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MILLERTON NEWS

The

Thursday, January 14, 2016
Volume 84 Number 49
14 Pages in 1 Section

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Millerton • North East • Amenia • Pine Plains • Millbrook • Ancram • Dover • Copake

INSIDE

MILLERTON

A Look Back On
Birds In 2015 A10

SPORTS

Town Board
Organizes
For 2016 A3

The Benefits Of
Bowenwork To
The Body A7

COMPASS

Movie: ‘Concussion’ A11

©2016 The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC Periodical Rate Postage Paid at Millerton, New York 12546

Historic flag comes back
to its home in Copake Falls

At the Millbrook Library

Dutchess One Stop
By JUDITH O’HARA BALFE
judithb@millertonnews.com

MILLBROOK — The Millbrook
Library has a full calendar of offerings for the public — most of which are
free. One of the most useful programs
might be Dutchess One Stop, which
helps clients search for jobs. Once per
month, usually, the counselors help
with resumes, cover letters and/or
other professional advice.
Dutchess One Stop is a partnership
of state and local agencies and organizations that seek to aid in Dutchess
County’s economic growth, which, of
course, is affected by (un)employment
numbers. The career development

services are basic and unique to each
client. Appointments are helpful, but
whenever possible walk-ins are also
welcome.
Meghan Heady-Amara is a One
Stop counselor who visits the Millbrook Library; along with her colleagues, Heady-Amara visits 12 area
libraries. Collectively, they aid clients
in assessing skills, setting goals, writing resumes, developing cover letters
and conducting mock interviews. They
discuss both long-term and short-term
goals, as well as proper attire and comportment. Being a community services field coordinator is challenging,

By LIZETT PAJUELO
Special to The Millerton News

COPAKE FALLS — Ninety-seven
years after a former “resident” left
Copake Falls, it has finally returned
home. Roe Jan Historical Society Board
member and Copake resident Howard
Blue initiated a project called the Bash
Bish Flag, in an effort to conserve a
flag that is more than 100 years old. It
had belonged to the Bash Bish Inn. A
meeting to create a committee for the
project took place on Saturday, Jan.
9, at 10:30 a.m. at Copake Town Hall.
The project to conserve this flag was
proposed by Blue.
The idea to pursue this project was
tossed out at a history presentation
he gave at the Roe Jan Library. At that
presentation, Blue said that for his
next lecture he would be joined by a
100-year-old resident of the town —
the flag — eager to return to its home
and bare witness at the next history
presentation by Blue. Residents — curious to learn who this old resident was
— went out of their way to ask him for
hints, he said laughing.
Once Blue showed up at the presentation with the flag, residents met
the flag with applause, showing strong
support for the return of the Bash Bish
Inn flag.
The Bash Bish Flag
The 48-star Belgian wool flag once
waved atop Louis Moquin’s Bash Bish

See ONE STOP, A10

Who makes what where?
By WHITNEY JOSEPH
editor@millertonnews.com
HARLEM VALLEY — Towns
throughout New York state adopt their
budgets in December, to enact the first
of the year. Villages tend to budget in
AMENIA
Town Supervisor
Councilman
(4) each
Town Clerk
Town Justice
(2) each
Highway
Superintendent
Sole Assessor
MILLERTON
Mayor
Deputy Mayor
Trustee (3) each
Village Clerk/
Treasurer
Highway
Supervisor
NORTH EAST
Town Supervisor
Councilman
(4) each
Town Clerk
Town Justice
(2) each
Highway
Superintendent
Sole Assessor

$23,3007.24
$5,814.57
$29,262.72
$17,405.22
$58,778.06
$29,686.93

$6,255
$4,377
$3,001
$43,704.96
$43,704.96

$21,900
$4,900
$34,298
$13,990
$53,203
$28,152

the spring.
Along with the municipalities’ fiscal plans, salary schedules are usually
included in town budgets. Below is a
list of salaries and wages for elected
and appointed officials throughout the
region.
MILLBROOK
Mayor
Deputy Mayor
Trustees (3) each
Village Clerk/
Treasurer
Public Works
Supervisor
WASHINGTON
Town Supervisor
Deputy
Supervisor
Councilman
(3) each
Town Clerk
Town Justice
(2) each
Highway
Superintendent
Sole Assessor
PINE PLAINS
Town Supervisor
Councilman
(4) each
Town Clerk
Town Justice
(2) each
Highway
Superintendent
Assessor
Chairman
Assessors
(2) each

Friday

43°/33°

$10,000
$4,000
$4,000
$49,650

See FLAG, A10

$52,000

PHOTO PROVIDED BY HOWARD BLUE

Copake resident Howard Blue stood proudly with his acquisition, the
Bash Bish Flag, after it returned back to its original point of origin.

Reviewing the news of 2015

$16,480
$5,150

By WHITNEY JOSEPH
editor@millertonnews.com

$4,120
$53,500

HARLEM VALLEY — A lot happened last year — there were meetings and events, good news and bad.
Throughout it all, The Millerton News
covered life in the Harlem Valley. So,
as the New Year begins, it seems the
perfect opportunity to look back and
review some of the biggest stories of
2015.
This week the paper is publishing
part two of the year in review. Part one
appeared last week.
July
Webutuck created a new position,
the dean of students, as part of an administrative restructuring effort.
The Dover teachers’ union picketed
Superintendent of Schools Michael
Tierney’s decision to lay off teachers,
which the union claimed he did without reason.
Charlotte Taylor opened on Main

$14,590
$55,000
$35,840
$20,000
$5,800
$22,300
$13,300
$50,000
$11,000
$7,300

Saturday

40°/23°

Sunday

34°/17°

Obituaries .....................................A2
Millerton ........................................A3
Amenia ............................................ A4
Pine Plains .................................... A5
Millbrook ..................................... A6

Street in Millerton, offering home accessories, gifts and nursery items.
The Pine Plains Barbershop, an
old-fashioned barbershop, opened on
Church Street.
Triathletes competed in the fifth annual Stissing Sprint in Pine Plains. The
winner was Michael Sikorski of New
York City, who finished the triathlon
in 1:20:35.
The 22nd annual Fitch’s Corner
Horse Trials was held in Millbrook.
More than 500 people attended the
weekend-long event.
Longtime Merritt Bookstore owner
Scott Meyer passed away; Meyer had
suffered through a long illness.
Millerton’s St. Patrick’s Catholic
Church announced it was shutting its
doors for good; the cemetery remained
open.
The Amenia Monarchs baseball
team pitched their way into the playoffs, with wins over the Canton Crushers and the East Mountain Cougars. It

Sports ................................................A7
Opinion .....................................A8-9
Compass ................................A11-12
Classifieds ...........................A13-14

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was the team’s first playoff appearance
in two years.
August
Twenty-year-old cyclist Kaitlin Lyle
was struck by a car while crossing the
Harlem Valley Rail Trail at Sheffield
Road in Amenia. According to the New
York State Police, Lyle was stuck by
a Jeep Cherokee operated by William
O’Connell of Amenia. No charges were
filed following the accident.
A dead grenade was discovered near
Franklin Avenue and Friendly Lane in
Millbrook, by a tree-trimming service.
Though not live, it was missing its pin
and handle.
The Pine Plains Town Board and
the Pine Plains Fire District came to
heads over a two-year-old bill for
water hydrant use. Town Supervisor
Brian Coons said the fire district had
been collecting money for that service
from taxpayers without reimbursing

Equal Housing Lender

12/28/15 12:43 PM

A2

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

OBITUARIES
Hendon Chubb
CORNWALL — Hendon
Chubb, an eccentric polymath,
died suddenly Jan. 3, 2015. He was
a husband, father, grandfather,
brother, artist, writer, psychologist, dog-lover, Yale graduate, rug
designer, director and CFO of a
Fortune 500 company, honorary
Girl Scout, gardener, officer of the
American Cycad Society, vintner,
Army veteran, civil rights election
monitor, early programmer, lover
of France, Justice of the Peace, and
poet. He was much loved by many
and is sorely missed. A service
will be held in the spring.

Einar Lindholm
CORNWALL — Einar Lindholm, 85, died on Jan. 5, 2015, at
the Sharon Hospital after a short
illness. He was the very loving
husband of Patience Lindholm.
Einar was born Feb. 8, 1930,
in Washington, D.C., the son of
the late Hedwig (Krueger) and
Svante Lindholm. He graduated
from Syracuse University with
a degree in architecture and,
after serving in the U.S. Army,
he practiced architecture in the
New York City area with the
firms of Thatcher Construction, William Lescaze, Welten
Becket, and Snibbe Taffel Lindholm. He transferred his practice in the 1980s to northwest
Connecticut.
He is survived by his brother, Ulric Lindholm; his two

sons, Aron and Sven Lindholm;
his three daughters, Wendy
Pomeroy, Sera Daemi and Tyra
Lindholm; and his six grandchildren Arianna, Roya and
Neeka Daemi, Lief and Ariel
Lindholm and Olivia Pomeroy.
He was predeceased by his
son Tobias Dennett.
A memorial service will be
held at the United Church of
Christ on Saturday, Jan. 16, at
3 p.m. A party to celebrate his
life will be held afterward at his
home in West Cornwall.
Memorial contributions may
be made to the Housatonic Valley Association, P.O. Box 28,
Cornwall Bridge, CT 06754.
The Kenny Funeral Home in
Sharon has charge of the arrangements.

Martha Ann Riva
NORTH CANAAN — Martha Ann Riva, 57, of East Canaan
Road, died Jan. 5, 2016, after being
stricken at her home.
Martha was born Oct. 25, 1958,
in Sharon, the daughter of the late
Mabel (Karlson) Johnsen and Paul
P. Riva.
She graduated from Housatonic Valley Regional High School
and then worked for many years
for Elyse Harney and the late John
Harney Sr. of Salisbury.
Martha was a wonderful
homemaker.
She provided care for her
mother and the many farm animals that were on the property
over the years.
She is survived by her daughter, Hannah Riva of North Ca-

naan; her sisters, Pauline Moore
of North Canaan and Bernadette
Gandolfo of Salisbury; her brothers, Peter and Karl Riva of North
Canaan and Forbes Riva of New
York; as well as several nieces and
nephews.
Martha was predeceased by
her son, Brooks Conklin.
A memorial service for Martha will be held Jan. 23 at 11 a.m.
in the North Canaan Congregational Church in East Canaan.
Memorial donations may be
sent to the Little Guild of St.
Francis, 285 Sharon Goshen
Turnpike, West Cornwall, CT
06796.
Arrangements are under the
care of the Newkirk-Palmer Funeral Home in North Canaan.

Marion Ann Donovan
NORFOLK — Marion Ann
Donovan, a career foreign service officer and
world traveler,
died peacefully at
her home on Dec.
22, 2015. She was
95.
Miss Donovan
was born on Oct.
13, 1920, and grew
up in Brooklyn,
N.Y., where she
played the violin
and piano and read
voraciously. Her
love of travel began early, when,
with her father at the wheel, the
Donovan family traveled across
the country in a 1928 Buick to
visit historic and natural sites
during summer vacations.
Miss Donovan majored in
fine arts at Barnard College,
where she was a member of the
violin section of the Columbia
University Orchestra, had a special passion for archaeology and
won a fellowship to study artists
Diego Rivera and Jose Clemente
Orozco in Mexico. She graduated cum laude from Barnard in
1941.
Miss Donovan held several
positions in publishing after college, then entered the U.S. Foreign Service, where she served
for more than 25 years. Fiercely
independent her whole life, Miss
Donovan lived and worked as
a single woman in Egypt, Turkey, Peru, Afghanistan, Vietnam,
Chile, the Ivory Coast and other
countries, sometimes leaving
just before the outbreak of a war.
She loved nothing more than
the adventure of visiting a new
city or country, and eventually
visited every continent and corner of the world, often with her
sister, Mary, who shared her passion for travel. Miss Donovan’s
six nieces and nephew were the
beneficiaries of postcards from
all over the world, written in
her witty and distinctive voice,
with vivid descriptions of all she
saw. Her passion for travel remained strong throughout her
long life. Well into her 80s, she
said, “When I get a new travel
brochure in the mail, I lick my
chops.”
When asked to name her favorite country, Miss Donovan
would always say, “The U.S. of
A!” because of the freedoms we
enjoy here.
Miss Donovan found a home

in Norfolk in 1982 after she retired from the foreign service.
She was attracted
to Norfolk’s natural
beauty and the Yale
School of Music’s
summer program,
but her decision
was cinched when
she walked into the
Norfolk Public Library and found a
fire burning in the
fireplace. The setting
was so comfortable
and inviting that she
decided that Norfolk was the
town where she wanted to settle.
Miss Donovan lived happily
as a Norfolk resident for more
than 30 years, where she closely followed local politics and
events, loved the opera and the
many arts the area has to offer,
and enjoyed Norfolk’s changing seasons — especially the bold
colors of autumn — while building a reputation as a gracious
hostess who spoiled her family
and friends with big meals and
many wonderful weekends at
her home.
A lifelong animal lover, Miss
Donovan was also a devoted supporter of the Little Guild of St.
Francis, a shelter for cats and
dogs in West Cornwall, and attended many of its blessings of
the animals over the years.
Miss Donovan is survived by
a sister, six nieces and a nephew.
She received superlative
care around the clock during
her long illness, and the family
is deeply grateful to her wonderful caregivers: Tina Prigge,
Madeline Falk, Theresa Kochiss-Padua, Marcella JencikovaSadlon, Mary Yard, Katie Hester
and Stacey Roberts. The family would also like to express
our appreciation to the other
members of the Norfolk community who looked out for our
aunt over the years.
A Mass will be celebrated for
Miss Donovan at Immaculate
Conception Church in Norfolk
on Saturday, Jan. 16, at 11 a.m.
In lieu of flowers, those who
wish are invited to make a donation in Miss Donovan’s memory
to the Norfolk Library, the Little Guild of St. Francis (www.
littleguild.org), or a charity of
your choice.
The Kenny Funeral Home in
Norfolk has charge of arrangements.

Look for a Girl Scout (and cookies) this month
By KAREN BARTOMIOLI
karenb@lakevillejournal.com

each box was reduced.
Be grateful it’s not 1942, when
baking supplies were in short
Move over Oreos. From Jan- supply due to the war and Girl
uary to March each year, Girl Scouts sold calendars instead.
Scout cookies bump the classic
But then again, if it was 1933, a
off the top of the bestseller list box of 44 cookies would be only
with a total of about 2 million 23 cents (or six boxes for $1.24).
Of note is that, as of last year,
boxes sold.
Can’t guess which are the fa- Girl Scout cookies were available
vorite? Here’s a hint: an unknown at www.amazon.com, along with
percentage are eaten frozen, and a lot of knockoffs, such as Mint
some are eaten after having been Thin cookies and others that
forgotten about, stashed in a hid- claim to taste just like the “real”
den freezer corner.
thing. But be warned of sticker
The answer is Thin Mints, shock. Prices are high and so is
which account for a quarter of shipping. They can easily cost $10
sales and are baked at a rate of per box.
up to 4.5 million per day to meet
And while it might be fun to
demand.
someday get cookies delivered by
In the Tri-State region, there drone, it still won’t beat a smiling
are eight varieties to choose from, Girl Scout face, or support a loincluding Rah Rah Raisins, Tof- cal troop.
fee-tastic, Samoas, Trefoils, TagCan’t find a cookie-selling Girl
alongs, Do-Si-Dos and Savannah Scout?
Smiles.
They don’t go door-to-door
Local troops sell them for $4 anymore, but cookie shoppers
per box, or $5 for the gluten free can be put in touch with a troop
Toffee-tastic. Orders are taken leader in their area by contacting
until the end of this month, with productsales@gsofct.org or 800cookies delivered to troops at the 922-2770 ext. 3305.
end of February.
Cookies are sold online at
Those who must talk about www.gsofct.org, with all sales
nutrition will be happy to know done in connection with a troop,
the recipes have changed over which will receive credit.
the years to exclude trans fats
Troops are now allowed to
and preservatives. In this region, host booth sales at events and in
Thin Mints and Peanut Butter front of retail stores. Look for
Patties are also vegan.
them from Feb. 27 to March 27,
For the diet conscious who and get the app for that: Go to
find it hard to stop at a handful,
www.girlscoutcookies.org
to sign
Lakeville
Journal 1x2
the Thin Mints and peanut but- up for alerts and to get the cookie
tery Tagalongs are a good choice. finder app.
One can always donate a box
They don’t have fewer calories,
but in 2009, in response to rising or more to Cookies for Heroes
costs, the number of cookies in by adding to an order. Veterans

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When you need to know what’s happening in your area, we’re there.

Congressman Gibson
honored for love of history
WASHINGTON, D.C. — New
York Congressman Chris Gibson (R-19), of Columbia County,
received the John F. Seiberling
Award from the Register of Professional Archaeologists during a
ceremony held last week on Capitol Hill to launch Preservation 50,
the year-long commemoration of
the 50th anniversary of the National Historic Preservation Act.
Rep. Gibson and Sen. Martin
Heinrich of New Mexico were
presented the Seiberling Award
in recognition of their support
for historic preservation and the
conservation of archaeological

Week of January 17, 2016

The Congregational Church
Of Salisbury, U.C.C
30 Main Street
Serving the Lord with Gladness
We bid you warm welcome to come
worship with us Sundays at 10 am.
All are welcome!
Child care, moving music,
and Christian fellowship in a
historic 19th C. Meeting House.
The Rev. Diane Monti-Catania
(860) 435-2442
www.salisburycongregational.org

St. John's Episcopal Church
12 Main Street, Salisbury, CT

“Praising God, Serving Neighbor”
Sunday Services
8:00 a.m. Holy Eucharist (Rite I) Said
10:00 a.m. Choral Eucharist, Rite 11
Coffee Hour and Fellowship follows
Breakfast Club
1st Sunday of the month Oct.-May
Litany for Healing
2nd Sundays of the month
www.stjohnssalisbury.org
860-435-9290
Please join us!

North Canaan
Congregational Church, UCC
Rev. Savage Frieze
172 Lower Rd/Route 44, East Canaan, CT
860-824-7232, Church Office
A congregation that puts faith into service,
in the community and in the world.
Worship Services Sundays at 10 am
Fishes & Loaves Every Wed. 9-11 am
at the Pilgrim House, 30 Granite Ave., Canaan
All are welcome. Please join us!
www.northcanaancongregationalchurch.org
nccongchurch@snet.net

North East Baptist Church

The Lakeville
United Methodist Church
319 Main St., Lakeville, CT 06039
860-435-9496
The Rev. MARGARET LAEMMEL
9:30 a.m. Worship Service
Sunday School 9:15 a.m.
"Open Hearts – Open Minds – Open Doors"
Lakevillemethodist@snet.net

The Sharon United
Methodist Church

PHOTO BY KAREN BARTOMIOLI

The classic trefoil cookies are popular Girl Scout offerings, but
they can’t compare with the most popular of all: Thin Mints.
and active duty military members, both at home and overseas,
will enjoy a sweet thank-you for
their service.
So, while the public gets it annual fix of Thin Mints, Samoas or
whatever, troops get a chance to
fill
their treasuries,
Millerton
Newslearn
1x2a variety

of life skills and the value of striving for goals.

In Loving Memory of
Jeffery Jay Petkovich
May 12, 1968
January 20, 1990

All our dreams
are built around you
And we’ve come
to know it’s true
In our life there
is no living
That is not a part of you

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• CVS
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We Love and Miss you deeply,
Mom, Dad, Jamie, Nonnie

resources.
“As a lifelong student of history and someone who is committed to protecting and promoting our historic sites, it is
a tremendous honor for me to
receive this award,” said Gibson,
seen here with Terry Klein of the
Society for Historical Archaeology. “I will continue to advocate
for programming like the Hudson
River Valley National Heritage
Area to help grow travel and tourism in our region and connect
more Americans to the fascinating places that tell the story of
our nation.”

Worship Services

Historic Meeting House, Main & Maple
Millerton, NY
God's word Is Always Relevant!
A Warm Welcome Awaits You At
Sunday Services:
Family Bible School - 9:30 AM
Morning Worship - 11:00
Evening Service - 6:00 PM
Weekday Meetings:
Tues. Bible Studies, 1:30 PM,
and Weds. Prayer Meeting 7:00 PM at
at Parsonage 33 S. Maple Ave.
Fellowship Luncheon, first Sunday of
each month after AM services
Contact Pastor Henry A. Prause
Phone: 518/789-4840
Email: heprause@gmail.com

Insert Listing House Ads - January 14, 2016

Check them out inside.

PHOTO SUBMITTED

Congressman Chris Gibson (R-19), left, received an award from
Terry Klein of the Society for Historical Archaeology.

112 Upper Main Steet,
North end of Sharon Green
Touching Lives - Lifting Spirits
The Rev. MARGARET LAEMMEL
10:45 a.m. Worship Service, Nursery Care
No Sunday School in Summer
860-364-5634
email: sharonumc5634@att.net

Falls Village
Congregational Church
16 Beebe Hill Road, Falls Village
10:00 a.m. Family Worship
11:00 a.m. Coffee Hour
A Friendly Church with
a warm welcome to all!!
860-824-0194

Canaan United
Methodist Church

2 Church St., Rte 44, Canaan, CT
860-824-5534
Pastor Peter Brown
10 a.m. Worship Service
"Open Hearts – Open Minds – Open Doors"
Canaanumc.wordpress.com
Church email: canaanctumc@gmail.com

The Smithfield
Presbyterian Church

656 Smithfield Valley Rd.
Amenia, NY
845-373-8320
Hours of Worship:
Every Sunday 10 a.m. - 11 a.m.

Church of St. Mary

76 Sharon Rd., Lakeville, CT
860-435-2659
Weekend Liturgies
Sat. Vigil at 4:00 PM
Sun. at 8:00 & 10:15 AM
Weekday Liturgies Thurs. & Fri. at 9:00 AM
Wed. at 10:00 AM at Noble Horizons

Christ Church Episcopal in Sharon
9 South Main, Sharon CT 06069
860-364-5260
email: cces@att.net
www.christchurchsharon.org
Reverend Jon Widing
Sunday Holy Eucharist 8 & 10 AM
All welcome to join us

Greenwoods Community Church
355 Clayton Road, Ashley Falls, MA
413-229-8560
Sunday Service 10:30 AM
Kidz Konnection K-6th grade
(during Sun. Service)
Nursery Care All Services
Rev. Richard Woodward

St. Thomas Episcopal Church
Rev. Elizabeth Fisher, Vicar
Leedsville Road at
Hitchcock Corner & Amenia Union
Every Sunday Silent Prayer:
10-10:15 am
Worship: Sunday 10:30 am
Silent Meditiation Every Sunday
10-10:15 a.m.
Tel: 1-845-373-9161

Trinity Episcopal Church
484 Lime Rock Rd., Lime Rock
Sun. 8 & 10:30 a.m. Holy Eucharist
Nursery Care/Sunday School 10:20 a.m.
(860) 435-2627
"Offering companionship along the way"
email: trinity@trinitylimerock.org
website: www.trinitylimerock.org
Rev. Heidi Truax

All Saints of America

Orthodox Christian Church
313 Twin Lakes Rd., Salisbury, CT
860-824-1340
Rev. Fr. John J. Kreta
Vespers Sat. 5PM
Divine Liturgy Sun 9:30 AM
Go to our website, or call
www.allsaintsofamerica.us

Unitarian-Universalist
Fellowship of NW CT
Cobble living Room,
10:30 a.m.
Second Sunday of the Month
Noble Horizons
For information call 860-435-2319
Explore Unitarian Universalism:
Our past, present and future

The Chapel of All Saints, Cornwall
An intimate Episcopal service every Sunday
8:00am Holy Eucharist and sermon
The North Cornwall Meeting House
Town Street at Cogswell Road,
West Cornwall, CT

Congregation Beth David
A reform Jewish Synagogue
3344 East Main St., Amenia
Rabbi Jon Haddon
High Holiday Services and Services- Sat.
morning-twice monthy
Followed by lunch and adult education
ALL ARE WELCOME
For information call Rabbi Haddon 203 748 4589
or visit our website: www.congbethdavid.org

St. Bernard Church

52 New Street, Sharon, CT
Vigil Mass at 5:30pm
Sunday Mass at 10:30am
Weekday Mass - Wed, Thurs and Fri 9:00am
Eucharistic Adoration Fri after Mass
Confession call 860-364-5244

St. Bridget Church

7 River Road, Cornwall, CT
Vigil Mass at 4:00pm
Sunday Mass at 8:30am
Confession call 860-364-5244

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

A3

MILLERTON

North East organizes for 2016
By WHITNEY JOSEPH
editor@millertonnews.com

NORTH EAST — As is annual
protocol, the Town Board met
soon after Jan. 1 to organize for
the upcoming year. The board’s
organizational meeting was held
on Monday, Jan. 4, at Town Hall.
Newly elected town Supervisor George Kaye, who previously
served as town councilman, welcomed the small audience. He also
welcomed newly elected town
Councilman John Midwood to
the Town Board and made note
that former town Supervisor John
Merwin was now serving as town
councilman.
“John [Merwin] and I ran
because there were things that
weren’t accomplished during our
first term,” Kaye said. “Number one
is the town garage. Hopefully we
can have that resolved as quickly
as possible. The building is not in
very good shape.”
Kaye said the other “major thing
that needs to be done” is a reworking of the town’s zoning.
“This is something that’s bugged
us the last few years,” he said. “It
needs a major overhaul.”
He then segued into the annual
appointments and resolutions that
are part of the town’s organizational meeting.
Councilman John Merwin was
named as deputy supervisor.
The monthly meeting time was
kept the same; the Town Board will
continue to meet on the second
Thursday of the month at 7 p.m.
at Town Hall.
Salisbury Bank and Trust was
renamed as the official depository.
The Millerton News was again
designated as the official newspaper; The Poughkeepsie Journal was
named as alternate.
Warren Replansky was reappointed as attorney for the town.
Morris Associates was reappointed for engineering services.
Sickler, Torchia, Allen &
Churchill was reappointed for
accounting services.
Lorna Sherman was reappointed as bookkeeper and budget officer.
Donna Morrison was reappointed assessor’s aide.
John Lloyd was reappointed as
real property data lister.
Claudia Stevens was reappointed as secretary to the planning and
zoning boards and to the Building
Department.
Doreen Morrison was reap-

A winter rainbow
PHOTO BY LORNA SHERMAN

North East Town Justice Casey McCabe, left, swore in Councilman John Merwin, Town Clerk Lisa Cope, town Supervisor
George Kaye and Councilman John Midwood at the annual
organizational meeting held on Monday, Jan. 4, at Town Hall.
pointed as clerk to the town justices.
Ken McLaughlin was reappointed as building inspector/code
enforcement officer for administrative and zoning matters.
Mike Segelken was reappointed
as deputy building inspector/code
enforcement officer for building/
fire inspections and field work.
Town Clerk Lisa Cope was
reappointed registrar of vital statistics.
Ellen Owens was reappointed
as deputy town clerk and deputy
registrar of vital statistics.
Julie Schroeder and Edie
Greenwood were reappointed as
co-chairpersons of the Zoning
Board of Appeals (ZBA).
Patricia Lynch VandeBogart
was reappointed to the ZBA.
Dale Culver was reappointed as
chairman of the Planning Board.
Evelyn Garzetta was reappointed to the Planning Board.
Michelle Haab was reappointed
to the Ethics Committee.
Robert Stevens was reappointed as highway superintendent.
Ray Kilmer was reappointed
highway motor equipment operator (MEO) and Shawn Morrison
was reappointed highway assistant
foreman.
James Reilly was named temporary dog control officer.
A resolution was passed to fix
the salaries of all elected and appointed officers and to establish
the wage rate for all other personnel.
Mileage reimbursement was
established at .54 cents/mile, the
standard IRS rate.
Emergency interim successors
appointed were: Councilmen John
Merwin, Steven Merwin and Jim
Campbell, in that order.

