3-5 Year Strategic Plan This document includes Narrative Responses to specific questions that grantees of the Community Development

Block Grant, HOME Investment Partnership, Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS and Emergency Shelter Grants Programs must respond to in order to be compliant with the Consolidated Planning Regulations. NAME OF JURISDICTION: Morris County Consolidated Plan Time Period: 2010-2014 GENERAL Executive Summary 3-5 Year Strategic Plan Executive Summary: This 5-year Strategic Plan, incorporating input from public, private, and non profit agencies, strives to set the stage for the Division of Community Development in light of burgeoning needs and decreasing funds. While 39 municipalities comprise Morris County, 37 of these local governmental units have entered into inter-local Cooperation Agreements with the County, with the two remaining municipalities, Parisppany-Troy Hills and Dover, joining with the county in meeting housing needs with HOME funds. Demographic data provided by the Census, have been reinforced by the amount and range of applications submitted to the county for the three programs it administers: Community Development Block Grant (CDBG), HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME) and Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG). The newly established Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Rehousing and Community Development Block Grant-Recovery programs, funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, provide a reflection of need correlating to the current recession. Morris County, an affluent county with a Household Area Median Family Income of $87,600, does, however, have one in 10 households struggling financially, as demonstrated by CHAS data (Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy): • 7.14% households are characterized as Extremely Low-Income, • 7.08% Very Low-Income and • 12.92% Low-Income. • Of the 173,980 households, 27% are at or below low income level (<=80% median income); • 35.2% are experiencing a moderate or severe housing cost burden. • Nearly one quarter of the households are rental households • The Majority of all households are small in size (<=4 individuals) • As of 2008 12.7% of the county’s population was 65 years of age or older1.
1

2006-2008 American Community Survey, Data Profile Highlights.

• 10,330 elderly over the age of 65 are low to extremely low income. • 10,760 elderly over the age of 75 are low to extremely low income. • Seniors over the age of 75, who either rent or own their own homes,earning between 30 and 50% of the Area Median Income are experiencing significant housing problems (inferior kitchen or plumbing facilities or cost burden over 30%). • 5,895 households with special needs are low to extremely low income. • There are 694 persons living with HIV/AIDS, cumulative through June 30, 2009 in the county.2 • The homeless population, as determined by the annual Point in Time Count of Homeless, resulted in a count of 649 individuals 3 up from 302 in 2009; 28.4% of the adults were homeless for more than 1 year. Since the last Consolidated Plan (Con Plan) the real estate market has cooled although the decrease in activity and values didn’t occur until 2009. While there is a greater supply of houses at affordable prices, mortgatges have become increasingly difficult to obtain. The new homebuyer tax credit, however, has spurred some activity. Target populations identified as particularly vulnerable to loss of housing in this economic climate included: • Single women with children • Veterans, particularly female • Widows • Aging out youth • College graduates • Latinos/Latinas According to the CHAS data, there is a 1.2% vacancy rate of for-sale units in Morris County; there is a 5.7% vacancy rate of rental units. Income restricted housing units, both rental and owner occupied, are in high demand with waiting lists prevalent. Of the 35 senior rental complexes, 25 have active waiting lists.4 Waiting lists for all the 5 public housing authorities are closed. Data revealed disproportionate needs, in terms of housing problems, primarily among the Latino population. Non-housing community development needs were garnered from local government and non profit representatives. Water/sewer and flood/drain improvements, parks and recreational facilities, senior and transportation services and housing for the elderly were the categories receiving the highest priority as identified by municipalities. Non-profit agencies emphasized strong demand for transportation services, rental housing subsidies, child care services, employment training, legal
State of New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, http://www.state.nj.us/health/aids/repa/county/documents/morris.pdf 3 DRAFT Point in Time Count, 2010 4 Morris Count Area Income Restricted Senior Housing Guide, Housing Partnership,2009. 2
2

aid and services for elderly and special needs individuals. Regarding our Latino/Latina population, needs correspond closely, with emphasis on bilingual provision and on legal services dealing with immigration issues. Major initiatives identified throughout the 5 year strategic planning period include: • Further increase the Tenant Based Rental Assistance Program for Extremely Low- and Low-Income Households in transition • Promote the increase in availability of Project Based Rental Assistance • Assist production of new housing units using federal funds • Promote Universal (Accessible) Design in all new construction and rehabbed units • Rehabilitation of Owner Housing • Rehabilitation of Public Housing • Continue support of the Continuum of Care System, especially the prevention of homelessness • Develop or rehabilitate facilities to serve population segments – seniors, youth and children • Assist in infrastructure improvements in eligible areas of the county • Assist municipalities in the development and enhancement of neighborhood and other public facilities • Provide affordable childcare and children’s services • Expand senior and youth services • Reach out and empower veterans’ organizations • Continue assistance to supportive housing agencies, especially for persons with disabilities (mental, physical, developmental) and the frail elderly • Continued assistance to supportive program providers, especially for persons with disabilities (mental, physical, developmental), victims of domestic violence and youth aging out of the foster care system.

3

Glossary AMI: Area Median Income CEAS: Comprehensive Emergency Assistance System CDBG: Community Development Block Grant CHAS: Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy; a special tabulation of U.S. Census Bureau-derived American Community Survey data made available to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). These data provide counts of the numbers of households that fit certain combinations of HUD-specified criteria such as housing needs, HUD-defined income limits and household types of particular interest to planners and policy-makers. Cost Burden: Monthly gross housing costs, including utility costs, as a percentage of monthly gross income less than or equal to 30% Moderate cost curden – housing cost burden greater than 30%, less than or equal to 50% Severe cost burden - housing cost burden greater than 50% Disproportionate Need: when the percentage of persons in a category of need who are members of a particular racial or ethnic group is at least ten percentage points higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. Elderly: Household contains 1 or more persons age 62-74 Extra Elderly: Househo9ld contains 1 or more persons aged 75 or older ESG: Emergency Shelter Grant HAMFI: Household Adjusted Median Family Income HMIS: Homeless Management Information System HOME: HOME Investment Partnerships Program HOPWA: Housing Opportunities for People With Aids Housing Problem: lacks complete kitchen facilities, lacks complete plumbing facilities, has more than 1 person per room or has a cost burden over 30% HPRP: Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-housing Program HSAC: Human Services Advisory Council Income: Low Income = >50 to <=80% Median Family Income Very Low Income = >30 to <=50% Median Family Income Extremely Low Income = <=30% Median Family Income

4

Overcrowded: >1.01-1.5 persons/room Severely overcrowded: >1.5 persons/room Substandard Housing: Lacks complete kitchen or plumbing facilities Alternatively, the County’s Division of Community Development uses a list of indicators addressing substandard conditions, identified in its "Property Rehabilitation Eligibility Criteria,” which includes deficiencies existing in one of the following major systems: • Roof • Electrical • Plumbing • Sanitary Plumbing • Heating • Load bearing structure systems • Handicapped accessibility • Lead paint abatement • Energy conservation • Overcrowding • Severely deteriorated siding, porches or steps. Strategic Plan Mission: The Morris County Division of Community Development's mission is to provide safe, decent, and affordable housing and a positive community environment that offers a good quality of life and economic opportunity to all residents, but especially to lowand moderate- income residents, including the elderly, disadvantaged and disabled. MANAGING THE PROCESS Consultation 91.200(b)
1. Identify the lead agency or entity for overseeing the development of the plan

and the major public and private agencies responsible for administering programs covered by the consolidated plan.

The lead agency for overseeing the development of the plan is the Morris County Division of Community Development. It is the same agency primarily responsible for administering the programs covered by the consolidated plan.
2. Identify agencies, groups, and organizations that participated in the process.

This should reflect consultation requirements regarding the following: • General §91.100 (a)(1) - Consult with public and private agencies that provide health services, social and fair housing services (including those

5

focusing on services to children, elderly persons, persons with disabilities, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families, homeless persons) during the preparation of the plan. • Homeless strategy §91.100 (a)(2) – Consult with public and private agencies that provide assisted housing, health services, and social services to determine what resources are available to address the needs of any persons that are chronically homeless. Lead lead-based paint hazards §91.100 (a)(3) – Consult with State or local health and child welfare agencies and examine existing data related to lead-based paint hazards and poisonings. Adjacent governments §91.100 (a)(4) -- Notify adjacent governments regarding priority non-housing community development needs. Metropolitan planning §91.100 (a)(5) -- Consult with adjacent units of general local government, including local government agencies with metropolitan-wide planning responsibilities, particularly for problems and solutions that go beyond a single jurisdiction, i.e. transportation, workforce development, economic development, etc. HOPWA §91.100 (b) -- Largest city in EMSA consult broadly to develop metropolitan-wide strategy for addressing needs of persons with HIV/AIDS and their families. Public housing §91.100 (c) -- Consult with the local public housing agency concerning public housing needs, planned programs, and activities.

• •

2) A significant aspect in developing the Strategic Plan was the consultation of: General Housing and Social services agencies including: DAY CARE CENTERS/AFTER SCHOOL PROGRAMS Children on the Green Mount Olive Child Care and Learning Center EMPLOYMENT TRAINING Community Options, Inc. Employment Horizons HOUSING Boonton Housing Authority Fair Housing Committee of the Morris County Human Relations Commission Habitat for Humanity – Morris Homeless Solutions, Inc. Housing Alliance of Morris County Housing Partnership

6

Legal Services of Northwest Jersey Madison Housing Authority Morris County Housing Authority Mt. Kemble Home for Women LATINO AFFAIRS Morris County Office of Hispanic Affairs Special Needs: Community Hope, Inc. Community Options Interfaith Council for Homeless Families Jersey Battered Women’s Services Morris County Interfaith Food Pantry Morris County Office of Temporary Assistance NewBridge Services New Jersey AIDS Services Rose House SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS Daytop Village, Inc. YOUTH SERVICES CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) of Morris and Sussex Counties VETERANS AFFAIRS Morris County Department of Human Services, Veterans Services Homeless strategy Interfaith Council for Homeless Families of Morris County Jersey Battered Women’s Services Homeless Solutions, Inc. Morris Mental Health Association Lead lead-based paint hazards The New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services Adjacent governments The 37 municipalities within the county that participate in the CDBG program Metropolitan planning Housing Alliance of Morris County Legal Services of North West Jersey Morris County Department of Human Services, Division of Office of Temporary Assistance Morris County Fair Housing Committee Public housing Boonton Housing Authority

7

Madison Housing Authority Morris County Housing Authority (Dover Housing Authority) Morristown Housing Authority The input of these organizations, supplemented by US Census, Comprehensive Housing Affordability Strategy (CHAS) data, and data from various other research efforts informed the compilation of the various needs tables and narratives. Citizen Participation 91.200 (b)
3. Based on the jurisdiction’s current citizen participation plan, provide a summary

of the citizen participation process used in the development of the consolidated plan. Include a description of actions taken to encourage participation of all its residents, including the following:
• • • • •

low- and moderate-income residents where housing and community development funds may be spent; minorities and non-English speaking persons, as well as persons with disabilities; local and regional institutions and other organizations (including businesses, developers, community and faith-based organizations); residents of public and assisted housing developments and recipients of tenant- based assistance; residents of targeted revitalization areas.

In accordance with the regulations governing the Consolidated Planning process, the County of Morris will adopt and follow a citizen participation plan by resolution at a regularly scheduled meeting. The purpose of this Plan is to solicit comments and encourage the participation of Morris County residents, particularly those from low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, public housing residents, minorities, non-English speaking persons, and persons with disabilities. An effort was made to broaden public participation in the development of the consolidated plan as documented in the Citizen Participation Plan. "The Citizen Participation Plan process will provide for and encourage the participation in the development of the consolidated plan, any substantial amendments, and the annual performance report by citizens of Morris County. These citizens will include residents from low- and moderate-income neighborhoods, public housing and assisted housing residents, minorities, nonEnglish speaking persons and persons with disabilities.The County of Morris will consider any comments, oral or written. The Citizen Participation Plan will be provided in a format accessible to persons with disabilities, upon request. Public hearings and meetings are to be held in accessible locations at convenient times, with assistance offered to those with special needs such as a translator or sign interpreter."

8

The Division has enhanced its accessibility by developing and maintaining its website providing information on the grant programs, the application process, bylaws and drafts for US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)required documents, including the Consolidated Plan, announcements of meetings open to the public and subsequent minutes.
4. Provide a description of the process used to allow citizens to review and submit

comments on the proposed consolidated plan, including how the plan (or a summary of the plan) was published for review; the dates, times and locations of a public hearing, or hearings; when and how notice was provided to citizens of the hearing(s); the dates of the 30 day citizen comment period, and if technical assistance was provided to groups developing proposals for funding assistance under the consolidated plan and how this assistance was provided. Surveys on housing and non housing needs were distributed and discussed at the Housing Alliance and Fair Housing Committee meetings. Surveys were also distributed to non profits, local government and members of the Community Development Revenue Sharing Committee. Four public hearings are scheduled to allow for discussion and input: the afternoon and evening of April 8th, 2010 and April 12th, 2010. The public will have an opportunity to comment from April 1stth through May 14th. The Consolidated Plan will be posted to the Division’s website and made available at the County library and at the Office of the Division of Community Development. Technical assistance is offered on an ongoing basis. In addition, the Division has begun offering an orientation prior to the start of the year’s grant cycle.
5. Provide a summary of citizen comments or views received on the plan and

explain any comments not accepted and reasons why these comments were not accepted. Comments on the County of Morris, Division of Community Development’s Strategic Plan: Two members from the public, Cameron Wallace and his mother Ms. Lois Wallace, attended the evening Public Hearing on April 12th, 2010. Cameron, who 15 years ago at the age of 35 suffered a catastrophic stroke, is severely physically challenged and a tireless advocate for affordable housing and independent living for people with special needs. Despite the advances made in complying with the American Disabilities Act, Cameron’s description of his day-to-day existence amplifies the flaws in our system: • curb cuts that are blocked by bike racks and garbage containers, • handicapped unloading areas used as parking by handicapped drivers,

9

• • • •

affordable housing that needs to be located in close proximity to public transit to provide home health aides with transportation, reliable transportation that allows for some time allowance flexibility for people with serious mobility issues a transportation system with customer service that is accessible and responsive housing units designed with universal accessibility features enabling any unit to be made accessible.

