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October 2013

The Masters Bulletin


In the Spotlight

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Kramnik Triumphs
in Troms
by GM Alex Yermolinsky

Topical Theory

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IM Robert Ris on
Andreikin's adventurous
rapid repertoire

In the News

Magnus Carlsen Wins


1st Sinquefield Cup

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GM-elect Mackenzie Molner
on Aronian's f4
against the Dutch

17

Hou Yifan regains


world title

Featured Blogs

This Saturday: Death Math #18


Judit Polgar vs. Nigel Short!

18

Leaderboards18
1 of 18

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

In the spotlight
Kramnik Triumphs in Troms
GM Alex Yermolinsky

Without losing a single game, Vladimir Kramnik won the World Cup
in Troms, his career's best performance since beating Kasparov in
2000 according to GM Evgeny Bareev. But how did he do it? GM Alex
Yermolinsky reveals that it was all about the middlegame...
Vladimir

Kramnik

an

result would have been good enough

career achievement since beating

interesting year so far in 2013. After

to win the Dortmund again if it wasnt

Garry Kasparov in 2000. Considering

a disappointing second-place finish

for a career-reviving performance by

the kind of career Kramnik has had,

in the London Candidates he turned

Mickey Adams.

thats saying something.

down an invitation to play in Norways

first Super Tournament, giving an

as Kramnik entered his first World

impression of a man resigned to

Cup

Knockout

and the other three on tie-breaks.

his fate. In his interviews Vladimir

Championship) since Las Vegas 1999.

His total score line reads: 9 wins, 13

talked about enjoying life as a family

Together with Worlds #2 Levon

draws and no losses. Vladimir went

man and his growing interest in

Aronian, Vladimir was already seeded

+5 =11 in long-time control games,

things other than chess. The 38-year

in the next Candidates tournament

and +4 =2 in 25-minute rapid games.

old Kramnik said he wasnt sure he

by rating, but was required to play in

No ten-minute games or blitz were

would play much after he turns 40.

one official FIDE qualification event.

required. His rating points gain was

two

Aronian and Kramnik have figured

modest: only 2.4 points.

appearances in tournaments did

out that playing the World Cup would

nothing to dispel this notion. His

be a way less painful alternative to

the

play seemed flat and dead-ended,

entering the Grand Prix series of four

accomplishment, its time to look at

particularly in the Tal Memorial,

round-robin events. Here in Troms,

chess and talk about how he did it.

which turned Vladimirs first ever

they could go out of the tournament

Its very common to praise his deep

last-place finish of his career. His

quickly, fulfill their obligation, cash

preparation in the opening, such was

rating dropped below Karjakins and

their checks and go home happy.

the case in the second half of the

Grischuks, placing Kramnik as low

Thats exactly what Levon did.

Candidates tournament. Of course,

as #3 in the Russian list for the first

Kramnik, however, wrote a different

then there is his legendary endgame

time since 1993.

story.

technique.

Then came the traditional

Three weeks later Vladimir

through Kramniks games, in contrast

Dortmund tournament. True to his

emerged with what was described

to what was said above, I got a feeling

history of dominance in that event

by his long-time friend and second

that he won the Troms tournament

going back some 12 years, Kramnik

at world championship matches, GM

largely due to his excellent handling

played much better and his final

Evgeny Bareev, as Kramniks best

of the middlegame.

Kramniks

has

next

had

Still, questions remained,


(formerly

World

2 of 18

In Troms, Kramnik won seven

matches, four of them in regulation

Now,

as

we

understand

magnitude

of

Vladimirs

However,

as

went

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

Kramnik-Kobalia

the first rapid game Kobalia took a

Black would have to find the only

FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013

quick draw with White, it was clear

way

Kramnik had a psychological edge

28.xg2 fe8 where Qe2+ is going

over his opponent.

to force a queen trade, unless White

18.a2 e7 19.c3 e6 20.af2 b5

finds 29.1f2 and then 29...b7+

21.axb5 axb5 22.h1

30.g1 e5 31.c1 gives White a

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to

continue,

27...xg2+!!

middlegame, where both sides have

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strong and weak points. White,

So, both sides have accomplished

fe8 Kramnik would have to find

obviously, is happy with his Bd5 and

their modest goals, and now what?

29.g4+ (certainly not 29.g5+ f8

pins his hopes on some play on the

22...h5?

30.xd5?? xf6) 29...f8 30.h6

f-file. Black, in his turn, has the

Kobalia picked a wrong moment to

e5 31.h4 and then at the end

powerful Nd4 and loads of space in

get active. 22...b4 23.xd4 exd4

of a forced line, 31...cxb3 32.h8+

the center.

24.a2 e5 and I still prefer Black.

xh8 33.xh8+ e7 34.e5+ e6

15.h5 f6 16.c4 g6 17.d1 g7

23.xd4 exd4 24.f5!

35.xc5+ d7 36.xd4+ e7 White

GM Mikhail Kobalia is an experienced

Kramnik seizes the only opportunity

looks winning, but some work still

grandmaster in his mid-30s who has

to get things going.

lies ahead.

distinguished himself as a trainer.

24...gxf5

27.fxg7

He possesses a solid if not defensive

24...d7 25.xg7 xg7 26.f6 looks

Vladimir

syle of play. Here his main concern

a bit depressing from Blacks point of

28.xh5 f7 29.fxg7 xg7 30.f7

was to shore up his king and then

view, but possibly he can defend.

winning on the spot.

prepare b6b5. A more actively-

25.exf5 bxc4

27...xg7 28.bxc4 xd5 29.xh5

The game started 1.e4 c5 2.b3, so I


won't talk about the opening at all.
By now what we have is a complex

have meant the instant elimination,

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and drew without difficulty. When in

After 25...xd5 26.f6 xf6 27.xf6

minded player wouldnt think of


surrendering the kingside to White:
17...g5 18.a2 e3+ 19.h1 g5 is
very logical, followed up by Bg4, or
better yet, g7 and f7f5! Is White
in trouble yet? Possibly, so, but I
dont see Kramnik being excessively
worried at this point. He was down
a pawn for nothing in the second
regulation game, where a loss would

3 of 18

strong attack.
26.f6!?
Its interesting that Kramnik rejected
a solid way to retain a big edge:
26.fxe6 fxe6 27.xc4 Black has a
collection of pawn weakenesses and
the presence of opposite-colored
bishops makes it even more difficult
to defend.
26...d6
On 26...xf6 27.xf6 xd5 28.xh5

missed

27.xe6

fxe6

Better was 29.cxd5 but its unfair to


blame the players who had to handle
tough tactics with whatever little
time was left on their clocks.
29...f5?
Kobalia

makes

the

last

error.

