged in the operation
should keep in safe or protected positions.
When machinery and, in particular, pistons are to be lifted by means of screw-in eye bolts, the eye-bolts
should be checked for correct SWL to make sure the correct eye bolts are fitted. They should also be
checked to ensure that they have collars, that the threads are in good condition and that the bolts are
screwed hard down on to their collars. Screw holes for lifting bolts in piston heads should be cleaned and
the threads checked to see that they are not wasted before the bolts are inserted.

SOME DIFFICULT LIFTING OPERATIONS


If a lift must be performed at sea while the ship is rolling, then the load acts as a pendulum and can be
controlled by the use of stabilising ropes.
If a load does not have suitable hitching points or does not allow the use of conventional hitching
types,specialist advice should be sought before a lift is attempted with the application of temporary lifting
points. Always report this situation to a superior officer.
If a load slips in conventional hitching once the lift is under way and becomes unbalanced, if possible,
lower the load back to the ground and readjust the hitching.
If there are height restrictions and the available rigging is too long for the lift to take place, a solution
may be to modify one of the conventional types of hitching. Always consult a superior officer before taking
such steps.

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CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT


If the lifting has to take place through an opening, such as a door or hatch, the solution may involve the
use of other rigging devices to assist with the transition of the load from one side to the other. The lifts on
each side have to be planned as if they were two separate lifts. Such a situation normally requires
specialist advice.
If a load requires a complex set of hitching so that it can be moved upwards as well as sideways, such
lifts are better left to the specialists as they require multiple calculation and application of several rigging
set ups. They are normally carried out in the presence of supervising engineers.

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CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT


TEST YOURSELF
Check on your knowledge of safe lifting of non-cargo loads so far by answering the questions below.
For answers see TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS on page 31.

1 BEFORE CARRYING OUT A LIFT, LIST THESE ACTIONS IN THE CORRECT SEQUENCE
If you think (a) is the first action, put 1 beside it, and so on for each action
a If required, make sure you have a valid permit to work
b Make sure any crew involved have been properly trained and have no other duties
while the lift is taking place
c Check weather and sea conditions are good enough to allow for a safe lift

2 WHATS THE RECOMMENDED MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE TO BE INVOLVED


IN A LIFT?
a Two people
b Five people
c Three people

3 WHO SHOULD BE IN CHARGE OF A LIFTING OPERATION?


a The captain
b Crane operator
c Appointed signaller
d Designated team leader

4 WHICH OF THESE IS THE BEST METHOD TO BE USED BY THE SIGNALLER TO


COMMUNICATE TO OTHER CREW MEMBERS INVOLVED IN THE LIFTING
OPERATION?
a Flags
b Walkie-talkie
c Hand signals

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CARRYING OUT A SAFE LIFT


5 MATCH THE DEFINITIONS BELOW TO THE OPERATIONS UNDERNEATH
(refer to pages 21-24)
a Hand signal showing hoist
b Hand signal showing lower
c Hand signal showing jib up
d Hand signal showing extend jib
e Hand signal showing travel in direction indicated
f Hand signal showing start
g Hand signal showing stop
h Hand signal showing secure load
i Hand signal showing emergency stop
j Hand signal showing operations cease
1 Start
2 Hoist
3 Jib up
4 Operations cease
5 Emergency stop
6 Lower
7 Extend jib
8 Secure load
9 Stop
10 Travel in direction indicated

6 DURING THE LIFT, WHICH OF THESE OPERATIONS SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED?


(You may choose more than one answer)
a Lifting over other people
b Lifting over access ways
c Letting people pass underneath the load being lifted

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AFTER A LIFT
All lifting appliances and items of loose gear should be kept in central locations and in a form
based on the model recommended by the ILO making it easier to maintain, access and check
equipment before use.
A mandatory programme of maintenance, testing and record-keeping must be adhered to.
Records of reports and registers may be kept in either paper or electronic form.
All nominated personnel should receive proper training and accreditation in lifting equipment use.

