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HARPSICH MUSIC

HARP SICH MUSIC

Sonatas

Sinpic Sojiatas iStLdTojis

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Operas

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MUSIC

ILIKPSICII

foi'tlie

HaS-plicliarcl orKtuiot'orfe

Ke/ner^ Preludes

,>

il\dJnia Kina

U'l/e/ie.,

Preface
common obfervafion

It is a

great progrei's in Mufic

of rexlrefsing

the difficulty

young Ladies

The Author of

in tliofe Seminaries, convinceif

Aat

fliat

each Scholar, where there are numbers

found that

to

way of Queftion and Anfwer. Thus


School, which
aiid then

one

is

Mafter can allow to

be taught, has at length after many experiments

the principles

if twenty

of Mufic

to

young S tudents

young Ladies learn mufic

in the

is

by

fame
,

another called to take her place, the whole number were collected together, and while

performing on
;

Harpfichord

the

fome

Mafter; for while he

the

the reft are as

js

this

engaged with

3cc

One
of

fome

in

learning the Ele-

the different

Characters

which may be done with very little trouble

at the

Harpfichord, the reft may be queftion _

the Science

in

here laid down

one Lefson than by feveral in the

That there

is a

necefsity for fome fuch Plan as this , any perfon who knows the great

deficiency of Ladies

all

method they muft doubtlefs learn more

common way

ufefuUy employed

names and length of Xotes;

- ing and afsifting each other in the princ iples

allow.

of time

fame time confcious

and cotrnting Time; others, copying Mufic

By

the fhortnefs

at the

not very uncommon J fuppofe inftead of one being taught the ufual Hiqe

15

^ments of Muf ic

to the

from

method of communica ting

the beft

book, wTio has been many years employed

this

of fuch remark, and

the truth

it, arifes

Boatcfing Schools, feldom make any-

at

Perhaps

in

general with regard

it is

to the

grammatical part of Mnfic , will readily

not necefsary for them to enter into the IVIiniltiae of the Science;

but furely, after learning a competent

ti

me they ough t
,

to

know how

to

perform any piece

of Mufic not extremely difficnlt, f rom their own refoiirces only? which they can never do
unlefs they be

at firft well

grounded

in the principles

of

Time

and other requifites

And I again

repeat

a ffifficient time to

only,

it, tliat

in a School

niK!;bers tobe tanghta MaiCter cannotallow

each Scholar for compleating thefe piirpofes ; if , while he

reft are unemployed

all the

where there are

engaged withOne

is

The want of necefsary knowledgei^jiot of finger or earj

great reafon why, after niany

is the

years practice, fo many of our female Performers give up Mufic

Left

too frequently meet with difficulties which they are unable to conquer;

to

themfelves

till at

they

length vexed to

find their beft endeavours ineffectrral , they will no longer endure the mortification b fuch

frequent difapointmen tS

Thus,
the

delightful and rational entertainment is loft both to themfelves and friends, through

want of being properly groujided

at firft

in the

principles of the Science

It

is to

be hoped the judicious and candid Mafter, if

lie

afCent to the truth of the above

. marks, will have no objection to a Plan , which will fave him

Scholars

Every

If many are

to

be taught his tafk


,

is

not eafy

No

afsiftance is to be wifhed for; and furely the ufe of this

importance than that of


,

Teacher of

Language

MuflC

affords an ample field for inveftigation

as well as the Scholar

Lefsons; if he aims

Soul of Mufic,
of
*

the

at

this

Book can no more affect his

Grammars,

Book and can perform

remember;

can only be infuf 'd into him by the

Mufician

aid is to be fligTited

there is enough for the Mafter to do,

ftill

writingfor his

who after he well underftands


higher attainments, inui

in

lefsened, by makingufe of

is

and other means of afsiftance for young beginners

Pen

much trouble

re-

that

Hand, and

all the

Exprcfsioil,

not by

the

theToil^Ue, or

Chapter

Lesson

On the Notes
Pupil,

How

Muf<er ,

Seven

P.

Which are

M.

A, B, C, D, E,F, G, and after

P.

How

M.

By

P.

How

majiy lines are

M.

Five

The loweft

P.

Are

M.

Yes. The

the 2

IS'anies

of

the

G, A, B,

Notes

Sec.

is call'd the

And

Line

The 1^

the

if*^

C,

in

l^*-

again

8cc.

'

Mufic 7

line, the next above the

above the

2? line Scccountingupwards

Mufic?

5*.^

line is call'd the li^

additional line under the if^ine

OVer

is call'd the

l^"^

Line, the 2^ the

Tinder Line, the

8fc.

Names of

line is

Notes on

the

E, the 2^G, theS'/fi,

under line C. and the

Put thefe down

in

Notes

2'J

the different

the 4t''D

Lines

in the

the 5t''F, the

<

Treble?

ft
if^over
line A, the2^ C, and

m
2

4 5

2 3

M.

diftintfniilied

lines ufed in

1^^ additional line

M.

the 1^'

made ufe of

more than five

there no

"What are the

P.

Mufic

they ?

are the

Sunder

3^ E,

in

P.

the

made ufe of

their fitnatiou on Lines and Spaces

2^ over Line
2^

m.uiy letters are

Yes, they are thus placed

E G B D F

C E

Under

Lines

A
P.

What do you

M.

The intermediate diftances between

P.

How do you

M.

Under

over Space B,

call

Spaces?

name

the if* line

the

2? D,

Put thefe down

3f

in

the

Spaces
the if*

the 3'/

the lines

Space F, the 2^ A, the 3^ C

F.

Yes , they are

2 3

4 i

4*.''

^i

as follows

Exerciff) of the Treble Notes

E,the jt^G.

the if*

Under
Spaces

the

Names of

before he proceeds to the 2^ Lefson

the

Notes,

D F A

fi

under Space B, the 2V G.

the

M,

C E G
all

which

the

^I Jill

Scholar muft be perfect in

ijrf^ri|j^rJ^j^.i^^rrr^rri^rjjj

ii

Lessor n
How

Pupil.

do yoii diftingxiiiK Treble Notes from Bafs Notes ?

Mafier. The TrebJe


it is

is diftijiguifh'd

called the Treble,or G, Cliff

on the fourth line, from whence

by

this

mark ^being placed on

r-

And

the

Bafs

known by

is

is is

What

M,

The l^^line G, the2^B,the3^

are the Names of the different lines in the Bafs

Example

the 4*.^ F, the sl^

f 4,

mark Ol beingplaced

this

If:

the if*

Lines

^
f%

over lineC,the2?E,kthea^G,

Under

r^^^ i
A

fecond line, from whence

^called the Bafs,or F Cliff -XJH^

P.

the

F
P.

How

M.

Under

the

do you know the Spaces in


the if* line F, the 1?*

the

Bafs

Space A, the 2? C,the 3^ E,the

5^''

B theiPover SpaceD,
,

Example

F
the

Under

ft

^ i

\m

3:

Spaces

-B

Bafs Notes: Their Names to be known

perfectly, before the HarpCchord

is

The Gamut, or Scale of Notes for

the

method of naming

Englifli

G, the

-2

2^ F.