29...xc4 30.dxc4 f6 would keep the


game going, as the strong d4pawn
forces White to looks for checkmate
of decisive win of material.
30.cxd5 g6 31.h4 be8 32.f3
e3

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

17...b6!

41...f1!

Clearing out the long diagonal to

Not anymore! Kramnik begins his

render Whites bishop useless.

attack on the white king.

18.d2 e7 19.e2 f7 20.e1 h5

42.h2

This provokes further weakening of

In case of the objectively better

Whites position.

42.xe5 Black would get the result

21.f3 c6 22.g4 f7 23.gxf5 xf5

he needed after 42...xd3+ 43.g4

24.e4 d4 25.d2 c5 26.f2 h8

(43.h2

27.g1 d5 28.g3 e6 29.h4 f4

43...d1+

30.f1 c4!?

g1+.

A great practical decision. Kramnik

42...xd3 43.g4 f6 44.e2 d4

switches

is willing to part with his advantage

45.d2 f3 46.g2 e4 01

tracks to collect some pawns and

in order to facilitate his play. When

wins prosaicly.

a thought of a match-clinching draw

Ivanchuk-Kramnik

33.xe3 dxe3 34.e7+ f7 35.xe3

is constantly on your mind the best

FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013

f4 36.e5+ f6 37.xf6+ xf6 38.g3

remedy is to play more direct chess.

f3 39.g1 f5 40.d6 f6 41.f2

31.dxc4

xe4

e5 42.e1+ xd6 43.e3 10

33.xd2

xe4

Does it look like a normal Kramnik

35.cxd3 c6 36.c3 g8

win to you? A Morozevich-like sudden

The white king is more open. In

attack from a slightly inferior position

another match situation Areshchenko

is a better way to describe it.

would be thinking queen swap, but

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Now

Kramnik

smoothly

These two have a long history of

worse

38...f4+

battles on the highest level, the

39.g2 xe4+ 40.dxe4 f7 41.h5

latest being an Ivanchuk victory in the

c5 42.d1 e6.

last round of the London Candidates

38...c5 39.g3 f8 40.g2 d8

that cost Kramnik a shot at regaining

41.e4

the world championship title. Painful

xd3

FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013

Still, a more experienced fighter

needed a draw to go through. His


opponent, a talented Ukranian GM,
took a decision to avoid theoretical
lines hoping to outplay Kramnik from
a worse position. Let's see.

45.g3

decide if he wants to enter a slightly

34.d3

xd2+

37.g4 f6 38.h3

winning the first game Kramnik just

e3+

h3#)

would play 38.e4 and let Black

32.fxe4

Areshchenko-Kramnik

Round three, another tiebreak. After

44.f4

44.xg1

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here he had to win at all costs.

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g1+

endgame

after

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4 of 18

memories notwithstanding, Vladimir


mapped out his strategy for this
match to be as solid as possible,
hence the Queen's Gambit Declined
in the first game. The position on the
board is very well known.
16.b5
This is not a novelty, but far more
popular is 16.ab1 which Kramink
faced against Radjabov at the Kazan
Candidates, 2011.

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

16...cxb5 17.xd5 exd5 18.xe7

xa3 33.g2

42.b4?

c8 19.ab1

It is not easy to defend this.

Leaving the light squares open ruins

The alternative 19.c6 leads to an

33...b3 34.d7 a8 35.d3 e6!

Whites game in a few moves.

endgame 19...b8 20.xc7 xc7


21.ab1 xc6 22.xb5 e7 that
is about equal. It is interesting to
mention that Levon Aronian played
the same idea, only with the other
rook 19.fb1 against Anish Giri and
won the game!
19...bxc5 20.xb5 e6 21.g5 h6
22.xd5 d6

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36.b7
36.d6 xd6 37.exd6 f8 38.e3
cuts off the black king and ensures
that the passed pawns will be traded
off. 36.xe6 fxe6 37.a3 looks more
troublesome, as the white rook is
badly placed. Still, White should
hold his own after 37...f7 38.f3
g5 39.h3 g6 40.e4 h5 41.g4 f8

42...c6+ 43.f2 b5 44.d4 c2+


45.f3 b2 01
It doesnt seem that Kramnik had
to do much; he just stayed with
the game and let his opponent selfdestruct!
Kramnik-Korobov
FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013

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42.e3 f4 43.f3 b4 44.c3.

Over the years Kramnik has made

36...c8

many contributions to the theory of

24.xc7 xc7 25.xa5 d3 26.d1

Kramnik continues to baffle Ivanchuk

chess. One of the least recognized

Without the queens the d-pawn isnt

with endgame riddles.

of those being his study and praxis

that dangerous.

37.f3 a5 38.a3 e8 39.e4 g6

of Isolated Queen Pawn positions.

23...c6 24.e2

40.f4?!

This one resembles a Queen's Gambit

24.e5 is intriguing, but it all fizzles

This one just feels wrong with the

accepted, only it came from the Slav,

out after 24...xe5 25.dxe5 xb5

queens still on.

the line Kramnik himself developed

26.exd6 d3.

40...h5 41.h4 g7

to use with Black against Peter Leko

23.a2?!
Far

stronger

was

23.c4

cxd4

24...cxd4 25.fb1
Ivanchuk continues to drift, his play
lacks precision and focus. 25.xa5 d3
26.e3 b6 27.a7 at least keeps
the extra pawn, although Blacks
chances are higher.
25...a4 26.e1 c5 27.d3 xd3
28.xd3 c3 29.d1 e6 30.e5
Not 30.xd4? as 30...e1+ 31.g2
c6+ 32.d5 xd1 wins a rook.
30...xe5 31.fxe5 b3 32.xd4

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5 of 18

in their match in 2004. White gets a


free move a2a4, but until this game
nobody figured out how to use it!
12.d2!?
A very unusual concept.
12...cb4
The knights are awkward, but its
not easy to find a constructive idea.
12...b6 13.e4 and Black doesnt
have the defensive move Nf6 in his
disposal.

12...f6

13.e4

ce7

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

14.e5 and the strong white queen

20...c7 21.a6!?

exerts pressure on both wings.