MAINTENANCE AND TESTING


All lifting equipment should be properly maintained according to manufacturers recommendations including cranes, derricks, hoists, rigging, chain blocks, handy billies and snatch blocks.
There are legal requirements in addition to your normal company practice. For instance, by law, lifting
equipment must be tested once in every five years.
A guide to examination, maintenance and testing of lifting appliances and loose gear is below:

Every lifting appliance and item of loose gear should be tested by a competent person before
being put into use for the first time and after any substantial alteration or repair to any part
liable to affect its safety. Upon completion of the test, the item should be thoroughly
examined by the competent person
Every lifting appliance and item of loose gear should be thoroughly examined by a competent
person at least once every 12 months
Every lifting appliance should be re-tested by a competent person at least once every five
years. Upon completion of the test, the lifting appliance should be thoroughly examined by a
competent person
The testing or re-testing and examination of the lifting appliances or loose gear should
adhere to a proper standard
All lifting gear and appliances should be maintained in accordance with the manufacturers
instructions
Subsequent to any examination or testing, a record duly signed by the competent person
carrying out such examination or test should be kept on board. Any record of maintenance,
alteration and damage repair should also be maintained

RECORD-KEEPING EQUIPMENT
A lifting equipment register should be implemented and regularly updated. The register should record
the history of all lifting equipment from the day its brought on board to the time of its disposal.
The register is a means of storing certificates of manufacture, test certificates, recording maintenance
and disposal. The upkeep of the register would typically be the responsibility of the chief officer who
should sign all entries and ensure that certificates, tests and maintenance are kept up to date.

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AFTER A LIFT
Following any statutory test or examination of lifting equipment, the master must ensure that a certificate
or report in the required form is supplied within 28 days. This must be kept in a safe place on board ship
for a period of at least two years from receipt of the certificate or report of the next following test or
examination.
Although the regulations allow 28 days for the production of documentation, where any competent person
discovers a defect affecting the safety of the plant, they should take immediate steps to ensure that a
suitable person in authority is made aware of these defects and inform the master or their deputy. The
master/deputy should then take appropriate action with respect to the use of the plant and the remedying
of the defect. Certificates or reports should be kept readily available on board and copies of the latest
certificates or reports should be available to any dock worker or shore employer using the ships plant.
Reports should be based on the model forms prepared by the ILO for the examination and testing of
ships lifting plant.

RECORD-KEEPING: PERSONNEL TRAINING


All personnel should be aware of the correct, safe operation of lifting equipment and should be given
adequate on board training prior to being assessed as to their ability to use such equipment.
When considered suitably accomplished, a Lifting Appliance Operators Certificate should be issued to
appropriate personnel which would be valid until their repatriation at the end of their tour on board. As
part of the test before a certificate can be issued, personnel should be tested on the hand signals code
included in this book on page yy.

STORAGE OF LIFTING EQUIPMENT


A central location should be identified on the ship for the storage of all lifting appliances and associated
equipment. This will include all straps, shackles, wires and lifting eyes, as well as chain blocks, handy
billies, etc. Rope slings should not be stored in an oily environment; they need to be hung up properly.
Wire slings need to be lightly oiled, regularly and properly.
All lifting equipment should be checked regularly by a trained, competent crew member and always
checked before any lifting operation takes place. If youre not happy with a piece of lifting equipmentdont use it.

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AFTER A LIFT
TEST YOURSELF
Check on your knowledge of safe lifting of non-cargo loads so far by answering the questions below.
For answers see TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS on page 32.

1 ALL LIFTING EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE MAINTAINED:


a To the manufacturers recommendations
b When it needs attention
c When its broken

2 HOW OFTEN SHOULD A LIFTING APPLIANCE OR ITEM OF LOOSE


LIFTING GEAR BE INSPECTED?
a Every two years
b Every year
c Every five years

3 HOW SHOULD RECORDS OF LIFTING EQUIPMENT BE MAINTAINED?


a By the chief officer
b By the safety officer
c By a responsible crew member

4 WHERE SHOULD LIFTING APPLIANCES AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT BE STORED?


a Near the place last used
b In a dedicated central location
c Each piece near the place its likely to be most used

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TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS


PAGE 17
1 WHAT DOES SWL STAND FOR?
b Safe Working Load

2 WHICH OF THESE THREE STATEMENTS IS CORRECT:


a SWL must never be exceeded on any piece of lifting equipment

3 EACH PIECE OF EQUIPMENT FOR LIFTING MUST HAVE A CERTIFICATE.


HOW LONG SHOULD THAT CERTIFICATE BE FOR:
c Five years

4 WHEN USING SLINGS TO LIFT LOADS, WHICH OF THESE STATEMENTS IS CORRECT:


b You must increase the SWL rating of slings if lifting takes place at different angles

5 WHEN CARRYING OUT RISK ASSESSMENT FOR LIFTING A LOAD,


WHICH OF THESE SHOULD BE INCLUDED IN THAT RISK ASSESSMENT:
a Personnel
b Condition of lifting equipment
c Safe Working Load
d Weather conditions
e Sea conditions

6 WHAT PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT SHOULD THOSE INVOLVED


IN A LIFT BE WEARING:
a Hard hat
b Gloves
c Goggles
d Boiler suit
e Safety shoes or boots

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TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS


PAGE 25
1 BEFORE CARRYING OUT A LIFT, LIST THESE ACTIONS IN THE CORRECT SEQUENCE
a If required, make sure you have a valid permit to work
c Check weather and sea conditions are good enough to allow for a safe lift
b Make sure any crew involved have been properly trained and have no other duties
while the lift is taking place

2 WHATS THE RECOMMENDED MINIMUM NUMBER OF PEOPLE TO BE INVOLVED


IN A LIFT?
c Three people

3 WHO SHOULD BE IN CHARGE OF A LIFTING OPERATION?


d Designated team leader

4 WHICH OF THESE IS THE BEST METHOD TO BE USED BY THE SIGNALLER TO


COMMUNICATE TO OTHER CREWMEMBERS INVOLVED IN THE LIFTING OPERATION?
c Hand signals

5 MATCH THE HAND SIGNAL TO AN INSTRUCTION TO THE LIFTING OPERATOR


a 2
b 6
c 3
d 7
e 10
f 1
g 9
h 8
i 5
j 4

6 DURING THE LIFT, WHICH OF THESE OPERATIONS SHOULD NOT BE ALLOWED?


a Lifting over other people
b Lifting over access ways
c Letting people pass underneath the load being lifted

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TEST YOURSELF ANSWERS


PAGE 29
1 ALL LIFTING EQUIPMENT SHOULD BE MAINTAINED:
a To the manufacturers recommendations

2 HOW OFTEN SHOULD A LIFTING APPLIANCE OR ITEM OF LOOSE LIFTING GEAR


BE INSPECTED?
b Every year

3 HOW SHOULD RECORDS OF LIFTING EQUIPMENT BE MAINTAINED?


a By the chief officer

4 WHERE SHOULD LIFTING APPLIANCES AND ASSOCIATED EQUIPMENT BE STORED?


b In a dedicated central location

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FURTHER RESOURCES
Safe Use of Rigging Equipment
Videotel DVD programme and book (code no. 700)

The Safe Use of Cranes in the Offshore Industry


Videotel DVD programme (code no. 922)

Who Needs It? Personal Protective Equipment


Videotel DVD programme and book (code no. 597)

Operation and Personal Safety in Dry Dock and Repair Yards


Videotel DVD programme and book (code no. 692)

Risk Assessment Course


Videotel CBT course [code no. 867]

Maritime and Coast Guard Agency: Code of Safe Working Practices for Merchant Seamen
(ISBN 0 11 5523693)

Marine Guidance Notes on Risk Assessment and Lifting Appliances


OCIMF: Recommendations for the Tagging/Labeling, Testing and Maintenance,
Documentation, Certification for Ships Lifting Equipment, May 2005
UK Statutory Instrument 1998 No. 2307, The Lifting Operations and
Lifting Equipment Regulations
UK Statutory Instrument 1992 No. 195 The Lifting Plant and Equipment
(Records of Test and Examinations, etc) Regulations 1992
Lloyds Register, Code of Lifting Appliances in the Marine Environment
Crane Accident website an archive of accident listings dating back to 1995
is available to subscribers:
www.its-insurance.com