The North East Town Board
Meetings: Rules of Procedures for
2016 were adopted.
Town Board Committees were
appointed for the upcoming year.
The are as follows:
Emergency Services Committee: Jim Campbell and John Merwin.
Police Services Committee:
George Kaye and John Merwin.
Highway Committee: Steven
Merwin and George Kaye.
Recreation Committee: Steven
Merwin and Jim Campbell.
Personnel Committee: George
Kaye and John Merwin.
Buildings, Grounds and Facilities Committee: Jim Campbell and
Steven Merwin.
Budget Committee: George
Kaye and John Merwin.
Website Committee: John Midwood, Lorna Sherman and Lisa
Cope.
Cemetery Committee: Jim
Campbell and John Midwood.
Zoning Review Committee:
John Merwin and George Kaye.
Hazard Mitigation Committee: Steven Merwin and John
Midwood.
Grants Committee: John Midwood, Jim Campbell and Lisa
Cope.

PHOTO BY KAYLA GANGLOFF

A full and vibrant rainbow could be spotted throughout the Hudson Valley on Sunday, Jan.
10, following a threatening thunderstorm. Above is a view of the colorful arc from Millerton.

WORD ON THE STREET
The arrival of the New Year often has us thinking about what we’d wish for those around us. The Millerton
News’ Lizett Pajuelo hit the streets to see what local residents are hoping for in 2016.

“In 2016 I am hoping that everyone experiences good health,
happiness and prosperity. I also hope that everyone gets involved in the upcoming elections and that as a society we make
a smart choice in who we choose to lead us into the next four
years because it is so important for all of us to elect someone
who will help make us a better nation.”
— Susan Macura
Millerton

PHOTOS BY LIZETT PAJUELO

“I hope that people can realize that we’re all the same,
and can treat each other with
respect regardless of their beliefs or culture.”
— Rhiannon Leo-Jameson
Millerton

MILLERTON IN BRIEF
Drum circle at NECC every Sunday
There will be a family drum
circle at 4:30 p.m., followed
by a dance with the Berkshire
Stompers from 5 p.m. to 6
p.m., every Sunday evening
during the winter months at

the North East Community
Center (NECC).
The event is free; donations
will be accepted. For more
information call organizer
Charlie Keil at 860-435-0717.

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A4

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

AMENIA

Amenia organizes for 2016

WORD ON THE STREET

By WHITNEY JOSEPH
editor@millertonnews.com
AMENIA — The town of Amenia held its annual organizational
meeting on Monday, Jan. 4. Appointments were made — all positions were actually reappointed
this year — resolutions were adopted and other housekeeping issues were addressed.
The board accepted the town’s
rules of procedure, committee
guidelines and procurement policies.
The Town Board’s business
workshop meetings were set for
the first Thursday of the month;
regular meetings were set for the
third Thursday of the month. Both
meetings are to take place at 7 p.m.
at Town Hall, located at 4988 Route
22, Amenia.
A motion was passed to establish elected officials’ salaries.
Denise Fitzpatrick was reappointed as town attorney. Councilman Mike DeLango voted against
the appointment; Councilwoman
Gretchen Hitselberger was absent
from the vote; she arrived later in
the meeting.
Marge Arnold was appointed as
bookkeeper. Lorna Sherman was
appointed as alternate bookkeeper.
Valerie Kulikowski was appointed bank reconciliation clerk.
Katrina Gore-Alexander was
appointed treasurer to the Water
District.
Tara Morey was appointed
clerk to the Water District.
Hilarie Thomas was appointed
town court special prosecutor.
Kimberlea Rea was appointed
attorney for the Old Amenia Landfill.
Annette Culligan was appointed
secretary to the supervisor.
Tara Morey was appointed
part-time typist.
Michael Segelken was appointed code enforcement officer.
Donald Smith was appointed
deputy building and fire inspector.
Katrina Gore-Alexander was
appointed building administrative assistant.

The arrival of the New Year often has us thinking about what we’d wish
for those around us. The Millerton News’ Lizett Pajuelo hit the streets to see
what local residents are hoping for in 2016.

PHOTO BY CHRIS KLINGNER

From left: Town Clerk Dawn Marie Klingner, Councilwoman Vicki Doyle, Councilman P.
Damian Gutierrez and town Supervisor Victoria Perotti were sworn in by Town Justice James
Devine.
Town Clerk Dawn Marie Klingner was appointed registrar of vital
statistics and tax collector.
Tanya Shook was appointed
bank reconciliation clerk.
Larissa DeLango was appointed
Planning Board secretary.
Susan Metcalf was appointed
Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA)
secretary.
Joseph Fontaine was appointed
Planning Board chairman.
Dave Everett was appointed
Planning Board and ZBA attorney.
Nancy Luther was appointed
first deputy town clerk.
Valerie Kulikowski was appointed second deputy town clerk.
Donna Morrison was appointed
assessor’s clerk.
John Lloyd was appointed data
collector.
Christopher Klingner was appointed chief police constable.
Jason Dean, Brett Johnson,
Deuwayne Jackson and Francis
Lansing were appointed police
constables.
Maureen Moore was appointed
justice clerk for the Hon. Norman
Moore.
Dawn Marie Klingner was appointed justice clerk for the Hon.
James Devine.
Andy Wheeler was appointed
highway foreman.
Allan Wilbur, Darren Peterson,
Megan Chamberlin and Arthur
Parrotte Sr. were appointed highway laborers.
Judith Carlson was appointed

highway office manager.
John Culligan was appointed
groundskeeper/cleaner.
Shawn Howard was appointed
recreation groundskeeper.
Charles Mayville was appointed
assistant recreation groundskeeper.
Mike Flint was appointed videographer.
Anthony DeBonis was appointed animal control officer.
Michael Hagerty was appointed
grant writer.
Kathleen Howard was appointed summer recreation director.
Councilwoman Vicki Doyle
was appointed deputy town supervisor.
Arlene Iuliano was appointed
town historian.
Andy Wheeler was appointed
deputy highway superintendent.
Jeff Barnett-Winsby was appointed ZBA chairman.
Town Supervisor Victoria Perotti was named in charge of All
Hazard Mitigation.
Dawn Marie Klingner was appointed record management officer.
Nancy Luther and Valerie Kulikowski were appointed deputy
tax collectors and deputy registrars
of vital statistics.
Mileage reimbursement was set
at the federal rate of .54 cents/mile.
A motion was passed to continue the town’s contract with
SEBI Environmental Services Inc.
for water treatment to the Water
District.

Something for everyone at
7th annual Kildonan Expo
By KAREN GRAZIA
Special to The Millerton News

AMENIA — The seventh annual Kildonan Expo was held on
Friday, Dec. 18, welcoming parents and families to The Kildonan
School campus to view student
work from the fall semester. Students presented their work in all
subject areas including: science,
math, history, literature, art, music and foreign languages.
Keynote speaker Amanda
Whalen, a 2007 graduate of The
Kildonan School and now a designer at BabyVision, a baby and
toddler clothing manufacturing
company, gave a very personal
address to students and their
families. Following her speech,
families moved throughout campus viewing students’ hard work

during the past four months.
Science projects included experiments, data collection and
presentations. Math presentations took the form of games using mathematical reasoning and a
musical video. Students in American Sign Language showed their
skill by signing along to songs,
both live and also in a creative
video performance. Spanish students showed their understanding of the culture by making salsa,
dancing and studying the music
of Spanish-speaking countries.
Charcoal drawings and photography were featured pieces of artwork, and musical performances
were given with full instrumentation and vocals, accompanied by
music teachers Michael Klvana
and Johan Narsjo. The Kodiaks’
(grades two to five) extensive

study of birds of prey culminated
with beautifully crafted paper mache replications of their specific
bird of study, guided by Kodiak
teacher Erika Hollander.
A full-size interactive cave,
built by three sixth-grade students, incorporated the book “Boy
of the Painted Cave,” which was
read in literature class and woven perfectly into art to bring the
caves off the page. Visitors could
enter the cave, reveling in the precision and detail and triggering a
recorded message that provided
information about the students’
creation. Students were assisted
in this massive endeavor by literature teacher Charles Brown and
art teacher Todd Titone.
Karen Grazia is in charge of
media and communications for The
Kildonan School.

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M&T Bank, the Bank of Millbrook and Salisbury Bank and
Trust were named the official depositories for town funds.
The Millerton News was named
the official town newspaper.
Emergency interim successors
were named in order: Councilwoman Vicki Doyle, Councilmen
Mike DeLango and P. Damian
Gutierrez.
Appointments were made to
Town Board committees. They
included:
Recreation Commission: P. Damian Gutierrez and Vicki Doyle.
Amenia Housing Commission:
Mike DeLango and Gretchen Hitselberger.
Wastewater Committee: P.
Damian Gutierrez and Mike
DeLango.
Enhancement Committee:
Mike DeLango and Vicki Doyle.
Conservation Advisory Council: Vicki Doyle and Gretchen Hitselberger.
Emergency Response/Safety
Committee: P. Damian Gutierrez
and Gretchen Hitselberger.
Ethics Committee: Mike
DeLango and P. Damian Gutierrez.
Kitchen Committee: Mike
DeLango and Gretchen Hitselberger.
Water District Committee:
Mike DeLango and P. Damian
Gutierrez.
Trail to Train Committee:
Gretchen Hitselberger and P. Damian Gutierrez.

PHOTO BY LIZETT PAJUELO

“I wish everyone health, happiness and peace — like in other
years.”
—Mary Murphy
Amenia resident and Webutuck teacher

AREA IN BRIEF
Firehouse pancake breakfast Jan. 17
AMENIA —The Amenia
Fire Company will sponsor
its monthly all-you-can-eat
breakfast on Sunday, Jan. 17, at
the firehouse at 36 Mechanic
St. The breakfast will be held
from 7:30 to 11 a.m.

The price for adults is $8;
children and seniors cost $7.
The menu consists of pancakes, French toast, omelettes,
eggs (any style), toast, hash
browns, bacon, sausage and
beverages.

Become an intern at The Wassaic Project
WASSAIC — The Wassaic Project is looking for
spring programming interns
to work in its Brooklyn and
Wassaic offices.
Interns will work with a
small team and have an opportunity to contribute to

winter projects.
The application deadline
is Monday, Jan. 18. Internships run from February to
May.
For more information and
to apply go to www.wassaicproject.org/opportunities.

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PHYSICAL THERAPY CENTER

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Program presented by Geer Physical Therapy
at Geer Village, 77 South Canaan Rd, Canaan, CT
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ELLIO’S PIZZA

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CHEESE & SUPREME BOXES

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THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

A5

PINE PLAINS

WORD ON THE STREET
The arrival of the New Year often has us thinking about what we’d wish
for those around us. The Millerton News’ Whitney Joseph hit the streets to
see what local residents are hoping for in 2016.

PHOTO BY STAN HIRSON

Pine Plains Town Justice Christi Acker, right, swore in newly elected officers at the town’s organizational meeting on Thursday, Jan. 7, at Town Hall. From left are Highway Superintendent
Heather Wilson, Assessor Chairman James Mara, Town Clerk Judy Harpp, town Councilwoman
Sarah Jones, town Councilman Don Bartles and town Supervisor Brian Coons.

Pine Plains organizes for 2016
By WHITNEY JOSEPH
editor@millertonnews.com

PINE PLAINS — The Town
Board held its annual organization meeting on Thursday, Jan. 7,
at Town Hall. Appointments were
made and resolutions passed, and
extraneous housekeeping issues
were tended to.
Town Supervisor Brian Coons
was reappointed as chairman to
the Town Board. He was also reappointed as budget director.
Town Clerk Judy Harpp was
reappointed clerk to the Town
Board. She was also reappointed
as marriage official and registrar.
Councilman Don Bartles was
named deputy town supervisor.
Richard Prentice was reappointed animal humane officer.
John Hughes was reappointed
officer in charge on the town’s
police department. Hughes and
Michael Lawson were also reappointed as patrolmen to the police
department.
Warren Replansky was reappointed as attorney to the town.
Drew Weaver was reappointed
as code enforcement officer and
zoning enforcement officer.
Catherine Prentice was reappointed as recreation director.
Eileen Ciaburri was newly
appointed as bookkeeper to the
supervisor. She was also reappointed as deputy town clerk,
deputy registrar and tax collector.
Kathy Rigano was reappointed
as secretary to the supervisor.
Maryann Lennon was reappointed as court clerk.
Mary Orlandi was reappointed
as part-time court clerk.
Nancy Proper was reappointed Planning Board secretary. She
was also reappointed Zoning

Board of Appeals (ZBA) secretary.
James Mara was reappointed
chairman of the assessors.
Lynda Ball was reappointed
secretary to the assessors.
The Bank of Millbrook and JP
Morgan Chase Bank were named
official depositories for the town.
Gary Keeler was reappointed
water superintendent to the Pine
Plains Water Improvement Area
(PPWIA).
Debra Phillips was reappointed clerk to the PPWIA.
The Millerton News was once
again designated as the official
town newspaper.
Morris Associates was reappointed as engineer to the town.
Robert Couse was named
cleaner.
Mileage reimbursement was
set at the IRS rate of .54 cents/
mile.
The Town Board’s monthly
meeting date was once again
set as the third Thursday of the
month at 6 p.m. at Town Hall.
John Forelle was renamed
chairman of the Planning Board.
The Planning Board will continue
to meet on the second Wednesday
of the month at 7:30 p.m. at Town
Hall. Planning Board members
are Kenneth Meccariello, Vikki
Soracco, Steve Patterson, Kate
Osofsky, Louisa Grassi and Michael Stabile. Alternate members
are Peter Salerno and Jane Waters.
Scott Chase was renamed
chair of the ZBA. The ZBA includes Margo Jackson, Carl
Baden, Marie Stewart and Mike
O’Neill. The ZBA will meet the
fourth Tuesday of the month, if
needed, at 7:30 p.m. at Town Hall.
The Conservation Advisory
Council (CAC) Chairman is John
Hoffman III. The CAC will meet

the second Thursday of the month
at 5 p.m. at Town Hall. CAC members include Joan Franzone, Chris
McNeil and Alysa McBeth.
Scott Chase was reappointed
chair of the Trails Committee.
Jack McQuade was reappointed chair of the Affordable
Housing Task Force.
Richard Prentice was named
as representative for the All Hazard Mitigation Plan.
The emergency succession
list was announced. In order, it
includes Councilmen Don Bartles, Gary Cooper and Richard
Brenner.
The Town Board liaisons were
named. They are as follows:
Highway, Don Bartles.
Planning Board, Sarah Jones.
Justice Department, Richard
Brenner.
Recreation, Richard Brenner.
Assessors, Sarah Jones.
Library, Brian Coons.
Insurance, Gary Cooper.
Code/Zoning Enforcement
Officer, Brian Coons.
Town Clerk, Brian Coons.
Town Attorney, Brian Coons.
Town Engineer, Brian Coons.
Town Police, Gary Cooper.
ZBA, Richard Brenner.
Trails Committee, Sarah
Jones.
CAC, Sarah Jones.
Affordable Housing, Brian
Coons.
Fire Department, Richard
Brenner.
Water Department, Brian
Coons.
School District, Don Bartles.
Hamlet Revitalization, Brian
Coons and Gary Cooper.
Communications, Don Bartles.
Agriculture, Gary Cooper.

PHOTO BY WHITNEY JOSEPH

“I’m hoping everyone has a safe and happy and healthy New
Year, and that we all help our neighbors.”
— Mary Shook
Pine Plains

o ing

en s a

PINE PLAINS
IN BRIEF
Week of Prayer for
Christian Unity
Four congregations
from Christian denominations in Pine Plains will
come together for an Ecumenical Celebration of the
Word of God on Sunday,
Jan. 17.
The service, part of the
area’s observance of the
annual Week of Prayer for
Christian Unity, will take
place at the First United
Presbyterian Church,
at 3039 East Church St.
(Route 199), at 4 p.m. Rev.
Carol Miller, pastor, will
deliver the message.
Begun in 1908, the Week
of Prayer for Christian
Unity is celebrated each
year around the world.
The theme for the 2016
observance is “Called to
Proclaim the Mighty Acts
of the Lord” (cf. 1 Peter 2:9).
The Pine Plains service
is sponsored by the Pine
Plains Council of Churches. The public is cordially
invited to attend.

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A6

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

MILLBROOK

WORD ON THE STREET
The arrival of the New Year often has us thinking about what we’d wish
for those around us. The Millerton News’ Judith O’Hara Balfe hit the streets
to see what local residents are hoping for in 2016.

PHOTO BY JUDITH O’HARA BALFE

“Focusing locally, I’d like to
see a park for the kids in Millbrook, for baseball, basketball,
even motor-cross bicycling.
They really don’t have any
place to gather and just hang
out in Millbrook. They’re good
kids, and I think they deserve
it.”
— Richard Mauro
Millbrook

Merritt moves to
temporary quarters
MILLBROOK — Merritt
Bookstore will move to 3264
Franklin Ave. for two months
while renovations are carried
out at its permanent home at 57
Front St.
New owner Kira Wizner plans
to carry on the normal business of
book and toy selling at the Franklin Avenue address until roughly
April 1.

Merritt Bookstore has long
been a favorite haunt of Millbrook residents and visitors alike,
and many have said they are excited about the store remodeling.
The move will be made by the
last week in January.
For more information about
Merritt Bookstore, call 845-6775957.
— Judith O’Hara Balfe

MILLBROOK IN BRIEF
Winter concerts at the library
The Millbrook Library
will host the Millbrook Arts
Group (MAG) winter concert
series in January, February and
March.
The first concert will be
held on Saturday, Jan. 16, at 5
p.m. The Catskill Jazz Factory
will present master New Orleans clarinetist Evan Christo-

pher and his trio, performing
as Evan Christopher’s Clarinet
Road.
During the concert intermission writer and poet
Jonathan Wells will present
poems from his latest book,
“The Man With Many Pens.”
Concerts are free and open
to the public.

Student Art Blast runs through February
The Millbrook Library will
host Art Blast, a collection of
student work by students from
Dutchess Day School and Millbrook Central School, from
Friday, Jan. 15, through Friday,
Feb. 5.
An artists’ reception will be

held on Jan. 15 from 4 to 6 p.m.,
with a musical performance by
Eric Rosi-Marshall and Friends.
The library is located at 3
Friendly Lane, Millbrook.
For more information call
845-677-3611 or go to www.
millbrooklibrary.org.

SCORE workshop Jan. 20
For a small business owner,
the beginning of the year is an
ideal time to assess printedand web-based marketing
materials to ensure they’re effective.
A SCORE (Service Corps of
Retired Executives) expert will
be at the Millbrook Library, 3
Friendly Lane, on Wednesday,

Jan. 20, at 6 p.m. to provide tips
for making business materials
relevant, engaging and up-todate. The presentation will
cover professional websites,
social media and printed materials.
Registration is required.
Stop by the circulation desk or
call the library at 845-677-3611.

Got news?

Email news and photos to editor@millertonnews.com

Town of Washington holds
organizational meeting for 2016
By JUDITH O’HARA BALFE
judithb@millertonnews.com
WASHINGTON — The Town
Board met on Monday, Jan. 4, for
its annual reorganization meeting. Those in attendance were
town Supervisor Gary Ciferri and
Councilmen Stephen Turletes, Al
DeBonis and Michael Murphy.
Also present were Town Clerk
Mary Alex, Highway Superintendent Joe Spagnola and Town Attorney Jeffrey Battistoni. Resident
Howard Schuman was also at the
meeting.
The oath of office was administered to Alex, DeBonis and
Murphy by Battistoni. Town Justice Jeff Feigleson and Spagnola
were previously sworn in. Town
Justice Elizabeth Shequine was
sworn in on Jan. 5. Ciferri also
welcomed Spagnola to the town
team.
Ciferri made the following Town Board appointments:
Turletes, liaison to the Recreation
Department and deputy supervisor. Named liaison to the Buildings and Grounds Department
was Audia. DeBonis was named
liaison to the Planning Board and
Zoning Board of Appeals. Murphy was named liaison to the
Highway Department.
Irene Wing, meanwhile, was
appointed as deputy town clerk,
deputy tax collector and deputy
registrar of vital statistics for a
period of four years as recommended by the town clerk.
Other appointments made by
Turletes and seconded by DeBonis were as follows:
Dana Sukow, justice court
clerk and bookkeeper to the supervisor; Nikki Caul, secretary
to the Planning Board and Zoning Board of Appeals; Warren
McMillan, recreation director;
Kelly Cassinelli, assistant recreation director; John Neubauer,
building inspector and zoning
administrator.
In addition, other appointments included: Judy Malstrom,
clerk to the assessor; Nancy Patrick, clerk to the building inspector and zoning administrator;
Louis Spagnola Jr., constable;
Louis Spagnola III, deputy constable. DeBonis was appointed
dog control officer; David Greenwood was named town historian.
The law firm of Van de Water &
Van de Water was appointed as attorney for the town. The Bank of
Millbrook was named as the official depository for town funds.
The following items were also
decided:
• Town meetings will be held
on the second Thursday of each
month at 7 p.m. Ciferri was authorized to invest town funds in
time for authorized investments

Make someone feel at home and
they’ll remember you always

PHOTO BY MARY ALEX

The Washington Town Board met for its organizational meeting on Monday, Jan. 4. The board
includes, front row, from left, Councilman Steve Turletes and town Supervisor Gary Ciferri;
and back row, from left, Councilmen Al DeBonis, Robert Audia and Mike Murphy.
as approved by the Town Board.
• The official mileage reimbursement rate was established
at .50 cents/mile for employees
and elected officials while on
town business.
• A procurement policy was
established to authorize the highway superintendent to spend up
to $3,500 to buy additional equipment without prior approval, up
to $5000 with prior approval and
between $5,000.01 and $120,000
with prior approval and a minimum of two quotes from vendors.
• Any elected official was authorized to attend the Association
of Towns meeting in February.
• The Millerton News,
Northern Dutchess News and
The Poughkeepsie Journal were
designated as the official town

newspapers. Legal notices will be
published dependent on publication needs.
• The procurement of a blanket
undertaking from a duly authorized corporate surety covering
town officers, clerks and employees was approved. Any such
blanket undertaking entered into
must indemnify against losses
caused by the failure of said person to faithfully perform their duties or by fraudulent or dishonest
acts.
• To compensate all employees
within the limits of the appropriated funds as established in the
2016 budget. All non-salaried
employees will receive time-anda-half for any hours worked over
40 hours per week.
• Establish the rates of com-

pensation for all officials and
employees as decided on in the
2016 budget.
DeBonis made a motion, seconded by Turletes, that the Town
Board will increase fees with the
2016 budget. In regard to the
Transfer Station, the board approved the increase in bag punch
cards from 10 bags for $40 and
five bags for $20 to 10 bags for
$50 and five bags for $25.
Before the meeting closed all
motions were passed unanimously, with only Councilman Robert
Audia absent.