Kramnik

13.a5 d7

most energetic choices, as he did

32.h3!

13...b6 14.a6.

the whole tournament against the

This little move makes a lot of

14.xd5 xd5 15.e5

younger

difference.

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continues

opposition.

capitalise on Blacks weak 7th rank.


to

play

21.ac1

the

a6

22.d3 is solid, but not spectacular.

32...g6 33.d2 xc6!?

21...bxa6 22.b4 fd8 23.xa6 h5

As good a choice as any. Its hard to

24.f3

imagine Black surviving if the c6

Possibly 24.e2 was more precise.

pawn stays on the board.

In the line 24...ab8 25.da1 xb4

34.xc6 xc6 35.b1 g5 36.h4!

26.xa7 xc5 27.xf7 xd2 28.xd2

In the same energetic style.

xc4 Black could have put up

36...gxh4 37.h6 c7

some resistance if it wasnt for the


shot 29.xf6!! and then 29...gxf6
30.h6+ g8 31.a7 and the white
queen miraculously didnt let the c4

15...e8

square out of her sights.

Korobov decides to sit in the trenches.

24...ab8 25.e1 xb4 26.xd8+

After the match the Ukranian spared

xd8 27.xa7 g8 28.c6 d5

no words criticizing himself for


playing this game so timidly. To his
credit, Korobov nearly equalized the
score by outplaying Kramnik in game
2 before blundering the win away in
the endgame. Normally Black should
play 15...c6 as the trade on c6
favors him, but Korobov must have
been annoyed with 16.a6.
16.f3 f6 17.d3 f7 18.g4 h8
19.c5 xc5 20.dxc5

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34.b4 d5.

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38.a7
38.b4! would have won right away.
38...b5 39.b4 d6 40.b8+ e8
41.e7 e5 42.h2
Black has managed to organize some
sort of a defense, but of course, hes
lost in the long run.

29.b7?

42...h3 43.gxh3 h7 44.e3 g8

A serious error. The best was 29.a3

45.b1 d6 46.g1+ f8 47.a7

tying up the black queen.

c7 48.c1 e6 49.c8+ g7

29...c8!

50.e8 c7 51.b8 10

Suddenly Black is threatening to win


the c6pawn.

The victory over Anton Korobov saw

30.b5 d6 31.e4 c5?

Kramnik through to the semifinals.

Korobov returns the favor with this

His matches against two youngsters,

obscure move. More hands-on would

Maxime

be to continue attacking the pawn

Dmitry Andreikin, featured more

with 31...e8 32.d3 g6 33.b5 e7

spectacular middlegame play by

Now it's clear who won the early

Suprisingly White whos hampered by

Vladimir Kramnik, but I will leave for

middlegame battle.

his back rank problem is unable to

you to study it on your own. Enjoy.

6 of 18

Vachier-Lagrave

and

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

Topical Theory
Andreikin's Adventurous Rapid Repertoire
IM Robert Ris
Dmitry Andreikin surprisingly managed to reach the World Cup
final. His secret? Good rapid chess and an adventurous white
repertoire based on the Colle, the London, the Torre and the
Trompovsky! IM Robert Ris tells the amazing story.
Introduction

his games, pointing out the critical

or d4. Another option for Black is

Dear readers, I'm IM Robert Ris and

theoretical moments of the game

to fight for the key square e5 by

this is my first contribution to The

as well as the typical tactical and

means of 7...d6 8.d3 00 9.00

Master's Bulletin. One of the biggest

positional ideas for either side. I

but this setup doesn't work out well

stars of the World Cup in Troms

hope you'll find it both an instructive

for Black, since the desirable 9...e5

was the Russian youngster Dimitry

and enjoyable read!

seems to be premature.

Andreikin, who, against all odds,


managed to make it to the final.

Andreikin-Karjakin

Along his way he defeated several big

FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013

guys in the tiebreaks with impressive

1.d4 f6 2.f3 e6 3.g5 d5 4.bd2

attacking play. In this article I have

h6

a closer look at the use of his White

Other moves like 4...e7 and 4...c5

repertoire, as in fact he succeeded

have been tried here as well, but in

in outplaying opponents like Karjakin

most cases they transpose.

and Svidler from openings which

5.h4 c5 6.e3 c6 7.c3

aren't seen frequently at top level


anymore: the Torre Attack, the
London

System,

the

Trompovsky

and the Colle System or any kind of


hybrid version of these four. What
kind of impact does Andreikin's
games have on the current state
of opening theory in these lines? In
general we can say that play has a
less forcing character compared to
openings like the Grnfeld or Sicilian

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a) 10.dxe5 xe5 11.xe5 xe5 12.f4
d6 13.e4 c4?! (Better is 13...e7!
14.xf6 xf6 15.exd5 xd5 16.e4
c6 and Black is in control.) 14.e2
b6+ 15.f2 c5 (15...xb2 fails
to 16.e5) 16.e5 e4 17.xe4 dxe4
18.xc5 xc5+ 19.d4 and after
the s came off Black had some
problems protecting the on e4 in

Najdorf, where every single mistake

7...b6?!

Morozevich-Alekseev, Moscow 2008.)

decides the outcome of the game.

The seems to be a little bit

b) The best way for White opening

Below I have taken up the challenge

misplaced here, as Black fails to

the centre is 10.e4! when it turns

giving an objective view on three of

increase the pressure either on b2

out the black forces are quite badly

7 of 18

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

coordinated, e.g. 10...exd4 (10...

opening rules) 9.g3! b6?! 10.e4!

e5 by playing ...f7f6.

g5 can strongly be met by 11.xg5!

dxe4 11.xe4 cxd4 12.b5! b7

8.b1!

hxg5 12.xg5 c4 (12...g4? runs into

13.a4! c8 (13...dxc3 14.xc6

Since the is already on d2, there is

13.xf6!) 13.b1! (13.c2?! exd4

(14.000!? might even be stronger.)

no need protecting the on b2 with

14.exd5 d3 15.dxc6 dxc2 16.f3

14...cxb2 15.b1 xc6 16.xc6 c8

8.b3.

xh2+ 17.xh2 g4+ 18.xg4 xg4

17.d6+ xd6 18.xd6 should be

8...e7 9.d3

19.xd8 axd8) 13...e6 (13...e7

technically winning for White, e.g.