For the last 15 years Mr. Cameron has searched for accessible housing in the Morristown area and has only partially succeeded. His current apartment has a wide entrance way but a door ledge making entrance and egress challenging and a bathroom that is non-navigable. His desire is to live independently, in a location centrally located to doctors’ offices, retail, public transportation, etc. As his mother ages, this quest has become more urgent. Comments were also received from Dan McGuire Director of Headquarters Development Division of Homeless Solutions, Inc. A summary of Mr. McGuire’s comments follows: • Increase allocation for homeless housing and services: shrinking the homeless ranks would be more cost-effective for local government than prevention. • Do not increase - in fact, decrease – allocation for homebuyer assistance: questioning the economic benefit of moving households from renting to owning versus the economic engine fueled by funding production of new affordable housing. • Target housing production funds for acquisition: take advantage of depressed economy by encouraging use of housing production funds to acquire property. • Make Senior Housing Repair Program a Repayable Loan: transform the program into a self-sustaining, revolving fund. • CDBG funds should not be used to fund projects that are the function of local government: argues against activities considered to be standard local governmental expense. • Funds should not be allocated to affordable housing developments that have previously received funding. • Decrease funding to public housing authorities: ConPlan should reference federal stimulus funds that went to local housing authorities for renovations. • Include “lack of county funds” in the list of impediments to solving problems: distinguish between municipal and county when referring to “local” government funding. • Five Year Plan should Support the Concept of County Homeless Trust Fund: if lack of funds is an impediment to affordable housing, the ConPlan should identify the County Homeless Trust Fund as an opportunity to address homelessness through housing and services. • County HOME and other funding programs must develop objective, quantifiable criteria through which projects are selected: incorporate “threshold” requirements as a review tools for review committee to review

10

applications. As provided by Lou Riccio, Executive Director of the Madison Housing Authority “If our goal is to provide decent, safe and sanitary housing, using Federal funds to renovate affordable housing whether to maintain their affordability, or maintain their livability is a worthwhile use. In addition, over the past twelve years the federal government has reduced the amount of the public housing authority’s operating subsidy and capital funds. In 1998 a study undertaken by Abt Associates commissioned by Congress showed that there was a backlog of modernization needs among public housing that amounted to $22.5 billion. Based on this study the annual accrual needs increased by about 1 percent between 1990 and 1998. At a per-unit level the increase was about 10%. Extrapolating from these statistics, the need today would be $70.6 billion. Deduct from that the allocations over the past twelve years of approximately $29 billion and you still have a significant shortfall of $40.6 billion. Due to this shortfall many of the public housing units have fallen into disrepair and funds from operations have had to be expended to maintain their livability. By using these funds there is a two-fold risk; 1) We are depleting our operating reserves and as HUD reduces our operating subsidy, as they have done this year( Madison’s Operating Subsidy was reduced by 74.4%), we run the risk of being insolvent. 2) By expending these Operating funds we will have to make other major cuts to services. The majority of these cuts will come in the form of layoffs and staff reductions that further delete our ability to serve our clients. The system used to allocate funds in Morris County has significantly added to the quality of life of the residents of public housing and should be continued. There is still a significant need for these funds to supplement the loss of capital funds over the past two decades, and even with the one-time infusion of the Reinvestment Act funds this year we are all still way behind what is needed. Therefore, there remains a substantial need for additional funding for major renovations and repairs to existing public and assisted housing units to assure their continued viability, and to supplement the meager funds received by the federal government that are being reduced every year.” There were no comments from the public that were not accepted. HOUSING AND HOMELESS NEEDS Housing Needs 91.205
6. Estimated housing needs projected for the next five year period:

Several sources were used to estimate the housing needs in Morris County e.g., Comprehensive Housing Afordability Strategy (CHAS) 2009 data, "Out of Reach 2009" from the National Low Income Housing Coalition, the U.S. Census “American

11

Community Survey,” and anecdotal testimony from providers and interested parties. CHAS data indicate: • HUD Adjusted Median Family Income in Morris County is $87,600. • Of the 173,980 households, 12,430 (7.14%) are considered to be Extremely Low-Income. • 12,320 (7.08%) households are considered to be Very Low-Income. • 22,485 (12.92%) households are Low-Income. Of the 173,980 households in Morris County, 133,675 (76.8%) are homeowners; 40,305 (23.2%) are rental households. The CHAS data indicate that of the 40,305 renter occupied households, • 6,035 (15.0%)households are 1 parent families • 12,465 (30.9%) households are 2 parent families • 21,805 (54.1%) households are non-family households • 2,295 (5.7%) are large households (>=5 persons) • 38,015 (94.3%) are small households (<=4 persons) A breakdown of rental households by income range is depicted below.

Rental Household Income in Morris County
Number of Households <= 2 20 0 % .1 AM 30 30% I .1 A 40 40% MI .1 A 50 50% MI .1 A 60 60% MI .1 A 65 65% MI .1 A 80 80% MI .1 A 95 - 95 M .1 % I 10 - 10 AM 0. 0% I 1 11 -11 AM 5. 5 % I 1 12 -12 AM 0. 0 % I 114 AM 0 I >1 % A 40 M % I AM I 9,000 8,000 7,000 6,000 5,000 4,000 3,000 2,000 1,000 0 Percent of Household Area Median Income

Of the 133,670 households owner occupied households, • 12,495 (9.3%)households are 1 parent families • 95,440 (71.4%)households are 2 parent families • 25,735 (19.3%)households are non-family households • 16,535 (12.4) are large households (>=5 persons) • 117,145 (87.6%) are small households (<=4 persons)

12

A breakdown of owner occupied households by income range is depicted below.

Owner Household Income in Morris County
Number of Households 80,000 70,000 60,000 50,000 40,000 30,000 20,000 10,000 0
<= 2 20 0 % .1 AM -3 30 0% I .1 - 4 AM 40 0% I .1 - 5 AM 50 0% I .1 - 6 AM 60 0% I .1 - 6 AM 65 5% I .1 - 8 AM 80 0% I .1 A 95 - 95 MI .1 % A 10 100 M 0. % I 1A 11 115 MI 5. 1 %A M 12 -12 0. 0 % I 114 AM 0% I >1 A 40 MI % AM I

Percent of Household Area Median Income

Housing Problems: Housing Problems are defined by CHAS as “lacks complete kitchen facilities, lacks complete plumbing facilities, has more than 1 person per room or has a cost burden over 30%.” Of the estimated 133,675 homeowner households in the county, 45,580 (34.1%) are experiencing housing problems. Of these households experiencing housing problems, the largest group (22,330 or 49%) consists of small, 2 parent households. Of the 45,580 homeowner households experiencing housing problems, 3,520 (7.7%) are disabled. Of the 40,305 renter households, 17,345 (43%) experience housing problems. Incidence of Housing Problems experienced by Rental Households, by household income, is depicted below. For the most part, there is an inverse relationship between level of income and number of housing problems.

Incidence of Housing Problems for Rental Households by Income Range, in Morris County
Incidence of Housing Problems 3,500 3,000 2,500 2,000 1,500 1,000 500 0 30.140% 50.160% 65.180% <=20% AMI 115.1120% >140% AMI 95.1100%

Percent of Household Area Median Income

13

The largest type of renter households experiencing housing problems are small, unrelated households (9,130). Of the 17,345 renter-occupied households experience housing problems, 1,840 are considered disabled households. Of these households identified as disabled, 52.7% are at 30% or less of AMI; 22.6% are between 30.1% and 50% AMI and 9.5% are between 50.1% and 80% of AMI. That is to say, 80.4% of renteroccupied disabled households experiencing housing problems are low income. Of the 133,675 homeowner households, 45,580 (34.1%) have housing problems. This chart depicts the incidence of households experiencing housing problems per income range. Cost-Burden: According to CHAS data, of the 133,675 homeowners in Morris County, Small family, non-elderly households experience the greatest incidence of cost burden. 17.3% of homeowners experiencing a moderate cost burden were White, 1.6% households were Hispanic, 1.3% households were Asian and 0.7% households were Black. Of the 133,675 homeowners, 10% of households experiencing a severe cost burden were white, with 1.3% of the households Hispanic 0.6% of the households Asian 0.3% of the households Black Of the 40,305 rental households in Morris County, non-family, non-elderly households experience the most incidence of cost burden, followed closely by small family, non-elderly households.

Incidence of Housing Problems for Homeowners by Income Range, in Morris County
Incidence of Housing Problems 10,000 8,000 6,000 4,000 2,000 0

30.140%

50.160%

65.180%

<=20% AMI

115.1120%

Percent of Household Area Median Income

>140% AMI

95.1100%

14

Of the 40,305 rental households, A moderate cost burden was experienced by 11.2% of households which were White 4.0% of households which were Hispanic 2.5% of households which were Asian and 2.1% of households which were Black. Of the 40,305 rental households, 14.3% of households experiencing a severe cost burden were White, 3.9% households were Hispanic, 1.4% households were Black and .6% households were Asian. In an attempt to target households possibly at risk of homelessness, CHAS data correlated substandard housing conditions and overcrowding with size of household and household income. CHAS data depicting Housing Problem Severity revealed some expected and some surprising findings as depicted below by type of housing problem and the correlating income range showing greatest frequency of that problem. In this context, substandard is defined as lacking complete kitchen or plumbing facilities Household Income Tenure Housing Problem All >95% AMI All >95% AMI All Income Levels 30.1-50% AMI All >95% AMI All <=30%AMI All <=30%AMI All <=30%AMI All >95% AMI All 30.1-50% AMI All 30.1-50% AMI All <=30%AMI All >95% AMI Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Owner Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Renter Estimated Number Of Households Substandard 640 Substandard 505 Overcrowded 550 Overcrowded 220 Severely Overcrowded 95 Severely Overcrowded 35 Cost Burdened 27,980 Cost Burdened 17,560 Severely Cost Burdened 16,310 Severely Cost Burdened 3,715 No income or no cash rent 425 No income or no cash rent 425 Substandard 470 Substandard 205 Overcrowded 1,420 Overcrowded 410 Severely Overcrowded 240 Severely Overcrowded 125 Cost Burdened 7,585 Cost Burdened 2,250 Severely Cost Burdened 7,625 Severely Cost Burdened 4,560 No income or no cash rent 2,250 No income or no cash rent 835

15

There are 100,165 owner-occupied units with a mortgage. Of these, 560 (<1%) lived in substandard conditions. There are 33,505 owner-occupied units without a mortgage. Of these, 85 (<1%) lived in substandard conditions. There are 40,305 renter-occupied units. Of these, 470 (1.2%) lived in substandard conditions. There is a concern that households composed of multiple “subfamilies” and households composed of unrelated individuals (non-family households) are at greater risk of homelessness, when living in overcrowded conditions. CHAS data indicated 60 homeowner households and zero unrelated households living in moderate overcrowding. Of the 133,675 owner occupied households, 550 experienced (less than 1%) moderate overcrowding 95 (less than 1%) experienced severe overcrowding. Of the 40,305 renter occupied households, 1,420 (3.5%) experienced moderate overcrowding. 260 (.1%) experienced severe overcrowding. In looking at correlations of housing data and implications for vulnerabilities to foreclosures, CHAS data present housing built during the boom of the 2000s, and those occupied by low income households with a cost burden. Of the 133,675 owner occupied households in Morris County, 9,005 units were constructed in the Owners of New Housing With A Cost Burden housing boon of the 2000’s. This chart depicts owner occupied 900 800 units constructed during 700 Moderate Cost the 2000’s, new, by 600 Burden 500 income range and cost 400 Severe Cost burden. In Morris 300 Burden County, homeowners of 200 100 units built during the 0 2000’s show an 50.180.1>120% <=50% increase in households AMI 80% AMI 120% AMI experiencing moderate AMI cost burden as income Household Income Range increases. There was a jump in number of households (835) experiencing severe in the 50.1-80% AMI range. The correlation between cost burden and foreclosures has not been established in Morris County.
Incidence of Cost Burden

16

Foreclosure trends can be discerned from several sources, all slightly different. What can be gleaned however, is that incidence of foreclosure has been rising since 2006 and that the towns at the greatest risk of foreclosure are, in order of severity: Morristown, Dover, Mine Hill, Mt. Olive, Victory Gardens and Wharton. CHAS also suggests a correlation between the number of older units occupied by low income households with a cost burden, as an indicator or vulnerability to abandonment. There are 9,060 (6.8%) owner occupied low income households, experiencing a cost burden, living in housing constructed prior to 1960. There are 5,810 (14.4%) renter occupied low income households, experiencing a cost burden, living in housing constructed prior to 1960. While this correlation can be used as an indicator for risk for abandonment, it has not been established as a risk in Morris County. Lead-based paint hazard Of the 173,980 housing units in Morris County, there are 21,275 (12.2%) housing units constructed prior to 1979, with small children residing within. Of these, 17,160 are owner occupied and 4,115 are renter occupied. In Fiscal Year 2006, 5,131 children between the ages of 6-29 months were tested: 24 had blood lead levels >/=10 ug/dL (level at which the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has stated may cause health and/or developmental problems in children); 3 had blood lead levels >/= 20 ug/dL (level at which environmental investigation is required under State regulations). 7,134 children over the age of 29 months but under 6 years of age were tested: 40 had blood lead levels >/=10 ug/dL; 6 had blood lead levels >/=20 ug/dL.5 Housing Affordability According to CHAS data there is a 5.7% vacancy rate for rentals and a 1.2% vacancy rate of for sale units. Of • • • • the estimate 1,560 units of vacant for sale units, There are no units available to households earning less than 80% of the AMI. There are 155 available to households earning 50.1-80% of the AMI. There are 170 available to households earning 80.1-100% of the AMI There are 1,235 available to households earning more than 100% of the AMI.

Of the estimated 2,180 standard vacant rental units, • 150 are affordable to households earning 30% of the AMI. • 195 are affordable to households earning 30.1-50% of the AMI • 1,415 are affordable to households earning 50.1-80% of the AMI.
5

State of New Jersey, Department of Health and Senior Services, Annual Report “Childhood Lead Poisoning in New Jersey,” Fiscal Year 2006. 17

420 are affordable to those earning above 80% of the AMI.

7. To the extent that any racial or ethnic group has a disproportionately greater

need for any income category in comparison to the needs of that category as a whole, the jurisdiction must provide an assessment of that specific need. For this purpose, disproportionately greater need exists when the percentage of persons in a category of need who are members of a particular racial or ethnic group is at least ten percentage points higher than the percentage of persons in the category as a whole. According to CHAS Table 1 Housing Needs by Race, disproportionate need is evident primarily in Hispanic renter households; the entire list depicting incidence of disproportionate need, at specific income ranges, includes: Household Income Race Tenure Estimate Number of Households 50.1-80% AMI Hispanic Owner 1,225 out of 9,510 HH 80.1-95% AMI Hispanic Owner 565 out of 4,695 HH <=30% AMI Hispanic Renter 875 out of 5,625 HH 30.1-50% AMI Black Renter 535 out of 4,895 HH 30.1-50% AMI Hispanic Renter 1,360 out of 4,895 HH 50.1-80% AMI Hispanic Renter 1,145 out of 4,325 HH 80.1-95% AMI Asian Renter 220 out of 930 HH 95.1% AMI and above Asian Renter 400 out of 1,570 HH 95.1% AMI and above Hispanic Renter 285 out of 1,570 HH Similarly, CHAS Table 2 Severe Housing Needs by Race depicts households suffering severe overcrowding or which are severely cost burdened. Disproportionate incidences were observed for: Household Income 30.1-50% AMI 50.1-80% AMI 80.1-95% AMI 30% AMI or less 30.1-50% AMI 95.1% AMI and above 95.1% AMI and above Race Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Hispanic Asian Hispanic Tenure Owner Owner Owner Renter Renter Renter Renter Estimate Number of Households 405 out of 3,510 HH 775 out of 4,665 HH 260 out of 1,585 HH 840 out of 4,990 HH 715 out of 2,465 HH 35 out of 265 HH 50 out of 265 HH

Housing Needs for Seniors Seniors (=>62 years of age) make up 17,612 of the 45,580 owner occupied households experiencing housing problems. Although the largest group of these are elderly (62-74) with incomes at or over 95% of the AMI, the second largest group are extra-elderly (=>75 years of age) at 30.1-50% of AMI. Seniors make up 7,123 of the 17,345 renter households experiencing housing problems. The largest subgroup within this group consists of extra-elderly at 30% AMI or less.