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View of a typical
private rehab room.

J

oan and Donald know that it takes
more than just their great sense of style
or Joan’s talent in the kitchen to make a
B&B work. Your guests need to feel so
welcome they never want to leave. At the
Bank of Millbrook, we like our customers
to feel that way too.

S

o when Joan saw the for sale sign on
that B&B and asked, “Do you think we
can do this?” – the Bank of Millbrook said,
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Joan LaCasse and
Donald Kennedy
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Customers since 2014

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Short-term rehabilitation at Noble Horizons is designed to make the
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in a fine hotel. Find out more by contacting Judy Sheridan, Director of
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THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

A7

SPORTS

SPORTS SCHEDULES
Millbrook
Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Millbrook at Rhinebeck, League,
Rhinebeck High School.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m., Girls
Basketball, Junior Varsity, Rhinebeck at Millbrook, League, Millbrook High School.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 5:45 p.m., Boys
Basketball, Varsity, Millbrook at
Rhinebeck, League, Rhinebeck
High School.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 6 p.m., Girls
Basketball, Varsity, Rhinebeck at
Millbrook, League, Millbrook
High School.
Saturday, Jan. 16, at 1 p.m., Indoor Track, Varsity Millbrook at
OCIAA, B Meet, West Point.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Pine Plains at Millbrook, League,
Millbrook High School.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Millbrook at Pine Plains, League,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 5:45 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Varsity, Millbrook at Pine Plains, League,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 4:15
p.m., Girls Basketball, Junior Varsity, Pawling at Millbrook, Non-

League, Millbrook High School.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 4:30
p.m., Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity, Millbrook at Pawling, NonLeague.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 6 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Varsity Pawling
at Millbrook, Non-League, Millbrook High School.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 6:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Varsity, Millbrook
at Pawling, Non-League.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Modified, Millbrook at Highland, 5 Quarters,
Highland Middle School.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Modified, Highland at Millbrook, 5 Quarters,
Millbrook High School.
Pine Plains
Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Webutuck at Pine Plains, League,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Pine Plains at Webutuck, League,
Webutuck High School.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 5:30 p.m., Girls
Basketball, Varsity, Pine Plains at
Webutuck.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 5:45 p.m., Boys
Basketball, Varsity, Webutuck at
Pine Plains, League, Stissing
Mountain Middle/High School.

SPORTS IN BRIEF

Friday, Jan. 15, at 6 p.m., Indoor Track, Varsity, Pine Plains
at OCIAA, B Meet, West Point.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Pine Plains at Millbrook, League,
Millbrook High School.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Millbrook at Pine Plains, League,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 5:45 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Varsity, Millbrook at Pine Plains, League,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Modified, Marlboro at Pine Plains, 5 Quarters,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Modified, Pine
Plains at Marlboro, 5 Quarters,
Marlboro Intermediate School.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Dover at Pine Plains, Non-League,
Stissing Mountain Middle/High
School.
Webutuck
Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Webutuck at Pine Plains, League,
Stissing Mountain Middle High
School.

Sports injuries, arthritis
pain helped by Bowenwork

Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Pine Plains at Webutuck, League,
Webutuck High School.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 5:30 p.m., Girls
Basketball, Varsity, Pine Plains at
Webutuck, League.
Friday, Jan. 15, at 4:15 p.m., Boys
Basketball, Varsity, Webutuck at
Pine Plains, League, Stissing
Mountain Middle/High School.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Junior Varsity,
Webutuck at John A. Coleman,
League, John A. Coleman High
School.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 5:30 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Varsity, John A.
Coleman at Webutuck, League.
Tuesday, Jan. 19, at 5:45 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Varsity, Webutuck
at John A. Coleman, League, John
A. Coleman High School.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Modified, Dover
at Webutuck.
Wednesday, Jan. 20, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Modified, Webutuck at Dover, Non-League.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Boys Basketball, Modified, Rondout Valley at Webutuck, 5 Quarters, Webutuck High School.
Thursday, Jan. 21, at 4:15 p.m.,
Girls Basketball, Modified, Webutuck at Rondout Valley, 5 Quarters,
Rondout Valley Middle School.

Maplebrook School hosts open swim
AMENIA — Maplebrook
School will open its swimming pool to town of Amenia
residents during the winter
months. The pool will be
open on Sundays from Jan. 17
through Feb. 28.
Children under the age of 12
may swim with adult supervision from 5 to 6 p.m. There will

be a general swim time from
6 to 7 p.m. and 7 to 8 p.m. will
be reserved for an adult swim.
A lifeguard will be on duty
during the entire swimming
period and guests should
check in with security.
Maplebrook School is located at 5142 Route 22, Amenia.

Jumpfest 2016 will be Feb. 12 to 14
SALISBURY, Conn. — The
Salisbury Winter Sports Association (SWSA) will host two
major events in February as it
celebrates its 90th birthday.
The annual Jumpfest Winter Festival will be held Feb. 12
to 14. In addition to the competition between the top ski
jumpers in the East, there will
also be the popular Human
Dogsled Race, Chili Cook-off
and ski jumping under the
lights, all at Satre Hill.
In town, there will be ice
carving demonstrations, a
wine tasting, a bourbon tast-

ing, restaurant specials, art
shows, children’s activities,
retail sales and more.
From Feb. 23 to 27, SWSA
will host the Junior Nationals. This event comes to
Salisbury every five years and
features the highest-ranked
jumpers in the country who
are 20 years old and under.
Many of these competitors
will go on to represent the
United States in the 2018
Olympics.
Event dates, times and locations will be posted online
at www.Jumpfest.org.

Matteo plays soccer at SUNY
MILLERTON — Matthew Matteo of Millerton was one of 27
student athletes who played for the SUNY Oneonta men’s soccer
team this fall.

Send sports news and photos to
editor@millertonnews.com

O F F I C I A L E N T RY

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By JUDITH O’HARA BALFE
judithb@millertonnews.com
MILLBROOK — Millbrook
Library started its January series
of adult events with the Bowen
Therapy Work Body Clinic on
Wednesday, Jan. 6. Conducted by
Danielle Molella, a nationally-certified therapeutic body worker, the
session was attended by 15 participants, most of whom had already
experienced the therapy first hand.
The Bowen Technique was
started by the late Tom Bowen in
Australia. It’s a dynamic system of
muscle and connective tissue work
that addresses the whole body, and
treats a myriad of ailments, including: sports injuries, tennis elbow,
Fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue
symptoms and Chrone’s disease
as well as many others. Some also
claim it is good for migraine headaches and vertigo.
Bowenwork is effective, yet
gentle, inflicting no pain or forced
results. It is used by many in the
medical profession and can reportedly bring about rapid results. It is
said to restore the body’s natural
balance, thus allowing the body
to heal itself.
Studies have shown that competitive athletes who have regular
Bowen treatments consistently
perform better with an accelerated rate of recovery from injury
than those who do not.
Many have made testimonials lauding Molella’s work. One
baseball player said he was in a car
accident that left his left arm — his
pitching arm — broken. After a
few sessions with Molella, he said
he could pitch without pain, and
without hesitation.
When there is acute injury, a
Bowenwork therapist may concentrate on the injured part of the

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Danielle Molella performed Bowenwork on a willing volunteer
at a recent demonstration at the Millbrook Library.
body, but generally Bowen Technique facilitates the whole body
in healing itself with minimum
intervention. That’s unlike many
other forms of manipulation
therapy. According to Molella,
the body continues to respond
to Bowen Therapy for several
days after the treatment, which
is why Bowen treatments are well
spaced out.
Molella, who hails from Millbrook, was living and working
as a designer in Seattle when she
decided to train as a Licensed
Massage Practitioner; she started her Bowenwork training three

years later. She’s been practicing Bowenwork for the past six
years. She said that when she
saw how Bowenwork helped her
own body recover from injury
she wanted to offer it to others.
After living outside of the area
for almost 20 years Molella has
returned to her roots; she is
back in Millbrook to practice
her work.
To learn more about Bowenwork and Danielle Molella, go
to danielle@1bluedragonfly.com.
To learn more about events
at the Millbrook Library, call
845-677-3611.

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MillertonNews-1.75x3.indd 1

1/11/16 1:16 PM

A8

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

OPINION
THE MILLERTON NEWS
EDITORIAL PAGE 8

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

THURSDAY, JANUARY 14, 2016

Traffic stop for DWI in Millerton

EDITORIAL

A time to reorganize,
and a time to learn

A

s part of our towns’ annual protocol, Town Boards
must hold reorganization meetings after the first of the
year. Amenia, North East, Pine Plains and Washington
have all done that. It’s at these meetings that appointments are
made, salaries authorized, resolutions passed and a sundry of
other housekeeping issues addressed.
It might not sound overly stimulating, but it’s important
business. Town Board members gather as soon after Jan. 1 as
possible to make sure their towns can fully operate for the
upcoming year. Without these organizational meetings, or
reorg meetings, municipal business would come to a halt.
And, it’s worth noting, as this paper has had the opportunity
to sit in on more than a few of these meetings, they can be
pretty interesting. It’s at the reorgs where one can find out
who does what for the town and how much many of them are
paid. Such financial decisions are actually made when the
towns draft their budgets, but they get final approval and are
adopted at the organizational meetings.
Town Board committees and liaisons are also set at these
reorg meetings. And that’s important, because that’s where one
can learn which Town Board members deal with specific
issues and departments — so taxpayers can know who to
approach if they’re unhappy or curious about certain matters.
For instance, Councilmen Steven Merwin and Jim Campbell
sit on the town of North East’s Recreation Committee. Anyone
with questions about how decisions are made regarding
recreation — for instance the cost of summer camp — now
know with whom they should speak. Same goes for other
matters. Just look up the Town Board committee members or
Town Board liaisons. That can be vital information.
If, perhaps, someone wants to know who the animal control
officer is, that appointment would have been made at the reorg
meeting. So, too, would the appointment of a town attorney, a
town engineer, a town’s depositories, a town’s official newspaper, etc.
This last tidbit is important because it lets taxpayers know
where to find legal notices, which municipal entities along
with fire districts must publish before holding public hearings,
adopting resolutions/laws and accepting bids, as well as to
meet other legal requirements. Private corporations also have
to publish legal notices before forming and to qualify for
specific licenses, etc.
The Millerton News is proud to announce that it’s the
official newspaper for Amenia, Millerton, North East, Pine
Plains and Washington, as well as for the North East (Webutuck), Pine Plains and Millbrook central school districts. Legal
notices are printed weekly and reading them makes for good
habit.
But back to the reorgs, they’re mandatory, sure, and they
deal with minutia, absolutely, but they can be interesting. Read
all about the Harlem Valley’s latest organizational meetings in
this week’s issue of The Millerton News. Chances are those
who do will learn something new.

A Latin lesson with a $1 bill

A

re you getting the hang
of Latin yet? Salve (pronounced Sahl-way)! That’s
“Hello!” in Latin.
Let’s take a look at the reverse
of an American $1 bill, where you
will find both sides of the Great
Seal of the United States. On the
left, above the eye at the top of the
unfinished pyramid, you can see
the Latin words ANNUIT COEPTIS, which mean “He approves
[our] beginnings or undertakings.”
About 233 years ago designers of the Great Seal went back
to the Latin poetry of Vergil to
find words that would inspire
the people of these new United
States. Vergil lived between 70-19
B.C. Astonishing, isn’t it, to think
that Americans have connections
to ancient Romans who lived over
2,000 years ago!
The Latin word annuit is a
form of a verb meaning “nod,
express approval.” We have a few
unusual English words related
to this Latin verb like nutation (a
wobble) and the adjective numinous (supernatural, holy). From
the Latin noun coeptis, meaning
“beginnings or undertakings,”
we get many English words like
inception (beginning), concept
(idea) and receptive (open to

LEARNING
LATIN
Rowena
Fenstermacher
ideas).
The designers of the Great Seal
wished to acknowledge a divine
Providence from the beginning
of this new government called the
United States of America. Readers interested in the many Latin
words and phrases found not
only on the Great Seal but also
on other early American forms
of currency will find this website
of interest: www.greatseal.com/
mottoes/coeptis.html.
That’s our third Latin phrase
of the week. The next Latin
phrase also can be found on the $1
bill, also on the Great Seal.
Vale (pronounced “Wahl-ay”)!
That’s Latin for “good-bye.”
P.S. The obverse of a bill or
coin is the side that has the portrait!
Millerton resident Rowena Fenstermacher is a retired teacher; she
taught Latin at Hackley School in
Tarrytown, N.Y., from 1990 to 2015.

Cartoon by Bill Lee of Sharon, Conn., and New York City

A serious problem
facing Congress

T

he argument put before
Congress by the military industrial complex
— whether in time of war or
peace — is that the investment
the taxpayer makes into developing technologies will benefit
American jobs, benefit American commercial industry
and, especially, thereby benefit American global strength.
A great deal of that strength
comes from commercial and
financial strength.
Now, imagine you are on
the Congressional Committee hearing evidence on why
we need to build a new stealth
strategic bomber (as is currently being approved and discussed). General Robin Rand,
“… modernization and sustainment can only take us so far,
so we look forward. And with
the LRS-B, that future looks
promising. The LRS-B will extend American air dominance.
…” And then they quote the
price 2010 tag of “only $550
million per plane.” Air Force
procurement chief William
LaPlante told a congressional
hearing that that price (in today’s dollars of $575 million
already) “… excludes development expenses that AF analysts
estimate could reach less than
$24 billion.”
That’s $24 billion (with a
“B”) taxpayer dollars for research and development. Now,
traditionally, last century, the
taxpayer’s protectors — Congress — have ensured that
those dollars benefit America. For example, Eisenhower
approved and had Congress
fund the development of a jet
transport that, two years later,
morphed into the Boeing 707.
Jobs? Hundreds of thousands
in America. Industry? Billions
of dollars in American industrial profits. Global strength?
America became the world’s
leading aviation provider.
Now, imagine if Boeing
had taken that early transport
technology and decided to
build all their aircraft in, say,
Japan? Think Congress would
have allowed that to continue?

A VIEW FROM
THE EDGE
Peter Riva
Nope.
And yet, today, American
taxpayer investment in microchips, plastics, wireless
technology, computer coding,
touchscreens and a host of
technological improvements
are being trickled-down to
American companies who then
march off to China and elsewhere, provide jobs there and,
to make matters really insulting, then refuse to bring corporate profits back to America
because they don’t like to pay
tax; keeping the funds overseas
to provide more investment
and jobs over there. Their entire businesses were built on
U.S. taxpayer investment in
basic technologies and yet they
are marching off into the sunset with our investment.
Now, if you are in Congress,
when are you going to wake up
and see that, for just the new
bomber, the LRS-B, that $24
billion technology research
and development program
might not be a good deal for
the U.S. taxpayer? The bomber
may be necessary (that’s a separate issue), but investing with
corporations who will have
no restrictions on providing
more jobs outside of America,
keeping profits away from our
country and, in so doing, further weaken our nation? Do
you really want to fund something supposed to strengthen
the nation while you undermine that very strength by
providing research and development funds without securing sole-U.S. taxpayer benefit?
I don’t know about other taxpayers, but I am not happy to
think that the Tim Cooks of
this world will take my investment and weaken the USA.
Peter Riva, a former resident
of Amenia Union, now lives in
New Mexico.

Environment and autism; and opposition to TPP
Dear EarthTalk: What is the
latest thinking on the environmental causes (if any) of autism?
I hear so much conflicting information I don’t know what to
believe.
Bill Stribling
Austin, Texas
In the 1980s, about one in
2,000 American kids was diagnosed with autism. Today the
number is around one in 68,
according to estimates from the
U.S. Centers for Disease Con-

trol and Prevention’s Autism
and Developmental Disabilities Monitoring Network. This
disconcerting increase has led
to intensified examination into
what environmental factors may
play a role in the disorder’s development. A wide range of exposures have been scientifically
linked to autism, including air
pollutants, phthalates and other
endocrine disruptors, pesticides
such as Chlorpyrifos, and many
more. Vaccines were considered
a leading culprit, but more re-

EARTHTALK
Editors of E/The
Environmental
Magazine
cent research has proven this
connection wrong — although
the subject still engenders much
debate.
A 2014 study by researchers
at the Harvard School of Public

Health found a strong link between autism and in utero exposure to air pollution: the risk of
autism was doubled among children of women exposed to high
levels of particulate air pollution
during pregnancy. Another 2014
study out of the University of
California, Davis determined
that pregnant women living in
close proximity to fields and
farms where chemical pesticides
are applied experience a 66 perContinued to next page

It was 10 p.m. We were returning home from 52 Main in
Millerton. We are in our 70s and
have clean driving records. That
was about to change.
Officer Michael Veeder, siren and lights flashing, pulled
us over on Gay Road. Accompanying him was Sheriff Deputy
Bonds.
We have not been the same
since.
Officer Veeder said he spotted Louise turning on her
headlights while heading north
on Rudd Pond Road. He said
he smelled alcohol. Louise acknowledged having had two
vodka drinks over three hours
with dinner. His alcohol detector failed to register. After several tries he became annoyed,
accusing her of not blowing
properly. He ordered her to perform several field sobriety tests.
When it came to the heel-to-toe
walk, she refused, explaining
that she has diminished strength
in her legs and feeling in her feet
due to femoral bypasses and peripheral neuropathy, negatively
affecting her balance. Upset, he
accused her of not cooperating,
handcuffed her, arrested her
and put her into the back of his
squad car for transport to the
Millerton Police Station.
Louise submitted to Breathalyzer testing, which she had to
do several times while Deputy
Bonds and Officer Veeder complained that the machine was
not working properly.
None of this was reflected in
the arrest report noting an alcohol level of .09 percent (below
.08 percent being the legal limit). She was alleged to have failed
several field sobriety tests (some
of which were never administered), to have had glassy eyes
and slurred speech.
Thanksgiving and Christmas

were lost this year. Instead, we
prepared for Louise’s hearing.
We hired a lawyer; visited our
physician for an evaluation of
the officer’s report. The doctor’s
conclusion: the findings were
unremarkable for a 76-year-old.
At Louise’s court appearance,
the assistant district attorney acknowledged there was an issue
with “probable cause.” Officer
Veeder did not have grounds for
stopping, much less arresting,
her. Louise was offered a “deal.”
DWI would be dropped if she
pled guilty to a traffic infraction,
along with a fine of $193 and
two points on her license. If she
refused, there would be a trial
costing thousands more. She
took the deal.
The Millerton Police have
a reputation for “staking out”
restaurants on Main Street.
They trail patrons, pulling them
over for negligible infractions,
claim to smell alcohol and arrest
them for DWI.
Officer Veeder was lauded
as a “top DWI cop” in Dutchess
County (see Millerton News
12/10/15). While the STOP-DWI
program has good features and
certainly preventing drunk driving is a laudable goal, this award
creates a perverse incentive that
rewards policing practices that
are at best over-zealous, and at
worst, illegal.
We love Millerton. But, our
sense of security and community have taken a bruising,
knowing that the slightest traffic infractions can lead to being
pulled over by a police officer
more intent on becoming the
next “top DWI cop” than on protecting and respecting the rights
of the citizens of the town he or
she has sworn to protect.
Louise Black and
Mary Howard
Millerton

Thanks for support and donations
Millerton Astor Early Childhood Program would like to
thank everyone for all of the
local support and donations we
received this holiday season.
The families and children received items that they needed.

The families and staff greatly
appreciate you considering us
and the needs of our families.
Athena Galarza
Center director
Millerton Astor ECP
Millerton

PHOTO BY BERNARD A. DREW

Fallen elder
Email letters to editor@millertonnews.com.
Limit is 500 words. Deadline is Monday at 10 a.m.
Include a daytime phone number.

THE MILLERTON NEWS

(USPS 384600)
An Independent New York Newspaper
Official Newspaper of the Village of Millerton, Town of North East, Town of Washington
Town of Amenia, Town of Pine Plains, North East (Webutuck) Central School District,
the Pine Plains Central School District and Millbrook Central School District
Published Weekly by The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC
16 Century Blvd, P.O. Box AD, Millerton, NY 12546
Tel. (518) 789-4401 • Fax (518) 789-9247
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Volume 84, Number 49

Mission Statement

Thursday, January 14, 2016

The Lakeville Journal Company, LLC, Publishers of
The Lakeville Journal, The Millerton News, and The Winsted Journal
Our goal is to report the news of our communities accurately and fairly,
fostering democracy and an atmosphere of open communication.
Whitney Joseph
Editor
Janet Manko
Publisher
Libby Hall-Abeel
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In Memoriam
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1918-2011
Editor and
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THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

A9

VIEWPOINT

EARTHTALK

Continued from previous page
cent increased risk of having
a child with autism or a developmental delay. The advocacy
group Autism Speaks, which
contributed to the funding of the
Harvard study, believes that despite all the emerging data linking toxic exposures to autism, no
environmental influence appears
to cause or prevent autism by itself — rather they appear to influence risk in those genetically
predisposed to the disorder.
“It’s important to remember
that not all mothers exposed to
air pollution during pregnancy
will have a child with autism and
not all children with autism were
necessarily exposed to air pollution in utero,” said epidemiologist Michael Rosanoff, associate
director for public health at Autism Speaks. “We know autism is
a complex disorder and underlying genetic and biological factors
interact to influence susceptibility. The next step is to identify
the biological mechanisms that
connect air pollution to autism
and identify ways to treat if not
prevent the harm to brain development.”
While many studies linking
environmental toxins and autism

have been inconclusive, one developing research approach appears to hold great promise. Remarkably, fallen baby teeth can
be used to track a child’s prenatal and infant exposure to chemicals — thus allowing scientists to
determine what environmental
causes may have contributed to
the disorder’s development.
“As a result, we can use teeth
like an archeological record,”
says Dr. Raymond Palmer of
the University of Texas Health
Science Center. “The enamel
of different types of teeth begins to form at different points
during prenatal development.
In infancy, the enamel continues
to absorb chemicals circulating
through the baby’s body.” Palmer says the greatest insights from
dental analysis may come from
looking at chemical exposures
along with gene abnormalities,
which may affect one’s vulnerability to potentially toxic chemicals. “It’s not necessarily genes or
environment,” he adds. “It’s likely
to be both.”
Alysson Muotri at the University of California San Diego Department of Pediatrics is using
teeth analysis to identify gene

abnormalities in children with
autism, even in cases with no
previous known genetic cause.
Parents of an 8-year-old autistic
boy mailed Muotri’s team one
of the boy’s baby teeth, and the
researchers were able to detect
a mutation in a gene known as
TRPC6. The researchers treated
the autistic boy with hyperforin,
the active ingredient in St. John’s
Wort. Dental analysis could potentially lead to personalized
treatment for autism, whether
the cause be identified as genetic,
environmental or both.
Contacts: CDC Autism Spectrum Disorder Page, www.cdc.
gov/ncbddd/autism/;
Autism
Speaks, www.autismspeaks.org;
Muotri Lab at UCSD, www.
pediatrics.ucsd.edu/research/
muotri-lab; UT Health Science
Center, www.uthscsa.edu.
Dear EarthTalk: Why do
many green groups oppose the
Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP)
governing trade in the Pacific?
Jane Donahue
Larchmont, N.Y.
 