14.xf6 xf6 15.exd5 xd5 16.h5

18...c1+ 19.d2 c5 20.he1! a8

looks very dangerous for Black.)

21.e2 and White consolidates.)

14.f4! and Black's position looks very

14.xd4

suspicious.) 11.exd5 e5 12.xe5

something clearly had gone wrong for

xe5 13.f4! (A clear improvement

Black in Zherebukh-Troff, Wheeling

upon a recent rapid game which

2013.)

went 13.c4?! d6 14.f3 g4 15.h3

b) 8...b6 9.00

xf3 16.xf3 ae8 17.xf6 and a

b1) 9...b7 10.e1 (10.e5 xe5

draw was agreed in E.Levin-Shirov, St

11.dxe5 d7 12.g3 h4! since

Petersburg 2013.) 13...c7 14.e4

Black hasn't castled kingside yet this

xd5 15.xf6+! (15.xf6?! is less

looks like a good idea 13.f4 xg3

9...h5?

convincing, in view of 15...c4!) 15...

14.hxg3 e7 15.g4 h5 16.e2 h4

Black temporarily misplaces the

gxf6 16.f3! and due to the exposed

17.g4 hxg3 18.xg3 000 19.f3

on the edge of the board, while after

Black is in huge trouble. In my

and now in Kamsky-Golod, New York

the trading off the dark-squared s

opinion the most natural continuation

rapid 2004 Black could have played

he remains only with bad pieces.

is 7...e7 8.d3 (8.b5?! b6 9.a4

19...f6!) 10...00 11.e5 xe5

However, after 9...00 10.00 d7

00 10.b1 a6 11.d3 cxd4 12.exd4

12.dxe5 d7 13.g3 c7 14.f4 c4

11.e5 followed by 12.f4 White

c7 13.e2 was seen in Stefanova-

15.c2 c5 16.f3 e4 17.d4

retains excellent prospects building

Kosteniuk, Beijing 2008 and now

c5 18.g4 xd4 19.exd4 d7

up an attack on the kingside.

13...h5! would have given Black a

20.h4 h8 21.e3 g8 22.h3 h7

10.xe7 xe7 11.00

good game, as 14.xe7 is met by the

23.f1 h8 24.f6 ag8 25.ff3

There is nothing wrong with this

intermediate move 14...f4!) and

e8 26.g5 10 Korotylev-Karpov,

natural developing move, but White

now:

Moscow blitz 2007. Although it was

had a nice little tactic at his disposal

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+lwqk+-tr0
9zpp+-vlpzp-0
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9-+-zP-+-vL0
9+-zPLzPN+-0
9PzP-sN-zPPzP0
9tR-+QmK-+R0
xiiiiiiiiy

just a blitz game and Black's play

with 11.dxc5! xc5 12.a4+ d7

could be improved several times, the

13.g4 g6 14.e5! d6 (14...f6

fact that the 12th World Champion

is met by 15.f4) 15.xg6! and

loses in such a manner reminds us we

Black

shouldn't underestimate the Torre

compensation for the .

Attack!

11...f6 12.e5 00 13.f4 e8

b2) 9...00 10.e5 xe5 11.dxe5

Another passive move, but it's difficult

d7 12.xe7 xe7 13.f4 b7= and

pointing out a better plan for Black.

objectively speaking Black is doing

Perhaps 13...d7 with the idea to

fine

Harikrishna-Kryvoruchko,

play b5 comes into consideration,

Kallithea 2008, as any moment he

but even after the simple 14.e2!

a) 8...d7?! (against the basic

can get rid of White's stronghold on

White continues with his aggressive

in

xd4

15.xd4

8 of 18

and

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9PzP-sN-zPPzP0
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doesn't

obtain

sufficient

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

intentions on the kingside.

will be regained, retaining a huge

decisive too.

14.h5 f6

positional advantage.

28.xh6 dxc3

There is no chance of repeating

19...c7 20.h4

moves with 14...f6 in view of

Including the last piece into the

15.h4 and ideas like g4g5 spring to

attack with 20.be1 is even stronger.

mind.

20...b5 21.fe1 d7

15.g6 xg6 16.xg6

After 21...xf4 22.xe6 the is

More precisely than 16.xg6 since

ready jumping to f5.

after 16...f5 17.f3 d7 Black is

22.f5?

about to consolidate with f6, d6

Too hasty, allowing Black to exploit

etc.

the exposed kingside. In case of

16...d7

22.d3! White's advantage remains

XIIIIIIIIY
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17.g4!
Nothing can be gained from 17.f3
f5! (intending to play 18...f6)

beyond dispute, since 22...xf4 is

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met by 23.g6.

29.h3! c2 30.bc1 d4 31.g1

22...e5 23.dxe5

d3+ 32.g3 10

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Andreikin-Svidler
FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013
1.f3 f6 2.d4 g6 3.g5 g7
4.bd2 c5

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18.xe8 xe8 and the ''bad'' is

23...fxe5?

quite a good defender.

Amazingly Black could still have held

17...cxd4 18.exd4 d8

the balance with 23...c5+! and I

There is no chance for Black to play

failed to spot a win for White, e.g.

18...f5 at any time, because of 19.g5

24.g2 d4 25.e6 c6+ 26.f3 d6

and soon the g- and/or h-file will be

27.e7 dxc3 28.exf8+ xf8 29.bxc3

5.e3

opened. Black might have considered

xf3+ 30.xf3 xc3+ 31.g2 d2+

Another line is 5.xf6 xf6 6.e4

18...b5 but after 19.f2 followed

32.h3 c3+ 33.h4 d2 and

but after 6...xd4 7.xd4 cxd4

by 20.e1 White's position is very

neither side can avoid the perpetual!

8.xd4 00 practice has shown that

promising.

After the text move White's attack

Black doesn't have fear that much.

19.f3

looks crushing.

5...cxd4

Another option is 19.g5!? fxg5 20.fxg5

24.g5! c5+ 25.g2 d4 26.gxh6

Black has tried several other moves

xf1+ 21.xf1 xg5+ 22.xg5 hxg5

f6 27.g5 gxh6

here as well, like 5...b6, 5...d5

23.f7+ h7 24.f3 and soon the

27...c6+ 28.h3 dxc3 29.hxg7 is

and 5...b6 but Svidler prefers to

9 of 18

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

determine the pawn formation in the

under favourable circumstances via

on h5. However, since it's time

centre immediately.

h5.

consuming, I'm not really convinced

6.exd4 c6 7.c3 d5 8.h3

9.f4!?

of Andreikin's plan. Another plan is

earlier

Quite an unexpected change of

to go after the weakened doubled

games which mainly saw White

direction, as the moves for a second

b-pawns with 13.c7 but then I think

playing

time

reason.

