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Covering the communities of Barkhamsted • Colebrook • Hartland • New Hartford • Norfolk • Winchester • Winsted

AREA
DOT Gives
Details Of
Transportation
Project A2

12 pages in 1 section • $1.25

WINSTED
Geography Bee
At St. Anthony
School A3

OPINION New Zoning Regulations Are Key To Economy; Columns A6

SPORTS
Norfolk
Curling Club
Sweeps On A5

COMPASS Movie: ‘Concussion’; and More A9-10

The Winsted Journal

www.tricornernews.com • 860-738-4418

Volume 20, Number 32 • FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 2016

© 2016 The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC Periodical Rate Postage Paid at Lakeville (Town of Salisbury), Connecticut 06039

Epiphany celebrated at Boar’s Head

New zoning
regulations
almost ready

By ERICA TAYLOR
WINSTED — “If anyone is caught
not enjoying the show, they will be
flogged!” youth choir director and
financial secretary for the First Church
of Winsted, Debbie Storrs, said at the
beginning of the 26th annual Boar’s
Head Festival.
The event was held on both Saturday, Jan. 9, and Sunday, Jan. 10.
Before each performance, Storrs
went over the rules of attending the
festival.
“It’s a small church, but it turns into
a pilgrimage,” Storrs said. “It’s much
more than just a show!”
Proceeds benefitting the Sharon
Lewis Memorial Scholarship Fund
and the Open Door Soup Kitchen.
The festival brought in about 500
people throughout both Jan. 9 and
Jan. 10.
Despite the rainy weather, the Jan.
10 perfomance had a packed house
and all seemed in good spirits to enjoy
the live nativity scene including a full

By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON
WINSTED — New zoning regulations will be completed in February,
according to representatives from
both the town’s Planning and Zoning Commission and Zoning Board
of Appeals.
Members of both the commission
and the board spoke at the Board
of Selectmen’s meeting on Monday,
Jan. 4.
In May, the commission chose to
hire Graydon Land Use Strategies
of Cincinnati, Ohio, to consult with
the town in analyzing and rewriting
zoning regulations.
In August, the commission voted
to form a subcommittee to review
the proposed revisions.
Town Planner Steven Sadlowski,
See ZONING, page A8

PHOTO BY ERICA TAYLOR

See BOAR’S HEAD, page A8

A large cast performed at the Boar’s Head Festival on Sunday, Jan. 10, at the First Church of Winsted.

Superintendent’s lawsuit against BOE chair
continues after almost six months
By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON
WINSTED — On Monday, Jan.
11, an attorney for Superintendent
of Schools Anne Watson filed a motion objecting to the dismissal of her
lawsuit against Board of Education
Chairman Susan Hoffnagle.
The motion was filed at the Superior Court of Hartford by Watson’s
attorney Leon Rosenblatt of Hartford.
It has been almost six months since
Watson originally filed the lawsuit
against Hoffnagle.
On Aug. 17, School District Receiv-

PHOTO BY SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON

Northwestern Connecticut Community College President Michael
Rooke.

NCCC
president:
a new vision
for 2016

er Robert Travaglini placed Watson
on administrative leave to conduct a
“thorough and objective review.”
As of this month, Travaglini still has
not issued any reports or any review
on Watson.
Over the past few months, The
Winsted Journal has asked Travaglini
about the review on Watson.
In every interview, Travaglini
would not comment on the situation.
On Aug. 19, after she was placed
on administrative leave, Watson filed
a lawsuit against both Hoffnagle and
the Board of Education.

In the lawsuit, filed by Rosenblatt,
Watson makes several accusations
against both Hoffnagle and the school
district.
Rosenblatt claims that Hoffnagle’s
and the board’s actions caused Watson
to be removed from her position as
superintendent and “the defendants
have damaged the plaintiff ’s reputation and placed her in a false public
light.”
Watson is suing Hoffnagle and the
board for financial damages, benefits,
compensatory damages, costs and attorney’s fees.

In a motion filed on Nov. 9 by Hoffnagle’s attorney Allison Pannozzo,
associate attorney at Rose Kallor LLP
in Hartford, Pannozzo moved for a
dismissal of the case.
Pannozzo argues that neither Hoffnagle or the board had any authority to
remove Watson as superintendent and
seeks a dismissal of the lawsuit under
Connecticut General Statute 31-51m.
The statute reads, in part: “No
employer shall discharge, discipline
or otherwise penalize any employee
See LAWSUIT, page A8

Ski Sundown opens late for season
By JESSE WILLIAMS

By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON
WINSTED — Northwestern Connecticut Community College (NCCC)
President Michael Rooke is looking
forward to the remainder of the 20152016 school year.
Rooke was named the college’s new
president in mid-October by the state’s
Board of Regents, taking the place of
Barbara Douglass, who retired on Oct.
1 after serving for 11 years.
Rooke is originally from Yorkshire,
England, and he earned his baccalaureate degree in applied chemistry from
Nottingham Trent University.
He earned a Ph.D. in analytical
chemistry from Kansas State University, a Master of Science degree in
educational technology from Long
Island University and a Bachelor of
Science degree in applied chemistry
from Nottingham Trent.
Rooke started his educational administrative career at the University
of Hartford, where he served as the
assistant professor of the chemistry
See ROOKE, page A8

NEW HARTFORD — For all you
frustrated winter sports enthusiasts,
Ski Sundown has a message: The wait
is finally over.
Long delayed by the unseasonably
warm beginning of winter that saw
records shattered throughout New
England, Ski Sundown took advantage of plummeting temperatures
last week and opened for business
on Friday, Jan. 8.
The opening was a relief to many
local residents and employees of the
ski resort, including ski resort marketing director Lori Shield.
“This has been a bit of a strange
winter,” Shield said “Just unprecedented.”
Although Shield said staff have
been hard at work at the resort since
November, there was nothing they
could do about weather that included
70-degree days in December and rain
that would wash away any attempt to
build up a snow base on the slopes.
“Telling skiers that they have to
wait just stinks,” Shield said. “I felt
really badly for children and families over Christmas vacation when
they’re accustomed to coming here.
Hopefully this will just become a bad,
distant memory.”

Shield said that the evening of
the opening on Jan. 8 had a “carnival
atmosphere,” and that the resort is
actually seeing more business than
they would usually see this time of
year because of the delay.
On the morning shortly after
opening, Shield said the resort was
already seeing a brisk business, with
a steady trickle of cars filling up the
parking lots and groups of skiers
and snowboarders crowding around
the lifts.
“People are overjoyed,” Shield said.
Even after the big opening, Mother
Nature stayed uncooperative, as a
thaw and heavy rain on Sunday, Jan.
10 initially threatened the integrity
of the slopes. But Shield said that
through the use of new portable snow
guns, as well as with the resource of
stockpiles of snow made during last
week’s freezing temperatures, none
of the slopes had to close.
“We’re working around the clock,
taking every opportunity to make the
snow that we can,” Shield said.
Shield said these measure should
prevent any further interruption to
the ski season, regardless of continued
thaws or rain.
Looking ahead, Shield said that
See SKI SUNDOWN, page A8

Celebrating our 20th year of publication

SEND LETTERS

editor@winstedjournal.com
The Winsted Journal, 396 Main St.,
PO Box 835, Winsted, CT 06098

Area............................ A2
Winsted...................... A3
State Police ........... A4
Sports ....................... A5

Editorial .................. A6
Brain Teasers ....... A7
Compass ......... A9-10
Classifieds....A11-12

PHOTO BY JESSE WILLIAMS

Ski Sundown finally opened up for the season on Friday, Jan. 8. The
season started very late due to the unusually warm winter.

Winsted municipal meeting schedule

Monday, Jan. 18
Town Hall closed for Martin
Luther King Jr. holiday
Tuesday, Jan. 19
Board of Selectmen, 7 p.m.
Economic Development
Commission 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Jan. 20
Inland Wetlands
and Watercourses
Commission, 7 p.m.

Meetings are scheduled to take
place at Town Hall except
where noted. Times and dates
are subject to change.
For more information go to
www.townofwinchester.org.

A2

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

Area News

Armed robbery investigated
NEW HARTFORD — The
State Police are investigating an
attempted armed robbery that
took place at Radwick’s Coffee
and Deli on Tuesday, Jan. 12.
The store is located at 1165
Litchfield Turnpike on Route
202 and is also referred to as the
Bakerville Store.
According to a press release
issued by the State Police, troop-

ers from Troop B-North Canaan
and detectives from the Western
District Major Crime unit responded to a call at the store at
5 p.m. on Jan. 12.
Troopers secured the scene
and, along with K9 units, searched
the area for subjects.
The store’s clerk described a
male suspect who demanded cash
after showing a black handgun.
The suspect tried to get cash
from the store’s register but left

after he could not get money from
the register.
He then left on foot towards
Cotton Hill Road and may have
entered a vehicle.
No injuries were reported at
the crime scene.
The suspect is described as a
white male, 5’ 8” and approximately 140 to 150 pounds. He is
also described as having a thin
build, with blonde hair and blue
or green eyes.

The suspect was wearing a
black hooded sweatshirt, a black
fleece-style neck warmer pulled
up to his nose and a black baseball cap.
The State Police asks that
if anyone has any information
on the suspect to call Detective
Barbero at 860-626-1869 or 860626-1841, or text TIP711 with the
information to 236748.
All calls and texts will be kept
confidential.

DOT reps give details
of transportation project
By ERICA TAYLOR

BARKHAMSTED — On
Thursday, Jan. 7, representatives
from the state’s Department of
Transportation (DOT) held a
public informational meeting at
the town’s Highway Garage.
The meeting was held to give
details of a proposed intersection
improvement project at Route
219 and Route 318.
The meeting was a public
outreach to gather feedback and
comments from the community to identify the next steps
in moving the project towards
construction.
“Our unit is responsible for
reviewing locations that come
to our attention and this particular project was brought to our
attention by a state trooper and
[First Selectman] Don Stein,” Supervising Engineer of the Project
Development Unit, Peter Talarico
said. “We try to establish early
coordination with major stakeholders, in this particular case
both the town of Barkhamsted
and the metropolitan district
commission. Part of what we do
is we make sure the concepts we
develop are technically feasible,
and the meet established design
criteria, but we also want to make
sure that whatever we come up
with can fit well with the community.”
Talarico said the route is a significant East-West truck route to
Route 44 and Bradley Airport in
Windsor Locks. According to the
DOT, the route sees an estimated
6,200 to 6,800 vehicles passing
through daily, with approximately six accidents every three years.
It is a cross-state route which
loops around the Barkhamsted
Reservoir and includes two designated bike routes.

The intersection at Route
181-219 south, past Lake McDonough, is a designated scenic
route and attracts many visitors
during the summertime, according to DOT officials.
“With the cutoff road and
secondary cutoff road, we have
five intersections here today,”
project engineer Paul Metsack
said at the meeting.“The primary
intersection on Route 318 is stop
controlled and it’s difficult to see
what’s coming up the road from
Route 219.”
He added that the steep conditions of the hill make problems
for trucks in slippery conditions
to get going after stopping. With
average speeds such as 48 MPH
on Route 219 and 46 MPH on
Route 318, there is a possibility
of head-on collisions and other
serious accidents.
Metsack said that facing westbound on Route 318, the cutoff
road intersection is where the
new, T-style intersection will be
directly across from the driveway
in front of the reservoir. The
department is proposing to close
off the leg of Route 219 which
comes to a sharp skewed angle,
creating a smoother, continuous
throughway.
“One of the biggest concerns
that we have with this intersection, not only can you not see
cars coming up behind you from
your right, but the cars coming
down the road have a through
movement in both directions,”
Metsack said. “ If I go to the right
on Route 318, I go to the left onto
Route 219, it’s just a through
movement for me, I don’t need
to signal, there is nothing that
says I have to yield or anything.
It makes it more difficult for the
person sitting at the south side
to know whether or not they

COLEBROOK — The Colebrook Preservation Society received a $5,500 matching grant
made possible by the Edwin M.
Stone and Edith H. Stone Fund
and the Marion Wm. Alice
Edwards Fund, both funds of
the Community Foundation of
Northwest Connecticut.
The grant requires the Colebrook Preservation Society to
raise matching funds of $5,500,
which in total sum will be used
for restoration and repair of
the Colebrook Store, which the
CPS purchased in 2013.
“We are delighted to be the
recipient of this generous grant
and to be recognized as an important community program
by the funds of the Community
Foundation of Northwest Connecticut,’ said Edward G. Lord,
president and board chair of
the CPS. “This is an important
and timely contribution to kick
off our 2016 annual appeal as
we continue to fund a $100,000

capital improvement program
to stabilize the Colebrook
Store building, replace exterior
siding and windows, fix rotted
sill and roofing and procure
an emergency generator,” he
added.
Visitors to the Colebrook
Store, located at 559 Colebrook
Road (Route 183) will see evidence of continuing renewal of
the 223-year-old four-column
building that houses the bustling country store operated by
Jodi Marinelli.
A visually intrusive fan
system was replaced, new windows have been installed, and
replacement of new siding and
new insulation is underway.
Tax deductible donations
of any amount may be sent to
the Colebrook Preservation Society, P.O. Box 24, Colebrook,
CT 06021. Include your name
and address so an acknowledgement and receipt for your
tax records can be sent to you.

Budget presentation on Jan. 20
COLEBROOK — All members of the Colebrook community are invited to hear a
presentation of the superintendent’s 2016-2017 proposed
budget on Wednesday, Jan. 20
at 7:30 p.m. in the Colebrook
School multi-purpose room. Superintendent James P. Chittum
will explain in details his plans

PHOTO BY ERICA TAYLOR

First Selectman Don Stein and Department of Transportation
representative Peter Talarico.
can go.”
The project would provide a
minimum 20 foot pass section, to
allow the vehicles traveling west
on Route 318 or south on Route
219 to be able to safely pass by
left-turning vehicles.
The department has opened
a two-week comment period for
anyone with concerns about the
proposal to get in touch with
them and representatives said
that they are flexible in addressing concerns.
Some concerns attendees
discussed before and after the
meeting with the representatives
included beach traffic issues,
whether the project would in-

Correction
The residents listed in the
the photo cutline for the article
“New Year’s glitz and glamour
at Crystal Peak,” published in
the Jan. 8 issue of The Winsted
Journal, were misidentified.
The residents in the photo
are, from left, Rhonda Detlefsen, Ken Kazlauskas, Lara
Green-Kazlauskas, Jane Cohen
and Gay Schempp.

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Learn more with a presentation by:
Dr. Mike Mangini, PT, DPT, OCS, CMP
Board Certified Clinical Specialist
Orthopedic Physical Therapy
Wednesday, January 27, 3:30 pm
Geer Village - Hollenbeck Room - Light refreshments
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crease traffic or discourage traffic
from routes, school bus and tractor trailer safety, and concerns
for the biking community and
wildlife. Overall, the audience
response was positive and most
seemed anxious to see the project
underway.
The project is in the conceptual development stages, and if
it moves into the design phase,
another, more detailed public
meeting will be held in 2018. The
project has an anticipated cost of
$3 million, with 20 percent rural
funding and 80 percent funding
from both federal and state
funds. The target construction
date is 2020.

for allocating resources for the
operation of the school district.
Community members will
have an opportunity to ask
questions and provide input to
this proposal before the Board
of Education takes action on
the final proposal to be presented to the Board of Finance
in February.

derful Thing
n
o
s
W nnual Ya
r
n Sa
dA
r
le
3

2

By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON

Colebrook Preservation Society
receives matching grant

Jan 21st-24th

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THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

A3

Winsted

DARE program
resurrected
By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON

PHOTO BY SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON

Students who participated in St. Anthony School’s annual Geography Bee on Friday, Jan. 8.

St. Anthony students quizzed in geography
By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON
WINSTED — St. Anthony
School held its annual Geography Bee on Friday, Jan. 8.
The bee is held in schools
across the country and is organized by the National Geographic Society.
Nine students took part in
the event, which included participants from fifth to eighth
grade.
The winner of the competition was eighth-grade student
Sydney Kolosky. Second place
was seventh-grader Billy Lyder,
and third place was eighth-

grade student Gabe Landi.
Seventh-grade teacher Scott
Norton moderated the event
and asked students geography
questions.
“What we do is start off a
classroom component and then
we have a competition within
the classroom to determine
grade level winners,” Norton
said in an interview before the
bee started. “From there we
pick the winners to compete
in the school championship.
From here, the winner of the
bee will take a written test in
an attempt to qualify for the
state level competition.”

Norton said the winner of
the state competition in April
will move on to the national
bee held in Washington, D.C. ,
in May, where the winner will
receive a $50,000 scholarship.
“Geography is important to
students because it gives them a
window to the world,” Norton
said. “Geography is important
because students need to know
where things are because it’s
a multicultural world. As a
country, America is involved
in everything across the globe,
including a global economy.
An app like Google Maps is a
great tool, but you still need to

Enrollment blitz begins NCCC semester
By ALICIA KIRSCH
WINSTED — On Saturday,
Jan. 9, Northwestern Connecticut Community College
(NCCC) held its Super Saturday
Enrollment Blitz for the upcoming semester at Green Woods
Hall. Students from all walks
of life and levels of education
attended and checked out course
offerings.
Glastonbury resident Chris
Fiddler is a new college student
who said he hopes to be a veterinarian and said he was there just
checking out the school.
Stephanie Stankiewicz of
Torrington on the other hand,
already has her Certified Nursing
Assistant (CNA) from Goodwin
College in East Hartford.
“I’m taking classes to further
my nursing education along,”
Stankiewicz said. “One aspect
about NCCC that I like is that
it’s spread out like a true college
campus.”
Winsted resident Eireann
Doherty, already a licensed
practical nurse, wants to become
a registered nurse.
She said that she previously took classes at Asnuntuck
Community College in Enfield,
but said that NCCC is “much

Game night
WINSTED — The Winchester PTO is sponsoring a free
game night on Friday, Jan. 15, at
Hinsdale School in the cafeteria.
Time slots for play are 5, 6, and 7
p.m. (one hour) to play. All community families are invited. Food
will be available for purchase.
A table will be set up to purchase games, and 50 percent of
the proceeds will benefit the
PTO.

PHOTOS BY ALICIA KIRSCH

Glastonbury resident Chris Fiddler and Winsted resident
Eireann Doherty checked out Northwestern Connecticut
Community College during its Super Saturday Enrollment
Blitz event on Saturday, Jan. 9.
friendlier,” and even though she
is ready for the new semester
that the registration “was making
[her] even more excited.”
Faculty was also on hand to
assist the students in any way they
could at the registration event.
Jane O’Grady, who is the program
coordinator for Medical Assisting
and Allied Health, has been full
time at NCCC since 2008 after
being an adjunct since 1995. She
graduated from NCCC in 1992.
“I love NCCC because of
the students and the size of the

college,” O’Grady said. “I know
that it is a place that truly makes
a difference in people’s lives.”
She said so often in life, people
grow and their interests change
and that NCCC is a place to
cultivate those changes.
“It’s not rare to have 60-yearolds in my classes after they’ve
decided to shift career paths,”
O’Grady said.“I also love that the
faculty all know each other and
can get the students precisely who
they need because of the strong
network.”

have a knowledge of where the
world is to find its significance
and importance.”
“I think geography is extremely important to students,” school Principal Patricia
Devanney said. “It’s important
for our children not just to
know about our local community, but also about our state
and world. It’s something they
have to have. They should know
that Google Maps is there, but
there is nothing like having
the geographical knowledge
themselves. Technology is very
important, but it is not the end
all for everything.”

Learn about
Girl Scouts
Colebrook, Norfolk and
Winsted girls in kindergarten
through second grade can
learn about becoming a Girl
Scout on Thursday, Jan. 28,
from 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at
the Beardsley and Memorial
Library. This event will be
canceled if schools are closed
or dismiss early because of
weather.
Girls must be accompanied by an adult. Parents
may apply to be a leader.
For more information on
this and other Girl Scout
programs, contact Teresa
Allen 203-757-1340 ext 3615
or tallen@gsofct.org.

1st Time Home LAKEVILLE

WINSTED — After a fouryear hiatus, the Winchester
School District’s DARE program
has been resurrected, according
to Sgt. Robert Varasconi.
According to the national
program’s official website at
www.dare.org, the program,
which stands for Drug Abuse
Resistance Education, was
founded in 1983 in Los Angeles.
It has grown over the 32 years
and is now implemented in 75
percent of America’s school
districts and 52 countries.
The program consists of
a series of classroom lessons
taught by police officers on
how to resist peer pressure, the
dangers of drugs and bullying.
According to Varasconi, the
reason why the program has
not been implemented in the
past four years is due to a lack
of funding.
Varasconi said that the department received a donation
from the Auxiliary Thrift Shop
in order to buy program supplies
and materials, although he did
not specify how much the shop
donated to the department.
“The shop made a generous donation to help fund the
program,” Varasconi said. “We
are also looking for donations
to fund other parts of the program.”
While the national program
is taught at all grade levels,
from Kindergarten to twelfth
grade, Varasconi said that the
local program will concentrate
on sixth grade classes at both
Pearson Middle School and St.
Anthony School.
“The program we will be
teaching will be for 10 weeks
in a classroom,” Varasconi said.
“It will be taught by both myself
and Officer Daniel Pietrafesa.
We will be teaching them how
to make wise decisions and
how to deal with certain tough

situations they have to deal
with today. We want to build
confidence in them and have
them feel comfortable with the
police so if they do have issues
and problems, they can come to
us so we can help them.”
Varasconi said that the program is extremely important to
the community and its children.
“A lot of kids are subjected
to a lot of opportunities that are
not necessarily good,” he said.
“This includes opportunities to
take drugs, alcohol or tobacco.
Also, children are subjected to
peer pressure and bullying issues.It’s very important for the
DARE program to exist.”
He said that after the 10
classes, there will be a day at
both schools for a graduation
ceremony.
“We want them to know that,
because of their hard efforts to
study and learn these materials,
that they’ve all made quite an
accomplishment,” Varasconi
said. “It was Chief William
Fitzgerald’s desire to get this
program back and running, and
we’re happy to do so. There has
been a lot of positive changes
thanks to the chief.”
Varasconi said that this will
be the first time the program
has been offered to St. Anthony
School.
St. Anthony School Principal
Patricia Devanney said she is
happy to have the program.
“We can’t wait for it to start,”
Devanney said. “The first class
started on Wednesday, Jan. 13. I
can’t wait to have an officer in the
building because it’s extremely
important for our children to
have the knowledge of the world
around them. Unfortunately,
drugs and all that go with it
are part of our world. It’s a
part that we don’t like, but it’s a
part that they need to be aware
of. I’m grateful to the police
department for giving us this
opportunity.”