Exercife on

41''

the

touched

HarpCchord

Notes by Letters

e^gaj Ldef g !U i-T^

Italian method by Syllables

Z:t. mia

fol ia

i^i

do

remifafoJJ^^W

-A

French method by Syllables


ut re mi fa fol la fi

utremi fafoll

have always found that Scholars are better grounded in their Notes by this , than by any
other method. _ The fituation of the Notes thus feparated, makes a ftronger imprefsion on the

mind, than when they are placed

in a

Diatonic order, as in the Gamut.

NB. The French Mafters geiierally begin

to teach

Sol Fa the Notes in the Scale J which feems

Notes or Tones, from


thus

the

half Nott

to

be

even their Harpfichord Scholars toSing,or

good method,

to

make them

diftingitifh the whole

orfemitones ^Inthe above Scales theSemitones are

all

marked

Lesson HI
Which IhouM he omitted till the Scholar has made fome proficiency.
Pupil.

Are

there no other Cliffs

made

Mafier . Yes. there are four others

Alto; the Mezzo Soprano,


Treble or upper Part
a

Note there placed

is

of

in Mirficbefides

The Tenor,or Altiis

tlie

the

Soprano, in which laft

and the

Thefe are

tife

all

Treble and Bafs Cliffs

Counter Tenor, or Contra


Cliff the Italians write their

called C,Cliffs J liecaufe on whatever Line the Cliff fiands,

always caUedC; and the other Kotes follow progreffively as in the Gamut.

Example of the C Cliffs


,

Soprano

Does

P.

M.

Yes

the

Bafs or F Cliff ever change

It is

c
mezzo Soprano
its

Counter Tenor

pofition

fometimes, but rarely, placed on the

c
Tenor

Line

Example of the different C,Cliffs with their ufual compafs for the Voice

Soprano

ilezzo Soprano, rarely ufed.

Counter Tenor or Contra Alto


,

Tenor or Alto

'

Baritono, feldom ufed.

>|C

-U^

however, they are of great ufe

r^vr

Modern Compofers avoid ufing

to increafe difficulties,- for all

the C, Cliffs as

much as poGble,and indeed they only tend

Harpficord Mufic may be written, and performed without them;


in

.tDtion, and compofing (he French

Vocal Misfic,

Horn parts

to

iji

arrange

Score

the different

Voices , alfo in Tranfpo

Chapter
As I

Pupil

myfelf perfect

frtppofe

on the Harjjficord

Lessoj^ IV

11

names of

in the

the

what method am I

Notes,

to

know them

Mailer, Ail Harpricords are connpofed of long and fhort Keys: the long, Keys are called natural

Notes , ^ though they are not always fo \ and

The long Key about

Key between

M.

Key between E
B

8cF, and

8c

me

Pray

M.

Notes are

teil

from one Note

8f

that by counting the

E fharp, and which

and the long.

longKeys only
all

theNotes

flat muft

is

now as there

B lharp 2

from each other J confequentlyEfJiarp

beE natural, and C Flat B ratural,


?
,

meaning of

is the

Sharp?

Note before which it

:|f,raifes the

put , half

is

tone hi<Jher. thus, if a

on the right hand, immediately above it, and fo of

"What

M.

The contrary

is the

thus

if

td a

Flat

P.

"What

M.

A Natural

fitiiation.

is the

If

is

fharp

Key

marked

Natural
it

a Flat

marked

placed before

thus

thus

lowers

inftead of putting

the

|j

in the

the

it,

long

Note

either raifes or lowers a

fame Bar fucceeds

Sharp

it

in

order to

M,

Sharps proceed by fifths afcending, from

are Sharps placed in order

of

little

natural , you

ail the

reft

leaire it in its original

^^

~
||
[j

\!

the

Note B which

is the

fharpeft Note in the natural

ufe, where the Student has the benefit of a Mafter:butas thefitua_

-tionof many may deprive them of that advantage


.

put, half

has then the effect of a Flat. Example

fucceeds a Flat, it has then the effect of a Sharp

How

is

it is

Natural?

P.

This LeiXbn

Key B

and fo of

power

Note before which

down

on the left hand immediately below

meaning of

and if

'Ij:^

all the reft

meaning of a Flat ^

muft put down the fhort

his

to another.

P.

<K

is

placed before F, inftead of putting down the longKey F natural you muft put down the

Key

two fhort Keys

Characters from which you play and Tones are the diftances from

the identical

A Sharp ma rkd th us

Tone

is

difference betweeri^otes and Tones

the

F,nor between B 8cC, which

B fharp C natural

What

fhiort

A. fo

C, are only femitones, or half tones

P.

is

is

the

faid the lojxg Keys were natural Notes and tbe fliort ones iharps and flats

P.

Sharp

between

muft be F natural, and

the Isiftrument

You
fliort

of

the center

upper of the next three fhort Keys

the

On the Harpficord

no

long ones, are called Flats

h^nd from any D,or A, according to the Gamut you know the Names of

to the right

is

the

There are two fhort KeyS,;ind three Hiort ones alternately throughout the Harpf,

and Sharps.

P.

Keys between

the fhort

the

Author wifhes

to

give every afsiftance in


/

Sc.ile. thus, the

if there

I'i^

Sh;*rj) is

alwdvs F, the 2^ C

bat one Sharp in a Tiiue

is

iffour F,C,GSfD,

it

G, the4t''D, the 5 1*^ A, and the ^J^E therefore

the 3'J

can be no other than F, i two Sharps

8cc.

&

2
a

C, if three F,C,ScG,

4-

Order of Sharps

p.

How

M.

Flats proceed by fourths afcending

are Flats placed in order 7

Scale, thus, the


liJce the

l^Flat

is

always B,

from

2?E,

the

the

Kote F, which

3^ A,

Are

-fides what are mark'd

M. Yes,but

at the

the Flats,

Bind between

the laft

Flats

explain from the above Iiiftructions

Of

Six.

Sc thfefe

the firft

the

next Bar, they are

to

Lesson

the different length o Notes


?

Semibreve, Minim, Crotchet ,Ouaver Semiquaver


,

in Englifh,

Kote of

different forts of Notes are ufed in Mufic

Write them down

3(:

Demiquaver

French and Italian.

M. Yes.
.

(J

Englifh

Semibreve , Minim .

French.

,Ronde

o
Italiaji

A-

Chapter ni
M.

Example

and double Flats, for the Scholar

How many

the ^l"

or Katurals in the courfe of the Mufic ,be

Note of one, and

on the Sharps, and double Sharps

p.

in the natural

th

beginning next the Cliff

both conCderdbut as one Kote

Exercife,

5V'G,and

Kote

th

affect only every Kote in that particular Bar in which they are marked; for if

tliey

there happen to be

the 4^."D, the

there not new, or accidental Sharps

is the flatteft

th

Sharps never vary,

Order of Flats

P.

the

J
Blanche.