Black obtains good play: 13...fc8

impression is that the exchange of

However, since the pawn formation

14.xb6 c4 15.xc4 dxc4 16.c5

light-squared s gives Black an easy

in the centre has become statical,

(16.e5?! d5 17.xc4 (17.c5?

life.

Black can't take advantage of this

fails

loss of time. Thanks to his useful

18.xc4

last move the can't be driven away

16...d5 17.xc4 f4 18.f1 (18.

from the b8h2 diagonal. In case of

g3 b6 19.xb6 xc4 20.gxf4 b8)

9.e2 c7 Black gets a good game.

18...b6 19.a3 xa3! 20.bxa3 xc3

9...00 10.e2 b6

and Black has more than sufficient

Frankly speaking, I don't like Svidler's

compensation

plan that much as he voluntarily

material. Taking into account White's

damages his own pawn structure. A

favourable pawn formation, I think

logical alternative is 10...e4!?

the best plan is to proceed in quiet

11.b3

style. Hence, the simple 13.00!

Compared with the previous game,

comes into consideration. White can

For example:

11.b1

gradually improve his position with

a) 8...00 9.h3 c7 10.00 f5

obvious reasons.

moves like fe1, e5 etc. and in

11.c2

11...a5

the long run Black might have some

just have been overlooked by both

11...xb3 12.axb3 only gives White

difficulties protecting his structural

players.) 12.xd3 e6 13.fe1 fe8

additional options on the queenside.

weaknesses on the queenside.

14.xf6 xf6 15.h4

12.xb6 axb6

13...d7 14.g5 h5 15.c7

Andreikin

deviates
8.d3

but

from
the

general

XIIIIIIIIY
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9PzP-sN-zPPzP0
9tR-+QmK-+R0
xiiiiiiiiy
xd3

(11...b4!?

e7

might

16.g3

f5= and Black is perfectly fine in


Seirawan-Anand, Amsterdam 1996.
b) 8...f5 9.e2 (9.xf5 gxf5 10.00
e4 11.f4 e6 12.e1 00 13.f3 d6
14.d3 e7 with a rather balanced
position in Ibragimov-Perelshteyn,
Ledyard 2008.) 9...xd3 10.xd3
00 11.00 c7 12.fe1 and a draw
was agreed in Korobov-Volokitin,
Kiev 2012.
8...f5

without

isn't

particular

advisable

here

for

XIIIIIIIIY
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to

17...xe5)

17...xc4

favours

xb6

for

the

Black.)

invested

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xiiiiiiiiy

Future games may proceed with

13.g4?!

15...b5

8...c7!? controlling the f4 square,

A very ambitious plan which is based

Initiating a forcing sequence which

so that the on f6 may jump there

on getting the black out of play

must have been checked by both

10 of 18

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

players far in advance. However,

h3 26.xh5 gxh5 27.h1 f3

temporarily misplaced on a6.

Black might have considered the

28.hg1 h3 29.h1 f3 30.hg1

Furthermore he could also have

dynamical

15...fc8!?

h3 and Svidler decided to repeat the

offered

16.xb6 f4 17.xa5 (17.f1 c4

moves. He could still have tortured

squared s once White has moved

18.xc4 dxc4 and the on b6 might

White a little bit longer with 30...

the on f1. However, I don't see

get into trouble.) 17...xa5 18.b3

d4 31.cxd4 d8 32.g3 xg3 33.fxg3

what is wrong with the more common

aa8 19.h4 f6 and since the pieces

xd4 but the despite the extra he

7...b7 8.d3 00 and here several

in White's camp aren't cooperating

didnt feel like having any realistic

moves have been tried.

efficiently I think Black has ample

winning chances here.

pawn

sac

a) 9.00 d6 10.e4 cxd4 11.cxd4

interesting battle of space advantage

bd7 12.e1 a6 13.a4 h5 and now

versus the pair of s ensues.

in Kamsky-Markowski, Mainz rapid

3...h6 4.h4 c5 5.e3 e7 6.c3 b6

2010 White might have considered

7.gf3

14.xe7 xe7 15.b3 and White is

c6 19.d3 f6 20.h4

FIDE World Cup (Troms), 2013

needs to compensate his structural


weaknesses with active piece play.
21.g1?!
Better is 21.f1 fxg5 (21...e5 is
inaccurate,

in

view

of

22.gxf6

e4 23.fxg7 xg7 24.de5 exf3


25.d1!) 22.hxg5 (22.xg5? runs
into

22...g3+)

and

now

both

22...f4 and 22...e5!? should give


Black good play.

light-

and after 3...h6 4.xf6 xf6 an

Andreikin-Svidler

An excellent move as Black seriously

of

An ambitious alternative is 3.e4

16.xa5 xa5 17.b3 aa8 18.c5

20...ae8!

exchange

XIIIIIIIIY
9rsn-wq-trk+0
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compensation.

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the

1.d4 f6 2.g5 e6
The critical way to combat the
Trompovsky is 2...e4 but that
certainly requires more theoretical
knowledge.
3.d2

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slightly better. In fact Black's position


is quite unpleasant to play, in view of
the slightly weakened queenside and
his lack of space.
b) 9.e2 c6 10.a3 d5 11.g3?!
was

seen

in

Harikrishna-Almasi,

Torrelavega 2007 and now Black


seems to be doing OK after 11...h5!.
c) 9.a3 cxd4 10.cxd4 d5 11.00
e4?

(Completing

development

with 11...bd7 makes more sense.)

21...e5! 22.gxf6 22...exd4!

7...a6?