The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) is an international

LEGAL NOTICES
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that a public hearing will be held
before the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of North East,
Dutchess County, New York, on
Thursday, January 21, 2016 at
8 p.m., or as soon thereafter as
possible, in the Town Hall, 19
North Maple Avenue, Millerton,
New York, on the application
of Frank Langella for a special
permit to convert an existing
three car garage into an accessory apartment on tax parcel #
7069-00-659902. The parcel is
located at 269 Perotti Road in
the A5A Zoning District of the
Town of North East.
The above application is open
for inspection at the Town Hall.
Persons wishing to appear
at such hearing may do so in
person or by attorney or other
representative. Communications
in writing relating thereto may
be filed with the Board at such
hearing.
Dated: January 8, 2016.
Julie Schroeder,
Chairman,
Zoning Board of Appeals
01-14-16
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
that a public hearing will be held
before the Zoning Board of Appeals of the Town of North East,
Dutchess County, New York, on
Thursday, January 21, 2016 at
7:30 p.m., or soon thereafter as
possible, in the Town Hall, 19
North Maple Avenue, Millerton,
New York, on the application of
Carol Popp, owner of tax parcel
# 7271-00-440574, for a variance
of Section 98-14 D(5) of the Zoning Law of the Town of North
East, requesting a reduction in
the required front yard setback
of 75 feet from the center line of
the street in order to construct
a garage 52 feet from the center
line of the street. The parcel is
located at 169 Beilke Road in the
R1A Zoning District of the Town
of North East.
The above application is open
for inspection at the Town Hall.
Persons wishing to appear
at such hearing may do so in
person or by attorney or other
representative. Communications
in writing relating thereto may
be filed with the Board at such
hearing.
Dated: January 8, 2016.
Julie Schroeder,
Chairman,
Zoning Board of Appeals
01-14-16
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of
Limited Liability Company
Bougades Company, LLC.
Articles of Organization
filed with SSNY on July 22,
2015. Office location: Dutchess
County. United States Corporation Agents, Inc., is designated
as agent upon whom process

against the LLC may be served.
United States Corporation
Agents, Inc., shall mail process
to: 106 Ernest Road, Stanfordville
, NY 12581. General Purpose.
12-17-15
12-24-15
01-07-16
01-14-16
01-21-16
01-28-16
LEGAL NOTICE
Notice of Formation of
a limited liability company
(LLC)
The name of the limited liability company is WISTERIA
DREAM LLC. The date of filing
of the articles of organization
with the Department of State was
October 29, 2015. The County
in New York in which the office
of the company is located is
Dutchess. The Secretary of State
has been designated as agent
of the company upon whom
process may be served, and the
Secretary of State shall mail a
copy of any process against the
company served upon him or her
to c/o James Conway, 205 North
Clove Road, Verbank, New York
12585. The business purpose
of the company is to engage in
any and all business activities
permitted under the laws of the
State of New York.
01-07-16
01-14-16
01-21-16
01-28-16
02-04-16
02-11-16
LEGAL NOTICE
The United Presbyterian
Church of Amenia will cease
operation on or about January
22, 2016. Any debts or financial
obligations must be submitted in writing to the Amenia
Administrative Commission at
Hudson River Presbytery, 655
Scarborough Road, Scarborough
NY 10510 by the close of business
on January 18, 2016.
01-07-16
01-14-16
LEGAL NOTICE
NOTICE OF RECEIPT OF
TAX ROLL AND WARRANT
TAKE NOTICE, that I, Dawn
Marie Klingner, the undersigned
Collector of Taxes of the Town
of Amenia, County of Dutchess
and State of New York, have duly
received the tax roll and warrant
for the collection of taxes within
the Town of Amenia for the year
2016, and that I will attend at
4988 Route 22, Amenia from
January 4, 2016 to May 31, 2016,
9 o’clock in the forenoon to 2
o’clock in the afternoon on each
day, excepting Fridays, Saturdays,
Sundays and holidays for the
purpose of receiving the taxes
listed on the said roll.
TAKE FURTHER NOTICE,
that taxes may be paid on or
before February 29, 2016. On
all taxes received after such
date, there shall be an additional
one percent for each additional
month or fraction thereof there-

after until such taxes are paid or
until the return of unpaid taxes
to the county treasurer pursuant to law.
January to February 28, 0%
(percent) penalty;
March 1 to March 31, 2%
(percent) penalty;
April 1 to April 30, 3% (percent) penalty;
May 1 to May 31, 4% (percent)
penalty;
June 1 until settlement with
County Treasurer, 5% (percent).
In addition, after May 15, a
fee of $2.00 will be added for
each parcel.
TAKE FURTHER NOTICE,
that pursuant to the provisions
of law the tax roll of the Town
of Amenia will be returned to
the County Treasurer of the
County of Dutchess on the 1st
day of June.
Dated January 4, 2016.
Dawn Marie Klingner,
Collector of taxes of the
Town of Amenia
01-14-16
01-21-16
LEGAL NOTICE
MONTHLY MEETING
NOTICE
Please take notice that the
Amenia Town Board of the Town
of Amenia, County of Dutchess,
New York will hold its meetings
for the year 2016 on the First and
Third Thursday of each month
at 7 p.m.; the Amenia Planning
Board will hold its meetings on
the Second and Fourth Wednesday of the month at 7 p.m. and
the Zoning Board of Appeals will
hold its meetings on the Third
Monday at 7 p.m. of the monthon such day at the Amenia Town
Hall, 4988 Route 22, Amenia,
New York, and beginning in
January.
All meetings are open to the
public.
This notice is being posted in
accordance with the provisions
of Section 94 of the public Officers Law of the State of New York.
Dawn Marie Klingner,
Town Clerk
01-14-16
LEGAL NOTICE
MONTHLY MEETING
NOTICE
Please take notice that the
Amenia Fire District #1 Board of
Fire Commissioners in the Town
of Amenia, County of Dutchess,
New York will hold its meetings
for the year 2016 on the Second
Monday of each month at 6:30
p.m. - on such day at the Amenia
Fire House, 36B Mechanic Street,
Amenia, New York, and beginning in January.
All meetings are open to the
public.
This notice is being posted in
accordance with the provisions
of Section 94 of the public Officers Law of the State of New York.
Dawn Marie Klingner,
District Secretary
01-14-16

agreement that seeks to unite
the economic interests of 12
countries that border the Pacific Ocean by lowering trade
tariffs and establishing an international trade court to settle
disputes. TPP emerged as a West
Coast equivalent to the proposed
Trans-Atlantic Trade and Investment Partnership, designed to
ease trade restrictions between
the U.S. and Europe. But TPP
has progressed much faster
thanks to the willingness of Pacific nations to “play ball.”
International negotiators released a draft of the TPP agreement in October 2015 and are
awaiting approvals from participating governments. However,
despite the theoretical advantages of more fluid international trade, the current draft has
several complications that could
lead to a variety of problems for
participating nations and others, meaning its implementation
is far from a sure thing at this
point.
Green leaders criticize the
Obama administration and negotiators from other countries
for keeping early talks on the
formation of the TPP closed
to observers and media. Many
individuals and public interest groups requested access to
the discussions, fearing that the
agreement would unfairly favor
large corporations. However,
those appeals were ignored and
the drafted document revealed
what many feel was a prioritization of corporate interests over
health and environmental concerns. Without any enforceable
guarantees for environmental
protection, the TPP could actually significantly contribute
to global warming through increased exportation of U.S. fossil
fuel supplies.
Additionally,
differences
in national policies regulating
chemical use, artificial fertilizers and seeds from genetically
modified organisms (GMOs)
have yielded an agreement that
encourages minimal protection.

PHOTO BY KRIS KRÜG FOR POPTECH (FLICKRCC)

Alysson Muotri, of the University of California San Diego
Department of Pediatrics, is using teeth analysis to identify
gene abnormalities in children with autism, even in cases
with no previous known genetic cause.
The nonprofit Public Citizen
points out that existing U.S. regulation of pesticide and GMO
labeling on packaging could be
challenged in the international
court as “trade barriers.” Another
point of contention is the distinct
advantage given to foreign corporations under the current TPP
model. Overseas firms would be
able to sue the U.S. government
over new policies that disrupt
the company’s “expectations.”
Perhaps more troubling is
what’s not  included in the document, which fails to mention how it will protect from
over-harvesting of limited natural resources. Green groups
point out that, while the TPP
accounts for nearly a third of
global fish harvest, there are no
provisions to protect against
overfishing. The draft also barely
mentions enforceable safeguards
of endangered species products,
such as elephant ivory.
Yet another issue critics say
is woefully ignored is social justice. With free-trade opening up,
even more American jobs would
be sent overseas to reduce costs.

Economists estimate that 5 million U.S. jobs could shift oversees under the TPP, resulting in
serious pay cuts for American
workers. Meanwhile, the richest
10 percent would profit at even
higher rates, adding to an already
drastic U.S. wealth inequality.
Clearly, the current draft of
the TPP agreement needs a lot
of work before Congress should
even consider it. Those opposed
to the current version of the
TPP can voice their dissatisfaction by signing onto the Stop
the Trans-Pacific Partnership
petition on MoveOn.org, or by
urging your representatives in
Congress to vote against it altogether.
Contacts: TPP Page, https://
ustr.gov/tpp; Public Citizen,
www.citizen.org; MoveOn.org’s
Stop the Trans-Pacific Partnership Petition, petitions.moveon.
org/sign/stop-the-trans-pacific.
EarthTalk is produced by Doug
Moss and Roddy Scheer and is a
registered trademark of Earth Action Network Inc. Email questions
to earthtalk@emagazine.com.

Brain Teasers

CLUES ACROSS
1. Engine additive
4. Soluble ribonucleic
acid
8. Subdue
10. One long, three short
11. Morally bad
12. With collapsible shelter
13. Central church parts
15. Summer shoes
16. Intestinal
17. Transgressors
18. Meeting expectations
21. Clutch
22. Autonomic nervous
system
23. What you can repeat
immediately after
perceiving it
24. Favorite summer
sandwich
25. An accountant
certified by the state
26. Cologne
27. Norma Jean Baker
34. Galaxies
35. Bluish greens
36. Detected
37. Having 3 dimensions
38. Made level
39. The destroyer (Hindu)
40. Uncovered
41. Ooze slowly
42. Aerie
43. Point midway between
S and SE
CLUES DOWN
1. Having beautiful
natural views
2. Fanafuti is the capital
3. Shrub used for hedges
4. Polishing tools
5. Slow down
6. Christmas carols
7. & & &
9. Sound of sheep or goat
10. A long flag, often
tapering
12. Atomic #73
14. Schilling (abbr.)
15. Female sibling

17. Long sandwich
19. In a way, necessitated
20. Mayan people of SW
Guatemala
23. Cleaned up
24. Prohibit
25. Upright cupboard
26. Cyclone center
27. Metric linear units
28. Young male
29. Securities market
30. City across from
Dusseldorf
31. Animal disease
32. Mount of __ east of
Jerusalem
33. Get free

34. Variable stars
36. One point N of NE

January 7 Solution

Sudoku

January 7 Solution

retirement rehabilitation healthcare
www.noblehorizons.org 860-435-9851
17 Cobble Road, Salisbury, CT 06068

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

ONE STOP Continued from Page
Heady-Amara said, but, “It is also
fulfilling.”
It is also a brand new position.
One of the frequent challenges
Heady-Amara faces is lack of public transportation.
Another is that many women
need to update their skills as they
haven’t worked outside of the
home for a while. Other women
may be looking to change their
careers. These challenges apply
to men, as well.
Federally- and state-funded
Dutchess One Stop has its main
office in Poughkeepsie, yet counselors often venture out into the
surrounding community to reach
clients.
Computer training is a part of
the program. Skills as simple as
attaching a resume to an e-mail
are taught.
Many times people just need to
identify their existing skills and
figure out where such skills are
needed, said Heady-Amara.
There is also financial assistance available for those seeking
ongoing adult education. Such
training covers a wide array of
professional skills, including
learning Microsoft Word.

YEAR IN REVIEW Continued from Page

A1

PHOTO BY JUDITH O’HARA BALFE

Meghan Heady-Amara visited
the Millbrook Library recently, where she met one-on-one
with clients to discuss job
searching, resume and cover
letter writing and skill assessment. Heady-Amara is part of
the Dutchess One Stop program, through which career
counselors visit 12 libraries
in Dutchess County.
Schedules of Dutchess One
Stop workshops may be found
at area libraries or by checking
out Dutchess One Stop on the
Internet.

Got news?
Email news and photos to editor@millertonnews.com

FLAG Continued from Page

A1

Inn (located near Bash Bish Falls).
When the Inn burned down to
the ground on Sept. 18, 1918, Jean
Pierre August Dalmas — headwaiter of the Inn at the time —
worked his courage and climbed
onto the roof to save the flag.
After the fire, Dalmas relocated with his family, and the flag, to
Valdese, N.C., where every Fourth
of July he proudly displayed his
flag. The flag remained with the
Dalmas family ever since.
Last December, Dalmas’s
grandson, Pierre, reached out to
Blue for more information on the
fire that devastated the Bash Bish
Inn. This is when Blue learned of
the existence of the flag, and over
some conversations Pierre agreed
that the flag should return to its
hometown. The flag was mailed
this spring, and is currently in the
possession of Blue.
A historian’s love
Historian by profession, Howard Blue authors the Copake History Facebook page. He has lived
in Copake about a dozen years,
he said.
His attachment to the town
and the importance of history led
him to start the Facebook page to
share stories of Copake’s past. He
found that Copake holds a fascinating history, he said.
“We don’t protect our history
and historical artifacts sufficiently,” he said.
Efforts to conserve historical
landmarks and period pieces in
this quaint town are not common,
said Blue.
Most recently, in October,
there was an old inn building
demolished, which he said was
sad for him to watch. With the
demolition of that inn, Blue said
he worries that Copake’s Railroad
Depot may have a similar fate.
“There is no effort to save it.
It could be turned into a tourist
center or a museum,” he said.
But with the restoration and

conservation of a clock tower
that stands in the center of town
there is hope for future projects
to save historical landmarks.
That project, he said, proved
the community’s commitment to
preserve its most prized artifacts.
“I love seeing what the community does to protect history,”
Blue said.
He also said that the flag is
a symbol that represents the
town’s tourism industry, and
that its display would also represent the pride the town has in
its history.
Future plans for a
historic flag
Blue has already contacted a
textile expert who suggested the
flag be conserved to maintain its
authentic look.
“The flag would not be able to
be flown again,” he said.
The cost to do so is estimated
to be around $11,000.
Notable town figures also involved in this project are Jeanne
Mettler and Russ Davis — who
were involved with the fundraising for the clock tower revival
project.
Where the flag is to be displayed is yet to be decided by the
project’s committee, but some
ideas have already been tossed
around: historical societies in the
proximity of Copake; the Roeliff
Jansen Community Library; a
recreation building in Copake;
and in nearby towns or villages
such as Millerton.
The idea would be to display
the flag periodically in different
places for an allotted amount of
time, and for its grand “welcome
home” to display it near its original site. Blue said he hopes the
Dalmas family will be able to
make it to the flag’s 21st century
debut.
To learn more about the
project contact Howard Blue at
memrevs@gmail.com.

the town. The fire district, meanwhile, said the town couldn’t
document why it was charging
the district $5,500 annually for
hydrant use.
The Dutchess County Republican Party tried to knock Legislator Michael Kelsey, faced with
child molestation charges, off the
Sept. 10 primary ballot. Efforts to
do so did not succeed.
Thousands flocked to The
Wassaic Project arts festival in the
hamlet of Wassaic. The multi-disciplinary arts initiative was held
from Friday, July 31, to Sunday,
Aug. 2.
The Millbrook Horse Trials
were held at Coole Park Farm.
The equestrian event is often referred to as a “warm up” for the
Olympics.
Webutuck Director of Facilities Mark Loundsbury, 57, died
suddenly at his home on Saturday,
Aug. 1.
Amenia’s Connie Mack baseball team finished its season with
a 19-4 record and a championship
title.
Zack Tuke, 16, and Lucian
Rex Alexander-Roy, 11, won the
NorthEast-Millerton Library’s
Every Hero has a Story writing
contest. The two submitted works
of fiction, which were selected
as winners by three local judges.
The North East Town Board
announced it was looking for a
new highway garage and Town
Hall. The board informed the
public that it was in talks with
the owner of Dutchess County
Diesels to buy that property and
convert it into the necessary
buildings. The asking price for
Dutchess County Diesels was
$1.75 million; the total project
cost was estimated at more than
$3 million.
More than 130 runners attended the annual Erin Shanley
Memorial 5K in Pine Plains on
Sunday, Aug. 16.
The Painted Peach opened in
Millbrook, offering artwork, revived furniture and home decor,
as well as coffee, tea and tasty
treats for shoppers to enjoy.
Legislator Michael Kelsey
claimed diminished mental capacity — showing a lack of criminal responsibility due to mental
health issues — in the sex charges
filed against him.
Riley’s Furniture and Flooring
in Millerton celebrated 30 years
in business.
Mimi Ramos opened Camp, a
mobile clothing store, in front of
No. 9 restaurant and inn in Millerton.
Seymour Smith Intermediate
School Principal Julie Roberts
resigned from the Pine Plains
Central School District. She accepted a position as principal at
Millbrook High School.
September
Concerns were raised about
a proposed solar farm at the defunct North East Landfill, where
BQ Energy of Poughkeepsie proposed installing solar arrays.
Linda and Larry Marrish, the
former owners of The Pond restaurant in Ancramdale, returned
to run the business.
Amenia residents and Town
Board members resisted the
MTA’s proposal to install an 180foot monopole just north of the
Wassaic Metro-North railroad
station.
The fifth annual Artisans Fair
was held in Millerton on Sept. 4

A1

and 5, on the front lawn of No. 9
inn and restaurant.
The Kicking Cancer Buzzsaw
Invitational golf tournament,
founded in honor of the late Bill
Pederson, was held on Friday,
Sept. 25, at Undermountain Golf
Course.
The Orvis Game Fair and
Country Sporting Weekend was
held at the Sandanona Shooting
Grounds in Millbrook — the oldest permitted shooting preserve
in the country.
The Amenia Fish and Game
Association Inc. filed an Article
78 petition again town- and Silo
Ridge Field Club-related agencies. The club protested Silo
Ridge’s plans for several houses
at the edge of one of its shooting
ranges.
Judith O’Hara Balfe joined The
Millerton News as its newest reporter for the town of Washington and the village of Millbrook.
The annual Millbrook Community Day was held throughout
the village, letting residents and
visitors alike check out the best
that Millbrook has to offer.
North Elm Home Furnishings
opened its doors in Millerton,
selling new, vintage and antique
furniture.
The North East Community
Center (NECC) celebrated its
25th anniversary with a barn
party on Silver Mountain. Proceeds from the fundraiser were
earmarked for NECC programs,
which benefit residents living
throughout the Harlem Valley.
Indian Rock Schoolhouse in
Amenia celebrated Community
Day at the schoolhouse grounds
on Mygatt Road on Saturday,
Sept. 19.
The next day, Sunday, Sept.
20, the Amenia Lions Club held
its third annual car show at the
Maplebrook School. Nearly 60
car aficionados participated in
the event.
Following a brief stint at Millbrook High School, Julie Roberts
returned to the Pine Plains Central School District as principal
of Seymour Smith.
October
Caroline Hernandez Pidala
joined the staff of Millbrook High
School as its newest principal, replacing Julie Roberts.
Millerton held Fall for Art,
which highlighted local artists
and provided exhibition space
throughout the village.
The Pine Plains FFA held its
annual Fall Festival — bringing all things agriculture to the
school grounds and local community. There was a parade on
Saturday, Oct. 10, with a sundry
of events scheduled that Friday
and Saturday.
The Blue Barn B&B opened in
Millbrook. The B&B replaced the
former Cat in Your Lap Bed and
Breakfast, which had been in the
area since the ‘70s.
The Antler Club sought a zoning change in the town of Pine
Plains. The Antler Club is a member-owned not-for-profit corporation owning 10.5 acres on the
western shore of Stissing Lake.
The Webutuck Warriors varsity field hockey team was named
division champs following a very
successful season.
Webutuck held its annual
Community Day on Saturday,
Oct. 17.
The Inn at Pine Plains opened
its doors on Route 199 on Oct.

Birds in 2015:

Curiouser and curiouser
By FRED BAUMGARTEN
Special to The Millerton News

The year just ended may go
down in (natural) history as the
Year of the Rare Bird. And I’m not
talking about the undercooked
turkey you had for Christmas.
During the month of December alone, a western tanager
was hanging out in New Haven,
American white pelicans were aswimming in Old Saybrook and
an ash-throated flycatcher was
catching flies in Montauk, N.Y.
These birds are many, many miles
from where they naturally occur
at this time of year — or any time
of year, for that matter.
As its name implies, the western tanager’s home range does not
cross east of the Mississippi. Same
for the ash-throated flycatcher, a
bird of the arid Southwest. And
while the flycatcher is a fairly

drab species, the tanager male
(including the New Haven bird) is
a sunny yellow with a red-orange
head. White pelicans, among the
largest North American birds,
come a little closer to us, to the
Midwest and South.
I had the chance to chase two
of these rarities last month —a
behavior the English call “twitching.” On Christmas Day I visited
the Shawangunk Grasslands National Wildlife Refuge in Walkill,
N.Y., following reports of a gyrfalcon that had returned to the
area for the second time in the
year. This location, I should add,
is little more than an hour from
the Northwest Corner.
The “gyr” is the largest and
most powerful falcon in the
world. Its natural habitat is the
Arctic tundra. Some have a white
plumage, others gray. Thanks to
email, a birder’s best friend, I was

able to locate the bird among a
gaggle of gazers a short distance
from the refuge, perched on a
tree overlooking a farm field.
“Life bird” for me — the first I
have ever seen.
Only two weekends earlier, I
had made a similar trip to Brooklyn’s Prospect Park to see what
may be the ultimate celebrity
bird: a male painted bunting that
has leisurely lingered in the park
since the beginning of December.
Talk about a stunner! This is a
rainbow bird, with plumage of
lime green, yellow, purple and
red. This wanderer from the
Deep South feeds obligingly in
full view of gawking multitudes,
astride one of the park’s many
footpaths.
The inevitable questions that
occur are: How did these birds
get here? What will happen to
them? Unfortunately, it’s hard to

know for sure, but it’s difficult to
rule out climate change — or at
least the incredibly un-winter we
have had so far.
Birds do get lost or carried
off by weather systems far more
than most people realize; the
search for rarities (also known
as “accidentals” or “vagrants”)
keeps a lot of birders on their
toes. The warmer temperatures
may make it far easier for these
birds to wander farther north
and east, and stay longer, than
would otherwise be possible.
As to what will happen, the
possibilities include birds staying long-term, as long as food
is plentiful; birds finding their
way back to their normal home
ranges; and birds perishing, if
the weather turns harsh, or at
the hands (claws) of predators.
What will 2016 bring? Stay
tuned!