Semibreve. Minima .

J
Ouaver, Semiquaver. Demiquaver.

Crotchet.

J
Croche . Double croche. Triple croche.

Noire.

J
Semirninima

Chroma, Semicroma
orFufa.

Bifcroma

Pupil

What

Mafter.

is the

length of a Semibreve ?

Semibreve

long as, or takes ^an eafier word f or Harpricorcf Performer


8^2
Minims , or 4 Crotchets, or 8 Quavers or 1^ Semiquavers, or 32 Demiqiravers ,
is as

P.

What

M.

P.

What

M.

P.

Write them down.

M.

Yes.

is tbe

length of a Minim 2

Minim takes 2 Crotchets, or 4 Quavers, or 8 Semiquavers, or l6 Demiquavers


is the

length of

Crotchet?

Crotchet takes 2 Quavers

or 4 Semiquavers, or 8 Demiquavers

j"3

mmmmmmmm
p.

Are

M.

Yes

the

there not marks of fileiice called


.

A Reft

is

equal in length to the Note

following Example over the

Are

P.

there not frequently whole

>

Yes; as follows

in

reprefents

Which

>

Bars refted 2

oneBar

reft

modern Overtures or Concertos j where one Note is held on for many Bars ; In

Example

Where Ref^S

time of the

lO

order to relieve the Eye, the number of Bars are mark'd by figures at

>K

Note is placed in

pmihrRvS~
or nieai'lire note
is

Frequently

it

M.

Reft .OfC
,

Example of ReftS

Rcfts

Reft

XX xx xn

End.

XX XX XX

are placed, that hand.fhould be immediately taken


It is a fault |^too common^with

the

from

i
the,

many Performer sj to keep

Keys duringthe

(he

Key down .whir

10

Chapter IV
0 the

Lesson VI

duration o Sound called Time and the


,

manner of counting it throughout all its proportions


Pupil*

How many

Mafter,

Two* Common Time, and Triple Time

P.

How

M.

By fome of thefe marks

forts of Time are there

do you diftinguifh Common Time

^ being placed at the beginning of any Piece of Mirfic.


quantity of Notes has Common Time in a Bar ?
(j)

vj)

P.

"Wliat

M.

Common Time

P.

How

M.

I count, or

P.

Suppofe there happen to be Quavers and Semiquavers

M.

For Quavers I fay

do you count Common Time

Exa mple of
19.94 19 .94

9 3

Semi breve, 2 for

and 2 and, 3 and 4 and


,

a JVIinim ,8c 1

f or each Crotchet

Bar, how do you thenproceed

in a

For SemiqitaverS I double them thus

Time counted, flow, by 4Cr otchets

2^,s8c45f

,94

Bar

ill

,9

4 12

How do you count Common Time markd 4 at the beginning


If the Words JjargO Larghetto Andante be placed at the beginning; or any other

p.

M.

4 Quavers

woi'ds denoting a flow Movement, I then coimt by

Ouavers

as lon'g as

I did Crotchets

in the

1^

Sc^

2^k^3-Sc^4-k~

Mood ^ do

P.

In

M.

No. If

denoting

the

the

Words

yoir

19,94 12

in a

preceeding Exajnple

Example of Common Time marled


and counted by 4 Quavers ia a Bar
1

34

Bar j and

AUegrO ,Vivace PreftO


,

quick movement* I count by 2 Crotchets in

in a

Thus far advanced,

the

Scholar may priaceed

"

Bar

th

i Sc

3 4

12

,9

4_

'

it

ought to

( f

afe

practice the two firft eafy Times, re

'

-turning afterwards to the 4. Chapter,

4-18c2 2cSk42c

Bar*

to

I make

or any others'are written at the beginnlj.rr

NB

Largo
2 3 4- 12 3Sc^ l2'3-&--4

always count by 4 Quavers

in this cafe

has a very difagreable effect by continuing the vibration , where

'

Bar.

Cornsrnon

in. a

4 equal motions for

beat

l-a-nd,2-a-nd,3-a_nd, 4_a-.nd

\.

4 Minims Crotchets or Ouavers

has always 4 or to the value of

:^

11
Example of Common Time marked ^ and counted by
,

1-2

1 Sc

1-80-2- 8c-

Sc

^2 k

2)k

Bar

2 Crotchets in a

'

k 12

AlletTro
o

p..

Are

M.

Yes. The

p.

By what method

M.

The Alia breve

in a

of Common Time differently counted

there no other fpecies

AUa breve

([^,

And

the

do yo coujit them

retorted

Mood

"j) .

counted by 4 Minims in a Bar quick

is

and the retorted

Moodby 2 Minims

Bar quick*
12

Examplf

.3

2 3 4

Ik 2^3 4k 12

2 3 4

HQ

"1

[?'->

Pi

12

34

3 4

12

34

Alia brev e

ar

Retorted

Mood

2 k

Da

IT

^ 2

Capella

Lesson VH
Of fimple Triple Time
How

P.

3-

do yoji diftinguifh Triple Time

3 3

By feme of tliefe marks 2'4 8'^^"S pl^^ed

at the

P.

"What quantity of Notes has Triple Time in

Bar

M.

Three

P.

What

M.

A Dot

or

to the

is the
,

half longer

Dot, or point placed

NotC

A Dot

to a

Sembreve

A Dot

to a

Minim

A Dot

to a

Crotchet

to a (Quaver is a

or

is a

is a

Reft,

end of

at the

Minim

meaning of

Thus

beginning of any Piece

value of 3 Minims Crotchets or Quavers

or point at the end of any


.

augments

value , and makes

its

Note

it juft

one

Crotchet

Dot

And
I have no doubt but
to

Dot

this

to a

let it be

Semiquaver _

Semiquaver

is a

in

Demiquaver

an(WemiquaverS will appear

a fair trial is to be wifh'd

conCder'd, that

- J

Qiraver _

method of counting Quavers

many Muficians ; However,

my own Scholars

is a

Novel

for; I knowhow ithaS fucceededwith

Common Time of 4 Crotchets

in

aBar,where one

is

counted for each Crotchet, if thefe Crotchets be doubled and become Quavers , the Imaginationmuft

fuppiy

by

the

the length of' the

2^ 4^ 6^}" 8c 8*^ Quaver which

is

difficult for

young beginners

to dowheren

method here laid down, they count very eafily, the vacancy beingfiU'd up by tbe word

And

12
"What

Pupil,

Mafler.

is the

Two dots

meaning of two dots


end of

at the

at the

end of

How

3 3 3
do you count Triple Time marked 2 4 g

M.

If I

is

marked,! count by 3 Minims

in a

"WTiy are figures placed at the beginning

M.

In order

tbat

Note or Reft, are equal to 3 quarters of theNote. Ex.Zl2^Z2E

P.