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APPENDIX A
USING SLINGS CORRECTLY
CHECKING SLINGS FOR WEAKNESSES
Slings can be made of rope, wire, chains, synthetic web and metal mesh:

They must be in good condition


They must be free from blemish to maintain their weight rating
Syntheoc webs must be free of oil and grime
Metal mesh must be free of rust

CHECKING FOR LIFTING POINTS


The best lift requires the lifting gear to be hitched to the object vertically above its centre of gravity to
achieve balance.
Once the weight to be lifted is known, check for any lifting devices provided on the object itself. If the
makers of the object have provided lifting points, it is most likely that the lift will be balanced.

Electric motors sometimes have an eyebolt for hitching a hook or a shackle for lifting
Other objects may have lifting plates welded to them with holes or rings for fitting lifting gear
Although a fitted eyebolt provides a single lifting point at the motor's centre of gravity, due to the location
of the motor, a vertical lift is not possible. The motor must be carefully lifted and moved horizontally
using two hoists hanging from two separate beams. Each sling and hoisting device must be capable of
lifting the full weight of the motor.

CHECKING THE RATINGS


The hook, the sling and the shackle used must be rated higher than the weight of the motor
This rating must be checked before lifting. The information is stamped on the gear by the
manufacturer
Provided that the gear is in good condition and free from damage, it is safe to use within its
rating

USING TWO SINGLE SLINGS


A piece of machinery can be lifted by two vertical slings hanging from a beam:

As the slings are employed vertically, the two slings share the weight of the object equally
but each of the slings must be capable of lifting the whole weight

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APPENDIX A
USING MULTIPLE SLINGS
Often the object to be lifted requires more than one hitching point for a balanced lift and a beam cannot
be used. A common alternative is a multiple sling in a bridle hitch.

Neither sling lifts vertically. They form an angle to the vertical


This angle reduces the rated weight each sling can lift
The greater the angle, the smaller the weight it can lift
The solution is to choose higher rated slings and shackles to compensate for this deficiency

HOW TO CHOOSE WHICH HIGHER RATED SLING TO USE


Manufacturers of lifting equipment provide a table of data to help in the choice of a higher rated sling for
a given angle of application. For example, a sling employed at 10 from the vertical will be able to lift only
80% of its rated weight. At 20, it may only lift 50% of its rated weight.

HOW TO USE A BRIDLE HITCH


A bridle hitch, employing four slings, has to be calculated as follows:

Experiments show that two of the four slings actually take most of the weight
The other two only function in a balancing role and take only a small portion of the weight
during the lift, these roles interchange as the object is moved
It follows from this that all four slmgs must be rated capable of lifting half the weight of the
object
There are two different angles from the vertical involved in this lift, depending on whether
viewed from the side or from the end. Of course, for safety, the larger of the two must be
considered when choosing the correctly rated slings

HOW TO USE A BASKET HITCH


Certain objects require the slings to be employed in a basket hitch:

Choosing the correctly rated slings and shackles will be done on the basis already discussed
The narrower the sling angle from the vertical the safer the lift, provided that the object
remains in balance throughout

HOW TO USE A CHOKER HITCH


A choker hitch is frequently employed on round objects such as piping:

The sling is wound around the object and fastened back on itself
In this configuration the sling can only lift about 80% of its rated weight
The critical point is the angle at which the sling is hitched back on itself
This angle should be kept as close to the vertical as possible

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APPENDIX B
ESTIMATING THE WEIGHT OF OBJECTS TO BE LIFTED
[NB this appendix uses the diagrams from pages 10 and 11: Safe Use of Rigging Equipment Videotel booklet]

ESTIMATING THE WEIGHT OF REGULAR SHAPED OBJECTS


Estimating the weight of regular shaped objects can be carried out by calculating the volume of the
object:

A rectangular shaped object with length, width and height can be measured in feet or metres.
The three measurements multiplied will give its volume in cubic feet or cubic metres
A hollow cylindrical objects volume can be estimated by measuring its diameter and height,
calculating the area of its circular side and multiplying this by its height
Find out what material the object is made from and the materials weight per unit of volume (data tables
are available to provide this information).
Multiply this figure by the volume of the object to get its approximate weight.