15. The inn is located in the former Paige’s Place day care, which
closed earlier in the year.
Kent, Conn., resident Randy Miles was convicted of the
hit-and-run that left Copake
resident Concetta Eastman
dead. The accident occurred on
Bog Hollow Road in Wassaic.
November
The Millbrook community
voted in favor of the library’s 414
public referendum vote, which
increased its public funding from
$100,000 to $184,000.
The Pine Plains Bombers second-seeded varsity field hockey
team defeated the Webutuck Warriors in overtime at the Section 9
finals. The final score was 1-0.
The town of North East renewed its $180,000 contract for
ambulance coverage with Northern Dutchess Paramedics, for the
same terms as the original contract.
The Sunday in the Country
Food Drive struggled for donations for its Thanksgiving dinner
baskets, which provide meals to
hundreds of families in need during the holidays.
Veterans Day observances
were held throughout the region in recognition of those who
served in the Armed Forces.
Nooch’s Bar and Grill opened
in Millbrook. The restaurant is
located on Church Street in the
village.
The Millbrook Blazers varsity
volleyball team was crowned as
Class C champions. The team beat
Pawling for the finals at a match
held in East Fishkill.
Counterfeit $100 bills were
passed throughout Millerton, as
well in other communities in the
Hudson Valley. Oblong Books &
Music, Taro’s, The Moviehouse
and Irving Farm Coffee Roasters were among the businesses
handed the bogus bills.
Merritt Bookstore in Millbrook changed hands. Alison
Meyer, who had owned the store
with her husband Scott, sold it to
Kira Wizner.
The Millbrook Blazers girls
varsity volleyball team lost its bid
for the state title, falling to Eden
in the championship game.
December
Millerton News reporter Ga-

briel Napoleon announced that he
would be leaving the paper for a
marketing job.
The Millerton Fire Company
held its annual Parade of Lights,
with floats and firetrucks from
around the region.
Monte’s Health Nut Hut
opened its doors at 61 Mechanic
Street in Amenia, next to Monte’s
Local Kitchen and Tap Room.
Pine Plains held its annual
Decorating Day and Parade of
Lights to welcome in the holidays.
Grand Marshall Bill Boyles, who
helped establish the event, was
honored.
The towns of Amenia, North
East, Pine Plains and Washington all adopted their municipal
budgets.
Millbrook School Athletic Director Edward Allen, 32, died in
a car accident on Dec. 5. His two
daughters were also injured in the
crash, but they survived.
Millerton’s Sandy Berger, who
went on to work for the Clinton
administration, passed away on
Dec. 2 in Washington, D.C.
Three area restaurants closed
or planned to close: No. 9 in Millerton, McDonald’s in Millerton
and Pastorale in Lakeville, Conn.
Deuel’s Hardware in Pine
Plains held a liquidation sale.
Owner Joan Taylor announced
she wanted to retire and close the
store, which was founded in the
early 1990s.
Millbrook held its annual Parade of Lights,, with more than
50 floats. Millbrook also held its
first, First Saturday; the event
was sponsored by the business
association as a way to promote
holiday shopping and activities.
The Pine Plains Free Library
building sale was completed. The
$1 million purchase took more
than three years to finalize.
The village of Millerton held
a holiday celebration, with a free
showing of “It’s a Wonderful Life,”
horse-drawn carriage rides and
an appearance by Santa.
Amenia celebrated Holiday of
Lights, with activities including
a tree lighting, parade, caroling,
pictures with Santa and a dance
performance.
The village of Millbrook held
its annual menorah lighting in
honor of Hanukkah.

MILLERTON IN BRIEF
Minion madness

Out of school early and
need something to do as a
family? Stop by and see the
“Despicable Me” minions in
their movie spinoff at the
NorthEast-Millerton Library
Annex on Friday, Jan. 15, from
3 to 4:40 p.m.
The Annex is located at 28
Century Blvd.

Crafts and games will be
available for young children
in another room. Snacks and
beverages will be provided.
Children 10 and younger
must be accompanied by an
adult who stays to watch the
film.
For more information call
the library at 518-789-3340.

The art of Alexander Shundi
Amenia artist Alexander
Shundi will give a gallery
talk at an opening reception
on Saturday, Jan. 16, at the
Moviehouse Studio Gallery,
48 Main St. The gallery talk
will take place from 5 to 6 p.m.
The reception will be from 6
to 7 p.m.

Light refreshments will be
served. All are welcome.
The exhibition will focus
on paintings along with a collection of collages, accompanied by poems written by
Shundi in English or Italian,
with the accompanied translations.

Got news?

Email news and photos to editor@millertonnews.com

derful Thing
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A10

Jan 21st-24th

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7:00-8:00 40% off Yarn only
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All cascade yarns 40% off for entire sale
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Mon.-Sat. 9:30 - 5:00; Sun. 12:00 - 4:00

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

COMPASS
Your Guide to Tri-State Events

A11

Jan. 14 - Jan. 20, 2016

THEATER: MARSDEN EPWORTH
‘The Music Man’

All It Takes Is Music, a Man and a Miracle

W

e learn from the
start that Professor Harold Hill is
a scoundrel. He gives traveling salesmen a bad name,
one of that tribe aboard a
train rattling through the
state of Iowa complains. Hill
comes to a town, creates
a boys’ band, sells instruments and uniforms and
skips before anyone discovers he knows nothing about
music.
And so Meredith Willson’s 1957 Tony Award-winning musical (beating out
the ground-breaking and
powerful “West Side Story”
for heaven’s sake) about
midwestern, small-town life
opens with the memorable
talk-song, “Rock Island,”
and a coach-full of salesmen
bouncing across the landscape, wondering where
their next dollar is coming
from.
Professor Hill knows,
of course. He’s heading for
River City, a town with lots
of kids.
This is terrain that director Michael Berkeley has
mined many times before.
A few years back, Berkeley,

a founder of TriArts and its
onetime artistic and music
director, was asked at an
audition how many children he planned to cast. “As
many as we can fit on the
stage,” he said. And once
again, Berkeley, along with
fellow director and choreographer Lori J. Belter, founder
of the Housatonic Musical
Theatre Society, has done
a great job casting a lot of
very well-rehearsed and tremendously engaged young
people (and concomitantly
filling the theater with lots
of parents and friends) for
this spirited and sometimes
touching production.
True to form, the professor, played, alas, by a rather
listless and disheveled
Christopher Gilbert, hits
town, gets word of the new
billiard parlor and arouses
anxieties about wayward
boys shooting pool, and
taking to using words like
“swell” and phrases like “so’s
your old man.”
Stirred by Hill’s promise
of “shimmering trumpets,”
various other instruments
such as euphoniums and
bassoons, as well as braided

uniforms and well-mannered youth, the parents of
River City buy in.
But oh, if only life were
that simple. The town’s
librarian and piano teacher
Marian Paroo, a spinster,
is suspicious. She is also
beautiful. And Amy LeBlanc
performs Willson’s gorgeous, sometimes wistful,
songs like an angel.
So Harold Hill is in
trouble. He may not know
a thing about music, but he
is a master manipulator of
human beings. He knows he
can divert trouble by turning school board members
into a barbershop quartet.
One note on the pitch pipe
and they are off and singing,
wonderfully in this case. But
Marian is another matter.
She has no time for this
fellow, and so the professor
must settle, in song at least,
for “the sadder but wiser
girl,” a Hester seeking “to
win just one more A.”
This is the thing about
“The Music Man.” It is wonderful in every way. Willson
wrote a witty, touching,
funny, clever musical (with,
incidentally, the most

unusual rhyme around:
Marian and carrion), and
the Centerstage production
at Rhinebeck’s Center for
Performing Arts has done
it right. The musical direction by Paul and Joanne
Schubert is spot on. The
sets are simple and charming, the costumes, lovely,
the dancing, good; and the
performances are wry when
they’re supposed to be and
open-hearted when it matters. Jamison Fountain is
fine as 8-year-old Winthrop,
the boy mourning the loss
of his dad; and Cindy Kubik
as Mrs. Paroo, his mother, is
spirited and touching. Most
everyone has done right
by this lovely show about
human nature and miracles
and, of course, romance.
“The Music Man,” based
on a story by Meredith Willson and Franklin Lacey, with
book, music and lyrics by
Willson, runs at The Center
for Performing Arts at Rhinebeck through Jan. 31. For
tickets and information, go
to www.centerforperformingarts.org or call 845-876-3080.

ART SCENE: MARSDEN EPWORTH

A Varied and
Entertaining Show

I

t’s called a Winter
Warmer, The White
Gallery’s annual exhibit
of varied —very varied
— pieces by 17 artists. It
opened this week with
works by photographers
and painters.
It’s an unusual show.
“Every two weeks it’s
recurated, gallery owner Tino Galluzzo says. “I
add new pieces and move
them around to change it
up. And in a show like this
without a point of view,

you can mix abstract and
traditional work.”
And mix he does.
Most prominent on entering the gallery is Avery
Danziger’s very large and
starlit photograph of Jockey’s Ridge in North Carolina in the middle of the
night. The star streaks and
the glowing horizon speak
of a lengthy and expert
exposure. It’s a beautiful
scene.
Continued on next page

PHOTO BY JORDAN FEAST

Janet Iffland, “Mt Pleasant Farm,”
Acrylic on Canvas, 30x40.

Hosted by The Hotchkiss Class of 2019

Community Skating Party

FREE Sunday, January 17, 1-3 p.m.

Children must
be accompanied
by an adult

Schmidt Rink at The Hotchkiss School

Arts & Entertainment
James Barron Art
James Barron Art / Kent is pleased to announce
a group exhibition entitled, “Winter Solstice / Little Sun,” honoring the achievement of Olafur
Eliasson’s Little Sun during the winter solstice, the sun’s low ebb.
Works will include paintings, drawings, and photographs by:
Angela Dufresne
Beverly Pepper
Cameron Martin
Cy Twombly
Dawn Clements
Jacob Kassay
James Siena

Jeannette Montgomery Barron
Jose Lerma
Jules Olitski
Kenneth Noland
Little Sun
Lynn Davis
Margherita Marchioni

Gallery Hours:

ACCLAIMED PHOTOGRAPHS & ACCOMPANYING BOOK

19 December - 6 March

TREMAINE GALLERY: JAN. 23 - MARCH 6
RECEPTION: JANUARY 23, 4 - 6 P.M.

Saturday, January 30 ~ 7:00 p.m.

www.jamesbarronart.com
info@jamesbarronart.com

free & open to the public

Leonel Morales, Spanish pianist
PERFORMING WORKS BY BEETHOVEN,
RACHMANINOV, AND STRAVINSKY

Martine Bedin
Roberto Caracciolo
Ralph Gibson
Shirana Shahbazi
Sol LeWitt
Tristano di Robilant
Yun-Fei Ji

4 Fulling Lane Kent, CT 06757

HOTCHKISS.ORG/ARTS
THE OLDEST LIVING THINGS IN THE WORLD

MOVIE: PATRICK L. SULLIVAN
‘Concussion’

A Serious Matter
Needing Better
Treatment

J

ust in time for the
pro football playoffs
comes Peter Landesman’s “Concussion,”
starring Will Smith as Dr.
Bennet Omalu, a pathologist who identified
what is now known as
chronic traumatic encephalopathy in National
Football League players.
Omalu, a Nigerian,
has an uphill battle
with his coworkers and
colleagues, with the immensely powerful NFL
and with resentful fans.
The film starts promisingly enough, with
David Morse playing the
increasingly disturbed
Mike Webster, center for
the legendary Pittsburgh
Steelers teams of the
1970s. 
Webster is living in his
pickup truck, and is so
out of it he is yanking his
own teeth and glueing
them back in his mouth.
He dies, officially, of a
heart attack.
But Omalu orders a
full autopsy and eventually concludes that years
of collisions incurred
playing football had
damaged Webster’s
brain. He finds other
players with similar
conditions, publishes a
paper and that’s when
the trouble starts.
Along the way he
meets a young woman
from Kenya, falls in love,
gets married and starts
to build a house.
And the NFL pushes
back. 
Omalu’s boss is indicted on federal charges for
misusing his office. His
wife is stalked and loses

their first child. Omalu
loses his faith in the
American Dream, and
eventually takes a job in
California.
Only when another
ex-player, Dave Duerson, kills himself and
leaves a note asking that
his brain be examined
for CTE, does the dam
break to some extent,
and Omalu is somewhat
vindicated.
This is all good
material, and should
make for a compelling
film. But “Concussion”
is lifeless. Loose ends
abound. Is Prema OMalu
(Gugu Mbatha-Raw)
really being stalked by a
mysterious car, or is she
being paranoid? And
is that really enough to
cause problems with her
pregnancy?
Are the Feds acting
as proxies for the NFL?
Are the nasty phone calls
Omalu receives the work
of conspirators or of
individual nut cases? We
don’t know — and if
the film moved faster it
wouldn’t matter. But if a
film has a slow, deliberate pace, it better explain
everything — because
the audience has the
leisure time to wonder.
The net effect is,
ultimately, a dull and
somewhat preachy film.
The issue of concussions is a serious one. It
deserves a more forceful
treatment than this.
“Concussion” is rated
PG-13 for thematic
material including some
disturbing images, and
language.

Winter Solstice / Little Sun

Saturday & Sunday / 11-5
& by appointment

RACHEL SUSSMAN

PHOTO BY MELINDA SUE GORDON - © 2015 COLUMBIA PICTURES

Peter Landesman and Will Smith in Concussion.

ALL ARE WELCOME!

At The
Movies
To advertise your upcoming
event under the “At The Movies”
banner of Compass, email
advertising@lakevillejournal.com.

Now Showing

1/15, 16, 17, 19, 20, 21
“REVENANT” R 7PM
“ CAROL” R 7PM
CLOSED MONDAYS
354 Main St., Winsted
354 Main St. Winsted Ct 06098
1-860-379-5108 • www.gilsoncafecinema.com
Doors open at 6 p.m. • 21 Years & Older

SAVE THE DATE:
February 12, 7 p.m.
Hotchkiss Concert Series — QUINK,
DUTCH VOCAL ENSEMBLE WITH FABIO &
GISELE WITKOWSKI, PIANO. Works by
English Romantic composers, Clara
Schumann, and Johannes Brahms.
February 19 - 21
Hotchkiss
Dramatic
Association
- Measure for Measure by William
Shakespeare. Walker Auditorium. (Tickets
are $10, $5 for students and senior citizens.
Cash or check only. Phone 860-435-3203
or buy at the door.)

The Hotchkiss School | 11 Interlaken Road, Lakeville, ct | 860.435.4423 | hotchkiss.org/arts

Perles

A12

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

TELEVISION: DARRYL GANGLOFF
‘Making a Murderer’

TRI-CORNER CALENDAR
THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL • THE MILLERTON NEWS • THE WINSTED JOURNAL

Hubris and a Flawed
Auditions
Justice System

I

spent New Year’s Day
binge-watching “Making
a Murderer” on Netflix.
Every time the credits rolled
on an episode of the 10part documentary series,
I watched the next one. By
the time it was over, I was
overwhelmed by anger,
frustration, sadness and the
desire to share this series
with others.
The documentary follows
Steven Avery, a Wisconsin
man who spent 18 years
in prison for a rape he did
not commit. DNA evidence
led to his exoneration in
2003, when he became a
free man. In 2005, while
filing a $36 million lawsuit
against Manitowoc County
for wrongful imprisonment,
he was charged with the
murder of Teresa Halbach,
a photographer who visited
the Avery family’s salvage
yard to photograph a minivan for Auto Trader magazine. Avery’s 16-year-old
nephew, Brendan Dassey,
was also charged with participating in the murder.
“Making a Murderer,”
which was filmed over a
period of 10 years, is filled
with courtroom footage,
recorded phone calls from
prison and intimate interviews with the Avery family.
Filmmakers Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos read
about Avery’s case in The
New York Times in November 2005 and headed out
to Wisconsin to attend his
preliminary hearing. They
ultimately moved there to
follow every development
as it occurred in real time.
They followed the trials of
Avery and Dassey, as well
as the aftermath of the
verdicts. Even though the
verdicts are a decade old, I
will avoid stating them here.
For those of you who don’t
know how the story unfolds,
hearing the juries reach
their decisions is incredibly
powerful.
If there wasn’t undeniable proof that these trials
occurred, I would swear
that “Making a Murderer”
was a scripted, serialized
courtroom drama. There are
shocking and heartbreaking

“Our question
going in was
never about guilt
or innocence or
about trying to
solve this crime.”
twists and turns throughout
every hour-long episode
that will leave viewers
asking countless questions:
Why did the Manitowoc
County sheriff ’s department
participate in the murder
investigation, despite the
clear conflict of interest?
Did the police plant evidence to frame Avery? Was
Dassey’s confession coerced?
“Our question going in
was never about guilt or
innocence or about trying
to solve this crime. It was really an exploration into the
system,” Demos told CBS
News. This is an important
distinction to make. As you
watch “Making a Murderer,”
you’ll likely find yourself
attempting to assign guilt
or innocence to Avery and
Dassey. Perhaps you’ll question whether the series is
biased toward Avery, since
it focuses so much on his
family. Former Wisconsin
state prosecutor Ken Kratz
told People magazine that
the series left out key pieces
of evidence;  in response,
Ricciardi made a statement
to The Wrap, a website, that
“we stand by the project
we did. It is thorough. It is
accurate. It is fair. That is
why it took us 10 years to
produce it.”
In any case, “Making a
Murderer” shows a flawed
legal system. Dean Strang,
a sensible defense lawyer
for Avery, says it best: “Most
of what ails our criminal
justice system lies in unwarranted certitude on the part
of police officers and prosecutors and defense lawyers
and judges and jurors that
they’re getting it right. That
they are simply right. Just a
tragic lack of humility of everyone who participates in
our criminal justice system.”

… Winter Warmer
Continued from previous page
Photographer Tom
Zetterstrom is a newcomer
to the gallery and his trees
in black and white are very
fine.
Nearby hangs a lovely
painted abstract by Sarah
Martinez: patches of lime
and purple and pink on a
white back.
And further, “Mount
Pleasant,” a traditional red
barn in the snow painted
by Janet Iffland. “We like
her barns and landscapes,”
Galluzzo said, referring to
himself and his wife Susan,
co-owner of the gallery.
For simplicity and serenity, Francis Ashforth’s
“Tidal Inlet 5” in sand and
pale blue is arresting. And
Deborah Losada’s “Provisional Visibility,” a sleakly
defined red bar dissolving
into smoke always impresses viewers, Galluzzo said.
One year, shortly after
opening the gallery, Galluzzo said, he closed it for the
winter. “It bothered me,” he
said. “Never again. This is a

community gallery. People
come in to get warm. They
give me feedback. It’s good.”
The White Gallery, located in Lakeville opposite the
Post Office on Main Street, is
open weekends from 11 a.m.
to 5 p.m. For information,
call 860-435-1029.

We’ve introduced

The Sharon Playhouse, 49 Amenia Road, Sharon, CT, 860-3647469, www.sharonplayhouse.
org Auditions for 2016 season,
by appointment only, Feb 27,
callbacks, Feb 28. Email info@
sharonplayhouse.org or call and
speak to Wendy to schedule.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Call
for artists, Elected Artists,
drop-off, Jan 25; The Art of the
Flower, drop-off, Jan 25. For
all info. go to westhartfordart.
org/call-for-artists.

Books
The White Hart, 15 Undermountain Road, Salisbury, CT,
860-435-0030, www.whitehartinn.com The White Hart
speaker series: Helen Klein
Ross “What Was Mine,” Jan
16, 4-5 pm.

Galleries
The M Studio Gallery, 48 Main
Street, Millerton, NY 12546,
518-789-3408, www.themoviehouse.net The Art of Alexander
Shundi, a collection of collages
accompanied by poems, Jan
16-April 14, gallery talk, Jan 16,
5-6 pm, reception, 6-7 pm.
Morrison Gallery, 25 North
Main Street, Kent, CT, morrisongallery.com Wolf Kahn,
pastels, through Jan 31.
Noble Horizons, 17 Cobble
Road, Salisbury, CT, 860-4359851, www.noblehorizons.
org Housatonic Camera Club
exhibit of new works, Jan 15Feb 14, opening reception, Jan
15, 5-7 pm.
Ober Gallery, 10 North Main
Street, Kent, CT, 860-927-5030,
www.obergallery.com Leonid
Sokov, sculpture and drawings, through Feb 28; Robert
Andrew Parker and Geoffrey
Parker, Father and Son, paintings, prints and sculpture,
through May 1.
Sharon Historical Society
& Museum, 18 Main Street,
Sharon, CT, 860-364-5688,
sharonhist.org Solo exhibition
of photographs by Jonathan
Doster, Impressions of China The Land, People and Culture,
Jan 16-March 4, opening
reception, Jan 16, 5-7 pm.
Sohn Fine Art Gallery, 69
Church Street, Lenox, MA, 413551-7353, www.sohnfineart.
com Muse, through January.
West Hartford Art League
37 Buena Vista Road, West
Hartford, CT, 860-231-8019,
westhartfordart.org Instagram 2016, through Jan 24.
The White Gallery, 344 Main
St, Lakeville, CT, 860-4351029, www.thewhitegalleryart.com 2016 Winter Warmer
exhibition, through Mar 31,
weekends.
Window into the World of Art
Gallery, 716 Main Street, Winsted, CT, 203-243-3069, win-

PHOTO: MARSDEN EPWORTH

THEATER

Sharon Playhouse Opens New Year

S

haron Playhouse
began the new year
last weekend with
audition workshops led by
the theater’s artistic director, John Simpkins. Beside
Simpkins, Pippa Clark,
6, of Sharon, who sang
“Amazing Grace,” watched

dowworldart.com Lara Troisi,
paintings, Some Thoughts on
Life, opening reception, Jan
16, 4-7 pm.

Movies
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net
Salisbury Forum, documentary “The Millionaires’ Unit,” Jan
17, 11:15 am. Free.

Music
Bardavon, 35 Market Street,
Poughkeepsie, NY, 845-473-2072,
www.bardavon.org Met Opera
Live in HD: Bizet’s “Les Pêcheurs
de Perles,” Jan 16, 1 pm.
Club Helsinki Hudson, 405
Columbia St., Hudson, NY,
518-8284800, helsinkihudson.
com Darlingside, Jan 14, 8 pm;
Elvis Birthday Bashwith the
Lustre Kings, Jan 15, 9 pm;
Bindlestiff Family Cirkus Cabin Fever Cabaret, Jan 16, 9 pm;
Adrien Reju with Elijah Wolf,
Jan 21, 8 pm.
Infinity Music Hall & Bistro,
8232 Route 44, Norfolk, CT,
866-666-6306, www.infinityhall.com Kathy Mattea, Jan 14, 8
pm; Johnny A, Jan 15, 8 pm; The
Spirit of Johnny Cash, Jan 16, 8
pm; The Steel Wheels, Jan 21,
8 pm.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,

the other young people
perform in this annual
event aimed at preparing
youngsters for the tough
job of auditioning for roles
in musical theater.
Sharon Playhouse opens
the season June 16 with
“Gypsy,” continues with
Great Barrington, MA, 413-5280100, www.mahaiwe.org Met
Opera Live in HD:Bizet’s “Les
Pêcheurs de Perles,” Jan 16, 1
pm, Scott Eyerly’s pre-broadcast opera lecture, 11 am
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net Met
Opera Live in HD: Bizet’s “Les
Pêcheurs de Perles,” Jan 16,
12:55 pm.
Warner Theatre, 68 Main
Street, Torrington, CT, 860-4897180, www.warnertheatre.org
Met Opera Live in HD: Bizet’s
“Les Pecheurs de Perles,” Jan
16, 12:55 pm, pre-opera lecture
by Nunzio DeFilippis, 10:55 am.
The White Gallery, 342 Main
Street, Lakeville, CT, 860-4351029, www.thewhitegalleryart.
com Jazz group No Chordtet,
Jan 16, 7-9 pm.

