Consolidated Annual Performance Evaluation Report

CDBG Grant: # B-06-MC-37-0008 HOME Grant: # M-06-MC-37-0205 July 1, 2006 - June 30, 2007

City of High Point Community Development & Housing Department P.O. Box 230 High Point, NC 27261

The preparation of this document was financed through funds from the City of High Point’s Community Development Block Grant Program. This grant was made available to the city under the provisions of Title I of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974 and is referred to as Project B-07-MC-37-0008.

1

2

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY...................................................................7 PROJECTED SOURCES OF FUNDING............................................................................10 PROPOSED USES OF FUNDING.................................................................................12 Description of Affordable Housing and Non-Housing Activities...............12 GENERAL....................................................................................15 THE ASSESSMENT OF PROGRESS TOWARD FIVE-YEAR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES.........................17 ASSESSMENT OF PROGRESS TOWARD ONE-YEAR GOALS AND OBJECTIVES .............................18 SELF-EVALUATION AND PERFORMANCE MEASURES .........................................................19 PROGRAM CHANGES ...........................................................................................19 AFFIRMATIVELY FURTHERING FAIR HOUSING ................................................................19 OTHER ACTIONS TO ADDRESS OBSTACLES IN MEETING UNDERSERVED NEEDS ........................23 LEVERAGING RESOURCES OF PUBLIC AND PRIVATE FUNDS ................................................23 MONITORING.....................................................................................................24 Ensure Monitoring Compliance with Program and Planning Requirements ................................................................................................................24 LEAD BASED PAINT.............................................................................................26 Current Lead Activities and Goals...........................................................28 GENERAL PROGRAM ADMINISTRATION.........................................................................31 HOUSING REHABILITATION ADMINISTRATION..................................................................32 HOUSING NEEDS.........................................................................35 AFFORDABLE HOUSING PROGRAMS............................................................................37 HOUSING REHABILITATION .....................................................................................40 INFILL HOUSING PROGRAM ....................................................................................47 WEST MACEDONIA REDEVELOPMENT .........................................................................50 HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM .............................................................52 Assessment of HOME Funds to Goals and Objectives ............................52 HOME MATCHING REQUIREMENTS..........................................................................54 RECAPTURE PROVISIONS........................................................................................54 Affirmative Marketing..............................................................................54 Anti-Displacement and Relocation..........................................................57 HOMEBUYER ASSISTANCE.......................................................................................60 COMMUNITY HOUSING DEVELOPMENT ORGANIZATION (CHDO) ACTIVITIES ............................63 ELIMINATE BARRIERS TO AFFORDABLE HOUSING............................................................65 FILL GAPS IN LOCAL INSTITUTIONAL STRUCTURE............................................................66 FACILITATE PUBLIC HOUSING AUTHORITY PARTICIPATION/ROLE............................................67 HOMELESSNESS..........................................................................68 HIGH POINT HOUSING COALITION.............................................................................70 GUILFORD/HIGH POINT/GREENSBORO TASK FORCE ON ENDING HOMELESSNESS ......................71 CONTINUUM OF CARE...........................................................................................72

3

MINORITY/ WOMEN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE...................................74 MINORITY/ WOMEN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE..................................................................76 COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELPOMENT DIVISION..........79 COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT CENTER.................................................81 COMMUNITY RESOURCE PROGRAMS...........................................................................85 CITIZENS ADVISORY COUNCIL..................................................................................86 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS (CDBG)....................................................88 Public Service Grants..............................................................................88 CDBG Subrecipient Project Summaries:..................................................90 Community Based Initiatives (CBI) .........................................................96 CBI Project Summaries:...........................................................................98 COMMUNITY MEETING SUMMARIES ............................................113 MACEDONIA NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION................................................................115 BURNS-HILL NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION..............................................................116 WEST END NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION.................................................................117 BROADSTONE VILLAGE CONCERNED CITIZENS (BVCC).................................................118 SOUTHSIDE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION ..............................................................119 WASHINGTON DRIVE NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION......................................................120 FIVE POINTS PRIDE ASSOCIATION ...................................................................121 GRACE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH..................................................................123 HIGHLAND MILLS NEIGHBORHOOD ASSOCIATION ........................................................124 WEED AND SEED PROGRAM........................................................128 PROGRAM OVERVIEW.........................................................................................130 Weed and Seed Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program......131 Weed and Seed Safe Sites....................................................................132 ADDENDUM...............................................................................135 FINANCIAL SUMMARIES.............................................................137 PUBLIC NOTICE FOR CAPER REVIEW............................................141 CONTRACT AND SUBCONTRACT ACTIVITY....................................146 HOME MATCH REPORT...............................................................150 CITIZEN COMMENTS..................................................................154 West End Community Meeting; February 13, 2007, 6:00 PM................156 Southside Community Meeting; February 22, 2007, 6:30 PM...............156 Washington Terrace Park Community Meeting; February 8, 2007, 6 PM ..............................................................................................................157 Highland Mills Community Meeting; March 12, 2007, 7 PM..................158 Macedonia Community Meeting; March 13, 2007, 6 PM ......................159

4

CAPER PUBLIC COMMENTS ........................................................161 FIVE POINT PRIDE ASSOCIATION COMMENTS...............................................................163 CHECKLIST................................................................................ 165 CAPER CHECKLIST..........................................................................................167

5

6

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

7

8

City of High Point Fiscal Year 2006-2007

CAPER
The City of High Point’s Federally-funded Community Development and Housing programs strive for the development of viable urban communities through the provision of decent housing and a suitable living environment for principally low-to moderateincome persons and neighborhoods.

What’s a CAPER?
It’s an acronym for Consolidated Annual Performance & Evaluation Report, an annual report required by the U.S. Housing and Urban Development Department (HUD). It summarizes and evaluates activities funded through the City of High Point’s federal grants: • • Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME) PJ

9

• •

HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME) Consortium, and American Dream Downpayment Initiative (ADDI)

In High Point, the Community Development and Housing Department manages the CDBG, HOME, and ADDI funds received by the City, preparing all plans and reports required by HUD. The basic goals for these funds are to provide decent and affordable housing, a safe and suitable living environment, and a host of public services for primarily low-and moderateincome persons and neighborhoods. The CDBG funds also provide for a host of public service grants allocated to local non-profit and grass-roots organizations to plan and implement a variety of non-housing communitybased programs and projects that principally benefit low/moderate income persons and neighborhoods. The Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) is an important component of the planning process associated with High Point’s Consolidated Plan for Housing and Community Development Programs. Consolidated Plan regulations require any city drawing funds directly from the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development, or HUD, to submit an Annual Action Plan. This Plan describes the housing and community development activities that High Point intends to engage in for the coming year, and sets performance goals for those activities. The goals and activities established in the Annual Plan are drawn from the objectives and priorities established in the five-year Consolidated Plan. Cities that receive these funds are also required to submit an Annual Performance Report, referred to as the CAPER, which reviews a community’s housing and community development activities for the recently completed program year. This Report compares the city’s actual accomplishments to its projected goals and requires the city to evaluate its performance in operating its programs and projects. This annual performance report (CAPER) contains a review and evaluation of the housing and community development activities undertaken by the City of High Point during the period of July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2007. Projected Sources of Funding HUD uses CDBG to plan and implement projects that foster revitalization of eligible communities throughout the United States. High Point is an entitlement city and receives its CDBG allocation directly form HUD. Title 1 of the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, as amended, is the

10

legislation that authorizes the federal government to disburse block grant funds. The primary goal of this law is the development of viable urban communities. Program objectives include the provision of decent housing, a suitable living environment and expanded opportunities principally for low/moderate income individuals and families. The City of High Point has been an entitlement city for over 30 years1. CDBG-funded projects and activities plan must meet one of three broad national objectives: • • • Benefit low and moderate-income persons Aid in the prevention and/or elimination of slums or blight; and Meet community development needs having a particular urgency

All of the City’s CDBG funded activities in this CAPER meet one of these national objectives. Both the HOME and CDBG programs benefited low to moderate income persons 100%. The HOME Investment Partnerships program affirms the federal government’s commitment to: • • • • Provide decent, safe and affordable housing to all Americans Alleviate the problems of excessive rent burdens Alleviate and/or eliminate homelessness; and Eliminate deteriorating housing stock

The HOME program provides funding and guidelines to assist in developing affordable housing strategies that address local housing needs. This program strives to meet both the short-term goal of increasing the supply and availability if affordable housing and the long-term goal of building partnerships between state and local governments and non-profit housing providers. It was created under the auspices of the National Affordable Housing Act of 1990. Funds to operate the program are allocated by formula. Grantees must spend their allocations within five years; otherwise funds are subject to recapture by HUD. In the past the City of High Point has received its allocation of HOME funds as part of a consortium that includes the cities of Greensboro and Burlington and Alamance and Guilford Counties. The City was a participating
1

A city, which based on factors such as its population, age of housing and poverty levels, is entitled to receive funding directly from HUD.

11

jurisdiction in the consortium for a decade2. This report represents the second year that High Point will not be a part of the consortium and will receive funds directly as a HOME participating jurisdiction. HOME projects and activities presented in the City’s 2006-07 CAPER meet one of the two national objectives: • • To expand the supply of decent, safe, sanitary, and affordable housing; and To strengthen public-private partnerships

HUD regulations require the City to identify all resources expended on activities identified in its One-Year Action Plan. These funds were used to develop a coordinated and comprehensive approach to the core goals identified in the plan. The table below shows the projected and actual expenditures for the 2006-07-program year.

Anticipated Funding & Sources
Federal Grant 2006-07 Federal Grant Prior Year Consortium Funds Program Income City Local Funds (HOME Match)

Proposed HOME
$455,153 112,629 238,808 50,000 233,168 $977,870

Proposed CDBG
$461,770 68,000 0 650,000 0 $1,179,770

TOTALS
Proposed Uses of Funding

Description of Affordable Housing and Non-Housing Activities Community Development and Housing has designed and implemented various housing assistance strategies that include rehabilitation, down payment assistance for first-time homebuyers, and affordable housing new construction. The City’s Community and neighborhood development activities are designed to assist with neighborhood improvement projects; assist small businesses; provide public services; help low/moderate income
2

HUD designation as a participating jurisdiction occurs if a State or local government meets the funding thresholds, notifies HUD that it intends to participate in the program, and obtains approval by HUD of a Consolidated Plan.

12

residents acquire needed information, knowledge, and skills to build their capacity; enhance the provision of public services; and provide relocation assistance to residents who are required to move from their homes. A summary of these activities is presented below: Affordable Housing Activities Budget
Project ed No. Act ual No.

Type of Act ivit y
Homes repaired Acquire properties, infill redevelopment PJ Homes purchased Consortium Homes Purchased Homes built and sold Units constructed

Housing Rehabilitation Infill Housing Homebuyer Assistance CHDO Activities Macedonia Redevelopment TOTALS Community & Neighborhood Development Community Resource Programs Public Service Grants Community Based Initiatives Housing Code Relocation TOTALS Program Administration

$1,402, 553 226,000 190,000 155,902 19,037 $1,993, 492 Budget

126 20 30 9 10 195
Project ed No.

68 4 10 15 1 19 117
Act ual No.

Type of Act ivit y
Support public service activities Assist public service agencies Neighborhood improvement projects Relocation assistance

$222,99 0 59,177 20,000 5,000 $307,1 67 Budget

5 8 10 5 28
Project ed No.

12 4 9 1 26
Act ual No.

Type of Act ivit y
Program Administration &

Community Development Block Grant

$208,35 4

N/A

N/A

13

HOME Investment Partnerships Program TOTALS

90,515 $298,8 69

N/A

N/A

Management Program Administration & Management

14

GENERAL

15

16

The Assessment of Progress Toward Five-Year Goals and Objectives The Community Development & Housing Department completed the second year of the Consolidated Plan, which outlined goals and objectives for the City of High Point. The Plan is the road map that outlines the department’s process of achieving the strategic objectives. In accordance with HUD, the Plan must be submitted every five years to illustrate the housing and community development needs in the area and also a coordinated plan to meet those needs. The Plan identified two basic housing goals; 1) Provide Decent and Affordable Housing for Lower-Income Households, and 2) Provide Housing and Services for Homeless Populations with Special Needs. In each goal, there are specific strategies used to obtain the goal. The Department strived to meet those strategies through a variety of affordable housing activities and service to the community. The City’s affordable housing strategies utilize comprehensive homeowner rehabilitation, investor-owner rehabilitation, emergency assistance; homebuyer’s assistance and property acquisition to address distressed or underutilized properties. Specifically, the department uses its CDBG and HOME entitlement funds to meet the five-year strategies while incorporating lead based paint, weatherization, and handicap accessibility in all programs. This year, efforts were made to address strategies involving the utilization of the Housing Authority, Habitat for Humanity and the federal low-income tax credit program. While not all strategies were realized, the department put forth great effort in developing the footprint and will seek to accomplish those five-year goals in FY08. The department continues to be proactive in reaching out to the community by hosting events like Community Development Week, Homeownership Month, Lenders and Realtors Workshops, attending neighborhood meetings, CHDO projects, and infill lot acquisitions. Windley Avenue In summary, progress to the five-year strategic plan is moving steadily forward. In some areas Community Development and Housing has made tremendous strides such as bringing Habitat into the program as a CHDO and the successful implementation of the homebuyer education program. Other areas, like leveraging city resources by utilizing the federal low income tax credit program, continue to fall short. The City has proposed a tax credit project in each of the last two years to have it stalled prior to acceptance.

17

Community Development and Housing takes these five-year strategic objectives very seriously and will continue to address those goals through each Action Plan. Assessment of Progress Toward One-Year Goals and Objectives The Community Development and Housing Department continues to experience mixed results regarding the FY2007 affordable housing goals. Unlike the past, Macedonia, which absorbed a huge proportion of budget and staff resources, has been completed. The 2008 Action Plan does not address any future Macedonia Redevelopment activities. The City’s “ripple theory” is in place. The theory was to come in and make a big impact and realize those efforts by watching the ripple effects. Community Development and Housing has seen this scenario come to life with development on the fringes of the target area. The Macedonia developer built seven additional homes working as the City’s non-profit builder but also purchased six more homes as an independent contractor in the area. This represents a personal investment in the community, which is what the Redevelopment Plan sought to accomplish. Now, staff resources can be redirected to Southside, which proves to be the next formidable redevelopment task. The 2008 Action Plan specifically addresses that community. All of the City’s affordable housing programs served low-moderate-income individuals and increased the supply of quality housing units. While the City strives to meet all its program goals, like the year before, the department completed an overwhelming amount of emergency repairs. Like before, because of the demand of the program, the intake function for the urgent repair program was contracted out to Guilford County Homeownership Center. The program goals are ambitious but fell short of the total number of housing units primarily due to an increase in per unit costs, which reflected the poor conditions of the housing that was repaired. One highlight of the previous year is the City’s aggressive approach to obtain a Lead Based Paint grant from Healthy Homes. The City committed a staff person and procured a consultant to write a $3 million grant to address lead in High Point’s homes. Lead Based Paint is a five-year strategic goal that we address each year in our Action Plan. The Community Development and Housing department also obtained infill-housing lots in the Southside area in anticipation of the redevelopment plan’s focused effort on affordable housing and park development. The department continues to rise up to High Point’s community challenges and put forth an aggressive approach to combat substandard conditions.

18

Self-Evaluation and Performance Measures In 2006, HUD implemented a new performance measurement system in response to Federal legislation for agencies to measure the performance of their programs. The performance measures will give both HUD and the Community Development and Housing Department the capability to assemble and analyze the necessary performance information in order to better inform citizens, funding agencies, and stakeholders how Federally supported community development programs impact the communities. The objectives are outlined in the program descriptions and are followed by the outcomes and staff evaluations. The new performance measurement system is designed to provide common performance measures that apply to all departmental programs; housing, public services, and neighborhoodbased revitalization efforts. Program and project objectives and outcomes will be driven by four common indicators that are reported on throughout the CAPER; amount of funds leveraged, number of units, persons, or households assisted, income levels, and demographics of beneficiaries. Program Changes During fiscal year 2006-2007, there were no amendments or changes to programs established in the CDBG/HOME Annual Plan for July 1, 2006 – June 30, 2007. Although no changes were made programmatically, the department continues to focus on service delivery. As need arises, the city will not hesitate to adjust programs to meet efficiency or community need. Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing Fair housing is based on the concept that all Americans should have equal housing choice. In a housing market with equal housing choice, members of each of the protected classes have a range of housing options similar to the range of options afforded to those who are not members of a protected class. The protected classes of people are race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, and familial status. The premise of fair housing is that all low-income residents would have the same housing choices, in terms of neighborhoods, housing design, tenure type, accessibility, and bedroom size. In short, no person shall be subjected to discrimination because of his or her race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, age, or national origin.

19

Fair housing protections are guaranteed and regulated through a myriad of Federal, state, local statutes, ordinances, regulations, guidelines, and executive orders. The most commonly known of the fair housing laws is the federal Fair Housing Act, or Title VIII of the Civil Rights Act of 1968. The Act and its implementing regulations at 24 CFR Part 100 defines who is protected, what type of housing the law covers, and what types of actions constitute illegal discrimination. The requirements of the Fair Housing Act apply to housing regardless of whether or not it is developed or otherwise assisted with Federal Funds. Although the Fair Housing Act generally requires applicants and residents to be given equal treatment regardless of membership in a protected class, there are certain circumstances when the Act may require a housing provider to treat persons with disabilities differently, to enable them to have equal access to or enjoyment of housing and other housing related programs. For example, the Fair Housing Act directs housing providers to provide “reasonable accommodations” to persons with disabilities. In addition, the Fair Housing Act contains minimal accessibility requirements that apply to the design and construction of new multifamily housing built for first occupancy after March 13, 1991. In addition to Federal legislation, many states and localities have enacted fair housing legislation and oversight. The City of High Point is currently striving to develop and adopt its own Fair Housing Ordinance. This effort is being spearheaded by the High Point Human Relations Department of the City of High Point. This department provides the oversight for Fair Housing. The High Point Human Relations Department provides three principal services to facilitate human rights and relations for citizens, which are Equitable Fair Housing Transactions, Equal Opportunity in Employment, and Multicultural & Diversity Training. In addition, the Department’s mission is to: • • • • • Partner with agencies on initiatives that address human rights issues and improve quality of life Sponsor a student human relations commission for grades 9 – 12 Hold forums Convene special interest meetings Provide special programming

20

Conduct outreach The High Point Human Relations commission is comprised of 13 public citizens and 3 city liaisons that review and advise on issues of human rights. They help to organize special events and build public awareness around human rights issues. There are four main committees under the commission: Executive, Fair Housing, Education, and Special Programs. The commission meets the second Thursday of each month at 5:30 p.m.