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State website fights fraud
HARTFORD — The State of Connecticut has launched a
website to help its efforts at fighting fraud, waste and abuse
that cost state programs tens of millions of dollars each year.
The website, www.FightFraud.ct.gov, is a one-stop source to
educate the public on what constitutes waste, fraud and abuse
in government programs, and make it easier for the public to
report suspicious conduct.
The website is an outgrowth of the state’s Interagency
Fraud Task Force. Gov. Dannel P. Malloy created the Task
Force in 2013 to coordinate efforts by 13 state agencies and
strengthen the state’s ability to identify, investigate, prosecute
and recover state funds.

Our windows are
your windows
WINSTED — The Winsted
Journal office has big windows
that face both Main and Elm
Streets. This window space is
available to any individual, organization or school to promote an
event or cause, exhibit artwork,
crafts or any other project or idea.
Call The Winsted Journal
office at 860-738-4418 or stop
in to request space.

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repaid in 360 monthly principal and interest payments of $470.24.
Rates as of January 5, 2016 and are subject to change. Payment
amounts do not include taxes, homeowner’s insurance or mortgage
insurance. Your payment will be greater if taxes and/or insurances are
escrowed. Contact a loan representative for details.

SUPPORT YOUR LOCAL GROCER

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372 Main Street Winsted, CT 06098
860-379-1946
Featuring Fine Quality Meats, New York Style Deli,
Local, Natural, and Organic products.

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Torrington Main 129 Main St. (860) 496-2152 • Torrington North 635 Main St. (860) 482-5421
Torringford 235 Dibble St. (860) 482-2664 • Burlington 260 Spielman Hwy. (860) 675-2601
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New Hartford 518 Main St. (860) 738-0200

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A4

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

Obituaries
Marion Ann Donovan
NORFOLK — Marion Ann
Donovan, a career foreign service officer and world
traveler, died peacefully at her home on Dec.
22, 2015. She was 95.
Miss Donovan
was born on Oct. 13,
1920, and grew up in
Brooklyn, N.Y., where
she played the violin
and piano and read
voraciously. Her love
of travel began early,
when, with her father at the
wheel, the Donovan family traveled across the country in a 1928
Buick to visit historic and natural
sites during summer vacations.
Miss Donovan majored in
fine arts at Barnard College,
where she was a member of the
violin section of the Columbia
University Orchestra, had a special passion for archaeology and
won a fellowship to study artists
Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente
Orozco in Mexico. She graduated
cum laude from Barnard in 1941.
Miss Donovan held several
positions in publishing after college, then entered the U.S. Foreign Service, where she served
for more than 25 years. Fiercely
independent her whole life, Miss
Donovan lived and worked as a
single woman in Egypt, Turkey,
Peru, Afghanistan, Vietnam,
Chile, the Ivory Coast and other
countries, sometimes leaving
just before the outbreak of a war.
She loved nothing more than
the adventure of visiting a new
city or country, and eventually
visited every continent and corner of the world, often with her
sister, Mary, who shared her passion for travel. Miss Donovan’s
six nieces and nephew were the
beneficiaries of postcards from
all over the world, written in
her witty and distinctive voice,
with vivid descriptions of all
she saw. Her passion for travel
remained strong throughout her
long life. Well into her 80s, she
said, “When I get a new travel
brochure in the mail, I lick my
chops.”
When asked to name her
favorite country, Miss Donovan
would always say, “The U.S. of
A!” because of the freedoms we
enjoy here.
Miss Donovan found a home
in Norfolk in 1982 after she retired from the foreign service.

She was attracted to Norfolk’s
natural beauty and the Yale
School of Music’s
summer program,
but her decision
was cinched when
she walked into the
Norfolk Public Library and found a
fire burning in the
fireplace. The setting
was so comfortable
and inviting that she
decided that Norfolk
was the town where she wanted
to settle.
Miss Donovan lived happily
as a Norfolk resident for more
than 30 years, where she closely followed local politics and
events, loved the opera and the
many arts the area has to offer,
and enjoyed Norfolk’s changing
seasons — especially the bold
colors of autumn — while building a reputation as a gracious
hostess who spoiled her family
and friends with big meals and
many wonderful weekends at
her home.
A lifelong animal lover, Miss
Donovan was also a devoted
supporter of the Little Guild
of St. Francis, a shelter for cats
and dogs in West Cornwall, and
attended many of its blessings of
the animals over the years.
Miss Donovan is survived by
a sister, six nieces and a nephew.
She received superlative care
around the clock during her
long illness, and the family is
deeply grateful to her wonderful
caregivers: Tina Prigge, Madeline Falk, Theresa Kochiss-Padua, Marcella Jencikova-Sadlon,
Mary Yard, Katie Hester and
Stacey Roberts. The family
would also like to express our
appreciation to the other members of the Norfolk community
who looked out for our aunt
over the years.
A Mass will be celebrated for
Miss Donovan at Immaculate
Conception Church in Norfolk
on Saturday, Jan. 16, at 11 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, those who
wish are invited to make a donation in Miss Donovan’s memory
to the Norfolk Library, the Little Guild of St. Francis (www.
littleguild.org), or a charity of
your choice.
The Kenny Funeral Home in
Norfolk has charge of arrangements.

Einar Lindholm
CORNWALL — Einar Lindholm, 85, died on Jan. 5, 2015, at
the Sharon Hospital after a short
illness. He was the very loving
husband of Patience Lindholm.
Einar was born Feb. 8, 1930, in
Washington, D.C., the son of the
late Hedwig (Krueger) and Svante
Lindholm. He graduated from
Syracuse University with a degree
in architecture and, after serving
in the U.S. Army, he practiced
architecture in the New York City
area with the firms of Thatcher
Construction, William Lescaze,
Welten Becket, and Snibbe Taffel
Lindholm. He transferred his
practice in the 1980s to northwest
Connecticut.
He is survived by his brother,
Ulric Lindholm; his two sons,

Aron and Sven Lindholm; his three
daughters, Wendy Pomeroy, Sera
Daemi and Tyra Lindholm; and his
six grandchildren Arianna, Roya
and Neeka Daemi, Lief and Ariel
Lindholm and Olivia Pomeroy.
He was predeceased by his son
Tobias Dennett.
A memorial service will be held
at the United Church of Christ
on Saturday, Jan. 16, at 3 p.m. A
party to celebrate his life will be
held afterward at his home in West
Cornwall.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Housatonic Valley
Association, P.O. Box 28, Cornwall
Bridge, CT 06754.
The Kenny Funeral Home in
Sharon has charge of the arrangements.

Death Notices
Josef K. Antoniak
Josef K. Antoniak, 84, of New Hartford, died Jan. 3, 2016. Calling
hours followed by a funeral service were held Jan. 7. Burial followed
in St. Francis New Cemetery with full Military Honors. Cook Funeral
Home, Torrington, has care of arrangements.

John ‘Sully’ R. Sullivan
John “Sully” R. Sullivan, 81, of Winsted, died Jan. 7, 2016. Funeral
services will be held Jan. 16 at Winchester Center Congregational
Church at 2 p.m. Burial will be in the spring. Montano-Shea Funeral
Home has care of arrangements.

New Arrival
Elliot Francis Chamberlin
TORRINGTON — A son, Elliot Francis Chamberlin, was born
Dec. 28, 2015, at Charlotte Hungerford Hospital to Sybil (Haggard)
and Tyson J. Chamberlin of Torrington.
Maternal grandparents are Frank and Dora Haggard of Rocky
Mount, N.C.
Paternal grandparents are Marc and Mary Chamberlin of Sun
City, Fla.

State Police
The following information was
provided by the Connecticut State
Police at Troop B. All suspects are
considered innocent until proven
guilty in a court of law.
Speeding while suspended
Michael Diorio, 30, of Winsted was stopped for speeding
on Route 8 southbound in Torrington at 10:57 a.m. Dec. 28. He
was charged with speeding and
driving with a suspended license.
Bond was set at $500. He was
to appear in Bantam Superior
Court Jan. 11.
Driver flees scene
Santo Consolini, 40, of New
Hartford was arrested Jan. 2
after he fled the scene of a collision at about 5:49 p.m. in the
intersection of Burwell and West
Hill roads in New Hartford. The
front of the 1993 Ford F150,
owned by Christine Civitillo, of
the same address, collided with
the driver’s side of a 2008 Acura
TL driven by Wendy Pena, 29,
of New Hartford. There were no
injuries to the drivers or Pena’s
passenger Jacob Beliveau, 29, of
the same address. Consolini was
located by state police. He was
charged with evading responsibility, operating a motor vehicle

without a license, operating an
unregistered motor vehicle and
operating an uninsured motor
vehicle. He was released on a
written promise to appear in
Bantam Superior Court Jan. 19.
Warrant arrest
William Martin, 29, of Winsted was driving on Route 183
in Winsted Jan. 2. At about 7:07
p.m., he was observed by state
police making a U-turn without using a turn signal. He was
stopped. A warrant was found.
He was taken into custody. Martin was charged with violation
of probation. He was held on a
$25,000 bond. He was to appear
in Bantam Superior Court Jan. 4.
Rear-end collision
Brad Steward, 29, of Winsted
was driving east on Greenwoods
Road/Route 44 in Norfolk Jan.
4. At about 9:11 a.m., his 2007
Chevrolet Cobalt hit the rear of
a 2012 Freightliner tractor-trailer
driven by John Braver, 30, of
East Haven. Braver had signaled
and slowed to turn right into a
driveway. Steward had taken his
eyes off the road to operate the
radio. The truck, registered to
Elm City LLC in Killingworth,
Conn., sustained minor rear
damage. The car was towed
with front end damage. Steward
was taken to Winsted Health

Academic Achievements
University of Vermont dean’s list
BURLINGTON, Vt. — The following area students have been
named to the fall 2015 dean’s list at the University of Vermont:
Taylor Roth of New Hartford, an engineering major in UVM’s
College of Engineering and Mathematical Sciences; and Autumn
Maust of New Hartford, a natural resources major in UVM’s Rubenstein School of Environment & Natural Resources.
To be named to the dean’s list, students must have a grade-point
average of 3.0 or better and rank in the top 20 percent of their class
in their respective college or school.

Lasell College dean’s list
NEWTON, Mass. — Lasell College has released the dean’s list for
outstanding academic achievement during the fall semester of the
2015-16 academic year. A student must be full-time, carrying 12 or
more graded credits for the semester with a grade point average of
3.5 or above to receive dean’s list recognition.
Among the 726 students honored in the Fall 2015 semester were:
Jaclyn Colombie of New Hartford, who is studying communication and is a member of the class of 2018; Kaley Chamberlain
of Winsted, who is studying communication and is a member of
the class of 2019; Molly Parrott of New Hartford, who is studying
psychology and is a member of the class of 2019; and Sara Tuller of
Barkhamsted, who is studying fashion design and production and
is a member of the class of 2019.

Kurtz named to
president’s list
HARRISONBURG, Va. —
New Hartford resident Meredith
Odile Kurtz has been named to
the president’s list at James Madison University for the fall 2015
semester. Kurtz is scheduled to
graduate in 2016 and is majoring
in psychology.
Students who earn president’s
list honors must carry at least 12
graded credit hours and earn a
GPA of 3.900 or above.

Gilbert offers
scholarships
WINSTED — The W.L. Gilbert Trust Corporation and The
Gilbert School announce that
applications are being accepted
for 2016 scholarships to pursue
higher education. All Gilbert
graduating seniors and alumni
who are attending or plan to
attend college are invited to apply.
Each year The Gilbert School
recognizes outstanding seniors
and alumni with scholarship
awards given through The W.L.
Gilbert Trust. Last year, over
$130,000 was distributed to help
with the ever-rising cost of higher
education.
These scholarships are made
possible thanks to the generosity
of alumni and friends of The Gilbert School. These scholarships
represent an appreciation for
the education received at Gilbert
and/or established in memory
of a loved one who was a Gilbert
alumnus. Some scholarships have
been in place since the early 1900s
and continue to grow each year.
Applications are available
from The Gilbert School or can
be downloaded from the school’s
website www.gilbertschool.org.
The application deadline is
April 29. No applications will be
accepted after this date. For more
information contact The Gilbert
School at 860-379-8521.

Center with minor injuries. He
was charged with following too
closely and failure to have vehicle
insurance. He was released on
a written promise to appear in
Bantam Superior Court Jan. 19.
Car hits guardrail
Holly Herdman, 23, of Prospect, Conn., was driving east on
Greenwoods Road/Route 44 in
Norfolk Jan. 4. At about 1:09
p.m., near River Place, she lost
control on a curve. The 2014 Fiat
500 hit a guardrail off the right
shoulder. The car was towed with
front-end damage. Herdman was
not injured. She was charged
with failure to maintain the
proper lane.
Car hits pole
Gregory Farr, 52, of Colebrook
was driving south on Prock Hill
Road in Colebrook Jan. 5. At
about 7:20 a.m., his 2000 Subaru
Legacy veered off the right side
of the road. It sideswiped a utility pole. There were no injuries
to the driver or passenger Anna
Farr, 16, of the same address. The
car sustained right quarter panel
damage. It was driven from the
scene. Farr was charged with failure to maintain the proper lane.
Rollover
Brianna Wilcox, 27, of Canton, Conn., was driving east on
Route 182 in Norfolk Jan. 8. At

about 5:20 p.m., she lost control
on a curve. Her 2002 Chevrolet
Trailblazer crossed the road. It hit
an embankment. It rolled onto its
passenger side. Wilcox was not
injured. She was given a written
warning for failure to stay right
on a curve.
Disorderly conduct
Alyssa Gagnon, 22, of New
Hartford was arrested Jan. 9 after
state police responded to a 4:20
a.m. report of an active domestic disturbance on Little Brook
Road in New Hartford. Gagnon
is accused of punching a victim
in the face numerous times while
that person told her to leave the
premises. The victim left, and
Gagnon allegedly proceeded
to destroy about $2,500 worth
of items in the home. She was
taken to Charlotte Hungerford
Hospital for evaluation of a
minor injury to her thumb. She
was subsequently charged with
first-degree criminal trespass and
disorderly conduct. Bond was set
at $5,000. She was to appear in
Bantam Superior Court Jan. 11.
The Winsted Journal will publish the outcome of police charges.
Contact us by mail at PO Box 835,
Winsted, CT 06098, Attn: Police
Blotter, or send an email, with
“police blotter” in the subject line,
to editor@winstedjournal.com.

Community Foundation scholarship
application deadline is April 1
NORTHWEST CORNER
— The Community Foundation of Northwest Connecticut
is awarding scholarships for
the 2016-2017 academic year.
Scholarship applications are
now available for the more than
$100,000 available to area students. Scholarship guidelines,
requirements and applications
are available on the Community
Foundation website.
Scholarship applications for
the 2016-2017 academic year
must be submitted by April 1.
The Community Foundation of
Northwest Connecticut serves
Litchfield County with a collection of more than 250 funds

from local donors. These funds
support nonprofit organizations
and provide scholarships to area
students throughout the Northwest Corner.
Most scholarships are awarded to residents of the Foundation’s 20-town service area. The
Foundation serves the towns of
Barkhamsted, Bethlehem, Canaan/Falls Village, Colebrook,
Cornwall, Goshen, Hartland,
Harwinton, Kent, Litchfield,
Morris, New Hartford, Norfolk,
North Canaan, Salisbury, Sharon, Torrington, Warren, Washington and Winsted/Winchester.
Visit www.cfnwct.org/scholarships for more information.

TriCornerNews.com
The Best Regional News Site

When you need to know what’s happening in your area, we’re there.

Winsted Area Worship

Second Congregational
North Congregational Church
Riverton
Church of Winsted Baptist
17 Church St., New Hartford
Congregational Church
& Congregational Biblical,
Pastor: Rev. Margret Hofmeister
United Church of Christ
Traditional, Protestant Worship
Sunday Worship, Sunday School
Ellen Peterson, acting pastor
800 Main Street, Winsted
and Child Care 10 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
Worship Service 10 a.m.
860-379-2466
860-379-6141
Sunday School 9a.m. (all ages)
St. Paul’s Evangelical
St. James
Jul. and Aug. Worship 9:30 a.m.
Lutheran Church
Episcopal Church
www.sccwinsted.org • info@sccwinsted.org
30 Prospect St.
160
Main
St.,
Winsted
860-379-4766
New Hartford, CT
The Rev. Jesse Bigham
First Church of Winsted
The Rev. Jonathan Manor
9:30 a.m. Worship Service,
Baptist and Congregational
Sunday Worship: 8 & 10:30a.m.
Sunday School and Nursery
95 Park Place, Winsted
(nursery care provided)
860-379-5657
The Rev. Lisa Gustafson
Sunday School &
Christian Harvest
Worship Service 10 a.m.
Bible Study: 9:15a.m.
Fellowship
(Nursery Care Provided)
860-379-3172
“A
Branch
of the True Vine”
Sunday School 10 a.m.
95 Pinney St., Winsted
(Pre-K through high school)
Temple Beth Israel
6 p.m. Every Sunday
860-379-1778
74 Park Place, Winsted
Tel. 860-379-2075
860-379-8923
St. Joseph’s Church
860-379-9700
Roman Catholic
First Congregational
Colebrook
31 Oak St., Winsted
Church of Barkhamsted
Congregational Church
Fr. Ronald Gliatta, OFM, Pastor
6 Old Town Hall Road at Rte 181
471
Smith Hill Road, Colebrook
Saturday Evening Vigil 4 p.m.
10:00 a.m. Worship Service
The Rev. Alice Murphy
and Sunday School
Sunday Mass: 8, 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m.
Worship Service: 10:30 a.m.
Rev. Susan Wyman Minister
Spanish Mass 3rd Sunday, 3:00 p.m.
Nursery care provided year round
Fellowship Hour
ild en
a i t e fi t un.
Sunday School: 9:30 a.m.
Follows the Service
Oct. to June, 10:30 a.m.
Church 860-379-6775
860-379-5864
860-379-3369
Parsonage 860-379-2517
. a a tedfi tc u c .co
Pleasant Valley
Second Congregational Church
United Methodist Church
United Methodist Church
Route 20, West Hartland
Route 181, Pleasant Valley
630 Main St., Winsted
The Rev. James A. DiQuattro
Pastor: Rev. Trudy Codd
Florence Eddins, Pastor
Worship and Sunday School: 10:00
Worship Service : 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.
Nursery care provided.
o union unda i fi t
860-379-6386
Bible Study, Choir,
Sunday of each month
Community Outreach,
Praise Christian
860-379-2157
Missions Work and Fellowship.
Fellowship
Winchester Center
52 New Hartford Rd (Route 44)
United Methodist Church
Congregational Church
Barkhamsted
630 Main St., Winsted
Route 263 and West Street
Ryan Nilsen, Pastor
Florence Eddins, Pastor
Jackie Hall, Pastor
Sunday Services
Bible
study
Wednesdays at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.
9:30 a.m. and 11:00 a.m.
Sunday Worship: 10 a.m.
860-379-8900
www.praisepcf.org
860-379-6386
winchestercentercongchurch.org
860-738-9039
Church
of
Christ
St. John’s Episcopal Church
Bakerville United
Congregational
51 Church Street, Pine Meadow
Methodist Church
Rev. Erick Olsen
The Rev. Salin M. Low
itc field u npi e
On the Green in Norfolk
Sunday Worship: 8 a.m. and 10 a.m.
New Hartford
Sunday Worship: 10:00 a.m.
(Sunday School & Child Care
Worship Sundays at 9 AM,
Sunday School: 10:00 a.m.
at 10:00 a.m.)
Fellowship at 10:15
860-542-5721
860-379-3062
Adult and Youth
Christian education 10:45
Faith
Bible
Church
Immaculate
Praise and Worship 368 Main St., Winsted
Conception Church
Wednesdays at 7 PM
The
Rev.
Joseph
McNally
60 Town Hill Road, New Hartford
Communion 1st Sunday
9:00 a.m. Sunday School
The Rev. Timothy O’Brien
of the Month
10:15
a.m.
Worship
Saturday Vigil Mass: 6 p.m.
Pastor Kathleen Patterson
860-738-0617
Sunday Masses:
860-482-6147
8:00 a.m. and 11:30 a.m.
860-379-5215
This directory is published as a public service by The Winsted Journal.
Changes or inquiries should be directed to the Editor of The Journal.

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

A5

Sports

Two great days of football
Last week, 3-1.

T

PHOTOS BY KATERI KOSEK

Members of the Norfolk Curling Club during a day on the ice on Saturday, Jan. 2.

New curlers sweep onto scene
By KATERI KOSEK
NORFOLK — Halfway
through its season, the action at
the Norfolk Curling Club is in full
swing. At a visit to the club by The
Winsted Journal on Saturday, Jan.
2,club President Ted Stone pointed
to a couple playing on the ice.
“This is their first year and
they are playing so good,” Stone
said. “You should have been here
yesterday. Every member had to
bring a team to this tournament
but two of the people had to have
never played before. So we had
all these people who had never
played the game. And it went all
afternoon. Everyone had such a
good time.”
Stone reported that the club has
gained six or seven new members
this season. Members can join a
variety of leagues: men’s, women’s, mixed, seniors’, weekend and
beginner’s.
“There’s a whole family over
there,” Stone said, pointing to the
other side of the ice. “They want
to join and start playing, probably
next year. But they’ve stayed all day
so far today.”
He also added that they have
one wheelchair team coming in
March, and are trying to get two
wheelchair teams.
“Good weight, wrong turn!”
someone shouted from the ice.
Two bloggers from Unlocking
Litchfield were trying their hand
at the sport. “At first it was scary. I
thought I was going to fall on my
face,” said one. “But it’s a blast!”
They agreed the ice isn’t as slippery
as one might think.
Heidi Smith was there with her
parents. “We just came here out
of the blue,” Smith said. “My dad
wanted to try it. We didn’t know if
we were going to get to try it or not.”
Her father, James Smith, said,
“We’ve always talked about coming up here. Now that we live in
Goshen it’s closer. And I watch it
every Olympics.”
Back in action, he started
screaming,“C’mon, harder! Harder!” as was the tradition. But all in
all, curling is about etiquette and
respect. Games begin with a handshake and everyone wishes each
other “good curling.” That’s a rule.
When James Smith launched
the stone, someone shouted,
“Money shot!”
As the stone slid down the ice,
people said, “Plenty of weight, it’s
going through the house.” But the
stone went past the target. “Oh,
too hard.”

James Smith prepared to launch a stone.