12.xe7 xe7 13.c1 xd2 14.xd2

The point. Inferior is 22...e4? 23.fxg7

A strange move which I don't really

c6

xg7 24.fe5 exd3 25.xd3 and

get. It seems Svidler wanted to

17.c2 e7 18.a4 and thanks

Black is clearly worse.

simplify the position at any cost

to the better , without running

23.fxg7 xf3 24.d2 dxc3+ 25.bxc3

and doesn't mind playing with the

any risk White could pressurize his

11 of 18

15.c3

fc8

16.fc1

d6

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

opponent's position in Harikrishna-

have obtained full equality by means

game, I find it quite amazing that

Bluvshtein, Montreal 2007.

of 20...e7 21.a4 xc1 22.xc1 c8

Andreikin defeated Karjakin in such

d) 9.h3 c6 10.a3 d5 11.b1 d7

23.xc8+ xc8= and there's nothing

great style. However, some critical

12.g3 f6 13.b4 cxd4 14.cxd4 a6

left to play for.

notes have to be added to Karjakin's

15.b2 and White seems to be

21.fe1 f7 22.f4 b4 23.e2

play, who clearly failed to generate

slightly better in Kamsky-Navara,

xa2 24.xc8 xc8 25.e4! b4

counterplay against White's kingside

Achaea 2012.

Black will quickly collapse after 25...

attack. Moves like 7...b6 and

8.xf6 xf6 9.xa6 xa6 10.e4

fxe4? 26.xe4 since the light squares

9...h5 are certainly not in the

cxd4

are too vulnerable.

spirit of Black's plan in this type of

10...e7?! 11.d5! would give White a

26.exf5 exf5 27.f3 a5

position. Still, it takes quite some

firm grip over the centre.

More stubborn is 27...d5 28.e5 g8

effort to defeat a player of this

11.xf6+

and Black retains drawing chances.

calibre!

I think better chances obtaining an

28.e6 g8

advantage are offered by 11.cxd4

Still, Black might have considered

The classical game against Peter

e7 12.00 and the s are nicely

28...d5 but either after the aggressive

Svidler is, from a technical point of

placed in the centre.

29.g4! or the simple 29.xb6 Black's

view, perhaps the most interesting

11...xf6 12.cxd4 e7 13.00 00

position isn't much fun to play.

of the three. The move 9.f4!? looks

14.a4 c7 15.ac1 d5 16.e5

29.g3

quite mysterious but it seems that

d6 17.d3
17.c6!? d7 18.c2 is perhaps
more critical.
17...fc8 18.h3 b7 19.a3 d7
20.a6

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of direction and didn't react well.


Instead of playing for an edge with
the natural 13.00, Dmitry Andreikin
became very ambitious by pushing
his g-pawn but had to be a little
bit careful and settle for a draw. In
the rapid game Svidler didn't play
accurately by trading off the lightsquared bishops so quickly, and had
to deal with a somewhat passive

29...d5? 30.b3
Now Black loses the

Svidler was surprised by this change

, since

position. It was pretty close to equal,

30...xf4 is met by 31.e7+! winning

but from a practical point of view

the . 10

White's position is easier to play.


After Black committed a few errors,

20...f5?!

Conclusion

the game quickly ended in White's

Simply too weakening. Black could

Even though it was just a rapid

favour. 

12 of 18

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

Aronian's f4 against the Dutch


GM-elect Mackenzie Molner
Whenever World #2 Levon Aronian plays an opening line, it
should be investigated especially when he plays it twice in
one tournament. According to GM-elect Mackenzie Molner, the
rare move f4 against the Dutch might be better than it looks!
Hi all! This is GM-elect Mackenzie

surprise

variation

played

by

and no time has been wasted.

Molner with a Dutch update for the

Aronian against the Dutch. Will this

a) 6.g3?! This would transpose back

Chess.com Bulletin. In the recent

be a new trend to follow or a short-

to classical lines but isn't very logical

Sinquefield Cup, Levon Aronian, one

lived experiment?

here. 6...c6.

of the strongest and most prepared

5...d6 6.e3

b) 6.c5?! This is similar to the line

XIIIIIIIIY
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that I will encourage for White but

Carlsen, in his postgame interview

I don't see a clear path to equality

with Chess.com reporter Mike Klein,

after it. I think that 6... h5

Aronian-Carlsen

said: I used to play the Dutch a bit

may not reach complete equality

St. Louis, 2013

10 years ago. There was an IM on

either but forces White into less

1.d4 f5 2.f3 f6 3.c4 g6 4.c3

ICC who played f4 all the time,

straightforward

g7 5.f4!?

but I never could understand it.

White has an aggressive setup that

It's true that this f4 may leave you

he can build upon and I would

with a strange impression at first,

recommend continuing in the spirit

especially when the classical kingside

of future lines with 8.b3+.

fianchetto

exclusively

a1) 7.e2 was played successfully

played against the Dutch, but I think

by Timur Gareev in 2007. Black tried

if White takes the game into a new

a different setup compared to the

direction, compared to their game,

early c6 but failed to equalize.

he has chances for an advantage. I

7...h6 8.h3 c6 Black tried a different

don't think White has done anything

setup compared to the early c6

to forfeit the initial advantage. The

but failed to equalize. 9.c2 g5

white pieces are well centralized

10.h2 a6 11.a3 c7 12.d3 d7

players played a relatively rare


line against the Leningrad Dutch
that has never been seen in elite
tournaments.

Whenever

Aronian

plays an opening line, it should be


investigated, especially as he played
it twice! Aronian's opponents were
Carlsen and Kamsky. Both games
ended in draws, which is not a
glowing endorsement for the line but
I think there is room for improvement
on the White side.

XIIIIIIIIY
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is

almost

13 of 18

here it's not ideal. Black has two


responses that lead to playable
positions. 6...e6 (6...c6 can be
met by 7.b3 but 6...dxc5 is also
good enough for equality.) 7.e3
(7.g5 g8=) 7...dxc5 8.dxc5 xd1+
9.xd1 c6!=.
6...c6!?
I was originally planning on giving
this move an exclamation mark but

play.

a)

6...00

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

13.d1 b5 14.c5 cd5 15.e2 e4


16.xe4 fxe4 17.d2 dxc5 18.xe4
c4

19.c5

Gareev-Dzhumaev,

Tashkent 2007.
a2) Meister-Glek, Germany 1991
was one of the few higher level
games that has seen the f4 idea.
Black was successful using the c6
setup: 7.b3 h8 8.000 c6 9.d5
Combining queenside castling along
with opening up the long diagonal
doesn't work out well for White here.
Black's counterplay is straightforward
with ideas of c5, a6, and b5, opening
up lines on the queenside. 9...a5
10.c2 c5 11.h4 h5 12.e2 a6

Carlsen: I used to play the Dutch a bit 10 years ago. There was an IM on ICC

13.d2 d7 14.a4 b6 15.dg1 b4

who played f4 all the time, but I never could understand it.