As a condition of receiving HOME and other HUD formula-based funding, a “AI” Working Lunch participating jurisdiction (PJ), such as High Point, must submit a Consolidated Plan that analyzes the jurisdiction’s housing market conditions, assesses the housing needs of its lower-income families and other groups within the eligible population, describes a strategy for addressing the identified needs, and articulates an action plan for investing Federal affordable housing dollars. As a part of this plan, which must be approved by HUD, a PJ certifies that it will affirmatively further fair housing. In this pursuit, the PJ is required to: • • • Conduct an analysis to identify impediments to fair housing choice within the jurisdiction (an “Analysis of Impediments,” or “AI”). Take appropriate actions to overcome the effects of any impediments identified through that analysis; and Maintain records reflecting the analysis and actions in this regard.

The AI is an analysis of a wide range of actions including; existing conditions, and policies that affect housing choice, in both the public and private housing sectors and markets, and non-housing issues that affect housing choice and opportunity. In its simplest form, an Analysis of Impediments addresses the question: “Do all residents and potential residents of this jurisdiction have equal access to housing regardless of their race, color, religion, sex, national origin, disability, or familial status? If not, why not?” Impediments to fair housing choice include specific actions as well as the lack of action, as follows:

21

• •

Any actions, omissions, or decisions taken because of race, color, religion, sex disability, familial status, or national origin which restrict housing choices or the availability of housing choices, and Any actions, omissions, or decisions which have the effect of restricting housing choices or the availability of housing choices on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, disability, familial status, or national origin.

The Human Relations Commission and Community Development and Housing Department were especially instrumental this year as Staff collected information for the Analysis of Impediments (AI) to Fair Housing Report. The Department convened public forums around the city so that citizens would have an opportunity to voice their concerns and thoughts about the state of fair housing in High Point and the communities in which they reside. From July 2006 to June 2007, the Human Relations Department received a total of 38 housing related complaints. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: TOTAL CLIENTS 38 Black 28 White 2 Hispanic 7 Other 1 - Asian FHH 24

The Human Relations Department and Commission has engaged in activities this past year that promoted affirmative and proactive fair housing in High Point’s jurisdiction and addressed issues outlined in the previous AI. Standard practices continue to be: • • • • • • Stocking multilingual, current information about fair housing Providing educational talks about fair housing Receiving and investigating fair housing complaints Conducting mediations to resolve fair housing issues Providing a proclamation to the mayor declaring April as Fair Housing Month Sponsoring/attending outreach events to disseminate fair housing information and female head of of complainants, the City get a local fair housing vitally important to this

Because African-Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, households consistently comprise the primary pool of High Point has been diligent in its efforts to ordinance in place. A fair housing ordinance is

22

segment of citizenry; for many times local government is the most immediate and only accessible line of assistance for ensuring equitable fair housing practices. As such, the High Point Human Relations Department & Commission in collaboration with the City Manager, City Attorney, City Council Liaison, CD & Housing, the support of the High Point Housing Coalition, the Citizens Advisory Council, the High Point YWCA, and the Latino Family Center were successful in bringing to the forefront: • • • • The dire need for local legislation as indicated by the AI study The importance of establishing substantial equivalency The financial benefit as a FHAP agency The means to provide citizens with comprehensive fair housing services

The collaborative effort culminated with the submission of a completed draft of a local fair housing ordinance to City Council. In addition, a bill for authorization to enact a local fair housing ordinance has been submitted to the NC state senate and has made it through committee to the senate floor. Once approved by the senate, City Council will have the authority to enact the local fair housing ordinance. Other Actions to Address Obstacles in Meeting Underserved Needs There still exists a need for housing rehabilitative and emergency repair programs to assist low/moderate income persons who cannot afford to repay a loan for reasons of insufficient income, unstable work history, or a poor credit history. While these grants are few in number due to limited resources, the growing waiting list is indicative of the substantial need. Leveraging Resources of Public and Private Funds The City has continued to leverage program dollars to receive benefit in longer lasting methods. Community Development and Housing continues to try and leverage Low Income Housing Tax Credits with the North Carolina Housing Finance Agency but has not been able to get past opposition to the program. This past year the City tried to leverage over $5 million with $400,000 spread over two fiscal years. This would have been a significant leverage of the entitlement dollar if passed. The City continues to leverage private funding through local participating lenders for the Down Payment and Closing Costs Assistance Program funded

23

through the HOME program. The amount of private funds leveraged this fiscal year totaled $2,159,901. The Downpayment and Closing Costs Assistance Program allows the Participating Lender to qualify a low/moderate income homebuyer by supplementing/leveraging the mortgage with public funds to pay down a first mortgage to make it affordable for the homebuyer. The Southside Redevelopment Plan has leveraged City park dollars with the implementation of the new SplashPad located at Morehead Recreation Center. The Department facilitated the community meetings that lead to the decision to construct a splash pad. The Parks and Recreation Department has prioritized the Southside neighborhood and has expended $150,000 in bond funds to construct the first SplashPad in High Point. The Community Based Initiative (CBI) Public Service program requires subrecipients to contribute twenty-five percent (25%) cash or sweat equity match. This fiscal year, $7,100.00 in cash match was leveraged and over $5,200.00 in sweat equity (volunteer hours) was contributed.

Water Cannon at the SplashPad

Monitoring Ensure Monitoring Compliance with Program and Planning Requirements The Community Development and Housing Department has revised their standard monitoring procedures to ensure all subrecipients who receive CDBG funds comply with the applicable CDBG regulations. All subrecipients seeking funding for projects must submit an application. The department staff reviews applications to ensure that they comply with CDBG regulations prior to approval. Once funding is approved for a project, department staff oversees the expenditure of funds for the project. This oversight ensures

24

that CDBG funds are properly expended. Each organization receiving funds must sign a detailed performance contract with the city. This agreement describes all of the Federal laws and regulations to which the organization must adhere. The agreement clearly defines the reporting and project management responsibilities of the subrecipient. The contract also clearly states performance goals that the organization is expected to meet. As a project progresses, subrecipients are required to submit monthly progress reports so that department staff can assess the organization’s performance. The new performance measurement system implemented by HUD in 2006 has been included in the monitoring compliance of the City of High Point’s CDBG programs and planning requirements. The design is to provide common performance measures that apply to all departmental programs: housing, public services and neighborhood-based revitalization efforts. Program and project objectives and outcomes are driven by four common indicators that are reported throughout the year, the amount of funds leveraged, the number of units, persons, or households assisted, the income levels of the households and the demographics of beneficiaries. The Department has also developed procedures that ensure that all of its housing programs or projects that are funded with CDBG and HOME funds meet the regulations for those programs. Any person or household receiving assistance through a housing program must also submit an application. The Department’s staff reviews applications to ensure that the beneficiary and the property involved meet Federal eligibility requirements. The owners of rental property, who receive rehabilitation loans, must agree to affordability criteria and occupancy by low/moderate income persons. The Department maintains a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) manual that is updated regularly to guide affordable housing process. As rehabilitation projects proceed, a department project manager monitors the project’s progress to ensure that this standard is achieved. The city monitors the condition of housing units being purchased by firsttime, low/moderate income homebuyers who receive homebuyer assistance from the city. The city requires that these units meet its Minimum Housing Code prior to the loan closing. The city believes that this standard meets or exceeds Section 8 Housing Quality Standards. City housing inspectors inspect these units to ensure this standard is met. The department’s staff visits subrecipient sites at least twice a year to discuss the project’s progress with its manager and examine appropriate records.

25

Subrecipients were monitored at their sites within the first six months of the fiscal year. If it was a first time project, a visit took place during the first quarter of the fiscal year to review files, documentation and payment status. A monitoring checklist was mailed to each subrecipient with dates and times of the visit and follow-up confirmation. All CDBG funded subrecipients are required to make a mid-year report and/or appearance before the Citizens Advisory Council at a regular meeting to review timeliness. Projects are also required to demonstrate a minimum of low/moderate income benefit ratio of 70% and all areas served must have high concentrations of low/moderate income residents. Lead Based Paint The City of High Point Community Development & Housing Department conducts housing rehabilitation on structures primarily constructed prior to 1978. During the course of most rehabilitation activities, whether emergency, limited or comprehensive in scope, it is likely that painted surfaces will be disturbed. The department conforms to the federal mandate established by Title X of the 1992 Housing and Community Development Act that HUD funded programs, including Housing Rehabilitation Programs, incorporate lead-based paint hazard evaluation, remediation/reduction strategies and clearance requirements for all housing structures built before 1978. Lead is a dangerous and pervasive poison that damages virtually every system in the body. Lead is not naturally in our bodies, and no safety threshold has been established for lead. Anyone at any age-even pets-can become poisoned by lead. Because lead is harmful to the developing brain and nervous system, exposure to lead is especially dangerous to fetuses and young children. Lead in a young child's system hinders neurological development and can lower intelligence levels. Children are particularly at risk for lead poisoning because:

26

• • •

Their bodies and nervous systems are still developing: Frequent hand-to-mouth activity brings a child into greater contact with lead in the environment, especially in lead dust and soil; They absorb and retain a larger percentage of ingested lead per unit of body weight than adults, which increases the toxic effects of the lead.

Over 85 percent of all residential housing built before 1978 contains some lead-based paint. The estimated number of affected households in the United States is believed to exceed 60 million. At the time of the year 2000 census, the City of High Point’s housing demographics indicated that approximately 60% of our local housing stock was built before 1978. Children living in poverty are four times more likely to have elevated blood lead levels than children from wealthier families. Children with elevated blood lead levels are not distributed evenly; rather, they are disproportionately located in older neighborhoods. African-American children are four times more likely to have elevated blood lead levels than white children. Nationwide, more than one-third of African-American children living in large central cities have elevated blood lead levels. Ingestion of lead-contaminated dust is the most common pathway of childhood lead poisoning. Due to its small particle size, lead dust may not be visible to the naked eye and is therefore difficult to clean up. Ingestion of lead dust the size of three granules of sugar, over a period of a few days time, is sufficient enough to severely poison a child! Most commonly, childhood lead poisoning occurs when lead dust gets on children’s hands and toys and then into their bodies through normal hand-to-mouth activities. This dust comes from lead-based paint that has been impacted by weathering and neglect. It is also the result of friction and impact disturbance such as opening and closing windows and doors contaminated by the substance. Repainting and remodeling activities may also disturb lead-based paint. Another significant pathway of lead exposure is from bare lead-contaminated soil. Soil contamination can be found everywhere in the United States – due to past widespread use of 1) leaded gasoline, 2) deteriorating exterior paint on houses, bridges, highways, and industrial facilities, and in some areas, 3) industrial production of lead containing products (battery manufacturing plants). Other sources of lead contamination in a child’s environment can include drinking water (where lead solder was once commonly used in plumbing), imported ceramic tableware, old toys or furniture painted with lead-based paint, and imported crayons and vinyl mini-blinds.

27

To reduce the potential for adverse health effects attributable to the rehabilitation of deteriorated lead-based paint surfaces, the city provides educational material to all rehab customers. All customers receiving housing rehabilitation assistance from the city are informed about the potential health hazards posed by the presence of deteriorated lead-based paint. They are provided with information about protecting their families from this hazardous substance. Project Managers, who oversee rehabilitation projects, are trained to incorporate proper hazard reduction techniques into the treatment of lead-based paint. Currently, our strategy is to presume that lead-based paint is present in all housing built before 1978. Visual assessment, stabilization, and standard treatment methodologies are employed to achieve clearance for each comprehensive rehabilitation project. Current Lead Activities and Goals The City of High Point Community Development & Housing Department has affirmed their support of state and federal goals to end lead-based paint poisoning by 2010. Despite efforts at education and prevention, children in High Point continue to be exposed to lead hazards such as peeling lead-based paint, leadcontaminated dust, mini-blinds and other sources.

28

Currently the Guilford County Department of Public Health has identified

twenty-four (24) children in High Point with Elevated Blood Lead Levels (EBL) greater than ten (10) and is currently monitoring 369 others with EBL above 5. One of our greater challenges includes the increase in elevated blood lead levels in children who are not United States natives.

29

The City of High Point Departments of Community Development & Housing and Geographic Information Systems in collaboration with the NC State Department of Public Health, the Duke University Nicholas School of the Earth and Environment and the Guilford County Department of Public Health to compile data and build a geo-coded mapping system to identify childhood lead poisoning and potential sites of deteriorated lead based paint in order to provide data for the grant application process and to develop strategies for prevention of childhood lead poisoning. The map below shows the location of elevated lead blood level investigations in High Point. Note that the investigations are concentrated in the core-city area. High Point’s older housing, low-income neighborhoods and renter populations are concentrated in core-city neighborhoods also share the unfortunate concentration of lead poisonings. Lead poisoning knows no income limits, but it has been documented through various studies that families with low/moderate incomes and those living in inner cities are most likely to have children who are lead poisoned. With the assistance of a professional consultant and grant writer, the department filed a 2007 HUD Lead-Based Paint Hazard Reduction Program grant. High Point proposes to use Lead hazard Reduction Grant funds to reduce hazards in residential housing and to implement a Lead Safe High Point initiative. The goals of the Lead Safe High Point Initiative include: • • • • • • • Reduce the risk of lead poisoning in targeted core-city neighborhoods; Provide lead remediation services, including repairs or relocations, to one hundred fifty (150) families; Fund an environmental health specialist position in the Guilford County Department of Public Health who would focus exclusively on High Point; Promote increased blood lead level screening of children under six; Provide bi-lingual educational opportunities about the dangers of lead poisoning and actions families can take to protect themselves; Train and certify building owners and contractors and their employees on visual inspections and lead safe work practices; and Create a web-based Lead Safe Registry that list houses that are known to be lead safe as well as houses that have been identified as hazardous.

The City of High Point Community Development & Housing Department supports the Guilford County Lead Reduction Ordinance as adopted by the

30

Guilford County Board of Health, effective January 1, 2006 (the most stringent health regulation in the state). Regulations under the Ordinance: • • Require that all children in Guilford County younger than six are tested for elevated blood lead levels (EBL). Children found to have EBL shall be reported to the North Carolina Department of Public Health, Childhood Environmental Health Division, for immediate referral for the required environmental health investigation to identify the source(s) of the EBL. Identify and monitor any child whose lead level is at or more than 5 milligrams per deciliter of blood. Prior to this regulation, children were monitored only if their lead level was a ten (10) or higher. Requires the homeowner or investor owner of residential housing found to have been the source of lead poisoning of a child (with a level of ten (10) or higher) to remediate the lead hazards. Landlords will not be permitted to rent units identified as hazardous until remediation of lead hazards are completed.

• • •

General Program Administration Allocation: Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: $298,869 $300,238 Administration HOME and CDBG N/A 24 CFR 92.206, 570.200(a)(3)(i)

Administrative costs that are necessary for program planning and management of the CDBG and HOME programs are charged to program administration. The Community Development and Housing Department is responsible for ensuring program implementation in compliance with the national objectives of both programs, as well as state and local requirements. Reasonable administrative and planning costs include, but are not limited to: • • General management, oversight and coordination Salaries, wages, and related costs of the participating jurisdiction’s staff

31

• • • • • • • •

Monitoring progress and compliance with program requirements Preparing reports and other documents related for submission to HUD Coordinating the resolution of audit and monitoring findings Evaluating program results against stated objectives; and Travel costs incurred for official business in carrying out the program Administrative services performed under third party contracts or agreements Capacity building and training activities for staff and non-profits; and Fair housing and activities to affirmatively further fair housing

HUD regulations permit the city to use up to twenty percent (20%) of the CDBG grant and up to ten percent of its HOME grant for reasonable administrative and planning costs. The department has retained Neighboring Concepts (the Southside study consultant) to assist with the implementation of the revitalization plan. Housing Rehabilitation Administration Allocation: Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Included in the Total Costs for Rehabilitation $406,709 Administration CDBG N/A 570.206(g)

Administrative costs are necessary for project management and implementation of the Affordable Housing Programs and activities. Affordable Housing administrative costs include; but are not limited to, staff salaries and fringe benefits for a staff of six, general operating supplies, telephone, communication services, postage, vehicle and mileage expense, printing, miscellaneous services and charges, legal expenses, fees, travel and training, and dues and subscriptions. Staff positions include: 1 Affordable Housing Manager 2 Project Managers 1Housing Specialist 1 Office Supervisor 1 Office Support III 1 Summer Intern

32

33

34

Housing Needs

35

36

Affordable Housing Programs The Community Development and Housing Department strives to strengthen High Point communities by increasing homeownership and housing rehabilitation opportunities enhancing core-city neighborhoods. The corecity consist of 3.5 square miles, approximately seven percent of the city’s land area and is bounded by Lexington Avenue to the north; the US 311 Bypass to the east; Business 85, Main Street and Ward Avenue to the South; Ennis Street, Rotary Drive, Ferndale Boulevard, and North Main Street to the west. This section of the City has a population of just over twenty-one thousand (21,000) residents. The core-city also host most of the public housing communities operated by the High Point Housing Authority. The core city is characterized by a high concentration of low/moderate income families; minorities, renter occupied housing, and houses that are at risk for lead based paint poisoning. The City strives to implant objectives of the 2006-2010 Consolidated Plan that outlined strategies to develop a viable urban community. All affordable housing activities must meet at least one of three national objectives, defined by the Federal Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), which include benefiting low-to-moderate-income persons, aid in the prevention or elimination of slums or blight, or meet a need having a particular urgency. The Department seeks to meet these objectives by implementing and managing the following affordable housing programs:          Down payment Assistance for 1st time homebuyers Comprehensive Homeowner Repair Urgent Homeowner Repair Investor-Owner Repair Infill Housing/Land Acquisition Redevelopment Activities (West Macedonia, Southside) Lead Based Paint Remediation Efforts Environmental Reviews Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (NRSA)

All of these programs are described in the HUD mandated five-year Consolidated Plan and the Annual Action Plans. The current Consolidated Plan outlines how the City will address housing and community needs and priorities for the period of July 1, 2005 through June 30, 2010. The required Annual Action Plan describes how the city plans to implement the activities outlined in the Consolidated Plan in the upcoming fiscal year. This

37

Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER), covers the period of July 1, 2006 through June 30, 2007. The affordable housing programs are funded by several sources including CDBG entitlement and program income, HOME entitlement and program income, and City of High Point general revenue funds. The 2006-2007 Annual Action Plan allocates more than two-thirds of the total budget to the various housing activities.