63

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alk about getting lucky!
Somehow my Steelers
and Seahawks managed
to win their respective games,
but not without the help of
the proverbial horseshoe stuck
you know where! As for the
Chiefs, there is no doubt that
they silenced many a critic with
the overwhelming performance
against the Texans, and you can
be assured that Bill Belichick and
his Patriots paid close attention
to that dominating victory. I
know I picked the Redskins in
the final game of the weekend,
but that was nothing more than
an old closet Redskin fan hoping
for a victory.
I would be remiss if I didn’t
add my two cents in regards to
the injurious style of play of Bengal linebacker Vontaze Burfict.
There is no room at any level
of sports for a person to attack
another player with the obvious
intent to injure them. What this
shows me is the individual has
no regard and respect for his
opponent and little or none for
himself, as well. In the end I don’t
see anything but the harshest of
penalties being levied against
Burfict, including the possibility
of banishment from the league.
When finished with administering the punishment for the
player, you can then continue
to spread the guilt by penalizing
the coach for not recognizing
the potential for disaster, the
GM for going out and signing a
player with a track record such
as Burfict and the owners of the
Bengals for failure to set high
standards for the team and then
ensuring that they are followed
and adhered to by all individuals
associated with the team.
Not much else to be said. There
are two great days of football on
the horizon, so here is my take on
this week’s games. As always, good
luck with your picks.

Pink’s
NFL Picks

C. “Pink” Bunel
Sat., Jan. 16
Kansas City at New England
First off, I can only hope that
the weather in Foxboro is above
freezing rather than below zero.
With that said, if the weather
cooperates this should be a super
exciting game.
You know exactly what you
are going to get from the Pats
— Tom Brady to Gronk, Edelman and Amendola, and a stout
defense and great place kicking.
As for the Chiefs, you get
a mobile QB in Alex Smith, a
solid running game and a stout
defense. Unfortunately, wideout
Jeremy Maclin is questionable at
best for the game.
I’d love to see the Chiefs upset
the Pats — it’s possible, but not
probable enough for me to pick
them. New England wins,34-24.
Green Bay at Arizona
Going back just a few weeks
ago the Cards annihilated the
Packers, but that won’t necessarily be the case this time. Against
the Redskins Aaron Rodgers and
the Packer offense came alive,
but that’s against the Redskins
defense not the Cards, whose
defense sacked Rodgers eight
times when they last met.
The Packers may make it
interesting for a while, but QB
Carson Palmer and Co. get going, and their stout defense gets
clicking finishing business. Cards
win, 30-17.

Sunday, Jan. 17
Seattle at Panthers
This is a great matchup. First
off the Seahawks can thank their
lucky stars for even being in this
game, but they’re here and the
Panthers better take notice. The
weather will be better, and Russell
Wilson and Co. will be better too.
The Panthers are rested and
will rely on QB Cam Newton
and their defense to take them
to the NFC Championship game.
They came from behind earlier in
the season to beat the Seahawks
in Seattle, but they will need a
mistake-free performance from
Newton if they hope to advance.
I like Seattle because Wilson
can beat you both throwing and
running with the ball. Newton
can do the same, but I still think
he is prone to making mistakes
in big situations, therefore for
I’m sticking with my Seahawks
in this one, 27-20.
Pittsburgh at Denver
So now the Steelers move on
and, unfortunately, injuries may
play a big role in this matchup. If
Big Ben Roethlisberger and Antonio Brown are unable to play,
the Steelers are in big trouble.
Combined with the return of a
healthier Peyton Manning, the
Broncos will enter the game as
a sizable favorite.
Unfortunately for me, I must
make a pick well before the final
injury reports come out. I’ll make
a variety of picks depending on
the availability of the injured
Steelers. If just Big Ben plays
without Brown, I see the Broncos
winning, 23-20. If both players are
sidelined the Broncos win, 23-13.
If both players play, I’ll take the
Steelers, 27-23.
What might be a game-changer is Manning’s sub par history in
playoff games and the fact that
the Steeler defense may force him
to the sidelines early. You should
know by now that I’m a Steeler
fan, so that may be influencing
my pick just a bit.

A6

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

The Winsted Journal
EDITORIAL PAGE A6

FRIDAY, JANUARY 15, 2016

New zoning
regulations are W
key to economy

Z

oning regulations are the foundation of all economic
development for any town or city.
While attracting businesses to a town through an
economic developer or advertising is important, making sure
that a business will not have roadblocks and headaches with
zoning regulations is even more important.
Unfortunately, for the town of Winsted, zoning regulations have been a hinderance when it comes to economic
development. Over the years, the ones who have issued the
most complaints about the town’s zoning regulations are the
town officials themselves, who have called the existing regulations inadequate and too old.
According to Zoning Board of Appeals Chairman David
Villa, who spoke about the town’s zoning regulations at a
Board of Selectmen meeting on Jan. 4, the town’s regulations
were all created in 1956, with amendments in 1977, 1982 and
during the 1990s.
Almost 60 years is too long for a town to wait to update
and revise zoning regulations.
While there have been several projects over the past few
years that have had difficulties getting off the ground due to
these old regulations, there are two economic development
projects in recent years that have had to deal with the most
hindrances.
The first project, undertaken by Brooklyn, N.Y., resident
Marty Goldin, is to turn the building he owns at 10 Bridge
St. into artist lofts. The building itself was originally built
in 1887 and was home to Winsted Furniture. However, the
building has been vacant for many years due to the closure
of the business.
The project was delayed for several months because, due
to the old zoning regulations, Goldin would have had to
create 60 parking spaces around the building. After several
months, the board changed the zoning regulations in order
for the project to be approved with 22 parking spaces.
In November 2013, Nutmeg State Health and Wellness
Center tried to open a medical marijuana dispensary in
Winsted. While the majority of the commission was in favor
of the dispensary, the town’s zoning codes did not have any
regulations on its books concerning dispensaries and production facilities.
The town’s zoning codes were changed in February to allow for the dispensary, but by that time it was too late for the
company to be approved for a license from the state.
Businesses look at these decisions and at a town’s zoning
codes before they decide to open a store or a facility. This
is why the Planning and Zoning subcommittee, along with
Town Planner Steven Sadlowski, should all be applauded for
developing new zoning regulations.
The work on developing new regulations has taken several
months since it started in August, but that is understandable.
Hopefully the new regulations, when they are approved, will
bring much-needed growth and economic development to
town.

I

The waste of
bottled water

n 2011, the National Park
Service introduced a policy
as part of its Green Parks
Program to ban the sale of bottled
water and reduce or eliminate
the use of plastic water bottles
in National parks.
At the behest of Big Water
companies, Congress tried to
prohibit the Park Service from
using taxpayer money to ban
plastic water bottles and included a requirement that the Park
Service file reports to justify
these bans. This is an example
of corporate interests seeking
to prevent responsible change.
In 2012 alone, Americans
spent $11.8 billion on bottled
water. Consumer attachment to
bottled water is a contradiction.
The federal Safe Drinking Water
Act ensures tap water is rigorously screened and all public water
systems in the U.S. are required
to follow the standards and regulations set by the Environmental
Protection Agency. In addition,
thanks to organizations such as
Clean Water Action, the U.S. has
the safest potable water supply in
the world. But big water companies spend billions to convince
us tap water is unsafe. This is
especially ironic when two of
the most popular companies,
Aquafina and Dasani, sell bottled
tap water.
Bottled water costs a thousand times more than tap. The
production of water bottles uses
an estimated 17 million barrels
of oil a year. Three liters of water
are used to produce one liter of
bottled water. Annual production produces 2.5 million tons of
carbon dioxide emissions — the
same as 400,000 cars.
Bottled water companies
continue to damage the environment while deceiving consumers.

An Intern’s
View
Cady Stanton

Companies like Arrowhead,
Evian and Aquafina “greenwash”
their products, branding their
bottles as “green” and advocating for recycling on their labels.
In reality, the term “green” has
no legal meaning. Slapping the
insignia of a leaf on a plastic
bottle does not change its environmental impact. Gimmicks
like Dasani’s PlantBottle are
especially deceptive. There is an
ethanol from sugarcane waste
used in Dasani’s bottle that
achieves nothing except justifying the label “plant-based.” It is
still non-biodegradable plastic.
Resistance to the bans at
national parks is clear indication that corporate interests are
preventing meaningful change.
The problem of plastic waste is
becoming more urgent. There are
currently 2 million tons of plastic
water bottles in our landfills, and
10 million tons of plastic waste
in our oceans.
Consumers must take responsibility — and action. Before
you discard your next plastic
bottle, consider the 450 years it
will take to biodegrade. Opt for
reusable containers, be aware of
the deception in labeling, and
don’t be fooled by companies’
advertising trying to convince
you bottled water is better than
what comes from your faucet.
Cady Stanton is an intern at the
Office of the Community Lawyer.
She is a senior at The Hotchkiss
School.

OPINION
What I got wrong so far
in this election cycle

hen I was a teenager
in the election year
of 1948, my elders
assured me this was the big one,
the year I would witness the
first election of a Republican
president in my 15-year lifetime.
Thomas E. Dewey would definitely replace the accidental and
terribly unpopular — at least
in our comfortable New Jersey
suburbs — Harry Truman.
On election night, I was earning a quarter an hour babysitting
the kids next door while their
parents and my parents and
virtually everyone else in the
neighborhood were attending
a Dewey victory party.
When the celebrants came
home, apparently too early to
hear Mr. Truman’s concession
speech, I was assured that the
farm vote was slow coming in
and Dewey would soon be declared the winner.
Seven years later, working at
my first newspaper, I found the
elders in my new profession were
still wary, after 1948, of taking
anything in presidential politics
for granted.
We’re relearning that in 2016.
So before the year gets much
older, I must join many of my
fellow opinion expressers in
confessing what I got wrong so

If You Ask Me
Dick Ahles

far in the current election cycle.
It’s quite enough to fill a column.
Early on, there was my lonely
enthusiasm for the candidacy of
James Webb, as an alternative to
the impending coronation of
Hillary Clinton. It was and still
is the result of my displeasure
that the Democrats would rig
the nomination for Clinton by
seeming to limit the opposition to an elderly Democratic
candidate, who will be 75 on
Inauguration Day, just happens
to be a socialist, not the brightest
winning combo.
In December 2014, I wrote
glowingly of Webb, the former
Democratic senator, Reagan
cabinet member and talented
novelist:
“Seven months before the
second Iraq war began in 2003,
Webb warned we could be in
the region for 30 years and
presciently noted, ‘The Iraqis
are a multiethnic people with
competing factions who in
many cases would view a U.S.
occupation as infidels invading
the cradle of Islam. In Japan,

American occupation forces
quickly became 50,000 friends.
In Iraq, they would quickly become 50,000 terrorist targets.’”
As we approach the halfway
point in our 30-year Middle East
war, what in that statement has
been proven wrong and who
else — from either party — has
even broached it?
I still have a bit of hope for the
other long shot I praised in that
column, the not so successful end
man on the Republican debate
stage, John Kasich.
Unlike the inexperienced
senatorial contenders, Cruz
and Rubio, Kasich has actually
governed a large and important
state and did so successfully amid
economic turmoil. After helping
President Clinton I balance the
budget in 1997, he retired from
Congress, worked on Wall Street
(nobody’s perfect) and became
governor in the 2008 election
as Bush prosperity was crashing
down. In his first term, all he did
was turn an $8 billion deficit
into a $1.5 billion surplus while
cutting the state income tax by
10 percent and taxes on small
businesses by 50 percent.
I did mention Kasich has had
two wives but only because my
other favorite, Webb, has been
married for 44 years — to three

wives. That, of course, only ties
a presidential candidate record
with Donald Trump, also married to three wives, but two thirds
of them were immigrants, and
Trump will eventually take credit
for that act of kindness.
But before we get to my
Trump mistake, I must confess
that before Trump’s debut, I
erroneously wrote that Chris
Christie’s gruff, Jersey Boy
attitude and style would never
play south and west of his side
of the Hudson. Christie has, of
course, been a stylistic Little Lord
Fauntleroy next to the boorish
Trump.
As to Trump, I shared the conventional view that no sensible
American would consider a man
who offered bluster in the place
of serious discussion or offered
boasts like “We’re going to make
our military really, really strong”
without deigning to tell us how.
Maybe we’re suffering from a
shortage of sensible Americans,
but I still hope we’re not about
to confirm the old saw that “the
common people know what they
want and deserve to get it good
and hard.”
Simsbury resident Dick Ahles
is a retired journalist. Email him
at dahles@hotmail.com.

Twelve people who made a difference
(and you can too!)

C

an one person truly make
a difference in the world?
Far too many people think
not, and thus they sell themselves
far too short. A wave of pessimism
leads capable people to underestimate the power of their voice and
the strength of their ideals. The
truth is this: it is the initiatives of
deeply caring people that provide
the firmament for our democracy.
Take a sweeping look at history
and you will discover that almost
all movements that mattered
started with just one or two people — from the fight to abolish
slavery, to the creations of the
environmental, trade union,
consumer protection and civil
rights movements. One voice
becomes two, and then ten, and
then thousands.
It’s fitting that this time of year
marks the 79th anniversary of the
sit-down strike in Flint, Mich., in
which thousands of workers sat
down in a General Motors factory to fight for recognition of the
newly formed United Auto Workers (UAW) union. On Feb. 11,
1937, General Motors conceded
to raising wages and labor standards and recognizing the UAW,
a major win for unionization in
the United States.
This is an aspect of the American story that most people love
and celebrate, yet sadly are quick
to dismiss as being improbable in
today’s partisan, corporate-dominated world. But, as I often say, real
change is easier than you think.
The following 12 men and
women maximized their power
as citizens to improve the lives of
millions of people in real, tangible
ways. Let their stories serve as an
inspiration to you in the coming
year.
Lois Gibbs
Lois Gibbs lived with her family
in the Love Canal neighborhood
of Niagara Falls, N.Y., when news
of the toxic contamination beneath their feet made local headlines. Lois organized her neighbors
into what was known as the Love
Canal Homeowners Association.
Her movement grew to become
the country’s largest grassroots
anti-toxic movement. She later
founded the Center for Health,
Environment & Justice.
Ralf Hotchkiss
I first met Ralf at Oberlin College over 40 years ago where he was
majoring in physics and moving
about the campus in a wheelchair
after a bicycle accident when he
was in high school rendered him
paraplegic. Recognizing a need
for low-cost, sustainable and
versatile wheelchairs, he started
Whirlwind Wheelchair to teach
people around the world how to
manufacture their own wheelchairs in small shop facilities.
Clarence Ditlow
Once described by The New

In The
Public Interest
Ralph Nader

York Times as “the splinter the
[auto] industry cannot remove
from its thumb,” Clarence Ditlow
is an engineer, lawyer and the executive director of the Center for
Auto Safety. He has been responsible for car companies initiating
millions of lifesaving recalls, and
was instrumental in the passage
of “lemon laws” in all 50 states,
which compensate consumers for
defective automobiles
Al Fritsch
A Jesuit priest and Ph.D., Al
Fritsch was the environmental
consultant at the Center for the
Study of Responsive Law in Washington, D.C., before returning to
his roots in Appalachia to start the
Appalachia Center for Science in
the Public Interest. Using applied
science and technology, Al Fritsch
is a driving force for sustainability
and maintaining a healthy planet.
Ray Anderson
The late Ray Anderson was
founder and CEO of Interface,
the world’s largest modular carpet
manufacturing firm based in Atlanta, Ga. Disturbed by the hugely
damaging effects of industry on
the environment, he shifted his
company’s directive to “make
peace with the planet.” With the
ultimate goal of zero pollution
and 100 percent recycling for his
company, he managed to move
toward these objectives while
reducing expenses year after
year and increasing profits. Why
aren’t more CEOs following his
example?
Annie Leonard
With her widely successful Story of Stuff project, Annie Leonard
scoured the world for the stories
that tell the tale of where our
throwaway economy is leading
us (hint: it doesn’t have a happy
ending.) Her imaginative 20-minute “Story of Stuff” film has been
watched and shared online by
millions, and was turned into a
book and an ongoing website.
She is now the executive director
of Greenpeace.
Wenonah Hauter
As the founder and director
of Food & Water Watch, Wenonah has fought tirelessly for the
future of our food, water, energy

and environment. A relentless
organizer, author and activist, she
is a champion in getting citizens
involved in issues that matter most
the things we put in our bodies.
Rev. Dr. William J. Barber
The Rev. William Barber walks
with a cane but he is making big
strides for justice and equality
through his organizing of “Moral
Mondays” protests, which first
started in North Carolina. The
protests started as a response to the
“mean-spirited quadruple attack”
on the most vulnerable members
of our society. In the tradition of
the Rev. Martin Luther King, Rev.
Barber is fighting restrictions on
voting and for improvements in
labor laws. In addition to his work
as a minister, Rev. Barber is the
president of the North Carolina
NAACP.
Michael Mariotte
For over 30 years, Michael
Mariotte has been a leader in
successful movements against
nuclear power in the United States.
As the president of the Nuclear
Information and Resource Service
(NIRS), Michael has testified before Congress and spoken in countries around the world against the
dangers of nuclear power and its
radioactive byproducts.
David Halperin
David is a tenacious advocate
and tireless worker for justice who
has launched several advocacy
organizations and projects such
as Progressive Networks, The
American Constitution Society
and Campus Progress. Nothing gives him greater joy than
thwarting those with positions of

power in our society who seek to
profit from unjust practices. Most
recently, Attorney Halperin has
focused his considerable talents
on exposing the predatory and
deceptive practices of for-profit
colleges.
Sid Wolfe
Dr. Sidney M. Wolfe and I
started the Public Citizen Health
Research Group in 1971 to promote good health-care policy and
drug safety. Dr. Wolfe, through
his “Worst Pills, Best Pills” books,
newsletters and outreach via the
Phil Donahue show, has exposed
by brand names hundreds of ineffective drugs with harmful side
effects which were removed from
the marketplace.
Dolores Huerta
A legendary activist, Dolores
Heurta co-founded the United
Farm Workers Union with Cesar
Chavez in the 1960s and has a
long history of fighting for social
change, worker’s rights and civil
justice. She was rightfully awarded
the Presidential Medal of Freedom
in 2011, amongst many other
awards and recognitions.
Our country has more problems than it should tolerate and
more solutions than it uses. Don’t
allow cynicism to silence your
voice — people matter, you matter and systemic change will only
happen when citizens speak out,
gather, and believe in themselves
and their ideals.
Consumer advocate and former
presidential candidate Ralph Nader
grew up in Winsted and is a graduate of The Gilbert School.

THE WINSTED JOURNAL

(USPS 014512)
An Independent Connecticut Newspaper
396 Main Street, PO Box 835, Winsted, CT 06098
Tel. (860) 738-4418 • Fax (860) 738-3709
Published Weekly by The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC
33 Bissell St., Lakeville, CT 06039 • (860) 435-9873
www.tricornernews.com • editor@winstedjournal.com
Volume 20, Number 32

Friday, January 15, 2016

Mission Statement

The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC, Publishers of
The Lakeville Journal, The Millerton News, and The Winsted Journal
Our goal is to report the news of our communities accurately and fairly,
fostering democracy and an atmosphere of open communication.
Shaw Israel Izikson
Editor
Janet Manko
Publisher
Libby Hall-Abeel
Advertising Manager
James Clark
Production
Coordinator
In Memoriam
A. Whitney Ellsworth
1936-2011
Managing Partner

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THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

A7

Many changes for Winsted, area towns in 2015
By SHAW ISRAEL IZIKSON

This is the second and final installment of our year in review of
2015. The first part can be found
in the Jan. 8 edition and on our
website at www.tricornernews.
com.
WINSTED — For residents,
2015 will always be remembered
as the year of many changes.
July
On July 8, NOSH, formally
known as Kelly’s Kitchen, closed
its doors. The restaurant was
open for 11 years and located
at 436 Main St.
On July 9, the annual Summer Concert Series presented by
Friends of Main Street started
with a concert by the Farmington Valley Band. The series, held
at East End Park, lasted until
September.
On July 11, the Highland
Lake Watershed Association
held its annual boat parade on
Highland Lake. Twenty boats
and many residents took part
in the event.
On July 25, a fire at 536 Main
St. displaced several residents
and closed Kent Pizza restaurant. The fire damaged the third
floor of the building, displacing
seven adults and three children
who lived in the building. The
restaurant eventually re-opened
in September.
On July 28 the state’s Bond
Commission authorized $24.7
million for NCCC to construct
a new building for its Allied
Health and Veterinary Technology programs. Plans for the
building have been in the works
for several years.
August
On Aug. 17, the Board of Selectmen named Robert Asselin
was named as the new chief for
the Winsted Fire Department.
Asselin took over from former
Chief Robert J. Shopey II when
his term ended on Sept. 1.
At the same meeting on Aug.
17 the selectmen chose Connected to Connecticut from East
Hartford as the town’s economic
development consultant.
From Aug. 19 to 22 the
Winsted Fire Department held
its 153rd annual carnival at the
Rowley Street Fairgrounds. The
carnival included a parade down
Main Street on Aug. 22.
On Aug. 29, through a press
release from Winchester Republican Town Committee Chairman Jerry Martinez, the party
announced that they would not

I

be taking part in a candidates
forum on Sept. 24. The forum
was organized by the Winchester
Cradle to Career collaborative
and held at NCCC.
While Martinez wrote that
none of the Republican candidates would appear at the forum,
several Republican candidates
did including then Republican
Mayor Candace Bouchard and
Selectman Glenn Albanesius,
along with selectmen’s candidate Todd Arcelaschi. However,
none of the Republican Board of
Education candidates attended
the forum.
As the school year started in
late August, the school district
named Suzanne Guglietta as
the new principal for Batcheller
Early Learning Center, taking
the place of Holly Martin whose
contract was not renewed by the
Board of Education.
September
In early September the town
named Trumbull resident Bruce
Stratford as its new finance
director.
On Sept. 10 Republican Ray
Rabago, who was elected to the
Board of Education in November
2014, submitted his resignation.
Rabago’s term was set to expire
in November 2017.
From Sept. 10 to Sept. 12 a
series of events commemorated
the 125th anniversary of the dedication of Soldiers’ Monument
and Soldiers’ Memorial Park.
The monument and park, both
located on Crown Street, were
dedicated in 1890.
On Sept. 23 Town Manager
Dale Martin submitted his resignation, with his last day of work
for the town on Nov. 18. Martin,
who was hired by the town on
March 2011, moved to accept the
position as the city manager of
Fernandina Beach, Fla.
On Sept. 26 ceremonies were
held surrounding the opening of
the American Museum of Tort
Law, located at 654 Main St.
The long-in-the-works museum
includes exhibits and displays
of famous and prominent cases
throughout the years.
During the ceremonies,
speakers included museum
president Ralph Nader, U.S. Sen.
Richard Blumenthal (D), various
attorneys and plaintiffs in tort
law cases and Rock and Roll Hall
of Fame member Patti Smith.
October
At the Board of Selectmen’s
meeting on Oct. 5 Planning and
Zoning Commission Chairman
Craig Sanden was removed

FILE PHOTOS

Remembering 2015: The
opening of the American
Museum of Tort Law in September at 654 Main St. In
November the town elected
a Democratic majority to the
Board of Selectmen.
from the commission due to
a political deadlock between
Democratic and Republican
members. Sanden was eventually reinstated at a meeting on
Nov. 2.
Town Planner Steven Sadlowski started working for the
town on Oct. 5. Sadlowski was
previously the land use administrator for New Hartford.
On Oct. 15, the state’s Board
of Regents named Michael
Rooke as the new president
of NCCC. Rooke, a Windsor
native, took over for former
college President Barbara Douglass, who retired on Oct. 1 after
serving for 11 years.
November
At the town’s municipal
elections on Nov. 3, residents
voted in a Democratic majority
to the Board of Selectmen. The
selectmen elected to the board
were Democratic incumbents
Candy Perez and Steven Sedlack, along with new members
Melissa Bird, Jack Bourque and
Brian Shaughnessy. Also elected
to the board were Republican
incumbent Glenn Albanesius
and Todd Arcelaschi.
At the induction ceremony on
Nov. 4, Perez was named mayor

Fallen tree

gained extra woods hiking
days in December, thanks to
Mom Nature being penurious with snow.
Typically I follow old forest
roads to look for stone walls,
foundations, wells, dams and
any other signs of human activity
years ago.
One day my best find was a
fallen tree. It wasn’t just any tree.
It was a grandfather (or perhaps
grandmother — gender is so
difficult to determine in trees).
I don’t know what kind of tree
it was, the bark was gone and its
leaves had long ago mushed into
the soil.
But it was a large tree, easily 3
feet through. I had a tape measure
with me, and could have taken
its girth. But I just stood and
admired it.
When the tree toppled, it
took a huge circle of its root base
with it. This base at one end and
branches at the other left the
trunk suspended in the air.
I wondered how long it will
take to sink to the ground.
u
u
u
Coincidentally I came across
an article by Rebecca Heisman in
the winter 2015 issue of Northern
Woodlands in which she began
to answer my question based on
a U.S. Forest Service and University of Minnesota survey of
thousands of fallen trees. They
tallied how long it takes 36 tree
species to break down.
This scholarly study/computer model yielded estimates
of what they call “range of
residence,” that is, how long it
will take a tree to completely
decompose.
“Conifer species,” Heisman
reported, “range from 57 to 124
years, while hardwood species

PHOTO BY BERNARD A. DREW

Fallen elder
Nature’s
Notebook

Bernard A. Drew
are typically around on the forest
floor for 46 to 71 years. Warmer,
more humid environments promote faster decay than cooler,
drier climates.”
Of course, a hung-up tree will
take longer to decompose than
branches or shorter logs lying on
the forest floor will.
On the other hand, not far
away stands the remnants of
another tree, shed of limbs, full

of holes, soft as a spunge, determined to go out with dignity.
The scientists were looking
at the effects of climate change.
I was just speculating on how
much more my prone tree
would add to the environment
the longer it took to rot. It will
provide habitat. It will provide
a home for moss and lichen and
microorganisms. It will provide
food for grubs. It will provide a
pecking place for woodpeckers,
a roost for birds and a scouting
site for chipmunks.
Its useful life goes on.
The writer is an associate editor
of this newspaper.

and Sedlack was named deputy
mayor.
For the Board of Education,
Democrats Nora Mocarski and
incumbent Doug Pfenninger,
along with Republicans John
Pollack and Liz O’Dowd, were
all elected to four-year terms,
while Democrat Michelle Hintz
was elected to a two-year term.
Democrat Shelia Sedlack was
re-relected to the town clerk’s
office.