Theater
The Center for Performing Arts
at Rhinebeck, 661 Route 308,
Rhinebeck, NY, 845- 876-3080,
www.centerforperformingarts.

a yet-to- be-named new
musical July 7; followed
by “Big River,” July 21. “I
Love You, You’re Perfect,
Now Change” opens Aug. 4
and “Quartet” begins Aug.
18. For information, go to
www.sharonplayhouse.org.
— Marsden Epworth
org “The Music Man,” through
Jan 31. Go to website for tickets
and times.
The Ghent Playhouse, 6 Town
Hall Place, Ghent, NY, 518-3926264, www.ghentplayhouse.org
“The Weir,” Jan 22-Feb 7.
Mahaiwe Theatre, 14 Castle St,
Great Barrington, MA, 413528-0100, www.mahaiwe.org
London’s National Theatre in
HD, “Les Liaisons Dangereuses,” Jan 28, 7 pm.
The Moviehouse, 48 Main St,
Millerton, NY, 518-789-3408,
www.themoviehouse.net
London’s National Theatre in
HD, “Les Liasons Dangereuses,”
Jan 28, 7 pm, Feb 7, 1 pm; “As
You Like It,” Feb 25, 7 pm, Feb
28, 1 pm.
TheaterWorks, 233 Pearl Street,
Hartford, CT, 860-527-7838,
theater- workshartford.org
Tom Lenk in “Buyer & Cellar,”
through Feb 14. For tickets and
times go to the website.
For free access to our
calendar, go to our website
at www.tricornernews.com

Dining
A farm to table restaurant in the heart of Amenia
A Monte Family tradition since 1906
from Brooklyn to Montauk to Amenia,
with the newest addition of
Executive Chef, Dafna Mizrahi
Wed.-Fri. 5-10 Sat. 12-10 Sun. 12-8

Bar Open After Hours

3330 Route 343
Amenia, NY 12501
845-789-1818
monteskitchen@gmail.com
www.monteskitchen.com
www.facebook.com/
monteskitchenandtaproom

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

A13

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an AdanCall
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Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
The Winsted
Journal
- www.tcextra.com
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
NewsNews
- The- Winsted
Journal
- www.tricornernews.com

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED

FARM MAINTENANCE POSITION: available
in Amenia. SumASSOCIATE
REGISTRAR:
Remer, temporary
job. 40associate
hours per
treat
center seeking
week. ForOutstanding
details please
call Tom
registrar.
customer
at 845 518-1546.
service,
communication, and

organizational
skills,
familiarity
GOLF
COURSE
LABORERS:
with
Jewish
andseason.
excelneeded
forcustoms,
up coming
lent
computer
skills required.
Call Bill,
860 364-0146.
Email resume and cover letter
to jobs@hazon.org.
MACINTOSH
SUPPORT: Do your
friends call you first when they
DRIVER/MECHANIC:
rubbish
have a problem orforquestion
company.
time.
Must
be
about theirFull
Mac,
iPod,
iPhone,
at
leastor25AppleTV?
years old and
iPad
Canhave
you
translate
techno-speak
into
medical
card.
Random testing.
plain English?
Are to:
you
Please
send resume
P.O.ready
Box
to spend
your workday
enrich426,
East Canaan,
CT 06024.
ing people’s lives while using
the coolestUpApple
technology
DRIVERS:
to $350
per day
on earth?
Drop
us an
email3 and
benefits.
Class
A CDL,
jobs@visionarycomputer.net
years minimum experience. Part
time, with full time opportunity.
PAINTERS
AND
PAINTERS
Weekdays and
weekends.
Local
HELPERS: Pay according to
and
long
distance.
Safe
record.
experience. Own transportation
Team
Judge
Manning
a plus. work.
Monday
- Friday.
Call 518
Horse
Transport, Amenia, NY.
789-4185.
845 373-8700.
PASTORALE BISTRO IN LAKEELECTRICIAN
- MILLBROOK
VILLE, CT: is currently
seeking
SCHOOL:
is seeking
a candian experienced
Line Cook
to add
date
who
has atteam.
least Must
five years
to our
kitchen
have
of
professional
commercial
culinary
background,
ambitious
outlook and
great attitude.
electrical
experience
to join
Clean
& neatPlant
appearance
a plus.
our
Physical
Department.
Pleaseexperience
call 860 435-1011.
HVAC
helpful. Interested candidates should
POOL/RECREATION
DIRECTOR:
submit a resume to Virginia
ConThe North
Recreation
nolly
at 131Canaan
Millbrook
School
Commission
is
looking
for
ReRoad, Millbrook, NY 12545,
sponsible, reliable lifeguardsor
to
gconnolly@millbrook.org
work at town pool for the 2011
845
677-0339
(fax).
summer.
Must
have current

INSTRUCTIONS,
HELP
WANTED
CLASSES

SERVICES OFFERED
SERVICES OFFERED

positionLESSONS:
is part-time
(3 days/
GUITAR
An innovative
week,
some
Saturdays)
with
program
personally
designed
competitive
pay in ayou
positive,
around the music
listenpato.
tient-centric
worktheory,
environment.
Learn technique,
chords
To
apply
or for
more
information:
and
scales
from
an experienced
SharonDentalAssoc@gmail.
college instructor. Explore songcom
or 860
writing
and364-0204.
recording. Electric
and acoustic guitars welcome.
RN
FULL
TIME
- EVENINGS:
Call Jeff at 845 877-3311.
Must work every other weekend & every
other
PRIVATE
LESSONS
IN holiday.
WATERSubstance
Facility in
COLOR: byAbuse
an experienced
Litchfield
Hills.
Experience
painter. $50/2 hours. My place
with
psychiatric
substance
or yours.
And/or /learn
to sell
abuse
treatmenton
preferred
but
you paintings
E-bay. 860
will
train. Will oversee range of
596-4251.
medical-medication issues and
activities
for guest
population.
SAT
TUTOR:
Critical
reading,
Familiarity
with 12
Step
Program
grammar, essay,
SAT
II Literature,
helpful
not required.
We
NY Statebut
Regents,
college applioffer
competitive
salary eduand
cationa essays.
Experienced
benefits
package.
state
cator with
excellentPlease
references.
where
you
saw thisYour
ad and
either
Tri-state
location.
home
or
fax
resume
to 860 927-3515 or
mine.
845 729-3193.
email to communications@hig
hwatchrecovery.com.

DAVID
JAMESCARE:
VALYOU
2016
PROPERTY
Horti- CARPENTER
- PAINTER
culture,
gardening,
and land- HANDYMAN:
Renovation
scape
contracts. Complete
tree,
for homes
and barns.
lawn,
and property
care.Full
203
remodeling
kitchens,
391-1061
/ service;
www.arborartct.
baths,
additions, roofing,
com
(John).
painting, structural repairs.
Historic preservation
and
A1-HOUSEHOLD
ITEMS
care of older
homes.
Long
REMOVED
AND
TRUCKED
list of local
many
AWAY:
fromclientele,
basements,
atreferences.
364-9880
tics,
garages &860
barns.
Insured.
davidvalyou@yahoo.com.
Call
860 364-4653.

HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED

RETAIL SALES POSITION LEARN
NEWSPAPER
BUSIPARTTHE
TIME:
available at
our
NESS
A PAID
INTERNnewlyWITH
expanded
tile and
stone
SHIP:
Qualified
stushowroom
in Shefficollege
eld. Looking
dents
interested and
in learning
for a motivated
friendly
the
ins to
and
of how
a
person
joinouts
our team.
Good
newspaper
works
now
have
communication
skills
- ability
the
opportunityand
to apply
a
to multi-task
basic for
compaid
summer
internship
at The
puter
knowledge
a must.
SatMillerton
News. The internship
urdays required.
Will train
isthe
to last
a total
of eight
weeks.
right
person.
Please
call
The
York Press
Association
413New
297-6940
or e-mail:
lisa(NYPA)
Foundation is offering
rocksolid@roadrunner.com,
$2,500
internship
stipends
to 25
Rock Solid
Marble
and Granite
randomly selected newspapers.
Applicants
in a careeris
THE
TOWNinterested
OF PINE PLAINS:
in community journalism must
accepting applications for the
apply directly to The Millerton
position of truck driver/laborer.
News. Applicants must attend
Applicants
mustthe
have
a CDL
college
during
2016-17
Class B license
valid
for the State
academic
year.
Application
of New
Job will
include
forms
areYork.
available
online
at:
seasonal mowing, operation
www.nynewspapers.com.
Mail
of equipment
and
machinery
completed
forms
to The
Milleras well
a Box
variety
manual
ton
News,asPO
AD, of
Millerton,
tasks
in connection
withFeb.
the
NY
12546
by Monday,
construction,
main15,
2016.For repair
more and
informatenance
of Town
roads,
tion
contact
Richowned
Hotaling
at
highways
and464-6483,
other properties.
NYPA
at 518
email
Applicants must pass physical
editor@millertonnews.com
or
and518
drug
testing. Applications
call
789-4401.
are available from the Highway
Superintendent- during
RECEPTIONIST
PART regular
TIME:
hours ofDental
businessAssociates
at 20 Highway
Sharon
is
seeking
orgaBlvd., Pineenthusiastic,
Plains, NY 12567.
Apnized
& skilled
receptionist
plications
are to be
returned to
with
a dedication
to providing
the Highway
Superintendent
or
excellent
service
in a
mailed tocustomer
the Highway
Superproactive
where
intendentenvironment
at PO Box 955,
Pine
multi-tasking
& prioritization
Plains, NY 12567
by the close
are
essential.
of the
businessResponsible
day on June for
10,
ensuring
positive
patient
2011. TheaTown
of Pine
Plains
experience,
is an E.O.E. efficiently managing front office responsibilities,
patient RESEARCH
scheduling ASSISTANT:
& payment
WHALE
processing.
The right
for NSF funded
Arcticcandidate
Research
will
possess
consistently
program
onathe
Narwhal.posiMust
tive
attitude,
to probbe skilled
onthe
theability
computer,
and
lem-solve
effectively,
computer
good with writing and editing
proficiency
&
a
dedication
to
skills. Part-time position with
excellent communication. Reabout 20 hours. Please call 860
sponsibilities include: answer364-0800 and/or fax resume to
ing inquiries via phone and e860 364-2600.
mail,
booking and maintaining

lifeguard, first aid and CPR certiFLORIST:
florist
fications. Experienced
Hours may vary.
Must
who
can to
work
byevenings
themselves,
be able
work
and
and
handle
all
aspects
of
the
weekends. Applicants should
job
from
largeand
arrangements
email
resume
cover letter
to
small
bouquets.
Please
call
with
references
to Adam
Bunce,
860
397-5161.
North
Canaan Recreation Director, abuncencrecdir@hotmail.
com.
LABORER
- FULL TIME: Town
of North East. Call Bob Stevens
PROGRAM
ASSISTANT: North
518 821-0908.
East Community Center seeks a
part-time
Assistant for
appointment schedules, greetTHE
NORTHProgram
EAST COMMUNITY
FIND
HELP INpatients
AN INSTANT:
our summer
youth
employment
ing & directing
during
CENTER:
Teen
Program
CoorVisit
our
new
web
site www.
program.
Assist
with
Farm
and
care, maintaining confidential
dinator (P/T) at the North East
TriCornerNews.com.
Food education
compatient
information, confirmCommunity
Centerproject,
in Millerton.
plete
enrollment
paperwork.
ing appointments, verification
Plan
and
lead weekend
outings,
Drivers license, clean record
of insurance and collection of
community
enrichment
required. service,
June 15
- August
patient fees, general adminprograms.
Jobatdescription
and
20. Details
www.neccmilistrative support to the team,
details
at
www.neccmillerton.
lerton.org or call Sara at 518
maintaining an organized &
org
or
call
Betsey
at
518
592789-4259.
efficient workspace. The –
1399.
Lakeville Journal
RESEARCH AND PERSONAL
Size: 2 (3.15") x 3"
ASSISTANT: for Doctor, including writing, organizational and
computer skills needed for Property Management and Biological
Studies. Call 860 364-0800.

SERVICES
OFFERED
SCHOOL
BUS DRIVER
- ALLSTAR TRANSPORTATION: Paid
ALL
SMALL
HOME
IMPROVETraining
Starting
Now!
Lakeville
Handyman
Services •
-MENTS:
Region#1
School district.StartHome
• Carpentry
• Painting
payRepairs
rate $15.20.
Immediate
ing • Decks
• Wood
Floors •
openings
for• Tile
school
bus drivers.
Licensed
and Insured
Years
Paid
training
starting• 35
now
to
Experience
• Goodbus
Prices
• I will
get
your school
license.
show
up
and
do
the
job!
Call
NO experience necessary. 20 to
George
30
hours860
per435-6461.
week on average.
Clean driving record required.
CPerfect
A R E TA attendance
K E R AVA I Lbonus,
ABLE:
Young,energetic
and and
very 401
exdental,
life insurance
for
Kperienced
available.person
Apply looking
in person.
a caretaker Farnum
positionRoad.
full time
Lakeville,40
860
or a part time in exchange for
435-0352.
housing. 860 318-1707 or 518
696-5021.
Peter.
SPECIAL
PROSECUTOR
- PART
TIME: Town of North East seeks
CHAIRS
CANED: Hand
or pressed
an experienced
attorney,
accane available.
860 law
824-0899.
cepted
to practice
in New
York State, to render legal serDON’T
SPENDofYOUR
WEEKvice on behalf
the Town
as a
ENDS CLEANING!
Lessen
your
special
prosecutor of
Vehicle
&
chores
during
this
fun
time
of
Traffic Law violations in Town
year.
Leave
the
cleaning
to
me!
Justice Court. Hours: one afterCall Leigh
860 913-4471.
noon
or evening
per month,
subject to court schedule.
HOUSCLEANING,
OFFICE
&
Interested parties are
invited
HOME:
Very
thorough.
Honest
to
submit
a letter
of application
and
to
thereliable.
Town ofGood
Northreferences.
East, Town
Call Ruth, 860-824-0795
or516,
860
Supervisor’s
Office, PO Box
318-1662.NY 12546.
Millerton,

LESSONS AND
INSTRUCTION

HABITAT FORGUITAR
HUMANITY
LESSONS: An innovative
Sprin

program personally designed
around the music you listen to.
Learn technique, theory, chords
and scales from an experienced
college instructor. Explore songwriting and recording. Electric
and acoustic guitars welcome.
Call 845 877-6309.

g Ho
liday

NEWS REPORTER T
AG SAWANTED
LE

SPORTS PRO SHOP AND PAVILION HELP: Responsible person
Full-time
wanted for The Lakeville
to oversee
sportsreporter
pro shop and
pavilion.
Administrative,
Journal.
Includescombenefits.
puter and people skills required.
Please
resumé and writing samples
Seasonal,
Maysend
September.
Weekends
must. Respond
with
toaCynthia
Hochswender
at cynthiah@
resume to scc1985@sbcglobal.
lakevillejournal.com
net.

SUNFISH PARTS: Young, 15
year old, rebuilding a Sunfish,
needs parts. Center board,
rudder, mast etc. Call Orin, 860
435- 9062.

DRIVE YOUR
Anywhere.
DAVE’S
TREE CAR:
SERVICES
AND
NY/CT airports,
business/
FIREWOOD:
25 NY
years
experishopping
trips,
local
trips,
ence,
insured
with
excellent
trains. Reasonable
rates, courier
references.
860 309-2112.
service. 860 364-5950.
DAVID JAMES VALYOU HOUSE
CLEANING
- OURCONVERY
RENOVATION
AND
BEST: Experienced. Thorough,
STRUCTION:
Renovation
& honest. Satisfaction guaranand restoration
homes
and
teed.
Call Dilma of
860
459-4383.
outbuildings. Painting and
handyman
services. 860
435HOUSE
CLEANING:
Depend9799,honest
davidvalyou@yahoo.
able,
and thorough.
com. hours. No job too big
Flexible
or too small. Experienced with
GET
ORGANIZED
2016!
references.
Call 860 IN
459-1878
Simplify
your life today! No
leave message.
project too large or too small.
LAWNS
ETC.:
Extremely
reasonFor fast,
efficient
service,
call
able rates. All phases of lawn
860-364-5338.
care, you pick the day and
time. NoCLEANING:
job too small. Call
860
HOUSE
Experi318-5280.
enced,
mature woman seeks
estate and house cleaning posiMANZ
Extion. 1/2CONSTRUCTION:
to full day in the greater
cavation,
foundations,
heavy
Falls
Village
area. Dependable,
brush removal for property/
trustworthy,
with with
references
fence lines & slopes
boom
available.
Please
call
Laurie
at
mounted brush mower.
203
860
824-0233.
206-8306.

SERVICES OFFERED
APARTMENTS

TAG SALE CLEAN-UP • SAVE
PINE
bedroom.
WalkTHISPLAINS:
AD: Have1truck
- will come
ing help
distance
schools
and
and
haul ittoaway!
860 824village.
Heat,
water, electric
7181,
leave
message.
and garbage removal included.
Non-smoking.
No pets.- $750.
WINDOWS
- WINDOWS
WINOne month’s
security
and referDOWS!
Cleaning
residential
and
ences
required.
518
398-7328.
commercial windows, inside and
out! Call 860 913-4471.
PINE PLAINS: In front of high
school.
1 bedroom,
1 bath,
YARD
WORK:
College students
large kitchen and living room.
available
for
raking,
lawn
mow$750 plus utilities and 1 month’s
ing,
cleanup.
Millerton,
security.
Call Amenia,
845 366-8349.
Millbrook, Lakeville, Sharon 845
373-8832.Above Doctor’s Office,
SHARON:
need quiet individuals. 2 bedroom, 1 bath. Center of town.
HOUSEHOLD
$950
per month, plus utilities.
1st/last GOODS
month’s rent security.
Call 860 364-5814.
FOR THE KITCHEN: Stainless
SHARON:
Extra-large
studio
Steel Traulsen
Refrigerator
• GE
apartment.
Second
floor.Range
Near
Profi
le Electric
Glass Top
hospital.
$800
plus
utilities.
• Granite Counters & Sinks •
References
and Refrigerator.
security. No
White
Kenmore
pets. 860
671-0006.
Good
Condition,
best offer. 860
364-5929.
SHARON: One bedroom, heat
included, second floor, no smoking $875/month. Bosworth Real
APARTMENTS
Estate
860 364-1700.
AMENIA: Two bedroom, deck,
yard. Heat included.
MetroCONDO
FORNear
RENT
North. Walk to village. $875.
845-373-9570.NY CONDOMINMILLERTON,

DOVER PLAINS: 2 bedroom
apartment.
$850/month
inFALLS
VILLAGE:
Room in nice
cludes
heat, hot
trash
home. Shared
bathwater,
and kitchen.
and
lawn maintenance.
Credit
Off street
parking. $120/week.
860 824-0827.
check
required. 845 8779343.

APARTMENTS
SEASONAL
LIME ROCK:
Large, 3 bedroom,
RENTALS
2 bath apartment equipped

with
washer/dryer,
SHARON
WINTERdishwasher.
RENTAL:
$1,200/month plus utilities. Now
Brick
house.
Dining room, livavailable, 860 435-8149.
ing room with fireplace insert,
kitchen with
appliances,
MILLBROOK
VILLAGE:
Beautiful,4
bedrooms,
2 baths,
aff
ordable, well
kept utility
studio,room
one
EAST
CANAAN:FOR
First floor,
three
HOUSES
RENT
with
washer/dryer
and
twonew
bedroom
apartments.and
All
rooms, $625. Second floor, four
garage.
$1,200 Includes
with security
major
appliances.
washLIME
ROCK:
- 3 erdeposit.
rooms,
$750. Small
Heat house
and hot
NowClose
through
April
with
and dryer.
to all
amenibedroom
‚ 1/2 bath
for rent.
Off- ties.
water
included.
Shared
yard,
optional
renewal. 860 364-5019
$630/$990/$1,215/$1,175.
street
parking.
Non-No
smokers
off
-street
parking.
pets.
Call
677-8180.
for845
details.
only! Please call
JWReferences,
at 203 725Non-smokers
only.
1706 or email
MILLERTON: Spacious 1 bedsecurity,
lease.popwoerm@aol.
860 824-5751.
com.
roomOFFICE
apartment.SPACE
Walk to town.
$800/month
includes
heat &
LAKEVILLE: Charming one
FOR
RENT
MILLERTON:
cozy apartment.
2 bedroom hot water, and garbage, utilities
bedroom, 2 bath
Credit check required. 845
cottage for rent,
suitable
for extra.
Convenient
location,
walk
LAKEVILLE: A World of Your
877-9343.
single
or $700
couple.
to
town.
per Available
month,
Own. Immaculate, carpeted
January heat.
1. Propane
includes
Pets OK.fireplace/
Tenant
second
story1 bedroom.
space for Hardoffice
PLAINS:
stoveown
heat,
largeReferences.
yard area, PINE
or retail
with 1/2
bathincluded.
and large
pays
electric.
wood
floors.
Heat
deck,last,
quiet
neighborhood.
storage area.
1,120
ft. Ideal
First,
security.
For appoint$650.
Callsq.518
398Located
one+
mile
Village. References.
central location near Salisbury,
ment,
please
call
860from
435-3023,
7683.
Security
&
references
required.
Millerton and Sharon. Ample
or 413 229-5951.
$850/month plus utilities. Call PINE
parking,
central
A/C,large
$1,100effiper
Nice,
PLAINS:
518
789-3201.
monthapartment
+ utilities.on
Best
& Caval2nd
floor.
ciency
LAKEVILLE: 125 Millerton Road,
Central
laro 860location.
435-2888.$600/month
corner Belgo Road. Park like
SHARON: 4 bedroom, 1.5 bath, includes utilities. 914 474-5176.
setting.
3
large
rooms,plus
washer/dryer, garage. $1,500 845
462-7381 -leave
message.
LAKEVILLE
MAIN
STREET:
aper
kitchen
andutilities.
bath. $1,300
month plus
No pets,
Historic Colonial office building
includes
heating,
snow
plowno smoking. 860 435-9481.
WEST
CORNWALL
1/2
DUPLEX:
has 2 available offices that can
ing, and garden maintenance.
Available
now. 2 or
bedrooms.
be rented together
separately
Wired for cable
and internet,
SHARON:
Charming
cottage References
andmonth
security
deposit
at $250 per
each.
860
separate
garage,
washer/
$800 per month plus
built on water’s edge, over- required.
435-2131.
dryer
on
premises.
No
smoking
looking cascading waterfalls. utilities. 860 672-6048.
building.
1 year minimum.
2/3 bedrooms,
2 baths. 860
Fully
SHARON: Office near hospital,
435-2818
666-4513.
Furnished.or10212
minutes
to train.
1,200 sq. ft. for sale or lease.
Available immediately. Perfect CONDOS
FOR SALE
Available immediately.
Former
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK:
1
&
for weekends $1,100 per month
tenant Nordicare Physical
2plus
bedroom
apartments.
$700
SALE 860
BY OWNER
utilities. Security/ Excellent FOR
Therapy.
567-2435.-LION’S
and
up per required.
month + utilities.
References
860 248- HEAD CONDOMINIUM: 2 bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, living room
Available
immediately.
Please
9933. Please
leave message.
with fireplace, dining area,
call Dan at 860 435-7000 or eterrace. Swimming pool and
mail dmason@kuhnsbrothers.
tennis available. $270,000. Call
com.
860 596-4040.

IUM: 2 Bedroom Condo with
COLEBROOK
APARTMENT
loft
area for rent
in Millerton.
IN COUNTRY
FARM
HOUSE:
Available
January
1, 2016.
Close
2
room
furnished
apartment
to town, yard area, deck & more.
with full bathroom, wood
$1,150 per month plus utilities.
stove (firewood provided),
Call 518 789-3636.
cable and Dish connections,
“closet” kitchen. On 100 acre
property with lake, woods
pool, sauna, trap range,
chickens, dogs, cats, etc.
Hunting/fishing rights to licensed tenant. $650 monthly.
Write: Byrd Farm, Colebrook,
CT 06021 with full biographical
Available
80information.
Main St., Canaan,
CT 06018 • (860)-453-4370 | email: statelineauctions@gmail.com
June 1st.