ESTIMATING THE WEIGHT OF IRREGULAR SHAPED OBJECTS


Some irregular objects can be segmented into several regular shapes, in which case:

Each component can be measured


The weight can then be calculated by the methods shown in the section
on regular shaped objects above
Add the component weights together
If this method cannot be applied, the weight must be guessed at and a multiplying factor must be applied
to provide a margin of safety. Always over-estimate for safety. A helpful way to do this is to think of the
size a rectangle would need to be to fit around all the irregular shapes.

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APPENDIX C
CARRYING OUT RISK ASSESSMENT ONBOARD SHIP
The detail of risk assessment, together with the form in Appendix D, is an example of how risk is
assessed by one particular company. Your own company may well have a different method.
Most activities on board ships carry at least some form of basic risk and a number of policies and
procedures are encompassed within the TQM. However, due to the varied nature of the industry it is
impracticable to cover all eventualities, Therefore, risk assessments must be carried out when
appropriate and if a risk is identified, then necessary measures shall be taken to eliminate such risk or
reduce it to an acceptable level.
For regular work, or work that is almost daily routine but not covered specifically in the Shipboard
Manual, a set of risk assessments shall be prepared by each department onboard. These shall be given
an onboard reference number (e.g. D-01, D-02, E-01, E-02, etc) and may refer to parts of the Shipboard
Manual. Cross-referencing to a specific risk assessment(s) can then be made in the Safety Morning
Meeting. These risk assessments shall be transmitted to Head Office when first prepared. These
routine assessments shall also be reviewed periodically on board, (a reminder may be inserted in the
vessels 6 monthly planned maintenance routine).
For periodic work, such as launching of lifeboat, major main engine maintenance (piston change, etc), a
risk assessment shall be carried out initially and transmitted to Head Office. These risk assessments
shall be reviewed on each occasion before, and (in the light of any potential new hazards identified during
the operation) after the work has been carried out.
Prior to carrying out any other critical or special tasks, a risk assessment shall be conducted to identify
any hazards. Such risk assessment is also to be made whenever new equipment or new technology is
introduced and whenever modifications are made to the planning or organisation of work that may affect
the health and safety of workers. Risk assessments shall also be made for all temporary and permanent
changes to procedures or equipment onboard the vessel.
Upon review of any risk assessment, if there is a change, the revised version shall be transmitted to Head
Office.
The results of the risk assessments are to be documented in writing in the Accident Prevention Log.
Classification of critical work activities and their risk assessments shall be discussed at the Protection
and Environment Committee (PEC) meetings.

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APPENDIX C
IDENTIFYING HAZARDS
The first step in any risk assessment procedure is to identify the hazards that create the risks. A hazard is
anything that has the potential to cause harm.
In the marine environment, we have various hazards are present. Examples of hazards are:

42

Weather this includes sea, swell, wind, fog, extreme heat or cold
Chemical hazards
Electrical hazards
Fire and explosion
Hazards from high pressure mediums, such as compressed air, steam, oil, gas or water
under pressure
Moving machinery parts, unguarded rotating machinery
High noise levels
Working at heights onboard/outside of the ships rail
Slippery surfaces
Handling heavy weights onboard/outside of the ships rail
Unsecured objects in a moving seaway
Unsecured openings
Inadequate lighting
Inadequately ventilated spaces, especially enclosed spaces
Improper use of tools
Radiation
Slips, trips and falls
New, inexperienced or unfamiliar personnel
Whenever new working equipment or new technology is introduced
Whenever other modifications are made to the organisation or planning of work, which may
affect the health and safety of workers

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APPENDIX C
RISK ASSESSMENT
Risk can be defined as the combination of the severity of the hazard (consequence) with the likelihood of
its occurrence. Therefore,

RISK = CONSEQUENCE OF HAZARD X LIKELIHOOD OF OCCURRENCE


Prior to carrying out a task, the hazards must be identified. Then the risk arising from such hazard
should be estimated by using a simple risk assessment matrix as below.