P.

Note

Bar if 4 by 3 Crotchets,8f if '|by<3 Quavers


,

of any Piece

every Bar may have an equal quantity of

fuch Notes

Figures Specify,

as the

the

imder Figtire

always fhews into how many parts the Semibreve, or meafureNoto

the

upper Figure

tells

you how many of foch Notes thercare

be 2, it informs you the Bar confifts of Minims , becaufe

it

in a

takes 2

Bar.

Minims

is

thus, if the
to

make

dividedyand

under Figure

Semibreve; and

upper Figure being 3 fhews that there are 3, or to the value of 3 Minims in each Bar, and is
marked thus 2
If the under Figure be 4, as in this Mood 4, it tells you there are 3, or to the
the

value of 3 Crotchets in

Figure be 8 as in
,

Mood

this

8 1'^part of a Semibreve

P.

"W^rite dovirn

Bar, becaufe

it

Crotchet

Bar becaufe
,

fome Examples of the method of counting Triple Time


12 3

in a

12?

the

12 3 12 3

^1^ 2gc.3

2 3

2 3

.9

Sc

I 8c

i-jc-~-23

12 3

rrmrr'r"

LLr

Bar .

Ex . 3^ Of fimple Triple Time


counted flow by 3 Quavers in a Bar .

23 123

Moderato

this

under

Quaver is

1^2 ^Sk

2 3

Larcfo

2^ Of fimple Triple Time

NB.In

the

*^

counted by 3 Crotchets

If

counted by 3 Minims in a Bar

c.

Semibreve

fhewS that there are 3 Quavers in

Example 1^.* Of fimple Triple Time

of

is the 4^.''part

2 3

2^3 123

JEIE

Example, Qiiavers are

Lartf o

counted as flow as Crotchets were


in the

preceeding one

Prefto

Ex.

4*!'

Of fimple Triple Time

of 3 Quavers

in a

Bar counted quick


,

The rapidity of

the

difagreable Effect,
_,ftitute in its

room

Mood

it is

l|.',!r'l

in the laft

T tah;x

Example, caufes

the

beating every bar,

therefore to be wiflied Compofers would entirely lay

the fextuple

ip

r^

to

it

of Quavers markd thus 3, which would exclude

have

very

afide ,and fub_


the

horridnoifo

of fuch continual beating.


Xt certainly

was

the original intention

of Theorifts

tha t in the

mark'd J,each Bar fhould be as quick again played as in this


aiidin Triple

Time

the

mood

Mood

Mood of Common Time

C of 4 Crothets in a Bar

fhould be as quick again aS 4, but the truth

is,

inodernMuficianS

Lesson

13

V]

Of mixed and compound Triples.


Pupil,

What do

Mafter.

Mixed and compound Triples are form'd by collecting (wo,

yoTr call mixerf Hiid

quick firaple Triples into one

compound Triples

and are <hus marked

three

doubleTriples-j of Quavers

|..or

(of
f Semi(
Semiquavers "^ifj

|^f Crotchets

Tfiofe

markd thus+

Qiiadruple-^

^Konuples"j of Quavers

of Qjiavers

(^f Semiq!''' +

Triples

are feldom or never ufed

Mixed Triples

123I23

23

Ex.Of the Sextuple of Crotchets, counted by


6 Crotchets

in a

Bar, or by twice 3

of Semiqf^

to

12'3

bemet with

in

Muic.

123 123123

iyAi.ff.n Ue

Of the

Give me an example of counting fuch mix'd and compound Triples as are

or four Bars of the

(of Crotchets uurk'd 4 ^Dodecuples l^f Crotchets+ 12^

Sextuple or

NB.

f'^^9t\23^ 2.m

Sextuple of <^uaver8,countedby

'

'

2 3 }2 S 12 3

123123^23^

1 2 3

Bar, or by twice 3
6
NB.Quavers are coiinted as flow in this, aS
Crotchets were in the preceedingExample
Qiravers in a

Of the

Sextuple of Quavers counted

qrrick

J^Ile5?ro

Of theDodecuple of Quavers

counted flow,

by four times 3 Quavers

Bar ,

in a

Of theDodecuple of Qiravers counted quicJc.

Compound Triples
of the Nonuple of

Of

the "N"ouuple

When
only once,

Foot

the

Qiravers

at the firft

is

123123123 123

,LJJlll

I
I

jlfr

h^

rf'lfiff.tfgfcpi

l9o

r,

perfect in counting time as above, but not before; he mayproceed to beat

Note of everyBar __The rule for Common Time, and the mix'dTriplesis, for

be down the firft half of the meafure and up the fecondhalf J and in thefimple and
-pound Triples, the Foot to be down the firft two thirds, and up the laft third of the meafure
the

III

ll

7}"jl(tfllDl flll TO

of Semiquavers

Scholar

12/?12 3 12 3 12 3
'

to

com-

pay very

little

regard

to the different

Moods or Figures

at the

they afcertain the exact quantity of fich fort of Notes in a

regard
at the

to the

fpeed of performing any Piece

beginnig of

movement, after

-rent Pieces ftould be performed,

all it

is the

beginning any farther , than as

Bar

as the figures

they depend chiefly on the Italian

fpecify.For in

words placed

muft be allowed that the abfoluteTime in which diffe-

moft undetermin'd matter in the whole Science of Mufic,

14'
I have dwelt longer, and given more examples for countingTime throughout
than perhaps

is,

confequence

to

be found in any other production of

thorough knowledge of

its

this

kind becaufe I think


i

principles and counting


,

it

by Harpfichord Performers, and if tbey ar6 not properly grounded


attain it afterwards

is

in

tbe

D llletante

are doom'd to folitary amufement

properly

at

tlie

Chapter V
0 the different
Pupil.

What do you

Maimer,

A Bar is

P.

What do von

M.

call a

of the greateft

it

at firft,they

it

in

rarely

Performers on the

Concert merely becaufe they


,

beginning.

Lesson

JK.

Characters and Terms made ufe of in Mufic


,

Bar

made f and ferves

thus

or Gentlemen Performers well qualified in other refpects,

and render'd quite ufelefs in

Time

to count the

moods

but too mucli neglected

The fame neglect may be too frequently obferved

Violin; bow many of

were not made

all its

call a double

Bar

to

divide tbe Tune into fmall quantities

doable Bar, thus made -jjiilij^ fliews the end of

if it be dotted fuch part muft be repeated

Section, or part of the Tunejand

r
^

meaning of

P.

What

M.

A Hold mark'd thus

is tbe

Hold

a
is

an unmeafur'd Paufe or fufpenfion

opportunity of dwelling on fome particular Note, longer than


It

pleafure.

at

P.

What

A Repeat

'J8^.

from

that

to repeat

What

M.

They mean

P.

What

M.