PARENTS CONSIDER: College
andAPARTMENTS
Secondary School placement. English preparation
AMENIA:
2 bedroom.
$1,000
per
tutoring in
composition,
grammar, vocabulary
and
literature.
month.
All utilities
included.
No
Dary Call
Dumham:
College Counpets.
845 518-6276.
selor and English Faculty of
Berkshire School.
Former
Head
CORNWALL
BRIDGE:
Adjacent
of Indian
Mountain School
to
the Housatonic
Valley and
AsASSOCIATE DIRECTOR/DIRECTOR
Foote School.
860 364-0039.
sociation.
2 bedroom
apartOF ALUMNI PROGRAMMING
ment in a country setting. Pets
welcome. Eat-in kitchen, living
Salisbury School is seeking a professional person with development
room, pantry, bath, large yard
to oversee and execute alumni programming in the
with space for garden. Rental
Preview Hours: Thursday, Friday &experience
Saturday 10-5
arrangement includes cleaning
Development
Office. Responsibilities include event and fundraising
and Sunday from 9am till Sale Start
at the Association.
management of Reunion Weekend and the Fall Classic Golf
DeadlineRent
for the$600/
June 2ND and JuneInitial
3RD issues
Pictures
can
be
viewed
at
auctionzip.com,
month, plus utilities. Please
Tournament, as well as 8-10 local and regional gatherings on an
TH
will6678
be THURSDAY,
call 860 672days. AskMAY
for 26 , at 12 NOON for ALLAuctioneer ID#22549
annual basis. Candidate will play a key role in the volunteer manRegister
for
Online
Bidding
at
Patience. Advertising. Classified Deadline is NOON on Friday,
agement of the school’s alumni governing body and will work to
liveauctioneers.com/state-line-auctions
TH
May 27 . This includes all sections of the newspapers.
develop a targeted young alumni program. Must possess strong
LAKEVILLE: Sunny second
planning
abilities, interpersonal and organization skills, attenOur New TH
Year Sale features contentsevent
of a fine
Sharon
floor apartment
for
rent.
One
4 p.m. many pieces of tion
Editorial Deadline Will Be THURSDAY,CT
MAYhome.
26 atOffering
fine to
art,detail
prints,
and proficiency in Raiser’s Edge and Microsoft Office.
bedroom, lake view, pet free,
persian and asian items. Large collection
of custom
Title and
salary commensurate with experience. Preference will be
smoke Urgent
free. News
$1,200/month
Items & Late Letters to the
Editor will be acmahogany furniture, period empiregiven
furniture,
and
includes heat, water, electric.
to those
with professional experience in Alumni Relations.
TH
cepted
Noon Friday,assorted
May 27 .mid century items. A dozen lots of interesting
References, security.
Calluntil
or text
Competitive
compensation with full benefits package.
sterling silver, bronze & crystal
chandeliers
860 307-3751.
Call to reserve your jewelry,
space!
and much, much, more. HappyInterested
New Year!candidates should send cover
LIME ROCK: 2 bedroom apartletter, resume and to:
Plan to attend this unreserved fast paced auction.
ments for rent. Includes heat,
Nattalie Smith Will, Assistant Director
garbage pickup & off street
Our Terms: We have a 18% Buyer’s Premium
on All PurchasesSalisbury School, 251
of Development,
parking. Non- smokers
HE only!
ILLERTON In House
EWS with a discount of 3% for cashCanaan
and checkRoad,
and a Salisbury, CT 06068,
Please call JW at 203-725-1706
nwill@salisburyschool.org
20% Buyer’s Premium on all Online
Purchases.
or email popwoerm@aol.com.
We accept Master Card, Visa, Good Check and Cash.
Salisbury School is an
All Items Sold AS IS and AS FOUND.
NORTH CANAAN: 1 Bedroom
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
For Questions or to leave Bids please call 860-453-4370
$750. 1 year lease. Heat and
hot water included. Call 860
605-5923.

STATE LINE AUCTIONS
& ESTATE SERVICES

Salisbury School

January Estate Auction

EARLY DEADLINE

January 17, 2016 @ 11:30 AM

T M
N
The Winsted Journal

Salisbury School
FURNITURE
Salisbury School

Most Items at Half Price

THE HOTCHKISS MATHEMATYour Independent,
ICS AND COMPUTER DEPARTLocally Owned,
MENT:
is seeking
applicantsN
forEWS
a
THE
MILLERTON
Community
teaching position in MathematThe
Winstedacademic
Journal
ics for
the 2011-2012
Newspapers &
ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF
year. This is a one-year, partRegional News Website
COMMUNICATIONS/WEB
MANAGER
www.
.com
time, teaching-only position,
Director of Parent
Programs
possibly renewable for a second
Salisbury School is seeking a full-time Assistant Director of Comyear. Responsibilities include
munications/Web
Manager. The person in this position will have
Salisbury School is seeking a Director
of Parent Programs.
teaching four sections of two
responsibility
for managing and producing content for the
The Director is responsible forprimary
supervising
the annual
or three courses in the core curSchool’s Weband
site and
socialof
media platforms, as well as coordinating
solicitation
of
current
parents,
grandparents,
parents
riculum of intermediate algebra,
multimedia
resources.
In addition,
he/she will assist in the production of
alumni
and
for
the
non-solicitation
programs
associated
with
geometry, advanced algebra
school publications.
these constituencies. The Director collaborates
with the Director
and pre-calculus. Experience
with technology in the classof The Salisbury Fund and AlumniCandidate
Relations
to have
set experience
strategy, with Web-based content management
must
room is expected, and some
systemsdetermine
and proventhe
skillsmost
editing digital video, audio files and still
analyze and review prospective donors, 
#$! 

Associate
Director
of
The
Salisbury
Fund
experience with curriculum deimages.
A Bachelor’s
degree and strong written communication and
effective solicitation process, and manage
and
oversee programs 

and
Alumni
Relations
velopment would be desirable. 
!%$  !#$!$#'$
and events for these constituents. marketing skills are necessary. Working knowledge of boarding
Email
resumeSchool
and cover
to an Associate Director of The
Salisbury
is letter
seeking
schools preferred.
Interested candidates should send or email a letter of application and 
!# 
! 

Teachingjobs@hotchkiss.org.
Salisbury Fund and Alumni Relations. Individual will have a
Salary is competitive and comes with an excellent benefits package.
resume to:
significant role in engaging the School’s alumni through events
To see the detailed job description, visit:
Director of Human Resources www.salisburyschool.org/employment_opportunities.
and programming, increasing alumni participation and support
Salisbury School
for The Salisbury Fund, and connecting alumni to each other
Interested candidates should send cover letter,
and the school. Two to four years of development and direct
251 Canaan Road
resume and three references to:
Salisbury, CT 06068
fundraising experience required preferably in an educational
Danielle Sinclair, Director of Commuhumanresources@salisburyschool.org
setting. Bachelor’s degree preferred.
nications, Salisbury School, 251
Interested candidates should send or email a letter of application
Canaan Road, Salisbury, CT 06068,
and resume to:
dsinclair@salisburyschool.org
Director of Human Resources
Salisbury School is an
Salisbury School
Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer.
251 Canaan Road
Salisbury, CT 06068
humanresources@salisburyschool.org
SALISBURY, CT
FALLS VILLAGE, CT

TriCornerNews

APARTMENTS
ROOMS FOR RENT

HUGE
SELECTION 

& !#& 
#!$! 
"

Salisbury School

63

Tag Sales

MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE Saturday, May 28
from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. 15 Westmount Road (off
Rt.41, Undermountain Road), Salisbury. Variety
of houshold items, fishing boat, motor & trailer,
lots more.

or send a resume via fax or e-mail.
GEER V I L L AGE
7 7 South Canaan Road
Canaan, CT 0 6 0 1 8
8 6 0 -8 24 -26 39
8 6 0 -8 24 -26 0 7 F ax
lfoley@ geercares.org
EO E

Reach more local customers with a
search-optimized, mobile-ready, socialfriendly website for your small business.

28, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.

ay Center

ESTATE SALE 142 Knibloe Hill, Sharon CT. Saturday and Sunday, May 28 &(PART
29 from 9 a.m.
till
TIME/PER
DIEM) Per D iem D river
4 p.m. Mid Century bedroom set, book case,
SUNDAY ONLY - MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE!!!
end tables & Cassina stacking stools. Thonet
May 29th from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Come one,
Geer D ial-A-Ride, Relief D river
& Loom chairs. Farm, glass & chrome tables.
come all! Deals to be had, treasures to be found!
Ifmetal
you’re
hard-working
D 8’epartment
head
position
open
fortea
an cheerful,
ex perienced
sofas, leather
chairs,
vintage
cart
Like
to be you
up can
on think
the latest
Want to
work
Everything
of! Toys,news?
baby items,
and child nurse
chairs. at
Arts
& Crafts
mirror
&atable,
registered
N
oble
Horiz
ons,
highly-respected
books,
kitchen
stuff
,
clothes,
collectables,
small
and
flexible,
we
have
a job for Must
you! have strong interpersonal skills to
in the charming, picturesque Harlem Valley?
German beer hall table and benches, Brass &
become part of our caring Staff.
furniture, and lots more! 13 Seneca Lane, just continuum
care retirement
village
in Salisbury, CT.
maple beds.ofComplete
sets vintage
Rosenthal
The
Millerton
News
is looking
a full-time
off of
Dugway Road
in Lime
Rock. Justfor
follow
Public service license will be required.
china. Dressers, desks & outdoor furniture.
our signs!
See you
willeducation,
include some
Prior ex perience driving a
Tracker 12’ applicant
tadpole boat
hp. motor
news
reporter
tothere!
work 40 hours a weekSuccessful
coverwill/Honda
direct5Hours
in-service
& electric motor. Pyranha kayak. Kitchen
items, & evenings 1 0 – 1 2 passenger mini-bus preferred.
weekends
e general
orientation
programs,
coordinate quality
ing Amenia, Pine Plains and Webutuck.organiz
dog fencing,
a toilet
& more. You
name it! See
CANAAN,
CTof local newsassurance
you there!and
Cashassessment,
& Checks. conduct nurse assistant training,
Position covers
all aspects

Full Time

% of people
use the Internet as
Homecare/community– based healthcare
ex perience is when
highly desirable.
their first resource
looking
Pleaseservice
call L ori F oley
for an appointment,
for a local
or product.
co e in and fill out an application

It’s Time To
Get Online

Careers at
Noble
MEGA-MOVING SALE Everything
must go! 114 Horizons
Beebe Hill Road, Falls Village, CT. Saturday, May

careers at noble
Horiz
onsa
Noble Horizons
is seeking
SHARON, CT
NewsLIME
Reporter
DINING AIDEAdult D
ROCK,Wanted
CT
u Director of Education, Q uality

cnA Positions

Full-time and Part-time, 7 a.m. – 3 p .m.
Part-Time, 3 p .m. – 11 p .m.
Per diem all shif ts

Assurance and Assessment

NEWS REPORTER
Wanted: Reporter for weekly
community newspaper.

Reporters frequently work on
weekends and evenings and must
Contact Us,
have Today!
a flexible schedule.
Please call for an appointment,
as employee health
and
nurse, and
community
business
news,
FLEA MARKETnews,
Saturday,
May 28th,
9 a.m.government,
to serve
Great
partinfection
time
job:control
good hourly
wage. Ifcoyou
areand fill out an application
MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE!
Saturday
and Sunday,
e in
This is a full-time job with benefits.
860-435-9873 •websites@lakevillejournal.com
the& 29
Employee
F und.
May 28
from 9 a.m.Scholarship
to
4 p.m. 31 Mudge
Pond at a beautiful progressive
2 p.m. 310 Salisbury
44) in skills
North a chair
education
and the Road
arts.(Rte
Writing
must.
interested
in
working
Canaan, CT. New, used and handmade items
for sale. Refreshments available. Sponsored by
the Housatonic Lodge of Mason #61. VENDORS
WANTED. Contact 860 824-5038 or jbrien@snet.
net for more information.

Send Résumé and Writing Samples
attn.
Whitney Joseph
MULTI-FAMILY TAG SALE Friday and Saturday,
E-mail: editor@millertonnews.com

May 27 & 28 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. 37 Old TurnThe
Millerton
News
pike
Road
South, East
Canaan CT. Indoor and
P.O.furniture,
Box AD,ping
Millerton,
NY books,
12546too
patio
pong table,
much to list!

www.TriCornerNews.com

or send a resume via fax or e-mail.

Road, Sharon. Lamps, filing cabinets, fireplace

retirement
community
screen,
porta
crib,hours
stroller,
book
shelf,
dishes, please stop at the Wagner
B.s.,
R.n.
• 32
p er
w eek
toss pillows, fabrics, books, and
much more!
Reception
and fill out an application.
GEER AD U L T D AY CEN TER
ualified applicants a e ail a resu e to ileen .
8 3 South Canaan Road
ulligan,MILLERTON,
Ad inistrator, at emulligan@
churchhomes.org
NY
Canaan, CT 0 6 0 1 8
HE
MOVING SALE May 27, 28, & 29 from 9 a.m. Noble Horizons 8 6 0 - 8 24 -7 0 6 7
8 6 0 - 8 24 -7 8 7 1 F ax
to 4 p.m. 104 Old Post Road #4, Millerton,17 Cobble Road, Salisbury, CT 06068
NY. Rain or Shine. Tools, hunting and fishing
lneil@ geercares.org
(860) 435-9851

Please send resume
Your Independent,
and writing
samples.
Locally Owned,

T MILLERTON NEWS
Community
The Winsted Journal
Send inquiriesNewspapers
to Cynthia&Hochswender

equipment, knick knacks, furniture. Something
for everyone.
1 7

CO BBL E RO AD

8 6 0 -4 35 -9 8 5 1

EOE

SAL I SBU RY , CT

0 6 0 6 8

w w w. n o b l e h o r i z o n s . o r g

Equal Opportunity Employer

EO E

Regional News Website
at .com
cynthiah@lakevillejournal.com
www.TriCornerNews

A14

THE MILLERTON NEWS, Thursday, January 14, 2016

To Place
an AdanCall
or Visit
www.tricornernews.com/classifieds
To Place
Ad 860-435-9873
Call 860-435-9873
or Visit
www.tcextra.com/classifieds

Real Estate

Monday at
at 12:00
12:00 p.m.
p.m. except
except holiday
holiday weeks
weeks
Monday
when aa special
special deadline
deadline is
is published
published in
in advance.
advance.
when

CONDOS FOR
FOR SALE
SALE
CONDOS

SEASONAL
SEASONAL
RENTALS
RENTALS

RATES
RATES

LINE AD
AD DEADLINE
DEADLINE
LINE

$12 for
for the
the first
first 15
15 words
words or
or less.
less. 40¢
40¢ for
for each
each
$12
additional word.
word. Call
Call us
us for
for our
our special
special 44 time
time rate.
rate.
additional
All line
line ads
ads must
must be
be prepaid.
prepaid.
All
Mastercard, Visa
Visa and
and American
American Express
Express accepted.
accepted.
Mastercard,

Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
News
- The
Winsted
Journal
- www.tcextra.com
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Millerton
News
- The
Winsted
Journal
- www.tricornernews.com
To Place
an AdanCall
To Place
Ad 860-435
Call 860HOUSES FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
HOUSES

HOUSES FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
HOUSES

Real Estate
REAL ESTATE
ESTATE FOR
FOR
REAL
SALE
SALE

SPACE FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
SPACE

TriCornerNews
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IS YOURNEWS
NEW SITE
REGIONAL

Rob inson L eech Real Estate

LAND FOR
FOR SALE
SALE
LAND

ANCRAMDALE, N.Y.
N.Y. 28
28 estate
estate
ANCRAMDALE,
MILLERTON STORE
STORE FOR
FOR RENT:
RENT:
MILLERTON
acres. 33 acre
acre stocked
stocked pond.
pond.
acres.
Nextto
toMcDonalds,
McDonalds,750
750Square
Square
CORNWALL:New
New22bedroom,
bedroom,1.5
1.5
Next
CORNWALL:
SHARON: 44 bedroom
bedroom Cape,
Cape,
SHARON:
Valley
and
Catskill
range
views.
Valley
and
Catskill
range
views.
feet,
recent
renovation,
good
bath duplex
duplex home
home on
on 55 acres.
acres.
feet, recent renovation, good
bath
deck, pool,
pool, barn
barn on
on .97
.97 acre.
acre.
deck,
Engineered driveway.
driveway. B.O.H.A.
B.O.H.A.
parking. Available
Available March
March 1,
1,
Engineered
Large living
living room
room with
with 16’
16’ ceilceilparking.
Large
$265,000Bosworth
BosworthReal
RealEstate
Estate
$265,000
2011. Telephone
Telephone 518
518 789789Electricity -- Several
Several sites
sites total
total
ing, kitchen/dining
kitchen/dining room
room with
with
2011.
-- Electricity
ing,
860 364-1700.
364-1700.
860
3636.
all new
new appliances,
appliances, offi
office/study
ce/study
3636.
privacy -- 55 minutes
minutes Millerton
Millerton
all
privacy
area,laundry
laundrywith
withwasher/dryer.
washer/dryer.
area,
center. Owner
Owner -- 518-329-2244.
518-329-2244.
center.
MOBILE HOMES
HOMES
MOBILE
HOUSES FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
Pictures at
at www.cornwalct.org.
www.cornwalct.org.
HOUSES
RENTALS
Pictures
RENTALS
Price $995,000.
$995,000. Ready
Ready to
to go.
go.
Price
REAL
ESTATE
FOR
REAL
ESTATE
FOR
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK:
3
bedLAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 3 bedAnnuallease
lease$1,800/month
$1,800/monthplus
plus
Annual
FOR SALE
SALE
FOR
room
house,
1.5
baths,
garage,
room
house,
1.5
baths,
garage,
AMENIA:
3
bedroom,
2
bath
utilities
and
security
860
672CHRISTMAS IN
IN ENGLAND?
ENGLAND?
AMENIA: 3 bedroom, 2 bath
utilities and security 860 672CHRISTMAS
SHARON: Close
Close to
to town,
town, apapSALE
SHARON:
SALE
from
large living
living room,
room, kitchen,
kitchen, dindinlarge
6309 or
or 212
212 534-0727.
534-0727.
home,deck/yard,
deck/yard,washer/dryer.
washer/dryer.
Christmas in
in London?
London? Swap
Swap
6309
home,
Christmas
proved, 22 acres.
acres. $95,000.
$95,000. BoBoproved,
from
DOVER: 33 bedrooms,
bedrooms, 22 baths.
baths.
DOVER:
from
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ing
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CONDOS
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my
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HOUSES
FOR
RENT
COPAKE
LAKE
FOR
SALE
OR
sworth Real
Real Estate
Estate 860
860 364364LAKE - FOR SALE OR
sworth
$1,200/monthincludes
includestrash
trash&
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$1,200/month
The
Lakeville
Journal
fromCOPAKE
wooden flfloors
oors and
and lots
lots of
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Lakeville
Journal
wooden
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stephanie.
in
maintenance &
& garbage.
garbage. No
No
maintenance
RENT: 22 cottages
cottages on
on 1/2
1/2 acre.
acre.
RENT:
1700.
snowremoval
removaland
andlaw
lawmaintemainte1700.
snow
The
Lakeville
Journal
from
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Lakeville
Journal
rior details.
details. $1500/month
$1500/month plus
plus
rior
holm@fox.com ..
SALISBURY
SALE:
and FOX
SALISBURY: 3 bed
The
Millerton
News
HOLLOW FARM
holm@fox.com
SPACE FOR
FOR RENT
RENT
The
Lakeville
Journal
pets. Security
Security &
& references
references 845
845
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK: 2 bed75
yards to
to the
the lake!
lake!
Asking
SPACE
pets.
75
yards
Asking
nance.Quiet
845 877-9343.
877-9343.
nance.
845
The
Millerton
News
utilities 860
860 435-7000
435-7000 or
or e-mail
e-mail
utilities
from
private
baths, deck patio
The
Millerton
News
The
Lakeville
Journal
room
house,
large
living
room
$179,000
or best
best offer.
offer.
845in a woodsy setting.
224-8454 or
or 845
845 373-9387.
373-9387.
$179,000
or
845
224-8454

5,541
sq.ft.

67
acres

5
BRs

5.5
BAs

The
Millerton
News
from
The
Winsted
Journal
The
Millerton
News
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
CORNWALL:
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
from Journal
SHARON HIDEAWAY:
2 bedrooms, one car garage.
acres. $2,000 mont
MILLERTON: Several
SeveralThe
offices.
with fireplace, study, 1 bath and
242-3996.
MILLERTON:
offices.
242-3996.
Winsted
The
Lakeville
FALLS
VILLAGE,
CT.
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The
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The
Millerton
News
from Journal
$225,000 by owner. Call 860
ties.
Great downtown
downtown The
location!
TheLakeville
Winsted
Journal
a gardener’s shed. $900/ month
Great
location!
COPAKE
LAKE:
bedroom
loft,SFT, large open living- Near Mohawk Ski area, hiking trails, and the Housatonic
2+ acre,LAKE:
3 bedrooms,
2 baths, 1840
COPAKE
11 bedroom
loft,
The
Winsted
The
Lakeville
MILLERTON
COTTAGE
FOR
MILLERTON
COTTAGE
FOR
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309-9166.
Plenty
of
off
street
parking.
518
plus utilities. 860 435-7000 or
FALLS
VILLAGE:
Estate on
on 55
55
PlentyWe’ve
of off street
parking.
518 to
FALLS
VILLAGE:
Estate
close
to lake,
lake, nice
nice
views.
Rent1 compact car or shop River. 3 bedrooms, spacious LR with fireplace, open
close
to
views.
Rent
dining-kitchen
area with
fireplace,
Millerton
News
made
it
easier
find
all
the
news,
The
Winsted
Journal
The
Lakeville
RENT: and
Small one
one bedroom
bedroom
RENT:
Small
The
Millerton
News
789-3623.
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
acres,
call
for
details.
$875,000.
789-3623.
acres,
call
for
details.
$875,000.
negotiable.
845 242-3996.
242-3996.
c r os s c LYSE
ount
r y s ki i ng. ARNEY
2- s t or y LR w / EAL
w EAL
r a p- a r ound STATE
ba l c ony
& SEASON
negotiable.
845
area, party deck.
Brand
new roof, great condition
kitchen,
dining area, home office room, separate building
The
Millerton
News
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
LYSE
ARNEY
STATE
We’ve
made
it
to
find
the
news,
cottage, 1.5
1.5 miles
miles from
from Village,
Bosworth
Real
Estate
860 364364The
Winsted
Bosworth
Real
Estate
860
arts
coverage,
classified
ads
and
more!
easy to care for. Offered at $335,000. Callcottage,
Robin.
for storageVillage,
or shop. Circa 1920 origins, 2000+- SFT, 8
The
Millerton
News all
We’ve
madephotos,
it easier
easier
toJournal
find
all
the
news,
f o r m a l D i n i n g R o o com.
m , b o th w ith F P s . S c re e n e d b lu e s to n e
The
Winsted
Journal
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
suitable for
for single.
single. Nice
Nice yard,
yard,
suitable
1700.
The
Winsted
Journal
HOUSES FOR
RENT
1700.
Ahe Tradition
Tradition
of Trust
Trust
RENTAL
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
COPAKE, NY:
NY: 22 bedroom,
bedroom, living
living
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
COPAKE,
acres,
with
pond
view.
Offered
at
$349,000.
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
pa t i o ove
r l oki
ng t A
pr i va t e pond. of
quiet neighborhood,
neighborhood, cable
cable
quiet
LAKEVILLE
MAINSTREET:
STREET:
LAKEVILLE/LIME
LAKEVILLE
••MAIN
33 classified
The Winsted
Journal ads and more!
arts
coverage,
photos,
room, kitchen,
kitchen, landing,
landing, washer
washer
room,
oo
ooROCK: 3 bedConnecticut
New
York
Massachusetts
Connecticut
New
York
Massachusetts
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
available,
$650/month
plus
available, $650/month plus
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
exceptional
offi
ces available.
available.
room
house,
1.5 baths, garage,
Web# EH3297
Thomas
Callahan
$1,495,000
LAKEVILLE:
Belgo
Road
with 3 bedroom,
exceptional
offi
ces
Belgo
Road
with
AMENIA:
2 bath
CHRISTMAS IN E
anddryer
dryerhookup.
hookup.
oors.properties
$750
and
22flfloors.
$750
We’ve
made
it
find
all
the
news,
Selling
in CT, Mass,
andreferences.
New York , since
1955 LAKEFRONTSUMWe’vewell
made
it easier
easier to
toLAKEVILLE:
find Southern
all
the
news,
utilities,
security,
references.
utilities,
security,
FURNISHEDLAKEFRONT
SUMFURNISHED
Extremely
well
maintained
large living room, kitchen, dinGreat
Southern
Views,
open
Extremely
maintained
Great
Views,
open
home,
deck/yard, washer/dryer.
Christmas in Lond
+ utilities.
utilities. Security
Security deposit,
deposit,
+
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
We’ve
made
it
easier
to
find
all
the
news,
518
789-3201.
518
789-3201.
MER
RENTAL:
Charming
3
318
Main
Street