18

Special Needs: According to the NJ Division of Develpmental Disability, there is a waiting list for all residential programs and for adult day programs. The desire to enable individuals with special needs to live independently with the full spectrum of support services is unmatched by financial resources. A list of uiversal design features suitable for new construction or rehabbing of an existing unit, promoting independent living, could include: • Higher wall outlets • Lower wall light switches • Reachable thermostat • More then average number of outlets in the Bathroom • Panic button on corkscrew extension cord • 54” minimum door width in all doors • Lever door-knobs • Roll-in or Greek shower • Tiled bathroom with drain in shower floor • Remote front door opener • Entranceway flush with outdoors • Remote window opener • Electric stove (no pilot light) • Accessible sinks(bath + kitchen) • Sideways opening oven door • Drawer refrigerator • Sufficient reachable kitchen storage • Radiant floor heat Public Housing: Public Housing units are affordable to households at the "uncapped" 80% or less of the median income for the area. Approximately 40% are designated for low-income households. These units have affordability controls for at least 20 years. Needs for the next five years: During the five years from the last ConPlan, housing construction has plummeted, unemployment has risen to 7.1%, foreclosures have jumped, there has been greater demand at foodbanks (a 48.8% increase in individuals and a 51.1% increase in families) and soup kitchens (from 49,766 guests in 2005 to 64,780 in 2009), the homeless population nearly doubled between 2009 and 2010, and there are more people at risk of becoming homeless, all within the environment of diminishing funds for social services. Conversations were conducted with members of the Housing Alliance and with the Fair Housing Committee on housing strategies. Some ideas not involving the creation of new housing units included: • Funding: Three categories involved in providing supportive housing for individuals with special needs include enhanced funding sources for: - Capital

19

- Rental assistance - Supportive services – A required component when Special Needs housing providers apply to New Jersey Housing and Mortgage Finance Agency (NJHMFA) for capital funding. Establishment of a County Homeless Trust Fund: Signed into law September 8, 2009, Public Law 2009 Chapter 123 permits a county to impose a surcharge of $3 on each document recorded with a county, for deposit into a county homelessness trust fund, five per cent of which may be used annually for administrative costs related to the administration of the fund, and the remainder of the monies in the fund may be used solely for the operation of a homelessness housing grant program. Eligible uses include: 1. acquisition, construction, or rehabilitation of housing projects, or units within housing projects, that supply permanent affordable housing for homeless persons or families, including those at risk of homelessness; 2. rental assistance vouchers, including tenant and project based subsidies, for affordable housing projects or units within housing projects that provide permanent affordable housing for homeless persons or families, including those at risk of homelessness; 3. supportive services as may be required by homeless individuals or families in order to obtain or maintain, or both, permanent affordable housing; and 4. prevention services for at risk homeless individuals or families so that they can obtain and maintain permanent affordable housing.6

 

Project Based Rental Assistance: more project based rental assistance is needed to meet the demand for special needs rental housing. When housing is developed for very low income, special needs individuals, such as the mentally ill, developmentally disabled or youth aging out of foster care, this project based rental assistance is needed to meet the underwriting criteria of NJHMFA’s Special Needs Housing Trust Fund for capital funding. Because the cash flow generated by the rents paid by low/very low income individuals are not sufficient by themselves to ensure the viability of the project, non-profit housing developers require this project-based rental assistance to ensure the sustainability of the project. Where mortgages are needed as part of a project’s capital funding, lending institutions view Project Based Rental Assistance favorably because it provides guaranteed cash flow that will ensure the sustainability of the project. Without this guarantee that the project will stay afloat, lenders hesitate or decline to provide loans to projects, particularly those that serve low/very low income individuals, which do not generate enough cash flow from rents.”7

New Jersey Advocacy Network to End Homelessness Diane Driscoll, Housing Development Specialist, Community Hope, Inc., correspondence, 3/18/10.
7

6

20

• • •

Independent living for people with special needs, specifically housing opportunities providing private living quarters with a full spectrum of supervision accessible but not necessitating congregate living. A need that is not new but is emerging as increasingly important is housing and services for veterans. Issues and associated housing needs identified by the Fair Housing Committee include: - Women divorced with children - Widows - College graduates - Aging out youth - Difficulty in obtaining credit - Increased credit delinquencies - Respite housing for special needs individuals who are approaching crisis but might not require hospitalization if interventive support was available in a temporary housing facility. This would supplement the work of case managers. - Decent, reliable transportation. - Housing opportunities convenient to town center

Homeless Needs 91.205 (c) *Refer to the Homeless Needs Table 1A or the CPMP Tool’s Needs.xls workbook
8. Homeless Needs— The jurisdiction must provide a concise summary of the

nature and extent of homelessness in the jurisdiction, (including rural homelessness and chronic homelessness where applicable), addressing separately the need for facilities and services for homeless persons and homeless families with children, both sheltered and unsheltered, and homeless subpopulations, in accordance with Table 1A. The summary must include the characteristics and needs of low-income individuals and children, (especially extremely low-income) who are currently housed but are at imminent risk of either residing in shelters or becoming unsheltered. Emergency shelter is described as overnight sleeping accommodations, the primary purpose of which to provide temporary shelter for the homeless in general or for specific populations; transitional housing is housing with supportive services for up to 24 months duration. The nature and extent of homelessness in Morris County is well documented through the results of the annual Point in Time Count of Homeless8. The following statistics were derived from that report, which was in its Draft stage as of this writing.

New Jersey (DRAFT) Point in Time Count of the Homeless Data Report, Corporation for Supportive Housing, January 28, 2010. 21

8

The count, which was conducted January 28th, 2010 resulted in 649 homeless men, women and children counted in Morris County; this doubled the count in 2009 of 302. The 2010 count included: • 76 were in emergency shelters • 31 adults were in hotel/motel accommodations • 48 adults were in transitional housing • 15 adults were unsheltered • • • • • • • • • • 52.7% lost their jobs and/or couldn’t find work 49.3% had a disability 38.1% were veterans 34.2% had a substance abuse issue 32.3% were homeless because housing costs were too high 29.7% were homeless due to relationship/family break-up/death 28% suffered mental illness and/or emotional problems 22.8% had medical problems/physical or developmental disability 13.4% had work but wages were too low to pay for housing 11.1% were victims of domestic violence

• 17.6% of the homeless population defined their ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino • The majority of the population was white (415). The highest ranking factors that respondents stated conributed to their homelessness, in order of importance, were: • Lost job/cannot find work • Alcohol or drug abuse problems • Housing costs too high • Relationship/family breakup/death • Mental illness/emotional problems • Medical problems/phsicalor developmental disability • Eviction Morris County the number one locale identified as the last permanent address.
9. Describe, to the extent information is available, the nature and extent of

homelessness by racial and ethnic group. A quantitative analysis is not required. If a jurisdiction provides estimates of the at-risk population(s), it should also include a description of the operational definition of the at-risk group and the methodology used to generate the estimates.

Additional data, derived from the county's "Homeless Management Information System (HMIS)" tool revealed characteristics of individuals and households facing imminent homelessness. Data were collected through the Morris County Office of Temporary Assistance administration of its Homeless Prevention program (July 2005 through February 2010) and funded through Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG) and the Homeless Prevention and Rapid Rehousing Grant (HPRP) (October 2009 through February 2010.

22

“Homelessness to Home Ownership: A Blueprint to Prevent Homelessness For Everyone” defines "at risk" of becoming homeless as households who are not yet homeless, but are only one step from becoming another statistic" as temporarily homeless (usually in stable housing but have been temporarily displaced due to a variety of factors and only need temporary housing assistance to regain that stability in housing. That "one-step" could be a sudden and unexpected health or financial crisis or even "bed-hopping," i.e., frequent moves from one relative/friend to another. Trends emerging from both programs indicate the largest percentage of individuals with the following characteristics: Single individuals were the most common cohort in terms of marital status for both programs. In the Homeless Prevention program, 88.6% of the clients had no children; 6.6% of clients had 1 child. Whites constitute the largest race group in both programs (76%). Three to 4% of the adult clients for the both programs were veterans. In the longstanding Homeless Prevention program, the majority of individuals were homeless. In the 2009 Stimulus Funded Homelessness Prevention and Rapid ReHousing Program, the majority of households were not homeless; all, however, were at risk of homelessness. In the Homeless Prevention program 60% of the clients were individual males; in the HPRP program 44% of the households were single parent family – female head of household. Needs for services for homeless persons and families with children, sheltered and unsheltered and subpopulations, were developed by the Comprehensive Emergency Assistance System Committee (CEAS) while preparing the Continuum of Care (CoC). Goals were established to meet those needs including: • Increase the number of permanent supportive housing units • Enhance homeless people’s access to mainstream and other social service programs • Improve transportation options • Increase collaboration among the faith based community, non-profits, county agencies and business • Expand outreach to specialized populations. Morris County’s 2009 Morris County Homeless Plan Update of "From Homelessness to Housing: A Blueprint to Eliminate Homelessness" cites the primary causes of homelessness: foreclosures, loss of higher paying jobs, and loss of two incomes for a family. The lack of affordable housing is a given.

23

In terms of needs, the Plan emphasized “lack of supportive service dollars for Housing First9, for payee services and for case management services.”10 Additionally, there are “increasing needs for families, particularly those with complex medical, mental health and housing needs. Families with a high-need parent and/or child who should probably not be housed without intense support are most difficult to place permanently outside our shelter system.” This ConPlan attempts to identify the characteristics and needs of low-income individuals and children, especially extremely low-income, who are currently housed but are at imminent risk of either residing in shelters or becoming unsheltered. There is a constellation of needs for households at risk of homelessness: affordable housing, rent and mortgage assistance and assistance with utility payments. Supportive programs include employment programs, transportation, child care, medical programs and education. A coordinated and comprehensive approach is required to assist these members of our community. Non-homeless Special Needs 91.205 (d) including HOPWA

10. Estimate, to the extent practicable, the number of persons in various

subpopulations that are not homeless but may require housing or supportive services, including the elderly, frail elderly, persons with disabilities (mental, physical, developmental, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families), persons with alcohol or other drug addiction, victims of domestic violence, public housing residents, and any other categories the jurisdiction may specify and describe their supportive housing needs. Please refer to the Needs Table. The estimated number of persons in various subpopulations that are not homeless but may require housing or supportive services, in order of need identified by providers throughout the county: • Elderly – there are: 3,075 elderly households that are extremely low-income 2,655 elderly households that are very low-income 4,600 elderly households that are low-income • Extra Elderly – there are: 3,540 extra elderly households that are extremely low-income 3,575 extra elderly households that are very low-income 3,645 extra elderly households that are low-income • Persons with disabilities (mental, physical, developmental, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families)- there are: 2,375 disabled households that are extremely low-income 1,520 disabled households that are very low-income 2,000 disabled households that are low-income
Housing First is also known as rapid re-housing; it is an alternative to the current system of emergency shelter/transitional housing, BeyondShelter.org. 10 From Homelessness to Housing: A Blueprint to Eliminate Homelessness, 2009. 24
9

There are 694 persons living with HIV/AIDS, cumulative through June 30, 2009 in the county.11 • Public Housing residents: There are 778 public housing units in Morris County. Persons with alcohol or other drug addiction12: • In 2008 there were 3421 Substance Abuse Admissions of Morris County residents, ranking Morris County 8th in the state; • These 3421 admissions translates to 2,175 unduplicated clients; • Alcohol was the primary drug followed closely by heroin and opiates; • The majority of admissions were white, male, not in the labor force, completed High School and lived independently; • 21% of the admissions were 35-44 years of age; • 19% were 45-54 years of age; • 5% of the admissions were under the age of 18. Victims of domestic violence: data from the Jersey Battered Women’s Services indicate:
Transitional Shelter Transitional Shelter Transitional Shelter Transitional

Shelter

Women Children Total Turned Away •

2006 60 85 145 48

17 21 38

2007 63 76 139 51

16 27 43

2008 64 84 148 98

17 18 35

2009 62 88 150 68

18 35 53

Veterans – thus far the need has not been quantified; nonetheless, anecdotal observation from the County’s Veterans Services Coordinator has identified homelessness and employment as the 2 top issues for female veterans followed by male veterans, in terms of severity of need.

Please see “Non Homeless Special Needs” Table for complete breakdown. Lead-based Paint 91.205 (e)

11. Estimate the number of housing units* that contain lead-based paint hazards, as

defined in section 1004 of the Residential Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Act of 1992, and are occupied by extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate-income families. As indicated on the “Needs” Table, there are an estimated 2,350 households that may contain lead-based paint hazards. This number is based on CHAS data using parameters including age of housing unit and the presence of young children.
11

State of New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, http://www.state.nj.us/health/aids/repa/county/documents/morris.pdf 12 New Jersey Department of Human Services, Division of Addiction Services, New Jersey Drug and Alcohol Abuse Treatment, Substance Abuse Overview, 2008, Morris County. 25

HOUSING MARKET ANALYSIS Housing Market Analysis 91.210 Refer to the Housing Market Analysis Table in the Needs.xls workbook
12. Based on information available to the jurisdiction, describe the significant

characteristics of the housing market in terms of supply, demand, condition, and the cost of housing; the housing stock available to serve persons with disabilities; and to serve persons with HIV/AIDS and their families. Supply: CHAS 2009 data indicate there are: • 173,980 housing units in the county. − 133,675 (76.8%) are owner occupied; − 40,305 (23.2%) are renter occupied. • 2,300 rental units were vacant • 1,560 for sale units were vacant Of the 39,815 standard (as in no substandard conditions) rental units in the county, • 19,385 were 0-1 bedroom units • 13,525 were 2 bedroom units • 6,905 were 3+ bedroom units. Of the 133,050 standard owner occupied units, • 3,950 were 0-1 bedroom units • 19,570 were 2 bedroom units • 109,530 were 3+ bedroom units. Housing Stock Available to serve persons with disabilities Morris ARC Access House I – Entin Rd, Parsippany 6 beds Lake Parsippany – Entin Road, Parsippany 6 beds Chester – Furnace Rd 6 beds Washington Township 6 beds Randolph, High Street 5 beds Horsehill Rd, Hanover 6 beds Eden Lane, East Hanover 6 beds Center for Humanistic Change – Denville, Flanders, Jefferson 17 beds Cheshire Home I – Madison 35 beds Cheshire Home II – Parsippany 7 beds Cheshire Home III – Florham Park 8 beds Community Hope – Roxbury 3 beds Community Hope – 14 Lorraine, Boonton 6 beds Community Hope – 54 Lorraine, Boonton 6 beds

26

Community Hope – 93-95 Berry St, Dover Community Hope – Madison St, Morristown Community Hope – Cambridge Rd, Wharton Community Hope I – Parsippany Community Hope II– Roxbury Community Hope III – Mt. Olive Community Hope IV- Kenvil Community Hope – Drake Lane, Roxbury Community Options Siek, Butler Community Options Van Houten S., Butler Comprehensive Behavioral Healthcare, Morris Plains Department for Persons With Disabilities, Jefferson Developmental Resources Corporation Jewish Service for Developmental Disabilities Mcail Liberty House – Morris Township Much Dignity House – Randolph New Bridge Services, Inc., Boonton New Bridge Services, Mt. Olive New Bridge Services, Inc., Roxbury Rose House, Mt. Olive Special Homes of NJ, Wharton Special Homes of NJ, Boonton Ave., Boonton Special Homes of NJ, Hillside Ave., Boonton United Cerebral Palsy of Northern NJ

6 5 3 3 4 4 4 3 3 3 25 23 10 5 15 8 5 2 4 8 4 6 6 8

beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds beds

Housing to serve persons with HIV/AIDS and their families: There are 694 persons living with HIV/AIDS, cumulative through June 30, 2009 in the county13. The Eric Johnson House, in Morristown, is the only residence in Morris County specifically serving this population. It can accommodate up to 10 individuals at a time. Hope House in Dover receives HOPWA (Housing Opportunities for People With AIDS) dollars to provide long term rental assistance.14 Demand According to CHAS data there is a 5.7% vacancy rate for rentals and a 1.2% vacancy rate of for sale units. There is a zero percent vacancy rate at all the County’s Housing Authorities; in addition, waiting lists for housing units and for Section 8 vouchers have closed. The County’s HOME funded Tenant Based Rental Assistance program is oversubscribed with each referring agency maintaining a waiting list.
13

State of New Jersey Department of Health and Senior Services, http://www.state.nj.us/health/aids/repa/aidsdata.shtml 14 Laurie Litt-Robbins, MSW, LCSW, Chief Executive Officer, The Eric Johnson House

27

Condition • 645 owner occupied units are identified as substandard (housing lacking complete kitchen or plumbing facilities). • 470 renter occupied units are identified as substandard Cost of Housing Of the estimate 1,560 units of vacant for sale units, • There are no units available to households earning less than 80% of the AMI. • There are 155 available to households earning 80% of the AMI. • There are 170 available to households earning 100% of the AMI • There are 1,235 available to households earning more than 100% of the AMI. Of the estimated 2,300 vacant rental units, • 150 are affordable to households earning 30% of the AMI. • 195 are affordable to households earning 50% of the AMI • 1,415 are affordable to households earning 80% of the AMI. • 420 are affordable to those earning above 80% of the AMI. The housing market suffered a slow down in the current recession although not to the extent the rest of the state experienced. Two statistical indicators, median and average, sales price of single family homes, are offered for comparison. The median sales price for a single family home in the 3rd quarter of 2009 was $436,300, a 21% decrease from the same period in 2006. While the decrease in real estate value would suggest an availability of housing affordable to households, the increase in unemployment and underemployment, the job insecurity and the challenge in obtaining mortgages have resulted in a very weak housing market. The table below provides a more detailed picture of residential sales, per municipality. Morris County, on the whole, didn’t slide until 2009. In some towns, however, prices sank below 2005 sales prices.