On Nov. 23, Barkhamsted resident Robert Geiger was named
as the acting town manager. The
board went forward with a search
for a new town manager, who is
expected to be named some time
in the new year.
December
On Dec. 5 Friends of Main
Street and the Winsted Recreation Department held its annual Christmas on Main Street
event. The event included food,

hay rides, food and a visit from
Santa Claus.
At a special town meeting
on Dec. 21, residents approved
the sale of the house formally
belonging to the Centrella family. The house, located on 198
Gilbert Ave., was co-owned by
former Finance Director Henry
Centrella and his ex-wife, Gregg.
Finally, on Dec. 19 the Winsted Fire Department held its
12th annual Gator Parade.

Send your news to editor@winstedjournal.com

Brain Teasers

CLUES ACROSS
1. Engine additive
4. Soluble ribonucleic
acid
8. Subdue
10. One long, three short
11. Morally bad
12. With collapsible shelter
13. Central church parts
15. Summer shoes
16. Intestinal
17. Transgressors
18. Meeting expectations
21. Clutch
22. Autonomic nervous
system
23. What you can repeat
immediately after
perceiving it
24. Favorite summer
sandwich
25. An accountant
certified by the state
26. Cologne
27. Norma Jean Baker
34. Galaxies
35. Bluish greens
36. Detected
37. Having 3 dimensions
38. Made level
39. The destroyer (Hindu)
40. Uncovered
41. Ooze slowly
42. Aerie
43. Point midway between
S and SE
CLUES DOWN
1. Having beautiful
natural views
2. Fanafuti is the capital
3. Shrub used for hedges
4. Polishing tools
5. Slow down
6. Christmas carols
7. & & &
9. Sound of sheep or goat
10. A long flag, often
tapering
12. Atomic #73
14. Schilling (abbr.)
15. Female sibling

17. Long sandwich
19. In a way, necessitated
20. Mayan people of SW
Guatemala
23. Cleaned up
24. Prohibit
25. Upright cupboard
26. Cyclone center
27. Metric linear units
28. Young male
29. Securities market
30. City across from
Dusseldorf
31. Animal disease
32. Mount of __ east of
Jerusalem
33. Get free

34. Variable stars
36. One point N of NE

January 7 Solution

Sudoku

January 7 Solution

retirement rehabilitation healthcare
www.noblehorizons.org 860-435-9851
17 Cobble Road, Salisbury, CT 06068

A8

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

» ZONING
who was hired in October, has
served as a consultant to the
commission in reviewing regulation updates.
At the selectmen’s meeting
on Jan. 4, Planning and Zoning
Commission Chairman Craig
Sanden spoke to the board about
the commission’s progress with
reviewing the regulations.
“Part of what Graydon Land
Use did was check our Plan of
Conservation and Development
(POCD), see where we stand
long-term and to see how our
current POCD and regulations
were complimenting one another, or if they were not,” Sanden
said. “The subcommittee, which
consists of myself, [former Selectman] George Closson and
[Chairman of the Zoning Board
of Appeals] David Villa have
met every Tuesday since August.
We have dissected the program
that has been presented by the
consultant and gone forward.
The consultants were all very
dedicated in their efforts.”
Former Selectman Closson,
who now serves as an alternate
to the commission, was the next
to speak.
“This whole process is once
in a generation,” Closson said.
“We have had the opportunity
to do a complete revision of
the regulations. We obviously
discovered, through use, that the
regulations were all patchwork,
at best. We have made a lot of
progress and we’re very close to
what we set out in the original
anticipated timeline.”
Closson said the subcommittee has had conference calls with
representatives with Graydon to
settle on the final organization
of the regulations.
“I would say this will be ready
to get a recommendation from
the subcommittee at our first
meeting in February,” Closson
said.“Subsequent to that, Steven
has done some leg work when it
comes to looking at professional
land use regulations. He wants to
make sure that the t’s are crossed
and the i’s are all dotted when
it comes to being supported by
the laws of the state.”
Closson added that the new
regulations are going “to be
here for a long time,” which is
why it is undergoing multiple
reviews.
“Following the reviews, the
Planning and Zoning Commission will schedule a public hearing so that all of the information

» BOAR’S HEAD
Gilbert School basketball came
to help set up the event.
“They help lay out all the
carpets for the animals, and they
help carry up the stable that is
down in the basement, which
is no easy task,” Storrs said. “It’s
such a blessing. Their coach
plays the Herald, and it’s like a
community service that they do,
which is great.”
The festival tells the tale of
the Epiphany and is a celebration
of the Three Kings, all done in
medieval fashion with unique
period costumes. Members
from all different local churches
come to participate in and enjoy
the festival, different religions
including Catholic and Protes-

tant. Featured musical selections
for the evening included Rutter’s “Gloria,” Adam Dressler’s
“O Holy Night,” and Morten
Lauridsen’s “O Magnum Mysterium” as well as some classic
Christmas carols.
The Festival featured a lively
pre-show with several talented
musicians including Kenneth
Storrs on the bagpipes.
“This is the first year we had
a lot of those instruments in
the pre-show, which was really
nice,” Storrs said. “They all came
together. Actually the bass player
and guitarist met last Thursday
and realized they had a lot in
common musically and got it
all together, and it became this

great pre-show.”
“It’s such a fun festival,” participant John Eggering said. “It
started off as a fundraiser and
since then we’ve just been doing it 26 years. With no snow,
it was kind of weird to start the
festival because we it didn’t feel
like Christmas, but it brings everybody together and that feels
like Christmas.”
The festival is always held
after Christmas. “It’s past all
that commercial stuff, all that
has gone by, and now we have
a chance to reflect on the true
meaning,” she said. “It’s one
of those things we couldn’t
do without all the help of the
community.”

on these allegations is legally
untenable since neither the board
nor defendant Hoffnagle had any
authority to discharge, discipline
or otherwise penalize [Watson]
as of July 1. Simply put, [Watson]
sued the wrong defendants.”
In a response filed on Jan. 10
with the Superior Court Judicial
District of Hartford, Rosenblatt
wrote that Pannozzo’s motion
for dismissal should be rejected.
“The defendant’s motion to
strike is based on a false premise,”
Rosenblatt wrote. “The defendant’s account of the plaintiff ’s
complaint is that this case was
brought because of events that
occurred on Aug. 17. Defendant’s
entire argument is based on the
notion that this case is about the
plaintiff being terminated after
Public Act No. 15-5 was enacted
on July 1, and the defendant was
placed in receivership.”
Public Act No. 15-5 is a provision in the state’s fiscal 2015-2016
budget that allowed the State

Department of Education to
put into place receivership for
the Winchester School District.
“The notion is simply wrong,”
Rosenblatt wrote. “There is no
allegation in the complaint that
the plaintiff ’s employment was
terminated. This case is about
events that occurred before
Public Act No. 15-5 was enacted
and the receivership imposed. As
the defendant says, Public Act
No. 15-5 removed the board’s
ability to ‘supervise and direct
the Superintendent, and placed
said authority into the hands of
a receiver and a board of advisors

appointed by the Commissioner
of Education.’”
Rosenblatt goes on to accuse
Hoffnagle of ignoring the allegations that Watson has made,
which he wrote occurred before
Public Act 15-15 was enacted.
“It is obvious the material
allegations occurred prior to
the state’s July 1 takeover of the
school system, so the defendant’s
motion to strike misses the
mark,” Rosenblatt wrote.
A return date for the court
case has not been listed on the
state’s judicial website as of this
writing.

will be available,” Closson said.
Sadlowski said the new
regulations are “a lot clearer and
more concise.”
“We have addressed a lot of
issues that have caused people
a lot of headaches,” Sadlowski
said. “I think they are going to
be a great improvement. We
simplified several aspects of the
current regulations.”
Sadlowski said that the town
is also working on a new zoning map.
“I think it’s going to be very
good when it gets done,” Sadlowski said. “We’re going to be
using these regulations for many
years. I did recommend that they
would be sent for a professional
legal review. We’ve put that out
to bid. I thought that is very
important just in case we ever
get challenged in court.”
Villa said the current regulations were all based in 1956.
“They were amended in 1977
and re-amended in 1982,” Villa
said. “They were also re-amended somewhere in the 1990s.
They’re just a hodge podge. A
crossword puzzle. There is no
linear thinking involved. It’s
all very confusing. What we
planned on doing and what we
have accomplished is to make
everything linear.”
Villa said the regulations will
include an overlay of regions
in town.
“For example, we recognized
that there are four villages in the
town’s center,” he said. “Each
one of them is remarkably
different from each other. We
have made plans for insuring
that by being clear about what’s
there and where we think the
town will develop out, we’ve
made room for development
in the town. The existing rules
actually makes it very difficult
to develop in this town. Particularly along 1.8 miles of Main
Street which is six blocks wide.
Everyone is concerned about
Main Street. I understand that,
but there are four more that
exist. We need to look at these
regulations and understand
how it will impact the future
of the town.”
Villa said that the commission will receive the new regulations to review in February
and that a public hearing will
be scheduled on the regulations
a few weeks later.
However, he did not give
specific dates.

choir, madrigal singers, organist,
and brass ensemble. There were
also fiddlers, bagpipers, Scottish sword dancers, drummers,
with a donkey, goats and hens
provided by Commerford Farm
in Goshen.
Following the event, Storrs
was more than happy to discuss
what makes Boar’s Head such a
success.
“We’re working on things
from October to December,” she
said.“The basic setup happens in
the month of December, when
gradually it turns from a church
to a medieval hall, so every week
as the petitioners come in, it’s
something different.”
This year, students from The

Ski Sundown is aiming to have
their final six slopes open by this
weekend, which is a holiday and
long weekend for many schoolchildren in the area.
“Some children have a fourday weekend, some children
have a three-day weekend,” she
said. “It’s a very big ski weekend,
so hopefully we just see everybody coming back out to enjoy
the slopes.”

The weekend will also include a visit by the “Tell a Friend
Tour,” Shield said, a group of
professional freestyle skiers hold
competitions and do demonstrations for children.
The tour will be at Ski Sundown on Saturday, Jan. 16, from
10 a.m to 3 p.m, and will be followed by a pizza party courtesy
of Pizza Pete’s restaurant of New
Hartford.

makes us unique is that while
we are small we do a lot. What
really struck me, because I have
learned how people out in the
community view the college, is
how important the college is to
the community. I’m trying to get
out there to know people the best
I can as quickly as I can.”
Rooke said community support is critical to the college.
“It’s a real pleasure to find out
that the college is important to
the community,” he said. “We
have a lot of connections to a
lot of different areas. Yesterday I
went to Sharon Hospital, which
is quite a way out there from
here, but representatives from
the hospital told me about how
important the college is when it
comes to providing the nursing
staff the hospital needs.”
Rooke said that, while at this
point he has not had much time
to get to know students at NCCC,
he said that the ones he has met
seem to be similar to the students
at other colleges.
“They have the same challenges, often working multiple
jobs and often working on difficult personal situations,” he
said. “But they are striving to
improve themselves. At the end
of the day, that’s what keeps us
coming to want to work here. It’s
really all about the students and
that’s the main thing.”
Rooke said the faculty and
staff at NCCC are one of the
college’s biggest strengths.
“I think that the faculty and
staff here are outstanding,”
Rooke said. “They are so committed to what they do and it
makes it a real pleasure to come
to work every day.”
As for challenges, Rooke said
the college’s budget is “always a
challenge.”

“The state is going through
some tough times,” he said.
“So we’re always at the mercy
of the governor’s office and the
legislature. I’ve been struck by
the support we’ve gotten from
the state legislature. The college
is very important to the people
of this region and I think the
legislature knows that.”
Rooke said another challenge
NCCC faces is enrollment.
“We’re going to be creative in
ways of reaching out to people
in this region,” he said. “We will
also be working closely with
high schools. It’s something I
want to spend quite a bit of time
on during the first year or two.
There’s no ‘magic bullet’ to solve
this problem because, if there
was, someone would have done
it already. I think each college
is unique in that respect. Our
enrollment is fairly stable which
is encouraging. Also, the college
is doing well financially, despite
the budget cuts we have endured.
However, it’s important not to
get complainant.”
He said that one of the things
he would like to do as president
is “get the message out there” to
parents and students that community colleges are an affordable
option when it comes to higher
education.
“You can’t go wrong starting
out at a community college then
transferring to a university,” he
said. “You can save yourself a lot
of money and our credits transfer
everywhere. I think trying to get
that message out there, especially
with the cost of college going up
every year, is important. People
are trying to find ways to get
education and not break the
bank. For that, this is the place
to come.”
Rooke said construction has

started on the college’s new
building for its Allied Health
and Veterinary Technology
programs.
In July, the state’s Bond Commission authorized $24.7 million
to construct the building, which
has long been in the works.
Rooke said the building
should be complete some time
in 2017.
“It took a long time for construction to get going, but as far
as I know, right now everything
is on track,” he said. “I’m real excited to be here and I am thrilled
to be going out and meeting new
people. I’m willing to travel out to
visit people to get to know them
and find out how the college can
help them. I want to be known
as someone who is collaborative
and eager to work with any group
in the area.
“To me, community colleges
are very critical in helping out
the state’s economic improvement. Helping the students in
this area get the education there
need helps them get the jobs that
they need. I like to view this college as part of the future of the
state. Supporting the citizens of
the state is critically important.”

» LAWSUIT
because the employee, or a
person acting on behalf of the
employee, reports, verbally or in
writing, a violation or suspected
violation of any state or federal
law or regulation or any municipal ordinance or regulation to a
public body.”
In her lawsuit, Watson claims
that she lost her position due
to reporting deficiencies in
the district’s special education
program, including the false
reporting of expenditures, along
with reporting alleged improprieties committed by the school
district’s former food service
director.
“While [Watson] makes
several allegations about her
treatment, the crux of her claim
is that [the board and Hoffnagle]
removed her from her superintendent position because of her
whistleblowing activity,” Pannozzo wrote in her motion to
dismiss. “Any Connecticut General Statute 31-51m premised

» SKI SUNDOWN

» ROOKE
department from 1996 to 2003.
After the University of Hartford, he served as the director of
information technology for Long
Island University in Brookville,
N.Y., from 2003 to 2006.
He moved on to Manchester
Community College in Manchester where he served as the
academic division director for
the college’s center for business
and technologies from 2006 to
2009.
In 2009 he began serving as
the dean of academic affairs for
Tunxis Community College in
Farmington.
“It’s been a real pleasure and
I’ve enjoyed the time that I’ve had
here,” Rooke said in an interview
on Thursday, Jan. 7. “I officially
started on Nov. 27. I couldn’t be
happier. I’m still learning a great
deal about NCCC.”
Rooke said that NCCC is the
third college campus where he
has worked.
“Each college campus I have
worked at is unique in many
ways, but in some ways there
are things that are very similar,”
Rooke said. “I’m still getting to
learn about everyone who is
working here and getting to know
all of all students. I’ve also spent
about half of my time out in the
community trying to get to know
elected officials and the business
community.”
Rooke said that there were
several factors as to why NCCC
is unique.
“Certainly its location is part
of its uniqueness,” he said. “It’s
got the largest geographical area
of any of the colleges in the state,
yet it’s the smallest of the them
all. But this part of Connecticut
is what attracted me to come
here, which is being out in the
rural part of the state. What also

Send your news
to editor@
winstedjournal.com

Correcting Errors
We are happy to correct
errors in news stories when
they are called promptly to
our attention. We are also
happy to correct factual and/
or typographical errors in
advertisements when such
errors affect meaning.

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

The classic trefoil cookies are popular Girl Scout offerings, but
they can’t compare with the most popular of all: Thin Mints.

Look for a Girl
Scout (and cookies)
this month
By KAREN BARTOMIOLI
Move over Oreos. From
January to March each year, Girl
Scout cookies bump the classic
off the top of the bestseller list
with a total of about two million
boxes sold.
Can’t guess which are the favorite? Here’s a hint: an unknown
percentage are eaten frozen, and
some are eaten after having been
forgotten about, stashed in a hidden freezer corner.
The answer is Thin Mints,
which account for a quarter of
sales and are baked at a rate of
up to 4.5 million per day to meet
demand.
In the Northwest Corner,
there are eight varieties to choose
from, including Rah Rah Raisins,
Toffee-tastic, Samoas, Trefoils,
Tagalongs, Do-Si-Dos and Savannah Smiles.
Local troops sell them for $4
per box, or $5 for the gluten free
Toffee-tastic. Orders are taken
until the end of this month, with
cookies delivered to troops at the
end of February.
Those who must talk about
nutrition will be happy to know
the recipes have changed over
the years to exclude trans fats
and preservatives. In this region,
Thin Mints and Peanut Butter
Patties are also vegan.
For the diet conscious who
find it hard to stop at a handful,
the Thin Mints and peanut buttery Tagalongs are a good choice.
They don’t have fewer calories,
but in 2009, in response to rising
costs, the number of cookies in
each box was reduced.
Be grateful it’s not 1942, when
baking supplies were in short
supply due to the war and Girl
Scouts sold calendars instead.
But then again, if it was 1933,

a box of 44 cookies would be
only 23 cents (or six boxes for
$1.24).
Of note is that, as of last year,
Girl Scout cookies were available
at www.amazon.com, along with
a lot of knockoffs, such as Mint
Thin cookies and others that
claim to taste just like the “real”
thing. But be warned of sticker
shock. Prices are high and so is
shipping. They can easily cost
$10 per box.
And while it might be fun to
someday get cookies delivered
by drone, it still won’t beat a
smiling Girl Scout face, or support a local troop.
Can’t find a cookie-selling
Girl Scout?
They don’t go door-to-door
anymore, but cookie shoppers
can be put in touch with a troop
leader in their area by contacting productsales@gsofct.org or
800-922-2770 ext. 3305.
Cookies are sold online at
www.gsofct.org, with all sales
done in connection with a troop,
which will receive credit.
Troops are now allowed to
host booth sales at events and
in front of retail stores. Look
for them from Feb. 27 to March
27, and get the app for that: Go
to www.girlscoutcookies.org to
sign up for alerts and to get the
cookie finder app.
One can always donate a box
or more to Cookies for Heroes
by adding to an order. Veterans
and active duty military members, both at home and overseas
will enjoy a sweet thank-you for
their service.
So, while the public gets it
annual fix of Thin Mints, Samoas or whatever, troops get
a chance to fill their treasuries,
learn a variety of life skills and
the value of striving for goals.