16.g5 f7 17.h2 b5 18.cxb5 axb5


19.xb5 xb5 20.xb5 c4 with a

e7e5 break, although Black should

leave the pin on the diagonal. White

strong attack.

be able to arrange counterplay in

has a clearer path to an advantage

a3) 7.c5 c6

a different way. 9...h5! The only

here. 9.c4! (9.cxd6 cxd6 10.d3

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+lwq-trk+0
9zppzp-zp-vlp0
9-+nzp-snp+0
9+-zP-+p+-0
9-+-zP-vL-+0
9+-sN-zPN+-0
9PzP-+-zPPzP0
9tR-+QmKL+R0
xiiiiiiiiy

way to equalize. (9...e4!? 10.d1

h5 11.g3) Declaring Black's pieces.

d7 11.00) 10.d1 xf4 (10...e8

It's important to remember to play

11.d5) 11.exf4 e6 12.00 dxc5

a3 in the following variations,

13.dxc5 e7.

targeting

a3b) 8.b3+! I like this move more

10.xe6+ h8 11.a3 xe6 12.xa5

than c4 which looks even more

b6

natural than b3+. There are a

10.cxd6 cxd6 11.a3!.

few positive points behind b3+ in

a3b2) 8...h8 9.d1 This could

comparison to c4. The a1rook is

be an area for Black to look for

cleared to post itself on d1. Ideas

improvement if 00 is something that

involving a potential d4d5 push are

Black wants to try to make work. I

a3a) 8.c4+ h8 (8...e6 9.00

more powerful because Black's most

don't see anything convincing for

e7 10.cxd6 cxd6 11.a3! Now d4

natural response, a5, will no longer

Black though. 9...h5 10.e2 xf4

d5 is a threat due to the fact that

gain a tempo because of a3. Lastly,

11.exf4 White should almost always

a5 will be met with a2.) 9.c2!

in the event of h5, the white light-

be happy to get this structure.

(9.h4!? looks threatening but Black's

squared bishop would like to be on

b) 6...h5

response meets it well: 9...h5

e2.

b1) 7.e2!? This is also a reasonable

Black prepares counterplay and stops

a3b1) The downside to 8...e6 is that

choice for White. Without the threat

the h-pawn before it can become an

it's still going to take extra time to

of ...e4, White's bishop is usually

issue.) A benefit of this set up is that

arrange the standard e5 break for

very comfortable on e2.

it is hard for Black to arrange an

Black. Sooner or later Black needs to

b1a) 7...00 Now 8.g5?! h6 9.h4

14 of 18

d6.

13.a3;

9...e7
9...e8

(9...a5
10.a3)

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

g5 10.d2 gxh4 (10...f6?! 11.g3)

some lines. In essence it maximizes

diagonal Black doesn't have any

11.xh5 e5 is a typical example

the potential of both of White's

problems after he breaks in the

of how Black can gain counterplay.

bishops. I believe that if White wants

center. 8...e5 9.dxe5 xc3 10.bxc3

After 8.00 White will look for the

to play this line the best chance for

dxe5

g5 idea under better circumstances

an advantage lies with this move.

e7=.

here. Black will need c6 in order to

b1) 7...00 transposes back to the

c3) 8.b5!? The second best try.

support e5 but it's not the best move

note a3 on page 14.

This looks very tempting but it is not

now because of d4d5.

b2) 7...h5? Mixing both knight

the most dangerous option for Black.

b1b) 7...xf4 8.exf4 00 9.00.

moves before castling is favorable

8...00 9.b3+ h8 10.d1 d7!

b2) 7.b3! White aims to reach play

for White. Black does not have the

and Black has a decent Dutch after

that resembles the mainline. Black's

same counterplay with e5 here

this. 11.00 h6! 12.h3 g5 13.h2 a5

two pawn moves with the c-pawn are

because g5 is a tempo gaining

14.a4 xc3 15.bxc3 xb5 16.xb5

the only ways I see to give this line

move for White. 8.d5! xf4 (8...e5?

b6 17.c4=.

independent value. In both cases

9.g5) 9.exf4 b8 10.b5+! Black

c4)

White reaches a stable advantage.

will have to ruin his pawn structure

10.xe4 fxe4 11.d2 b6 (11...f8

7...c5 (7...c6 8.c5 xf4 9.exf4 d5

in order to deal with White's direct

12.g3 c8 13.c1 White has the

10.d3 b6 11.a4 d7 12.c1)

play. 10...c6 11.dxc6 bxc6 Now

better

8.dxc5 xf4 9.exf4 dxc5 10.d1 a5

both a4 and c4 have the benefit

14.xc8 xc8 15.exd4 c1+ 16.d1

11.g3! c6 12.g2 d4 13.xd4

of stopping Black's d5 advance.

xb2

cxd4 14.b5+ xb5 15.xb5

Even cxd6 is possible here, with an

13.xe4. More details in this line

7.e2?!

advantage for White. 12.a4 This

can be found in the PGN version of

a) 7.d5? e5!= is a shot one must

is probably simplest way to a clear

this bulletin.

remember!

edge for White. White's pieces are

7...00

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+lwqk+-tr0
9zppzp-zp-vlp0
9-+nzp-snp+0
9+-+-+p+-0
9-+PzP-vL-+0
9+-sN-zPN+-0
9PzP-+-zPPzP0
9tR-+QmKL+R0
xiiiiiiiiy

solidly coordinated and Black will be


left with ruined central pawns.
c) 7...e4! Threatening e7e5.

11.xd8+

8.cxd6!

xd8

cxd6

chances
17.xe4)

12.000+

9.b3!

here.

d7

13...xd4

12.xb6

axb6

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+lwq-trk+0
9zppzp-zp-vlp0
9-+nzp-snp+0
9+-+-+p+-0
9-+PzP-vL-+0
9+-sN-zPN+-0
9PzP-+LzPPzP0
9tR-+QmK-+R0
xiiiiiiiiy

White's set up. It has the upside of

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+lwqk+-tr0
9zppzp-zp-vlp0
9-+nzp-+p+0
9+-zP-+p+-0
9-+-zPnvL-+0
9+-sN-zPN+-0
9PzP-+-zPPzP0
9tR-+QmKL+R0
xiiiiiiiiy

potentially increasing the scope of

c1) 8.b3?! e5 9.dxe5 dxe5 10.g3

King's Indian type of position. White

the bishop on f4 as well as making

(10.d1 e7 11.d5 xc5 12.g5

has less space and Black's kingside

the a2g8 diagonal a source of play

f8 13.xe4 fxe4 14.g3 e6

attack is already in formation. 9...h6!

for White. Additionally, b5 may even

15.b5 xb5 16.xb5) 10...xc3!=.