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APPENDIX C
AN EXAMPLE OF RISK REDUCTION BY APPLICATION OF 'CONTROL MEASURES'
The foremast navigation light is extinguished and requires changing. Weather is bad with moderate
rolling and pitching and it is dark.
In this instance, the consequence of harm will be critical and harm is likely to occur to any person
carrying out the task. Therefore, there is 'considerable risk' attached to carrying out this activity under
the present circumstances.
If we wait for the weather to moderate and arrange to carry out the task in daylight hours and good
weather, we would be reducing the risk to a moderate level.
There is a smaller likelihood of critical harm, nevertheless there is an overall 'moderate risk' attached to
carrying out the task and we need to further reduce the level to bring it into the tolerable area.
We instruct the person to use a hard hat, safety shoes and utilise a safety harness to carry out the task
during daylight hours in good weather and to carefully examine that the mast ladder is in good and dry
condition.
By implementing additional control measures, we have now brought the risk down to as low as
reasonably practicable, and within the 'tolerable risk' level.
Note: If a likely consequence is a fatality then consequence is 3. If, with due safety precautions the likelihood
is significantly reduced to a tolerable level, i.e. unlikely to occur but the consequence of failure of all
precautions would be fatal, then consequence still remains a 3 but the risk is within the acceptable level.
Risk assessment involves three basic steps:

1 Identify hazards
2 Estimate the risk from each hazard the likelihood and severity of harm
3 Decide if the risk is tolerable

THE PROCESS OF RISK ASSESSMENT:


Classify work activities
Identify hazards
Determine risk
Decide if risk is tolerable
Prepare risk control action plan
(if necessary)

Review adequacy of action plan

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APPENDIX C
To carry out effective risk assessment, it is necessary to:

A Classify work activities: prepare a list of work activities covering areas, machinery, people
and procedures, and gather information about them
B Identify hazards: identify all significant hazards relating to each work activity. Consider who
might be harmed and how
C Determine risk: make a subjective estimate of risk associated with each hazard assuming
that planned or existing controls are in place. The effectiveness of the controls and the
consequences of their failure should also be considered
D Decide if risk is tolerable: judge whether planned or existing precautions are sufficient to
keep the hazard under control and meet legal requirements
E Prepare a risk control action plan (if necessary): prepare a plan to deal with any issues found
by the assessment to require attention
F Review adequacy of action plan: re-assess risks on the basis of the revised controls and
check that risks will be as low as reasonably practicable

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APPENDIX D
V essel:

LPG/C BW Havsol

RISK ASSESSMENT FORM


Deck

Engine

Form ref No

Description of critical activity:

Related hazards:

Crit ical

Considerable risk

Moderat e

M oderat e risk

Insignif icant

Tolerable risk

Pract ically
im possible

Risk reducing efforts for all related hazards:

Unlikely
t o occur
Likelihood

Likely
t o occur

Consequences

Crit ical

Considerable risk

Moderat e

M oderat e risk

Insignif icant

Tolerable risk

DCM 01.06-86 rev. 01

Pract ically
im possible

46

Conclusion / Remarks:

Dat e: 03.01.2007

Unlikely
t o occur
Likelihood

Likely
t o occur

Head of Safety M orning M eet ing:

Triv ial risk

Signat ure

Acceptable

Based on t he
abov e analy sis,
indicat e t he
residual risk by
t icking relev ant box

Risk grading:

Not acceptable

Residual risk:

Triv ial risk

Acceptable

Consequences

Based on all
relat ed hazards,
t ick relev ant box

Risk grading:

Not acceptable

Initial risk:

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APPENDIX E
SHIPBOARD MANUAL

SBM 06-03

06 Safety

Safety Meetings

Safety planning shall be an integrated part of all operations and maintenance activities. The
meetings listed below are mandatory company requirement.
Meeting

Frequency

Safety Morning
Meeting

Particip

Every workday
morning

ants

Deck meeting:
Chief Officer,
Bosun and and if
required,
Electrician.
Riding squad
leader regardless
of size of squad.

See link above


and comments
below.