Note

is

or end

at the

meaning of

is the

P.

alfo called a Clofe or Sign, in which cafe

it

Fine dal Se^nO

is

to

is the

Sign

it

to

give tbe Performer an

due time, or

means

to

that the

add otherKotes

Tune ends tbere^:

Kepeat

often placed at the beginning or fome other part of a Pioce

mark, wherever

meaning of

is the

its

begin

it

be found, and to end at the

the Italian

agaiiij

meaning of

Words

Sign

and fhews

Bind'^"*^ is a curved line placed bet's^een two Notes

not to be ftruck

or

and means

Da CapO ^

and end with the firft Part

Bind

Hold

that the

fecond

both
but that thf firftNote be continued, or held down (he length of

Bind,
Formerly, and even now, many Authors inftead of writing two Notes aud ufing the
,

exprefs the fecond Note by

P.

What

M.

to

is the

Slur

is

meaning of

Dot, ^hus
a

made fomething

Slur

-formers

it

means

Legato,

^^^^^^
^

all to

L^^

when placed over feveral Notes,

like a Biud,-^

Violin Performers that they are


,

be playd in one

fniooth, equal

8f

Bow

it

fignifies

^^JZ^ to Harpficord Per

connected touch


, , .

What

Pupil.

marked

What

M.
thus

I*

of StilOCato

tho nieHiiing

The revere of

Mafter.

is

meaning of

certain fpring of the Fingers

of two Qjiavers

aDirect

What

M.

A Direct, or Index
Note

the firft

underftood by

What

M.

Yolti

P.

What

M.

Forte, means

very foft

is a

the figuification
at the

is the

bottom of

be play'd in (he time of one

C^ f

end of

a line to

of Volti

of

Page means

over the leaf .Volti Sulaito turn over quick

to turn

Forte,rortifsimo,PianO,Pianirsimo .
,

loud.Piano, foft . Pianifsimo

What

M.

P.

Of

Tremando

M.

trembling or fhaking

P.

Of Crefcendo

M.

Increafing.

is the

Smorzato

meaning of

kind of fmothering, or dying away of the Sound. much the fame as

muft be increafed

in the

word following PianO and prec^eding Forte , means


,

and rife gradually ftronger

fame manner yow had juft before been playing.

It is a

fave the trouble of frequent repetitions in writing. Ex.

What

is the

meaning of

That the Note, or

Key

that the found

ftroke,or two ftrokes, through MinimS or Crotchets with Segue wrote

under them, what do they mean

To play

This
,

Diminuendo

One often meets with

M,

the Name

fhew you

ftrong or loud, Fortifsimo very

P.

P.

be play'd in the time

-j^^'^^tf

;^f=^

at the

all to

the Italian Words

meaning of

fmallw placed

following Stave

in the

P.

is

all to

two , in theTime

that they are confiderr[ but as

Example

or one Crotchet.

P.

is

fC

Figure of 6 over Six Semiquavers means that they are


,

tlius

Figure of 3, or Figure of 6 ; withaSlnr over 3 or ^ Notes

Figure of 3 over any three Notes means

Crotchet ; and

M.

fignifies rfiftinct or pointed; and Notes

Figure of 3 over three Quavers means that they are

Le^atO StaCCato

muff be playVf with

is the

'

"3

TenutC

modern
f r

"

invention, to

Segue

'

Segue

muft be held down .-y-

^ Many Performers always

ufe, and think this ought

to

be the common touch for theHarpficord;

but the beftMafters are of a contrary Opinion , and generally ufe the Iie^atO,whichproduces a
better tone

from

more equal vibration of

It would be a very difficult matter to collect all the terms

However I have inferted here, and

caufing

the Inftrument, by

)r

thepurpofes of

.-i

'

with

in the next

Exprefsioil .

neW^V ords fhoud

to i(;arii tlunt

language

the Strings,

made ufe of in modern Mufic, -

Page thofe generally ufed, and which are fufTicient

The Foreigners who are fo fond of embellifhing their

remember,

that though

we

like to

play their Mufic , we are not

16

Chapter VI
On the
Pirpil

"What

MaAer,

is

Lesson

Graces, or

meant by Graces

ornaiTjfjnts

of Exprefsion.

Graces, are certain marks placed over or before Notes, by way of Embellifhmeiit , or

Bxprefsion,

"Which are the principal Graces 2

M.

The

p.

Explain

M.

There are three Torts of Shakes

is

Shake
the

The Beat
Shake

made by fhaking the

The

"

Turn

and

1^.*

the

tumd

Shake,

the others

which is proper

at all clofes. it

is

2^ k 3^

Thefe Notes being more diftant from each

l**.*

8c.3?

Fingers

which fach Fingers are ufed as naturally recur

tranfient Shake, which


from

tone, or half tone above, along with the principal note, ufing the

other, the hand will be lefs diftorted by ufing the


to

Apo^iatura

Fingers except between F# 3cK, or between C# 8cB

Shake,

the

in the

Secondly, the pafsin^

pafTage

only ufed in quick defcending Notes and


,

is

Thirdly, the

differently prepared

Example

of

the different forts

of

Shakes

As

they are written

As

they Ihould be played

Beat

,^

-Si-

=^

p.

Explain

M.

A Beat differs from a Shake ,by proceeding from the

tone, or half tone, below the

principal Note
thus

marked

Example of Beats
thus

P. Explain

Tum

played

M. There are3 forts of TurnS.

the

common Turn

the inverted

Turn - (V
marked

Tums

and the plain note and

i
thus

Example of

Turn 2

thus played

Ptrpil.

Explain the

Mafter.

The Word

upon.
a

It

Grace

AppO^itura

App Oritur a, is derived from the Italian Vf rb

i^ote fnialler in fize than

is a

It is not reckon'd in

-ever length

Example

is

given to

of

the

it,

tlie

given to the

Example
it,

Appogiatura

Appogiatura

principal Kote which follows


the

to the

it

and

Bar muft be compleat without

in
is

which exactly

taken from it,

j^swntten

it

to wliicli it is

therefore ,what-

TSTote is

it

J^^

as written

of AppOgiaturaS, where more

and given

A.ppogiar3, to lean, or reft

muft be taken away from the principal Xote which follows

than half of the next, or principal

from

tlie

Time, for

half of the next, or principal Kote


aiid

taken

Appo^iatura

as played

jilr;illTi'fll%lli^^
Italian words

made ufe of

exprefs whether

to

movement

is to

be play d flow, or quick

Adagio

Largo
For flow Movements

Larghetto

Andante

Allegro ma non troppo

Andantino

Moderato
/ Siciliano.

Al
Allegro

For quick

Vivace

Movements

Allegro afsai

Gratiofo

liTon

Lento

Prefto

troppo Prefto

For exprefsion Slow

-<!

Affettuofo

Very quick

\ Cantabile

Chapter VH

Preftifsimo

LessonXI

0 the Major and Minor Modes, commonly called lliarp and flatKeys,
WhatHs

Pupil.

the

meaning of

The laft Note of theBafs

Mafter.