28

Average Residential Sales Price Per Municipality15 2009 2008 2007 2006 BOONTON TOWN 408,117 414,620 448,097 430,407 BOONTON TWP 544,768 708,524 976,243 626,132 BULTER BORO 352,807 376,682 352,095 381,353 CHATHAM BORO 739,691 729,546 795,696 765,557 CHATHAM TWP 836,023 763,000 811,052 787,708 CHESTER BORO 664,100 598,222 565,854 540,433 CHESTER TWP 822,129 1,050,333 852,930 891,339 DENVILLE TWP 441,169 483,556 482,609 464,256 DOVER TOWN 285,491 318,731 363,770 344,563 EAST HANOVER TWP 461,500 507,790 566,882 552,243 FLORHAM PARK BORO 638,707 575,787 638,202 630,729 HANOVER TWP 471,581 504,906 509,705 502,334 HARDING TWP 1,363,008 1,715,615 1,568,771 1,445,470 JEFFERSON TWP 364,125 372,381 383,397 394,405 KINNELON BORO 709,780 700,375 753,698 744,141 LINCOLN PARK BORO 330,003 366,609 386,165 371,440 MADISON BORO 683,489 737,351 761,795 819,615 MENDHAM BORO 645,460 770,090 910,474 867,939 MENDHAM TWP 1,123,915 1,024,889 1,161,863 1,042,396 MINE HILL TWP 336,835 330,242 358,149 359,733 MONTVILLE TWP 628,532 646,006 641,873 633,658 MORRIS TWP 537,412 592,698 604,107 629,752 MORRIS PLAINS BORO 435,487 501,895 480,167 482,569 MORRISTOWN TOWN 430,770 441,862 472,261 489,977 MOUNTAIN LAKES BORO 728,136 1,064,614 941,696 902,375 MOUNT ARLINGTON BORO 339,881 368,668 419,181 371,496 MOUNT OLIVE TWP 386,815 430,404 417,649 438,928 NETCONG BORO 235,333 289,574 285,911 310,327 PARSIPPANY-TROY HILLS TWP 383,451 414,168 422,653 434,668 LONG HILL TWP 522,711 567,265 553,119 586,429 PEQUANNOCK TWP 428,593 452,556 425,908 490,051 RANDOLPH TWP 584,160 576,678 608,741 607,458 RIVERDALE BORO 331,991 368,865 363,653 392,757 ROCKAWAY BORO 337,133 342,143 353,324 354,948 ROCKAWAY TWP 381,630 409,218 408,401 413,688 ROXBURY TWP 354,651 382,839 411,451 409,396 VICTORY GARDENS BORO 211,525 244,269 284,794 242,981 WASHINGTON TWP 470,631 565,607 530,434 535,777 WHARTON BORO 291,058 330,768 373,112 364,528 Morris County 503,792 534,643 531,039 528,395

2005 397,083 532,922 342,078 653,006 663,063 583,271 775,034 403,218 310,261 515,857 570,830 478,500 1,317,336 319,899 654,532 352,513 702,695 745,000 948,612 314,223 609,513 551,123 461,762 417,614 1,024,283 327,638 376,763 285,936 392,326 530,070 413,740 543,078 368,126 303,640 370,730 364,659 230,227 484,049 316,252 468,109

15

State of NJ Department of the Treasury, Division of Taxation, http://www.state.nj.us/treasury/taxation/lpt/class2avgsales.shtml.

29

13. Provide an estimate; to the extent information is available, of the number of

vacant or abandoned buildings and whether units in these buildings are suitable for rehabilitation. According to CHAS data: • There are 0 for-sale vacant units identified as substandard (housing lacking complete kitchen or plumbing facilities); • There are 645 owner occupied units identified as substandard; • There are 120 vacant rental that are identified as substandard; and • There are 47 renter occupied units identified as substandard. Considering the current recession, employment insecurities, credit tightening and incidence of foreclosure, it would be appropriate for the Division to expand the Division’s outreach to low income homeowners, by way of its Homeowner Rehabilitation program. Public and Assisted Housing 91.210 (b)
14. In cooperation with the public housing agency or agencies located within its

boundaries, describe the needs of public housing, including • the number of public housing units in the jurisdiction, • the physical condition of such units, • the restoration and revitalization needs of public housing projects within the jurisdiction, • the number of families on public housing and tenant-based waiting lists and • results from the Section 504 needs assessment of public housing projects located within its boundaries (i.e. assessment of needs of tenants and applicants on waiting list for accessible units as required by 24 CFR 8.25).

A survey was conducted of the 5 public housing authorities in the county. As funding for the authorities has decreased, the needs have escalated, ranging from management and operations costs to modernization, rehabilitation and capital improvements, all self-identified as high priorities. Projected needs included: • Capital improvements $5,020,000 • Modernization/Rehabilitation $3,300,000 • Rehabilitation $1,020,000 • Management and Operations $9,360,000 • Neighborhood Revitalization $250,000 • Safety/Crime Prevention/Drug Elimination $730,000 • Resident Services/Family Self Sufficiency $900,000 Public Housing units, as relayed by housing authorities, are experiencing a 0% vacancy rate. Public Housing Authorities' housing stock is as follows:

30

The number of public housing units consist of the following: 0 & 1 bedroom 2 bedrooms 3+ bedrooms • Boonton 42 18 14 • Dover 59 • Madison 79 32 23 • Morristown 26 79 101 • Morris County 181 52 74 TOTAL UNITS 387 181 212

Total 74 59 134 206 307 780

The physical condition of the public housing units is habitable but showing signs of wear e.g., kitchens need remodeling, apartment doors need replacing. A priority for the past 5 years has been to fund at least 1 public housing modernization activity per year. Section 8 vouchers have been in increasing demand. There are currently 2,522 people on the waiting list for both public housing and Section 8 vouchers. Refer to Priority Public Housing Needs Table for detail.
15. Describe the number and targeting (income level and type of household served)

of units currently assisted by local, state, or federally funded programs, and an assessment of whether any such units are expected to be lost from the assisted housing inventory for any reason, (i.e. expiration of Section 8 contracts). Low Income Tax Credit-funded projects, some leveraged with HOME dollars, provide the following housing stock: • Abbett Avenue Rental Housing Morristown 12 units • Cook's Pond Senior Housing Denville 69 units • Jean Street Transitional Housing Morris Twp. 10 units • Lounsberr Meadow Senior Housing Long Hill Twp. 51 units • Park Avenue at Florham Park Florham Park 65 units • River Park Village Landing 122 units • Spruce Street Senior Housing Dover 90 units • Wharton Senior Citizen Housing Wharton 100 units Multi-Family Properties with Assistance and Section 8 Contracts (US Dept of HUD): HUD Section 202/811 • Access House, Parsippany 6 units Yes • Baldwin Oaks Apartments, Parsippany 251 units • Butler Senior Housing, Butler 91 units • Cheshire Home II, Parsippany 7 units Yes • Cheshire Home III, Florham Park 8 units Yes • Community Hope I, Parsippany 4 units Yes • Community Hope II, Roxbury 4 units Yes • Community Hope III, Mt. Olive 4 units Yes • Community Hope VI, Kenvil 4 units Yes • Community Options Siek, Butler 3 units Yes

31

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Community Options Van Houten S., Butler 3 Jefferson Chase, Jefferson 50 Jewish Service for Develop Disabled, Par-Troy 5 Mcail Liberty House, Morris Township 15 Mill Pond Tower Apartments, Dover 127 Morris Mews, Morristown 100 Mt Olive Manor, Flanders 60 Mt Olive Manor II, Flanders 50 Much Dignity House, Randolph 6 NewBridge, Roxbury 4 Parsippany-Troy Hills, Parsippany 191 Pequannock Senior Citizens, Pequannock 99

units units units units units units units units units units units units

Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes

Low and Moderate Income Restricted “Mt. Laurel Housing” Rentals in Morris County16 Municipality Name Units Florham Park Park Avenue at Florham Park 155 River Bend 50 Sun Valley 75 Harding Twp. The Farm at Harding 24 Kinnelon Kinnelon Ridge 38 Long Hill Twp. Stirling Manor 6 Chestnut Run 8 Montville Twp. Rachel Gardens 168 Morristown Abbett Ave. 12 Pequannock Twp. 32 Jackson Ave. 1 Pompton Square 2 Hearle Village 100 Roxbury Twp. River Park Village 122 Randolph Twp. Brookside Apts. 10 Arrowgate 27 Canfield Mews 38 Riverdale Rock Creek Crossing 13 Wharton Edgewater 14 Washington Twp. Peachtree Village 42 Homeless Inventory 91.210 (c)

16. The jurisdiction shall provide a concise summary of the existing facilities and

services (including a brief inventory) that assist homeless persons and families with children and subpopulations identified in Table 1A or in the CPMP Tool Needs Table. These include outreach and assessment, emergency shelters and services, transitional housing, permanent supportive housing, access to permanent housing, and activities to prevent low-income individuals and families with children (especially extremely low-income) from becoming homeless. This

16

Housing Partnership, “Apartment Resource Guide,” 2010. 32

inventory of facilities should include (to the extent it is available to the jurisdiction) an estimate of the percentage or number of beds and supportive services programs that are serving people that are chronically homeless. A summary of the existing facilities and services that assist homeless persons and families with children and subpopulations follows. EMERGENCY SHELTER Interfaith Council for Homeless Families 14 beds Homeless Solutions, Inc. Safe Haven 20 beds Homeless Solutions, Inc. Family 30 beds Homeless Solutions, Inc. Women 10 beds Homeless Solutions, Inc. Men's 25 beds Jersey Battered Women's Service 34 beds Market Street Mission 34 beds Office of Temporary Assistance: 375 overflow vouchers TRANSITIONAL HOUSING Jersey Battered Women's Service Homeless Solutions, Inc. Roots and Wings Market Street Mission Eric Johnson House 40 30 7 76 10 beds beds beds beds beds

PERMANENT SUPPORTIVE HOUSING Interfaith Council for Homeless Families: Provides Case Management, solely Mental Health Assocation of Morris County 95 beds Community Hope 59 beds Homeless Solutions, Inc. 153beds Supportive Services • Case Management (assessment, service planning, service linkage, service monitoring, advocacy and life skills training) is provided within each of the homeless services provider agencies. • Mental Health Treatment is provided through the community mental health centers operated by St. Clare's Hospital and NewBridge Services, Inc. • Other mental health providers include: Community Hope Family Service of Morris County Hope House Family Intervention Services Morristown Memorial, St. Clare's, and Chilton hospitals all provide psychiatric emergency services and prescription assistance. The Mental Health Association of Morris County provides information and referral and a psychiatrist provides weekly treatment for homeless individuals who cannot otherwise access treatment. First Call for Help, Our Place, Inc., and the Collaborative Support Programs of NJ self-help centers all provide information and referral.

33

• Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment is provided through Morristown Memorial, St. Clare's Hospitals, • CURA, Inc. provides prevention services for Spanish speaking individuals. • Market St. Mission, Hope House, NewBridge Services, Inc., DayTop.and Family Service of Morris County, all private non-profit agencies, provide counseling, education, and prevention services. • Co-occurring disorders are provided by the community mental health centers. • Mrs. Wilson's, Turning Point, and Sunrise House accept people with substance abuse and mental illness. • St. Clare's Hospital provides an array of MICA services as well as transportation. • The Mental Health Association of Morris County incorporates MICA services into the outreach and clinical case management services provided. • New Views Treatment Program, Inc. of Morris Plains • Physical Health Services are provided by the Community Soup Kitchen and Outreach Center and Faith Kitchen, which have public health nurses and St. Clare's Hospital, which operates a mobile clinic for people who are homeless/underserved. • Morristown Memorial and St. Clare's Hospitals offer family health/dental clinics. • Domestic Violence Services are offered by Jersey Battered Women Services. The Morris County Sexual Assault Center operated by Morristown Memorial Hospital offers programs and services devoted to survivors, their families and their partners. • Criminal Justice Involvement • Morris County operates a Drug Court Program that is a partnership between the legal system, substance abuse treatment providers and other community organizations. • Homeless Solutions, Inc. works with the county probation/parole officers and the NJ Administrative Office of the Courts that operate an Intensive Supervision Program. • Family Service of Morris County provides a liaison to the county jail and county jail personnel participate in the Acute Care Subcommittee (of the Morris County Mental Health Professional Advisory Committee). • AIDS/HIV related care is provided by the (New Jersey AIDS Service, Inc (Eric Johnson house), the Zufall Health Center in Dover, the Family Health Clinic at Morristown Memorial Hospital and the Hope House AIDS Center (transitional housing with supportive services, medical care, alternative therapies, nutrition and mental health counseling, and medication monitoring). • Employment/education/training is provided on-site at some shelter and transitional living facilities. For others, linkage and transportation is provided to

34

area adult schools, the county vocational technical school and the County College of Morris. • St. Clare's and the Mental Health Association in NJ/Career Connections offer supportive employment services for individuals in reovery from mental illness. • Morris County has a One-Stop Career Center. • Childcare slots are reserved at Children on the Green and Neighborhood House. • Transportation is provided by service providers. • Clients are referred to the Office of Temporary Assistance for medical transportation. Outreach and assessment for people who are homeless and living on the street is provided by the following agencies: • The Mental Health Association of Morris County, which provides mobile outreach. It offers access to basic needs such as food, shelter and medical care. • The Community Soup Kitchen and Outreach Center serves lunch 365 days a year and operates a Resource Center three days a week, which offers services, information and referrals. Workshops have dealt with immigration issues, health screenings and employments resources. A substance abuse outreach initiative was also undertaken. • The Faith Kitchen in Dover serves meals Monday through Saturday and offers health screenings on-site. • The First Memorial Presbyterian Church in Dover serves a meal on Sundays. • The Market St. Mission, an emergency shelter and substance abuse residential program for men, offers breakfast dinner to homeless men and women seven days a week as well as showers, clothing and furniture vouchers. • Homeless Solutions, Inc.’s Hospitality Link, housed at St. Peter’s Episcopal Church, is a drop-in center where people that are homeless can talk with trained staffers about services such as case management, determining their eligibility for benefits, connections to mental health services, addiction services and referrals to emergency shelters. • Our Place, Inc, a drop-in center, provides outreach to the chronically homeless population. The agency offers free telephone usage, address/mail receipt, clothing vouchers, personal hygience products, temporary storate, and information and referral. • The Mental Health Association of Morris County sends staff to drop-in centers weekly to engage people who are homeless. Outreach for other people who are homeless includes: • Office of Temporary Assistance operates a 24-hour homeless hotline. • Jersey Battered Women's Services Helpline and Legal Advocacy Program offer domestic violence outreach. • Outreach to the Latino populatin was expanded with an increased presence at the Morristown Court House, the Community Soup Kitchen and Outreach Center in Morristown and the Morristown Neighborhood House. • The Morris County Office of Veterans Affairs, Community Hope and the Lyons VA Hospital provided outreach to veterans.

35

• The New Jersey AIDS Services (Eric Johnson House), Hope House and The Ryan White Service at Morristown Memorial Hospital's Family health Center provide outreach to people with HIV/AIDS. • Roots and Wings and Community Hope provide residential services for young people aging out of DYFS care. DYFS Hotline and/or the CART process reach out to youth (18-21) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Emergency Shelters and Services available to people who are homeless, in the county, include: • Interfaith Council for Homeless Families of Morris County - serving families with children • Homeless Solutions, Inc. - Safe Haven, and an emergency shelter for family with children, and for men • Jersey Battered Women’s Service - serving families with children • Market Street Mission - serving single males • Office of Temporary Assistance - Supportive Services to the Homeless - serving a mixed population Transitional Housing opportunities in the county include: • Jersey Battered Women’s Service - serving families with children • Homeless Solutions, Inc. - Transitional Housing - serving families with children • Roots and Wings - serving unaccompanied young males and females • Market Street Mission - serving single males • The Eric Johnson House - serving single males and females with AIDS Permanent Supportive Housing opportunities in the county include: • Interfaith Council for Homeless Families of Morris County - serving families with children • Mental Health Association of Morris County - serving single males and females • Community Hope - serving single males and females • Homeless Solutions, Inc. - serving families with children. Agencies working to assist people who are homeless gain access to permanent housing include: • Homeless Solutions, Inc. - working to increase the stock of affordable housing. • The Housing Partnership of Morris County conducts rental readiness and firsttime homebuyer seminars and distributes a housing guide which lists affordable units. Please refer to the Continuum of Care Housing Activity Chart. Special Need Facilities and Services 91.210 (d)

17. Describe, to the extent information is available, the facilities and services that

assist persons who are not homeless but require supportive housing, and programs for ensuring persons returning from mental and physical health institutions receive appropriate supportive housing.