Affordable Housing Activities Housing Rehabilitation Infill Housing Homebuyer Assistance CHDO Activities Macedonia Redevelopment Total

Budget $1,402,5 53 $226,000 $190,000 $155,902 $19,037 $1,993,4 92

No. Propo sed 126 20 30 9 10 195

No. Actual 68 4 10 15 1 19 117

Performance Measures Homes Repaired Acquire Properties, infill redevelopment PJ Homes Purchased Consortium Homes Purchased Homes Built & Sold Infrastructure and Housing

The City’s affordable housing strategies were focused in three areas during 2006-2007; increasing the supply of safe, sanitary and decent affordable housing (single & multi-family housing development), improving the condition of the existing low income housing stock (housing rehabilitation) and improving the accessibility to affordable housing (homebuyer education and down payment assistance). All program recipients for 2006-2007 qualified by determined HUD income limits. The table below contains 20062007 income limits with breakdowns by family size and income categories. 2006 INCOME LIMITS Persons In Household 30% of Median 50% of Median 80 % of Median

38

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8

$11,850 13,500 15,200 16,900 18,250 19,600 20,950 22,300

$19,750 22,550 25,400 28,200 30,450 32,700 34,950 37,200

$31,550 36,100 40,600 45,100 48,700 52,300 55,900 59,550

39

Housing Rehabilitation Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective: Outcome: Rehabilitations) Performance Measures: repaired Goals: • • • To provide housing rehabilitation services to low and moderate-income homeowners and investor-owners, To extend the economic life of existing housing stock, thereby improving the quality of life for homeowners, and To acquire dilapidated housing for repair and/or demolition to mitigate blighting influences and to eliminate or reduce the risks of lead-based paint poisoning in the Core-City. $1,402,553 $ 720,480 Affordable Housing CDBG and HOME Affordable Housing 24 CFR, 570.202 and 24 CFR, 92.205(a) To conduct substantial and/or emergency repairs on at least 70 homes citywide Sixty-eight (68) units (57 Emergency and 11 One hundred twenty-six (126) Homes

Objectives: • • • To conduct substantial and/or emergency repairs on at least 70 homes citywide, To conduct substantial repairs on ten (10) homes, citywide, and To acquire vacant dilapidated properties The rehabilitation program continues to be the cornerstone of the Community Development and Housing Department. There is a tremendous need in the City of High Point for rehabilitation and large-scale land acquisition. The department has recognized this for years and implemented the emergency grant program in 2004 to address urgent needs quickly in conjunction with our comprehensive program. We have

Before 40

also steadily acquired properties as buying and marketing opportunities presented themselves. This past year the High Point City Council approved the Core City Plan on February 8, 2007. This plan is a comprehensive effort of revitalization in the core city in conjunction with the Macedonia and Southside Plans. Most importantly, it sets forth recommendations for standards to promote unity with new and existing housing. The plan provides a clear blueprint for improving the physical, economic and social facets of High Point’s central core area; it reflects the collective vision of the community. With the adoption of the plan, other City policies will be adapted for consistency with the plan, including zoning, development regulations, and capital improvement projects. The Community Development and Housing department has taken the lead and emerged as a forerunner in the implementation. Although, passed by City Council, actions have not been taken from a regulatory standpoint. The department has become a leader implementing the Plan’s themes within the City through our redevelopment efforts. The most common themes in the plan were recommendations to rehabilitate existing homes and develop appropriate infill housing on vacant parcels that would compliment the respective neighborhoods. In conjunction with the new Core City Plan and the Department’s aggressive attitude to rehabilitation work has begun on a Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy Area (NRSA). The designation is possible due to HUD’s desire to create communities of After opportunity in distressed neighborhoods. Entitlement communities such as High Point may define a NRSA that meets the threshold for low/moderate income residents and is primarily residential. Within the NRSA the City receives much greater flexibility in the use of CDBG funds to stimulate the reinvestment of human and economic capital and by economically empowering low-income residents. In order to enhance the impact of its community development programs in core-city neighborhoods, the department will seek NRSA designation from HUD in specific core-city areas starting with the Southside Community. Before The rehabilitation of the city's aging housing stock is of primary concern and Community Development and Housing utilized CDBG and HOME funds to accomplish rehabilitation goals. There is a demonstrated economic and social

41

benefit of rehabilitation but also a desire to save the character of the corecity. Our program provides repair services to eligible homeowners and investor owners, whose property is in substantial violation of the city’s minimum housing code. The city acts as the owner’s representative to ensure the repairs are performed properly. Community Development and Housing’ s services are second to none and include the inspection and assessment of required repairs; preparation of the work write-up; development of requests for bids; supervision of work and ensure compliance with regulations; and provide lead-based paint clearance dust sampling to assure that the unit is safe for occupancy. The City defines rehabilitation as improving a property significantly to ensure a return to functionality and compliance with the After City’s minimum housing code. The department performs two types of rehabilitation – comprehensive or substantial and emergency. The City’s substantial rehabilitations have a standard dubbed “maintenance free.” At the end of each substantial rehabilitation the property is left in a like new condition leaving the homeowner to tend to routine maintenance and care. Emergency rehabilitations are designed to repair or replace component items only. The department’s most often cited emergencies are heat, plumbing and roofing. Rehabilitation services are provided through either a loan program or emergency home repair grants. Repairs in excess of $7,500 require substantial rehabilitation to the home’s structure, components and systems (including foundations, framing, plumbing, electrical, HVAC, roofs, siding, flooring, windows, and doors). The city also offers an emergency home repair program for income eligible families living in substandard housing requiring immediate attention. In order to enhance our understanding of who is receiving emergency repair services, the department monitors the income levels of service recipients. The graph below charts the income levels of emergency repair service recipients over the last three fiscal years. As in the prior years, at least seventy-five percent (75%) of service recipients had annual household incomes less than $25,000. The City provided emergency repair services to fifty-seven (57) families during the 2006-07-program year. NOTE: For Area Median Family Income (AMFI) see the 2006 INCOME LIMITS table above.

25 20 15 10 5 0 2004-2005 2005-2006 2006-2007

0-30% 31-50% 51-80%

42

AMFI

Priority is given, but not limited to major systems failures such as: • • • • • Roofs, HVAC, Electrical and, Plumbing/Sewer, and Collapsing Floor Systems

Funds from this program may also be used to acquire vacant housing to mitigate blighting influences. Targeted properties are assembled and any structures demolished for redevelopment. All properties to be demolished will be subject to the City’s bid process and tested per EPA asbestos survey protocol. Properties that have been demolished and cleared are made available to affordable housing producers for the construction of new affordable housing. The department utilizes this program to enhance rehabilitation efforts in communities and to acquire parcels for strategic development. This year, seven new homes on Park Street were built from acquisitions. The properties compliment the redevelopment effort in Macedonia. Properties in the West End were conveyed to a local non-profit builder and construction has become on the first of nine new homes set to arrive in FY2008. Households residing in acquired properties will receive benefits in accordance with the Uniform Relocation Act (URA). This strategy of clustering new home development promotes interest, increased sales and stable neighborhoods.

43

Accomplishments: This report period realized fifty-eight (58) emergency repairs completed and ten (10) comprehensive rehabilitations completed totaling sixty-eight rehabilitations. Comprehensive Unit Rehabs s 1928 Boulding 1. 1 Avenue 2. 808 George Place 1 3. 706 Barbee Avenue 1 4. 516 Flint Avenue 1 5. 1707 Oberlin Drive 1 1403 Cloverdale 6. 1 Street 7. 1007 Gordon Street 1 2605 Dallas 8. 1 Avenue 9. 509 Amos Street 1 736 Montlieu 10. 1 Avenue Total Units 10

Emergency Rehabs 1. 2. 3. 1618 Culler Place 1315 Boundary Avenue 1315 Wendell

Unit s 1 1 1 30 . 31 . 32

Emergency Reh abs 825 Willow Place 823 Hickory Chapel Road 810 Central

Unit

1 1 1

44

Avenue 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10 . 11 . 12 . 13 . 14 . 15 . 16 . 17 . 18 . 19 . 20 . 21 . 22 . 23 . 24 1410 Wise Avenue 1454 Kingsway Drive 1508 Davis Avenue 1611 Franklin Avenue 1226 Hoover Avenue 1721 Lamb Avenue 1763 Lamb Avenue 1805 Arden Place 1809 Rotary Drive 1509 Cook Street 1313 Boundary Avenue 123 Kendall Avenue 1225 Carolina Avenue 1219 Cedrow Drive 1213 Camden Avenue 1212 Terrell Drive 1203 Blain Street 1200 Forrest Street 1113 Cedrow Drive 1029 Montlieu Avenue 1012 Meadowbrook 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

. 33 . 34 . 35 . 36 . 37 . 38 . 39 . 40 . 41 . 42 . 43 . 44 . 45 . 46 . 47 . 48 . 49 . 50 . 51 . 52 . 53

Court 809 Willoubar Terrace 808 Kroll Lane 808 George Place 716 Woodrow Avenue 707 Kroll Lane 705 O’Neill Street 704 Ellwood Drive 1822 Pershing Street 611 Montlieu Avenue 303 Windley Street 2031 Wesley Drive 221 Grand Street 2216 Ridgecrest Drive 614 Clover Drive 2900 Central Avenue 600 Habersham Road 325 Amhurst Avenue 302 Hobson Street 407 Meredith Street 409 Brentwood Street 500 Kent Court

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

45

. 25 . 26 . 27 . 28 . 29 .

Blvd 1928 Boulding Avenue 1306 Franklin Avenue 602 Habersham Road 1909 Franklin Avenue 911 Willoubar Terrace Total Units

1 1 1 1 1 58

. 54 . 55 . 56 . 57 . 58 .

501 Fourth Street 506 Pendleton Court 2510 E. Lexington Avenue 1212 Delk Drive 1454 Kingsway Dr

1 1 1 1 1

Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: CDBG Emergency Repairs TOTAL Low Modera CLIENTS Incom te e Income 58 44 13

Blac k 47

Whit e 10

Hispani c 0

Othe r 1Asia n

FHH 8

HOME Comprehensive Rehabilitation TOTAL Low Modera CLIENTS Incom te Blac Whit e Income k e 10 8 2 8 2 Evaluation:

Hispani c 0

Othe r 0

FHH 3

Community Development and Housing continues to seek innovative measures to assist qualified citizens regardless of the challenge. The address

46

breakdown of the units is listed in the Comprehensive Rehabs and Emergency Rehabs tables above. The department did not meet its stated objective to repair 126 homes as set forth in the Annual Action Plan. The initial estimate reflected usage of funds originally programmed for Allen Jay Apartments; a low income housing tax credit development. Unfortunately, the project received a low site score from the NC Housing Finance Agency and the developer declined to go forward with the project, three days before the 2006-07 Annual Plan was scheduled for Council approval. The department decided to reprogram the funds to allow for additional housing rehabilitation activities (primarily emergency repairs). Subsequently, in light of continued flat appropriations by Congress, it was decided to utilize part of those funds to conduct repairs on the Safe Haven and roll the remaining funds forward into the 2007-08 Annual Plan. The city placed liens on all of the comprehensive rehabilitations but the department continued to grant all emergency rehabilitation dollars. Beginning with 2008-2009 program year, the department will place liens on properties receiving emergency repair service as well. The loans are secured by the borrower’s execution of a promissory note and deed of trust that outlines the recapture provisions. Homeowners will be provided with construction management services, including lead based paint hazard assessments, work write-ups, bid letting and site inspections. One of the objectives of neighborhood revitalization is to leverage additional affordable housing production by other parties. The Macedonia Project builder/developer (SHARE) seized the opportunity to increase homeownership and cement our accomplishments in the Macedonia neighborhood by branching out into private rehabilitation to support and sustain affordable housing development activities with the addition of two comprehensive rehabilitations in the Macedonia neighborhood and one (1) comprehensive rehabilitation in the West End community. One (1) additional rehabilitation in the Macedonia neighborhood was underway at this time of this report.

Infill Housing Program Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: $226,000 $55,591 Affordable Housing (New Construction)

47

Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective:

Performance Measures: Goal:

General Funds Affordable Housing N/A To promote the construction of eleven (11) new units of affordable housing City Wide and to plan for additional units in the Southside community Acquire eleven (11) properties

To encourage Core-City housing development to mitigate blighting influences The city continues to investigate all vacant land and derelict properties that come on the market to seek acquisition opportunities. During the past year the following properties were acquired in the Southside area: • • • • 508 602 608 702 Vail Vail Vail Vail Avenue Avenue Avenue Avenue

An objective of the Infill Housing Strategy is to accelerate the development of new housing in High Point’s most distressed census tract areas as part of a comprehensive community revitalization strategy. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, a "distressed" census track is one that has a forty percent-plus (40%+) poverty rate. These tracks are concentrated in the following High Point neighborhoods: Southside, West End, Macedonia, Washington Drive and East Central. Geographically, these neighborhoods are located in the Core-city area of downtown High Point. For-profit developers rarely go into these neighborhoods without incentives. Basic issues of financial feasibility prevent the private sector from taking on ventures in these low-income neighborhoods.

48

Barriers include: decrepit infrastructure (sewers, water, etc.), low appraised values, high costs of development, expensive lien clearance, high relocation expenses, and the difficulty of acquiring contiguous real estate parcels. High Point’s Infill Housing Strategy continues to be to seek out underutilized opportunities inclusive of the large number of vacant lots and derelict housing (for acquisition and demolition) that could be land banked relatively cheaply for future development of new single family homes. Our main infill focus continues to be in the Southside community, building on the momentum of previous years and the acquisition of properties in clusters. The planning process for the addition of nine new homes, that will face the Southside Recreation Center Park complete with walking trails, picnic shelters and Splash Pad, remains underway. The city Parks and Recreation Department has completed the Splash Pad and playground. Towards this end we continue to Completed Demolition retain the consulting services of Neighboring Concepts, the authors of the original Southside Redevelopment Plan, as advisors to the Southside neighborhood. Further, the city’s Public Services Department will be pursuing infrastructure improvements in the Southside community, including improved storm water control measures. The City’s goal was to facilitate the construction of 20 new affordable singlefamily homes for low/moderate income homebuyers by the end of the fiscal year. While the City did not meet that goal, progress towards the overall goal include strategic land/parcel accumulation, participation on the planning process for the city’s 2007 Core-City Plan, and continuation of the consulting services of Neighboring Concepts. Outside of the Southside Infill initiative, the Infill Housing program also developed affordable housing opportunities in the Washington Drive and West End communities. With department guidance Habitat for Humanity of High Point, Archdale, and Trinity became a certified CHDO. Habitat for Humanity will develop six (6) contiguous new single-family homes on Graves Avenue. The site has been cleared and is ready for construction. Additionally, SHARE of NC, Inc., a non-profit builder, has been conveyed three of nine lots slated for development of new single family housing in the West End neighborhood.

49

Accomplishments: The units were not completed as scheduled. Acquired four (4) Infill lots this fiscal year. Current Infill Housing Land Acquisition Inventory: 1124 Adams 1701 Graves 464 Meredith 801 Amos 1703 Graves 307 Park 802 Amos 1705 Graves 808 Tryon 803 Amos 1707 Graves 508 Vail 313 Cedar 1709 Graves 601 Vail (71, 534 sq ft) 611 Cross 1711 Graves 602 Vail 608 Cross 809 George 608 Vail 613 Cross 462 Meredith 702 Vail Evaluation: The City’s goal was to facilitate the construction of eleven (11) new affordable single-family homes for low/moderate income homebuyers by the end of the fiscal year. While the City did not meet that goal, progress towards the overall goal includes strategic land/parcel accumulation, participation on the planning process for the city’s 2007 Core-City Plan and continuation of the consulting services of Neighboring Concepts.

801 Vail 802 Vail 803 Vail 1523 Willard 229 Windley 232 Windley 502 White Oak 504 White Oak

West Macedonia Redevelopment Allocation: Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective: Outcome: Performance Measures: $19,037 $200 Affordable Housing Infrastructure HOME Investment Partnerships, General Fund Affordable Housing 24 CFR 92.205(a)(1) To facilitate the construction of an additional ten affordable homeownership opportunities. To provide home ownership opportunities for low/moderate income families. Nineteen (19) Units constructed

50

The City has allocated CDBG and HOME funds to implement well-designed affordable homeownership opportunities in Macedonia. To date six new homeowners have decided to invest in the community with long-term mortgages. This represents a capital investment in the community that the department has spent years cultivating. Council approved the West Macedonia Redevelopment Plan on July 12, 1999. Subsequently, substantial redevelopment activities have been conducted in the project area. During the previous four years the following activities were completed: • • • • • Land acquisition assembly; Relocation; Demolition and clearance; Affordable housing development and related improvements; and, Development of public facilities for community use.

The City issued a request for proposals for the construction of affordable housing units in the redevelopment area during the spring of 2003; the Brownsfield Steering Committee approved the proposal submitted by SHARE of North Carolina, Inc. Ground was broken on the first of twenty-one new homes on November 24, 2003. Of that number, nine homes have been completed with construction pending on the remaining twelve (12) homes. Construction was complete in 2006-07. Macedonia Accomplishments: • • SHARE constructed fifteen (15) new single-family units in Macedonia's final two phases (Park Street and Macedonia Way) Four (4) additional privately developed (SHARE) new single-family units across the street from Macedonia target area on Park St, Wise Ave., and Clay Ave with three more under construction.