COMPASS
Your Guide to Tri-State Events

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

A9

Jan. 14 - Jan. 20, 2016

THEATER: MARSDEN EPWORTH
‘The Music Man’

All It Takes Is Music, a Man and a Miracle

W

e learn from the
start that Professor Harold Hill is
a scoundrel. He gives traveling salesmen a bad name,
one of that tribe aboard a
train rattling through the
state of Iowa complains. Hill
comes to a town, creates
a boys’ band, sells instruments and uniforms and
skips before anyone discovers he knows nothing about
music.
And so Meredith Willson’s 1957 Tony Award-winning musical (beating out
the ground-breaking and
powerful “West Side Story”
for heaven’s sake) about
midwestern, small-town life
opens with the memorable
talk-song, “Rock Island,”
and a coach-full of salesmen
bouncing across the landscape, wondering where
their next dollar is coming
from.
Professor Hill knows,
of course. He’s heading for
River City, a town with lots
of kids.
This is terrain that director Michael Berkeley has
mined many times before.
A few years back, Berkeley,

a founder of TriArts and its
onetime artistic and music
director, was asked at an
audition how many children he planned to cast. “As
many as we can fit on the
stage,” he said. And once
again, Berkeley, along with
fellow director and choreographer Lori J. Belter, founder
of the Housatonic Musical
Theatre Society, has done
a great job casting a lot of
very well-rehearsed and tremendously engaged young
people (and concomitantly
filling the theater with lots
of parents and friends) for
this spirited and sometimes
touching production.
True to form, the professor, played, alas, by a rather
listless and disheveled
Christopher Gilbert, hits
town, gets word of the new
billiard parlor and arouses
anxieties about wayward
boys shooting pool, and
taking to using words like
“swell” and phrases like “so’s
your old man.”
Stirred by Hill’s promise
of “shimmering trumpets,”
various other instruments
such as euphoniums and
bassoons, as well as braided

uniforms and well-mannered youth, the parents of
River City buy in.
But oh, if only life were
that simple. The town’s
librarian and piano teacher
Marian Paroo, a spinster,
is suspicious. She is also
beautiful. And Amy LeBlanc
performs Willson’s gorgeous, sometimes wistful,
songs like an angel.
So Harold Hill is in
trouble. He may not know
a thing about music, but he
is a master manipulator of
human beings. He knows he
can divert trouble by turning school board members
into a barbershop quartet.
One note on the pitch pipe
and they are off and singing,
wonderfully in this case. But
Marian is another matter.
She has no time for this
fellow, and so the professor
must settle, in song at least,
for “the sadder but wiser
girl,” a Hester seeking “to
win just one more A.”
This is the thing about
“The Music Man.” It is wonderful in every way. Willson
wrote a witty, touching,
funny, clever musical (with,
incidentally, the most

unusual rhyme around:
Marian and carrion), and
the Centerstage production
at Rhinebeck’s Center for
Performing Arts has done
it right. The musical direction by Paul and Joanne
Schubert is spot on. The
sets are simple and charming, the costumes, lovely,
the dancing, good; and the
performances are wry when
they’re supposed to be and
open-hearted when it matters. Jamison Fountain is
fine as 8-year-old Winthrop,
the boy mourning the loss
of his dad; and Cindy Kubik
as Mrs. Paroo, his mother, is
spirited and touching. Most
everyone has done right
by this lovely show about
human nature and miracles
and, of course, romance.
“The Music Man,” based
on a story by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey, with
book, music and lyrics by
Willson, runs at The Center
for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck through Jan. 31. For
tickets and information, go
to www.centerforperformingarts.org or call 845-876-3080.

ART SCENE: MARSDEN EPWORTH

A Varied and
Entertaining Show

I

t’s called a Winter
Warmer, The White
Gallery’s annual exhibit
of varied —very varied
— pieces by 17 artists. It
opened this week with
works by photographers
and painters.
It’s an unusual show.
“Every two weeks it’s
recurated, gallery owner Tino Galluzzo says. “I
add new pieces and move
them around to change it
up. And in a show like this
without a point of view,

you can mix abstract and
traditional work.”
And mix he does.
Most prominent on entering the gallery is Avery
Danziger’s very large and
starlit photograph of Jockey’s Ridge in North Carolina in the middle of the
night. The star streaks and
the glowing horizon speak
of a lengthy and expert
exposure. It’s a beautiful
scene.
Continued on next page

PHOTO BY JORDAN FEAST

Janet Iffland, “Mt Pleasant Farm,”
Acrylic on Canvas, 30x40.

Hosted by The Hotchkiss Class of 2019

Community Skating Party

FREE Sunday, January 17, 1-3 p.m.

Children must
be accompanied
by an adult

Schmidt Rink at The Hotchkiss School

Arts & Entertainment
James Barron Art
James Barron Art / Kent is pleased to announce
a group exhibition entitled, “Winter Solstice / Little Sun,” honoring the achievement of Olafur
Eliasson’s Little Sun during the winter solstice, the sun’s low ebb.
Works will include paintings, drawings, and photographs by:
Angela Dufresne
Beverly Pepper
Cameron Martin
Cy Twombly
Dawn Clements
Jacob Kassay
James Siena

Jeannette Montgomery Barron
Jose Lerma
Jules Olitski
Kenneth Noland
Little Sun
Lynn Davis
Margherita Marchioni

Gallery Hours:

ACCLAIMED PHOTOGRAPHS & ACCOMPANYING BOOK

19 December - 6 March

TREMAINE GALLERY: JAN. 23 - MARCH 6
RECEPTION: JANUARY 23, 4 - 6 P.M.

Saturday, January 30 ~ 7:00 p.m.

www.jamesbarronart.com
info@jamesbarronart.com

free & open to the public

Leonel Morales, Spanish pianist
PERFORMING WORKS BY BEETHOVEN,
RACHMANINOV, AND STRAVINSKY

Martine Bedin
Roberto Caracciolo
Ralph Gibson
Shirana Shahbazi
Sol LeWitt
Tristano di Robilant
Yun-Fei Ji

4 Fulling Lane Kent, CT 06757

HOTCHKISS.ORG/ARTS
THE OLDEST LIVING THINGS IN THE WORLD

Peter Landesman and Will Smith in Concussion.

MOVIE: PATRICK L. SULLIVAN
‘Concussion’

A Serious Matter
Needing Better
Treatment

J

ust in time for the
pro football playoffs
comes Peter Landesman’s “Concussion,”
starring Will Smith as Dr.
Bennet Omalu, a pathologist who identified
what is now known as
chronic traumatic encephalopathy in National
Football League players.
Omalu, a Nigerian,
has an uphill battle
with his coworkers and
colleagues, with the immensely powerful NFL
and with resentful fans.
The film starts promisingly enough, with
David Morse playing the
increasingly disturbed
Mike Webster, center for
the legendary Pittsburgh
Steelers teams of the
1970s. 
Webster is living in his
pickup truck, and is so
out of it he is yanking his
own teeth and glueing
them back in his mouth.
He dies, officially, of a
heart attack.
But Omalu orders a
full autopsy and eventually concludes that years
of collisions incurred
playing football had
damaged Webster’s
brain. He finds other
players with similar
conditions, publishes a
paper and that’s when
the trouble starts.
Along the way he
meets a young woman
from Kenya, falls in love,
gets married and starts
to build a house.
And the NFL pushes
back. 
Omalu’s boss is indicted on federal charges for
misusing his office. His
wife is stalked and loses

their first child. Omalu
loses his faith in the
American Dream, and
eventually takes a job in
California.
Only when another
ex-player, Dave Duerson, kills himself and
leaves a note asking that
his brain be examined
for CTE, does the dam
break to some extent,
and Omalu is somewhat
vindicated.
This is all good
material, and should
make for a compelling
film. But “Concussion”
is lifeless. Loose ends
abound. Is Prema OMalu
(Gugu Mbatha-Raw)
really being stalked by a
mysterious car, or is she
being paranoid? And
is that really enough to
cause problems with her
pregnancy?
Are the Feds acting
as proxies for the NFL?
Are the nasty phone calls
Omalu receives the work
of conspirators or of
individual nut cases? We
don’t know — and if
the film moved faster it
wouldn’t matter. But if a
film has a slow, deliberate pace, it better explain
everything — because
the audience has the
leisure time to wonder.
The net effect is,
ultimately, a dull and
somewhat preachy film.
The issue of concussions is a serious one. It
deserves a more forceful
treatment than this.
“Concussion” is rated
PG-13 for thematic
material including some
disturbing images, and
language.

Winter Solstice / Little Sun

Saturday & Sunday / 11-5
& by appointment

RACHEL SUSSMAN

PHOTO BY MELINDA SUE GORDON - © 2015 COLUMBIA PICTURES

ALL ARE WELCOME!

At The
Movies
To advertise your upcoming
event under the “At The Movies”
banner of Compass, email
advertising@lakevillejournal.com.

Now Showing

1/15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21
“REVENANT” R 7PM
“ CAROL” R 7PM
CLOSED MONDAYS
354 Main St., Winsted
354 Main St. Winsted Ct 06098
1-860-379-5108 • www.gilsoncafecinema.com
Doors open at 6 p.m. • 21 Years & Older

SAVE THE DATE:
February 12, 7 p.m.
Hotchkiss Concert Series — QUINK,
DUTCH VOCAL ENSEMBLE WITH FABIO &
GISELE WITKOWSKI, PIANO. Works by
English Romantic composers, Clara
Schumann, and Johannes Brahms.
February 19 - 21
Hotchkiss
Dramatic
Association
- Measure for Measure by William
Shakespeare. Walker Auditorium. (Tickets
are $10, $5 for students and senior citizens.
Cash or check only. Phone 860-435-3203
or buy at the door.)

The Hotchkiss School | 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | 860.435.4423 | hotchkiss.org/arts

Perles

A10 THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

TELEVISION: DARRYL GANGLOFF
‘Making a Murderer’

TRI-CORNER CALENDAR
THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL • THE MILLERTON NEWS • THE WINSTED JOURNAL

Hubris and a Flawed
Auditions
Justice System

I

spent New Year’s Day
binge-watching “Making
a Murderer” on Netflix.
Every time the credits rolled
on an episode of the 10part documentary series,
I watched the next one. By
the time it was over, I was
overwhelmed by anger,
frustration, sadness and the
desire to share this series
with others.
The documentary follows
Steven Avery, a Wisconsin
man who spent 18 years
in prison for a rape he did
not commit. DNA evidence
led to his exoneration in
2003, when he became a
free man. In 2005, while
filing a $36 million lawsuit
against Manitowoc County
for wrongful imprisonment,
he was charged with the
murder of Teresa Halbach,
a photographer who visited
the Avery family’s salvage
yard to photograph a minivan for Auto Trader magazine. Avery’s 16-year-old
nephew, Brendan Dassey,
was also charged with participating in the murder.
“Making a Murderer,”
which was filmed over a
period of 10 years, is filled
with courtroom footage,
recorded phone calls from
prison and intimate interviews with the Avery family.
Filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos read
about Avery’s case in The
New York Times in November 2005 and headed out
to Wisconsin to attend his
preliminary hearing. They
ultimately moved there to
follow every development
as it occurred in real time.
They followed the trials of
Avery and Dassey, as well
as the aftermath of the
verdicts. Even though the
verdicts are a decade old, I
will avoid stating them here.
For those of you who don’t
know how the story unfolds,
hearing the juries reach
their decisions is incredibly
powerful.
If there wasn’t undeniable proof that these trials
occurred, I would swear
that “Making a Murderer”
was a scripted, serialized
courtroom drama. There are
shocking and heartbreaking

“Our question
going in was
never about guilt
or innocence or
about trying to
solve this crime.”
twists and turns throughout
every hour-long episode
that will leave viewers
asking countless questions:
Why did the Manitowoc
County sheriff ’s department
participate in the murder
investigation, despite the
clear conflict of interest?
Did the police plant evidence to frame Avery? Was
Dassey’s confession coerced?
“Our question going in
was never about guilt or
innocence or about trying
to solve this crime. It was really an exploration into the
system,” Demos told CBS
News. This is an important
distinction to make. As you
watch “Making a Murderer,”
you’ll likely find yourself
attempting to assign guilt
or innocence to Avery and
Dassey. Perhaps you’ll question whether the series is
biased toward Avery, since
it focuses so much on his
family. Former Wisconsin
state prosecutor Ken Kratz
told People magazine that
the series left out key pieces
of evidence;  in response,
Ricciardi made a statement
to The Wrap, a website, that
“we stand by the project
we did. It is thorough. It is
accurate. It is fair. That is
why it took us 10 years to
produce it.”
In any case, “Making a
Murderer” shows a flawed
legal system. Dean Strang,
a sensible defense lawyer
for Avery, says it best: “Most
of what ails our criminal
justice system lies in unwarranted certitude on the part
of police officers and prosecutors and defense lawyers
and judges and jurors that
they’re getting it right. That
they are simply right. Just a
tragic lack of humility of everyone who participates in
our criminal justice system.”

… Winter Warmer
Continued from previous page
Photographer Tom
Zetterstrom is a newcomer
to the gallery and his trees
in black and white are very
fine.
Nearby hangs a lovely
painted abstract by Sarah
Martinez: patches of lime
and purple and pink on a
white back.
And further, “Mount
Pleasant,” a traditional red
barn in the snow painted
by Janet Iffland. “We like
her barns and landscapes,”
Galluzzo said, referring to
himself and his wife Susan,
co-owner of the gallery.
For simplicity and serenity, Francis Ashforth’s
“Tidal Inlet 5” in sand and
pale blue is arresting. And
Deborah Losada’s “Provisional Visibility,” a sleakly
defined red bar dissolving
into smoke always impresses viewers, Galluzzo said.
One year, shortly after
opening the gallery, Galluzzo said, he closed it for the
winter. “It bothered me,” he
said. “Never again. This is a

community gallery. People
come in to get warm. They
give me feedback. It’s good.”
The White Gallery, located in Lakeville opposite the
Post Office on Main Street, is
open weekends from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. For information,
call 860-435-1029.

We’ve introduced

The Sharon Playhouse, 49 Amenia Road, Sharon, CT, 860-3647469, www.sharonplayhouse.
org Auditions for 2016 season,
by appointment only, Feb 27,
callbacks, Feb 28. Email info@
sharonplayhouse.org or call and
speak to Wendy to schedule.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Call
for artists, Elected Artists,
drop-off, Jan 25; The Art of the
Flower, drop-off, Jan 25. For
all info. go to westhartfordart.
org/call-for-artists.

Books
The White Hart, 15 Undermountain Road, Salisbury, CT,
860-435-0030, www.whitehartinn.com The White Hart
speaker series: Helen Klein
Ross “What Was Mine,” Jan
16, 4-5 pm.

Galleries
The M Studio Gallery, 48 Main
Street, Millerton, NY 12546,
518-789-3408, www.themoviehouse.net The Art of Alexander
Shundi, a collection of collages
accompanied by poems, Jan
16-April 14, gallery talk, Jan 16,
5-6 pm, reception, 6-7 pm.
Morrison Gallery, 25 North
Main Street, Kent, CT, morrisongallery.com Wolf Kahn,
pastels, through Jan 31.
Noble Horizons, 17 Cobble
Road, Salisbury, CT, 860-4359851, www.noblehorizons.
org Housatonic Camera Club
exhibit of new works, Jan 15Feb 14, opening reception, Jan
15, 5-7 pm.
Ober Gallery, 10 North Main
Street, Kent, CT, 860-927-5030,
www.obergallery.com Leonid
Sokov, sculpture and drawings, through Feb 28; Robert
Andrew Parker and Geoffrey
Parker, Father and Son, paintings, prints and sculpture,
through May 1.
Sharon Historical Society
& Museum, 18 Main Street,
Sharon, CT, 860-364-5688,
sharonhist.org Solo exhibition
of photographs by Jonathan
Doster, Impressions of China The Land, People and Culture,
Jan 16-March 4, opening
reception, Jan 16, 5-7 pm.
Sohn Fine Art Gallery, 69
Church Street, Lenox, MA, 413551-7353, www.sohnfineart.
com Muse, through January.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Instagram 2016, through Jan 24.
The White Gallery, 344 Main
St, Lakeville, CT, 860-4351029, www.thewhitegalleryart.com 2016 Winter Warmer
exhibition, through Mar 31,
weekends.
Window into the World of Art
Gallery, 716 Main Street, Winsted, CT, 203-243-3069, win-

PHOTO: MARSDEN EPWORTH

THEATER

Sharon Playhouse Opens New Year

S

haron Playhouse
began the new year
last weekend with
audition workshops led by
the theater’s artistic director, John Simpkins. Beside
Simpkins, Pippa Clark,
6, of Sharon, who sang
“Amazing Grace,” watched

dowworldart.com Lara Troisi,
paintings, Some Thoughts on
Life, opening reception, Jan
16, 4-7 pm.

Movies
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net
Salisbury Forum, documentary “The Millionaires’ Unit,” Jan
17, 11:15 am. Free.

Music
Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org Met Opera
Live in HD: Bizet’s “Les Pêcheurs
de Perles,” Jan 16, 1 pm.
Club Helsinki Hudson, 405
Columbia St., Hudson, NY,
518-8284800, helsinkihudson.
com Darlingside, Jan 14, 8 pm;
Elvis Birthday Bashwith the
Lustre Kings, Jan 15, 9 pm;
Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Cabin Fever Cabaret, Jan 16, 9 pm;
Adrien Reju with Elijah Wolf,
Jan 21, 8 pm.
Infinity Music Hall & Bistro,
8232 Route 44, Norfolk, CT,
866-666-6306, www.infinityhall.com Kathy Mattea, Jan 14, 8
pm; Johnny A, Jan 15, 8 pm; The
Spirit of Johnny Cash, Jan 16, 8
pm; The Steel Wheels, Jan 21,
8 pm.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,

the other young people
perform in this annual
event aimed at preparing
youngsters for the tough
job of auditioning for roles
in musical theater.
Sharon Playhouse opens
the season June 16 with
“Gypsy,” continues with
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Met
Opera Live in HD:Bizet’s “Les
Pêcheurs de Perles,” Jan 16, 1
pm, Scott Eyerly’s pre-broadcast opera lecture, 11 am
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net Met
Opera Live in HD: Bizet’s “Les
Pêcheurs de Perles,” Jan 16,
12:55 pm.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main
Street, Torrington, CT, 860-4897180, www.warnertheatre.org
Met Opera Live in HD: Bizet’s
“Les Pecheurs de Perles,” Jan
16, 12:55 pm, pre-opera lecture
by Nunzio DeFilippis, 10:55 am.
The White Gallery, 342 Main
Street, Lakeville, CT, 860-4351029, www.thewhitegalleryart.
com Jazz group No Chordtet,
Jan 16, 7-9 pm.

Theater
The Center for Performing Arts
at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308,
Rhinebeck, NY, 845- 876-3080,
www.centerforperformingarts.

a yet-to- be-named new
musical July 7; followed
by “Big River,” July 21. “I
Love You, You’re Perfect,
Now Change” opens Aug. 4
and “Quartet” begins Aug.
18. For information, go to
www.sharonplayhouse.org.
— Marsden Epworth
org “The Music Man,” through
Jan 31. Go to website for tickets
and times.
The Ghent Playhouse, 6 Town
Hall Place, Ghent, NY, 518-3926264, www.ghentplayhouse.org
“The Weir,” Jan 22-Feb 7.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413528-0100, www.mahaiwe.org
London’s National Theatre in
HD, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” Jan 28, 7 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net
London’s National Theatre in
HD, “Les Liasons Dangereuses,”
Jan 28, 7 pm, Feb 7, 1 pm; “As
You Like It,” Feb 25, 7 pm, Feb
28, 1 pm.
TheaterWorks, 233 Pearl Street,
Hartford, CT, 860-527-7838,
theater- workshartford.org
Tom Lenk in “Buyer & Cellar,”
through Feb 14. For tickets and
times go to the website.
For free access to our
calendar, go to our website
at www.tricornernews.com

Dining
A farm to table restaurant in the heart of Amenia
A Monte Family tradition since 1906
from Brooklyn to Montauk to Amenia,
with the newest addition of
Executive Chef, Dafna Mizrahi
Wed.-Fri. 5-10 Sat. 12-10 Sun. 12-8

Bar Open After Hours

3330 Route 343
Amenia, NY 12501
845-789-1818
monteskitchen@gmail.com
www.monteskitchen.com
www.facebook.com/
monteskitchenandtaproom

THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

A11

To Place
an AdanCall
or Visit
www.tricornernews.com/classifieds
To Place
Ad860-435-9873
Call 860-435-9873
or Visit
www.tcextra.com/classifieds

Classifieds

RATES

LINE AD DEADLINE

Monday at 12:00 p.m. except holiday weeks
when a special deadline is published in advance.

$12 for the first 15 words or less. 40¢ for each
additional word. Call us for our special 4 time rate.
All line ads must be prepaid.
Mastercard, Visa and American Express accepted.

Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
The Winsted
Journal
- www.tcextra.com
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
NewsNews
- The- Winsted
Journal
- www.tricornernews.com

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED

FARM MAINTENANCE POSITION: available
in Amenia. SumASSOCIATE
REGISTRAR:
Remer, temporary
job. 40associate
hours per
treat
center seeking
week.
For
details
please
call
Tom
registrar. Outstanding customer
at 845 518-1546.
service,
communication, and
organizational
skills,
familiarity
GOLF COURSE
LABORERS:
with
Jewish
customs,
andseason.
excelneeded for up coming
lent
computer
skills required.
Call Bill,
860 364-0146.
Email resume and cover letter
to jobs@hazon.org.
MACINTOSH
SUPPORT: Do your
friends call you first when they
DRIVER/MECHANIC:
rubbish
have a problem orforquestion
company.
time.
Must
be
about theirFull
Mac,
iPod,
iPhone,
at
leastor25AppleTV?
years old and
iPad
Canhave
you
translate
techno-speak
into
medical
card.
Random testing.
plain English?
Are to:
you
Please
send resume
P.O.ready
Box
to spend
your workday
enrich426,
East Canaan,
CT 06024.
ing people’s lives while using
the coolestUpApple
technology
DRIVERS:
to $350
per day
on earth?
Drop
us an
email3 and
benefits.
Class
A CDL,
jobs@visionarycomputer.net
years
minimum experience. Part
time, with full time opportunity.
PAINTERS
AND
PAINTERS
Weekdays and
weekends.
Local
HELPERS: Pay according to
and
long
distance.
Safe
record.
experience. Own transportation
Team
Judge
Manning
a plus. work.
Monday
- Friday.
Call 518
Horse
Transport, Amenia, NY.
789-4185.
845 373-8700.
PASTORALE BISTRO IN LAKEELECTRICIAN
- MILLBROOK
VILLE, CT: is currently
seeking
SCHOOL:
is seeking
a candian experienced
Line Cook
to add
date
who
has atteam.
least Must
five years
to our
kitchen
have
of
professional
commercial
culinary
background,
ambitious
outlook and
great attitude.
electrical
experience
to join
Clean
& neatPlant
appearance
a plus.
our
Physical
Department.
Pleaseexperience
call 860 435-1011.
HVAC
helpful. Interested candidates should
POOL/RECREATION
DIRECTOR:
submit a resume to Virginia
ConThe North
Recreation
nolly
at 131Canaan
Millbrook
School
Commission
is looking
for ReRoad,
Millbrook,
NY 12545,
sponsible, reliable lifeguardsor
to
gconnolly@millbrook.org
work at town pool for the 2011
845
677-0339
(fax).
summer. Must have current

INSTRUCTIONS,
HELP
WANTED
CLASSES

SERVICES OFFERED
SERVICES OFFERED

positionLESSONS:
is part-time
(3 days/
GUITAR
An innovative
week,
some
Saturdays)
with
program
personally
designed
competitive
pay in ayou
positive,
around the music
listenpato.
tient-centric
worktheory,
environment.
Learn technique,
chords
To
apply
or for
more
information:
and
scales
from
an experienced
SharonDentalAssoc@gmail.
college instructor. Explore songcom
or 860
writing
and364-0204.
recording. Electric
and acoustic guitars welcome.
RN
FULL
TIME
- EVENINGS:
Call- Jeff
at 845
877-3311.
Must work every other weekend & every
other
PRIVATE
LESSONS
IN holiday.
WATERSubstance
Facility in
COLOR: byAbuse
an experienced
Litchfield
Hills.
Experience
painter. $50/2
hours.
My place
with
psychiatric
substance
or yours.
And/or /learn
to sell
abuse
treatment
preferred
but
you paintings on E-bay. 860
will
train.
Will
oversee
range
of
596-4251.
medical-medication issues and
activities
for guest
population.
SAT
TUTOR:
Critical
reading,
Familiarity
with 12
Step
Program
grammar, essay,
SAT
II Literature,
helpful
but
not
required.
We
NY State Regents, college applioffer
competitive
salary eduand
cationa essays.
Experienced
benefits
package.
state
cator with
excellentPlease
references.
where
you
saw thisYour
ad and
either
Tri-state
location.
home
or
fax
resume
to 860 927-3515 or
mine.
845 729-3193.
email to communications@hig
hwatchrecovery.com.