Major,
in

or fharp

Key ?

every regular movement

is

always called

and if there be two whole tones or five Semitones, or half tones, from the

above

it

fuch movement

is in a

fharp

Key

theKeyNotc;

Key note

to the third

Pirpil.

What

M.'Aer.

A Mmor, or flat Key,

to

tlie

meanijjg of

Minor,

Key

or flat

has only a tone and a half or four Semitones from thoKfv Vote

third above it.

Then

P.

is the

Time

is

not icnowii to be Sharp, or Flat, by the Sharps or Flats placed at thebeg^ii

uig

next the Cliff.

M
the

No : For
fame

Third
or flat

Tune may have ^lx flats


of

niiipber

ab ove

is

and yet be in

fliarps

from

Key Note,

the

at the

Key

a flat

that

beginning

we are

As I

io

and yet be

in a fliarp

faid before

it is

Sharp

Which

M.

The natural

P.

Give me anExample in notes of the barp

is the

natural

Sharp Key

is

and which the na tural

C, and the natnralTlat

Key

Ex.

Of the

is

the flat

Key of A

natural flat

it

to

Major, or fharp Keys

are whole tones

M.

Semitones are always the next note below

the

all (he

are always the next note below the

is a

the

Key, and the

other degrees are whole tones confiderd either afcending


,

In Minor, or flat Keys which muft be examin'd only in defcending

or defcendiiig.

What

/ ^

be known in the courfe of an Octave, where the Semitones are placed

next note above the Third ; and

P.

Sixth, and

the next note

below

tbe

the Semitones

Third,- and all the other dettrees


o

common Chord

perfect, or

common Chord

is a

3^ 5^^

8*.^

or

th
8. 3. or 8"'

5'."

3.5. fr om

the

Bafs Kote or

its

reckoning upwards J confequently there are three ways of playing every common Chord

Give me an example of common Chords

P.

8 0* 8*

common Chords

Chordof C.

ofD.

ofG.

maybe

objected that

Performers: But I think


whether they bs in

Nor do I

the

tlie

above Lefson

fen any reafon

why

is

'

'

of E.

m-

^*

of B.

"^ofF.

more calculated for Thorough Bafs

than

for Lefson

ought to underftand the nature of Keys,

Tyloodj as well as to

a La<fy fliould

of A.
1

CVery Performer, at leaft

major or minor

o- H-

Example of

Octave

^*

'

It

in afli.jrp^

Key of A

#6

all

<lie

8 8

In

the diftn iicp

Flat Key ?

Key of C. and

Ex. Of the natural iharp Key of C .

M,

by

h ive

How is

know whether any piece of Mufic, be

Key

p.

Key and it nic!\

play the common Chord

to

any Note

not know] how to tranfpofe any Songthat

maybe

too

high, or too low, in orrfer to accomod;i<e

of Tranfpofition

treat

her Voic<r

it to

LessonXII
0

"""What is the

Mafter.

Can

,P.

M.

Ko

it to the

remove any Piece of Miific higher or lower,

to

Voice, or any particular Inftrument

of Mufic

if a Song or piece

_ed into fome other Key which

is

fharp

tranfpofed into fome other Key which

As you have already defined

P,

Third ^ote

the

Key

above the

Keys may be known

all

to

tranfpofed into any other

it;

Key

natural fharp

Key of C

of Sharps, or Flats next


did in the

in

and if

be in the minor

it

/l*^

me an Example, how

give

that is

the

that all

fharp

make

Note below

From the givenKeyofCitmayb^Tranipofed,

it

muft be

to be

the

Tune

Key be

if

from it;and

duly diftant

that is in a

fharp

fharp

that

tone and a

Key may

be

f irft Part of

the

muft be tranfpo_

flat Key,

Keys may be known

Thircf Note above

into feven other fharp

Key of C Viz on

Mode or

it

Chapter

the Cliff, are to

major Mode or fharp Key,

be diftant two whole tones, or five half tones

I will give you an Example of

the.

the better to

is in the

is flat

be f lat , if the

half or four half .tones from

M.

Song, or Piece of Mufic,be tranfpofed out of any one Key into another

Tranfpofition.

meaning of Tranfpofition

Tranfpofition fignifies

accomodate

for which Tenfon the nextCh.jpter ki\U

Chapter V]
Pupil.

the

the

God faVC theKin^ tranfpofed from

Keys . and

it

muft be obferved

that the addition

Semitones fail in the natural order , which they

Key and
,

the

AlSTote higher

next Kote above the Third

intoD*

or a

higher

3:

into

1
or

or

lower into G

iJ

E jy.

iiJ

rff

jjSl'^

or

higher into

flat

will take the

Kex

-.f

or a 4*J'higher into F.

lower into Ai

or

Note lower into

Jji Jiii4 ii/jjJ iJJ ffiirJJi''JjaiL|!^


i

Bjy

.fiJ..^^^

P. Give me an Example of Tranfpofing a Tune

M. I

beginning of

in a flat

Song of DTArnes.

Key,into another

Key

My fond Shepherds

that is flat

of late

Scc.

In

the

na tii ral

From thegivf Key oA,itmaybeTranl})ofecfAKoteTiigherinfo


B
II

or a 3? higher in to C. or a4t'' higher intoD .

i
or a 4^*'lowerinfoE

Obferve,

that in keys

Tranfpofe from

Key

fir ch a

withfharps next

Key,

to a

Key

Sharp

in the

fecond

new fharp muft be

the Cliff, aiiv

with flats at

with flats next the Cliff, to one with fliarps,

-verted into

or aKote lower into G

or abs^lower into F#.

orajfS^loweriiitoF.

marfe a natural if voir

beginning, and if you Tranfpofe

tlu;

Natural in

the firft

i'

rom

Inftance muft be con.

ChapterIX.
Rules for Fingering.
Rule

l?*"

The ends of the Fingers and Thumbs

or refted

fhofild

always be held over the Keys whether ufed


,

hand<

The wrifts fhould be turned

2.

a little

outwards and raifed equal with


,

Every differentNote muft have a different Finger, unlefs


l^ever ufe the

or Flats,where

th
.

in

Keys except
;

the right

hand Thumb

in

of fhortKeys and in defcending, its place

The
and

fhort

in

Reft, or Paufe intervenes

very particular cafes of many Sharps

natu.ral place

afcending Kotes

is

is,

immediately after, or

immediately before

is

generally immediately after a fhort

The Hand

is

faid to be in

The

the

marked
Finder

The 2? Finger

Thumb
+
1

The 3? Finger 3

The

little

Finger 4

Key ;

fhort

Key

One fixedFofitioii,when every finger covers its riefpectiveKey


Examples of one fixed Fofition

NB. The place for

Key .

fhort

for the Bafs,or left hand Thiimt afcendingis, before

defcending,

is thus

cannot always be avoided,

The natural place of

the right

to

it

Thumb on the

of each

the knuckles

m
m

*^

Skip

H
i

1'^

II

2l*2fl2
or A

Skip a Finger

Mote

2l21

I212'5

3^;^'':i2'5

2fl

2i2 i^2^^2

^^^^^^^^
+

12

3 2 1 2+

Tlu

rxan.ples

invertprf;conff

iiiav

q.ienfljy

be pracficfd with (heB

you muft begin with

As thefirft twoTnnes

in the

Mafter. I

wiil give an

-gers and"W"rifts

to be

h.-m

the littleFinger

that the ends

over the Keys and th.sWrifts raifed


tice

or Joft

f oUowingL efTonSjare in on^

Pnpil. Yonfaicfin the firft Rule

Example for pra(

.fs

in a

of

the

line with the

'

ini'fe

which cafe Hie Fingering becomes

of

the

Thumb

fixf rfPorition , they may

To o the reft

nowbepracticed .