51

Developer (SHARE) has branched out into private rehabilitation to support new housing development with two comprehensive rehabilitations of single-family dwellings completed and one (1) additional rehabilitation underway. New Home in

Evaluation: All of the groundwork laid over the previous years with the acquisition, demolition, and infrastructure improvements paired with our homebuyer program culminated with the Macedonia Project being declared a huge success. The final two phases of the Macedonia Project coincided with additional development adjacent to the Macedonia Project target area. The builder/developer (SHARE) has expanded operations deeper into the neighborhood with additional new housing development and rehabilitation of existing properties to layer strong home ownership possibilities within the greater Macedonia neighborhood at different price points. HOME Investment Partnership Program

Assessment of HOME Funds to Goals and Objectives High Point’s HOME 2006-07 allocation was $455,153 combined with ADDI, HOME program income and a minimum twenty five percent (25%) nonfederal match for a combined budget of $1,089,758. The budget also reflects Greensboro Consortium funds. The City dissolved its partnership with the Consortium two years ago but has executed a programmatic agreement to expend the entirety of the consortium dollars. Next fiscal year will represent the last year of Consortium funds in the City budget. The remainder of these funds has been budgeted for Southside development and will be expended in FY08. Last year, all HOME funds were used to continue the city’s affordable housing activities. The intent of the HOME program is to implement multi-year housing strategies and address other costs related to the development of affordable housing. These activities include down payment assistance to first-time homebuyers, comprehensive rehabilitation, land acquisition, new housing construction, site improvements, demolition and clearance, relocation expenses, redevelopment areas and other related activities. FY2006-07 Funding Sources

52

Anticipated Funding: Federal Grant Program Income Guilford County Prior Years City Local Funds TOTAL

HOME 2006-07 $455,153 50,000 0 233,168 $738,321

HOME Prior Year $112,6 29 0 238,80 8 0 $351,4 37

Total All Funds $567,782 50,000 238,808 233,168 $1,089,758

Distribution for HOME Activity Expenditures Proposed Expenditure s $19,037 $808,304 $190,000 $155,902 $226,000 $90,515

HOME Activity Macedonia Homeowner Rehabilitation First-Time Homebuyer Assistance HOME Set-Aside (CHDO) Infill Housing (HOME Match) Administration-High Point

Actual Expenditures $200 $308,326 $199,537 $25,310 $55,591 $40,778

53

TOTALS HOME Program Income TOTAL HOME Expenditures HOME Matching Requirements

$1,489,3 94 $738,321 $751,073

$629,742 $33,868 $595,874

Jurisdictions participating in the HOME program are required to make contributions to housing that qualifies as affordable housing. During a fiscal year, the contributions or match must total not less than 25 percent (25%) of the HOME funds drawn from the jurisdiction’s HOME Investment Trust Fund Treasure account in that fiscal year for project costs, unless the participating jurisdiction has received a reduction in the match requirement. The City appropriates the required funds to match HOME project costs annually. When the City reimburses itself eligible HOME expenditures, the City draws the sum of total expenditure minus the required match. Consequently, the City’s required HOME match is realized when the funds are drawn from the treasury.

Recapture Provisions The City of High Point provides loans, payable in monthly installments (loans may also be deferred), to income eligible homebuyers for down payment and closing cost assistance and housing rehabilitation services. Typically, the loan is due and payable in full if the home is sold, transferred, or refinanced for any reason. The City of High Point applies recapture provisions consistent with 24 CFR Part 92.254 in its deeds of trust that call for accelerated repayment of loans in the case of resale, refinancing, or failure to exist as a primary residence of the home receiving assistance. However, the homeowner is permitted to 39 refinance the second mortgage without repayment in full if the borrower can document that the refinancing is for the sole purpose of lowering the first-mortgage interest rate or making improvements to the home. The borrower is not permitted to consolidate debts or receive cash at closing. Affirmative Marketing

54

As a HOME Participating Jurisdiction (PJ), the City of High Point must adopt affirmative marketing procedures and requirements for any housing with five or more HOME-assisted units. Affirmative marketing differs from general marketing activities because it specifically targets potential tenants and homebuyers who are least likely to apply for the housing, in order to make them aware of available affordable housing opportunities. PJs have an obligation to develop and adopt affirmative marketing procedures, and to specify the Certified HUD CCCS New Homebuyer affirmative marketing Class procedures that they will require project owners to undertake. In addition, PJs must periodically evaluate the impact of their affirmative marketing procedures to ensure that they are meeting the goals of affirmative marketing. One of the methods used by the City to meet this requirement is through the regular provision of homebuyer education workshops. The Department contracts with Consumer Credit Counseling Services (CCCS), a division of Family Service of the Piedmont, Inc. to provide twelve (12) monthly first-time homebuyer seminars using the NFCC Keys to Home Ownership, HUDapproved curriculum. CCCS was responsible for marketing the homebuyer/homeowner education program through public access TV, local newspapers and custom-made brochures/flyers. Two newspaper advertisements are placed in the High Point Enterprise prior to each class. CCCS and Family Service marketing staff received initial approval on ad templates used for all subsequent ads (with appropriate changes on date and locations). Family Service’s marketing director was given some discretion in the scheduling of these ads based on what proved to be most effective for generating participants. In order to assure access to low-income residents, the City reserves 5 seats in each class for residents of the High Point Housing Authority. Flyers advertising the dates and location of scheduled homebuyer education classes were placed in the numerous locations to maximize circulation: • Various sites in City Hall (Collections Department Pay Window, CD&H Department and City Hall Bulletin Boards)

55

• • •

City Hall at the Mall, Community & Neighborhood Development Center; and High Point Public Library.

Additionally, flyers and posters were located at the various sites of the homebuyer education classes; specifically Southside Recreation Center, Roy B Culler Jr. Senior Center, Community Neighborhood Development Center and Macedonia Family Resource Center in an effort to ensure that all persons, regardless of their race, color, national origin, age, religion, sex, disability or familiar status were aware of the affordable housing opportunities generated by the HOME Program activities. The City also facilitates an annual Lender’s Certification and Realtor Information Workshop. The workshop reviews with current and new financial institutions, the lending criteria to access the City’s down-payment assistance program. The City’s lending requirements Da : Thursday, June 14, 2007 te Time 9 AM—4 PM, with a lig breakfast serve at : ht d are designed to protect 8:30 AM low/moderate income Pla : Mace ce donia Re sourceFamily Cente r 401 Lake Avenue, Hig Point, NC h homebuyers from predatory With S a rsfrom: pe ke lending practices. Predatory NC Hous Fina Ag ncy, HUD, Cons ing nce e ume Cre r dit lending practices may Couns ling Tria EDC, LA e , d NDEX, Ame n Home rica include, but are not limited to, Mortg g , Hig Point Hous Authority, Guilford ae h ing County Home ne hip Ce r, S ow rs nte HARE, Aus & tin excessively high fees and Dick Attorne a La , a De rry Re lty ys t w nd Be ’s a commissions, the Contact pers Sony Randolph on: é misrepresentation of the PLEAS RS BY June8, 2007 E VP mortgage terms and Phone: 336.822.4791 conditions, high interest rates Email: sonye.ra ndolph@ highpointnc.gov PRESENTED BY THE CITY OF HIGH POINT and repeated financing of loans and balloon payments. In order to become a Participating Lender the institution must offer:

Le rs Ce nde rtification & Re altors Workshop
• • • • • •

Confirming loans with 1% or less origination fees, No associated charges, i.e. broker fees, costs, etc. for providing the loan, LTV not less than 90%, A maximum loan that does not exceed the FHA Mortgage limit, market interest rate, Lenders must also inform, educate and facilitate the application process, Ensure applicant’s eligibility, Mortgage brokers must be licensed and submit copy of lender’s certification.

56

Complete and submit the required document package on behalf of the buyer to CD & Housing.

Lenders and Realtors are notified of the Workshop by means of a postcard with a follow-up e-mail invitation/reminder. A current list of the Participating Lenders is available on the Department website located at www.highpoint.net/cd. Anti-Displacement and Relocation The City of High Point has a Relocation Assistance Plan that ensures uniformity in aiding persons displaced by Minimum Housing Code Enforcement. Extra steps are made to minimize displacement to tenants. Minimum Housing Code provides owners and property managers with ninety days to repair their substandard units. Failure to comply results in notification to owners and tenants that the unit will be placard and closed immediately after the tenant vacates the structure (thirty days to vacate). Correspondence and a Relocation Assistance brochure (explanation of the relocation program) are personally given to displaced households applying for assistance to ensure their understanding of their rights within the relocation process. Assistance is available to both renters and homeowners who are required to move from their homes due to the enforcement of the city’s minimum housing code. Funds may be used to pay moving expenses and/or rental security deposits. The number of rooms in the substandard unit determines relocation benefits. The maximum relocation benefit is $500 per household. Relocation due to code enforcement is a direct benefit provided without regard to family income. Com pliance with URA The city of High Point complies with the Uniform Relocation Act (URA) relative to providing relocation benefits to eligible persons and households displaced through federally assisted programs and activities. The program year, the City acquired 4 properties. The department’s acquisition strategy focuses on contiguous properties within the Core City area and in particular, Macedonia and Southside neighborhoods to compliment redevelopment efforts. Occasionally, the department researches and investigates acquisition opportunities outside those areas to remove a blighting influence. The City strives to remove the

57

development barriers that may exist and bid the properties back out to builders for affordable housing development. This past year, the properties in the West End neighborhood were bid out to a non-profit developer, SHARE of NC, Inc., in which, the City removed the development barriers to pave the way for new affordable homes. Accomplishments: The following properties were acquired this program year: 508 Vail Avenue 602 Vail Avenue Evaluation: All acquisitions were vacant except one. The individual was relocated after June 30, 2007 and those expenditures will be included in the next CAPER period. 608 Vail Avenue 702 Vail Avenue

Relocation Assistance Due To Code Enforcem ent Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective: Outcome: Public Service Access: Performance Measures: $5,000 $410 CDBG Public Service Subrecipient CDBG Low/moderate income 570.201(1) and 570.606(d) Provide assistance for up to ten households by June 30, 2007. (Decent Housing) Availability/Accessibility Improved To provide opportunities for up to ten households to relocate due to the Enforcement of the city’s Minimum Housing Code.

Project Description: The City of High Point has a Relocation Assistance Plan that ensures uniformity in aiding persons displaced by Minimum Housing Code Enforcement. Minimum Housing Code provides owners and property managers with ninety days to repair their substandard units. Failure to comply results in notification to owners and tenants that the unit will be

58

placard and closed immediately after the tenant vacates the structure (thirty days to vacate). Correspondence and a Relocation Assistance brochure (explanation of the relocation program) are personally given to displaced households applying for assistance to ensure their understanding of their rights within the relocation process. Relocation Assistance is available to both renters and homeowners who are required to move from their homes due to the enforcement of the city’s Minimum Housing Code. Funds may be used to pay moving expenses and/or rental security deposits. The number of rooms in the substandard unit determines relocation benefits and the amount of benefits is consistent with the Uniform Relocation Act. Relocation due to code enforcement is a direct benefit provided without regard to family income. Objectives:
• •

Provide relocation assistance (moving expenses and security deposits) to eligible applicants Assist qualified applicants in locating and securing standard housing

Accomplishments:
• •

A total of three households were inspected by the city’s Minimum Housing Code Enforcement and referred for relocation assistance. One referral received relocation moving expenses to move into a standard unit, however the two remaining referrals chose not to participate in the Relocation Plan

Income, Racial and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: TOTAL CLIENTS 1 Low Incom e 0 Moderat e Income 1 Blac k 1 Whit e 0 Hispani c 0 Othe r 0 FH H 0

Evaluation: The Relocation Assistance Program provided a valuable service to the High Point resident who was forced to move from the unit that was declared substandard and unfit for human habitation. The goal for this program fell

59

short of its goal to assist ten families because only three referrals were made, and two of those clients declined assistance. However, no additional families or individuals were displaced due to code enforcement. Homebuyer Assistance Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective: Outcome: Performance Measures: $190,000 $199,537 First -Time Homebuyer HOME PJ Low to moderate income 24 CFR Part 92.254 To assist low-to-moderate income homebuyers purchase 30 homes. Affordability Assist thirty (30) First-Time Homebuyers

Goal: • To assist thirty (30) low-to-moderate income families purchase homes. Homebuyer assistance is critical to the City’s goal of providing decent, safe, and sanitary housing. The Homebuyer program provides down payment and closing cost assistance to first time homebuyers to reduce out of pocket costs in the form of a deferred low interest rate loan. Homebuyer assistance is offered for the purchase of homes in the city limits of High Point. Traditionally, assistance is up to $5,000 that can be used for closing costs and/or lowering of the down payment. The department offers incentives in Macedonia up to $7,500 and the CHDO project on Windley Street offers assistance up to $15,000 as an incentive for homebuyers to purchase in these areas. As customary, the department invited local realtors and lenders to a required information/certification session held annually by the Housing Staff. The class is mandatory to participate in our program. Four years ago, there was a feeling that homebuyers were not being told about our program and being made to reapply after their application process with the lender. Also, lender fees and associated costs were creeping into Good Faith Estimates that shouldn't be there. It was determined that the application process needed to be streamlined. In order for this to occur, lenders had to be made aware of the programs and its guidelines. What has resulted is an efficient system

60

where a client comes applies for assistance with completed paperwork and a reputable lender. One of the basic program requirements is the completion of a 6-hour Homebuyer Education class offered Cit o H hPo t y f ig in Co m n yD v lo m n &H u g m u it e e p e t o sin by Consumer Credit Counseling D p rt e t e a mn Services (CCCS). This class is M Your D ake ream of Hom s eownership sponsored by the Community In a Reality to Development & Housing Department ATTEND AHOMEBUYER EDUC ATION CLASS through a contractual relationship SPONSORED BY THE CITY OF HIGH POINT with CCCS. Last year classes were COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT & HOUING DEPAR S TMENT offered and citizens completing the FREE Certified HUD classes to be held in various locations throughout the High Point Area. Future hom eow ners are invited to attend the following class: class received a Homebuyer Education Certificate. Consumer Thursday J anuary 26, 200 4:30PM— 9:00PM , 7 Credit Counseling Service has agreed Com unity & Neighborhood Developm Center m ent to partner with the City of High Point (form 4 Street Library & W & Seed) erly eed 201 Fourth Street High Point, NC 27260 to offer this valuable information (3 6) 8 3 041 3 8 -3 again for FY2008. The classes are six hours in length, free to the public and Additiona cla se will bes du d a a oun d. l s s che le nd nn ce all participants receive a certificate when completed. The classes Re is tion re g tra quire Me lspro d. a vide d. comprehensively cover the home To reg r, ple ca (3 6) 88 349 iste ase ll 3 3-3 Must com teoneclassto re ple ceivethece rtificatere quire to apply for the d purchasing process. Topics covered City of High Point’sDown Payme AssistanceProg . nt ram include a homeownership overview, financing a home, budgeting and credit counseling, working with a real estate professional and predatory lending & fair housing. Typically, the class is offered once a month on a Saturday at different locations throughout the City. This past year, because of the popularity and demand of the program, several evening classes were added in the fall in addition to the Saturday class. This lasted until December when demand subsided. Other basic Downpayment Assistance program requirements include meeting mandatory income eligibility requirements established by HUD, purchasing a home within the City Limits of High Point, and contributing $500 of an applicant's own money toward the purchase. Within the next year, it is anticipated that the program accomplishments will double as city-assisted housing units come online with infill and CHDO development. Currently the City of High Point has nineteen homes under construction that will be online in FY2008.
th

The sales price of homes purchased with assistance from this program cannot exceed the Federal Housing Administration (FHA) basic standard mortgage limit for Guilford County, which is $200,160 for 2007. Loans are

61

secured by a promissory note and deed of trust that outlines recapture provisions in accordance with 24 CFR Part 92.254. Liens coinciding with the loan terms are placed on all properties. One of High Point’s new initiatives for FY2008, contingent upon Council approval, is the implementation of a Public Safety Residence Assistance Program. The purpose of the program is to provide High Point Public Safety Officers with the financial assistance of a one time and no interest, forgivable loan to assist with the purchase of a principal residence within the Core-City area of High Point; assistance is increased for targeted communities (Southside, West End, Macedonia, East Central and Washington Drive). All properties purchased under this program must be located within the CoreCity area of High Point and must be the principal residence of the buyer. Properties purchased in targeted communities of the Core-City will be eligible for $15,000.00 in assistance. Properties purchased outside of the targeted communities will be eligible for $5,000.00 in assistance. Accomplishments: The department was successful in providing down payment/closing costs assistance to first-time homebuyers to purchase the following homes: 233 Windley Street 311 Edgeworth 424 Macedonia Way 815 Hopewell Street 2729 Alpha Street 408 Macedonia Way 2920 Station Court 426 Macedonia Way 217 Windley Street 806 Park Place 3625 Akers Court 432 Macedonia Way 817 Joines Street 3222 Wellingford Drive 1000 Park Street 2723 Alpha Street 910 Park Street 1205 Day Place 420 Macedonia Way 1200 Springfield Avenue 817 Hopewell Avenue 412 Macedonia Way 2721 Alpha Street 404 Macedonia Way 503 Clay Avenue

Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 10 Low Incom e 3 Moder ate Income 7 Black 7 White 2 Hispa nic 1 Other 1- ME FHH 8

Note: There were also fifteen (15) Homebuyers who received assistance with Consortium HOME funds.

62

The demographic breakdown on these clients has been provided to the City of Greensboro for inclusion in their CAPER and IDIS reporting. Evaluation: The department completed twenty-five (25) downpayment assistance loans to first-time homebuyers. This was short of the goal by 5 loans. The shortage was due in part because of the vacancy left by the Housing Specialist during the first quarter of the fiscal year. The department was initially unsuccessful in securing a qualified full-time candidate. Therefore, the department contracted with Guilford County Homeownership Center to facilitate the down payment assistance program. Also, the production number was hampered due to the City’s CHDO and potential CHDOs to produce in the program year. Community Housing Development Organization (CHDO) Activities Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective: Outcome: Performance Measures: Time Homebuyers Goal: • To provide affordable homeownership opportunities to nine (9) income eligible families. Community Housing Development Organizations or CHDOs are nonprofit organizations whose purpose is to provide decent and affordable housing to low/moderate income persons. In order to be certified as a CHDO, a non-profit organization must meet HUD regulatory $155,902 $25,310 New construction of affordable housing HOME Investment Partnership Program Affordable Housing 24 CFR Part 92.300 Construct nine (9) affordable houses purchase by income eligible families

for

Affordable new constructed houses Build and sell nine (9) homes to First-

63

requirements pertaining to their legal status, organizational structure and capacity and experience. The HOME Investment Partnership Act provides for a mandatory set-aside of a minimum of fifteen percent (15%) of the HOME allocation for the development of affordable housing opportunities through Community Housing Development Organizations (CHDO). The City of High Point currently supports two CHDOs. The first is Triad Economic Development Corporation. This organization, having completed two new single-family homes on Windley Street, has sold one. Two additional sites have been conveyed to Triad and are pending construction. Three other lots have been acquired for a Triad CHDO activity and are pending conveyance. In total, Triad will provide six units of affordable single-family homes on Windley Street. The remaining home is for sale at a cost of $80,000. The City is also offering up to $15,000 in down payment and/or closing costs assistance. The second CHDO is Habitat for Humanity of High Point, Archdale, and Trinity, which became a certified CHDO on May 30, 2007. Habitat for Humanity will develop six contiguous new single-family homes on Graves Avenue and one single family home on West Point Boulevard. The site has been cleared and is ready for construction. The department hosted a training event conduct by Gary Dimmick, CPD Field Director and invited local non-profits to an informational session. Habitat for Humanity of High Point, Archdale, and Trinity along with Family Services of the Piedmont, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and the Arc of North Carolina attended the training. It was a productive event and yielded one potential prospect and one additional CHDO.