DAVID
JAMESCARE:
VALYOU
2016
PROPERTY
Horti- CARPENTER
- PAINTER
culture,
gardening,
and land- HANDYMAN:
Renovation
scape
contracts. Complete
tree,
for homes
and barns.
lawn,
and property
care.Full
203
remodeling
kitchens,
391-1061
/ service;
www.arborartct.
baths,
additions, roofing,
com
(John).
painting, structural repairs.
Historic preservation
and
A1-HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS
care of older
homes.
Long
REMOVED
AND
TRUCKED
list of local
many
AWAY:
fromclientele,
basements,
atreferences.
364-9880
tics,
garages &860
barns.
Insured.
davidvalyou@yahoo.com.
Call
860 364-4653.

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED

RETAIL SALES POSITION LEARN
NEWSPAPER
BUSIPARTTHE
TIME:
available at
our
NESS
A PAID
INTERNnewlyWITH
expanded
tile and
stone
SHIP:
Qualified
stushowroom
in Shefficollege
eld. Looking
dents
interested and
in learning
for a motivated
friendly
the
ins to
and
of how
a
person
joinouts
our team.
Good
newspaper
works
now
have
communication
skills
- ability
the
opportunityand
to apply
a
to multi-task
basic for
compaid
summer
internship
at The
puter
knowledge
a must.
SatMillerton
News. The internship
urdays required.
Will train
isthe
to last
a total
of eight
weeks.
right
person.
Please
call
The
New
York
Press
Association
413 297-6940 or e-mail: lisa(NYPA)
Foundation
is
offering
rocksolid@roadrunner.com,
$2,500
internship
stipends
to 25
Rock Solid
Marble
and Granite
randomly selected newspapers.
Applicants
in a careeris
THE
TOWNinterested
OF PINE PLAINS:
in community journalism must
accepting applications for the
apply directly to The Millerton
position of truck driver/laborer.
News. Applicants must attend
Applicants
mustthe
have
a CDL
college
during
2016-17
Class B license
valid
for the State
academic
year.
Application
of New
Job will
include
forms
areYork.
available
online
at:
seasonal mowing, operation
www.nynewspapers.com.
Mail
of equipment
and
machinery
completed
forms
to The
Milleras well
a Box
variety
manual
ton
News,asPO
AD, of
Millerton,
tasks
in connection
withFeb.
the
NY
12546
by Monday,
construction,
main15,
2016.For repair
more and
informatenance
of Town
roads,
tion
contact
Richowned
Hotaling
at
highways
and464-6483,
other properties.
NYPA
at 518
email
Applicants must pass physical
editor@millertonnews.com
or
and518
drug
testing. Applications
call
789-4401.
are available from the Highway
Superintendent- during
RECEPTIONIST
PART regular
TIME:
hours ofDental
businessAssociates
at 20 Highway
Sharon
is
seeking
orgaBlvd., Pineenthusiastic,
Plains, NY 12567.
Apnized
& skilled
receptionist
plications
are to be
returned to
with
a dedication
to providing
the Highway
Superintendent
or
excellent
service
in a
mailed tocustomer
the Highway
Superproactive
where
intendentenvironment
at PO Box 955,
Pine
multi-tasking
& prioritization
Plains, NY 12567
by the close
are
essential.
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businessResponsible
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2011. TheaTown
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patient RESEARCH
scheduling ASSISTANT:
& payment
WHALE
processing.
The right
for NSF funded
Arcticcandidate
Research
will
possess
consistently
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onathe
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tive
attitude,
to probbe skilled
onthe
theability
computer,
and
lem-solve
effectively,
computer
good with
writing and
editing
proficiency
& a dedication
to
skills. Part-time
position with
excellent communication. Reabout 20 hours. Please call 860
sponsibilities include: answer364-0800 and/or fax resume to
ing inquiries via phone and e860 364-2600.
mail,
booking and maintaining

lifeguard, first aid and CPR certiFLORIST:
florist
fications. Experienced
Hours may vary.
Must
who
can to
work
byevenings
themselves,
be able
work
and
and
handle Applicants
all aspects of
the
weekends.
should
job
from
largeand
arrangements
email
resume
cover letter
to
small
bouquets.
Please
call
with
references
to Adam
Bunce,
860
397-5161.
North
Canaan Recreation Director, abuncencrecdir@hotmail.
com.
LABORER
- FULL TIME: Town
of North East. Call Bob Stevens
PROGRAM
ASSISTANT: North
518 821-0908.
East Community Center seeks a
part-time
Assistant for
appointment schedules, greetTHE
NORTHProgram
EAST COMMUNITY
FIND
HELP INpatients
AN INSTANT:
our summer
youth
employment
ing & directing
during
CENTER:
Teen
Program
CoorVisit maintaining
our new web
site www.
program.
Assist
with
FarmEast
and
care,
confidential
dinator
(P/T)
at the
North
TriCornerNews.com.
Food education
compatient information, confirmCommunity
Centerproject,
in Millerton.
plete
enrollment
paperwork.
ing appointments, verification
Plan
and
lead weekend
outings,
Drivers license, clean record
of insurance and collection of
community
service,
enrichment
required. June 15 - August
patient fees, general adminprograms.
Jobatdescription
and
20. Details
www.neccmilistrative support to the team,
details
at www.neccmillerton.
lerton.org
or call Sara at 518
maintaining an organized &
org
or call Betsey at 518 592789-4259.
efficient workspace. The –
1399.
Lakeville Journal
RESEARCH AND PERSONAL
Size: 2 (3.15") x 3"
ASSISTANT: for Doctor, including writing, organizational and
computer skills needed for Property Management and Biological
Studies. Call 860 364-0800.

SERVICES
OFFERED
SCHOOL
BUS DRIVER
- ALLSTAR TRANSPORTATION: Paid
ALL
SMALL
HOME
IMPROVETraining Starting Now! Lakeville
Handyman
Services •
-MENTS:
Region#1
School district.StartHome
• Carpentry
• Painting
payRepairs
rate $15.20.
Immediate
ing • Decks
• Wood
Floors •
openings
for• Tile
school
bus drivers.
Licensed
and Insured
Years
Paid
training
starting• 35
now
to
Experience
• Goodbus
Prices
• I will
get
your school
license.
show
up
and
do
the
job!
Call
NO experience necessary. 20 to
George
30
hours860
per435-6461.
week on average.
Clean driving record required.
CPerfect
A R E TA attendance
K E R AVA I Lbonus,
ABLE:
Young,energetic
and and
very 401
exdental,
life insurance
for
Kperienced
available.person
Apply looking
in person.
a caretaker Farnum
positionRoad.
full time
Lakeville,40
860
or a part time in exchange for
435-0352.
housing. 860 318-1707 or 518
696-5021.
Peter.
SPECIAL
PROSECUTOR
- PART
TIME: Town of North East seeks
CHAIRS
CANED:
Hand
or
pressed
an experienced attorney, accane available.
860 law
824-0899.
cepted
to practice
in New
York State, to render legal serDON’T
SPEND
YOUR
WEEKvice on behalf of the Town
as a
ENDS CLEANING!
Lessen
your
special
prosecutor of
Vehicle
&
chores
during
this
fun
time
of
Traffic Law violations in Town
year.
Leave
the
cleaning
to
me!
Justice Court. Hours: one afterCall Leigh
860 913-4471.
noon
or evening
per month,
subject to court schedule.
HOUSCLEANING,
OFFICE
&
Interested parties are
invited
HOME:
Very
thorough.
Honest
to
submit
a letter
of application
and
to
thereliable.
Town ofGood
Northreferences.
East, Town
Call Ruth, 860-824-0795
or516,
860
Supervisor’s
Office, PO Box
318-1662.
Millerton, NY 12546.

LESSONS AND
INSTRUCTION

HABITAT FORGUITAR
HUMANITY
LESSONS: An innovative
Sprin

program personally designed
around the music you listen to.
Learn technique, theory, chords
and scales from an experienced
college instructor. Explore songwriting and recording. Electric
and acoustic guitars welcome.
Call 845 877-6309.

g Ho
liday

NEWS REPORTER T
AG SAWANTED
LE

SPORTS PRO SHOP AND PAVILION HELP: Responsible person
Full-time
wanted for The Lakeville
to oversee
sportsreporter
pro shop and
pavilion.
Administrative,
Journal.
Includescombenefits.
puter and people skills required.
Please
resumé and writing samples
Seasonal,
Maysend
September.
Weekends
must. Respond
with
toaCynthia
Hochswender
at cynthiah@
resume to scc1985@sbcglobal.
lakevillejournal.com
net.

SUNFISH PARTS: Young, 15
year old, rebuilding a Sunfish,
needs parts. Center board,
rudder, mast etc. Call Orin, 860
435- 9062.

DRIVE YOUR
Anywhere.
DAVE’S
TREE CAR:
SERVICES
AND
NY/CT airports,
business/
FIREWOOD:
25 NY
years
experishopping
trips,
local
trips,
ence,
insured
with
excellent
trains. Reasonable
rates, courier
references.
860 309-2112.
service. 860 364-5950.
DAVID JAMES VALYOU HOUSE
CLEANING
- OURCONVERY
RENOVATION
AND
BEST: Experienced. Thorough,
STRUCTION:
Renovation
& honest. Satisfaction guaranand restoration
homes
and
teed.
Call Dilma of
860
459-4383.
outbuildings. Painting and
handyman
services. 860
435HOUSE
CLEANING:
Depend9799,honest
davidvalyou@yahoo.
able,
and thorough.
com. hours. No job too big
Flexible
or too small. Experienced with
GET
ORGANIZED
2016!
references.
Call 860 IN
459-1878
Simplify
your life today! No
leave message.
project too large or too small.
LAWNS
ETC.:
Extremely
reasonFor fast,
efficient
service,
call
able rates. All phases of lawn
860-364-5338.
care, you pick the day and
time. NoCLEANING:
job too small. Call
860
HOUSE
Experi318-5280.
enced,
mature woman seeks
estate and house cleaning posiMANZ
Extion. 1/2CONSTRUCTION:
to full day in the greater
cavation,
foundations,
heavy
Falls
Village
area. Dependable,
brush removal for property/
trustworthy,
with with
references
fence lines & slopes
boom
available.
Laurie
at
mounted Please
brush call
mower.
203
860
824-0233.
206-8306.

SERVICES OFFERED
APARTMENTS

TAG SALE CLEAN-UP • SAVE
PINE
bedroom.
WalkTHISPLAINS:
AD: Have1truck
- will come
ing help
distance
schools
and
and
haul ittoaway!
860 824village.
Heat,
water, electric
7181,
leave
message.
and garbage removal included.
Non-smoking.
No pets.- $750.
WINDOWS
- WINDOWS
WINOne month’s
security
and referDOWS!
Cleaning
residential
and
ences required.
518 398-7328.
commercial
windows,
inside and
out! Call 860 913-4471.
PINE PLAINS: In front of high
school.
1 bedroom,
1 bath,
YARD
WORK:
College students
large kitchen and living room.
available
for
raking,
lawn
mow$750 plus utilities and 1 month’s
ing,
cleanup.
Millerton,
security.
Call Amenia,
845 366-8349.
Millbrook, Lakeville, Sharon 845
373-8832.Above Doctor’s Office,
SHARON:
need quiet individuals. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Center of town.
HOUSEHOLD
$950
per month, plus utilities.
1st/last GOODS
month’s rent security.
Call 860 364-5814.
FOR THE KITCHEN: Stainless
SHARON:
Extra-large
studio
Steel Traulsen
Refrigerator
• GE
apartment.
Second
floor.Range
Near
Profi
le Electric
Glass Top
$800 plus& utilities.
•hospital.
Granite Counters
Sinks •
References
and Refrigerator.
security. No
White
Kenmore
pets. 860
671-0006.
Good
Condition,
best offer. 860
364-5929.
SHARON: One bedroom, heat
included, second floor, no smoking $875/month. Bosworth Real
APARTMENTS
Estate
860 364-1700.
AMENIA: Two bedroom, deck,
yard. Heat included.
MetroCONDO
FORNear
RENT
North. Walk to village. $875.
845-373-9570.NY CONDOMINMILLERTON,

DOVER PLAINS: 2 bedroom
apartment.
$850/month
inFALLS
VILLAGE:
Room in nice
cludes
heat, hot
trash
home. Shared
bathwater,
and kitchen.
and
lawn maintenance.
Credit
Off street
parking. $120/week.
860 824-0827.
check
required. 845 8779343.

APARTMENTS
SEASONAL
LIME ROCK:
Large, 3 bedroom,
RENTALS
2 bath apartment equipped

with
washer/dryer,
SHARON
WINTERdishwasher.
RENTAL:
$1,200/month plus utilities. Now
Brick
house.
Dining room, livavailable, 860 435-8149.
ing room with fireplace insert,
kitchen with
appliances,
MILLBROOK
VILLAGE:
Beautiful,4
bedrooms,
2 baths,
aff
ordable, well
kept utility
studio,room
one
EAST
CANAAN:FOR
First floor,
three
HOUSES
RENT
with
washer/dryer
and
twonew
bedroom
apartments.and
All
rooms, $625. Second floor, four
garage.
$1,200
with
security
major appliances. Includes washLIME
ROCK:
- 3 erdeposit.
rooms,
$750. Small
Heat house
and hot
Now
through
April
with
and dryer. Close to all amenibedroom
‚ 1/2 bath
for rent.
Off- ties.
water
included.
Shared
yard,
optional
renewal. 860 364-5019
$630/$990/$1,215/$1,175.
street
parking.
Nonsmokers
off-street parking. No pets.
Call
677-8180.
for845
details.
only! Please call
JWReferences,
at 203 725Non-smokers
only.
1706 or email
MILLERTON: Spacious 1 bedsecurity,
lease.popwoerm@aol.
860 824-5751.
com.
roomOFFICE
apartment.SPACE
Walk to town.
$800/month
includes
heat &
LAKEVILLE: Charming one
FOR
RENT
MILLERTON:
cozy apartment.
2 bedroom hot water, and garbage, utilities
bedroom, 2 bath
Credit check required. 845
cottage for rent,
suitable
for extra.
Convenient
location,
walk
LAKEVILLE: A World of Your
877-9343.
single
or $700
couple.
to
town.
per Available
month,
Own. Immaculate, carpeted
January heat.
1. Propane
includes
Pets OK.fireplace/
Tenant
second
story1 bedroom.
space for Hardoffice
PLAINS:
stoveown
heat,
largeReferences.
yard area, PINE
or retail
with 1/2
bathincluded.
and large
pays
electric.
wood
floors.
Heat
deck,
quiet
neighborhood.
storage area.
1,120
ft. Ideal
First, last, security. For appoint$650.
Callsq.518
398Located
one+
mile
Village. References.
central location near Salisbury,
ment,
please
call
860from
435-3023,
7683.
Security
& references required.
Millerton and Sharon. Ample
or
413 229-5951.
$850/month plus utilities. Call PINE
parking,
central
A/C,large
$1,100effiper
Nice,
PLAINS:
518 789-3201.
monthapartment
+ utilities.on
Best
& Caval2nd
floor.
ciency
LAKEVILLE:
125 Millerton Road,
Central
laro 860location.
435-2888.$600/month
corner Belgo Road. Park like
SHARON: 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath, includes utilities. 914 474-5176.
setting.
3 large
rooms,plus
washer/dryer,
garage.
$1,500 845
462-7381 -leave
message.
LAKEVILLE
MAIN
STREET:
aper
kitchen
andutilities.
bath. $1,300
month plus
No pets,
Historic Colonial office building
includes
heating,
snow
plowno smoking. 860 435-9481.
WEST
- 1/2 DUPLEX:
has CORNWALL
2 available offices
that can
ing, and garden maintenance.
Available
now. 2 or
bedrooms.
be rented together
separately
Wired
for
cable
and
internet,
SHARON: Charming cottage References
and
security
deposit
at $250 per month each.
860
separate
garage,edge,
washer/
$800 per month plus
built on water’s
over- required.
435-2131.
dryer
on premises.
Nowaterfalls.
smoking
utilities. 860 672-6048.
looking
cascading
building.
1 year minimum.
2/3 bedrooms,
2 baths. 860
Fully
SHARON: Office near hospital,
435-2818
666-4513.
Furnished.or10212
minutes
to train.
1,200 sq. ft. for sale or lease.
Available immediately. Perfect CONDOS
FOR SALE
Available immediately.
Former
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK:
1 &
for weekends $1,100
per month
tenant Nordicare Physical
2plus
bedroom
$700 FOR SALE BY OWNER -LION’S
utilities.apartments.
Security/ Excellent
Therapy. 860 567-2435.
and
up per required.
month + utilities.
References
860 248- HEAD CONDOMINIUM: 2 bedrooms,
2 1/2 baths, living room
Available
immediately.
Please
9933. Please leave message.
with fireplace, dining area,
call Dan at 860 435-7000 or eterrace. Swimming pool and
mail dmason@kuhnsbrothers.
tennis available. $270,000. Call
com.
860 596-4040.

IUM: 2 Bedroom Condo with
COLEBROOK
APARTMENT
loft
area for rent
in Millerton.
IN COUNTRY
FARM
HOUSE:
Available
January
1, 2016.
Close
2
room
furnished
apartment
to town, yard area, deck & more.
with full bathroom, wood
$1,150 per month plus utilities.
stove (firewood provided),
Call 518 789-3636.
cable and Dish connections,
“closet” kitchen. On 100 acre
property with lake, woods
pool, sauna, trap range,
chickens, dogs, cats, etc.
Hunting/fishing rights to licensed tenant. $650 monthly.
Write: Byrd Farm, Colebrook,
CT 06021 with full biographical
Available
80information.
Main St., Canaan,
CT 06018 • (860)-453-4370 | email: statelineauctions@gmail.com
June 1st.

PARENTS CONSIDER: College
andAPARTMENTS
Secondary School placement. English preparation
AMENIA:
2 bedroom.
$1,000
per
tutoring in
composition,
grammar, vocabulary
and
literature.
month.
All utilities
included.
No
Dary Call
Dumham:
College Counpets.
845 518-6276.
selor and English Faculty of
Berkshire School.
Former
Head
CORNWALL
BRIDGE:
Adjacent
of Indian
Mountain School
to
the Housatonic
Valley and
AsASSOCIATE DIRECTOR/DIRECTOR
Foote School.
860 364-0039.
sociation.
2 bedroom
apartOF ALUMNI PROGRAMMING
ment in a country setting. Pets
welcome. Eat-in kitchen, living
Salisbury School is seeking a professional person with development
room, pantry, bath, large yard
to oversee and execute alumni programming in the
with space for garden. Rental
Preview Hours: Thursday, Friday &experience
Saturday 10-5
arrangement includes cleaning
Development
Office. Responsibilities include event and fundraising
and Sunday from 9am till Sale
Start
at the Association.
management
DeadlineRent
for the$600/
June 2ND and JuneInitial
3RD issues
Pictures can be viewed at auctionzip.com,of Reunion Weekend and the Fall Classic Golf
month, plus utilities. Please
TH
,
at
12
NOON
for
ALLAuctioneer ID#22549Tournament, as well as 8-10 local and regional gatherings on an
will
be
THURSDAY,
MAY
26
call 860 672- 6678 days. Ask for
annual basis. Candidate will play a key role in the volunteer manRegister for Online Bidding at
Patience. Advertising. Classified Deadline is NOON on Friday,
agement of the school’s alumni governing body and will work to
liveauctioneers.com/state-line-auctions
May 27TH. This includes all sections of the newspapers.
develop a targeted young alumni program. Must possess strong
LAKEVILLE: Sunny second
planning
abilities, interpersonal and organization skills, attenOur New TH
Year Sale features contentsevent
of a fine
Sharon
floor apartment
for
rent.
One
4 p.m. many pieces of tion
Editorial Deadline Will Be THURSDAY,CT
MAYhome.
26 atOffering
fine to
art,detail
prints,
and proficiency in Raiser’s Edge and Microsoft Office.
bedroom, lake view, pet free,
persian and asian items. Large collection
of custom
Title and
salary commensurate with experience. Preference will be
smoke Urgent
free. News
$1,200/month
Items & Late Letters to the
Editor will be acmahogany furniture, period empiregiven
furniture,
and
includes heat, water, electric.
to those
with professional experience in Alumni Relations.
TH
cepted
Noon Friday,assorted
May 27 .mid century items. A dozen lots of interesting
References, security.
Calluntil
or text
Competitive
compensation with full benefits package.
sterling silver, bronze & crystal
chandeliers
860 307-3751.
Call to reserve your jewelry,
space!
and much, much, more. HappyInterested
New Year!candidates should send cover
LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom apartletter, resume and to:
Plan to attend this unreserved fast paced auction.
ments for rent. Includes heat,
Nattalie Smith Will, Assistant Director
garbage pickup & off street
Our Terms: We have a 18% Buyer’s Premium
on All PurchasesSalisbury School, 251
of Development,
parking. Non- smokers
only!
HE ILLERTON In House
EWS with a discount of 3% for cashCanaan
and checkRoad,
and a Salisbury, CT 06068,
Please call JW at 203-725-1706
nwill@salisburyschool.org
20% Buyer’s Premium on all Online
Purchases.
or email popwoerm@aol.com.
We accept Master Card, Visa, Good Check and Cash.
Salisbury School is an
All Items Sold AS IS and AS FOUND.
NORTH CANAAN: 1 Bedroom
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
For Questions or to leave Bids please call 860-453-4370
$750. 1 year lease. Heat and
hot water included. Call 860
605-5923.