(9...xe6?! 10.g5 c8; 9...e4?!

be a good square for White's bishop in

c2)

b) 7.c5!N This definitely seems


like the most consistent move with

8.c4?!

Despite
15 of 18

the

weak

8.00
a) 8.d5?! e5 9.dxe6 If White doesn't
take en passant, Black achieves a nice

10.xe4 fxe4 11.d2 xb2 12.b1)

The Masters Bulletin

10.00 xe6.
b) 8.g3 This was Aronian's attempt
at improving over his game with
Carlsen. 8...h6!? (8...e4?! Black's
consistent follow-up doesn't work as
well now due to the lack of central
tactics. With the bishop on g3, there
are no more xd4 tricks for Black.
White can safely exchange and enjoy
a slightly better position. 9.xe4 fxe4
10.d2 f5 11.00) 9.00 h5 10.d5

October 2013

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+lwq-trk+0
9zppzp-zp-vlp0
9-+nzp-snp+0
9+-+-+p+-0
9-+PzP-vL-+0
9+-sN-zPN+-0
9PzP-+LzPPzP0
9tR-+Q+RmK-0
xiiiiiiiiy

In conclusion, I think this line


offers White decent chances for
an advantage if he plays 7.c5. The
types of positions that are reached
are less common for Leningrad Dutch
players, which could make this a
dangerous surprise. A few things to
remember:
1) Black's idea in most cases is to play
c6 and then e4. This can often

xg3 11.hxg3 e5 In view of Black's

9.h3 e5=

times guarantee very good central

play in the game, White's best chance

After this move, Black's position is

play. If this can be discouraged, as in

here is e1. 12.c1 (12.e1 xf3+

already preferable.

Aronian-Kamsky, White has chances

13.xf3 e5 14.dxe6 c6 15.e4! xe6

10.h2 exd4 11.exd4 g5! 12.xg5

for an advantage.

16.exf5 xf5 17.g4 Now the point of

xg5 13.f4 f6 14.d5 d4 15.h1

2) In the lines with 7. c5, the move

having the rook on e1 is clear. The

c5 16.d3 d7

b3 is a key idea in most variations.


The time that is potentially lost by

in this line! Counterplay with e7e5

XIIIIIIIIY
9r+-+-trk+0
9zpp+l+-vlp0
9-+-zp-wqp+0
9+-zpP+p+-0
9-+Psn-zP-+0
9+-sNL+-+P0
9PzP-+-+PvL0
9tR-+Q+R+K0
xiiiiiiiiy

is essential and here White's play has

and eventually Aronian managed to

it is definitely worthy of a better

been too slow to disturb Black's plan.

hold the draw.

reputation and future experiments.

can't retreat to e6. White is better.)


12...xf3+ 13.xf3 e5!= Once again
this move equalizes the game for
Black. In Aronian-Kamsky, St. Louis
2013 a draw was agreed on move 44.
(diagram)
8...e4!
An idea that one needs to remember

16 of 18

playing c5 can be regained through a


check on the diagonal, or the queen
may even be useful on a3.
3)

Structures

involving

h5xf4

generally favor White. The open


e-file provides easy play for White.
It's not totally clear whether or
not Aronian's f4 was a product
of home preparation or over the
board inspiration but I think that

The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

In the News
Carlsen Wins 1st Sinquefield Cup
In the last round, Norwegian super star Magnus Carlsen
only needed a draw to clinch the first Sinquefield Cup
and the winner's $70,000 payday. He was offered one,
and declined.
Carlsen eventually won his last game

ensured tournament victory. Had

Carlsen, who will now fully focus

against Levon Aronian, securing the

Aronian found a way to convert his

on the prepation for his title match

world number one a plus three score

earlier advantage, the Armenian

against Vishy Anand, in November in

and grabbing the cup by a full point.

grandmaster would have forced a

Chennai.

American GMs Hikaru Nakamura and

three-way playoff.
You can read the final report on the

Gata Kamsky had drawn earlier, so


Carlsen knew that a draw or win

It was the last tournament for

Sinquefield Cup online here.

Hou Yifan Regains World Title

Needing only seven of the alotted

China, by beating title-holder GM

10 games, Chinese GM Hou Yifan

Anna Ushenina of Ukraine. You can

convincingly won the 2013 Women's

the final report on the match online

World

here.

Championship

in

Taizhou,

This Saturday: Death Match #18,


Judit Polgar vs. Nigel Short!
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The Masters Bulletin

October 2013

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Leaderboards - Top Titled Players


Bullet
#

Blitz

Name

Rating

Daily Chess/Correspondence
Name

Rating

Name

Rating

01

IM brute4ever

3004

01

FM Kulinarist

2637

01 IM elobispo

2766

02

FM TigerLilov

2903

02

GM Janosik

2609

02 GM Julio_Becerra

2736

03

GM SultanOfKings

2777

03

GM LiemLe

2606

03 GM Kalif88

2623

04

GM erichansen

2753

04

GM lorcho

2595

04 NM RWHaines

2595

05

IM Molton

2730

05

GM FabianoCaruana

2577

05 FM Soilsurf

2575

06

GM LittlePeasant

2709

06

NM TheTruth

2571

06 FM VPA

2569

07

FM Kulinarist

2700

07

FM TigerLilov

2548

07 NM BMcC333

2561

08

GM KnightStranger

2700

08

GM honestgirl

2541

08 FM The_Evil_Ducklings

2552

09

GM FabianoCaruana

2673

09

GM VovAn1991

2539

09 FM Immortal_Technique

2548

10

GM LiemLe

2657

10

GM CaptainJames

2539

10 NM KingWhacker85

2527

(Standings reflect the top titled players, active within the last month on Chess.com)

The Master's Bulletin is Chess.com's monthly PDF magazine for titled players. Any copying or distribution (reproduction, via print, electronic format,
or in any form whatsoever), as well as posting on the web, is strictly prohibited without prior written permission. 2013 Chess.com

18 of 18