64

The City will continue to recruit non-profits dedicated to serving traditional low-income populations. Accomplishments: During this report period, one house on Windley Street was sold to a FirstTime Homebuyer. The other sites were not completed as scheduled. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 1 Low Incom e 1 Moder ate Income 0 Black 1 White 0 Hispa nic 0 Other 0 FHH 0

Evaluation: The city’s goal was to facilitate the construction of nine (9) new, affordable homes for low- to moderate-income homebuyers by the end of the fiscal year. While the city did not meet that goal, progress was made to accomplish that goal. Triad Economic Development Corporation (Triad EDC), having sold one unit, continues to experience several stumbling blocks, primarily crime and vandalism, in the area. In response, the city facilitated a partnership between Triad, the Police Department and the community. City personnel and Triad attend all neighborhood watch meetings in the area to better understand and provide assistance to the community. Also, Habitat for Humanity will partner with the city on the development of six additional units on Grave Avenue to be under construction by October 2007. Eliminate Barriers to Affordable Housing Staffs from the City of High Point’s Department of Planning and Development and Community Development and Housing Department have continued to examine the city’s public policies and regulations relating to housing and residential development. It is believed that no public policies, regulations or ordinances have a significant negative impact on the cost of housing, or on the public incentives available to develop, maintain, or improve affordable housing. The City of High Point, therefore, plans no strategy to remove or ameliorate the affect of its policies, regulations or ordinances at this time. The City of High Point will continue to work with local and regional builders to increase the supply of affordable housing through new construction and

65

rehabilitation of existing housing stock. The City will also continue its efforts to reduce instances of housing discrimination through public education about fair housing and by utilizing the resources of local, state and federal fair housing agencies to deal with unfair housing practices. A staff person from the Human Relations Commission has been assigned the responsibilities of receiving fair housing complaints and implementing the city’s Fair Housing Plan. This includes the education of local builders and realtors concerning fair housing issues. Eliminate Barriers to Affordable Housing Staffs from the City of High Point’s Department of Planning and Development and Community Development and Housing Department have continued to examine the city’s public policies and regulations relating to housing and residential development. It is believed that no public policies, regulations or ordinances have a significant negative impact on the cost of housing, or on the public incentives available to develop, maintain, or improve affordable housing. The City of High Point, therefore, plans no strategy to remove or ameliorate the affect of its policies, regulations or ordinances at this time. The City of High Point will continue to work with local and regional builders to increase the supply of affordable housing through new construction and rehabilitation of existing housing stock. The City will also continue its efforts to reduce instances of housing discrimination through public education about fair housing and by utilizing the resources of local, state and federal fair housing agencies to deal with unfair housing practices. A staff person from the Human Relations Commission has been assigned the responsibilities of receiving fair housing complaints and implementing the city’s Fair Housing Plan. This includes the education of local builders and realtors concerning fair housing issues. Fill Gaps in Local Institutional Structure Affordable housing in High Point is provided through a variety of public agencies, non-profit organizations, and private sector developers and lenders. In many cases, individual housing providers focus their efforts on specific income groups, tenure types, or on providing certain types of housing and supportive services.

66

Facilitate Public Housing Authority Participation/Role The City of High Point has enjoyed a positive relationship with the High Point Housing Authority for many years. The City of High Point staff and Housing Authority staff work cooperatively and share information relative to the development of annual plans and performance reports.

67

HOMELESSNESS

High Point Housing Coalition The Community Development and Housing Department work closely with the High Point Housing Coalition, a task force of local homeless shelters and other organizations that provide a special need to communities in High Point. The Coalition meets on a monthly basis to address the increasing need for affordable housing and to assist the homeless. The High Point Housing Coalition and the Homeless Prevention Coalition of Guilford County will continue to meet on a regular basis, offering their ongoing supportive services to agencies and homeless providers of High Point and Greensboro. The Homeless Prevention Coalition of Guilford (HPCGC) is a group of individuals, service agencies, governmental entities and faith-based organizations that are working to end homeless in Guilford County. The High Point Housing Coalition is seeking additional grant funds to hire a part-time office support person to ease and promote affordable housing, assist the homeless, provide emergency assistance, document the necessary data and reporting information to members, agencies and other non-profits. High Points Housing Coalition’s successes over the past year includes: • • • • • • • A Proclamation read by the Mayor, declaring Monday, December 18, 2007 as National Memorial Homeless Person’s Day. A homeless program held at the First Baptist Church, honoring the homeless who died during the year 2006 in High Point. The City of High Point in collaborative with Open Door Ministries, received a Supportive Housing Grant in the amount of $265,440. The Salvation Army received a Supportive Housing Program Grant in the amount of $23,505. Open Door Ministries applied and received a Supportive Housing Program Grant in the amount of $48,919. Alcohol & Drug Services of Guilford received a Supportive Housing Program grant in the amount of $38,838 Conducted a Point-In-Time count in the city of High Point on January 23, 2007 Point-In-Time Count Results Sub-Population Number

Single Men Single Women Adult Males Adult Females Male Children Female Children TOTAL Number of families assisted

183 75 7 19 16 20 320 19

Guilford/High Point/Greensboro Task Force on Ending Homelessness The Task Force met regularly each month through December 2006. Meetings were held on August 24, 2006, on September 28, 2006, on November 9, 2006, and on December 14, 2006. The Task Force held a Town Hall Meeting in Greensboro on September 12, 2006, and one in High Point on September 19, 2006. Mayor Keith Holliday opened the Greensboro meeting, and Mayor Rebecca Smothers opened the High Point meeting. The meetings provided opportunities for the Task Force to present information on homelessness to community participants and to gather feedback from the participants to include in their planning. Additionally, the Data Collection Committee oversaw focus groups with providers of homeless services and with homeless individuals to gather their feedback for planning. On Friday, October 6, 2006, the Task Force hosted Philip Mangano, Executive Director of the U.S. Interagency Council on Homelessness, at a meeting in Jamestown. The meeting included providers of services to the homeless and leaders of local faith communities, who heard a presentation from Mr. Mangano and provided their comments and input for the planning process. The Task Force meeting on November 9, 2006, was a joint meeting with the Homeless Prevention Coalition of Guilford County and included presentations from New Orleans providers of “Housing First” (housing and supportive services). The Prevention and Supportive Services and the Housing Committees met regularly to review best practices and develop and put into place recommendations for the Ten Year Plan on Ending Homelessness. A Task Force meeting was held December 14, 2006 to receive recommendations and revisions by assigned committees. The

Implementation Committee was charged also with completing the Plan and developing a recommended implementation structure and budget. The Implementation Committee met on January 9, 2007, January 23, 2007, and on February 6, 2007, to finalize the recommendations and develop the implementation structure and budget. The committee met again also on February 20, 2007 to announce a proposed completion date of the Plan. Upon completion of the Plan, it will be presented to the Task Force for approval, to the elected officials, staff, and to the community at large. The Guilford County Board of Commissions presented the Ten Year Plan To End Homelessness in Guilford County, High Point and Greensboro on Monday, June 4, 2007, 3:00 p.m. at the Auditorium of Guilford Technical Community College.

Continuum of Care The Homeless Prevention of Guilford accomplished the following goals: • County Continuum of Care

Conducted a Point–In-Time Count of homeless individuals and families throughout Guilford County. The count took place January 23, 2007 with 304 families with children and 878 individuals for a total of 1,182 homeless individuals and families. The count is compiled annually and is gathered from shelters, campsites and streets. Served over 3,00 meals to homeless and needed individuals in Greensboro and High Point

The Continuum of Care is a community plan to organize and deliver housing and services to meet the specific needs of homeless people who are homeless as they move to stable housing and self-sufficiency. It includes action steps to end homelessness and prevent homeless individuals from returning to homeless status. HUD identified the fundamental components of a comprehensive Continuum of Care system to be: • • Outreach, intake, and assessment to 1) identify an individual’s or family’s service and housing needs, and 2) link them to appropriate housing and/or service resource. Emergency shelter and safe, decent alternatives to the streets

• •

Transitional housing with supportive services to help people develop the skills necessary for permanent housing Permanent housing and permanent supportive housing

The Homeless Prevention Coalition of Guilford County contracted with a consultant to complete the Continuum of Care and several High Point Service providers submitted applications for renewal. Listed are the agencies: • • • • Open Door Ministries $48,919 Salvation Army of High Point $23,505 Family Services of the Piedmont (Carpenter House) $37,834 Alcohol and Drug Services of Guilford $36,838 $147,096

Total Funds applied for:

The Homeless Prevention Coalition of Guilford County is comprised of the City of High Point, the City of Greensboro and Guilford County governments Each entity report and document activities and meetings on a monthly basis in preparation of processing the Continuum of Care annually. . Currently, the four agencies from High Point are active daily with their projects of transitional housing, emergency assistance and supportive services. A total of twelve (12) agencies applied for funding through the Homeless Prevention Coalition of Guilford County Continuum of Care for the year 2006-2007, and eleven (11) of the agencies were funded totaling 1.2 million dollars.

Minority/ Women Business Enterprise

Minority/ Women Business Enterprise Promoting and increasing contracting opportunities for small and disadvantaged businesses is a priority at HUD. A "minority-business enterprise" is a business in which 51 percent (51%) of the company is owned and operated by minority groups or women. For the purpose of this definition, minority group members are Black Americans, Hispanic Americans, American Indians, Asian Pacific Rim Americans and American women. The phrase "owned and operated" as used in this definition means a business which is 1) a sole proprietorship legitimately owned by an individual who is a minority or female, 2) a partnership or joint venture controlled by minorities and/or females, and in which at least 51 percent (51%) of the beneficial ownership interests legitimately are held by minorities or females, or 3) a corporation or other entity controlled by minorities or females, and in which at least 51 percent (51%) of voting interest and 51 percent (51%)of the beneficial ownership interests are legitimately held by minorities or females. In addition, these persons must control the management and operation of the business on a day-to-day basis. The City of High Point strives to ensure that small, minority and womenowned businesses are given equal access to programs and activities supported by funds coming through the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD). The accomplished goal is through affirmative action outlined in the city’s Minority and Women Business Enterprise Development Action Plan. Goal: • • Place annual advertisements in minority–owned and local newspapers Solicit qualified Minority/ Women Business Enterprise to participate in departmental programs

Accomplishments: • Qualified minority contractors and sub-contractors participated in the department’s housing rehabilitation program. The contractors met the Housing Quality Standards required to be listed as a contractor/subcontractor

• •

• • •

A workshop on “How to start your own Business” was held at the Macedonia Family Resource Center during National Community Development Week. The Triad Economic Development Corporation (TEC) and the Guilford Homeownership Center presented the workshop to twenty-three participants on April 18, 2007. As a follow-up to the workshop, several participants contacted the TEC for assistance with business plans An annual Minority Business Directory was updated and published for 2007. The High Point Public Library and the High Point Chamber of Commerce sponsored the directory. Minority and Women Business Enterprises (MWBE) were strongly encouraged to make inquiries and participate in the City’s Housing Rehabilitation Programs. Ads were placed for residential and subcontractors in local and minority owned newspapers. A total of 8 interested inquirers for small, minority/women business enterprise assistance, contacted the Community & Neighborhood Development Center. A local small minority business was contracted for lawn care services of housing rehabilitation projects. A minority/women owned restaurant provided catering services for special events and meetings throughout the year.

Income, Racial and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: TOTAL CLIENTS 8 Low Incom e 6 Modera te Income 2 Blac k 8 Whit e 0 Hispani c 0 Othe r 0 FHH 1

Evaluation: Special emphasis was given to the 8 inquiries interested in starting their own business. Scheduling appointments and referring them to free training seminars, small businesses, Chamber of Commerce, local colleges and acquiring a business licenses was of great assistance.

COMMUNITY AND NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELPOMENT DIVISION

Community and Neighborhood Development Center

The Community and Neighborhood Development Division (CNDD) is charged with developing and implementing the division’s non-housing strategies to promote stronger neighborhoods and implement community capacity development activities. The division partners with various organizations to enhance services to low-moderate income neighborhoods and coordinates community programs. Division activities include providing neighborhood capacity building opportunities, helping residents acquire needed skills, enhancing public services, providing resource coordination for ex-offenders (in Violence Crime Task Force Call-In), assisting in homeless activities and assisting residents who are required to relocate due to housing code enforcement violations. The Community and Neighborhood Development Center (CNDC) is located at 201 Fourth Street and works with and through other agencies that support low/moderate income neighborhoods. CNDC has recently completed upgrades to the facility to create a user-friendlier environment. The layout of the building has been reconfigured to maximize the available space. The facility now contains a 14-station computer center, two conference rooms, staff offices, a greeting area and kitchen facilities. Currently, the CNDD staff consists of a Community Resource Manager, two Community Specialists, Office Support Specialist and neighborhood volunteers. Accomplishments: The division has continued to partner with different neighborhood associations, neighborhood watch groups, organizations and agencies, Weed and Seed Steering Committee and Police Department. This partnership has

allowed the staff to provide neighborhood capacity building opportunities and assist residents in working to create a safe and crime-free living environment. This year the division has provided technical assistance, services and programs to eleven (11) neighborhoods, homeless individuals, twenty-five (25) ex-offenders and one (1) relocation assistance was given to one (1) family who was displaced due to housing code enforcement violations. During the earlier part of the year, the CNDC was renovated to effectively maximize the space and make it usable to the surrounding neighborhoods. The renovation provided a dedicated room for the Weed and Seed Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) program, Technology Access Point (TAP) and two other rooms used as multi-purpose rooms, which are used 90% of the time. The VITA program provided free income tax assistance, Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) and Child Tax Credits assistance to low/moderate-income families, and assisted families in poverty with an opportunity to accumulate enough assets to buy a home, start a small business or seek a higher education: • • The work of five (5) volunteer tax return preparers and four (4) volunteer non tax return preparers resulted in helping families of one hundred forty-five (145) taxpayers during the filing season. The total refund to taxpayers was $130,811. In addition, the VITA program free tax preparation services saved these taxpayers approximately $29,000 in tax preparation and transmission fees, resulting in a total of $159,811 that can be spent directly in the surrounding area, therefore, serving to improve and bolster the local economy. Certificates were issued by Internal Revenues Service (IRS) and presented by the U.S. Attorney of the Middle District to the City of High Point, Weed and Seed and the volunteers for their accomplishments with VITA. The VITA site was the only one out of three Weed and Seed sites in North Carolina that met and exceeded their goal of one hundred (100) federal tax returns

A Technical Access Point (TAP) was established this year with a total of fourteen computers installed to better serve the surrounding neighborhoods. • A crime kiosk was installed to allow residents to get information on police related activities in their neighborhoods.

Computer classes were held in the morning accommodate the schedules of the residents.

and

evening

to

The Weed and Seed Program continued to provide programs through the seeding efforts in the core-city target areas. Through the weeding efforts of reducing criminal activity by the High Point Police Department, the crime rate has dropped 45% in core-city neighborhoods. The Violent Crimes Task Force continued to notify violent repeat offenders in High Point to stop the violence or face the penalty for their actions. Ten Weed and Seed Safe Sites were established and/or revitalized, providing programs and activities throughout the core city areas. These sites are located within the core-city and Weed and Seed target areas. The division established a ‘Neighborhood Leaders Council’ that has allowed leaders to become more proactive on issues as it relates to their neighborhoods and the city as a whole. It has required them to take a different perspective toward working to improve their neighborhood. The Council worked together and created their first neighborhood Christmas float that represented all eleven neighborhoods. The foundation for the Youth Council has begun. The youth from three safe sites are preparing to go to a Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Council Summer Camp in Orlando, Florida. The camp will provide the youth with essential tools needed to become future leaders in the City of High Point. The CNDD partnered with two neighborhoods in providing computers to assist in establishing two other computer labs. The division has completed the website which will display information and activities at the Community and Neighborhood Development Center and neighborhood events. The City of High Point was awarded the Shelter Plus Care grant, which will provide permanent supportive housing for disabled and mentally chronic homeless persons in High Point, who are in need of ongoing services. This grant was collaboration between the City of High Point (applicant) and Open Door Ministries (the provider and coordinator of supportive services). This division will monitor this grant. The Citizen Advisory Council (CAC) continued to use the Community and Neighborhood Development Center for all their meetings, with the exception of Public Hearings, which were held in the Council Chambers of City Hall.

The Community and Neighborhood Development Center is very committed to providing the best possible service to all neighborhoods, in which we serve. The following services and programs were provided at the center this year: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • Tutoring classes for children Computer classes Resource information and referrals Meeting spaces for community workshops/meetings for the citizens of High Point Financial Peace University (financial literacy workshop) Ex-Offender program Domestic Violence Seminar Homebuyer Workshop (facilitated by Family Service of the Piedmont) JEETS Program (job preparedness workshop) Neighborhood Association meetings Citizens Advisory Council (CAC) meetings High Point Housing Coalition meetings Weed & Seed Steering Committee meetings Reading Connection (Adult literacy programs) Community Development and Housing Department Retreats

The CNDD has had approximately one thousand (1,000) visits from July 1, 2006 – June 30, 2007. A total of $307,167 was allocated for the Community and Neighborhood Development Division, of which $299,439 was expended. The department expended $84,201 for up fit of the Community and Neighborhood Development Center, of which $29,254 came from the Community Resource Program. The balance of the unspent funds for Community Based Initiative (CBI) ($1,334) and Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) ($1,803) was due to a subrecipient not expending all of the approved funds. (For details see the CBI and CDBG section.) Weed and Seed funds are not included in this amount. Weed and Seed is funded through the Department of Justice. Evaluation: Since the up fitting of the CNDC the capacity building programs and opportunities has increased by fifty percent (50%). The feedback from the surrounding communities concerning the capacity building programs and the up fit of the building has made a tremendous difference in the core city area.