Lakeville,
Connecticut

860-435-9891
MER
RENTAL:
Charming
3
building.
Small
,
medium
and
ing room, social room, beautiful
field, private.
private.
$459,000.
Bo-includes heat, lawnEE
building.
Small , medium
and classified
field,
$459,000.
Bomy London flat for
$1200
arts
coverage,
photos,
ads
and
more!
reference and/or
and/or credit
credit scores
scores
reference
arts
coverage,
photos,
classified
ads
and
more!
C
C
I
bedroom,
2.5
bath
furnished
I
bedroom,
2.5
bath
furnished
large
spaces.
860
435-2635.
wooden
fl
oors
and
lots
of
intesworth
Real
Estate
860
364large
spaces.
860
435-2635.
sworth
Real
Estate
860
364in Sharon.email
maintenance & garbage.PPRRNo
required. No
No pets.
pets. Available.
Available. www.robinleechrealestate.com
required.
arts coverage, photos, classified
ads and more!
MILLERTONVILLAGE
VILLAGE--WALK
WALKTO
TO
MILLERTON
country chic
chic cottage
cottage on
on 11 acre
acre
country
W
W
rior
details.
$1500/month
plus
1700.
1700.
holm@fox.com .
pets. Security & references
845
6/1/11.Apartment
Apartmentis
isin
inaa22family
family
6/1/11.
NEE
N
EVERYTHING! Great
Great weekend
weekend
EVERYTHING!
with 150
150 ft.
ft. direct
direct lakefront,
lakefront,
with
utilities
860
435-7000
or
e-mail
224-8454 or 845 373-9387.
dwelling in
in aa Farm
Farm setting.
setting. 518
518
dwelling
small cottage,
cottage, ideal
ideal for
for one
one
small
gazebo,private
privatedock.
dock. Summer
Summer
gazebo,
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
851-9854.
851-9854.
person or
or couple!
couple! 11 bedroom,
bedroom,
person
2011--$25,000;
$25,000;winter
winter2011-12
2011-12
2011
COPAKE LAKE: 1 bedroom loft,
den, living
livingroom,
room,eat
eatin
inkitchen,
kitchen,
den,
$2,500/month plus
plus utilities.
utilities.
$2,500/month
MILLERTON - COTTAGE FOR
PUBLISHER’S NOTICE:
NOTICE: Equal
Equal Housing
Housing Opportunity.
Opportunity. All
All real
realclose
estate
to lake, nice views. Rent
PUBLISHER’S
estate
screen porch
porch and
and garage.
garage. FurFurscreen
Best &
& Cavallaro
Cavallaro Real
Real Estate
Estate
Best
RENT: Small one bedroom
advertisedin
inthis
thisnewspaper
newspaperis
issubject
subjectto
tothe
theFederal
FederalFair
FairHousing
Housing
Act
advertised
Act
negotiable.
845 242-3996.
nished or
or unfurnished.
unfurnished. $1200
$1200
nished
860 435-2888.
435-2888.
860
cottage, 1.5 miles from Village,
of1966
1966revised
revisedMarch
March12,
12,1989
1989which
whichmakes
makesititillegal
illegalto
toadvertise
advertiseany
any
of
plusutilities
utilitiesper
permonth.
month.Security
Security
plus
suitable for single. Nice yard,
preference, limitation,
limitation, or
or discrimination
discrimination based
based on
on race,
race, color
colorCOPAKE,
religion, NY: 2 bedroom, living
preference,
religion,
and references.
references. 845
845 677-3735.
677-3735.
and
SHARON, SILVER
SILVER LAKE
LAKE COTCOTSHARON,
sex,handicap
handicapor
orfamilial
familialstatus
statusor
ornational
nationalorigin
originor
orintention
intentionto
to
make
sex,
make
quiet neighborhood, cable
room,
kitchen,
landing,
washer
anysuch
suchpreference,
preference,limitation
limitationor
ordiscrimination.
discrimination.All
Allresidential
residentialproperty
property
TAGE: 11 bedroom,
bedroom, queen
queen
any
TAGE:
available, $650/month plus
and
dryer
hookup.
2
fl
oors.
$750
SHARON: Quiet,
Quiet, beautiful
beautiful localocaadvertised
in
the
State
of
Connecticut
General
Statutes
46a-64c
which
SHARON:
advertised
in
the
State
of
Connecticut
General
Statutes
46a-64c
which
size bed,
bed, new
new appliances.
appliances. On
On
size
utilities, security, references.
FURNISHED LAKEFR
utilities. Security deposit,
prohibitthe
themaking,
making,printing
printingor
orpublishing
publishingor
orcausing
causingto
tobe
bemade,
made,+
printed
prohibit
printed
tion. One
One large
large bedroom,
bedroom, spaspation.
private dead
dead end
end road.
road. 33 minminprivate
518 789-3201.
MER RENTAL: Ch
reference
scores
orpublished
publishedany
anynotice,
notice,statement
statementor
oradvertisement
advertisementwith
withrespect
respect
tothe
the and/or credit
or
to
EncHAnTinG
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cious kitchen,
kitchen, washer/dryer,
washer/dryer,
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RivERFRonT
cious
ute walk
walk to
to private
private dock.
dock. NonNonute
LAKEVILLE: Three
Three bedroom,
bedroom,
LAKEVILLE:
sale or
or rental
rental of
of aa dwelling
dwelling that
that indicates
indicates any
any preference,
preference, limitation
limitation
or No pets.
required.
Available. This
sale
or
living/dining with
with fireplace,
fireplace,
living/dining
sHARon.
This
beautiful property
property
features
322' of
of
motorized lake.
lake. Available
Available July
July
sHARon.
beautiful
features
322'
motorized
MILLERTON
VILLAGE
WALK
TO
country chic cottag
discriminationbased
basedon
onrace,
race,creed,
creed,color,
color,national
nationalorigin,
origin,ancestry,
ancestry,
sex,Apartment isfrontage
1.5 baths,
baths, village
village home
home with
with
discrimination
sex,
1.5
6/1/11.
in a 2 family
screenporch.
porch.Ideal
Idealfor
forcouples/
couples/
screen
andAugust.
August.$2,500
$2,500per
permonth.
month.
on the
the Housatonic
Housatonic
River.
The Main
Main
House has
has
and
frontage
on
River.
The
House
EVERYTHING!
Great
weekend
with 150 ft. direct
marital
status,
age,
lawful
source
of
income,
familial
status,
physical
or
marital
status,
age,
lawful
source
of
income,
familial
status,
physical
or
updated kitchen
kitchen and
and baths.
baths.
updated
dwelling
in
a
Farm
setting.
518
single.Non
Nonsmoking.
smoking.$1,000
$1,000per
per
single.
Nosmoking.
smoking.No
Nopets.
pets.11months
months
No
BRs, 22 BAs
BAs and
andsmall
loft overlooking
overlooking
the Kitchen.
Kitchen.
There
33 BRs,
aa loft
the
cottage,
ideal
for
one There
gazebo, private doc
mentaldisability
disabilityor
oran
anintention
intentionto
tomake
makeany
anysuch
suchpreference,
preference,limitation
limitation
mental
On aa side
side street
street with
with patio
patio and
and
On
851-9854.
month
plus
utilities.
Includes
month plus utilities. Includes
security,cleaning
cleaningfee
feeand
andreferrefersecurity,
is also
also an
anAntique
Antiqueperson
2-BR Guesthouse
Guesthouse
w/newly
renovated
or couple! w/newly
1 bedroom,
is
2-BR
renovated
2011 - $25,000; win
ordiscrimination.
discrimination.
or
large rear
rear yard.
yard. $1,800/month
$1,800/month
large
snow removal
removal and
and lawn.
lawn. Call
Call
snow
ences.
aff
ord71020@mypacks.
ences. afford71020@mypacks.
Kitchen. Enjoy
Enjoy dining
dining
in
the screened-in
screened-in
Covered
Bridge
den, in
living
room, eat inCovered
kitchen,Bridge
Kitchen.
the
$2,500/month plu
unfurnished.Best
Bestand
andCavallaro
Cavallaro
unfurnished.
860 364-0319.
364-0319.
860
net.
net.
screen
porch
andgardens
garage.
Furspanning the
the brook.
brook.
Tennis
courts,
gardens
and
Pergola.
spanning
Tennis
courts,
and
Pergola.
Best & Cavallaro R
Real Estate,
Estate, 860
860 436-2888.
436-2888.
Real
nished
or
unfurnished.
$1200
Elyse Harney
Harney morris
morris &
& kathleen
kathleen Devaney
Devaney
860 435-2888.
Elyse
plus
utilities
per
month.
Security
Web# EH2202
EH2202
$985,000
Web#
$985,000
LAKEVILLE:2.5
2.5bedrooms,
bedrooms,living
living
LAKEVILLE:
and references. 845 677-3735.
SHARON, SILVER L
room, dining
dining room,
room, 1.5
1.5 bath.
bath.
room,
860-435-2200 www.HarneyRE.com
www.HarneyRE.com TAGE: 1 bedroo
860-435-2200
Remodeled kitchen
kitchen with
with new
new
Remodeled
SHARON: Quiet, beautiful locasize bed, new app
appliances.Laundry
Laundryroom
roomwith
with
appliances.
tion. One large bedroom, spaprivate dead end ro
Real Estate
Estate
Real
washer/dryer.Walking
Walkingdistance
distance
washer/dryer.
cious kitchen, washer/dryer,
ute walk to private
LAKEVILLE: Three bedroom,
to lake.
lake. $1,200
$1,200 per
per month
month plus
plus
to
living/dining with fireplace,
motorized lake. Av
1.5 baths, village home with
utilities,references
referencesand
andsecurity.
security.
utilities,
screen porch. Ideal for couples/
www.RosiniAntiques.net
51878 9- 3582
518-789-3582
www.RosiniRestorations.com
and August. $2,500
updated kitchen andChristopher
baths.
We Honor
Honor All
All Those
Those Who
Who Have
Have Given
Given Their
Their Lives
Lives
We
860 480-2349.
480-2349.
Toomey
860824- No
4956 smoking. No pet
860
single. Non smoking. $1,000 per
On a side street with patio and
month plus utilities. Includes
cleaning fe
L icensed Arborist
Telephone security,
& F ax
So
That
We
May
Be
Free
This
Memorial
Day
!
“When
You
Want
The
Best”
So
That
We
May
Be
Free
This
Memorial
Day
!
HIC#
0629057
large
rear
yard.
$1,800/month
LAKEVILLE:33bedroom
bedroomhouse,
house,11
snow removal and lawn. Call
LAKEVILLE:
ences. afford71020
unfurnished.
Best
and
Cavallaro
bath,private
privateyard,
yard,washer/dryer
860 364-0319.
bath,
net.
Old/new resurfaced to perfection.
Allwasher/dryer
Types
of Gutters
Real Estate, 860 436-2888.
hook-up.$950/month
$950/month
plusutiliutilihook-up.
plus
www.theboz.com
www.theboz.com
“Improving
our
neighborhood
one
home
at
a
time”
FRANK
MONDA
ties.Vinyl
References.
No
pets.Replacement
860
ties.
References.
pets.
860
Siding No
• Vinyl
Windows
VINYL SIDING LAKEVILLE: 2.5 bedrooms, living
435-2533.
435-2533.
(800) 671-4505 (413) 229-3434 (413) 229-8432
Standing Seam Metal Roofing
SEAMLESS GUTTERSroom, dining room, 1.5 bath.
Remodeled kitchen with newSCOTT L. MONROE - ARBORIST - #62048
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK: 22 bedbed(518) 789-3342
Millerton, NY 12546
LAKEVILLE/LIME
ROCK:
Canaan, CT
appliances.
Laundry room withJASON E. BRESSON - ARBORIST - #62658
LYSE 860.824.5094
ARNEY
EAL STATE
STATE
LYSE
ARNEY
EAL
room
house,
baths, large
large
room
house,
22 baths,
FAX
(518)
789-6256
Est. 1961
Kent
Brokerage
860.927.1141
Kent
Brokerage
860.927.1141
RESTO
RERS
& family
CO N SERV ATO RS
washer/dryer. Walking distance
kitchen,
outdoor
deck,
family
kitchen,
outdoor
deck,
A
Tradition
of
Trust
A
Tradition
of
Trust
Lakeville Brokerage
Brokerage 860.435.2400
860.435.2400
to lake. $1,200 per month plus76 Jackson Road Sharon, CT 06069
room,dining/living
dining/living
room,
wood
room,
www.pqpainting4u.com
25 Y ears Exp.
F ree Estimates
O F per
F room,
I N month
Ewood
AN +TI Q U ES Lakeville
oo
oo
utilities, references and security.
Connecticut
New
York
Massachusetts
Connecticut
New
York
Massachusetts
stove. $1,200
$1,200 per
month +
stove.
Each
Office
Is
Independently
Owned
and
Operated.
Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.
6 B arracks Road 860-364-0323
Canaan, CT 0618
860 480-2349.
utilities.860
860435-7000
435-7000or
ore-mail
e-mail
utilities.
PUBlic oPEn
oPEn HoUsEs
HoUsEs
PUBlic
CT Arborist L ic. #S -4207
6 1 26 Rt. 22 • PO Box 7 7 0
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.
SERVICES PROVIDED
LAKEVILLE:
3 bedroom house, 1
277 Ashley Falls Road
(P) 860-824-5784 Every
Every saturday
saturday
and sunday,
sunday,
12:00-2:00
and
12:00-2:00
The best
decision
you’ll ever
make
PO BoxMillerton,
770, Millerton,
N Y 1 25 NY
4 6 12546
bath,
private
yard,
washer/dryer
West main
main street,
street, north
north canaan,
canaan, cT
cT
West
Pest Management
Canaan, CT 06018
(F) 860-824-7496
hook-up. $950/month plus utiliobiNSoN eeCh
eeCh
eaL
STaTe
obiNSoN
eaL
STaTe
Emerald Ash Borer & Asian Long
ties. References. No pets. 860
Email:
jdbpainting@snet.net
Distinctive Country
Country Properties
Properties
Distinctive
435-2533.
Horned Beetle Preventative Control
SALISBURY SALE:
SALE: Quiet
Quiet and
and
SALISBURY: 33 bedrooms,
bedrooms, 2.5
2.5
SALISBURY
SALISBURY:
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK:
ROCK: 22 bedbedLAKEVILLE/LIME
private in
in aa woodsy
woodsy setting.
setting.
baths, deck
deck patio,
patio, private
private 22
private
baths,
room house,
house, large
large living
living room
room
room
bedrooms, one
one car
car garage.
garage.
acres. $2,000
$2,000 month
month plus
plus utiliutili22 bedrooms,
acres.
withfifireplace,
replace,study,
study,11bath
bathand
and
with
$225,000 by
by owner.
owner. Call
Call 860
860
ties. 860
860 824-5601.
824-5601.
$225,000
ties.
gardener’sshed.
shed.$900/
$900/month
month
aagardener’s
INEX
P ENSIVE
W EEK
END
RETREATS
309-9166.
309-9166.
plus utilities.
utilities.
860 435-7000
435-7000
or
plus
860
or
FOR FUe-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
N AND REL AX ATION. SEASONAL
e-maildmason@kuhnsbrothers.
SEASONAL
com.
com.

Distinctive Country Properties

Lakeville
Journal
- The
M
TheThe
Lakeville
Journal
- The
Mille

IS YOUR NEW
IS YOURNEWS
NEW SITE
REGIONAL
REGIONAL
REGIONAL NEWS
NEWS SITE
SITE
REGIONAL NEWS SITE

E

H

R

E

A18 THE LAKEVILLE JOURNAL, Thursday, August 19, 2010

ToToHave
30,000 Potential
PotentialCustomers
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- The- Winsted
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Lightning Rods

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House of Color PaintinG
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Sharon. ASKING
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518-789-6636
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(800) 791-2916
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YEARS OF SERVICE

Plumbing & Heating

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owned
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• EXCAVATORS
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CANNON CARPENTRY, LLC
24 Reed Street, PO Box 1113
Canaan, Ct. 06018

Lightning Rods

email: cannoncarpentry11@gmail.com

860-309-8846

CT HIC# 0641295
Maintenance • Repairs • Renovations
Hal Cannon - Owner

Lightning
ComputerProtection!
Services
Professional design, engineering
& installation.
Visionary Computer
Since 1953.

ASSOCIATED

LIGHTNING ROD CO., INC.
Millerton, New York

845-373-8309

Overhead Doors

MacBook Pro with Retina display
29 Bissell St. • Lakeville

(860) 435-2211 • visionarycomputer.net

LICENSED / INSURED
Commercial/Residential
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(800)Custom
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364-0261
Inground Liner(860)
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860
- 364 - 0108
Decorating & Wallpapering

Roofing

Interior & Exterior
Residential, Commercial & Industrial
State Licensed Home Improvement Contractors
Insured & EPA Certified
SEA
GULL
ROOFING
& SIDING,
INC.
Now
accepting
most major
credit cards
Family Owned
and operated
Since 1978
All Types
of Gutters

Vinyl
Siding
• Vinyl Replacement
Windows
Emmet
Hussey
www.husseypainting.com
860.435.8149
emmethussey@gmail.com
Standing Seam
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(518) 789-3342
FAX (518) 789-6256

Millerton, NY 12546
Est. 1961

TriCornerNews.com
Septic Service

The Best Regional News Site

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happening in your area, we’re there.
DRAIN CLEANING SERVICE
24 HOUR EMERGENCY SERVICE

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Dave’s TV

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3814 Route 44, Millbrook, NY 12545 | tuxisselfstorage.com
VILLAGE LIVING:

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MULTI-FUNCTIONAL MINI-ESTATE:
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ROOT TREE SERVICE
TV, Stereos,

4-5 bedrooms, high ceilings, comfortable spaces, lovely
yard, and walk-to-school convenience. Also the lake
and restaurants. OFFERED AT: $398,000.

6+ acres, horse stables, horse pasture, large capacity
for vehicles or other needs, work shop, home office
wonderful 3+ bedroom residence including an apa
annex, and 2 car garage. Two additional homes also
within 5 minutesVintage
of Sharon. ASKING $985,000
Millerton,All
NY

Serving The Area Since 1983
STORAGE
michael
Root
cT Arborist
#Electronics
61802
Selling
properties
in CT, Mass,
and New York,
since 1955
518-789-3881
AGENCY:
McChesney
Design

TUXIS
SELF
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ADVERTISER: Tuxis Self Storage
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All Climate-Controlled Units
NClimate-Controlled Wine Storage
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NProfessional On-Site Manager
NAsk about our Discount Specials
N

AL
FACL NEW
ILIT
Y

L akeville, CT.

8 6 0 -4 35 -8 8 7 7

DIRECTV®
860-388-2349
318 Hours:
Main Street
• Lakeville,
Mon-Fri
8 to 5pm,Connecticut
Sat 8 to 3 • 860-435-9891
design@mcfun.net
www.robinleechrealestate.comSales and

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Email: davestv@optonline.net

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applewoodtree@yahoo.com
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Installation

E-Mail
Tri-State
News
Veterinary

your Classifi
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Ads to:
to:
your

classified@lakevillejournal.com
classified@lakevillejournal.com

3814 Route 44, Millbrook, NY 12545 | tuxisselfstorage.com

ROOT TREE SERVICE
Serving The Area Since 1983
michael Root cT Arborist # 61802

L akeville, CT.

8 6 0 -4 35 -8 8 7 7

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e

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upcountryservices.com
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PUB. DATE(S): 2013

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An immaculate
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1830 Lightning
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home
with 1,462
1,462 sq.
sq. ft.,
ft.,
An
Village
with
Protection
bedrooms, den,
den, 11 bath,
bath,
fireplace,
screened porch,
porch, 11
22 bedrooms,
fireplace,
screened
80’
Aerial
Lift
obiNSoN
eeCh
eaL
STaTe
car garage
garage just
just aa short
short walk
walk
to the
the Town
Town
Grove and
and
car
to
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Consultation
Distinctive
Country
Properties
lake.
On
.46
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with
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landscaping,
perenlake.
On
.46
acres
with
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perenand Norfolk.
Norfolk. Single-level
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attached 2-car
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nial
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the$2000/MO.
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in
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terrific Kitchens.
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Snow Plowing & Sanding

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CELEBRATING

cElEBRATinG

, LLC

kitchen, outdoor deck, family
Fertilizing Brokerage 860.435.240
Lakeville
room, dining/living room, wood
stove. $1,200 per month +
StumpEach
Grinding
Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.
utilities. 860 435-7000 or e-mail
Removals
1830 LAKEVILLE
LAKEVILLE
ANTIQUE
1830
ANTIQUE
dmason@kuhnsbrothers.com.

Interior - Exterior • Residential - Commercial - Industrial
Active Adult
Adult
condominiums
in aa Historic
Historic
village
at Millbrook
Commons,
Millbrook,
NY
Active
condominiums
in
village
New Construction - Restorations - Faux Finishes -Walk
Textures
MULTI-FUNCTIONALMINI-ESTATE:
MINI-ESTATE:
MULTI-FUNCTIONAL
Walk
to town
town and
and aa short
short drive
drive to
to Great
Great Barrington,
Barrington, Salisbury,
Salisbury,
to

keelerappliance@yahoo.com
ContraCtors PriCe
PO Box AK • 3 Century Blvd. • Millerton, NY 12546
Sellingproperties
propertiesin
inCT,
CT,Mass,
Mass,and
andNew
NewYork,
York,
since
1955
Selling
1955
% Guaranteed
By since
318 Main
Main Street
Street •• Lakeville,
Lakeville, Connecticut
Connecticut •• 860-435-9891
860-435-9891
318
www.robinleechrealestate.com
www.robinleechrealestate.com

Free
- Estimates
- Inspections

Pruning-Bracing-Clearing
litchfieldhillsSIR.co
Ornamental & Hedge Trimming
Removals-Vistas
Pruning
LAKEVILLE/LIME ROCK: 2 bedTree Fertilization
room house, 2 baths, large
Cabling
Kent Brokerage 860.927.1141

e
v
s
a
D

HOME CRAFTSMAN

4-5 bedrooms,
bedrooms,high
high ceilings,
ceilings,comfortable
comfortable spaces,
spaces,lovely
lovely
4-5
yard,and
and walk-to-school
walk-to-school convenience.
convenience. Also
Also the
the lake
lake
yard,
and restaurants.
restaurants. OFFERED
OFFEREDAT:
AT: $398,000.
$398,000.
and

Real Estate

10% off for new customers

e

Office
860-482-8308
GORDON
R. KEELER
APPLIANCES, Inc.

Quality

Painting & Home
Repair, LLC
H
R
E
860-201-7788

A NUMBER
NUMBER
OFYEARLY
YEARLY
RENTALS FROM
FROM $2000/MO.
$2000/MO.AND
AND UP,
UP,AVAILABLE.
AVAILABLE.
A
OF
RENTALS
RICH
DONEGAN

PROFILE,
ZERO, MONOGRAM, WOLF
CellSUB
860-459-0968
APPLIANCE SALES AND SERVICE
VILLAGE LIVING:
LIVING:
VILLAGE
For over 30 years

Tree
Tree Service
Service

Bosworth

STONE &TILE SERVICES

NATURAL STONE POLISHING & RESTORATION
HONING

CLEANING

SEALING

MARBLE GRANITE LIMESTONE
SLATE TERRAZZO SOAPSTONE

TILE REPAIR & INSTALLATION

Your best source of weekly news
and information about
LOOKtowns,
FOR
people, schools,
sports and
TRI-CORNER
organizations REAL
in yourESTATE
area!

NEXT WEEK

Independent Community Newspapers

Well Drilling
THE MILLERTON NEWS
loUis
AllYn
& sons
The E.
Winsted
Journal
Well D rilling

Water Systems I nstalled & Serviced
Established 1917
Canaan, CT
( 860)
824- 560

Upholstery
Window Treatments

GROUT COLORING

you have SaEALING
family member
in the
RDo
EGROUTING
MEXICANorTfriend
ILE REFINISHING
TILE &
GROUT
military
who
would C
beLEANING
interested

ZIGGY OSKWAREK
: ZIG@ACNINC.NET
in the news fromEMAIL
home?
TEL: 860-913-4473
TEL/FAX: 860-824-5192
VISIT US AT WWW.STONEPOLISHINGCT.COM

Remember

The Lakeville Journal Company offers free online
subscriptions to our website, tricornernews.com, for
active duty military personnel from the Tri-state region.
For more information or to set up a subscription, contact
Circulation Manager Helen Testa at circulation@
lakevillejournal.com or 860-435-9873, ext. 161.

Tree Service

Northwinds Upholstery & Design

Exquisite
Custom
Upholstery
W
indo
W Wa
res

Slipcovers, Window Treatments, Custom Pillows.
“Dressings for Your Windows”
LAURA WRIGHT
Closet/Storage
Systems CT
860-435-0121
• LAKEVILLE,
James
R. Wexler
FAX 860-435-0125

By Appointment
Sharon, CT 860.364.9824

jamesrwexlerdesign.com

Christopher Toomey
L icensed Arborist

8 6 0 -8 24 -4 9 5 6
Telephone & F ax

Veterinary