STATE LINE AUCTIONS
& ESTATE SERVICES

Salisbury School

January Estate Auction

EARLY DEADLINE

January 17, 2016 @ 11:30 AM

T M
N
The Winsted Journal

Salisbury School
FURNITURE
Salisbury School

Most Items at Half Price

THE HOTCHKISS MATHEMATYour Independent,
ICS AND COMPUTER DEPARTLocally Owned,
MENT:
is
seeking
applicants
for
a
THE MILLERTON NEWS
Community
teaching position in MathematThe
Winstedacademic
Journal
ics for
the 2011-2012
Newspapers &
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF
year. This is a one-year, partRegional News Website
COMMUNICATIONS/WEB
MANAGER
www.
.com
time, teaching-only position,
Director of Parent
Programs
possibly renewable for a second
Salisbury
School is seeking a full-time Assistant Director of Comyear. Responsibilities include
munications/Web
Manager. The person in this position will have
Salisbury School is seeking a Director
of Parent Programs.
teaching four sections of two
responsibility
for managing and producing content for the
The Director is responsible forprimary
supervising
the annual
or three courses in the core curSchool’s Weband
site and
socialof
media platforms, as well as coordinating
solicitation of current parents, grandparents,
parents
riculum of intermediate algebra,
In addition,
alumni and for the non-solicitationmultimedia
programsresources.
associated
with he/she will assist in the production of
geometry, advanced algebra
school publications.
these constituencies. The Director collaborates
with the Director
and pre-calculus. Experience
with technology in the classof The Salisbury Fund and AlumniCandidate
Relations
to have
set experience
strategy, with Web-based content management
must
room is expected, and some
systemsdetermine
and proventhe
skillsmost
editing digital video, audio files and still
analyze and review prospective donors, 
#$! 

Associate
Director
of
The
Salisbury
Fund
experience with curriculum deimages.
A Bachelor’s
degree and strong written communication and
effective solicitation process, and manage
and
oversee programs 

and
Alumni
Relations
velopment would be desirable. 
!%$  !#$!$#'$
and events for these constituents. marketing skills are necessary. Working knowledge of boarding
Email
resumeSchool
and cover
to an Associate Director of The
Salisbury
is letter
seeking
schools preferred.
Interested candidates should send or email a letter of application and 
!# 
! 

Teachingjobs@hotchkiss.org.
Salisbury Fund and Alumni Relations. Individual
will have
a
Salary is competitive and comes with an excellent benefits package.
resume to:
significant role in engaging the School’s alumni through events
To see the detailed job description, visit:
Director of Human Resources www.salisburyschool.org/employment_opportunities.
and programming, increasing alumni participation and support
Salisbury School
for The Salisbury Fund, and connecting alumni to each other
Interested candidates should send cover letter,
and the school. Two to four years of development and direct
251 Canaan Road
resume and three references to:
Salisbury, CT 06068
fundraising experience required preferably in an educational
Danielle Sinclair, Director of Commuhumanresources@salisburyschool.org
setting. Bachelor’s degree preferred.
nications, Salisbury School, 251
Interested candidates should send or email a letter of application
Canaan Road, Salisbury, CT 06068,
and resume to:
dsinclair@salisburyschool.org
Director of Human Resources
Salisbury School is an
Salisbury School
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
251 Canaan Road
Salisbury, CT 06068
humanresources@salisburyschool.org
SALISBURY, CT
FALLS VILLAGE, CT

TriCornerNews

APARTMENTS
ROOMS FOR RENT

HUGE
SELECTION 

& !#& 
#!$! 
"

Salisbury School

63

Tag Sales

MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE Saturday, May 28
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 15 Westmount Road (off
Rt.41, Undermountain Road), Salisbury. Variety
of houshold items, fishing boat, motor & trailer,
lots more.

% of people
use the Internet as
Homecare/community– based healthcare
ex perience is when
highly desirable.
their first resource
looking
Please
call
L
ori
F
oley
for
an
appointment,
for a localcoservice
or product.
e in and fill out an application
or send a resume via fax or e-mail.
GEER V I L L AGE
7 7 South Canaan Road
Canaan, CT 0 6 0 1 8
8 6 0 -8 24 -26 39
8 6 0 -8 24 -26 0 7 F ax
lfoley@ geercares.org
EO E

Reach more local customers with a
search-optimized, mobile-ready, socialfriendly website for your small business.

28, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ay Center

ESTATE SALE 142 Knibloe Hill, Sharon CT. Saturday and Sunday, May 28 &(PART
29 from 9 a.m.
till
TIME/PER
DIEM) Per D iem D river
4 p.m. Mid Century bedroom set, book case,
SUNDAY ONLY - MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE!!!
end tables & Cassina stacking stools. Thonet
May 29th from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come one,
Geer D ial-A-Ride, Relief D river
& Loom chairs. Farm, glass & chrome tables.
come all! Deals to be had, treasures to be found!
If
you’re
cheerful,
hard-working
D
epartment
head
position
open
for
an
ex
perienced
sofas, leather chairs, vintage metal tea cart
Like
to be you
up can
on think
the latest
Want to8’work
Everything
of! Toys,news?
baby items,
and child nurse
chairs. at
Arts
& Crafts
mirror
&atable,
Must have strong interpersonal skills to
registered
N oble
Horiz
ons,
highly-respected
kitchen stuff, clothes,
collectables,
small Valley?
and
flexible,
inbooks,
the charming,
picturesque
Harlem
German beer hall table and benches,
Brass we
& have a job for you!
become part of our caring Staff.
furniture, and lots more! 13 Seneca Lane, just continuum
of
care
retirement
village
in
Salisbury,
CT.
maple beds. Complete sets vintage Rosenthal
The
Millerton
News
is looking
a full-time
off of
Dugway Road
in Lime
Rock. Justfor
follow
Public
service license will be required.
china. Dressers, desks & outdoor furniture.
our signs!
See you
willeducation,
include some
Prior ex perience driving a
Tracker 12’ applicant
tadpole boat
hp. motor
news
reporter
tothere!
work 40 hours a weekSuccessful
coverwill/Honda
direct5Hours
in-service
& electric motor. Pyranha kayak. Kitchen
items, & evenings 1 0 – 1 2 passenger mini-bus preferred.
weekends
e general
orientation
programs,
coordinate quality
ing Amenia, Pine Plains and Webutuck.organiz
dog fencing,
a toilet
& more. You
name it! See
CANAAN,
CT
you
there!
Cash
&
Checks.
assurance
and
assessment,
conduct
nurse
assistant training,
Position covers all aspects of local news —

Full Time

Full-time and Part-time, 7 a.m. – 3 p .m.
Part-Time, 3 p .m. – 11 p .m.
Per diem all shif ts

It’s Time To
Get Online

Careers at
Noble
MEGA-MOVING SALE Everything
must go! 114 Horizons
Beebe Hill Road, Falls Village, CT. Saturday, May

careers at noble
Horiz
onsa
Noble Horizons
is seeking
SHARON, CT
NewsLIME
Reporter
DINING AIDEAdult D
ROCK,Wanted
CT
u Director of Education, Q uality

cnA Positions

Assurance and Assessment

NEWS REPORTER
Wanted: Reporter for weekly
community newspaper.

Reporters frequently work on
weekends and evenings and must
Contact Us,
have Today!
a flexible schedule.
Please call for an appointment,
as employee health
and
nurse, and
community
business
news,
FLEA MARKETnews,
Saturday,
May 28th,
9 a.m.government,
to serve
Great
partinfection
time
job:control
good hourly
wage. Ifcoyou
are
MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE!
Saturday
and Sunday,
e in and fill out an application
This is a full-time job with benefits.
860-435-9873 •websites@lakevillejournal.com
the& 29
Employee
F und.
May 28
from 9 a.m.Scholarship
to
4 p.m. 31 Mudge
Pond at a beautiful progressive
2 p.m. 310 Salisbury
44) in skills
North a chair
education
and the Road
arts.(Rte
Writing
must.
interested
in
working
Canaan, CT. New, used and handmade items
for sale. Refreshments available. Sponsored by
the Housatonic Lodge of Mason #61. VENDORS
WANTED. Contact 860 824-5038 or jbrien@snet.
net for more information.

Send Résumé and Writing Samples
attn.
Whitney Joseph
MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE Friday and Saturday,
E-mail: editor@millertonnews.com

May 27 & 28 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 37 Old TurnThe
Millerton
News
pike
Road
South, East
Canaan CT. Indoor and
P.O.furniture,
Box AD,ping
Millerton,
NY books,
12546too
patio
pong table,
much to list!

www.TriCornerNews.com

or send a resume via fax or e-mail.

Road, Sharon. Lamps, filing cabinets, fireplace

retirement
community
screen,
porta
crib,hours
stroller,
book
shelf,
dishes, please stop at the Wagner
B.s.,
R.n.
• 32
p er
w eek
toss pillows, fabrics, books, and
much more!
Reception
and fill out an application.
GEER AD U L T D AY CEN TER
ualified applicants a e ail a resu e to ileen .
8 3 South Canaan Road
ulligan,MILLERTON,
Ad inistrator, at emulligan@
churchhomes.org
NY
Canaan, CT 0 6 0 1 8
HE
MOVING SALE May 27, 28, & 29 from 9 a.m. Noble Horizons 8 6 0 - 8 24 -7 0 6 7
8 6 0 - 8 24 -7 8 7 1 F ax
to 4 p.m. 104 Old Post Road #4, Millerton,17 Cobble Road, Salisbury, CT 06068
NY. Rain or Shine. Tools, hunting and fishing
lneil@ geercares.org
(860) 435-9851

Please send resume
Your Independent,
and writing
samples.
Locally Owned,

T MILLERTON NEWS
Community
The Winsted Journal
Send inquiriesNewspapers
to Cynthia&Hochswender

equipment, knick knacks, furniture. Something
for everyone.
1 7

CO BBL E RO AD

8 6 0 -4 35 -9 8 5 1

EOE

SAL I SBU RY , CT

0 6 0 6 8

w w w. n o b l e h o r i z o n s . o r g

Equal Opportunity Employer

EO E

Regional News Website
at .com
cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com
www.TriCornerNews

A12 THE WINSTED JOURNAL, Friday, January 15, 2016

To Place
an AdanCall
or Visit
www.tricornernews.com/classifieds
To Place
Ad 860-435-9873
Call 860-435-9873
or Visit
www.tcextra.com/classifieds

Real Estate

Monday at
at 12:00
12:00 p.m.
p.m. except
except holiday
holiday weeks
weeks
Monday
when aa special
special deadline
deadline is
is published
published in
in advance.
advance.
when

CONDOS FOR
FOR SALE
SALE
CONDOS

SEASONAL
SEASONAL
RENTALS
RENTALS

RATES
RATES

LINE AD
AD DEADLINE
DEADLINE
LINE

$12 for
for the
the first
first 15
15 words
words or
or less.
less. 40¢
40¢ for
for each
each
$12
additional word.
word. Call
Call us
us for
for our
our special
special 44 time
time rate.
rate.
additional
All line
line ads
ads must
must be
be prepaid.
prepaid.
All
Mastercard, Visa
Visa and
and American
American Express
Express accepted.
accepted.
Mastercard,

Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
News
- The
Winsted
Journal
- www.tcextra.com
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
News
- The
Winsted
Journal
- www.tricornernews.com
To Place
an AdanCall
To Place
Ad 860-435
Call 860HOUSES FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
HOUSES

HOUSES FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
HOUSES

Real Estate
REAL ESTATE
ESTATE FOR
FOR
REAL
SALE
SALE

SPACE FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
SPACE

TriCornerNews
.com
.com
TriCornerNews
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.com
.com
IS
YOUR
NEW
IS
YOUR
NEW
TriCornerNews
.com
IS YOUR NEW
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IS
YOUR
NEW
REGIONAL
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SITE
TriCornerNews
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IS
YOUR
NEW
REGIONAL
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SITE
REGIONAL
NEWS
SITE
REGIONAL
NEWS
SITE
IS
YOUR
NEW
IS YOURNEWS
NEW SITE
REGIONAL

Rob inson L eech Real Estate

SALISBURY SALE:
SALE: Quiet
Quiet and
and
SALISBURY: 33 bedrooms,
bedrooms, 2.5
2.5
SALISBURY
SALISBURY:
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK:
ROCK: 22 bedbedLAKEVILLE/LIME
private in
in aa woodsy
woodsy setting.
setting.
baths, deck
deck patio,
patio, private
private 22
private
baths,
room house,
house, large
large living
living room
room
room
bedrooms, one
one car
car garage.
garage.
acres. $2,000
$2,000 month
month plus
plus utiliutili22 bedrooms,
acres.
withfifireplace,
replace,study,
study,11bath
bathand
and
with
$225,000 by
by owner.
owner. Call
Call 860
860
ties. 860
860 824-5601.
824-5601.
$225,000
ties.
gardener’sshed.
shed.$900/
$900/month
month
aagardener’s
INEX
P
ENSIVE
W
EEK
END
RETREATS
309-9166.
309-9166.
plus utilities.
utilities. 860
860 435-7000
435-7000 or
or
plus
FOR FUe-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
N AND REL AX ATION. SEASONAL
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
SEASONAL
com.
com.

LAND FOR
FOR SALE
SALE
LAND

ANCRAMDALE, N.Y.
N.Y. 28
28 estate
estate
ANCRAMDALE,
acres. 33 acre
acre stocked
stocked pond.
pond.
acres.
Valley and
and Catskill
Catskill range
range views.
views.
Valley
Engineered driveway.
driveway. B.O.H.A.
B.O.H.A.
Engineered
Electricity -- Several
Several sites
sites total
total
-- Electricity
privacy -- 55 minutes
minutes Millerton
Millerton
privacy
center. Owner
Owner -- 518-329-2244.
518-329-2244.
center.
Price $995,000.
$995,000. Ready
Ready to
to go.
go.
Price

MILLERTON STORE
STORE FOR
FOR RENT:
RENT:
MILLERTON
Nextto
toMcDonalds,
McDonalds,750
750Square
Square
CORNWALL:New
New22bedroom,
bedroom,1.5
1.5
Next
CORNWALL:
SHARON: 44 bedroom
bedroom Cape,
Cape,
SHARON:
feet, recent
recent renovation,
renovation, good
good
bath duplex
duplex home
home on
on 55 acres.
acres.
feet,
bath
deck, pool,
pool, barn
barn on
on .97
.97 acre.
acre.
deck,
parking. Available
Available March
March 1,
1,
Large living
living room
room with
with 16’
16’ ceilceilparking.
Large
$265,000Bosworth
BosworthReal
RealEstate
Estate
$265,000
2011. Telephone
Telephone 518
518 789789ing, kitchen/dining
kitchen/dining room
room with
with
2011.
ing,
860 364-1700.
364-1700.
860
3636.
all new
new appliances,
appliances, offi
office/study
ce/study
3636.
all
area,laundry
laundrywith
withwasher/dryer.
washer/dryer.
area,
MOBILE HOMES
HOMES
MOBILE
HOUSES FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
Pictures at
at www.cornwalct.org.
www.cornwalct.org.
HOUSES
RENTALS
Pictures
RENTALS
REAL ESTATE
ESTATE FOR
FOR
REAL
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK:
ROCK: 33 bedbedLAKEVILLE/LIME
Annuallease
lease$1,800/month
$1,800/monthplus
plus
Annual
FOR
SALE
FOR
SALE
room house,
house, 1.5
1.5 baths,
baths, garage,
garage,
room
AMENIA: 33 bedroom,
bedroom, 22 bath
bath
utilities and
and security
security 860
860 672672CHRISTMAS IN
IN ENGLAND?
ENGLAND?
AMENIA:
utilities
CHRISTMAS
SHARON: Close
Close to
to town,
town, apapSALE
SHARON:
SALE
from
large living
living room,
room, kitchen,
kitchen, dindinlarge
6309 or
or 212
212 534-0727.
534-0727.
home,deck/yard,
deck/yard,washer/dryer.
washer/dryer.
Christmas in
in London?
London? Swap
Swap
6309
home,
Christmas
proved, 22 acres.
acres. $95,000.
$95,000. BoBoproved,
from
DOVER: 33 bedrooms,
bedrooms, 22 baths.
baths.
DOVER:
from
ingroom,
room,social
socialroom,
room,beautiful
beautiful
ing
from
my London
London flflat
at for
for your
your place
place
$1200 includes
includes heat,
heat, lawn
lawn
CONDOS
FOR
SALE
HOUSES
FOR
my
$1200
HOUSES
FOR
RENT
COPAKE
LAKE
FOR
SALE
OR
sworth
Real
Estate
860
364COPAKE
LAKE
FOR
SALE
OR
sworth Real Estate 860 364$1,200/monthincludes
includestrash
trash&
&
$1,200/month
The
Lakeville
Journal
from RENT:
wooden flfloors
oors and
and lots
lots of
of inteinteThe
Lakeville
Journal
wooden
in Sharon.email
Sharon.email stephanie.
stephanie.
in
maintenance &
& garbage.
garbage. No
No
maintenance
RENT: 22 cottages
cottages on
on 1/2
1/2 acre.
acre.
1700.
snowremoval
removaland
andlaw
lawmaintemainte1700.
snow
The
Lakeville
Journal
from
The
Lakeville
Journal
rior details.
details. $1500/month
$1500/month plus
plus
rior
holm@fox.com ..
SALISBURY
SALE:
and FOX
SALISBURY: 3 bed
The
Millerton
News
HOLLOW FARM
holm@fox.com
SPACE FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
pets. Security
Security &
& references
references 845
845
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK: 2 bed75
yards to
to the
the lake!
lake!
Asking
SPACE
pets.
75
yards
Asking
nance.Quiet
845 877-9343.
877-9343.
nance.
845
The
Lakeville
Journal
The
Millerton
News
utilities 860
860 435-7000
435-7000 or
or e-mail
e-mail
utilities
from
private
The
Millerton
News
The
Lakeville
Journal
$179,000
or best
best offer.
offer.
845in a woodsy setting.
224-8454 or
or 845
845 373-9387.
373-9387.
$179,000
or
845
224-8454
• 5,541 sq.ft.room
• 67 house,
acres • large
5 BRsliving
• 5.5room
BAs • baths, deck patio
The
Millerton
News
from
The
Winsted
Journal
The
Millerton
News
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
CORNWALL:
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
from Journal
SHARON HIDEAWAY:
2 bedrooms, one car garage.
acres. $2,000 mont
MILLERTON: Several
SeveralThe
offices.
with fireplace, study, 1 bath and
242-3996.
MILLERTON:
offices.
242-3996.
Winsted
FALLS
VILLAGE,
P r i v a t e shed.
E s t a t e $900/
i m p e month
c c a b l y r e s t o ties.
r e d . 860 824-5601.
The
Winsted
TheLakeville
Millerton
News
from Journal
$225,000 by owner.
Call
860
Great downtown
downtown The
location!
The
Winsted
Journal
aCT.
gardener’s
Great
location!
COPAKE
LAKE:
bedroom
loft,SFT, large open living- Near Mohawk Ski area, hiking trails, and the Housatonic
2+ acre,LAKE:
3 bedrooms,
2 baths, 1840
COPAKE
11 bedroom
loft,
The
Lakeville
The
Winsted
Journal
The
Lakeville
MILLERTON
COTTAGE
FOR
MILLERTON
COTTAGE
FOR
G
r
m
o
e
d
1
m
i
l
e
t
r
a
i
l
w
i
h
c
h
i
s
i
e
d
a
l
f
r
o
w
a
l
i
k
,
g
n
i
b
i
k
,
g
n
&
309-9166.
Plenty
of
off
street
parking.
518
plus
utilities.
860
435-7000
or
FALLS
VILLAGE:
Estate
on
55
Plenty
of
off
street
parking.
518
FALLS
VILLAGE:
Estate on 55
close
to lake,
lake, nice
nice
views.
Rent1 compact car or shop River. 3 bedrooms, spacious LR with fireplace, open
close
to
views.
Rent
dining-kitchen
area with
fireplace,
Millerton
News
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
The
Winsted
Journal
The
Lakeville
RENT: and
Small one
one bedroom
bedroom
RENT:
Small
The
Millerton
News
789-3623.
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
acres,
call
for
details.
$875,000.
789-3623.
acres,
call
for
details.
$875,000.
negotiable.
845 242-3996.
242-3996.
c r os s c LYSE
ount
r y s ki i ng. ARNEY
2- s t or y LR w / EAL
w EAL
r a p- a r ound STATE
ba l c ony
& SEASON
negotiable.
845
area, party deck.
Brand
new roof, great condition
kitchen,
dining area, home office room, separate building
The
Millerton
News
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
LYSE
ARNEY
STATE
We’ve
madephotos,
it easier
easier
toJournal
find
all
the
news,
cottage, 1.5
1.5 miles
miles from
from Village,
Bosworth
Real
Estate
860 364364The
Winsted
Bosworth
Real
Estate
860
We’ve
made
it
to
find
the
news,
arts
coverage,
classified
ads
and
more!
easy to care for. Offered at $335,000. Callcottage,
Robin.
for storageVillage,
or shop. Circa 1920 origins, 2000+- SFT, 8
The
Millerton
News all
f o r m a l D i n i n g R o o com.
m , b o th w ith F P s . S c re e n e d b lu e s to n e
The
Winsted
Journal
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
suitable for
for single.
single. Nice
Nice yard,
yard,
suitable
1700.
The
Winsted
Journal
HOUSES FOR
RENT
1700.
Ahe Tradition
Tradition
of Trust
Trust
RENTAL
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
COPAKE, NY:
NY: 22 bedroom,
bedroom, living
living
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
COPAKE,
acres,
with
pond
view.
Offered
at
$349,000.
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
pa t i o ove
r l oki
ng t A
pr i va t e pond. of
quiet
neighborhood,
cable
quiet neighborhood, cable
LAKEVILLE
MAINSTREET:
STREET:
LAKEVILLE/LIME
LAKEVILLE
••MAIN
33 classified
The Winsted
Journal ads and more!
arts
coverage,
photos,
room, kitchen,
kitchen, landing,
landing, washer
washer
room,
oo
ooROCK: 3 bedConnecticut
New
York
Massachusetts
Connecticut
New
York
Massachusetts
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
available,
$650/month
plus
available,
$650/month
plus
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
exceptional
offi
ces available.
available.
room
house,
1.5 baths, garage,
Web# EH3297
Thomas
Callahan
$1,495,000
LAKEVILLE:
Belgo
Road
with 3 bedroom,
exceptional
offi
ces
Belgo
Road
with
AMENIA:
2 bath
CHRISTMAS IN E
anddryer
dryerhookup.
hookup.
oors.properties
$750
and
22flfloors.
$750
We’ve
made
it
find
all
the
news,
Selling
in CT, Mass,
andreferences.
New York , since
1955 LAKEFRONTSUMWe’vewell
made
it easier
easier to
toLAKEVILLE:
find Southern
all
the
news,
utilities,
security,
references.
utilities,
security,
FURNISHEDLAKEFRONT
SUMFURNISHED
Extremely
well
maintained
large living room, kitchen, dinGreat
Southern
Views,
open
Extremely
maintained
Great
Views,
open
home,
deck/yard, washer/dryer.
Christmas in Lond
+ utilities.
utilities. Security
Security deposit,
deposit,
+
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
518
789-3201.
518
789-3201.
MER
RENTAL:
Charming
3
318
Main
Street