Residents now feel that the center is a user friendly and really enjoy coming to seek services. Currently, the building is being used ninety percent (90%) of the time, which includes nights and weekends. Community Resource Programs Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Assistance Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Objective: Projected Outcome: Public Service Access: Performance Measures: $222,990 $194,000 Community Capacity CDBG Low/moderate-income Area 570.201(e), 570.201(p), and 208(a)(2) To conduct five capacity building activities by June 30, 2007 Sustainability Improved Projected Census Tracts/Block Group Number to be served - 136.01/2, 136.02/8, 138/2, 139/17, 140/17, 142/2, 143/3, 144.06/1, 144.08/1, 145.01/2, 145.02/2, 145.03/1, 146/12

Building

Technical

Accomplishments: This program was designed to offer a variety of community capacity building services that would increase neighborhood stability. Community and Neighborhood Development staff provided technical assistance to neighborhood groups and associations to help revitalize their neighborhoods. Assistance provided to low-moderate-income neighborhoods included: • • • • • • • Helping community leaders learn “How to establish a vision and set goals for their neighborhood Helping residents build skills and learn how to gain access to government services or community resources Helping residents to learn “How to become debt-free” Providing free income tax services Helping individuals to improve skill by learning to use the computer. Encouraging citizen’s involvement and leveraging resources to help core-city neighborhoods help themselves Providing technical assistance to subrecipients and neighborhood groups.

Programs and activities were coordinated through the Community and Neighborhood Development Division (Weed & Seed Safe Haven). Divisional staff worked with neighborhoods to assist and facilitate a variety of neighborhood-based public service initiatives, neighborhood events, capacity building programs, and other activities within low-moderate-income (corecity) neighborhoods. These activities included Finance Literary, Small Business Workshop, Job Preparedness Workshop, Computer classes, Youth Summer Fun and Learn, Volunteer Income Tax Services and other neighborhoods imitated activities. The budget for this program included personnel costs for a Community Resource Manager, Community Resource Specialist and an Office Support Specialist.

Citizens Advisory Council The Citizens Advisory Council (CAC), a nine member volunteer entity composed of city residents, serves in an advisory role in planning projects funded by the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program. All members were approved by the Mayor and City Council and are limited to two consecutive two-year terms. The CAC was established in April 1974 to function as the primary citizen participation mechanism for projects planned and implemented with block grant funds. The Community Development and Housing Department provided administrative support for the council. Below is a breakdown of current membership: Rick Johnson, Chairman, Ward 3 Michelle Bodie-Anderson, Ward 1 Lona Cobb, Ward 2 Don Stevenson, At Large Ward 5, Vacant Letitia Johnson, Vice Chair Mayor At Large Joe Blankinship, Ward 4 Charlene Green, At Large Ward 6, Vacant Ron Wilkins, Council Liaison

The CAC voted to hold their monthly meetings at the Community and Neighborhood Development Center, with the exception of the Public Hearings, which are held in the Council Chambers at City Hall. Highlights of some of their meetings are listed below. Copies of the minutes and agendas

are available at the Community & Neighborhood Development Center or the Mayor’s office.

CAC Meeting s January Meeting February Meeting3 February Meeting March Meeting 4

Dates 1/25/200 7 2/15/200 7 2/22/07 3/23/200 7

Attendanc e 19 15 17 22 12 11 96

Meeting Highlights CDBG presentations CDBG presentations (second half) Mid-year Subrecipient program updates. Public Hearing for 06/07 Annual Plan; Announced that City Council rejected the High Point Green tax credit project, proposed in the 07/08 Annual Plan. Discuss CDBG funding schedule. The revised 07/08 Annual Plan was approved by City Council.

April 4/27/200 Meeting 7 May 5/17/200 Meeting 7 Total

Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) All CDBG funded subrecipients are required to make a mid-year report and/or appearance before the Citizens Advisory Council at a regular meeting to review timeliness. Projects are also required to demonstrate a minimum of low/moderate-income benefit ratio of 70% and all areas served must have high concentrations of low/moderate-income residents. Public Service Grants Allocation: Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective:
3

$59,177 $57,374 CDBG Public Service Subrecipient CDBG Low/moderate-Income Limited Clientele

This meeting was an off schedule meeting to hear the remainder of the CDBG presentations. 4 The March CAC meeting was the Public Hearing for the 2006 – 2007 Annual Plan.

Eligibility Citation: 570.201(e); 570.208 (1) (1) and (a)(2) Goal:To provide public services that benefit low/moderate-income residents. Objective: Assist community organizations in the provision of public services. Outcome: Sustainability Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Projected Census Tracts to be served – 136.01; 136.02; 138; 139; 140; 142; 143; 144.06; 144.08; 145.01; 145.02; 145.03; 146 Program Description: A portion of the city’s CDBG entitlement fund public service activities provided by local community based organizations for the benefit of low/moderate-income residents. Eligible activities include labor, supplies and materials, employment; crime prevention; child-care; health; drug abuse; education; fair housing counseling; and energy conversation. These funds are allocated through a competitive process and the Citizens Advisory Council (CAC) reviews all applications and makes recommendations to the City Council. A total of fourteen applications were submitted for funding. Of these, the CAC recommended public service grants to four local non-profit agencies: Accomplishments: • • Public Service funds assisted a total of four (4) subrecipients that benefited low/moderate-income residents. Three grant workshops were held for applicants interested in applying for public service funds. The first workshop was held August 18, 2006 for the Community Based Initiative (CBI) funds and because all applications were neither eligible nor funded, the Community Advisory Council scheduled another workshop for October 20, 2006 to incur the remaining funding balance. The Community Development Block Grant workshop was held December 1, 2006. All of the workshops addressed the required performance measurements, record keeping, understanding subrecipient contracts, scope of service, timeliness, and monitoring.

• •

Community Development Public Service Activities Project Allocatio Expended Goal Accomplishme

Carl Chavis YMCA Housing Authority Reading Connections Shabazz Center TOTALS Evaluation:

n $12,081 15,083 18,854 13,159 $59,177

$12,081 15,083 18,854 11,356 $57,374

150 clients 451 youth 40 adults 25 clients 656 clients

nts 101 clients 344 youth 59 adults 26 clients 530 clients

The funds reserved for public service were expended with the exception of one project. The Joy A. Shabazz Center project “Independent Living” met their measurable goals but was unable to expend all of their funds due to a decrease in their personnel. All of the projects supplied the required documentations.

CDBG Subrecipient Project Summaries:

Carl Chavis Mem orial Branch YMCA (W ellness/Fitness Center Director) Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Goal: $12,081 $12,081 CDBG Public Service Subrecipient CDBG

Low/moderate-income Limited Clientele 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) To assist 90 youths and 60 seniors to acquire healthy eating and physical activity habits. Objectives: Suitable Living Environments Outcome: Sustainability Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Projected to assist 90 youths and 60 seniors Project Description:

Carl Chavis YMCA is an organization serving low/moderate-income youth and families. Their mission is to build strong kids, strong families and strong communities through programs and activities that build healthy spirits, minds and bodies. The Wellness/Fitness Center Director coordinated and implemented programs, activities and usage of the new Wellness/Fitness Center. The program targeted youth and seniors who according to statistics are at greater risk of becoming obese and developing chronic diseases such as Type II diabetes. Accomplishments: • • • • The Wellness/Fitness Program received 100% participation from the Youth. Participants were taught the benefits of physical activity and healthy eating, as well as health risks associated with physical inactivity, poor eating habits and obesity. Fifty percent of the participants demonstrated a reduction in calorie and fat consumption An increase in daily physical activity to a minimum of 30 minutes per day was acknowledged by eighty percent of the participants.

Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 101 Low Incom e 74 Moder ate Income 27 Black 91 White 6 Hispa nic 1 Other 3Asian s FHH 61

Evaluation: • • The program was a great introduction for youth and seniors to the benefit of fitness and wellness Participants acknowledge value of the program and the CDBG funds provided the opportunity for those who could not afford to pay for the program to participate.

Goals for the youth were met; unfortunately, the seniors did not meet their goals. The seniors acknowledge the value of the program but the

projected participation numbers fell short because of health problems the Seniors experienced along with basic life challenges.

High Point Housing Authority (Scholars Program ) Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Goals: $15,083 $15, 083 CDBG Public Service Subrecipients CDBG Low/moderate-income Limited Clientele 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1)(1) and (a)(2) To tutor and mentor 451 youths in Public Schools in preparation for graduation Objectives: Suitable Living Environment. Outcome: Sustainability Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Assist four hundred fifty-one (451) students in public schools Project Description: The High Point Housing Authority Scholars Program partnered with Communities in Schools to address dropout prevention and thereby increased graduation rates of persons residing in public housing and Section 8 communities. The project provided individual academic tutoring and mentoring, promoted future planning/career exploration and provided a support system to students and parents. Accomplishments:

• •

Ninety-five (95) of the high school seniors attending the targeted schools in High Point graduated, yielding a total of thirty-six (36) out of thirty-eight (38) seniors to graduate. Luncheon meetings were held throughout the year to encourage the youth and inform them of the importance of maintaining a good GPA (2.0 or above), Students were taught the difference between College Prep and College Tech Prep track and the determining factors for each Graduation requirements for the class of 2010 was reviewed with freshmen only

Selected students attended CIAA High School Day Program held during the CIAA Tournament in Charlotte, NC. Students were able to submit applications to colleges and universities represented on site.

Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 344 Low Incom e 344 Moder ate Income 0 Black 328 White 16 Hispa nic 8 Other 0 FHH 333

Evaluation: The High Point Housing Authority Scholars Program met all reporting and documentation requirements and utilized all grant funds toward the project. The project was a success with the percentage of seniors who graduated from the selected high schools in 2007. Unfortunately, due to the redistricting of Guilford County schools, many students were reassigned to schools that did not offer a Scholars Program. This reduced the number of youth to complete the program and meet the program goals.

Reading Connections (Adult Literacy & W orkplace Education) Allocation: $18,854 Total Expended: $18,854 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate-income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: To assist 40 low income adult learners Objectives: Suitable Living Environment Outcome: Sustainability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Projected number to serve 40 adults Project Description: Reading Connections serves as the adult literacy agency for Guilford County. CDBG funds was used for the Adult Literacy and Workplace Education

program that enable them to further expand their service offerings in the High Point community through Workplace Essential Skills classes. The classes addressed the acquisition of adult literacy skills through the context of job preparedness, helping students build job-related vocabulary and increase their employability. Participants had the option to receive 1:1 instruction from a trained volunteer literacy tutor. Enrolled workers was also in their 1:1 tutoring programs at the High Point Regional Hospital Accomplishments: • • • • • The Workplace Essential Skills Program classes were taught at several locations in High Point. Competing students achieved a personal literacy goal and improved at least one literacy level as determined by the Comprehensive Adult Student Assessment System scores. New partnerships were developed with businesses and nonprofits in High Point including Open Door Ministries, Job Link and Employment Security Commission of High Point. An office was opened at the Employment Security Commission and in for the Reading Connection. At this location, they are orienting, assessing and instructing students five days a week. This provided the program with a much needed base of operations in High Point, greatly aiding in their efforts to better serve the community by raising their visibility and increasing opportunities for clients to access their services.

Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Clien ts 59 Low Incom e 58 Modera te Income 1 Black 46 White 12 Hispan ic 2 Other 1Asian FHH 14

Evaluation: • • Overall the project was very successful in initiating word-of-mouth referrals with adults desiring to be students. The program exceeded their goals by assisting 59 participants instead of the 40 proposed.

The new partnerships and a generous office space provided better serve the community.

Joy A. Shabazz Center for Independent Living Allocation: $13,159 Total Expended: $11,356 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate-income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal:To access and advocate for the removal of any barriers that prevent equal access to communities for low-to-moderateincome persons or families with disabilities. Objective: Suitable Living Environment Outcome: Sustainability Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Projected number to serve twenty-five (25) applicants Project Description: The Independent Living Program is a multifaceted advocacy program designed to assist persons with lifelong significant disabilities to achieve their independent living goals. This is accomplished through providing multiple services. The Independent Living Program was responsible for identifying and advocating for the removal of architectural barriers that prevent equal access to the community, i.e. lack of curb cuts, inaccessible restrooms, narrow doorways and anything that does not conform to the Americans with Disabilities Act Accessibility Guidelines and the North Carolina State Building Code. CD funds were used towards the salary of the Coordinator for travel expenses, office equipment and office supplies. Accomplishments: • • The Independent Living Program assisted a total of twenty-six individuals with disabilities in counseling, mentoring and independent development for a successful living outcome. Eleven businesses were reviewed for handicap accessibility. There were also assessments of

• •

Convenience stores, the majority of which required ADA modifications to the parking areas. Thirteen sites were reviewed for compliance of 4.6 and 4.7 of the ADA Standards for Accessible Design (on Main Street, English Road, Kivett Drive and other streets in the area) to determine curb accessibility. All together, a total of twenty-four (24) sites have been reviewed and evaluated for compliance with Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The center conducted three disability etiquettes and sensitivity training sessions, of which the presentations were given to employees of the Culler Senior Center, Parks and Recreation and Caring Services. An invitation to do a training session for the Chamber of Commerce was conducted in August 2007.

Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 26 Low Incom e 26 Modera te Income 0 Black 16 White 10 Hispan ic 0 Other 0 FHH 0

Evaluation: • • • The program successfully met its goal of assisting twenty-six (26) participants within the city limits of High Point The total twenty-four Title III assessments conducted have resulted in the successful identification of a number of High Point Businesses that are not ADA compliant. An Aggressive outreach has been conducted resulting in up to two thousand (2000) units of information being disseminated. This includes brochures, flyers, newsletters; disability rights publications, and ADA information. Participants of the etiquette and sensitivity training sessions have rated the presentation good to excellent.

Community Based Initiatives (CBI) Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: $20,000 $18,671 CDBG Public Service Subrecipient CDBG

National Objective: Low/moderate-Income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(e); 570.208 (1) (1) and (a)(2) Goal:To provide public services that benefit low/moderate-income residents. Objective: Assist thirteen community organizations in provisions of public services. Outcome: Sustainability Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Projected Census Tracts to be served 136.01; 136.02; 138; 139; 140; 142; 143; 144.06; 144.08; 145.01; 145.02; 145.03; 146 Program Description: The City assigns a portion of its CDBG entitlement to fund the Community Based Initiative (CBI) for public service activities provided by local community based organizations for the benefit of low/moderate incomeincome residents. Eligible projects include using CBI funds as seed money for the purchase of supplies, materials, goods and services directly related to the implementation of the project, provide a city-wide or targeted community benefit, provide and document matching resources in dollars, inkind contributions, or volunteerism that equals or exceeds twenty-five percent (25%) of the grant amount requested. All activities must be implemented within the city limits of High Point, involve neighborhood people in the identification, planning or execution of the proposed activity. Projects must comply with all applicable local and federal health, safety and legal regulations and projects should be designed to provide assistance to the broader community rather than individuals. Support cannot take place to existing services or operating budgets of organizations that are already available to the target beneficiaries. The CBI funds were allocated through a competitive process and the Citizens Advisory Council (CAC) reviewed all applications and made recommendations to the City Council. A total of nine applications were approved for funding. CBI Subrecipients: Project Caring Services Five Points Gear Up Housing Allocatio n $700 2,000 5,000 2,000 Expended $700 2,000 5,000 1,738 Goal 13 clients 1 event 50 students 200 homeless Accomplishm ents 16 clients 1 event 56 students 236 homeless

the

Coalition HPCAV Reading Connections Ward Street West End Ministries Words of Comfort TOTALS 1500 2,000 2,000 2,800 2,000 $20,000 1,200 2,000 1,285 2,800 1,948 $18,671 30 exoffenders 20 adults 25 adults 35 women 50 families 424 clients 14 ex-offenders 28 adults 19 adults 40 women 50 families 460 clients

Accomplishments: The first workshop was held August 18, 2006 for the Community Based Initiative (CBI) funds and because all applications were neither eligible nor funded, the Community Advisory Council scheduled another workshop for October 20, 2006 to incur the remaining funding balance. Evaluation: A total of nine Community Based Initiative (CBI) grants were processed offering services or activities for low to moderate-income residents in the High Point community. Two of the nine projects were unsuccessful in meeting their measurable goals. The HPCAV project “Offender Assistance” did not meet their goals due to a lack of ex- offenders qualified to participate in the program and the Ward Street Mission project “Adult ESL Tutoring” was unable to expend all of their funds due to problems hiring qualified bilingual tutors and the lack of childcare for single moms.

CBI Project Summaries:

Caring Services, Inc. Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: Source: $700 $700 CDBG Public Service Subrecipient CDBG

National Objective: Low/moderate income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: To train thirteen staff members CPR & First Aid Objectives: Suitable Living Environments Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: The proposed number to be served: Thirteen (13) Project Description: Caring Services offers housing, emergency services and support services to recovering substance abusers. Many of the clients have health issues and need extensive care. The staff will be trained to administer CPR and First Aide Assistance. Accomplishments: • • • • The American Red Cross scheduled training classes for CPR and First Aide On site training reduced travel expenses and initiated additional staff to receive certification training. A total of sixteen (16) staff members participated in the training. All trainees were tested, graded and received a certification certificate in CPR and First Aid.

Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: Caring Services, Inc. received a $700 grant and used private donations for their required 25% matching funds. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 16 Low Incom e 12 Moder ate Income 4 Black 11 White 4 Hispa nic 0 Other 1 FHH 6

Evaluation:

The program was very successful and exceeded the proposed goal of thirteen (13) with sixteen (16) participants receiving certification in CPR and First Aide Assistance.