36

Facilities and services that assist persons who are not homeless but require supportive housing, and programs for ensuring that persons returning from mental and physical health institutions receive appropriate supportive housing. Housing stock available to serve persons with disabilities include the following residential facilities: Beds for the Physically Disabled • Cheshire I (Residential Nursing Care) 35 beds • Cheshire II (Group Home) 7 beds • Cheshire III (Group Home) 8 beds • Mcail Liberty House 15 beds • UCP Group Homes 8 beds Beds for the Developmentally Disabled • Center for Humanistic Change – Denville, Flanders, Jefferson 17 beds • Department for Persons With Disabilities, Jefferson 23 beds • Morris ARC: Access House, Parsippany 6 beds • Morris ARC: Lake Parsippany, Parsippany 6 beds • Morris ARC: Chester 6 beds • Morris ARC: Washington Township 6 beds • Morris ARC: Randolph 5 beds • Morris ARC: Hanover 6 beds • Morris ARC: East Hanover 6 beds • Community Options Siek, Butler 3 beds • Community Options Van Houten S., Butler 3 beds • Developmental Resources Corporation 10 beds • Jewish Service for Developmental Disabilities 5 beds • Much Dignity House , Randolph 8 units • Special Homes of NJ, Wharton 4 units • Special Homes of NJ, Boonton 6 units • Special Homes of NJ, Boonton 6 units • The Rose House, Budd Lake 8 beds Beds for the Mentally Ill • Richmond Fellowship • Community Hope • Comprehensive Behavioral Healthcare, Morris Plains • NewBridge Services, Inc. • St. Clare's/Morristown • St. Clare's/Denville 20 85 25 132 73 11 beds beds beds beds beds beds

Housing stock available to serve persons with HIV/AIDS and their families is offered by the Eric John House, which provides transitional housing and/or supportive services to 24 individuals. The jurisdiction plans to use HOME to assist one or more of these subpopulations by assisting with the construction of new housing and/or the acquisition and rehabilitation of existing housing as its mission is to provide safe, decent, and

37

affordable housing and a positive community environment that offers a good quality of life and economic opportunity to all residents, but especially to Low-and Moderate-Income residents, including the elderly, disadvantaged and disabled. Services include the following: Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Outpatient Services: • High Focus Centers - Substance Abuse Treatment • Hope House - Adolescent Substance Abuse Services • Hope House - Adult Alcohol Counseling • Memorial Hospital – Substance Abuse Treatment • NewBridge Services, Inc. - Substance Abuse Alternative • New Views Treatment Program - Substance Abuse Treatment • People Helping People – Substance Abuse Treatment • St. Clare's - Alcohol Evaluation Program • Thought Exchange Center for Personal Achievement – Substance Abuse Treatment - Substance Abuse Treatment • Treatment Dynamics - Substance Abuse Treatment • Willow Tree Center for Addition Intensive Outpatient Services • Morristown Memorial Hospital Center for Addictive Illness • Daytop Village, Inc. - treatment for delinquent and at-risk alcohol and drug abusing adolescents Extended Care - Halfway Houses • Mrs. Wilson's Halfway House for Women, Morristown, 14 beds Long Term Residential/Therapeutic Community – 9-12 months • Daytop Village, Inc. - treatment for at-risk alcohol and drug abusing adolescents 70 beds • Freedom House - Halfway House Program for Men, Morristown, 7 beds Short Term Residential – 28 days • Market Street Mission, Morristown, 34 beds • Saint Clare's Hospital, Riverside Campus - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency Unit, 30 beds Detoxification Services • Saint Clare's Hospital, Riverside Campus Hospital/Medical Detoxification • Saint Clare's Hopsital, Riverside Campus Disability Services are provided by the following agencies: • Services for those with Autism - The Allegro School and NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities

38

• Care Management - Morris County Division on Aging, Disabilities and Veterans, Morristown Memorial Hospital (Special Child Health Services), NJ Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities • Day Programs - ARC Morris County Chapter and Community Options • Dental Care - NJ Foundation of Dentistry for Persons with Disabilities, Zufall Health Center, Morristown and Dover • Education - College of Saint Elizabeth, County College of Morris, Drew University, and Fairleigh Dickinson University • Employment Assistance - ECLC of New Jersey, Morris County School of Technology, The Lexington Center, Allegro Adult Services, ARC Morris County, Cheshire Home Community Resource Center, Community Options, Employment Horizons, Jewish Vocational Service of MetroWest, NewBridge Services, Rehab Institute at Morristown Memorial Hospital and NJ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services • Hearing Impairment - NJ Division of Deaf and Hard of Hearing, NJ Association of the Deaf-Blind, NJ Division of Health and Senior Services • Information and Referral - Children's Center for Therapy and Learning, Disabled Advocates Working for Northwest, NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities, NJ Division of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Epilepsy Foudnation of NJ, Morris County Office for the Disabled, Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH) Center for Developmental Disabilities, MMH Special Child Health Services, MS SocietyGreater North Jersey Chapter, NJ Brain Injury Association, Spina Bifida Assocation of NJ and United Cerebral Palsy of Morris/Somerset • In-Home Care Services - Morris County Personal Assistance Services Program • Legal Assistance - NJ Protection and Advocacy, Community Health Law Project, Legal Services of Northwest Jersey, State Parent Advocacy Network, Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Employment of People with Disabilities, and ADA Information and Referral Line • Lifeskills Training - Disabled Advocates Working for Northwest • Respite Care - United Cerebral Palsy of Morris/Somerset, ARC Morris County, NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities, and Allegro School Respite Services • Transportation - Morris Area Paratransit System, Access Link • Visually Impaired - Alliance for Disabled in Action, NJ Foundation for the Blind, NJ Commission for the Blind and Handicapped, Family Service of Morris County Friends of the Blind, NJ Library for the Blind and Handicapped, Morris Conty Public Library, Parents of Blind Children, Seeing Eye

39

• Volunteerism - Volunteers for Morris County Services for Seniors include the following: • Family Service of Morris County − Care Management Program - adult day care, money management, and mental health assistance. − Outreach Program - offers outreach to caregivers of senior citizens at their place of employment. − Respite Program - respite care for at risk seniors through the Time Out Adult Day Care Programs. • Hope House CHORE Program - provides 2 hours a week of light housekeeping, laundry and food shopping services, specifically for seniors under a doctor's care, living alone, and are frail and physically disabled. Operation Fix-It - provides direct, in-home services in the form of health and safety home repairs, to prevent premature institutionalization. • Legal Services of Northwest Jersey/Senior Citizens Law Project - provides legal advice, counseling and representation to seniors, 60 years of age or older, with special emphasis on serving minority, indigent and frail/disabled clients. • Morris County Organization for Hispanic Affairs/Assisted Transportation provides transportation to seniors (60+) who are unable to access transportation services, have health barriers, are frail and live alone. • NewBridge Services, Inc./Operation SAIL - Senior Assistance for Independent Living provides Care Management services to help seniors remain in their homes and to assist seniors in applying for a variety of services. • NJ Foundation for Aging/Renaissance Magazine - provides information to senior citizens and their caregivers. • NORWESCAP/Healthy Bones Program, A Matter of Balance and Move Today programs • Saint Clare's Hospital/Senior Connection - in-home mental health counseling with special emphasis on those who are economically and socially challenged, have a medical need, are frail and/or homebound. • Visiting Nurse Association of Northern New Jersey - Caregiver Initiative Community Health Aide Program - in-home program of personal care and assistance Friendship House Adult Day Care - social day care center for individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and other memory related disorders Respite Program - provides home health aide and/or adult day care services as respite for the caregiver of senior citizen

40

• Volunteers for Morris County/Access Services for the Elderly - includes Telephone Reassurace to homebound/isolated seniors and Friendly Visiting to isolated seniors. Barriers to Affordable Housing 91.210 (e)
18. Explain whether the cost of housing or the incentives to develop, maintain, or

improve affordable housing are affected by public policies, particularly those of the local jurisdiction. Such policies include tax policy affecting land and other property, land use controls, zoning ordinances, building codes, fees and charges, growth limits, and policies that affect the return on residential investment.

Barriers to affordable housing identified in the county’s Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing include: • The lack of affordable housing, particularly for low-and middle-income households, seniors, people with special needs, single head of households, and young adults. • The greatest need of non-homeless special needs populations includes accessible/adaptable housing for persons with severe mental illness and the developmentally disabled, victims of domestic violence, veterans, people transitioning out of homeless shelters and the frail elderly. • United Way of Morris County identified the lack of housing accessible to affordable transportation to get to jobs and services as an important housing choice issue, particularly for senior citizens, people with physical disabilities and mental illness, low-income families and any other resident who does not have ready access to their own automobile. • Due to the backlash from Sub prime lending practices and the subsequent foreclosure crisis, banks have tightened their lending guidelines to the point where obtaining a standard fixed mortgage is very difficult. This further impedes the process of acquiring affordable housing for those who may have been viable candidates. • Insufficient Federal and State resources for affordable housing initiatives, such as programs and resources to build housing, provide rental assistance and tax credits for homebuyers. • The uncertainty of the future of New Jersey’s Council on Affordable Housing and the associated affordable housing municipal obligations. As of this writing, there are undecided policy questions including: fate of municipal obligations, regional contribution agreements and which agency will oversee the resulting program. • New Jersey's property taxes are the highest in the nation by the per capita measure and 2nd highest as a percentage of income. • The New Jersey Highlands Act restricts development within the delineated Highlands Protection Area. With the diminishment of available land, the cost of remaining land will rise, affecting existing and future stock of affordable housing. • The New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan, has had influence over land use through its designation of all areas in NJ as 1 of 5

41

different Planning Areas each with associated growth expectations. Implications for development constraints indicate an increase in costs for affordable housing. • Development approval process, e.g. state and regional agencies, county and municipal planning boards, utility authorities and soil conservation districts, all time consuming and therefore increasing cost of development • Impact fees associated with new development e.g., roads, sewer, water and other public facilities, result in the costs being passed along to the new homeowners and renters. • NIMBYism against affordable housing proposals. STRATEGIC PLAN The strategic plan must describe how the jurisdiction plans to provide new or improved availability, affordability, and sustainability of decent housing, a suitable living environment, and economic opportunity, principally for extremely low-, lowincome, and moderate-income residents. General Priority Needs Analysis and Strategies 91.215 (a)

19. In this narrative, describe the reasons for setting priorities for allocating

investment among different activities and needs, as identified in tables* prescribed by HUD. 92.215(a)(1) Please see the Needs Table. The basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority needs is predicated upon the following criteria in descending order of importance: a) meeting the goals and objectives of HUD programs b) meeting the specific needs of low- and moderate-income residents c) focus on low-to moderate-income areas or neighborhoods d) coordination and leveraging of resources e) response to expressed needs f) sustainability and/or long-term impact of strategy g) the ability to measure or demonstrate progress and success.
20. Describe the geographic areas of the jurisdiction (including areas of low income

families and/or racial/minority concentration) in which assistance will be directed.

The geographic area within the Consortium consists of all the 39 municipalities making up Morris County, with a land area of 469 square miles. The county enjoys a range of rural, wooded environment, farmland to the west, suburban developments, and some areas of more concentrated development such as hamlets, villages and small cities. As per the US Census, American Community Survey 2006-2008 Data Profile, the population’s major constituent groups consist of 3.2% Black or African American, 8.3% Asian, and 83.5% White, in terms of race. When considering origin and race,

42

10.5% of the total population is Hispanic/Latino. Pockets, or concentrations of these subpopulations occur in 14 of the county's 39 municipalities. (See map “Census Tracts and Block Groups With Low/Mod Areas and Minority and Ethnic Concentrations.”)
21. If applicable, identify the census tracts for Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy

Areas and/or any local targeted areas. N/A
22. Describe the basis for allocating investments geographically within the

jurisdiction (or within the EMSA for HOPWA) (91.215(a)(1)) and the basis for assigning the priority (including the relative priority, where required) given to each category of priority needs (91.215(a)(2)). See #19.
23. If appropriate, the jurisdiction should estimate the percentage of funds the

jurisdiction plans to dedicate to Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Areas and/or any local targeted areas. N/A
24. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

Obstacles to meeting underserved needs include: • Lack of affordable housing • Limited funds for all programs (HOME, CDBG and ESG) • Lack of State funds • Lack of local funds • Lack of private funds • Increased competition for diminishing pool of funds • Limited resources on the part of providers • Lack of affordable child care services • Lack of transportation • Lack of employment opportunities • Lack of capacity to meet needs of veterans • Lack of land for construction of facilities and residential units • Lack of availability of suitable structures from which to provide services or shelter • Lack of societal sensitivity to the needs of the underserved • Lack of employment training for veterans • Lack of affordable permanent supportive housing for veterans

43

Specific Objectives

91.215 (a) (4)

25. Summarize priorities and specific objectives the jurisdiction intends to initiate

and/or complete in accordance with the tables* prescribed by HUD. Outcomes must be categorized as providing either new or improved availability/accessibility, affordability, or sustainability of decent housing, a suitable living environment, and economic opportunity. Goals and objectives to be carried out during the strategic plan period are indicated by placing a check in the following boxes. Objective Category Decent Housing Which includes: assisting homeless persons obtain affordable housing assisting persons at risk of becoming homeless retaining the affordable housing stock increasing the availability of affordable permanent housing in standard condition to lowincome and moderate-income families, particularly to members of disadvantaged minorities without discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, national origin, familial status, or disability Objective Category: Expanded Economic Opportunities Which includes: improving the safety and livability of neighborhoods eliminating blighting influences and the deterioration of property and facilities increasing the access to quality public and private facilities reducing the isolation of income groups within areas through spatial deconcentration of housing opportunities for lower income persons and the revitalization of deteriorating neighborhoods Objective Category: Expanded Economic Opportunities Which includes: job creation and retention establishment, stabilization and expansion of small business (including micro-businesses) the provision of public services concerned with employment the provision of jobs to low-income persons living in areas affected by those programs and activities under programs covered by the plan

44

increasing the supply of supportive housing which includes structural features and services to enable persons with special needs (including persons with HIV/ADOS) to live in dignity and independence providing affordable housing that is accessible to job opportunities

restoring and preserving properties of special historic, architectural, or aesthetic value

availability of mortgage financing for low income persons at reasonable rates using nondiscriminatory lending practices

conserving energy resources and use of renewable energy sources

access to capital and credit for development activities that promote the longterm economic social viability of the community

Please see Summary of Specific Objectives HOUSING Priority Housing Needs 91.215 (b)
26. Describe the relationship between the allocation priorities and the extent of need

given to each category specified in the Housing Needs Table (Table 2A or Needs.xls). These categories correspond with special tabulations of U.S. census data provided by HUD for the preparation of the Consolidated Plan. The basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority needs is predicated upon the following criteria in descending order of importance: a) meeting the goals and objectives of HUD programs b) meeting the specific needs of low-and moderate-income residents c) focus on low-to moderate-income areas or neighborhoods d) coordination and leveraging of resources e) response to expressed needs f) sustainability and/or long-term impact of strategy g) the ability to measure or demonstrate progress and success.
27. Provide an analysis of how the characteristics of the housing market and the

severity of housing problems and needs of each category of residents provided the basis for determining the relative priority of each priority housing need category, particularly among extremely low-income, low-income, and moderateincome households.
45

Note: Family and income types may be grouped in the case of closely related categories of residents where the analysis would apply to more than one family or income type. The characteristics of the housing market will influence the use of funds made available for rental assistance, production of new units, rehabilitation of old units, or acquisition of existing units in the following ways: • lack of land for development will spur creative alternatives e.g., redevelopment, mixed use developments • escalating housing costs will re-direct funding targets e.g, rental subsidy • lack of land for new development will re-direct funding emphasis toward rehabilitation of old units.
28. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

• Limited funds for programs (HOME and CDBG ) • Lack of State funds (Balanced Housing) • Stringent requirements of funders of special needs housing to obtain scarce matches e.g., Project Based Rental Assistance, supportive services • Lack of local funds • Reluctance of local entities to use developers fees for new construction • Reluctance of lenders to make loans • Increased competition for diminishing pool of funds • Limited resources on the part of providers Specific Objectives/Affordable Housing 91.215 (b) Note: Specific affordable housing objectives must specify the number of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate-income households to whom the jurisdiction will provide affordable housing as defined in 24 CFR 92.252 for rental housing and 24 CFR 92.254 for homeownership. (24 CFR 91.215(b)(2)

29. Identify each specific housing objective by number (DH-1, DH-2, DH-2),

proposed accomplishments and outcomes the jurisdiction hopes to achieve in quantitative terms over a specified time period, or in other measurable terms as identified and defined by the jurisdiction. Please see Summaries and Needs Tables.
30. Describe how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that

are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs for the period covered by the strategic plan. At this writing, we are at the very initial stage of coming out of the Great Recession. Federal funds are the only sources that have remained steady. State funding sources continue to dry up and local government has had to severely curtail spending due to plummeting revenues. The private sector has decreased funding and has made credit very difficult to obtain. Therefore, available funds will be used primarily for priority activities dealing with life-sustaining type of

46

work e.g., safety, security, health and welfare.
31. Indicate how the characteristics of the housing market will influence the use of

funds made available for rental assistance, production of new units, rehabilitation of old units, or acquisition of existing units.