Fingers and Thumbs iliould always be


,

Knuckles give me therefore


,

hel(f

general

E xample

placed in

the conftant practice


a

of which will not only incline both the

tlie

riglit

For

Fini.

right pofition , but greatly advance execution.

General Example for attaining a right poTition of the Hands, and for quickening the Fingers

For

hand

the

left liand

Chapter

0 different Evolutions, and the manner o contracting tJie Finders


Proceeding
by 2TSrotes

fi

or thus

by SisoteS

or thus

by 4 Notes

or thus

2121

with

tlie

left

hand

21 2

^^^^^^^^
i

iJ

l'^; 1

+1 +

12

1 2 Sec

1 8fc

21212121 2121 212


1+1+

+1+

l+l">- 1 +

1+

22

0 ihe method o contracting the Fingers


,Perh;ij>s there is jiothi

-lecf^e
_

more necefsary

con* racting <he Fingers

oi'

Jonners finger pafsages


,

Example of
fiiiger the

It

from

to

piny well than


,

want of

this

obferverf that by the f irft

way of fingering

the

aS it

the

- pears
to

from

the effect, to

be produced from

But

Inftrument

above pafsago the pofition


,

the

Notes being all of

length, caufes

better

'^l'3252i9 19

faj}tjjJ7:iJJJ3^^

ry

interrupted ,nor can

Let therefore the following Examples be wellunder-

Treble hand alone

by 3 Notes

is

is a] terrf

-ftood and diligently practiced with both hands

Contraction

ought to be play'f

fecond way, by con( rac ting the Fingers there ap _

one Pofition

be but

the

in the

many Pe r

Fingers

end of every fonr notes, confequeutly the vibration of the Strings


.

that fo

know,

by contracting

to attain a thorou(5b

knowledge

The fame pafsage

method many Performers

every note be of an exact length

Tone

It is

order

improper manner

in an

f ollowin^Pafsage

may be

at the

the

in

i-rrn

u.-Pc

MM
rn

firriTrfrigrrrr f fjj.-.
+^+21291
VT] _

B_mffPmFm^m-^ 1

Contraction

by 4 Notes

2^1
8Q Q

2
S'^
-)

'

Exercifes for Fingering


NB. In

the following Examples

the8^ Finger

Extensions
4-0

is

often mark'd, where the 2^ might be ufed

2-#-2

^^^^^^

4
,

3.

2-^-2

4
2

As

_i ity; the
V 111

kind of ing,ering requires more practice than ExtenfionS in order

iio

Author would reconimend

amply reward

the Student

the

to

play with faci _

frequent ufe of the abo^e Examples which, thoMiffictilt,

for his trouble

24

Exercifes
r

_i

t t

for counting and playing in Time


_| 1

0-1

II

CommonTim^

3ZE

fff=i

rnTrnT->

33:

33:

i'iffp|ffi'iffi

^^

1
1

|p^c]h>||JJil IJJJ IJJ.I

l.lJJl.^llJJcl

rf

'I

Iff 1

ff'i

"iiffi'n>rrr

iT
4

4 Q u a ve r s

CommonTime^

n a

Bar

=9S

Etfl'll

,1

,1

Triple Time
123
:

3 CrOtcl lets

iji

Bar

^"
t

.4

I'l

ii

25

JJU. lJrJlJ.JlllJJ
I

pp|-:g: ^^^-grT-[|

Triple Time
1
i

ii.'rrnrif

rj^

r-

3 O'l^vers in aBar

is

rf,fririicgr

As far

Tcrififgrf,rii

as the Curve line extends firch Fingers are ue,d as lie immedi.itely ove r the

Keys

It rather cqnfufes the Performer to have the finger for every Note marJted; therefore in the

following Leffons the Fingers will only be marked over fuch Note s,whe re the pofition of the
Hand mrrft be changed.

Part

2/

2?

Progreffive Leffons for Practice

Method o fingering every Note in the Octave, Afcencfing


and Dnfcending, in the natural fbarp Key of C

Right hand alone

Left hand alone

Modulation Of the
in the

4-

1 S 2
rr~TTT
-be:

one

1+

-5

2 +

:^

2+1

+4

J^gg
One

fixed Pofition

r-r-

2 +

+1+^+1

+1

fixedPofition

Major, or natural fharp Key of C

Eafy Air
ill

Octave Afcending andDefcending

ri:j,i

4-

2 +

+4

28 NBt AsfarnS

the ciirv

<.{ lin'

go, }Oii

Fjiigt;rs aS uyturalljlie

t\ikt i'uch

over the Keys

i III le t

Tu

bjr

R ame a u*

j}

5>

r r p r

;i

F P m

^^ft^

'Ijjjl

'

(w'offx'ifPofitiojiS

'
1

1-^

14'

,i

4-

il

1_

4"

ijj j

4^^H-

nr^-

9-

+
1

c-

Da Capo

Minuet

Corelli

.ThePerformer is advif il never to

alter thepoCtion

of flie hands for the wrongSc flavifh cuftom ofalwaj^S

fhaking with the^'/ 8c3? Fingers_i_

d!)i^ rfr
i

Air

[LnMi[i3%[rWcfafi^

30

NB.Iithis

ji

may omit it for thf


1

'3

^ >

A.

^.

I
\

=^=^=^

Miller

prefeiit.

p-m

+1

V_ii

^r-

-4

'

IL

_^_J jJLd
^i-*
r
1
-i

"0^*

the Scholar, he

Ground

for

AoiiJff be too difficult

-f^

-d-

j='
-i

"

4r^V

j~

\"f
;

J 1

IJJJ

^
^fl T

f f

^
2

i:

-0.0

I*

jrnju

II

/
'

1
:

-1

^4=1=

ti-hbj

-rr< r r

i*.

^^=^

11

4-

+ 4

3J^=

..

3=

-4L

+ 2

=: -

l-fSt ac.

1
r

r r

m
ii

J,

Gavot

For Coui itin^r

(he

Time

82

Key of Cwith

major or

lliarp

Third

4
Method of fingering

Key of G,

III the

Modulation of

Octave

the

4*

4> 4 ^

4* 4

1
+ +

-yr

1"

+ +

n
" O

<>

4*

ft

'

'

aL

i.#

1 >

! + +. +
Cadence

+ +

r-.