Five Points Com m unity Pride Allocation: $2,000 Expended Total: $2,000 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Area Benefit Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: To provide activities Objective: Suitable Living Outcome: Available/Accessible Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: To provide activities to benefit neighborhood, individuals and families. Project Description: The Five Points Community Pride Association event relates to activities that are designed to benefit neighborhoods, individuals and families to live in a safe and sound living environment. A day of learning activities to include fun things for elementary age children, lessons on responsibility for middle and high school youth and valuable information for parents to help prepare their young adults for college. The day was also filled with important educational and health information, vendors, foods and recreational games. Accomplishments: • • • • The High Point Police Department participated in the Community event, finger printing and Literature on “How to start a Neighborhood Watch” was distributed. A clothing vendor was present with a variety of jewelry, clothing and other accessories. Several gift cards were given to community residents for participating. Several attending residents joined the association. Health literature and food samples was distributed to encourage healthy eating habits

the

Live Gospel music was used as an incentive to increase attendance

Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: The Five Points Community event received a $2,000 grant, which leveraged a 25% matching contribution of $500. In lieu of cash, Five Points recruited six members to volunteer ten hours (6x10x$10) of their time in setting up tables, tents, distributing flyers, coordinating agencies, preparing and distributing food and presentations during the day of the event. AREA BENEFIT: Census Tracts 138, Block Group 2 and 139, Block Group 2 Evaluation: Community residents and members participated in scheduling the event, which was held at the Washington Terrace Park on Saturday, April 21, 2007. Community participation was excellent and the scheduled activities assisted everyone in attendance to participate.

Gear-Up Allocation: $5,000 Total Expended: $5,000 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Area Benefit Eligibility Citation: 570.201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(ii) Goal: To assist 50 low to moderate at risk students Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Assist 50 students Project Description: The GEAR-Up Program assisted at risk students performing below their abilities in the High Point Public Schools. The program provided tutoring in Science, English, History and career exploration, SAT preparation and parental workshops. Accomplishments:

• • • •

Students increased their anatomy grades by at least one grade level within a month Parents workshop initiated an increase in volunteering for students Senior Recognition & Awards Program was held for 07 Graduates that received tutoring in the GEAR UP program A Questions and Answer Session was held for graduating students in May 2007.

Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: GEARUP received a donation from an active church within the community as leverage for the 25% match. Five volunteers donated hours (5x2x20x$10/hr) to tutoring at risk low-income students and coordinated parent workshops. GEARUP received a $5,000 CBI grant. Area Benefit: Census Tracts 138, Block Group 2 and 139, Block Group 2 The two High Schools that participated in the GEARUP program were: • • Andrews High School……………59.45% received free and/or reduced lunch High Point Central………………..58.69% received free and/or reduced lunch

Evaluation: The program was successful in assisting 56 students in preparing them for high school graduation and on to college. The parent workshops proved to be successful in networking with the students and becoming involved with their future plans.

High Point Housing Coalition Allocation: Total Expended: Activity: $2,000 $1,738 CDBG Public Service Subrecipient

Source: National Objective: Eligibility Citation: Goal:

CDBG

Low/moderate income Limited Clientele 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) To educate residents of High Point about the needs of the homeless and to feed tow hundred (200) homeless Individuals and families. Objective: Suitable Living Environments Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Assist two hundred (200) homeless individuals. Project Description: The High Point Housing Coalition is an organization that consists of non-profit organizations, businesses, government agencies and individuals who advocate or provide services for the homeless and those in need of affordable housing opportunities. The purpose of the event was to recognize persons who have died homeless and to bring awareness to the needs of homeless individuals and families in High Point. CBI funds were used to sponsor the National Homeless Person’s Memorial Day on December 19, 2006, 6:00 p.m. at the First Baptist Church, 405 N. Main Street. Funds were used for food, gift bags, socks, and hygiene products for the homeless. Accomplishments: • • • • • • A Proclamation was read by the Mayor declaring December 18, 2006 as National Memorial Homeless Persons’ Day for the city of High Point Two non-profit agencies participated in a walking vigil from their sites to the First Baptist Church, 405 North Main Street Donated items were given to complete the gift bags for the homeless Over two hundred thirty-six (236) homeless individuals were served dinner and given a gift bag Two former homeless individuals spoke words of encouragement A memorial was held in honor of those who died homeless during 2006

Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: The High Point Housing Coalition received a $2000 grant and selected sweat equity from their committee members to satisfy their match requirement. Eight members volunteered their services to contact businesses for donations, purchase gifts, prepared gift bags, set-up of the gym to receive

two hundred (200) hundred or more homeless individuals and served dinner to over two hundred thirty-six (236) homeless men, women and children to satisfy their match requirement. This was in honor of National Memorial Homeless Person’s Day. The program exceeded its goals and was a great success and covered by the media (WXII) and the High Point Enterprise. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 236 Low Incom e 236 Moder ate Income 0 Black 120 White 116 Hispa nic 0 Other 0 FHH 0

Evaluation: The High Point Housing Coalition commemorated the homeless who died during the year 2006 and highlighted the continuing problems of homelessness in High Point. The program included elected city officials, special music and remarks from two of the homeless agencies. Following the program, volunteers served a festive dinner for the homeless from a local church and non-profit organizations.

High Point Com m unity Against Violence (Client Assistance) HPCAV Allocation: $1,500 Total Expended: $1,200 5 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: To assist up to thirty (30) ex-offenders on a case by case basis. Objective: Suitable Living Environments Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved
5

HPVAC returned $300 to the CBI program due to lack of ex-offenders qualified to participate in the program.

Performance Measures: case-by-case basis. Project Description:

To assist up to thirty (30) Ex-offenders on a

Clients returning to the community from prison are vulnerable and require help to get re-established. The HPCAV Program assists the clients with utility bills, rent, tuition or some other need for which the lack of funds would impede their life changing goals. Recommendation for assistance must come from a probation officer or a member of HPCAV. Accomplishments: The program fell short of anticipated clients due to lack of referrals. The High Point Community Against Violence was able to purchase PART bus tickets to assist ex-offenders with transportation to and from employment interviews. Fourteen (14) ex-offenders utilized the bus tickets to obtain employment and assisted them with alternative ways to make money in the community. High Point Community Against Violence assigned ten members of their organization to volunteer five hours a quarter towards assisting ex-offenders in desperate need of help on a case-by-case basis. Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: High Point Community Against Violence received a $1500 grant and assigned ten members of their organization to volunteer five hours a quarter (10x5x4x$10/hr) towards assisting ex-offenders in desperate need of help on a case-by-case basis. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 14 Low Incom e 14 Moder ate Income 0 Black 14 White 0 Hispa nic 0 Other 0 FHH 0

Evaluation:

The success of the program is when an ex-offender changes his/her life of crime and takes advantage of the community resources being offered to them. Although the project fell below the targeted thirty ex-offenders being assisted, the program had great success from the fourteen offenders. The request of resources from offenders is not always on a daily basis but asneeded basis. The number of ex-offenders needing assistance varies from month to month and because of this all the CBI funds were not utilized, therefore, $300 was returned to the program.

Reading Connections Allocation: $2,000 Total Expended: $2,000 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: To assist twenty (20) low income adult learners Objective: Suitable Living Environment Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Assist twenty (20) adult students. Project Description: The program is to assist low-income adult learners with the opportunity to improve their knowledge, skills and abilities that will enable them to accomplish real life goals, including employability and quality of life. The Reading Connection Program “Improving Life Through Literacy ‘ supported low-income adult learners in High Point. The program assisted adult learners with the opportunity to improve their knowledge, skills and abilities that will enable them to accomplish real-life goal. These services were delivered through two small classes a women’s General Equivalency Diploma or GED study group at Southside Fairview resource Center and a beginning reading group at Elm Towers. Accomplishments: • • • Assisted twenty-eight (28) adult learners through the program Secured an office in High Point at the Employment Security Office Partnered with active agencies within the city of High Point

• •

Recruited 7 new tutors and volunteers Began computer and study skills classes to High Point students

Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: Reading Connections received a $2000 grant and used secured funds from existing grants as their required 25% match to expand services in High Point. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 28 Low Incom e 25 Moder ate Income 3 Black 23 White 4 Hispa nic 1 Other 1Asian FHH 11

Evaluation: The Literacy program has become very successful with 100 % of the students developing educational and literacy-based goals. Plans are being made to continue to provide the needed adult education, working towards literacy and self-sufficiency for all residents.

W ard Street Allocation: $2,000 Total Expended: $1,285 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: To provide tutoring to twenty-five (25) low-tomoderate adults. Objective: Creating Suitable Living Environments Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Assist twenty-five (25) adults Project Description:

Adult ESL Tutoring (English-as-a-Second Language) Program was designed to increase the English and communication skills of adults from other countries and to increase self- confidence and employment skills. The adults will have access to computers to develop written skills. The tutoring increased their communication skills, self-confidence and employment skills. They also had access to computers for development of written English skills and to develop resumes or information sheets to assist in their job search. CBI funds were used for the salary of two tutors. Accomplishments: • • English and communications skills were increased among the nineteen (19) students attending. The students were able to communicate with older English speaking children by reading to them in English Students learned computer skills to create resumes for employment opportunities

Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: Ward Street Mission provided space for tutoring as an in-kind donation as well as supervision of the tutors for their 25% matching funds. The Mission received a $2,000 grant. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 19 Low Incom e 19 Moder ate Income 0 Black 0 White 19 Hispa nic 19 Other 0 FHH 3

Evaluation: The Adult ESL Project was a great success for a total of nineteen (19) students that participated. However, the program was unsuccessful in reaching its goal of twenty-five (25) students due to maintaining the employment of qualified tutors and the lack of childcare for single mothers. .

W est End Ministries Allocation: $2,800 Total Expended: $2,800 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: Provide emergency shelter for thirty-five women Objective: Suitable Living Environment Outcome: Availability/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Project to assist thirty-five (35) women Project Description: West End Ministries’ immediate goal was to provide a warm safe haven and encouragement for single homeless women. The ministry provided emergency shelter for thirty-five women in High Point. CBI funds were used to purchase foldaway cots, sheets/pillowcases, blankets, pillows, shades, curtains, couch/chairs and area rugs. Accomplishments: The shelter provided short -term housing, food, clothing, personal hygiene and shelter for 40 homeless women. The shelter also referred the women to local medical providers for assistance. Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds: West End Ministries Board Members committed to a thousand dollars for their 25% matching funds for the women’s emergency shelter. The Shelter received a $2800 grant for emergency assistance for women. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 40 Low Incom e 40 Modera te Income 0 Black 23 White 17 Hispan ic 0 Other 0 FHH 40

Evaluation: The Shelter was successful in meeting its goal of providing a warm, safe haven for single women, offering them protection from life-threatening situations and excessive cold weather.

W ords of Com fort Allocation: $2,000 Total Expended: $1,948 Activity: CDBG Public Service Subrecipient Source: CDBG National Objective: Low/moderate income Limited Clientele Eligibility Citation: 570.201(201(e); 570.208(1) and (a)(2) Goal: Provide assistance of food and clothing to 50 families Objectives: Suitable Living Environment Outcome: Available/Accessibility Public Service Access: Improved Performance Measures: Assist 50 families

Project Description: Words of Comfort Outreach program was to assist 50 low-to-moderateincome families with basic needs in order for them to become self sufficient in their daily lives. On the third Saturday of each month, food and donated clothing was distributed to families in the Southside and English Road Communities. Funds were used to purchase food for the low-to-moderateincome families of the Southside and English Road communities. Accomplishments: The outreach Helping Hands Program was successful in assisting fifty low/moderate income families within the English Road and Southside areas with food and donated clothing. Community Based Initiative 25% Matching Funds:

Words of Comfort leveraged received a $2000 grant and leveraged their 25% matching contribution by working diligently with three volunteers to contribute five hours a month for eight months (3x5x8x$10/hr). They collected donated clothing and purchased food for distribution to low/moderate income families facing hardships. Income, Racial, and Female Head of Household breakdown for Program Beneficiaries: Total Client s 50 Low Incom e 50 Moder ate Income 0 Black 42 White 8 Hispa nic 7 Other 0 FHH 45

Evaluation: A community need was addressed in helping families with their basic nutrition and the proper clothing that they were not receiving due to the lack of funds.

Community Meeting Summaries

Macedonia Neighborhood Association The Macedonia Neighborhood Association is actively involved with the recruitment of new homeowners to join the Neighborhood Association. The Macedonia Redevelopment project has brought new homes and a diverse group of residents to the Macedonia area. Increasing the number of members will allow the association to form committees to work on issues and goals. The Community Development and Housing Department staff assisted the Macedonia Neighborhood Association with the process to begin developing a vision and mission for the association. The Neighborhood Association was very involved with the Macedonia Baseball League this past year. This youth baseball league is designed to offer a quality sports league for a very low participation fee. Members of the association volunteered time at the park working the concession stand as well as cleaning up after each game. The Neighborhood Association also conducted several neighborhood clean-ups that promoted a healthy clean neighborhood to new homeowners. The Community Development and Housing Department donated the supplies for the clean up. The Macedonia Family Resource Center continued to offer daily programs to address the needs of those living in the Macedonia area. Many of the programs at the center included: • • • Free computer classes GED classes Technology Access Point (TAP)

o Allow residents to access the main library database and check out books and have them delivered to the center.

Burns-Hill Neighborhood Association The Burns-Hill Neighborhood Association is a group of residents residing in the East Central area of High Point. This past year the Neighborhood Association was actively involved with establishing their mission, vision and goals for the association. The Community Development and Housing staff assisted with the facilitation of organizing this process and offered insight on how to address issues in the neighborhood. The Burns-Hill Neighborhood Association also participated in neighborhood activities that included: • • • • • Community clean-ups, which allowed residents to take, pride in their neighborhood and also recruit new members to join the Neighborhood Association Back to school celebration for the youth, which provided the youth with free school supplies A resident awards ceremony, which acknowledge those residents in the East Central area doing the right thing for the neighborhood Conducted a workshop on organizing a successful neighborhood watch group, which gave residents the training needed to become an active successful watch group Participated in National Night Out, which brought awareness to neighborhood issues and also was used to recruit new Neighborhood Association members

• •

Community Health Walk, which allows residents to walk and patrol the neighborhood while engaging in a fitness activity Community yard sale

The Burns-Hill Neighborhood Association is in the process of completing their paperwork for a non-profit status. This will allow the association to apply for funds to assist with neighborhood activities and programs.

West End Neighborhood Association The West End Neighborhood Association meets quarterly with over 50 residents in attendance each meeting. This past year the West End Neighborhood Association elected a new President and Vice-President whom live in the West End neighborhood. The new leadership is working with the Community Development and Housing Department to establish a vision and mission for the West End Neighborhood Association. Staff attends regular meetings in West End to assist with the facilitation of organizing and mobilizing residents to become more involved with their association. During the past year the West End Neighborhood Association was actively involved with: • • • Neighborhood clean-ups The West End Soup Kitchen o Neighborhood Association members feed the homeless every Thursday West End Thrift Store

o

Provides affordable clothing and furniture for residents.

The newly open West End Community Center will soon provide free computer classes for the residents of the West End. The City of High Point’s Weed and Seed Program purchased the computers for the West End Community Center. The West End Drug Initiative continues to maintain a 40% decrease in crime since it’s inception three years ago. The residents in the West End are pleased about the reduction in crime and now feel safer to walk the streets with family members. The West End Ministries are now offering free shelter to women that are homeless in High Point. This year the West End Women’s Shelter housed forty women whom were in need of shelter and food. Next year the West End Ministries will break ground on Leslies House, which will be a larger housing facility for homeless women.

Broadstone Village Concerned Citizens (BVCC) Broadstone Village, one of our newest neighborhoods, located in Southeast High Point in Ward 2, is continuing on with their quest to achieve a safer and family friendly neighborhood. As of July 2007 they have had eight (8) meetings and on average twenty (20) residents attend regularly. Although, BVCC is the new kid on the block, the group shows strong commitment

and determination in seeing their quests to the end. In just seven months the residents have: • • • • • • • Successfully solved property disputes Several residents learned how to retrieve deed information from the Register of Deed Office Created a letter addressing the management company detailing concerns they have about their neighborhood Decreased the number of “speeders” Doubled the BVCC membership Created a newsletter in English and Spanish Held the 1st National Night Out Block Party with seventy-seven (77) residents in attendance.

Throughout the group’s quest, these communities gained unity and trust amongst neighbors and developed a relationship with the City of High Point. Future goals for this neighborhood include: a neighborhood clean up, a community awareness block party, hiring a security officer and a landscaping workshop.