The characteristics of the housing market will influence the use of funds made available for rental assistance, production of new units, rehabilitation of old units, or acquisition of existing units in the following ways: • lack of financing for construction will result in delay of build start dates for activities; it may also lead to more partnerships among housing providers • lack of land for development will spur creative alternatives e.g., redevelopment, mixed use developments • unaffordable housing costs will re-direct funding targets e.g, rental subsidy • lack of land for new development will re-direct funding emphasis toward rehabilitation of old units and adaptive reuse of existing buildings.
32. If the jurisdiction intends to use HOME funds for tenant-based rental assistance,

specify local market conditions that led to the choice of that option. HOME funds have been used for tenant-based rental assistance for 3 years. The intended target was for households looking to achieve permanent housing from transitional housing or shelters. The demand has far outstripped the supply of TBRA vouchers. Local market conditions include • Rental units ‘out of reach’ for low income households Public Housing Strategy 91.215 (c)
33. Describe the public housing agency's strategy to serve the needs of extremely

low-income, low-income, and moderate-income families residing in the jurisdiction served by the public housing agency (including families on the public housing and section 8 tenant-based waiting list). There are 5 Public Housing Authorities in Morris County, each administering a number of programs to provide housing assistance to a range of populations. All units are affordable to households at the "uncapped" 80% or less of the median income for the area. Approximately 40% are designated for low-income households. These units have affordability controls for at least 20 years. Specifically, Morris County Housing Authority’s strategy includes: • Maximize the number of Family Self-Sufficiency participants by conducting workshops aimed to address financial, educational, parenting, employment and self-improvement issues. • Provide a broad range of social services and activities to the elderly/disabled populations, aimed to maximize independent living in a safe living environment. • Administer meal/housekeeping program for the frail, elderly, decreasing the need for unnecessary/premature institutionalization.

47

34. Describe the public housing agency’s strategy for addressing the revitalization

and restoration needs of public housing projects within the jurisdiction and improving the management and operation of such public housing. The Public Housing agencies' strategy for dealing with revitalization and restoration needs of public housing projects has been severely compromised due to drastic federal funding cuts. Likewise, management and operation budgets of the county's public housing agencies have been constrained due to funding cuts. Capital expenses, which normally would have received federal funding, are no longer receiving those resources, and thus either being diverted to operational budgets, or forgone altogether. As provided by Lou Riccio, Executive Director of the Madison Housing Authority “… over the past twelve years the federal government has reduced the amount of the public housing authority’s operating subsidy and capital funds. In 1998 a study undertaken by Abt Associates commissioned by Congress showed that there was a backlog of modernization needs among public housing that amounted to $22.5 billion. Based on this study the annual accrual needs increased by about 1 percent between 1990 and 1998. At a per-unit level the increase was about 10%. Extrapolating from these statistics, the need today would be $70.6 billion. Deduct from that the allocations over the past twelve years of approximately $29 billion and you still have a significant shortfall of $40.6 billion. Due to this shortfall many of the public housing units have fallen into disrepair and funds from operations have had to be expended to maintain their livability. By using these funds there is a two-fold risk; 1) We are depleting our operating reserves and as HUD reduces our operating subsidy, as they have done this year (Madison’s Operating Subsidy was reduced by 74.4%), we run the risk of being insolvent. 2) By expending these Operating funds we will have to make other major cuts to services. The majority of these cuts will come in the form of layoffs and staff reductions that further delete our ability to serve our clients. There is still a significant need for these funds to supplement the loss of capital funds over the past two decades, and even with the one-time infusion of the Reinvestment Act funds this year we are all still way behind what is needed. Therefore, there remains a substantial need for additional funding for major renovations and repairs to existing public and assisted housing units to assure their continued viability, and to supplement the meager funds received by the federal government that are being reduced every year.”   Morris County’s Public Housing Authority identified the following strategies: • Conduct quarterly inspection to address/repair maintenance issues proactively • Maximize the number of affordable housing units available to the Housing Authority within its current resources by reducing turnover time for vacated public housing units; reducing the time to renovate public housing units. • Develop collaborative working relationships with other housing agencies and nonprofits organizations.

48

• Maximize the capital funds in order to improve and maintain public housing buildings as they age.
35. Describe the public housing agency’s strategy for improving the living

environment of extremely low-income, low-income, and moderate families residing in public housing. The Public Housing agencies in Morris County have an excellent track record of providing decent, quality living environments for Extremely Low Income, Low Income and Moderate Income famlies. Morris County Public Housing Authority’s strategy includes: • Maintain Section 8 lease-up rates by establishing payment standards that will enable families to rent throughout Morris County. • Increase the numbers of affordable housing units by applying for additional Section 8 units should they become available and to pursue other housing resources other than public housing or Section 8 tenant based assistance. • Target available assistance to the elderly by applying for special purpose vouchers targeted to the elderly, should they become available. • Target available assistance to families with disabilities by applying for special purpose vouchers targeted to families with disabilities should they become available and to affirmatively market to local non-profit agencies that assist families with disabilities. • Increase awareness of PHA resources among families of races and ethnicities with disproportionate needs by affirmatively marketing to races/ethnicities shown to have disproportionate housing needs. • Conduct community outreach/presentations/fairs designed to increase public awareness of affordable housing options and alternatives. • Assist families of extremely low income, very low income and low income by continuing to employ admissions preference aimed at families who are working/residing in Morris County and to adopt rent policies to support and encourage economic self-sufficiency.
36. Describe the manner in which the plan of the jurisdiction will help address the

needs of public housing and activities it will undertake to encourage public housing residents to become more involved in management and participate in homeownership. (NAHA Sec. 105 (b)(11) and (91.215 (k)) The Consolidated Plan process included the solicitation of information regarding existing conditions and needs, on the part of the housing authorities. In addition, the county has been supportive of the Morris County Housing Authority's effort to support homeownership, through acquisition of a unit for resale and utilization of the Section 8 to Homeownership program.
37. If the public housing agency is designated as "troubled" by HUD or otherwise is

performing poorly, the jurisdiction shall describe the manner in which it will provide financial or other assistance in improving its operations to remove such designation. (NAHA Sec. 105 (g))

49

None of the public housing agencies have been designated as "troubled" by HUD or are otherwise performing poorly.

HOMELESS Priority Homeless Needs *Refer to the Homeless Needs Table 1A or the CPMP Tool’s Needs.xls workbook
38. Describe the jurisdiction's choice of priority needs and allocation priorities, based

on reliable data meeting HUD standards and reflecting the required consultation with homeless assistance providers, homeless persons, and other concerned citizens regarding the needs of homeless families with children and individuals. Consultation was made with the county’s homeless providers, members of CEAS and the Morris County Division of Human Services. Additional resources included the annual Point in Time, HMIS, the county’s Homeless Plan and the Continuum of Care.
39. Provide an analysis of how the needs of each category of residents (listed in

question #38) provided the basis for determining the relative priority of each priority homeless need category. The needs of each category of residents provided the basis for determining the relative priority of each priority homeless need category, as reflected in the Continuum of Care Table.
40. Provide a brief narrative addressing gaps in services and housing for the

sheltered and unsheltered chronic homeless. A community should give a high priority to chronically homeless persons, where the jurisdiction identifies sheltered and unsheltered chronic homeless persons in its Homeless Needs Table - Homeless Populations and Subpopulations. The gaps in services and housing for the sheltered and unsheltered chronic homeless are addressed in the county's 2009 Continuum of Care. These gaps, or obstacles included: • serious shortage of affordable housing • lack of programs with adequate resources to reduce excessive rent or mortgage burdens to qualified persons • community resistance to siting special-needs housing programs • lack of sufficient job training and supportive employment opportunities for disabled individuals who would like to return to work, and • nearly non-existent shelter and residential options for active substance abusers • high recidivism in the criminal justice system for individuals dually diagnosed with chronic mental illness and substance abuse

50

• individuals with serious and persistent mental illnesses can be very difificult to engage in treatment, making it especially challenging to provide them with permanent supportive housing. Homeless Strategy 91.215 (d) Homelessness
41. Describe the jurisdiction's strategy for developing a system to address

homelessness and the priority needs of homeless persons and families (including the subpopulations identified in the needs section). The jurisdiction's strategy must consider the housing and supportive services needed in each stage of the process which includes preventing homelessness, outreach/assessment, emergency shelters and services, transitional housing, and helping homeless persons (especially any persons that are chronically homeless) make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. • Increasing the number of permanent supportive housing units • Enhance homeless people’s access to mainstream and other social service programs • Improve transportation options • Increase collaboration among the faith based community, non-profits, county agencies and business • Expand outreach to specialized populations, e.g., veterans
42. Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy for helping extremely low- and low-income

individuals and families who are at imminent risk of becoming homeless. Activities to prevent low-income individuals and families with children from becoming homeless include services that reduce risk factors and enhance protective factors. Risk factors include mental illness, alcohol and drug use, co-occurring disorders, physical health problems, domestic violence, and criminal justice system involvement. Chronic Homelessness
43. Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy for eliminating chronic homelessness. This

should include the strategy for helping homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. This strategy should, to the maximum extent feasible, be coordinated with the strategy presented in Exhibit 1 of the Continuum of Care (CoC) application and any other strategy or plan to eliminate chronic homelessness. The jurisdiction’s strategy for eliminating chronic homelessness builds on its success in housing homeless people with mental illness (who are often identified as chronically homeless). “Step Off the Street” provides street outreach and intensive

51

case management for adults who are homeless with a serious mental illness in Morris County. The program provides daily outreach to Soup Kitchens and elsewhere in the community and provided intensive case management to 10 mentally ill adults who were assessed as not able to successfully manage and cope in a Safe Haven environment or emergency shelter. New Jersey AIDS Services (Eric Johnson House) provides transitional housing and/or supportive services to 24 individuals. Ten chronically homeless people live onsite. The Market Street Mission provided transitional housing and supportive services to 63 chronically homeless men. Strategy for helping homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. Transitional Housing opportunities in the county include: • Jersey Battered Women’s Service - serving families with children • Homeless Solutions, Inc. - Transitional Housing - serving families with children • Roots and Wings - serving unaccompanied young males and females • Market Street Mission - serving single males • The Eric Johnson House - serving single males and females with AIDS.
44. Describe the efforts to increase coordination between housing providers, health,

and service agencies in addressing the needs of persons that are chronically homeless.(91.215(l)) The effort to increase coordination between housing providers, health and service agencies in addressing the needs of persons that are chronically homeless includes primarily the Morris County Comprehensive Emergency Assistance Systems (CEAS) Committee, which is the lead entity conducting the Morris County's Continuum of Care planning process. The CEAS Committee reports to the County's Human Services Advisory Council (HSAC), which reports to the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders. The Division of Human Services coordinates Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) users sessions, which provides an opportunity to discuss common issues and finding ways to collect data uniformly. The new Homelessness Prevention and Rapid Re-Housing program has also been an opportunity for all the providers to gather and discuss their programs, challenges, possibilities for collaboration, cross-referrals and establishing a uniform intake form. The county also has a cross systems review committee comprised of homeless service providers, hospital Emergency room staff, representatives from the department of corrections, and professionals specializing in substance abuse. This review committee will identify gaps in services for homeless substance abusers.

52

Homelessness Prevention
45. Describe the jurisdiction’s strategy to help prevent homelessness for individuals

and families with children who are at imminent risk of becoming homeless.

The prevention component includes services that prevent people from becoming homeless by reducing risk factors and enhancing protective factors. Risk factors such as mental illness, alcohol and drug use, co-occurring disorders, physical health problems, domestic violence, and criminal justice system involvement ar addressed in the inventory section. Protective factors include the following: addressing minority status, poverty, the lack of affordable housing, the need for supportive services in housing, discharge planning, and education and advocacy. Institutional Structure
46. Briefly describe the institutional structure, including private industry, non-profit

organizations, and public institutions, through which the jurisdiction will carry out its homelessness strategy. The Institutional Structure consists of the Morris County Comprehensive Emergency Assistance Systems (CEAS) Committee, which is the lead entity conducting the Morris County's Continuum of Care planning process. The CEAS Committee reports to the County's Human Services Advisory Council (HSAC), which reports to the Morris County Board of Chosen Freeholders. Discharge Coordination Policy
47. Every jurisdiction receiving McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act,

Emergency Shelter Grant (ESG), Supportive Housing, Shelter Plus Care, or Section 8 SRO Program funds must develop and implement a Discharge Coordination Policy, to the maximum extent practicable. Such a policy should include “policies and protocols for the discharge of persons from publicly funded institutions or systems of care (such as health care facilities, foster care or other youth facilities, or correction programs and institutions) in order to prevent such discharge from immediately resulting in homelessness for such persons.” The jurisdiction should describe its planned activities to implement a cohesive, community-wide Discharge Coordination Policy, and how the community will move toward such a policy.

Local hospitals Discharge planners on medical units of the local hospitals call the area shelters for bed availability when a homeless patient is ready for discharge. Homeless individuals have been discharged to shelters, such as Homeless Solutions, Inc. with nursing follow up care provided on-site at the shelter. Shelters do require that a person is able to care for physical needs such as eating, bathing, ambulating, and complying with a medication.

53

Through a partnership between Jersey Battered Women’s Service (JBWS) and Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH), patients identified as domestic violence victims will be referred to JBWS for appropriate services, including shelter. The Office of Temporary Assistance (OTA) may assist with placements for homeless patients requiring a level of care that cannot be provided in a shelter. Discharge planners on psychiatric units of the local hospitals call the Mental Health Association of Morris County (MHAMC) for placement and services for psychiatric patients who are homeless and ready for discharge. The MHA will meet with the individual on the unit whenever possible and then arrange a Safe Haven bed at Homeless Solutions, Inc., a motel placement through OTA, or some other housing arrangement. Local hospitals can also utilize the OTA 24-hour emergency homeless hotline for housing assistance after hours. State psychiatric hospitals New Jersey has a policy prohibiting discharge from state psychiatric hospitals to shelters and/or to the streets. Patients who are ready for discharge are referred to the county Integrated Case Management Service (ICMS) prior to discharge. The MHAMC contracts for ICMS in Morris County and operates the service as a consortium with two community mental health centers - St. Clare’s and NewBridge Services. ICMS clients receive 18 months of post-discharge case management services. If an ICMS client becomes homeless the case manager refers the individual to the MHA Homeless Outreach Services for a Safe Haven bed if necessary. County and local jails Individuals who are incarcerated, homeless, and have a psychiatric illness come to the attention of the county-funded forensic liaison to the jail. The jail’s social worker and substance abuse counselor, county probation officers, and the Morris County Drug Court will also refer homeless individuals to the area shelters such as Homeless Solutions, Inc., and the Market St. Mission. Every effort is made to coordinate time of discharge with the receiving agency. JBWS has established linkages with correctional facilities to provide services for Morris County women who are victims of domestic violence while they are incarcerated and offer placement upon release. Prisons Homeless Solutions, Inc. has an agreement with the Administrative Office of the NJ Courts to accept Intensive Supervision Program (ISP) participants. ISP is an alternative to jail for non-violent offenders. Homeless men and women enter the shelter with 24/7 supervision and are expected to find employment, link with treatment, pay fines and eventually secure housing. Aging out youth DYFS provides discharge planning for 18 year olds leaving the care of DYFS.

54

Roots and Wings provides housing and case management support for youth who have aged-out of the foster care system. Currently Roots & Wings has 8 eligible youth in this program and is looking to expand. The county’s Acute Care Systems Review Committee, which includes representatives of the mental health system and the jail, reviews systems problems related to individuals who cross systems. The Mental Health/ Criminal Justice Task Force is actively forging a stronger partnership between systems. Specific Objectives/Homeless (91.215)
48. Identify specific objectives that the jurisdiction intends to initiate and/or

complete in accordance with the tables* prescribed by HUD, and how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs for the period covered by the strategic plan. For each specific objective, identify proposed accomplishments and outcomes the jurisdiction hopes to achieve in quantitative terms over a specified time period (one, two, three or more years) or in other measurable terms as defined by the jurisdiction. Please see Summaries Table.