4,

^>

^1

^Jf J;^Jlfff%jfrIilf^^^
l

Fine

r^
V-"1

fl

rJ%

fr rJ|jfiOTnirrrri?irro|i
Da Capo
V

>

11

04->

Fine

3 2

13

1.

L-J

32

CCrl^; j

ll

Da Capo

-I

Rondo

32
.

ib
+

>-

'

3213 2 1+

2 1 T_i-#

Tremolato

34

7|"r. jp. JjJ^jiff+rf iJjj


ii

^rtrr%

AGermanTune

_^-'<'jrrfiirrfiTff^i^J'itJ"''
12

2 1 2 I

1^

fTl^^^^lrrfr
fi J J J J

-P-

Gi^ue

hfcr^^

f ff ff

T~f"
-1

fffi
<

f#Ff-i
1

4.

MLj^l.iJ^Jflf

r
i

-f--r-ftT
1*

/ijJ^%f

rffiJjJ JjJ
i

lfriffrPJ.^tr

Minuet

jJ

i
,

4 g
'

J|iiJ JJ. |jflTJ<t, te


l

+
=3:

36

Key of Cu-ith a major or

the

Third.

fliarp

Key of D

Modulation of

the

Octave

in

Cadenza

--f

r-

p.

"^1

#3

-1

h44^
V\

# #

K3GE

X3t

11

^^1^

Hi

i-S

it

-f

9
1

Rondo Allegretto

39

_l
J

dXi

~f

1..

Fine

-A

L..,,.f--

-F-

41

<

-0-0

-0-9- -0-

;f

n
J

-<

''^

Miller

Menuetto Gratiofo

Fine

-fl-4,^_
r-%j

p.

J
e

JlJ

JTF

f>

i^^v^
Gi^Ue

-0-m

-0-m

in the

~0-m

Minor mood of D

^
1

End with

1^^^

la

ChafCe

7
1

Tc

nr"

Key of A with a Maj o


,

iiigeriiigin the

or fliarp Third

Key of A

MorIuI;^tiou othe

-o

i*

Octave

in

Cadence

o Q Q

XT
33:

43

'

f:

Minuet
Afeethiofi

LUJi
1

(Miller) I

( J*/

?^

+-r

p-

r p

r
1

^04

'1

'^^ r'r.

ii1

-U-^A

GaVOt,in

the

--

L,

^j.iuir;]'Jj:ij JjfnV[j'fij.i
i

Minor Mood of A.

n
4r

Minuet

in the Minor Mood of A.

^^^^^^^
3 ^

A,

2:

rr

rlJ

f 1,1

fl^

r-i9
lf-'

.3

"F"

,i

1f

f-

ntj ntj
1.-

"f

^^^^^
131

nrr

r r

\4=^
1

'

WW

:^

-0-

45
12

1
Rondo

Avalbii

AdBfettuofo

^f

itr

lij

f-'

ffff

a-H

1*^

B.C.

45
=

Ron do

Prefro
ft

8^

'

slfeki

m m TO
|i

'skkl

'm

'='Efel

'S

f-f

|>
|

mi*:

1^

wrw.
f

gjM<

^--3

\ilf\rp\r^^\n^\fp

^f
-'

i
3^

if^
v--

HI-

47

Key o

48
NB. If
omit

E, with a
Key

the Leffoiis in this

theijir

for

the

Major or fharp Third.

are too difficult for

prefent, and proceed

to the

tlie

Scholar, he h^fbeiter
one Flat

Key of F, with

Fingering

in the

Thumb on A

Key of E

4MM_
8

Modulation of the Octave in E

3E:

x;:=i:

Ca deuce

XT

<>

0=^

XT

EJelmanii

Mijiore
ttX

f^f

3
Fine

J
J

^]
N J
J,

4S

m
Dietz,

Cantabile con Variationi

...

_..

_.

rT"

JJJ

+
'''

-'
i

tf

%K;-j

Var.

f f f A.

pt

fpfxmf f

%fi mf

1^
i
Iti

Minore

A-

Ana

for pT

icticijig the

LEGATO'

Stile

of fingering

51

Lar ghetto

(~y^fY~
-

Cantabile

Paradies

'1

1^r

'

/U

Minore

Key o F,vith

I'iii'terjiiif

ill

thfi

Key of F.

Thumb on F k C
^'^

Major or fharp Third,

m^

\:s

-M-^

Mocfulation o the Octave in F

4
*

a:

g-

frfff.

i
i

S3
Minore
3
1^
*^

-1

i.

Trio
-er

__s_.-6

L
C

Men?D.C.

^^^^^

3:

Allegro

^^^^^^^
1

LJ

H^^jr-

^iff=i :N!rj
i

i
1

55

riVl
-J

I*

P4:

_p

r~0-

p_.
|

--^^

ir

J^l^?^

d d d d d

^
hv^

56
A-

Air
Allegro

-4

m
1

Affettuofo

Arne

O:

Ci

f.ffir"ciiff%fjiJM

^^

-f^^

-F

P-

1*

all
:

In

f'/u'{

^'

'L

iu ilt^fci-iidiiig (he

1?

>;

'Spring

htiuib

ifttr

'hi

Thumb before

(t

th'

s,

<

<,

II)

the Thumb beforefhe fhort Keys


inrfefcendiimtheThiimb after tho fhort Keys

In afcending
Mocfiilation

intheKey of b|?.
rl

'

33:

Arietta,

Cadence

O O

Xl-e-

o o

^>

Vanhall

r]

|Jrrr
|

-P-

IT

|:

IT

'T

-i^

p^E

,p
1

r
_?

-Q

1*

p.

-n

J |J

rrtH

Air with Variations


r lit'

2
0-0-

1-

-=^^^;

J
^

fl_

6*4

Key

of:

111

E^i'v^ith a

arcenrfing the Thirmh after the

in defceiicfiiig the

Fingering

in the

Key of eI?

2 J
1

auL

- +

the Thiiinb

in defcending the

Thumb before

f)]0 rt

Kf

v s

thefliorf JKt

In afceiiding
^

Modul
ation in Eb.

Major or fharp Third,

* 3ZZ3E
=
*

before the fhort Keys

Thumb after

the Oiort

Kevs

25:

'

Cadence

^ o
o Q

^ ~

Q o

Menuetto

m
'"^'v

1-

r
+

A-

J
1

r-W-fi^

4-

1^

EuKL MAKN

MV^rH
{

"A

-l-W

i-T-:

JJI^JLll

'

AllemaHide
O.',|,.

2- r

,'

a:
i

Fine
1^

pill

-0-

'ft

^-+
1

Schobert

-9-

^711D.C

Compofed by the King of Prufsia

Allegro

1;^

=z

^5
R

A,

i:t-H

1.

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