Lakeville,
Connecticut

860-435-9891
MER
RENTAL:
Charming
3
building.
Small
,
medium
and
ing
room,
social
room,
beautiful
field,
private.
$459,000.
Bobuilding.
Small
,
medium
and
field, private.
$459,000.
Bo-includes heat, lawnEE
my London flat for
$1200
arts coverage,
coverage, photos,
photos, classified
classified
ads and
and
more!
reference and/or
and/or credit
credit scores
scores
reference
arts
ads
more!
C
C
I
bedroom,
2.5
bath
furnished
I
bedroom,
2.5
bath
furnished
large
spaces.
860
435-2635.
wooden
fl
oors
and
lots
of
intesworth
Real
Estate
860
364large
spaces.
860
435-2635.
sworth
Real
Estate
860
364www.robinleechrealestate.com
in Sharon.email
maintenance & garbage.PPRRNo
required. No
No pets.
pets. Available.
Available.
required.
arts coverage, photos, classified
ads and more!
MILLERTONVILLAGE
VILLAGE--WALK
WALKTO
TO
MILLERTON
country chic
chic cottage
cottage on
on 11 acre
acre
country
W
W
rior
details.
$1500/month
plus
1700.
1700.
holm@fox.com .
pets. Security & references
845
EE
6/1/11.Apartment
Apartmentis
isin
inaa22family
family
6/1/11.
N
N
EVERYTHING! Great
Great weekend
weekend
EVERYTHING!
with 150
150 ft.
ft. direct
direct lakefront,
lakefront,
with
utilities 860 435-7000 or e-mail
224-8454 or 845 373-9387.
dwelling in
in aa Farm
Farm setting.
setting. 518
518
dwelling
small
cottage,
ideal
for
one
small cottage, ideal for one
gazebo,private
privatedock.
dock. Summer
Summer
gazebo,
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
851-9854.
851-9854.
person or
or couple!
couple! 11 bedroom,
bedroom,
person
2011--$25,000;
$25,000;winter
winter2011-12
2011-12
2011
COPAKE LAKE: 1 bedroom loft,
den, living
livingroom,
room,eat
eatin
inkitchen,
kitchen,
den,
$2,500/month plus
plus utilities.
utilities.
$2,500/month
MILLERTON - COTTAGE FOR
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:
NOTICE: Equal
Equal Housing
Housing Opportunity.
Opportunity. All
All real
realclose
estate
to lake, nice views. Rent
PUBLISHER’S
estate
screen porch
porch and
and garage.
garage. FurFurscreen
Best &
& Cavallaro
Cavallaro Real
Real Estate
Estate
Best
RENT: Small one bedroom
advertisedin
inthis
thisnewspaper
newspaperis
issubject
subjectto
tothe
theFederal
FederalFair
FairHousing
Housing
Act
advertised
Act
negotiable.
845 242-3996.
nished or
or unfurnished.
unfurnished. $1200
$1200
nished
860 435-2888.
435-2888.
860
cottage, 1.5 miles from Village,
of
1966
revised
March
12,
1989
which
makes
it
illegal
to
advertise
any
of 1966 revised March 12, 1989 which makes it illegal to advertise any
plusutilities
utilitiesper
permonth.
month.Security
Security
plus
suitable for single. Nice yard,
preference, limitation,
limitation, or
or discrimination
discrimination based
based on
on race,
race, color
colorCOPAKE,
religion, NY: 2 bedroom, living
preference,
religion,
and references.
references. 845
845 677-3735.
677-3735.
and
SHARON, SILVER
SILVER LAKE
LAKE COTCOTSHARON,
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Allresidential
residentialproperty
property
TAGE: 11 bedroom,
bedroom, queen
queen
any
TAGE:
available, $650/month plus
and
dryer hookup. 2 floors. $750
SHARON: Quiet,
Quiet, beautiful
beautiful localocaadvertised
in
the
State
of
Connecticut
General
Statutes
46a-64c
which
SHARON:
advertised
in
the
State
of
Connecticut
General
Statutes
46a-64c
which
size
bed,
new
appliances.
On
size bed, new appliances. On
utilities, security, references.
FURNISHED LAKEFR
utilities. Security deposit,
prohibitthe
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making,printing
printingor
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publishingor
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tion. One
One large
large bedroom,
bedroom, spaspation.
private dead
dead end
end road.
road. 33 minminprivate
518 789-3201.
MER RENTAL: Ch
reference
scores
orpublished
publishedany
anynotice,
notice,statement
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withrespect
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washer/dryer,
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ute walk
walk to
to private
private dock.
dock. NonNonute
LAKEVILLE: Three
Three bedroom,
bedroom,
LAKEVILLE:
sale or
or rental
rental of
of aa dwelling
dwelling that
that indicates
indicates any
any preference,
preference, limitation
limitation
or No pets.
required.
Available. This
sale
or
living/dining with
with fireplace,
fireplace,
living/dining
sHARon.
This
beautiful property
property
features
322' of
of
motorized lake.
lake. Available
Available July
July
sHARon.
beautiful
features
322'
motorized
MILLERTON
VILLAGE
WALK
TO
country chic cottag
discriminationbased
basedon
onrace,
race,creed,
creed,color,
color,national
nationalorigin,
origin,ancestry,
ancestry,
sex,Apartment isfrontage
1.5 baths,
baths, village
village home
home with
with
discrimination
sex,
1.5
6/1/11.
in a 2 family
screenporch.
porch.Ideal
Idealfor
forcouples/
couples/
screen
andAugust.
August.$2,500
$2,500per
permonth.
month.
on the
the Housatonic
Housatonic
River.
The Main
Main
House has
has
and
frontage
on
River.
The
House
EVERYTHING!
Great
weekend
with 150 ft. direct
marital
status,
age,
lawful
source
of
income,
familial
status,
physical
or
marital
status,
age,
lawful
source
of
income,
familial
status,
physical
or
updated kitchen
kitchen and
and baths.
baths.
updated
dwelling
in
a
Farm
setting.
518
single.Non
Nonsmoking.
smoking.$1,000
$1,000per
per
single.
Nosmoking.
smoking.No
Nopets.
pets.11months
months
No
BRs, 22 BAs
BAs and
andsmall
loft overlooking
overlooking
the Kitchen.
Kitchen.
There
33 BRs,
aa loft
the
cottage,
ideal
for
one There
gazebo, private doc
mentaldisability
disabilityor
oran
anintention
intentionto
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suchpreference,
preference,limitation
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mental
On aa side
side street
street with
with patio
patio and
and
On
851-9854.
month plus
plus utilities.
utilities. Includes
Includes
month
security,cleaning
cleaningfee
feeand
andreferrefersecurity,
is also
also an
anAntique
Antiqueperson
2-BR Guesthouse
Guesthouse
w/newly
renovated
or couple! w/newly
1 bedroom,
is
2-BR
renovated
2011 - $25,000; win
ordiscrimination.
discrimination.
or
large rear
rear yard.
yard. $1,800/month
$1,800/month
large
snow removal
removal and
and lawn.
lawn. Call
Call
snow
ences.aff
afford71020@mypacks.
ord71020@mypacks.
ences.
Kitchen. Enjoy
Enjoy dining
dining
in
the screened-in
screened-in
Covered
Bridge
den, in
living
room, eat inCovered
kitchen,Bridge
Kitchen.
the
$2,500/month plu
unfurnished.Best
Bestand
andCavallaro
Cavallaro
unfurnished.
860 364-0319.
364-0319.
860
net.
net.
screen
porch
and
garage.
Furspanning the
the brook.
brook. Tennis
Tennis courts,
courts, gardens
gardens and
and Pergola.
Pergola.
spanning
Best & Cavallaro R
Real Estate,
Estate, 860
860 436-2888.
436-2888.
Real
nished
or
unfurnished.
$1200
Elyse
Harney
morris
&
kathleen
Devaney
860 435-2888.
Elyse Harney morris & kathleen Devaney
plus
utilities
per
month.
Security
Web# EH2202
EH2202
$985,000
Web#
$985,000
LAKEVILLE:2.5
2.5bedrooms,
bedrooms,living
living
LAKEVILLE:
and references. 845 677-3735.
SHARON, SILVER L
room, dining
dining room,
room, 1.5
1.5 bath.
bath.
room,
860-435-2200 www.HarneyRE.com
www.HarneyRE.com TAGE: 1 bedroo
860-435-2200
Remodeled kitchen
kitchen with
with new
new
Remodeled
SHARON: Quiet, beautiful locasize bed, new app
appliances.Laundry
Laundryroom
roomwith
with
appliances.
tion. One large bedroom, spaprivate dead end ro
Real Estate
Estate
Real
washer/dryer.Walking
Walkingdistance
distance
washer/dryer.
cious kitchen, washer/dryer,
ute walk to private
LAKEVILLE: Three bedroom,
to lake.
lake. $1,200
$1,200 per
per month
month plus
plus
to
living/dining with fireplace,
motorized lake. Av
1.5 baths, village home with
utilities,references
referencesand
andsecurity.
security.
utilities,
screen porch. Ideal for couples/
www.RosiniAntiques.net
51878 9- 3582
518-789-3582
www.RosiniRestorations.com
and August. $2,500
updated kitchen and
baths. Toomey
We Honor
Honor All
All Those
Those Who
Who Have
Have Given
Given Their
Their Lives
Lives
We
Christopher
860824- No
4956 smoking. No pet
860 480-2349.
480-2349.
860
single. Non smoking. $1,000 per
On a side street with patio
and
month plus utilities. Includes
cleaning fe
L icensed Arborist
Telephone & security,
F ax
“When
You
Want
The
Best”
So
That
We
May
Be
Free
This
Memorial
Day
!
So
That
We
May
Be
Free
This
Memorial
Day
!
HIC#
0629057
large
rear
yard.
$1,800/month
LAKEVILLE:33bedroom
bedroomhouse,
house,11
snow removal and lawn. Call
LAKEVILLE:
ences. afford71020
unfurnished.
Best
and
Cavallaro
bath,private
privateyard,
yard,washer/dryer
860 364-0319.
bath,
net.
Old/new resurfaced to perfection.
Allwasher/dryer
Types
of Gutters
hook-up.$950/month
$950/month
plusutiliutilihook-up.
plus
www.theboz.com
www.theboz.com
“Improving our neighborhood
one homeReal
at a Estate,
time” 860 436-2888.
FRANK
MONDA
ties.Vinyl
References.
No
pets.
860
ties.
References.
No
pets.
860
Siding • Vinyl Replacement Windows
VINYL SIDING LAKEVILLE: 2.5 bedrooms, living
435-2533.
435-2533.
(800) 671-4505 (413) 229-3434 (413) 229-8432
Standing Seam Metal Roofing
SEAMLESS GUTTERSroom, dining room, 1.5 bath.
SCOTT L. MONROE - ARBORIST - #62048
Remodeled kitchen with new
(518)
789-3342
Millerton, NY 12546
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK: 22 bedbedLAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK:
Canaan,
CT
appliances.
Laundry room with
LYSE 860.824.5094
ARNEY
EAL STATE
STATE
JASON E. BRESSON - ARBORIST - #62658
LYSE
ARNEY
EAL
room
house,
baths, large
large
room
house,
22 baths,
FAX
(518)
789-6256
Est. 1961
Kent
Brokerage 860.927.1141
860.927.1141
Kent
Brokerage
RESTO
RERS
&
CO
N
SERV
ATO
RS
washer/dryer. Walking distance
kitchen, outdoor
outdoor deck,
deck, family
family
kitchen,
A
Tradition
of
Trust
A
Tradition
of
Trust
Lakeville Brokerage
Brokerage 860.435.2400
860.435.2400
to lake. $1,200 per month plus76 Jackson Road Sharon, CT 06069
room,dining/living
dining/living
wood
room,
www.pqpainting4u.com
25 Y ears Exp.
F ree Estimates
O F per
F room,
I room,
N month
E wood
AN
TI Q U ES Lakeville
Connecticut oo New
New York
York oo Massachusetts
Massachusettsutilities, references and security.
Connecticut
stove. $1,200
$1,200 per
month +
+
stove.
Each Office
Office Is
Is Independently
Independently Owned
Owned and
and Operated.
Operated.
Each
6 B arracks Road 860-364-0323
Canaan, CT 0618
860 480-2349.
utilities.860
860435-7000
435-7000or
ore-mail
e-mail
utilities.
PUBlic oPEn
oPEn HoUsEs
HoUsEs
PUBlic
CT Arborist L ic. #S -4207
6 1 26 Rt. 22 • PO Box 7 7 0
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
SERVICES PROVIDED
LAKEVILLE:
3 bedroom house, 1
277 Ashley Falls Road
(P) 860-824-5784
Every saturday
saturday
and decision
sunday, 12:00-2:00
12:00-2:00
Every
and
sunday,
The best
you’ll ever
make
PO BoxMillerton,
770, Millerton,
N Y 1 25 NY
4 6 12546
bath, private yard, washer/dryer
West main
main street,
street, north
north canaan,
canaan, cT
cT
West
Pest Management
Canaan, CT 06018
(F) 860-824-7496
hook-up. $950/month plus utiliobiNSoN eeCh
eeCh
eaL
STaTe
obiNSoN
eaL
STaTe
Emerald Ash Borer & Asian Long
ties. References. No pets. 860
Email:
jdbpainting@snet.net
Distinctive Country
Country Properties
Properties
Distinctive
435-2533.
Horned Beetle Preventative Control

Distinctive Country Properties

Lakeville
Journal
- The
M
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Mille

IS YOUR NEW
IS YOURNEWS
NEW SITE
REGIONAL
REGIONAL
REGIONAL NEWS
NEWS SITE
SITE
REGIONAL NEWS SITE

E

H

R

E

A18 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, August 19, 2010

ToToHave
30,000 Potential
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860-435-9873
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- The- Winsted
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- www.tricornernews.com
The Lakeville
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AntiqueGutters
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FloorPainting
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SEA GULL ROOFING & SIDING, INC.

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THE FLOOR SPECIALIST

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E
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INTERIOR & EXTERIOR

Lightning Rods

Home Remodeling
R

L

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Appliances

Storage

Storage

References

Lic# 563580 Insurance

House of Color PaintinG
Fast, Clean, Professional, Affordable

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6+acres,
acres,horse
horsestables,
stables,horse
horsepasture,
pasture,large
largecapacity
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garages
6+
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Ofoffice,
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forvehicles
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otherneeds,
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work
shop,
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bedroomresidence
residenceincluding
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anapartment
apartment
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2
car
garage.
Two
additional
homes
also
available.
annex, and 2 car garage.
additional
homes
also available.
We Two
Will
Beat
any
Allwithin
within55minutes
minutesof
of Sharon.
Sharon. ASKING
ASKING$985,000
$985,000
All

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YEARs oF sERvicE
NORTH EAST26M
UFFLER INC.

15

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Custom Bending Up to 3 Inches

Tires • Brakes • Mufflers • New York State Inspections
Open Monday - Friday
8 to 5; Saturday 8 to 1
upcountryservices.com
Route 22, Millerton, NY
LANDSCAPING
789-3669
John
Heck
Cindy Heck
One call
For All(518)
Of Your
Excavation,
Landscaping & Grounds Maintenance Needs:

Lawn Repair / Installation
• Landscape Construction
CHARLIE'S
Lawn Treatments ForREPAIR
Weeds /Insects
SHOP
Stone Walls / Retaining Walls • Paver Terraces
Complete
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Bluestone Terraces

Fencing
Brakes • Tires • Trailer Sales & Service
Bed MaintenanceWe
• Edging
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Buy and Sell Used Cars
Tree / Shrub ROUTE
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MILLERTON,
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up.country.svcs@snet.net Charles J. Flint, Jr.
518-789-6636
Commercial & Residential
Credit Cards Accepted
(800) 791-2916
(860) 364-0261
Home Improvement Contractor: #514326 • Ct Pesticide License: #b-1175
Nysdec Reg: #14898 • Nysdec Certification # C0871673

4228 Route 22 - Wassaic, New York 12592
845-373-9757
WWW.JACKSAUTOSERVICE.COM
(860) 364-5906

31

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design■styles:
styles:
$269,900-$299,900
Three
$269,900-$299,900
Climate-Controlled
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Web# EH2162,
EH2162,
2163, 2164
2164
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Moore/Dave Taylor
Taylor
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Juliet
■ 2163,
24-Hour
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YEARS OF SERVICE

CANNON CARPENTRY, LLC
24 Reed Street, PO Box 1113
Canaan, Ct. 06018

Lightning Rods

email: cannoncarpentry11@gmail.com

860-309-8846

CT HIC# 0641295
Maintenance • Repairs • Renovations
Hal Cannon - Owner

Lightning
ComputerProtection!
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Visionary Computer
Since 1953.

ASSOCIATED

LIGHTNING ROD CO., INC.
Millerton, New York

845-373-8309

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MacBook Pro with Retina display
29 Bissell St. • Lakeville

(860) 435-2211 • visionarycomputer.net

R

e

Dave’s TV

phone: 860-435-2888
860-435-2888 •
• fax:
fax: 860-435-6119
860-435-6119
phone:

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3814 Route 44, Millbrook, NY 12545 | tuxisselfstorage.com
VILLAGE LIVING:

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MULTI-FUNCTIONAL MINI-ESTATE:
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ROOT TREE SERVICE
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and restaurants. OFFERED AT: $398,000.

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for vehicles or other needs, work shop, home office
wonderful 3+ bedroom residence including an apa
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PUB. DATE(S):
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owned
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An immaculate
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1830Lightning
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home
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1,462 sq.
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ft.,
An
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bedrooms, den,
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bath,
fireplace,
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80’
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obiNSoN
eeCh
eaL
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lake. On
On
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acres with
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perenlake.
.46
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perenand Norfolk.
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withPRIORITY
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OUR
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and
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A NUMBERnial
OFbeds
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terrific Kitchens.
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Fertilizing Brokerage 860.435.240
Lakeville
room, dining/living room, wood
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StumpEach
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Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.
utilities. 860 435-7000 or e-mail
Removals
1830 LAKEVILLE
LAKEVILLE
ANTIQUE
1830
ANTIQUE
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ContraCtors PriCe
PO Box AK • 3 Century Blvd. • Millerton, NY 12546
Sellingproperties
propertiesin
inCT,
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andNew
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since
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318 Main
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e
v
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a
D

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lake
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restaurants. OFFERED
OFFEREDAT:
AT: $398,000.
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e

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GORDON
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R
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A
OF
RENTALS
RICH
DONEGAN

PROFILE,
ZERO, MONOGRAM, WOLF
CellSUB
860-459-0968
APPLIANCE SALES AND SERVICE
VILLAGE LIVING:
LIVING:
VILLAGE
For over 30 years

Tree
Tree Service
Service

Bosworth

LICENSED / INSURED
Commercial/Residential
Credit Cards Accepted
Weekly Maintenance
(800)Custom
791-2916
364-0261
Inground Liner(860)
Replacement

POOL & SPA

Painting
860
- 364 - 0108

2013

ADVERTISER: Tuxis Self Storage

at Millbrook Commons, Millbrook, NY
All Climate-Controlled Units
NClimate-Controlled Wine Storage
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AL
FACL NEW
ILIT
Y

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Decorating & Wallpapering

Roofing

Interior & Exterior
Residential, Commercial & Industrial
State Licensed Home Improvement Contractors
Insured & EPA Certified
SEA
GULL
ROOFING
& SIDING,
INC.
Now
accepting
most major
credit cards
Family Owned
and operated
Since 1978
All Types
of Gutters

Vinyl
Siding
• Vinyl Replacement
Windows
Emmet
Hussey
www.husseypainting.com
860.435.8149
emmethussey@gmail.com
Standing Seam
Metal Roofing
(518) 789-3342
FAX (518) 789-6256

Millerton, NY 12546
Est. 1961

TriCornerNews.com
Septic Service

The Best Regional News Site

When you need to know what’s
happening in your area, we’re there.
DRAIN CLEANING SERVICE
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

SEWER & DRAIN LINE CLEANING

8 6 0 -4 35 -8 8 7 7

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860-733-2020
applewoodtree@yahoo.com
License # 62658
B2580

Tree Care • Tick Spraying

$1 MOVE-IN SPECIAL

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Installation

E-Mail
Tri-State
News
Veterinary

your Classifi
Classified
ed Ads
Ads to:
to:
your

classified@lakevillejournal.com
classified@lakevillejournal.com

3814 Route 44, Millbrook, NY 12545 | tuxisselfstorage.com

ROOT TREE SERVICE
Serving The Area Since 1983
michael Root cT Arborist # 61802

L akeville, CT.

8 6 0 -4 35 -8 8 7 7

Call 1-800-339-9873
COMMERCIAL
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place your ad!

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Tile Installation

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Hussey Painting

L akeville, CT.

DIRECTV®
860-388-2349
318 Hours:
Main Street
• Lakeville,
Mon-Fri
8 to 5pm,Connecticut
Sat 8 to 3 • 860-435-9891
design@mcfun.net
www.robinleechrealestate.comSales and

STONE &TILE SERVICES

NATURAL STONE POLISHING & RESTORATION
HONING

CLEANING

SEALING

MARBLE GRANITE LIMESTONE
SLATE TERRAZZO SOAPSTONE

TILE REPAIR & INSTALLATION

Your best source of weekly news
and information about
LOOKtowns,
FOR
people, schools,
sports and
TRI-CORNER
organizations in
yourESTATE
area!
REAL

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Independent Community Newspapers

Well Drilling
THE MILLERTON NEWS
loUis
AllYn
& sons
The E.
Winsted
Journal
Well D rilling

Water Systems I nstalled & Serviced
Established 1917
Canaan, CT
( 860)
824- 560

Upholstery
Window Treatments

GROUT COLORING

you have SaEALING
family member
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EGROUTING
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ILE REFINISHING
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: ZIG@ACNINC.NET
in the news fromEMAIL
home?
TEL: 860-913-4473
TEL/FAX: 860-824-5192
VISIT US AT WWW.STONEPOLISHINGCT.COM

Remember

The Lakeville Journal Company offers free online
subscriptions to our website, tricornernews.com, for
active duty military personnel from the Tri-state region.
For more information or to set up a subscription, contact
Circulation Manager Helen Testa at circulation@
lakevillejournal.com or 860-435-9873, ext. 161.

Tree Service

Northwinds Upholstery & Design

Exquisite
Custom
Upholstery
W
indo
W Wa
res

Slipcovers, Window Treatments, Custom Pillows.
“Dressings for Your Windows”
LAURA WRIGHT
Closet/Storage
Systems CT
860-435-0121
• LAKEVILLE,
James
R. Wexler
FAX 860-435-0125

By Appointment
Sharon, CT 860.364.9824

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Christopher Toomey
L icensed Arborist

8 6 0 -8 24 -4 9 5 6
Telephone & F ax

Veterinary