NON-HOMELESS SPECIAL NEEDS *Refer to Table 1B Non-Homeless Special Needs or the CPMP Tool’s Needs.xls workbook Priority Non-Homeless Needs 91.215 (e)
49. Identify the priority housing and supportive service needs of persons who are

not homeless but may or may not require supportive housing, i.e., elderly, frail elderly, persons with disabilities (mental, physical, developmental, persons with HIV/AIDS and their families), persons with alcohol or other drug addiction by using the Non-homeless Special Needs Table. The “Non-Homeless Special Needs Including HOPWA”Table provides an actual estimated number housing units needed throughout the county for the various subpopulations. Priority needs, as indicated by the estimates offered by providers, are listed according to gap, starting with the largest gap: • Elderly • Developmentally Disabled • Public Housing • Persons with HIV/AIDS and their families • Persons with Severe Mental Illness • Alcohol/Other Drug Addicted • Physically Disabled • Frail Elderly

55

Services needed, ranked according to the largest gap, include: • Developmentally Disabled tied with Alcohol/Other Drug Addicted • Persons with Severe Mental Illness tied with Physically Disabled • Elderly tied with Persons with HIV/AIDS and their families
Rosemary Gilmartin, Director of Interfaith Food Pantry summed up the need for services: “Seniors needs are going to become even more of an issue - transportation, inhome services, food, health issues and housing. More and more seniors and the disabled are low-income and housebound. Services need to be brought to them to help them age in place rather than force them into nursing homes before they are ready.

Community services for clients with mental health issues will need to greatly expand as more move from inpatient settings into the community. This has been the area of our largest growth - clients being referred for food assistance from mental health agencies or brought up by their caseworkers. Affordable child care, not just for infants and toddlers, but before and after school programs and summer programs, are extremely important as low-income and middle income workers are spending a huge portion of their incomes to care for their kids or are forced to leave their kids unattended. Clearly affordable accessible transportation is critical to access services and get to jobs. You know how NJ cuts are going to affect all our clients. Housing - More affordable housing. So many workers are forced to move out of county or out into more affordable parts of Morris County and if public transportation is cut what will happen to them. A taxi from Dover to the Food Pantry can run $40.”17
50. Describe the basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority

needs. The basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority needs is predicated upon the following criteria in descending order of importance: a) meeting the goals and objectives of HUD programs b) meeting the specific needs of low- and moderate-income residents c) focus on low- to moderate-income areas or neighborhoods d) coordination and leveraging of resources e) response to expressed needs f) sustainability and/or long-term impact of strategy g) the ability to measure or demonstrate progress and success.
51. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

• Limited funds
17

Rosemary Gilmartin, Interfaith Food Pantry, March 2010. 56

• • • • •

Lack of funds for long term supportive services Increased competition for diminishing pool of funds Limited resources on the part of providers Lack of land for construction of facilities and residential units Lack of availability of suitable structures from which to provide services or shelter • Lack of societal sensitivity to the need of the underserved

Barrier identified in treating people with substance abuse issues include: • Lack of treatment programs of youth aged 0-12, including services for children of substance abusers • Lack of family services for youth under 12 • Limited substance abuse services available within the family model • Lack of bilingual/culturally sensitive services • Lack of transportation • Inadequately trained staff to address the developmental issues of youth • Lack of services for Co-Occurring disorders • The prevalence of sexual assault and incest in substance abusing adolescents • Parental resistance to identification of substance issue in adolescents • Lack of substance abuse program modification for disability issues • Insufficient programming for young adults • No childcare for mothers • Lack of placement opportunities and ongoing recovery that can accommodate children • Lack of affordable housing for women • Lack of vocational skills programming for women • Lack of services for pregnant women • Lack of methadone treatment for pregnant women • Need for detox services for pregnant women • Need for substance abuse treatment options meeting the needs of people with disabilities.
52. To the extent information is available, describe the facilities and services that

assist persons who are not homeless but require supportive housing, and programs for ensuring that persons returning from mental and physical health institutions receive appropriate supportive housing. Beds for the Physically Disabled • Cheshire I (Residential Nursing Care) • Cheshire II (Group Home) • Cheshire III (Group Home) • Mcail Liberty House • UCP Group Homes 35 7 8 15 8 beds beds beds beds beds

Beds for the Developmentally Disabled • Center for Humanistic Change – Denville, Flanders, Jefferson 17 beds • Department for Persons With Disabilities, Jefferson 23 beds • Morris ARC: Access House, Parsippany 6 beds

57

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Morris ARC: Lake Parsippany, Parsippany Morris ARC: Chester Morris ARC: Washington Township Morris ARC: Randolph Morris ARC: Hanover Morris ARC: East Hanover Community Options Siek, Butler Community Options Van Houten S., Butler Developmental Resources Corporation Jewish Service for Developmental Disabilities Much Dignity House, Randolph Special Homes of NJ, Wharton Special Homes of NJ, Boonton Special Homes of NJ, Boonton The Rose House, Budd Lake

6 beds 6 beds 6 beds 5 beds 6 beds 6 beds 3 beds 3 beds 10 beds 5 beds 8 units 4 units 6 units 6 units 8 beds 20 85 25 132 73 11 beds beds beds beds beds beds

Beds for the Mentally Ill • Richmond Fellowship • Community Hope • Comprehensive Behavioral Healthcare, Morris Plains • NewBridge Services, Inc. • St. Clare's/Morristown • St. Clare's/Denville

Housing stock available to serve persons with HIV/AIDS and their families is offered by the Eric John House, which provides transitional housing and/or supportive services to 24 individuals and has 10 beds available on site. Services include the following: Alcoholism and Drug Abuse Outpatient Services: • St. Clare's - Alcohol Evaluation Program • NewBridge Services, Inc. - Substance Abuse Alternative • Hope House - Adolescent Substance Abuse Services • Hope House - Adult Alcohol Counseling Intensive Outpatient Services • Morristown Memorial Hospital Center for Addictive Illness • Daytop Village, Inc. - treatment for delinquent and at-risk alcohol and drug abusing adolescents Extended Care - Halfway Houses • Mrs. Wilson's Halfway House for Women, Morristown, 14 beds Long Term Residential/Therapeutic Community – 9-12 months • Daytop Village, Inc. - treatment for at-risk alcohol and drug abusing adolescents 70 beds • Freedom House - Halfway House Program for Men, Morristown, 7 beds

58

Short Term Residential – 28 days • Market Street Mission, Morristown, 34 beds • Saint Clare's Hospital, Riverside Campus - Alcohol/Chemical Dependency Unit, 30 beds Detoxification Services • Saint Clare's Hospital, Riverside Campus Hospital/Medical Detoxification • Saint Clare's Hopsital, Riverside Campus Disability Services are provided by the following agencies: • Services for those with Autism - The Allegro School, Skyland Center and NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities • Care Management - Morris County Divisio on Aging, Disabilities and Veterans, Morristown Memorial Hospital (Special Child Health Services), NJ Commission for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities • Day Programs - ARC Morris County Chapter, Community Options and Skyland Center • Dental Care - NJ Foundation of Dentistry for Persons with Disabilities, Zufall Health Center in Dover and Morristown • Education - College of Saint Elizabeth, County College of Morris, Drew University, and Fairleigh Dickinson University • Employment Assistance - ECLC of New Jersey, Morris County School of Technology, The Lexington Center, Allegro Adult Services, ARC Morris County, Cheshire Home Community Resource Center, Community Options, Employment Horizons, Jewish Vocational Service of MetroWest, NewBridge Services, Rehab Institute at Morristown Memorial Hospital and NJ Division of Vocational Rehabilitation Services • Hearing Impairment - NJ Division of Deaf and Hard of Hearing, NJ Association of the Deaf-Blind, NJ Division of Health and Senior Services • Information and Referral - Children's Center for Therapy and Learning, Disabled Advocates Working for Northwest, NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities, NJ Division of the Deaf and Hard of Hearing, Epilepsy Foudnation of NJ, Morris County Office for the Disabled, Morristown Memorial Hospital (MMH) Center for Developmental Disabilities, MMH Special Child Health Services, MS SocietyGreater North Jersey Chapter, NJ Brain Injury Association, Spina Bifida Assocation of NJ and United Cerebral Palsy of Morris/Somerset • In-Home Care Services - Morris County Personal Assistance Services Program

59

• Legal Assistance - NJ Protection and Advocacy, Community Health Law Project, Legal Services of Northwest Jersey, State Parent Advocacy Network, Architectural and Transportation Barriers Compliance Board, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, Employment of People with Disabilities, and ADA Information and Referral Line • Lifeskills Training - Disabled Advocates Working for Northwest • Respite Care - United Cerebral Palsy of Morris/Somerset, ARC Morris County, NJ Division of Developmental Disabilities, and Allegro School Respite Services • Transportation - Morris Area Paratransit System, Access Link, Morris County Hispanic Affairs • Visually Impaired - Alliance for Disabled in Action, NJ Foundation for the Blind, NJ Commission for the Blind and Handicapped, Family Service of Morris County Friends of the Blind, NJ Library for the Blind and Handicapped, Morris Conty Public Library, Parents of Blind Children, Seeing Eye • Volunteerism - Volunteers for Morris County Services for Seniors include the following: • Family Service of Morris County − Care Management Program - adult day care, money management, and mental health assistance. − Outreach Program - offers outreach to caregivers of senior citizens at their place of employment. − Respite Program - respite care for at risk seniors through the Time Out Adult Day Care Programs. • Hope House − CHORE Program - provides 2 hours a week of light housekeeping, laundry and food shopping services, specifically for seniors under a doctor's care, living alone, and are frail and physically disabled. − Operation Fix-It - provides direct, in-home services in the form of health and safety home repairs, to prevent premature institutionalization. • Legal Services of Northwest Jersey/Senior Citizens Law Project - provides legal advice, counseling and representation to seniors, 60 years of age or alder, with special emphasis on serving minority, indigent and frail/disabled clients. • Morris County Organization for Hispanic Affairs/Assisted Transportation provides transportation to seniors (60+) who are unable to access transportation services, have health barriers, are frail and live alone. • NewBridge Services, Inc./Operation SAIL - Senior Assistance for Independent Living provides Care Management services to help seniors remain in their homes and to assist seniors in applying for a variety of services.

60

• NJ Foundation for Aging/Renaissance Magazine - provides information to senior citizens and their caregivers. • NORWESCAP/Healthy Bones Program - osteoporosis prevention eduction. • Saint Clare's Hospital/Senior Connection - in-home mental health counseling with special emphasis on those who are economically and socially disadvantaged, have a medical need, are frail and/or homebound. • Visiting Nurse Association of Northern New Jersey − Caregiver Initiative − Community Health Aide Program - in-home program of personal care and assistance − Friendship House Adult Day Care - social day care center for individuals with Alzheimer's Disease and other memory related disorders − Respite Program - provides home health aide and/or adult day care services as respite for the caregiver of senior citizen • Volunteers for Morris County/Access Services for the Elderly - includes Telephone Reassurace to homebound/isolated seniors and Friendly Visiting to isolated seniors. The jurisdiction plans to use HOME to assist one or more of these subpopulations by assisting with the construction of new housing and/or the acquisition and rehabilitation of existing housing because its mission is to provide safe, decent, and affordable housing and a positive community environment that offers a good quality of life and economic opportunity to all residents, but especially to Low- and Moderate-Income residents, including the elderly, disadvantaged and disabled.
53. If the jurisdiction plans to use HOME or other tenant based rental assistance to

assist one or more of these subpopulations, it must justify the need for such assistance in the plan.

HOME funds have been used for tenant-based rental assistance for 3 years. The intended target was for households looking to achieve permanent housing from transitional housing or shelters. The demand has far outstripped the supply of TBRA vouchers. Specific Special Needs Objectives 91.215 (e)
54. Identify each specific objective developed to address a priority need by number

and contain proposed accomplishments and outcomes the jurisdiction expects to achieve in quantitative terms through related activities over a specified time period (i.e. one, two, three or more years), or in other measurable terms as identified and defined by the jurisdiction. Please see CPMP Tool Project worksheets.

61

55. Describe how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that

are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs for the period covered by the strategic plan. This jurisdiction intends to provide continued assistance to supportive housing agencies, especially for persons with disabilities (mental, physical and developmental), veterans and the frail elderly. In addition, it will continue assistance for supportive services and facilities.

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT Priority Community Development Needs 91.215 (f) *Refer to the Community Development Table in the Needs.xls workbook
56. Identify the jurisdiction's priority non-housing community development needs

eligible for assistance by CDBG eligibility category specified in the Community Development Needs Table* − i.e., public facilities, public improvements, public services and economic development. The jurisdiction's priority non-housing community development needs eligible for assistance by CDBG eligibility category specified in the Community Development Needs Table are informed by multiple sources. The Division of Community Development solicited information from all the county's municipalities and several non profits to ascertain projected needs and the level of priority. Generally, Facilities and Improvements were the categories receiving the highest priority in terms of needs identified. Activities, by level of importance, rank accordingly: • Facilities − Senior Centers − Centers serving homeless individuals − Facilities serving veterans − Firehouses − Facilities serving youth suffering substance abuse addictions • Improvements Water/Sewer Improvements Street Improvements • Services − Services for children and youth − Childcare − Employment Training − Senior Care − Recreation, respite care and employment training for special needs population − Transportation • Housing − Safety and Security upgrades in private and public housing residential units − Homeowner rehabilitation
62

57. Describe the basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority

needs provided on Table 2B or the Community Development Table in the CPMP Tool’s Needs.xls worksheet. The basis for assigning the priority given to each category of priority needs is predicated upon the following criteria in descending order of importance: a) meeting the goals and objectives of HUD programs b) meeting the specific needs of low- and moderate- income residents c) focus on low- to moderate-income areas or neighborhodds d) coordination and leveraging of resources e) response to expressed needs f) sustainability and/or long-term impact of strategy g) the ability to measure or demonstrate progress and success.
58. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs.

Obstacles to meeting underserved needs include: • Limited funds • Increased competition by local government and nonprofit agencies for diminishing pool of funds • Tight fiscal constraints on all levels of government forcing zero funding for activities, deemed non essential, such as transportation assistance (car service) • Limited supplementary resources experienced by providers • Lack of sympathy for financial plight of local government • Lack of land for construction of facilities and residential units • Lack of availability of suitable structures from which to provide services or shelter • Lack of societal sensitivity to the need of the underserved. Specific Community Development Objectives
59. Identify specific long-term and short-term community development objectives

(including economic development activities that create jobs), developed in accordance with the statutory goals described in section 24 CFR 91.1 and the primary objective of the CDBG program to provide decent housing and a suitable living environment and expand economic opportunities, principally for low- and moderate-income persons. The primary objectives and strategies of the CDBG program in meeting the goals to provide decent housing and a suitable living environment and expand economic opportunities, principally for low- and moderate-income persons include: PUBLIC FACILITES NEEDS STRATEGIES Strategy #1 – Develop or Rehabilitate Facilities to Serve Population Segments – Senior, Youth and Children Strategy #2 – Assist Municipalities in the Development and Preservation of Neighborhood and Other Public Facilities

63

NON-RESIDENTIAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION STRATEGIES Strategy #1 Assist in the Preservation of Historically Significant Structures Community Development/Public Improvements Objectives PUBLIC INFRASTRUCTURE NEEDS STRATEGIES Strategy #1 –Assist in Infrastructure Improvements in Eligible Areas of the County Community Development/Public Services Objectives PUBLIC SERVICE NEEDS STRATEGIES Strategy #1 Expand transportation, senior and youth Services. Strategy #2 Provide Affordable Childcare and Children’s Services Strategy #3 Assist Other Public Service Needs and Programs Community Development/Economic Development Objectives N/A Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Areas 91.215(g)
60. If the jurisdiction has one or more approved Neighborhood Revitalization

Strategy Areas, the jurisdiction must provide, with the submission of a new Consolidated Plan, either: the prior HUD-approved strategy, or strategies, with a statement that there has been no change in the strategy (in which case, HUD approval for the existing strategy is not needed a second time) or submit a new or amended neighborhood revitalization strategy, or strategies, (for which separate HUD approval would be required).