Southside Neighborhood Association The Southside Neighborhood Association is actively involved with the Southside neighborhood residents. The neighborhood desires to invest heavily in area youths in order to keep the neighborhood activities

ongoing. The Southside Neighborhood Association planned a “Family and Friends Day” at the Southside Center. This encouraged neighborhood residents to become involved in family and school activities, and to become members of the Southside Neighborhood Association. The Association also sponsored a program “Christmas Time at Southside” that included residents. The program demonstrated the many talents of the area youths and association members. The Southside Neighborhood Association is very involved with the Revitalization Plans for the Southside area sponsored by the city of High Point Community Development and Housing Department. The Southside Neighborhood Association scheduled a trip to Charlotte, North Carolina for the purpose of touring a revitalized area in Charlotte that is identical to the revitalized plan proposed for the Southside residents. This gave the residents a clearer insight of the future plans for the Southside area. The Association is also the liaison to area residents; churches, schools, businesses/agencies and they meet monthly for updates, reviews and discussions. The Southside Neighborhood Association continues to involve neighborhood residents in activities and programs. Many of the activities and events over the past year include: • • • • • A Neighborhood Yard Sale National Night Out Southside “Community Breakfast” Fair Housing Workshop Home Repair/Maintenance Workshop

Washington Drive Neighborhood Association Washington Drive Neighborhood Association is located in a historical area of the city. The Association meets monthly and discusses

neighborhood concerns, boarded-up houses, drug activities, crime, and homelessness. The Washington Drive Association partnered with the High Point Police Department in a “Get To Know Your Neighbor” event within the Washington Drive Neighborhood. Association members and the Police networked with residents and businesses asking for feedback concerning crime and safety problems in the neighborhood. This was a successful event and several residents became members of the Washington Drive Association. The Washington Drive Association members worked diligently with the city’s Minimum Housing Code Division to initiate code enforcement of a boarded up unit that housed vagrants, drugs and crime elements. Through minimum code enforcement, the owner completed the repairs, removed trash build up and made the unit a safe and standard one. The proposed Core City Plan for the Washington Drive area was presented by the city’s Planning Department to the Washington Drive Association. A mix of association members, residents, businesses, churches and elected officials were in attendance of the meeting. Participation of the Association is very important for the future plans of the Washington Drive Area. The Association elected an active businessman of the Washington Drive area as their chairman. His business expertise and familiarity of the area will be a great asset to the Association and bring in new members. This will allow the association to form committees and to work on neighboring issues and goals. The Washington Drive Association participated in several activities during the 2006-2007 year to inform the community of available programs. Several of the events and activities included: • • • National Night Out Neighborhood Clean Up Work Force/Core City Plan

Five Points Pride Association

Five Points Pride Association includes residents and businesses of the Five Points area. The Association re-established meetings on a monthly basis as an effort to increase membership and to initiate participation from the neighborhood. A Five Point Pride Community event “GET ACQUAINTED WITH YOUR NEIGHBOR” was held in the Five Point area. A short survey was distributed among residents concerning their interest and participation in area activities, and becoming members of the Five Point Association. A follow-up was made within two weeks with the residents to receive their input. The Five Points Pride Association sponsored a “Holiday Breakfast” in honor of the area residents. Committee members, residents and businesses were invited to attend the breakfast. The event was planned as an appreciation of the member’s diligence and commitment to the Association during the past year. The Association held a “Spring Community Event” at a neighboring park. The Police Department, community members, residents, non-profits, and a health agency were present. New members were recruited on site and educational information was distributed. The purpose of the event was to make the neighborhood aware of the many facets the Association has and to encourage the residents to become active with the Association. A total of five residents of the area signed up to attend the next scheduled meeting, The Five Points Pride Association continues to offer programs and events to address the needs of those living in the Five Points Area. Several of the events includes: • • “A Teenage Girl’s Guide/Survival Session” National Night Out

Grace Evangelical Lutheran Church The Grace Neighborhood Association is currently in the process of developing their mission statement for a safer neighborhood. They meet on a monthly basis to address problems and crime related issues taking place in the Grace Neighborhood area. The Grace Neighborhood Association sponsored a “Fall Neighborhood Gathering” with area residents, friends, committee members and youth in attendance, increasing membership and getting acquainted was the goal and topic of discussion. The “Youth Matters. A concerns of encouraged activities. of Grace” also attended their first meeting to discuss Youth total of thirteen (13) youths were in attendance to share their the neighborhood and after school activities. Area Youths are to participate in the association activities to help eliminate gang

Grace Evangelical Neighborhood Association will continue to offer daily programs to address the needs of those living in the Grace Neighborhood area. A special event was held for the neighborhood to show appreciation for their diligently work with the Association was:

A Neighborhood Picnic

Highland Mills Neighborhood Association The Highland Mills Neighborhood Association is actively involved within their neighborhood. The Association desires to become active in eliminating blight in areas within the neighborhood and involve youth activities to help stabilize the future and keep neighborhood activities ongoing. The Association members expressed a great concern of the housing stock in the surrounding area. The city of High Point Inspection Services Division was ask to present to the Association during a monthly meeting. The Inspection Division addressed issues of boarded homes, debris and over-grown lots throughout the neighborhood. Complaints concerning landlord’s responsibility was also discussed and referred to the Human Relations Department. The Association scheduled a neighborhood clean up of the Highland Mills area. A trash trailer was placed at the church to secure trash and debris throughout the neighborhood. A combination of youths from the Penn-Griffin School and residents of the area participated in the clean up. A barbecue

followed the clean up at noon and an approximate total of 80 residents were in attendance. The Highland Mills Neighborhood Association continues to offer programs and events to address the need of those living in the Highland Mills area. Some of the features include:
• • •

National Night Out A Flu Clinic Neighborhood Clean Up

Weed and Seed Program

Ambassador Court Apts. Weed and Seed Safe Site

Weed and Seed Safe Sites Meeting

Weed and Seed Steering Committee Meeting Program Overview

Weed and Seed Poster Contest Winner

The High Point Weed and Seed Program continued to provide programs in the core-city target areas this past year. Through the weeding of criminal activity from the High Point Police Department, the crime rate has dropped tremendously in core-city neighborhoods. The Violent Crimes Task Force continued to notify violent repeat offenders in High Point warning them to stop the violence or face harsh punishment. Through the seeding of activities this year, residents were able to attend activities such as: free basic computer classes, financial management workshops, home care classes, ex-offender resource assistance, and community crime awareness events. The Weed and Seed Steering Committee worked hard this past year in recruiting more residents to serve on the committee. Those efforts were very successful with an increase in membership as well as participation. From the increase in membership, the Weed and Seed Steering Committee

was able to form sub-committees to work on key issues and projects related to Weed and Seed. The sub-committees formed included: • • • • • • Marketing/Advertising (Media Coverage) Outreach/Sustainability Over sites (Monitoring safe sites) Youth Imitative (Youth Council) Grants/Proposals Art/ Cultural Events

The Weed and Seed Steering Committee also continued to allocate funds toward programs that provided capacity building programs to residents in the core-city areas. The programs and projects that were funded this year through Weed and Seed funds included: • • • • • The JEETS Program, which provided employment preparedness workshops for selective ex-offenders. Macedonia Baseball League, in which Weed and Seed funds were used to purchase uniforms and equipment and pay for the umpire fees for the season. Computer Classes, which provided free basic computer skills and fundamentals to residents in the core-city. Family Service of the Piedmont provided free budgeting; home management and leadership workshops to residents of the Weed and Seed designated areas. Triad Economic Development Corporation provided ten-week certified curriculum training in the areas of entrepreneurship/small business development and promotion of job creation on a community level.

The Weed and Seed Youth Council began to take form this past Weed and Seed year. The Weed and Seed Youth Council will be the leadership and voices of the youth from core-city neighborhoods within High Point. To prepare the youth for future leadership skills, the Weed and Seed Steering Committee will send nine youth to attend the 2007 Weed and Seed Youth Leadership Council Summer Camp in Orlando, Florida. The summer camp will teach and equip the youth with essential tools needed to be future leaders in their neighborhoods. Weed and Seed Volunteer Income Tax Assistance (VITA) Program

The High Point Weed and Seed site participated in the VITA program, which provided free tax preparation to High Point residents this past tax year. The VITA volunteers prepared basic tax returns for taxpayers with special needs, including persons with disabilities, those with a low to limited income, nonEnglish speaking persons and elderly taxpayers. The VITA program resulted in helping families who Average Adjusted Gross Income was $13, 496, with the following tax credits: $53,153 with the Earned Income Credit (EITC), $16,037with the Child Tax Credit (CTC), $1,902 with the Education Tax Credit and $39 with the Elderly Credit. The total refund to taxpayers was $130,811 with over one hundred forty-five (145) residents filling taxes through the VITA program. In addition, the free tax preparation saved taxpayers approximately $29,000 in tax preparation and transmission fees. The resulting total of 159,811 represents the funds that will be spent directly in surrounding areas, serving to improve and increase the local economy.

VITA Program in Operation

Anna Mills Wagoner (center) Middle District of North Carolina United States Attorney awards VITA Volunteers

Weed and Seed Safe Sites The Weed and Seed Safe Sites provided an array of programs and activities for residents throughout the core-city neighborhoods of High Point. Some of the programs offered at the sites included: youth and tutoring services, HIV/AIDS awareness and counseling, free computer classes, after school youth programs, youth sports league, GED classes, and adult illiteracy classes. They met on a quarterly basis to discuss activities that could possibly be funded with Weed and Seed funds. The Weed and Seed Safe Sites include:

Macedonia Family Resource Center Provides: Free Computer Classes, GED Classes, Technology Access Point Fairview Resource Center Provides: Youth Services Washington Terrace Park Provides: Structured Youth and Adult Recreational Activities. Morehead Recreation Center Provides: After School Program and Structured Youth and Adult Recreational Activities. New Gate Garden Apartments Provides: Free Computer Classes

Brentwood Crossing Apartments Provides: Free Computer Classes and GED NIA Community Action Center Provides: HIV Awareness and Counseling Services. West End Community Center Provides: Free Computer Classes, Thrift Store items at low cost, Women’ s Shelter Washington Drive Enrichment Center Provides: After School Program and Teen Services Ambassador Court Apartments Will offer Free Computer Classes this fall and English as a second language classes.

ADDENDUM

Financial Summaries

Financial Information
City of High Point Rehabilitation Delivery Costs FYE '06 - '07

Activity Delivery Cost Production - units completed Total

$ 235,150.24 $ 718,201.13 $ 955,630.37

complete

Activity Delivery Cost Divided by: Total

$ $

235,150.24 955,630.37

complete

Equals: Delivery Cost %

25%

Jurisdiction: City of High Point Reporting Period: 07/01/06 6/30/07 Item Number of Units Completed Costs of Units Completed Number of Units In Process Estimated Cost of Units in Process

CDBG $ $ 58 412,153.93 -

HOME $ $

OTHER 0 -

TOTAL $ $ 68 720,480.13

10 308,326.20 $ $

Total

$

720,480.13

Jurisdiction: City of High Point

Reporting Period: 07/01/06 - 6/30/07 % of Time charged to Programs CDBG 100% 100% 80% 50% 50% 80%

Title Project Manager Project Manager Affordable Housing Manager Office Support II Office Support IV Housing Specialist

Total CDBG Salaries: Total CDBG Allocation:

$297,633.44 $235,150.34

HOME Program Income: $

City of High Point Loan Breakdown FYE '06-'07 CDBG Type Housing Rehab Housing Rehab - HOME Purchase Rehab Emergency Repair First Time Homebuyer Rental Rehab Economic Development TOTAL

# of loans 68 8 25 5 298 24 5 433

Loan balance $1,487579 $343,074 $ 189,463 $ 29,625 $ 741,347 $ 596,403 $24,950 $ 3,412,441

CD HOME HOME HOME

Public Notice for CAPER Review

Announcement
Public Comment Period For the CDBG and HOME Program Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) for report period July 1, 2006 – June 30, 2007 The City of High Point announces a fifteen-day public comment period to review the draft Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report (CAPER) for the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) and HOME programs. The purpose of the CAPER is to allow the public an opportunity to review and comment on the progress, achievements, and expenditures of the federal CDBG and HOME programs in the City of High Point. In order to encourage public input in this review process, the CAPER will be made available for public review from September 10 through September 24, 2007. After the review period, the CAPER will be finalized and submitted to HUD on or about September 28, 2007. Copies of the draft CAPER will be available for review and comment at the following locations: High Point City Hall, 211 S. Hamilton Street, Rm. 312 High Point Public Library, 901 N. Main St., 2nd Floor Research Services; Community & Neighborhood Center, 201 Fourth Street; Fairview Resource Center, 401 Taylor Avenue; City Hall at the Mall, 921 Eastchester Drive; Macedonia Family Resource Center, 401 Lake Avenue; Morehead Recreation Center, 101 Price Avenue West End Community Center, 901 English Road ARK of Safety Daycare, 1411 Montlieu Avenue Carl Chavis YMCA, 2357 Granville Street Any citizen who has a question about or wishes to comment upon any information in the CAPER, can attach their comments to the draft report at the public access

sites or submit their written comments to the Community Development and Housing Department, P.O. Box 230, High Point, NC 27261, or Email: paulette.anderson@highpointnc.gov. For more information, please call E. Paulette Anderson at (336) 883-3351.

Contract and Subcontract Activity

HOME Match Report

Citizen Comments

West End Community Meeting; February 13, 2007, 6:00 PM What • • • is the time frame to convey property to SHARE? Signed contact Council does the conveyance Zoning issues

There is a price increase in boarding houses. Are applicants of rental units expected to pay first/last months rent and include utilities? There is a population still left out that cannot afford rent and they are living in substandard and or boarding housing. NOTE: A Ten Year Homeless Plan is in process; the City of High Point is considering a Fair Housing Ordinance Southside Community Meeting; February 22, 2007, 6:30 PM Will the park have controlled operating hours once the splash is complete? We are very concerned that the splash will draw unfamiliar citizens. A: Yes, Parks & Recreation staff will supervise the splash pad. The revitalization can cause an increase in traffic from other areas within and outside of the city also. When will the placarded houses with yellow stickers and the vacant lots that need to be cleared be addressed? Does the city’s plan include replacing the houses and the lots with new homes? Have the city compiled a research for handicap homes? Will the facility at 201 Fourth Street be available for rental or is it for the use of the city only? A: The facility is available free of charge for community meetings/events. What resources does the city have available to inform the public about purchasing a home?

How can the public acquire more information concerning homebuyer education? What is the percentage of homeowners versus tenants in the Southside area? Washington Terrace Park Community Meeting; February 8, 2007, 6 PM What does comprehensive rehabilitation have to offer? • Offer a low interest loan for those that have the ability to pay. • If it is determined that the loan would cause financial hardships, a lien is placed on the property and a percentage of the loan is forgiven and/or deferred How do we motivate our neighbors to take ownership of their property/ community? • Offer “How to workshops” • Develop a neighborhood organization Property located beside the fire station on Gordon Street is unkempt. • Call the city to determine who is the rightful owner of the property • File a complaint with the inspections dept. Something should be done about the trash in the JC Morgan area, particularly between Camden Avenue and Dartmouth Avenue. • Encouraged residents to make concern know to City Council representatives and/or at City Council meetings (1st Monday of each month is pubic forum night) • Write a letter to the owner of the property stating your concerns. Do you have to have a neighborhood association before you address the City Council? • NO. But there is strength in numbers. What happened to the Five Point Beautification Plan? • This is a project of Dept. of Transportation. • Encouraged residents to talk to their City Council Rep. about this issue and issues like this. (Bernita Sims is the rep. for this area)

How would a person contact your office for questions we may have after the meeting? • Our main office number is 336-883-3349. • The City of High Point has one number that will connect you to any city dept. it is: o 336-883-3111 or 336-883-3100 or www.high-point.net When can we expect revitalization in the East Central area? • Estimate 4 to 5 years. There are problems in East Central that need to be addressed first. Highland Mills Community Meeting; March 12, 2007, 7 PM How will the more modern homes affect the property value of existing property? • There could be a tax increase • Wealth in property increases as well. What is the City of High Point going to do with the old mill? • Residents would like this building to be used as a Senior Citizen village with priority going to people that worked in the mill. • Or Specialty shops area • Or Montessori City of High Point should enforce zoning codes on commercial property. What can we do about property with high grass, litter, etc…. • Michael McNair (Director of CD & Housing) asked the group to form a list of property address’s that they think are in code violations. He will forward that list to the proper dept.. • Call the City of High Point’s “One Stop Shop Number” at 883-3100 or 883-3111. This number connects you to all city services. Residents note that there is a high rat infestation. Does the City have someone to check the “Old Mill” property? A resident states that the mill is a fire hazard and health hazard Can the HP Fire Dept. check the water system to ensure it is performing properly?

Residents would like to City of High Point to cut back trees/ vines off power lines throughout the neighborhood. Residents complained about an abandoned oil building on S. Elm Street. • Michael McNair stated he would check into it. City of High Point should enforce zoning codes on commercial property. Macedonia Community Meeting; March 13, 2007, 6 PM How can the Macedonia area obtain a recreation center? The police response time is too slow. Can speed bumps be added to several streets in the area? Can a basketball court be added next to the baseball field? How can the Macedonia area obtain a recreation center?

CAPER Public Comments

Five Point Pride Association Comments • • • • Minority and Women’s Business Enterprise should possibly include a youth entrepreneurship and youth investment component Block grants information should be available and advertised more widely Houses near Washington Park need to be rehabbed Also, several boarded up houses in the area near the park

CHECKLIST

CAPER Checklist

CONSOLIDATED ANNUAL PERFORMANCE & EVALUATION REPORT (CAPER) CHECKLIST AND TABLE OF CONTENTS
(The following information is required for a complete CAPER. We encourage the use of this form as an index to ease preparation and review of the report.)

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS Evidence of public notice for CAPER Review...................................... Assessment of progress toward five-year goals................................. Assessment of progress toward one-year goals................................. Impediments to fair housing and actions to overcome them............. Affordable housing actions for extremely low, low/moderate income renters and owners........................................................................
• • Actions taken and accomplishments to meet worst case needs............. Actions and accomplishments to serve people with disabilities............. Number of Section 215 housing opportunities created......................... ......

p 118 p 15 p 15 p 17 p 20
p 20 p 20 p N/A

Continuum of care progress to help homeless people...................... • • • • • Actions to meet supportive housing needs (include HIV/AIDS) Actions to plan and/or implement continuum of care................... Actions to prevent homelessness................................................. Actions to address emergency shelter needs............................... Actions to develop transitional housing.......................................

p 59 p 60 p 60 p 60 p 60 p 60

Actions and accomplishments to: • • • • • meet underserved needs.............................................................. foster and maintain affordable housing........................................ eliminate barriers to affordable housing....................................... fill gaps in local institutional structure ........…………………………. facilitate PHA participation/role ................................................... p 20 p 31 p 53 p 54 p 54

• • •

reduce lead-based paint hazards................................................. reduce poverty............................................................................

p 22 p 20

ensure compliance with program and planning requirements (include monitoring of CHDOs/subrecipient compliance............................ p 21 p 20 p 130
p 16

Leveraging of public and private funds ........................................... Summary of citizen comments...........................................................
Analysis of successes and failures and actions taken to improve programs.......

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) Relationship of expenditures to priority needs................................... Low/moderate income benefit............................................................ Amendments and other changes to programs .................................. Completion of planned actions to: • • • pursue all resources identified in plan ......................................... certify consistency for local applicants for HUD funds................. support Consolidated Plan goals.................................................. p 73 p 73 p 73 p 10 p 46 p 46 p 20 p 10 p 87

National objective failures, if any ...................................................... Actions taken to avoid displacement ................................................. Compliance with URA ....................................................................... If jobs were filled with over income people:

• • •

What was done to give low/moderate income first priority? ......................... List job titles created/retained and those made available to low/mods......... ...................................................................................................................... Describe training for low/moderate income persons.....................................

p N/A P N/A

p N/A

For limited clientele activities, if any: • The nature of the group that allows assumption of more than 51% low/mod ..............................................................................................p 10 Rehabilitation accomplishments and costs: • units completed for each type of program .................................... p 26

• CDBG expenditures for rehabilitation............................................ • other funds invested .................................................................... • delivery costs ................................................................................ Neighborhood Revitalization Strategy area, if any: • progress against established benchmarks ....................................

p 26 p 31 p 26 p 34

Sign up to vote on this title
UsefulNot useful