Purpose

A final check and


reminder that
safety procedures
are adopted
before the work
starts

Documentation

Safety Morning
Meeting Form to
be completed and
handed over to
Master.

Engine meeting:
Second Engineer
and person
leading engine
room crew and
the electrician.
Subcontractor if
applicable.
Weekly
Maintenance and
Safety Meeting

Once a week

The Master and


Department
Heads, Work
Leaders as
required

Planning of the
coming week's
planned
maintenance and
related safety
precautions.

The safety
aspects of the
work programme
have been
discussed and
recorded.

Protection and
Environment
Committee (PEC)

When required,
but at least once
a month

The Protection
Supervisors, the
Master, C/O, C/E,
Second Off, (as
ship's Safety
Officer & PEC
Secretary), 2nd
Eng. and if riding
squd of more
than four
onboard, the
squad leader.

To review the
safety work
onboard, To deal
with subjects
brought up by
the members and
safety related
issues from the
Company shore
organisation

Accident
Prevention
Notebooks,
Accident
Prevention Log.
Annual Report to
NMD

To review the
safety work
onboard, To deal
with subjects
brought up by
the members and
the Company
shore
organisation

Accident
Prevention
Notebooks,
Accident
Prevention Log.
Annual Report to
NMD/Head office

See link above

Common Meeting

When required
but at least 4
times per year.
Can be combined
with PEC
-meeting

The entire crew

Safety morning meeting

The purpose of the safety morning meeting is to identify the safety aspects and hazards involved
in the maintenance work and operations during the day. One meeting is to be held by the deck
Revision
06

Approved Date
23.10.2005

Document owner
Terje Gautesen

Superior approver
Leif Arthur Andersen

Page No
1 of 2

This is an uncontrolled paper copy of BW Gas ASA's TQM system. Whenever this document is electronically revised, a printed copy of the new revision
shall replace the old. It is the responsibility of the reader of this document to ensure that this paper copy is valid.

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APPENDIX F

Safety morning meeting


Master

Name of vessel

LPG/C BW Havsol

Date (day-month-year)

Yatin Bhiwandkar
At sea

In Port

Deck

Engine

1. Are the crew fit for w ork and personal safety equipment available as appropriate

Checked

2. If w orking aloft, w orking on the ship' s sides or cold w ork including/involving


hammering, chipping, sandblasting, pow er tools, disconnecting of electric
curcuits etc. have all precautions according to TQM been considered.

Checked

NA

Checked

NA

Checked

NA

Checked

NA

Necessary

Not necessary

3. If substances injurious to health are being used, have all instructions in " Journal
for Health Hazard Substances" been considered.
4. If entering enclosed spaces or hot w ork is involved, have all precautions
according to TQM been considered, and are all check lists and permits available.
5. Are the crew using required protective equipment?

NOTE : If special circumstances prohibit use of required protective equipment,


the reason shall be stated on this form, approved and signed by the Master.

6. Risk assessment has been considered and found to be:

Ref regulat ion concerning w orking env ironm ent , healt h and saf et y of w orkers
on board ship dated 04. 08. 2000 3 -2 . (NB docum entation if f ound t o be necessary , DCM 0 1 . 0 6 -8 6 )

Work description and safety precautions.


When appropriate, a w ritten reference to the relevant procedure must be stated below . See Shipboard Manual
chapter 6 - Safety.

DECK

Chof f / Prot . superv .

Time:

ENGINE

2 nd Eng/ Prot . superv .

DCM 01.06-14 rev. 05

Tim e:

48

SUBCONTRACTOR

Tim e:

COUNT ER SIGNATURE

Superv isor

Tim e:

Deck: Chof f

Engine: 2 nd. Engineer

At regular intervals during the working day it shall be confirmed that the w orking conditions established/
agreed upon during SAFETY MORNING MEETING are being followed.
At the end of the w orking day this check list shall be handed over to the master and filed in the SAFETY
MORNING MEETING FILE.

T im e

Nam e

Signat ure

Tim e

Nam e

Signat ure

T im e

Nam e

Signat ure

Tim e

Nam e

Signat ure

T im e

Nam e

Signat ure

Tim e

Nam e

Signat ure

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