N/A Barriers to Affordable Housing 91.215 (h)

61. Describe the strategy to remove or ameliorate negative effects of public policies

that serve as barriers to affordable housing, except that, if a State requires a unit of general local government to submit a regulatory barrier assessment that is substantially equivalent to the information required under this part, as determined by HUD, the unit of general local government may submit that assessment to HUD and it shall be considered to have complied with this requirement. Barriers to affordable housing identified in the county’s Analysis of Impediments to Fair Housing include:

64

• The lack of affordable housing, particularly for low- and middle-income households, seniors, people with disabilities, single head of households, and young adults. • The greatest need of non-homeless special needs populations includes accessible/adaptable housing for persons with severe mental illness and the developmentally disabled, victims of domestic violence, veterans, people transitioning out of homeless shelters and the frail elderly. • United Way of Morris County identified the lack of housing accessible to affordable transportation to get to jobs and services as an important housing choice issue, particularly for senior citizens, people with physical disabilities and mental illness, low-income families and any other resident who does not have ready access to their own automobile. • Due to the backlash from Sub prime lending practices and the subsequent foreclosure crisis, banks have tightened their lending guidelines to the point where obtaining a standard fixed mortgage is very difficult. This further impedes the process of acquiring affordable housing for those who may have been viable candidates. • Insufficient Federal and State resources for affordable housing initiatives, such as programs and resources to build housing, provide rental assistance and tax credits for homebuyers. • New Jersey's property taxes are the highest in the nation by the per capita measure and 2nd highest as a percentage of income. • Severe impediments to ease in filing Fair Housing complaint. Complaints cannot be made online; an individual has to travel to Paterson to file a complaint. • The New Jersey Highlands Act restricts development within the delineated Highlands Protection Area. With the diminishment of available land, the cost of remaining land will rise, affecting existing and future stock of affordable housing. • The New Jersey State Development and Redevelopment Plan, has had influence over land use through its designation of all areas in NJ as 1 of 5 different Planning Areas each with associated growth expectations. Implications for development constraints indicate an increase in costs for affordable housing. • Development approval process, e.g. state and regional agencies, county and municipal planning boards, utility authorities and soil conservation districts, all time consuming and therefore increasing cost of development • Impact fees associated with new development e.g., roads, sewer, water and other public facilities, result in the costs being passed along to the new homeowners and renters. • NYMBYism against affordable housing proposals. Lead-based Paint 91.215 (i)

62. Describe the jurisdiction’s plan to evaluate and reduce lead-based paint hazards

and describe how lead based paint hazards will be integrated into housing policies and programs, and how the plan for the reduction of lead-based hazards is related to the extent of lead poisoning and hazards.

65

Accordingly, the Division of Community Development has implemented the leadbased paint regulations requirements in the programs it administers. Specifically, it has helped develop and present educational presentations on lead-based paint hazards to students of the Step-by-Step Program for first time homebuyers. It also conducts visual assessments prior to the sale of a house to a first time homebuyer and provides educational material to first time homebuyers published by the US EPA entitled "Reducing Lead Hazards When Remodeling Your Home." Antipoverty Strategy 91.215 (j)
63. Describe the jurisdiction's goals, programs, and policies for reducing the number

of poverty level families (as defined by the Office of Management and Budget and revised annually The Division of Community Development does not itself have an adopted antipoverty strategy. Nonetheless the Division is involved in addressing poverty, de facto, in its role as administrators of HUD CDBG, CDBG-R, HOME, ESG and HPRP programs. In carrying out those responsibilities, the Division serves as a partner in several coalitions including CEAS, the Fair Housing Committee of the Morris County Human Relations Commission and the Housing Alliance of Morris County. Viewed as a governmental service provider, and located within the county government complex, the Division frequently serves as an information and referral provider to potential clients in need of assistance. Therefore the Division plays a part in a full spectrum of services needed to address the multiple needs of people in poverty. Examples of local efforts include the work of the Morris County Department of Human Services. The Division of Employment and Temporary Assistance offers employment and training services through the One Stop Career Center, the Workforce Investment Act, the Workforce Development Partnership Program, Work First New Jersey Program, Workforce Investment Board and the Youth Investment Council. In a county where residents rely heavily on single occupied vehicles to commute to work, lack of transportation is a pervasive problem interfering with many lowincome individuals trying to get to jobs. While providers recognize this gap, services, such as "Morris On the Move" and the Division of Employment and Temporary Assistance Office of Training and Assistance voucher system, are scant. Compounding this gap is the related need for transportation to child care services, a necessary reality enabling parents to work. The Morris County Human Services Advisory Council (HSAC) identified lack of transportation to and from child care services as a high priority need in their "2003 Child Care Services Plan Update." Affordable child care, as well as quality child care especially for infants and toddlers, were high priority items identified by HSAC.

66

The Offices of Temporary Assistance Program Services also provide a variety of financial, medical and social services for those who meet certain criteria, depending on family size, monthly income, assets and resources. The Morris County Mental Health and Substance Abuse Advisory Board (Morris County Department of Human Services) is working to address the service gap specific to indigent and homeless individuals. The needs of immigrants brings a new dimension to these issues. While specific needs are being researched, provision of culturally competent services are recommended.
64. Identify the extent to which this strategy will reduce (or assist in reducing) the

number of poverty level families, taking into consideration factors over which the jurisdiction has control. It is hoped that all funded activities will make individuals, families, households and communities stronger, consequently contribution toward the reduction of poverty. Institutional Structure 91.215 (k)
65. Provide a concise summary of the institutional structure through which the

jurisdiction will carry out its consolidated plan, including private industry, non-profit organizations, community and faith-based organizations, and public institutions. The jurisdiction will carry out its consolidated plan through a network of partnerships with governmental and non profit agencies. It reinforces these relationships through participation in regional efforts such as the Housing Alliance of Morris County, the Housing Committee of the Morris County Human Relations Commission and the Comprehensive Emergency Assistance Strategy Committee (CEAS). The Division collaborates with the Community Development Revenue Sharing (CDRS) Committee, consisting of municipal representatives, and other municipal officials in coordinating efforts to meet public facility, infrastructure improvements, public service needs, accessibility needs, economic development needs, and housing needs. The CDRS Committee determines which projects receive funding. Funding resources and programs for the homeless are coordinated through the Comprehensive Emergency Assistance System (CEAS). The county has entered into inter-local Cooperation Agreements with 37 municipalities which form the urban county. The two remaining municipalities, Parsippany-Troy Hills and Dover, have joined with the urban county in meeting housing needs with HOME funds. All participating municipalities and non-profit agencies apply for funding for CDBG, HOME, and Emergency Shelter Grants to the Division of Community

67

Development.The county enters into agreements for implementation of projects except for housing rehabilitation, which is administered directly by the Division. The Board of Chosen Freeholders, through the Division of Community Development, has the ultimate responsibility in assuring that the priority needs of the Consolidated Plan are met. The Division provides technical assistance to, and monitoring of, the municipalities, non-profit housing developers and service providers, and county agencies and authorities for projects that meet the needs documented in the plan. Priority human service needs are developed and incorporated into the Comprehensive Human Services Plan, and funding resources and programs to meet service needs, including health and mental health, are coordinated through the Department of Human services based on recommendations made by the Human services Advisory Council (HSAC) and its committees. Both public and private agencies are active on their respective committees. The lead agency meets with appropriate staff and committees to implement the strategies of the plan. The Division was recently invited, as a non-voting member, to participate in HSAC. Although the county enjoys a positive relationship with each of the five PHAs, it only has a formal relationship with the Morris County Housing Authority, by virtue of the county appointing the Commissioners to the Morris County Housing Authority Board. The county does not have any jurisdiction over the Morris County Housing Authority concerning its administration, development or other activities. However, as required, the county reviews all five PHA's Annual and Five-Year Plans for consistency, and assigns Certifications of Consistency accordingly. Each PHA boasts a respectable track record.
66. Provide an assessment of the strengths and gaps in the delivery system.

Strengths and Gaps in the Delivery System: The strengths of this delivery system lie in relationships and experience. The staff at Community Development have fostered relationships throughout the jurisdiction. This enables a certain "comfort level" in applicants' abilities and reliability in carrying through grants. Additionally, the staff and many applicants have a seasoned familiarity with the programs, facilitating grant development and implementation, as well as maximizing grant value through coordination between HOME and CDBG. The United Way of Morris County continues to facilitate the activities of the Morris County Housing Alliance. Because organizations approach affordable housing, through their service of specific subpopulations, the coalition is broad-based. Gaps in the delivery system have to do primarily with scarcity of resources, whether it be deminishing funds (Federal and State) or land (specifically for construction of housing). Based on information from providers and towns, as well as the total

68

amount requested through grant applications, the prevailing trend indicates a need for housing, services, and facilities, increasingly exceeding the supply of funding. These needs have been accentuated by the current recession, which has resulted in “newly needy” and pushed vulnerable households into need. A programmatic gap lies within the HOME program which applies income criteria on a regional basis, encompassing Newark. This results in unrealistic figures for Morris County, which has higher median sales prices for residential units. In Morris County there is a growing shortage of land for home construction. This low supply is resulting in substandard parcels. Project developers need to be creative in designing housing opportunities. That creativity needs to be met by flexibility within the formula programs.
67. Describe efforts to enhance coordination with private industry, businesses,

developers, and social service agencies, particularly with regard to the development of the jurisdiction’s economic development strategy. (91.215(l)) Enhanced coordination with private industry, businesses, developers and social service agencies is occurring through participation in coalition groups e.g., Housing Alliance of Morris County, the Fair Housing Committee of the Morris County Human Relations Commission, the county’s Human Services Advisory Committee, the Comprehensive Emergency Assistance Systems (CEAS), and through regular communication with the members of the Division’s Community Development Revenue Sharing Advisory Committee. This last group consists of volunteers from each participating municipality in the county. They review all the programs’ grant applications, make funding recommendations and serve as liaisons between the county and their towns. Coordination 91.215 (l)

68. Describe the efforts to enhance coordination between public and assisted

housing providers and governmental health, mental health, and service agencies. The best forum for coordination among housing providers is the Housing Alliance of Morris County and for governmental health, mental health and service agencies, the county’s Human Services Advisory Committee. Both organizations meet monthly and the Division is a participating member.
69. Describe efforts in addressing the needs of persons that are chronically

homeless with respect to the preparation of the homeless strategy. The County’s Continuum of Care is the most coordinated effort addressing needs of persons that are chronically homeless.

69

The "Step off the Street" project at the Mental Health Association of Morris County houses individuals in motel and/or apartments with case management services. The Eric Johnson House provides transitional housing and has 10 beds available on site and/or supportive services to chronically homeless people. The Market Street Mission provides transitional housing and supportive services to chronically homeless men. Strategy for helping homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. Transitional Housing opportunities in the county include: • Jersey Battered Women Services - serving families with children • Homeless Solutions, Inc. - Transitional Housing - serving families with children • Roots and Wings - serving unaccompanied young males and females • Market Street Mission - serving single males • The Eric Johnson House - serving single males and females with AIDS. The county's long-term plan "Homelessness to Home Ownership…" identified emerging strategies during its preparation, reflecting needs for services for people who are homeless; these included: • better, advanced housing planning for families with members of vulnerable populations; • creating a central, culturally competent center that is accessible to all for information, service delivery/referrals, and personal advocacy; • increased supply of affordable housing; • examining the best alternative for housing those with substance abuse issues • advocating to increase job skills, local job opportunities and livable wages to county residents; and • coordinated services available to homeless people. Goals included: • maintain quantity and quality of existing Emergency Shelter, Transitional, and Permanent supportive housing; • increase collaboration and coordination of Food distribution resources; • identify faith-based resources for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness; • improve transportation options for homeless people; • increase number of units of Permanent Supportive Housing for families and individuals; • enhance homeless people's access to mainstream and other social service programs in the county; • improve employment opportunities for homeless people; and • expand outreach to specialized populations.
70. Describe the means of cooperation and coordination among the state and any

units of general local government in the metropolitan area in the implementation of the plan.

70

In Morris County has entered into inter-local Cooperation Agreements with 37 municipalities which form the urban county. The two remaining municipalities, Parsippany-Troy Hills and Dover, have joined with the urban county in meeting housing needs with HOME funds.
71. Describe efforts to enhance coordination with private industry, businesses,

developers, and social service agencies, particularly with regard to the development of the jurisdiction’s economic development strategy. The Division does not, at this time, fund activities of economic development.
72. Describe the jurisdiction's efforts to coordinate its housing strategy with local

and regional transportation planning strategies to ensure to the extent practicable that residents of affordable housing have access to public transportation. The best forum for coordination of housing activities is the Housing Alliance of Morris County. The Division enjoys a close working relationship with the county’s Department of Transportation and Department of Planning and Development, which allows for coordination of reviews and technical assistance to municipalities, non profits and others. Monitoring 91.230
73. Describe the standards and procedures the jurisdiction will use to monitor its

housing and community development projects and ensure long-term compliance with program requirements and comprehensive planning requirements. All activities administered by the Morris County Division of Community Development are monitored as follows: Planning: Proposed activities are reviewed for eligibility under statutory and regulatory requirements and for their ability to meet an identified need in the County's Consolidated Plan. Implementation: Fiscal monitoring of activities include the review and approval of activity budgets; compliance with executed Grant Agreements and the subsequent review and approval of vouchers. Long-term Compliance: Staff establish a monitoring schedule for HOME projects as required. Based on the monitoring schedule staff conduct site visits to ensure compliance with the following: * Period of affordability * Income of tenants * Amount of rent charged * Housing quality standards of facility. Each activity is filed separately under a general Compliance/Monitoring File.

71

The County attempts, to the maximum extent possible, to identify Minority Business Enterprises and Women Business Enterprises and implement outreach programs to ensure inclusion of these entities in all contracting activities of the HOME program. Procedures include: * Methods to identify certified minority and women's business enterprises * Outreach Program * Record keeping * Other Activities. Staff visit facilities funded through Community Development Block Grant to ensure continued compliance with the national objective and applicable program requirements. Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) *Refers to the HOPWA Table in the Needs.xls workbook.
74. Describe the activities to be undertaken with HOPWA Program funds to address

priority unmet housing needs for the eligible population. Activities will assist persons who are not homeless but require supportive housing, such as efforts to prevent low-income individuals and families from becoming homeless and may address the housing needs of persons who are homeless in order to help homeless persons make the transition to permanent housing and independent living. N/A
75. Identify any obstacles to meeting underserved needs and summarize the

priorities and specific objectives, describing how funds made available will be used to address identified needs. N/A
76. The Plan must establish annual HOPWA output goals for the planned number of

households to be assisted during the year in: (1) short-term rent, mortgage and utility payments to avoid homelessness; (2) rental assistance programs; and (3) in housing facilities, such as community residences and SRO dwellings, where funds are used to develop and/or operate these facilities. The plan can also describe the special features or needs being addressed, such as support for persons who are homeless or chronically homeless. These outputs are to be used in connection with an assessment of client outcomes for achieving housing stability, reduced risks of homelessness and improved access to care. N/A
77. For housing facility projects being developed, a target date for the completion of

each development activity must be included and information on the continued use of these units for the eligible population based on their stewardship

72

requirements (e.g. within the ten-year use periods for projects involving acquisition, new construction or substantial rehabilitation). N/A
78. Provide an explanation of how the funds will be allocated including a description

of the geographic area in which assistance will be directed and the rationale for these geographic allocations and priorities. Include the name of each project sponsor, the zip code for the primary area(s) of planned activities, amounts committed to that sponsor, and whether the sponsor is a faith-based and/or grassroots organization. N/A 79. Describe the role of the lead jurisdiction in the eligible metropolitan statistical area (EMSA), involving (a) consultation to develop a metropolitan-wide strategy for addressing the needs of persons with HIV/AIDS and their families living throughout the EMSA with the other jurisdictions within the EMSA; (b) the standards and procedures to be used to monitor HOPWA Program activities in order to ensure compliance by project sponsors of the requirements of the program. N/A Specific HOPWA Objectives
80. Identify specific objectives that the jurisdiction intends to initiate and/or

complete in accordance with the tables* prescribed by HUD. Complete and submit Table 1C Summary of Specific Objectives or, if using the CPMP Tool, the Summaries.xls worksheets. N/A
81. Describe how Federal, State, and local public and private sector resources that

are reasonably expected to be available will be used to address identified needs for the period covered by the strategic plan. N/A OTHER NARRATIVES AND ATTACHMENTS
82. Include any Strategic Plan information that was not covered by a narrative in

any other section. If optional tables are not used, provide comparable information that is required by consolidated plan regulations. N/A 83. Section 108 Loan Guarantee

73

If the jurisdiction has an open Section 108 project, provide a summary of the project. The summary should include the Project Name, a short description of the project and the current status of the project, the amount of the Section 108 loan, whether you have an EDI or BEDI grant and the amount of this grant, the total amount of CDBG assistance provided for the project, the national objective(s) codes for the project, the Matrix Codes, if the activity is complete, if the national objective has been met, the most current number of beneficiaries (jobs created/retained, number of FTE jobs held by/made available to LMI persons, number of housing units assisted, number of units occupied by LMI households, etc.) N/A
84. Regional Connections

Describe how the jurisdiction's strategic plan connects its actions to the larger strategies for the metropolitan region. Does the plan reference the plans of other agencies that have responsibilities for metropolitan transportation, economic development, and workforce investment?

74

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful