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Mapping of Skills Development Initiatives in selected regions of Bangladesh

Submitted by:
Swisscontact

Swisscontact
Swiss Foundation for
Technical Cooperation

Hardturmstrasse 123
CH-8005 Zrich

Tel. +41 44 454 17 17


Fax +41 44 454 17 97

info@swisscontact.ch
www.swisscontact.org

Table of contents
ABOUT THIS REPORT ................................................................................................................................. 1
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ............................................................................................................................... 2
BACKGROUND ....................................................................................................................................................... 2
FINDINGS .............................................................................................................................................................. 2
LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS ............................................................................................................................ 3
GLOSSARY OF TERMS ................................................................................................................................ 4
1.0 BACKGROUND .................................................................................................................................... 5
1.1 RATIONAL FOR THE SURVEY ............................................................................................................................... 5
1.2 TARGET AREAS ................................................................................................................................................ 5
1.3 SURVEY APPROACH .......................................................................................................................................... 6
1.3.1 Scope of the survey ............................................................................................................................... 6
1.3.2 Contact collection.................................................................................................................................. 6
1.3.3 Data collection ...................................................................................................................................... 7
1.3.4 Data entry ............................................................................................................................................. 7
1.3.5 Limitations and Challenges ................................................................................................................... 7
2.0 FINDINGS ........................................................................................................................................... 9
2.1
2.2
2.3
2.4

SKILLS DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES IN TARGET AREAS ............................................................................................... 9


TRAINING SERVICE PROVIDERS IN TARGET AREAS .................................................................................................. 12
ENTERPRISES IN TARGET AREAS ........................................................................................................................ 16
CONCLUSIONS .............................................................................................................................................. 22

ANNEXURE.............................................................................................................................................. 23
ANNEX I: DATA TABLES (ARRANGED ACCORDING TO FIGURE NUMBER ABOVE) ................................................................... 23
ANNEX II: QUESTIONNAIRES .................................................................................................................................... 31
ANNEX III: LIST OF SKILLS DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS ..................................................................................................... 49
ANNEX IV: LIST OF TRAINING SERVICE PROVIDERS ....................................................................................................... 49
ANNEX V: LIST OF ENTERPRISES ............................................................................................................................... 64
ANNEX VI: TIMELINE OF THE SURVEY......................................................................................................................... 79

ABOUT THIS REPORT


The survey intends to provide an overview about existing skills development projects, training service
providers and enterprises in ten selected districts1 of Bangladesh. The information will be used for the
following purposes:

I)

Explore avenues of collaboration among skills development actors and avoiding


duplication of efforts. The survey aims to address the lack of consolidated information on
completed and ongoing skills development initiatives in Bangladesh. In this regard, the
survey intends to capture, among others, detailed information about donors involved in
Skills Development (SD) projects, geographical location of SD projects, target groups,
male-female ratio of people belonging to the primary target group and type of
interventions.

II)

Enable skills practitioners designing project befitting target groups that were so far
excluded from existing projects. To that end, the survey taps information usually not
readily available from Training Service Providers (TSP) and enterprises about necessary
elements of skills development. Survey data regarding TSPs will cue on TSPs staffing,
involvement with SD projects, and types of training related intervention. It will also
provide information such as Enterprises staffing and their skill level and provision for on
the job training among others.

III)

Substantiate the national skills data system of the National Skills Development Council
(NSDC) with complementary information. As a part of Swisscontacts close collaboration
with government agencies involved in skills development, the survey will support NSDCs
initiative of developing a National Skills Data System by sharing the survey data and
findings.

IV)

This report presents results of the analysis done based on data collected from the targeted
districts. In addition, the enclosed CD contains detailed data, analysis and other
calculations that were required to arrive at the results.

Dinajpur, Bogra, Rajshahi, Mymensingh, Sunamganj, Dhaka, Gazipur, Jessore, Khulna & Chittagong

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
BACKGROUND
Swisscontact has realized lack of consolidated information on completed and ongoing Skills
Development (SD) projects in Bangladesh. In addition, information about Training Service Providers
(TSPs), and employment opportunities at enterprises are also not easily available. With the above in
mind, expert staffs from the earlier SkillFUL project embarked on a research to locate SD projects,
TSPs and enterprises (employers of graduates) in Dhaka, Gazipur, Mymensingh, Bogra, Rajshahi,
Dinajpur, Jessore, Khulna, Chittagong and Sunamganj Districts.

FINDINGS
16 SD projects were mapped in the study which showed that more project operate in urban areas than
in rural ones, with the exception of Jessore. 94% of the projects target male, female and youth as
beneficiaries who are also economically poor. The focus on Differently Abled People (DAP) and
marginalised is low compared to male, female and youth. Tribal communities receive the lowest focus
from the projects. 100%, 94% and 94% of the project target their interventions on training material
development, training of trainers and skills training provision respectively. More SD projects (88%)
focus on wage-employment than entrepreneurship development (63%). Only 50% of the SD projects
carry out access to finance and policy advocacy related interventions.
175 TSPs were surveyed during the study of which 31% were based in Dhaka. Less than 5% of the TSPs
were found working in Sunamganj, Mymensingh and Chittagong2. 51% of the TSPs are NGO-based
compared to 39% private and 11% public. This shows dependency of TSPs on donor driven training.
Segregating the TSPs according to seating capacity shows that 35% and 30% of rural TSPs have 51-100
or 50 and less seats respectively. Larger TSPs are concentrated in urban areas and it shows that 50%,
50% and 42% have 101-250, 251-500 or 500 plus seats respectively. Only 37% of the TSPs have been
accredited by BTEB. Of all TSPs surveyed, 67% have been involved in SD projects funded by donors.
233 enterprises were surveyed, most of which (64%) do not employ any female. Only 10% of staff
comprises female in enterprises with 15 or less workers. The proportion increases to 30% for
enterprises employing between 16 and 100 workers. For enterprises (mostly ready-made garments
and tailoring firms) with more than 100 workers, the rate is around 50%. Segregating enterprises
among urban, semi-urban and rural locations, it can be seen that the gender ratio of staff is well
balanced (close to 1:1) in urban and rural areas. In semi-urban locations, however, female comprise
of only 25%3 of the total workers. Dividing the enterprises into various trade categories, it is found
that enterprises in 7 of the 18 trade categories have only male workers. The trade categories where
enterprises have more than 50% of female workers are traditional in nature. Workers with basic skills
consist of either 20% or less of the total workers employed in enterprises of all sizes, with smaller
enterprises employing more workers with basic skills than larger ones. Larger enterprises have higher
concentration of experienced workers than smaller ones.
72.5% of enterprises expressed their willingness to offer On the Job Training (OJT) at their workshops
without expecting any cost contribution from projects. The rate increases to 85% when projects offer
reimbursement of costs for OJT. Enterprises prefer smaller periods of OJTs with 58% suggesting a
maximum of 5 weeks. Smaller enterprises (below 100 workers) demand between 100 and 200 workers
with basic skills annually, while the larger enterprises (more than 100 workers) demand between 850
and 25004. Almost all the enterprises (employing 11 or more workers) expressed willingness to offer
higher wages to basic skilled workers as compared to untrained ones. Then onwards the willingness
to officer higher wages to trained workers reduces and reaches 50% for small enterprises (5 or less
workers).

Commented [Manfred1]: relative to what?


Commented [IU2R1]: Reformulated.
Commented [Manfred3]: Annex tells 176?
Commented [IU4R3]: Corrected in annex
Commented [Manfred5]: Maybe a footnote to
chittagong is needed as this was not sufficiently explored
Commented [IU6R5]: done
Commented [Manfred7]: Not necessarily. It only shows
that donors pay for training which still can be market/
demand driven.
Commented [IU8R7]: reformulated
Commented [Manfred9]: Can this be generalised?
Seems high. Is this because these are specific enterprises?
Commented [IU10R9]: Explained
Commented [Manfred11]: Strange -what would be
the logic for this? Is this because the sample size is not good
enough?
Commented [IU12R11]: Could be. Explained in footnote
Commented [Manfred13]: traditional what / regarding
what?
Commented [IU14R13]: reformulated
Commented [Manfred15]: =Workers with basic skills?
Commented [IU16R15]: Changed
Commented [Manfred17]: Workers with basic skills?
Commented [IU18R17]: chnaged
Commented [Manfred19]: This is probably the
combined need of all enterprises. But for us it would be
good to know per enterprise in average.
Commented [IU20R19]: If I put average here, the
information will not be coherent with the data in figure 18.
Commented [Manfred21]: same as above.
Commented [IU22R21]: See reply to above comment.
(Without comment numbers its very difficult to refer to
them. I am thinking of downgrading to office 2010).
Commented [Manfred23]: 10? or more

Special case for Chittagong. See section 2.2.


3
Small sample size could be a reason for this counterintuitive result. See Methodology for more details.
4
See figure 18 for more details.

Commented [IU24R23]: The graph in figure 19 is


categorised in a way that this result is for 11 or more
workers.

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS
ADB
BTEB
DFID
NGO
NSDC
OJT
PDF
SDC
SD project
SIDA
TSP
TVET

Asian Development Bank


Bangladesh Technical Education Board
Department for International Development, UK
Government
Non-Governmental Organization
National Skills Development Council
On the Job Training
Portable Document Format
Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation
Skills Development Project
Swedish International Development Cooperation
Agency
Training Service Provider
Technical and Vocational Education and Training

GLOSSARY OF TERMS
Term

Definition

Differently Abled People (we target


only those with physical incapacity)

Applies to people with predominantly physical or mental challenges. It


recognises that even if people have mental and/or physical impairments,
they still have abilities, contrary to the picture painted with the terms
disabled or handicapped.
People who are marginalised and poor
Workers who are able to perform routine work independently and can
supervise others
Assessment and certification that are either conducted directly by BTEB
or centres that are accredited by BTEB to conduct such assessments
Workers who are skilled but need occasional supervision to perform
routine work
People who, due to political or social reasons, are excluded from rights or
services like education, food, health, political participation, justice,
livelihood opportunities, access to markets, information, ownership of
land, etc.
An approach to implementing skills training project where TSPs offers
demandable courses for which trainees are willing to pay partial cost of
the course. This creates a paradigm shift from the traditional project
based training where the donors subsidise the courses fully.
TSPs that operate as NGOs and where costs of training are partially or
fully subsidised by SD projects
People who earn less than USD 1.25 per day
TSPs that are owned and operated by private enterprises
TSPs that are owned and operated by government
Staff of enterprises who are engaged directly with production works,
unlike staff engaged in managerial or administrative work.
Classrooms, workshops, equipment and tools required at a training
centres to conduct training.
Teaching aids such as curricula, training manuals, hand-outs, consumable
materials needed to conduct training.
Workers who need regular supervision for routine works

Disadvantaged5
Experienced worker
Formal assessment and
certification
Less experienced worker
Marginalized

Market development
approach/model

NGO based TSP


Poor
Private TSP
Public TSP
Technical staff
Training infrastructure
Training material
Worker with basic skills

Poverty Revisited: Understanding Direction and Actions for the Swiss Cooperation Strategy Bangladesh; Swiss
Agency for Development and Cooperation.

1.0

BACKGROUND

1.1

Rational for the survey

Bangladesh has a labour force of around 56 million with a growth of about 2 million young entrants
every year6. Around 88%7 of the workforce earns their living in the informal sector which is
characterised by low productivity due to lack of adequate education and skills training of the workers.
Although the poverty headcount index has declined over the years, high rates of unemployment and
underemployment continue to exacerbate the impoverished lives of the poor. Given this context Skills
Development (SD) has rightly become one of the urgent needs for the development of Bangladesh.
The Government of Bangladesh considers SD as one of its priorities to becoming a middle-income
country by 2021 and has integrated SD into policies. Major donor agencies such as ADB, The World
Bank, SDC, DFID, SIDA etc. also realize the need of SD in Bangladesh and have been funding several SD
projects. Besides, private sectors businesses have also come forward for funding SD initiatives to
various degrees.
From the experiences of implementing SD projects in Bangladesh, Swisscontact has realized the lack
of consolidated information about completed and still ongoing SD projects in Bangladesh. Whereas
information about larger SD projects is easier available from the major donors it is more difficult or
sometimes quite impossible to get information about smaller SD initiatives taking place in different
geographical areas in Bangladesh. In addition, information about Training Service Providers (TSPs),
and employment opportunities at enterprises are also not easily available. Consultation with donors
and representatives of government agencies support this perception.

Commented [Manfred25]: Would be interesting to


know how many of these have some training, esp skills
training. Because this is what justifies skills development
projects. Ask team Kabir or Makbul to look in to relevant
reports. It is there. Evt in a WB report.
Commented [Manfred26]: This is only one factor, there
are many others.
Commented [Manfred27]: cause by what? Lack of jobs
and lack of needed skills?
Commented [ME28]: Correct or 2020?
Commented [IU29R28]: 2021. checked.

The National Skills Development Council (NSDC), the national apex body on SD, has taken initiative to
develop a National Skills Data System. This system will cover information on employment
opportunities, skills requirements, overseas labour markets, graduates, and labour law. However
information on ongoing skills development initiatives, their focus areas, target groups, scale and
duration are not yet covered under this system.
With the above in mind, expert staffs from the earlier SkillFUL project embarked on a research to
locate SD projects, TSPs and enterprises (employers of graduates) in 10 selected districts. The
objective was to:

1.2

Enable skills development agencies to identify possible collaboration opportunities among


ongoing projects and avoid overlapping.
Enable skills development practitioners to design future projects that address challenges in
delivering market oriented skills training to needy beneficiaries.
Supply NSDC with information on skills development initiatives to enhance the National Skills
Data System.

Commented [IU31R30]: Now it matches.

Target areas

Commented [ME32]: There should be a short


descriptionn on how the areas were selected for the survey
- refer to TOR for MAPPING.

The districts proposed have been selected based on prevalence of poor and disadvantaged target
groups and economic opportunities. Because there are too many districts that qualify with these
rather generic criteria, which could not all be covered by the limited resources available for this study,
it was decided to focus on districts in which SDC has been present with project activities during the
last years plus some new ones. SDC Bangladesh is going to implement new skills development

6
7

Commented [ME30]: Does the objective match with the


MAPPING project document?

Report on Labour Force Survey, 2010; Bangladesh Bureau of Statistics.


ADB (2010)

Commented [IU33R32]: Done

initiatives and wishes to focus and deepen its impact of development work in their target areas by
making more use of networks and synergies among its projects and partners. The findings of this study
will be relevant for any skills development initiatives in the selected districts but might be of particular
interest for SDCs future skills development initiatives in these areas.

1.3

Survey approach

The research project utilised SkillFULs experience and expertise of its SD staffs who possessed the
required knowledge in research methodology, training implementation and analysis of stakeholders
of SD projects. Eight (08) staffs from the earlier SkillFUL project worked as researchers while the
former SkillFUL project manager provided support in the role as Technical Advisor.
Both primary and secondary data were collected to achieve the research objectives. Initially data
collection was done through desk research only to economise available financial resources. However,
it soon became evident that desk research alone could not provide enough data for a meaningful
survey (see 1.3.3 Field survey). Therefore field surveys were also conducted by the research staffs in
all of the 10 districts.
The survey started in May 2015 and was scheduled to be complete by the end of October 2015.

Commented [ME34]: Why, what was the reason?


Commented [IU35R34]: Referred to the section where
the reason is explained. Did not want to put the reason here
again to prevent repetition.

1.3.1 Scope of the survey


The survey covered three major stakeholders of SD projects:
1. TSPs: They play the most important role in selection, training and job placement of training
beneficiaries. The survey looked into TSPs that were privately owned and /or were NGOs. Care
was taken to involve not only TSPs that offered subsidized training financed through projects
but also those that required trainees to pay fully for the course. TSPs offering training on
livelihood skills such as cattle fattening, goat rearing, etc. were excluded; the focus was on
TSPs that provide more technically oriented skills training.
2. Skills Development Projects (SD projects): These projects support skills training with technical
and financial inputs. The research intended to survey SD projects funded by international
donors and those funded locally.
3. Enterprises: Enterprises are important because they provide information on demandable
occupations, on-the-job training and employment. For the survey mainly enterprises who
offered any of the former SkillFUL supported occupations (see Annex II: Questionnaire for
representatives of enterprises for the list of occupations) were considered as respondents. In
some cases, enterprises that comprise occupations outside SkillFULs interventions were also
considered. The selection of enterprises were facilitated by TSPs.

Commented [Manfred36]: Did we really select


enterprises based on these occupations? How could we?
But we asked enterprises whether they have these
particular occupations. Did we not provide options to state
new occupations as well or only with Qs at TSPs?
Commented [IU37R36]: Explained

1.3.2 Contact collection


In order to reach the TSPs, SD projects and enterprises to administer the survey, the first step was to
have access to their contacts. To facilitate this process, possible information sources which have
access to these contacts were brainstormed and listed. In many cases, the team members relied also
on their personal connections to get to these information sources.
Once the contact information sources were defined, these sources were contacted by phone to collect
the contacts for the survey among TSPs, SD projects and enterprises. After obtaining the respondents
contacts, questionnaires (see 1.3.3 and Annex II) were sent to them.

1.3.3 Data collection


Questionnaire development
Three (3) questionnaires were developed simultaneously with contact collection, one each for TSPs,
SD projects and enterprises. Based on the English skills, it was decided that the questionnaire for SD
projects, which usually employ staffs that have sufficient English skills, will be circulated in English,
while those for TSPs and enterprises will be translated into Bangla.
Before sending out the questionnaires they were tested with randomly selected respondents in
Dhaka. Six (6) questionnaires for TSPs, 3 for SD projects and 6 for enterprises were tested. After
receiving and analysing the responses, critical issues were further discussed with the respondents over
phone and the questionnaires revised.

Desk survey
Questionnaires were initially sent out to 236 TSPs, 24 SD projects and 445 enterprises by email and/
or surface mail. However, the initial response rate was very low. Therefore the team members had to
take considerable efforts to remind the respondents over phone repeatedly to return the filled out
questionnaires. At the end of the desk survey responses from 127 (54%) TSPs, 16 (67%) SD projects
and 205 (46%) enterprises were received.

Field survey
Given the low rate of responses, especially among the enterprises and TSPs, it was decided to also
conduct a field survey in all 10 districts to seek more information. At the end of the visits only 29 and
28 additional responses were collected from TSPs and enterprises respectively. However, given the
overwhelming number of enterprises in all the targeted districts, it was decided that only their contact
information shall be collected segregated according to districts. Many of the enterprise contacts are
only available in hard copy because the information sources, e.g. associations, did not have proper
soft copy files. Many of the enterprise contacts are also incomplete such as missing phone numbers,
addresses, type of their service/ product offered. At the end of the field survey, demanding a level of
effort of 91 person-days, 21412 contacts of enterprises were collected. These contacts are not yet in
a database because the high level of effort required for verification, completion and data entry. It was
decided to follow up further on the 1st field survey in Dhaka and Gazipur districts to locate additional
TSPs. For this additional 9 person-days were required. 19 additional TSPs were located and surveyed
using the TSP questionnaire.
At the end of desk and field data collection 175 (74%) TSP, 16 (67%) SD project and 233 (52%)
enterprise response were collected.

1.3.4 Data entry


Three (3) separate databases were prepared using Microsoft Excel 2013 to record, organise and
analyse the data received from the questionnaires of TSPs, SD projects and enterprises. The data entry
was done by the research team members. To facilitate easy data entry, the format of the data entry
sheets were kept similar to the questionnaires.
Once responses were keyed into the data base, data cleaning took place jointly with the research team
members who entered the data. In cases of unclear data respondents were contacted for further
clarification.

1.3.5 Limitations and Challenges


Although SD projects were fairly prompt in returning the questionnaires, it was extremely challenging
to get them back from the TSPs and enterprises. Some information related to SD projects, especially
7

Commented [ME38]: Does this included the numbers


from the field survey?
Commented [IU39R38]: No. Is it not clear from the
sentence?
Commented [ME40]: Is this true? Was the rate of return
lowest with enterprises?
Commented [IU41R40]: Explained in bracket
Commented [IU42]: Put response ratio of all the
categories: SDP, TSP and enterprise. Also mention that since
the number of enterprises overall is generally larger than
the number of TSPs, it justified looking to additional
enterprises to do a meaningful study.

Commented [Manfred43]: I would combine this para


with above and only talk about one field survey resp follow
up through field survey.
Commented [IU44R43]: Merged

those implemented in collaboration with GoB, were difficult to obtain as government officers were
unwilling to cooperate on phone. At the time of the survey, many TSPs were busy conducting the BTEB
exams. Research team members had to take considerable effort and made several phone calls to
individual respondents to have the questionnaires returned.
The greatest challenge however, was collecting responses from enterprises. Since they are not
sufficiently aware of or do not have a direct interest in skills development projects, enterprises were
reluctant to spend time towards providing their responses. There were cases when enterprises
informed that they do not see any point in filling out the questionnaires because there was no
apparent financial gain for them. The research team members had to use their personal connections
or had to involve TSPs (who were familiar with the enterprises) to convince management at
enterprises to respond to the questionnaires.
There were also technical difficulties with regards compatibility of programs (Adobe, MS Word) used
by the research team and the respondents. The research team used the latest program versions which
was not always the case for the respondents. It is therefore good to send files out with older program
version(s), not the latest one. Also files with questionnaires in Bangla must have Bangla fonts
embedded in the document else receivers of such files might not be able to read them. It is also good
to send files out in Word for Windows and PDF.
Whereas most TSPs and SD projects have computers most of the enterprises outside Dhaka and
Chittagong are not likely to have such. These enterprises were therefore provided with the
questionnaire through government postal service. To make matters easier for them, a return envelope
with postage stamps was sent along with the questionnaires. However, many respondents claimed
that it was very difficult for them to locate a government post box. So some of them preferred sending
back the questionnaire via private courier service that was easily available albeit at higher costs.
The study further encountered limitations with regards to the survey methodology. Since the total
size of the population of SD projects, TSPs and enterprises could not be estimated, it was not possible
to determine the sampling size that will allow statistically significant analyses and results of all the
variables mentioned in the report. The limited resources had also not allowed to considerably
expanding the survey to seeking more responses because this had to happen mainly through
additional filed work. Therefore, the results and interpretations presented in the report are more of
indicative nature. In order to allow the reader a better judgment of the significance of the results the
numbers of samples on which the results are based are also indicated.

2.0

FINDINGS

2.1

Skills development initiatives in target areas

Number of SD Projects

Altogether 16 active SD projects with varying durations could be located in the 10 targeted districts.
Data shows that there is no project with a duration of less than 1 year. Around 2/3rd (11) of the total
projects last between 1 and 5 years, while 5 of the projects have a duration of 6 or more years.
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
0

Targeted Districts

Figure 1: District-wise operations of SD projects

Figure 1 depicts that more SD projects8 are active in urban areas like Gazipur (7), Dhaka (5) and
Chittagong (4) than other districts. The concentration of SD project is much lower in rural districts like
Mymensingh, Gaibandha, Bandarban, Kurigram, Rajbari, Pabna, Satkhira, Sunamganj and Kushtia
where the survey found just one SD project operational in each of them. Jessore, generally regarded
as a semi-urban area, has also just one project. It is quite challenging to conduct skills development
initiatives in rural areas given that there are limited TSPs and job opportunities and the survey indeed
shows that rural areas are less catered to by such initiatives.

Commented [ME45]: I am not sure that it is good to use


% for number of projects conducted. E.g. 2% would mean
0.32 project is conducted in this district. How do I
understand this?
No name for y axis.
Commented [Manfred46R45]: How come we have 21
districts in this graph when we only did the survey in 10 of
them- ambiguous?
IU:Mentioned in footnote 5
Commented [IU47R45]: Changed
Commented [ME48]: Why is this so? Is it because SD
projects take place in more economically developed districts
where the jobs are?
Commented [IU49R48]: Explained

Some SD project operated in areas in addition to the ones targeted in this survey. Hence it was decided to
mention them to portray a true picture of the projects operations.

Percentage of Targeted groups covered


by all SD projects

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

Target groups
Figure 2: Target groups among SD projects

Commented [ME50]: Disabled people: We cant use this


expression.

100%

94%

94%

88%

81%

69%

63%

63%
50%

50%

Others

Policy advocacy

Access to finances

Entrepreneurship/Selfemployment

Formal (BTEB) assessment and


certification

Training of school
management

Occupational standard
development

Training infrastructure
development

Awareness raising

Job placement

Skills training

Training of trainers

19%

Intervention Areas

Figure 3: Intervention wise variation among SD projects

Commented [Manfred51R50]: What is the y-axis?


IU: Mentioned
Commented [IU52R50]: Changed Disabled people to
Differently abled people. Also changed the chart type for
the data to appear meaningful like the previous chart.

Commented [ME53]: What was our definition of


marginalised? Do DAPs and tribal communities fall under
marginalised as well?
Commented [IU54R53]: Definition of marginalized given
in the Glossary of Terms above. That includes DAPs and
tribal communities.

81%
69%

Training material
development

Percentage of total number of SD projects

Figure 2 shows the target groups addressed by SD projects. It shows that almost all the projects target
male and female and youth (94%) which are economically poor (81%) - a classic targeting for SD
projects. Differently Abled People (DAPs) receive a moderate level of attention from projects with 63%
supporting them. Adults are addressed by about half of the projects only which underlines that the SD
projects do mostly target youth. Children9 however are only addressed by 19% of the projects. Lastly,
tribal communities are targeted by just 6% of the total projects surveyed which is also understandable
given remote habitats of such communities. Although more challenging, it might be good if future SD
projects would pay more attention to address marginalised people (DAPs, tribal communities, others).
However reaching these will require more effort and resources as compared to others.

3 of the total SD projects that engage children considers only beneficiaries of age 14 years or above

10

Figure 3 shows that interventions directly related to training provision like training material
development, training of trainers, skills training provision are some of the favourite interventions
among the SD projects. Activities not directly related to training provision like occupational standard
development, training of school management and formal assessment and certification receive lesser
attention from SD project. Access to finance and policy advocacy are the least prevalent interventions
with just 50% of SD projects supporting such initiatives. Lesser focus on access to finance and
entrepreneurship compared to job placement indicates that SD projects invest more in wageemployment than self-employment. With such a high level of similar interventions among all projects
close cooperation and coordination among each other might be meaningful to benefit from and
complement each others activities and prevent unnecessary duplication of efforts (e.g. training
material development).

11

2.2

Training service providers in target areas

A total of 175 TSPs were located and


surveyed during the study in all the 10
Sunamganj,
Mymensingh,
targeted districts. Figure 4 shows that 31%
3%
3%
of all TSPs surveyed are located in Dhaka.
Chittagong,
This makes sense given the rapid
5%
urbanisation and industrialisation that has
Dhaka ,
taken place in Dhaka during the last few
Gazipur, 6%
31%
decades. With regards to concentration of
TSPs, Dhaka is followed by Bogra, Dinajpur,
Khulna , 9%
Jessore, Rajshahi and Khulna, all of which
have either 9% or more of the total surveyed
TSPs. Next is Gazipur and Chittagong with
Rajshahi,
9%
just 6% respectively 5% of the total TSPs
surveyed. The case of Chittagong is rather
Bogra, 13%
interesting considering that it is the Port City
Jessore,
of the country and is preceded only by Dhaka
11%
Dinajpur,
11%
in
terms
of
urbanisation
and
industrialisation. One should note that data
collection in Chittagong was suspended
halfway through due to a tropical cyclone Figure 4: District-wise distribution of TSPs
making landfall in the coastal areas of the district. As a result, the results are unlikely to be a true reflection
of TSP concentration in the area. Sunamganj has the lowest proportion of TSPs which reaffirms the
commonly held assumption that rural areas lack skills training opportunities.
Although not statistically significant, one can see a correlation between location-wise concentration of TSPs
and SD projects. Barring a few exceptions, both of them have higher presence in urban districts than in rural
ones (compare Figure 1 with Figure 4). An interesting analysis would be to explore whether high
concentration of TSPs in urban areas is caused by higher numbers of SD project in the same areas. Such
analysis requires one to look into the type of TSPs located in different districts.

NUmber and Type of TSPs

Figure 5 shows presence of proportionately large number of NGO-based TSPs in urban and semi-urban
areas (with the exception of Dhaka). Among
60
this districts, Dinajpur, Chittagong, Khulna and
50
Rajshahi are also the ones where
proportionately more SD projects are
40
operating (see figure 1). Hence, one can also
30
see a correlation between concentration of
NGO-based TSPs and presence of SD projects.
20
10
0

Districts
NGO
Figure 5: Type of TSPs

Private

Public

The above correlation could have manifested


because of several possibilities. The first
possibility is based on the assumption that
high number of TSPs were operating in
districts before SD projects started investing.
From SD project practitioners point of view, it
makes sense for donors to award projects in
areas where more TSPs were located to
facilitate easy training of beneficiaries. The
second possibility is based on the assumption
12

Commented [Manfred55]: Special case - must be


explained.
Commented [IU56R55]: Explained
Commented [ME57]: Two districts...but then only
Chittagong is explained.
I also find it unlikely that Chittagong has only so few TSPs.
Did we spend enough time to late the TSPs? I thought we
could not visit long enough.
Commented [IU58R57]: We did the visit, but for
enterprises not for TSPs. There is a possibility that
Chittagong has more TSPs but our data does not reflect
that.
Commented [Manfred59]: Include in explanation to
Chittagong above
Commented [IU60R59]: Done
Commented [Manfred61]: Fig1 and Fig4 do not show
the same districts. Hence it is not clear how one can make
such a comparison.
Commented [IU62R61]: As discussed, the comparison
highlights types of districts (urban, rural) rather than
specific districts.
Commented [Manfred63]: Why do we have to
speculate? Would we not have the data to look at this?
E.g. a graph that shows District wise distribution of type of
TSPs (stack Graph).
Commented [IU64R63]: Rephrased
Commented [ME65]: Above is mentioned that Fig 4
shows the distribution of TSPs among districts.
Dont combine figures that show different things. This
should be Fig 5.

that SD projects were already operating in certain district (with private TSPs). Sensing opportunities to
receive project funds, NGOs may have set-up training centres in districts with higher concentration of SD
projects. As a result, the number of NGO-based districts increased in areas where we see higher
concentration of SD projects. However, substantiating any of the above possibilities is beyond the scope of
this study.
Above results may also have implications for projects wanting to induce a more market development
approach to skills training. Although social businesses in nature, NGOs are mostly donor funded. They might,
therefore, not be used to adopting more sustainable business models such as charging tuition fee from
trainees, seeking industry contributions or other tapping upcoming sources such as the training fund
to be introduced by the government. This does not mean that privately owned TSPs do not work with
projects and donor funds. . During the implementation of the SkillFUL project, Swisscontact partnered
successfully with 17 privately owned TSPs.

100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

Commented [IU67R66]: Right. Reformulated


Commented [Manfred68]: Results of what might have
implications? Dont understand.
Commented [IU69R68]: reformulated

70
60
50
40
30
20
10

Total number of TSPs

Percentage of area-wise TSPS

The data further beacons towards the challenge for projects intending to work with public TSPs
because only 11% of the TSPs located and surveyed are run by the government. Yet another challenge
with regards to cooperating with public TSPs is the bureaucracy embedded in the process of engaging
them. This is substantiated by the experience of the SkillFUL project which tried working with several
public TSPs but the achieved cooperation was very short of expectations.

Commented [Manfred66]: Would this make sense?


What would be the presumption? Why are no TSPs there
right now?
If we do training then this should be based on training need.
Training need is crated when there is economic growth and
getting workers up to speed is not possible without external
training.

0
50 & below

51-100

101-250

251-500

500 +

Range of seat capacity


Urban

Semi urban

Rural

No of TSPs

Figure 6: Seating capacity-wise distribution of TSPs

Figure 6 shows categorisation of TSPs based on their total seating capacity divided further into urban,
semi-urban and rural areas. The results show that rural TSPs comprise around 35% of all the TSPs with
a seat capacity of 50 and below. The proportion gradually declines to only 20% as the seat capacity of
TSPs increases to more than 500. This implies rural areas have mostly smaller TSPs, hence a
practitioner of skills development may have to contract a large number of small TSPs for a project. It
further implies higher cost of monitoring, supervision and capacity development of partner TSPs in
rural areas.
Semi-urban based TSPs, on the other hand, do not follow any specific pattern and it shows that TSPs
with smaller but also large seat capacities are present. The seat capacities of urban based TSPs are

13

Commented [ME70]: Why is the Fig 5 caption inside the


graph border and in other graphs outside?
Is it possible to make 5 categories, e.g. <50, 51100,
101250, 251500, >500.
How does it look for TPS in urban and rural areas?
Commented [Manfred71]: What are the two y-axis?
The shape/ colour / colour of the graph for number of TSPs
is very dominant, use more subtle colour font?

generally higher than for rural and semi-rural areas. This is suitable for projects who intend to train a
larger number of beneficiaries in rural areas.

Accredited
42%
Not
accredited
58%

16%
14%
12%
10%
8%
6%
4%
2%
0%

Commented [ME72]: Colors not good for greyscale


printing.
Commented [IU73R72]: changed

Commented [Manfred74]: % on figure and text do not


match.
Commented [IU75R74]: changed

Tailor
Mobile Phone
Electrical House
Block Batik Printer
Garments Machine
Handicraft Maker
Hand Embroider
Food Processing &
Beautician
Construction Worker
Refrigeration and Air-
Kathchupi Fitter
Electronics Technician
Machine Embroider
Automobile Mechanic
Plumber and Pipe Fitter
Mason
Light Vehicle Driver
Electrical Technician
Motor Cycle Mechanic
Rod binder
Carpenter
Sweater Knitting
Mechanical worker
Sweater linking
Hand and Brush Painter
Welder
Jam, Jelly and Pickle
Wood Working
Textile Worker
Lacquer Polisher

Percentage of TSPs

Figure 7: TSPs with BTEB accreditation

Figure 7 shows the percentage of TSPs that


are accredited by the Bangladesh Technical
Education Board (BTEB) in comparison to
those which are not. It shows that 42% of
the surveyed TSPs have received
accreditation from BTEB, the remaining 63%
have not. This poses a particular challenge
for SD projects that intend to provide formal
training and/or ensure certification of
graduates under the formal system. Given
that the majority of the TSPs are not
accredited, SD projects have a limited
choice of working with such TSPs.

Occupations
Figure 8: Occupation-wise distribution of TSPs

Figure 8 depicts the type of courses that are offered by all TSPs combined. The list of courses was
determined based on the occupations used under the SkillFUL project plus additional ones provided
by the surveyed TSPs. The result shows that tailor training is the most frequent training with nearly
14% of all the TSPs offering it. Next are training for mobile phone technician and electrical house wiring
technician each offered by nearly 10% of all TSPs. The first 6 training courses up to handicraft maker
cover about 50% of all training courses offered. An interesting observation is that less than 2% of the
TSPs offer courses for occupations such as motorcycle mechanic, rod binder, carpenter, sweater
knitting operator, sweater linking operator etc. (the 12 last trades listed). For many of these
occupations skilled people were recently still in demand and training courses exist. Possible reasons
for the low course offers might be lack of capacity of TSPs to provide these courses which would imply
more capacity building for these courses at TSPs.

14

Commented [Manfred76]: y-axis?


Commented [IU77R76]: mentioned
Commented [ME78]: How were the training courses
selected/ listed? SkillFUL courses plus others suggested by
the TSPs?
Commented [IU79R78]: Explained

Not
involved
33%

Involved
67%

Figure 9: TSPs involvement with donor funded projects

Figure 9 shows the percentage of TSPs having


been involved in projects. The result shows that
67% of the TSPs have participated in the past or
are currently engaged in projects; only 33% had
no prior project exposure. This is not surprising
considering 51% of the total TSPs found are
NGO-based. This indicates a high familiarity of
TSPs with projects which can be an advantage
for cooperation insofar that expectations of
such TSPs towards new project support
remains realistic. It also means a still high
dependency on external source of funds and
lesser an approach for a more market oriented
model of skills delivery.

Commented [Manfred80]: We only say that the TSP has


been involved in a project. We did not collect information
on how the TSPs were funded, what money came from what
source.
Commented [IU81R80]: Reformulated

15

2.3

Enterprises in Target areas

As mentioned under section 1.3.5 one of the biggest challenges was to get responses from enterprises.
As a result, responses from enterprises were too limited to obtain an accurate perception of issues at
hand.
The number of contacts of enterprise collected in the 10 targeted districts is very high. However many
of the contacts do not allow segregating enterprises based on sectors, sub-sectors, trades and other
criteria because most information sources, e.g. associations, chambers of commerce, do not maintain
such segregated data about their members. For the use of this survey, it had however been essential
to select enterprises that provide work in occupations relevant for this survey. Also, the contact
information of enterprises is often incomplete (missing phone numbers, addresses, emails). Some of
the information was only available in hard copies. In order to make enterprises information more
useful, a tremendous amount of work would be required for verification, completion of information
and data entry. This level of effort was not possible within the limited resources available for the
survey. Hence the survey team had to limit itself mainly to only collect the contacts from the
information sources and organise them segregated as per districts. With some additional efforts, these
contacts can be very useful in the future, especially for projects who intend to locate enterprises for
facilitating OJTs and/or employment.
At the end of the data collection phase, contacts of 21,412 enterprises were available. Responses
specific to the survey questionnaire were collected from 233 enterprises only. The results below are,
hence, based on the analyses of data from these 233 enterprises and are statistically not relevant but
indicative in nature.
A general assumption among skills
development practitioners is that employers
tend to be biased against recruiting female
technical workers. A study10 commissioned by
SkillFUL project in 2013 revealed that more
than 58% of the enterprises do not employ
women. Security concerns, inability to make
them work overtime, risk of eve-teasing and
social disturbances were identified as some of
the reasons why enterprises are reluctant to
hire women.

Percentage of total number of


ENTs that do not hire either
male or female

70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%
Male

Female

Data in figure 1011 shows that the findings of


the MSDI survey are consistent with above
study. Close to 65% of the sample enterprises
have no female worker, while the equivalent for male workers is only 5%. The large gap between
preference for male and female employees poses a challenge for SD projects that intend to bring more
women into skills training and then jobs. Swisscontacts experience from implementing the SkillFUL
project was that it is relatively easy to provide training to female beneficiaries but difficult to place
Figure 10: Enterprises that do not employ either male or female
technical workers

10

Study to Identify Constraints and Opportunities for Employment of Skilled Women and Differently Abled
People in the Formal and Informal Job Market; MIDAS 2013
11
The results have been derived by calculating percentage of total enterprises that do not employ any male
and separately percentage of enterprises that do not employ any female. The opposite results (i.e. percentage
of enterprises that do employ male or female) were not plotted. Hence the results of both the bars in figure 10
is not expected to add up to 100%.

16

100%

80

90%

70

80%

60

70%
60%

50

50%

40

40%

30

30%

20

20%

Number of ENTs

Ratio of male and female

them in jobs, especially those that are not traditional female ones. A tracer study12 commissioned
by SkillFUL at the end of the project phase revealed that the employment rate of female graduates
was only 36%.

10

10%
0%

0
1 to 5

6 to 10

11 to 15

16 to 20

21 to 50

51 to 100 101 to 500

500+

Size of ENTs according to number of workers


Male

Female

Number of ENTs

Figure 11 shows the preference of male or female workers segregated according to the size of
enterprises (total number of workers they employ). It shows that the gender ratio of workers in
smaller enterprises is worse than the in larger ones. Among all the enterprises with 15 or less workers,
females comprise only about 10% of the total workforce. For enterprises that employ between 16 to
100 workers, around 30% of the total workforce is female. The gender ratio of workers becomes much
better for larger13 enterprises employing
100%
140
more than 100 workers where females
90%
comprise between 40% and 50% of the total
120
80%
workforce. The result points out the challenge
100
70%
for practitioners to gender mainstream skills
60%
training and employment, especially for jobs
80
50%
in the informal sector which comprises mostly
60
of smaller enterprises.
40%

Commented [IU83R82]: Done

30%

40

20%

20

10%
0%

0
Urban

Semi urban

Rural

Distribution of enterprises according


to type of location

Male

Female

number of enterprises

Figure 12: Gender ratio of location-wise enterprises

Number of enterprises

Commented [Manfred82]: I like the bluish shades of the


other graphs. Keep it.

Gender Ratio of male to female workers

Figure 11: Gender-wise distribution of technical workers based on size of enterprises (total number of workers)

Figure 12 shows the ratio of male and female


employment segregated according to the
location of enterprises. The results show the
male and female participation in urban
locations is almost equal. In semi-urban
locations, males comprise 75% of the total
workers. For rural areas is shows that female
participation in the workforce is much higher
than males although one would expect a
much higher percentage of males in wage

12

Tracer Study on Graduates under the SkillFUL Project, 2014; Md. Mahbubul Kabir, Research and Evaluation
Division, BRAC Centre.
13
Such enterprises fall under the following sectors: construction, garments and fashionwear, furniture and
handicraft and others.

17

Commented [Manfred84]: This seems a rather high


percentage if we talk about technical workers. Are larger
enterprises such with typically female jobs, e.g. garment
related, handicraft?
If we observe something like this, we can explain in a
footnote. No need to become too elaborative in main
report.
Commented [IU85R84]: Done. See footnote 13

Commented [Manfred86]: What type of enterprises


were these? Traditional female?
Commented [IU87R86]: Includes both male oriented
trades (automobile, light engineering, furniture) and female
oriented (tailoring, garment). Since the trades do not apply
to specific sex, I thought that analysis would not help here.

employment because of social constraints for females. As the number of enterprises surveyed in rural
areas is very limited (30) the result is doubtful and further verification of the result would be required
which was not possible under the survey. The result may indicate however that job placement for
females is easier in urban areas.
Number of ENTs
45

90%

40

80%

35

70%

30

60%

25

50%

20

40%

15

30%

Handicraft

Block batik

Fashion House

Beauty care

Dress Making and Tailoring

Garment

Others

Furniture

Computer

Electrical

Construction

Mechanical

Plastic

0%

Embroidery

Mobile phone technician

10%

Welding

10

Automobile

20%

Number of enterprises

Female

100%

Light Engineering

Ratio of male to female workers

Male

Sector of business

Figure 13: Gender-wise distribution of technical workers based on trade categories14

Figure 13 shows the segregation of male to female employment based on sector 15 of businesses. The
result shows that out of the 18 categories identified, 7 are completely male dominated. Surprisingly
embroidery, which is generally considered to be a female dominated business, shows 100% male
involvement; this result is however from the only one such enterprise among the sample size. On the
other hand, garment, beauty care, dress making & tailoring, fashion house, handicraft and block batik
are businesses that have a gender mix of workers with some of them clearly showing greater
prevalence for females traditional employment; this confirms earlier experiences and observations
and also the challenge to place females into non-traditional trades.

14

Others include: bakery, small manufacturing, sanitary equipment seller, metal seller, light engineering
retailers, engine spare parts seller, etc.
15
The sectors were defined by the survey team to facilitate easier analysis and do not refer to any national
or otherwise published business sectors.

18

Commented [Manfred88]: Question may come what is


Others. Maybe good to give example. I did check tables in
Annex. No info found to this.

Less experienced workers

Workers with basic skills

Number of enterprises

100%

80

90%

70

80%

60

70%
60%

50

50%

40

40%

30

30%

20

20%

Number of enterprises

Ratio of experienced, less experienced and


apprentice staff

Experienced workers

10

10%
0%

0
1 to 5

6 to 10

11 to 15

16 to 20

21 to 50

51 to 100 101 to 500

500+

Size of enterprises according to number of workers

Figure 14: Experience-wise distribution of technical workers based on size of enteprises (total number of workers)

Commented [Manfred89]: Workers with basic skills=


basic skilled workers? Pls change this everywhere.

Figure 14 shows workers segregated based on their experience and according to the sizes of
enterprises respectively the total number of workers employed. The result shows that irrespective of
their size enterprises employ only around 20% or less of their total workers with such having only basic
skills. The proportion of less experienced workers is also more or less consistent (around 30%) across
all enterprises of all sizes. For larger enterprises (employing more than 50 workers) the rate of basic
skilled workers is even lower. This makes sense considering that many larger enterprises are (more)
formal in nature and need more qualified workers for which they also have financial resources. The
observations may be relevant SD projects, especially for those that provide skills development for a
very basic skills level.

Commented [IU90R89]: Done.

Workers with basic skills

Number of ENTs

Block batik

Mechanical

Others

Embroidery

Garment

Fashion House

Furniture

Automobile

Light Engineering

Plastic

Beauty care

Electrical

Computer

Handicraft

Construction

Mobile phone technician

Number of ENTs

Less experienced workers

45
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
5
0

Welding

Dress Making and

Percentage of experienced, less experienced and


apprentice workers

Experienced workers
100%
90%
80%
70%
60%
50%
40%
30%
20%
10%
0%

Sector of business

Figure 15: Experience-wise distribution of technical workers based on trade catergories

19

Figure 15 shows the attempt to seggregate the distribution of work experience according to business
sectors. Although the interpretation of the data is meaningful for some of the sectors for others the
limitted sample size might not allow to show a reasobanly accurte picture, e.g. for handicraft,
embroidery, block batik printing one would expect to find workers with basic skills also. Dress making
and tailoring shows a very high percentage of workres with basic skills only which is also
questionnable.

Percentage of total number of


enterprises

85.0%
72.5%

27.0%
11.2%
3.9%

0.4%
Willing to provide OJT

Willing to provide OJT if costs covered


Yes

No

No response

Figure 16: Willingness of enterprises to provide OJT

Percentage of ENTs

SD projects often support on the job training (OJT) for graduates in workplaces. Figure 16 shows that
73% of the enterprises expressed their willingness to provide OJTs to freshly trained graduates without
expecting any contribution from projects towards the costs. The rate of willingness even increases to
85% when projects offer to reimburse costs. Both rates of willingness are very high and do not reflect
the experience with enterprises to contribute to skills training in the past and hence these result must
be taken with a dose of scepticism.

58%
26%
12%

1 to 5

5 to 10

11 to 15

3%

2%

16 to 20

20 +

Figure 17 shows the distribution with regards


to the duration of OJTs that enterprises are
willing to provide. Data shows that 58% of
the enterprises are willing to accommodate
trainees for 1 to 5 weeks, 26% for 5 to 10
weeks, 12% for 11 to 15 weeks, 3% for 16 to
20 weeks and only 2% for 20 weeks or longer.

The above result confirms earlier experience


that enterprises clearly prefer short OJT
durations, the majority preferring up to 5
Figure 17: Duration of OJT enterprises are willing to offer
weeks only. The findings are understandable
considering the fact that OJTs of larger duration are more costly, absorb more time from experienced
and otherwise productive staff for trainee supervision and guidance with negative consequences for
enterprises, e.g. lagging behind own business targets. Trainees are in first instant a cost factor to
enterprises and become profitable only with a sufficient high skills level, by which the OJT will be
over in many cases. SD projects have no option and must consider these implications when trying to
motivate enterprises to accept OJT.
Duration of OJTs (weeks)

20

Commented [Manfred91]: Decide whether to have/ not


have graph titles. I did not miss them in the other graphs. If
figure is properly named not needed.
Commented [IU92R91]: Corrected
Commented [Manfred93]: Obviously, else the graph
would not be here.
Commented [IU94R93]: Reformulated
Commented [ME95]: What is the y-axis?
Commented [IU96R95]: Mentioned

80

183

180

70

160

60

140
120

50

100

40

80

30

60
40
20

25
2

1 to 5

6 to 10

11 to 15

16 to 20

21 to 50

36

20

Number of enterprises

Average demand for basic skilled workers

200

10

0
51 to 100 101 to 500

500+

Size of enterprises according to number of workers


Average demand

Number of enterprises

Figure 18: Demand for basic skilled workers according to size of enteprise

In order to figure out the chances of SD projects to place trainees with basic skills in OJT and jobs, the
study looked into the number of basic skilled workers enterprises need to replace each year. The
study did not look into the replacement rate for less skilled and skilled workers. Figure 18 shows
smaller enterprises (employing less than 20 workers), most of them probably the informal sector, need
to replace around 2-4 workers with basic skills each year. Medium size and larger ones, of which many
are in the formal sector, seem to replace higher numbers. Average demand for enterprises16 in the
range of 101 500 workers is 183; a very high value compared to enterprises in other ranges.
The implication of the above result is generally good news for SD projects. Because the large number
of existing informal sector enterprises, besides newly established ones, offer the opportunity,
although limited, for placing trainees in OJT and later employment17. However getting these vacancies
is also very competitive taking into consideration common recruitment practices where enterprises
hire based on demonstrated skills (observe what an applicant can do before hiring) and not a training
certificate. The tracer study conducted by the earlier SkillFUL project18 which mainly worked with
enterprises in the informal sector shows that the rate of employment of graduates with basic skills
was only 48% and this with help for employment by the training providers. Larger enterprises offer
also opportunities for OJT and employment but are much lesser in numbers.

16

Enterprises in this range include those in the following sectors: construction, garments and fashionwear,
furniture and handicraft and others.
17
This statement does disregard the issue of Decent Work which is an issue especially in the informal sector,
but not only.
To get a feel for the number of informal sector enterprises needed: Assuming 3 replacements per year per
informal sector enterprise, and disregarding any other variables, would mean for each 1000 trainees finding
333 informal enterprises per year for OJT and employment.
18
Tracer Study on Graduates under the SkillFUL Project, 2014; Md. Mahbubul Kabir, Research and Evaluation
Division, BRAC Centre.

21

Commented [Manfred97]: This graph has to be changed


to show the average number of workers needed per
enterprise. I calculated the figures this is from left to right:
2.4/ 3.5/ 3/ 3.5/ 6.6/ 25/ 183/ 36
We need to explain the peak of 183 in average garment?
Commented [IU98R97]: Done
Commented [ME99]: What is the y-axis?
Commented [IU100R99]: Mentioned

Total number of enterprise and number of


enterprise willing to pay higher to trained
workers

80
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
0
1 to 5

6 to 10

11 to 15

16 to 20

21 to 50

51 to 100

101 to 500

500+

Size of enterprise according to number of workers


Number of enterprises

Willing to pay higher to trained workers

Figure 19: Enterprises willing to pay higher wages to workers with basic skills

It is in the mandates of many SD projects to ensure that the graduates of their skill training
programmes get better wages than untrained workers when negotiating job. To measure how realistic
this is vis-a-vis the job market, the study looked into the willingness of entrepreneurs to pay more.
Figure 19 depicts that almost all the enterprises (employing 11 or more workers) expressed the
willingness to offer higher wages to basic skilled workers as compared to untrained ones. As with the
willingness for OJT above, this does not reflect the experience with enterprises in the past to recognise
the value of skills development and hence the results must be taken with a dose of scepticism. The
willingness of smaller enterprises (10 or less workers) is clearly much lower; only 50% of enterprises
with 5 or less workers expressed their willing to offer higher wages to basic skilled workers. SD
projects, especially those providing basic skills training and catering to the informal sector, which
comprises 80% of the economy, will face an uphill battle to get better pay for their basic skilled
graduates. Chances for better pay seem higher if basic skilled graduates find jobs in larger and more
formal enterprises, which are however lesser in numbers.

2.4

Conclusions

Given the limitation of time and resources (human and financial) the survey made best efforts to map
SD projects, TSPs and enterprises. Although various donor funded SD projects were located and
surveyed, smaller projects funded by private institutions and/or government could not be mapped
adequately within the limitations of the survey. The number of TSPs mapped is also significantly lower
compared to the total number of TSPs in Bangladesh. According to SDC19 there are around 367 TVET
institutes and 4000 private TSPs available in Bangladesh (number in the districts surveyed is
unknown). This study covers only 175 of them. With regards to the number of enterprises, the study
could only 233 survey of them but collected contacts of around 21000. However, the total number of
enterprises in all the targeted districts must be in the hundreds of thousands.
Although the study could, because its limitations, not do as much justice to the extension and accuracy
of results as desired it provides a number of interesting insights valid for SD projects which are in
summary presented in the Executive Summary and not repeated here. As is the case with many
studies, one only knows more of what one should have looked closer after the 1st analyses of data is
done and results available. It would also be valid and interesting to follow up on a few aspects of this
study.
19

Project Document; Building Skills for Unemployed and Underemployed Labour (B-SkillFUL), Phase 1; Swiss
Agency for Development and Cooperation

22

Commented [Manfred101]: Adjust legend:


Number of enterprises = Total number of EBTs
Willingness to pay: No of ENTs willing to pay more to basic
skilled workers
Commented [IU102R101]: Done.

Annexure
Annex I: Data tables (arranged according to figure number above)
Table 1 (Figure1) : District-wise operations of SDPs
District

Total

Gazipur

7
5
4

Dhaka
Chittagong
Khulna

Rajshahi

3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1
1

Narayanganj
Rangpur
Nilphamari
Dinajpur
Sylhet
Barisal
Mymensingh
Gaibandha
Bandarban
Kurigram
Rajbari
Pabna
Satkhira
Sunamganj
Jessore
Kushtia

Table 16: Target group wise variation among SDPs


Target Group

Number of projects with the


following target groups

Percentage of projects targeting the


following groups (total 16 projects)

Male
Female

15
15

94%
94%

Youth (15 - 30)

15

94%

Economically poor

13

81%

Disabled people

10

63%

Marginalised

56%

Adults (30+)

44%

Children (6 - 14)

19%

Tribal Communities

6%

23

Table 3: Intervention wise variation among SDPs


Intervention

Number of SDP with


following interventions

Percentage of SDP
with following
interventions (total 16
projects)

Training material development


Training of trainers
Skills training
Job placement
Awareness raising
Training infrastructure development
Occupational standard development
Training of school management
Formal (BTEB) assessment and certification

16
15
15
14
13
13
11
11
10

100%
94%
94%
88%
81%
81%
69%
69%
63%

Entrepreneurship/Self-employment
Access to finances
Policy advocacy
Others

10
8
8
3

63%
50%
50%
19%

Table 4: District wise TSP distribution and Type of TSPs


District
Dhaka
Bogra
Dinajpur
Jessore
Rajshahi
Khulna
Gazipur
Chittagong
Mymensingh
Sunamganj
Total

Number
of TSPs

Percentage
of TSP
54

31%

22
19
19
16
15
10
9
6
5
175

13%
11%
11%
9%
9%
6%
5%
3%
3%
100%

24

Table 5: Number of TSPs according to types


Type

No. of TSP

Percentage

Public

19

11%

Private
NGO

68
88

39%
50%

Total

175

100%

Table 6: Variations in total seating capacity of TSPs


Seating
Capacity

No of TSPs

50 & below
51-100
101-250
251-500
500 +
Total

Percentage
of TSPs

25
44
61
31
14
175

14%
25%
35%
18%
8%
100%

Number of
TSPs in
urban
areas
9
11
31
16
6

Number of Number of
TSPs in
TSPs in
semi-urban rural areas
areas
7
9
19
14
14
16
8
7
5
3

73

53

49

Figure 7: TSPs with BTEB's accreditation


Status of
Number of
accreditation TSPs

Percentage
of TSP

Accredited

74

42%

Not
accredited

101

58%

Total

175

100%

Table 8: Occupation wise distribution of TSPs


Occupation

Number of
TSPs

Tailor
Mobile Phone Technician

Percentage of
TSPs
87
13.45%
64
9.89%

Electrical House Wiring Technician

62

9.58%

Block Batik Printer


Garments Machine Operator

43
36

6.65%
5.56%

Handicraft Maker
Hand Embroider
Food Processing & Preservation Worker

34
31
29

5.26%
4.79%
4.48%

Beautician
Construction Worker

26
23

4.02%
3.55%
25

Occupation

Number of
TSPs

Refrigeration and Air-conditioning Technician

Percentage of
TSPs
22
3.40%

Kathchupi Fitter
Electronics Technician
Machine Embroider
Automobile Mechanic
Plumber and Pipe Fitter

22
20
18
17
17

3.40%
3.09%
2.78%
2.63%
2.63%

Mason
Light Vehicle Driver
Electrical Technician
Motor Cycle Mechanic
Rod binder
Carpenter
Sweater Knitting Operator

16
15
14
9
7
6
6

2.47%
2.32%
2.16%
1.39%
1.08%
0.93%
0.93%

Mechanical worker
Sweater linking machine opetator

5
4

0.77%
0.62%

Hand and Brush Painter

0.62%

Welder
Jam, Jelly and Pickle maker

3
3

0.46%
0.46%

Wood Working Machine Operator

0.31%

Textile Worker
Lacquer Polisher

1
1

0.15%
0.15%

Table 9: TSPs involved in SD projects


Response
Involved
Not involved
Total

No. of TSP
117
58
175

Percentage
67%
33%
100%

Table 10: Enterprises that either do not employ male or female


Male
Either 0 male
or 0 female
Percentage

Female
8

139

3%

60%

26

Table 11: Gender distribution of technical staff based on size of enterprises according to number
of workers
Number of
workers

Male

1 to 5
6 to 10
11 to 15
16 to 20
21 to 50
51 to 100
101 to 500
500+
Total

Female
122
528
349
225
573
265
1627
20735
24424

Number of
enterprises
14
55
46
104
287
107
1155
20130
21898

36
76
31
18
29
5
14
24
233

Table 12: Gender distribution of technical staff for enterprises based in different locations
Type of location

Male

Urban
Semi urban
Rural
Total

Female
22525
1218
681
24424

number of
enterprises
22525
1218
681
24424

126
80
27
233

Table 13: Gender distribution of technical staff based on sector-wise classification


Sector of business
Light Engineering
Automobile
Welding
Mobile phone
technician
Embroidery
Plastic
Mechanical
Electrical
Construction
Computer
Furniture
Others
Garment
Beauty care
Dress Making and
Tailoring
Fashion House
Handicraft
Block batik

Male
total

Female
total

Total

Male

Female

Total
percent

Number of
enterprises

491
167
43
31

0
0
0
0

491
167
43
31

100%
100%
100%
100%

0%
0%
0%
0%

100%
100%
100%
100%

38
18
6
7

5
76
30
42
1276
8
5066
2329
14055
19
361

0
0
0
4
232
2
2237
1549
15503
33
890

5
76
30
46
1508
10
7303
3878
29558
52
1251

100%
100%
100%
91%
85%
80%
69%
60%
48%
37%
29%

0%
0%
0%
9%
15%
20%
31%
40%
52%
63%
71%

100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%
100%

1
3
2
8
11
1
41
14
32
6
16

403
22
0

1143
301
4

1546
323
4

26%
7%
0%

74%
93%
100%

100%
100%
100%

25
3
1
27

Sector of business
Total

Male
total
24424

Female
total
21898

Total

Male

Female

Total
percent

46322

Number of
enterprises
233

Table 14: Experience wise distribution of technical staff according to size of enterprises based on
number of workers
Size of enterprise
according to number of
workers
1 to 5
6 to 10
11 to 15
16 to 20
21 to 50
51 to 100
101 to 500
500+
Total

Number of Experienced
enterprises workers

Less
experienced
workers

Workers
with basic
skills

36
76
31
18
29
5
14
24

78
330
227
204
446
202
1812
28005

40
160
124
86
232
122
746
10764

18
93
44
39
182
48
224
2096

233

31304

12274

2744

Table 15: Experience wise distribution of technical staff based on enterprises in various business
sectors
Sector of business

Number of
enterprises

Experienced
workers

Less
experienced
workers

Workers
with basic
skills

Light Engineering
Automobile
Welding
Mobile phone technician
Embroidery
Plastic
Mechanical
Electrical
Construction
Computer
Furniture
Others
Garment
Beauty care
Dress Making and Tailoring
Fashion House
Handicraft
Block batik

38
18
6
7
1
3
2
8
11
1
41
14
32
6
16
25
3
1

64.15%
64.07%
34.88%
32.26%
80.00%
61.84%
86.67%
50.00%
56.03%
60.00%
64.51%
67.23%
72.31%
55.77%
7.43%
68.24%
10.84%
75.00%

25.66%
26.35%
30.23%
35.48%
20.00%
26.32%
13.33%
26.09%
17.44%
20.00%
30.47%
31.87%
25.64%
28.85%
7.75%
27.17%
63.78%
25.00%

10.18%
9.58%
34.88%
32.26%
0.00%
11.84%
0.00%
23.91%
26.53%
20.00%
5.03%
0.90%
2.05%
15.38%
84.81%
4.59%
25.39%
0.00%

Total

233
28

Table 16: Willingness of enterprises to provide OJT


Response

willing to
accept OJT

Yes
No
No response

170
63
0

Total

233

Willing to
provide OJT

Willing to accept
Willing to
trainees if cost
provide OJT if
reimbursed
costs covered
73%
199
85%
27%
26
11%
0%
8
4%

100%

233

100%

Table 17: Duration of OJT enterprises are willing to offer


Weeks

1 to 5
5 to 10
11 to 15
16 to 20
20 +
Total

Duration for
trainees
acceptance
115
51
24
5
4
199

Duration of
OJT
58%
26%
12%
3%
2%
100%

Table 18: Demand for workers with basic skills according to size of enterprises
Size of enterprises

1 to 5
6 to 10
11 to 15
16 to 20
21 to 50
51 to 100
101 to 500
500+
Total

Number of
enterprises

36
76
31
18
29
5
14
24
233

Demand for
workers
with basic
skills
88
262
93
64
192
124
2564
855
4242

Table 19: Enterprises willing to pay higher to trained workers


Size of enterprises
1 to 5
6 to 10
11 to 15
16 to 20
21 to 50
51 to 100

Number of
enterprises
36
76
31
18
29
5

Willing to pay higher


to trained workers
14
57
24
17
21
5
29

101 to 500
500+

14
24

12
24

30

Annex II: Questionnaires

31

32

33

Commented [Manfred103]: If the Annex is not much


segregated and each annex clearly named, then it will be
good if English titles are also included in the page so a
reader not understanding Bangla knows at least what the
document is about. (Valid for all Bangla Annexes)

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

Commented [Manfred104]: Formatting of 1st column


not good.

44

45

46

47

48

Annex III: List of Skills Development Projects


No.
1

Skills Development Project


Skills Development Project (SDP)

Skills and Training Enhancement Project (STEP)

Skills for Employment Investment Program (SEIP)

TVET for Young People in Informal Economy in Bangladesh

TVET Reform Project

Bangladesh Skills for Employment and Productivity (B-SEP) Project

Vocational training for women workers in RMG industry in Bangladesh

UCEP Technical Assistance Project

ILO RMG Center of Excellence Project

10

Centre of Excellence for Leather Skill Bangladesh Limited (COEL)

No.

Skills Development Project

11

Skills for Employment Program in Bangladesh (SEP-B)

12

Education for Youth Empowerment

13

Education for Youth Empowerment

14
15

Profitable Opportunities for Food Security through Vocational Education and Training
(PROOFS-VET)
Caritas Technical School Project

16

UDDIPAN TVET Project

Annex IV: List of Training Service Providers


SL
1

Name
Dinajpur Technical
Training Center

Address
Matasagor,
Shekhpura

District
Dinajpur

Phone
0531-51128

Mobile
1712070563

Bangladesh-Korea
Technical Training
Center (BKTTC)
Sheikh
Fazilatunnasa
Mujib Mohila
Technical Training
Center
Bangladesh-Korea
Technical Training
Center, Chittagong

Mirpur Road, Darussalam, Dhaka-1216.

Dhaka

9000184

1711976709

Darussalam Road,
Mirpur

Dhaka

9022999

1536262807

Nasirabad,
Chittagong-4209

Chittagong

031 682082

Maymensingh
Technical Training
Center
Rajshahi Technical
Training Center

164,
Maskanda(Dhaka
Road)
Shupora

Mymensin
gh

Rajshahi

49

SL
7

Name
Bogra Technical
Training Center

Address
Nishindara, Bogra

District
Bogra

Phone
5166391

Mobile
1716407578

Jessore Technical
Training Center

NazirShankarpur(So
uth side of Passport
office.)

Jessore

0421-68867

1972134667

Rajshahi Mohila
Technical Training
Center
Chittagong Mohila
Technical Training
Center

Sopura-6203,
Shahmukdom

Rajshahi

0721 861407

01712
110274

Polytechnic Road,
Nasirabad, Khulshi,
Chittagong-4209.

Chittagong

8.80313E+11

11

Khulna Technical
and Engineering
Colleage

AMONA Cotage, Plot Khulna


# 648, Mujgunni
Main Road,

041 763217

12

Chirst Church
Trade School

Smith Road, Bokul


Tala

Jessore

0421 66849

13

ADAMS Integrated
Training Institute

Rally Gate,
Doulatpur, KCC

Khulna

041 774048

14

Boyra Technical
School

Rayer Bazar, Boyra

Khulna

041 761141

15

Rong Training
Institute
UTTARAN Training
Institute

77/D, Mujib Sarak

Jessore

0421 51061

Chup Nagar,
Domoria

Khulna

17

International
Vocation Training
and Research
Center

Chachuria, Domoria

Khulna

18

DHARA

68, City Collage Para

Jessore

0421 69064

19

BANAPHUL

215, Khanjahan Ali


Road

Khulna

041 721314

20

ADORE

18/1, Shamsur
Rahman Road (1st
Floor)

Khulna

041 733378

21

Textile Vocational
Institute

Banani, Bogura

Bogra

22

CYBERTECH

10

16

Bogra

0173
3224488

01971
398556

01922808090

50

SL
23

Name
Shobujer Ovijan
Foundation (SOF)

Address
House # 745 , Road
# 8 , Baitul Aman
housing Society
,Adabor, Dhaka1207 , Bangladesh

District
Dhaka

Phone

Mobile

24

Srijonee Technical
Training Institute

College Road,
Sherpur, Bogra

Bogra

25

ASIA TECHNICAL
TRAINING CENTRE

16, Khan- A- Sobur


Road, Boyra Mohila
College More,
G.P.O-9000,
Khalishpur, Khulna.

Khulna

041-762840

01911
647786

26

Memory Technical
Training Institute

G.A Bhaban (4th


Floor) Nazir Ahmed
chowdhury Road,
Anderkilla,
Chittagong

Chittagong

031-2855071

01843356695

27

Grassroots Health
& Rural
Organization for
Nutrition
Initiative).

Address of the TSP:


13B/4B, Block-B,
Babar Road,
Mohammadpur,
Dhaka-1207

Dhaka

02-9139882

01715064637

28

Sachatan Training
Institute and
Research Center
(STIARC), Sister
Concern of
Sachatan Shahajjo
Sangstha (SSS)

Dhaka

02-9362134

01711
612752

29

Livelihood
Development
Training Institute
(LDTI)

30

AL ISLAM
TECHNICAL &
EDUCATIONAL
INSTITUTE

H/O: Kulsum
Apartment, Flat # 3B (3rd Floor), 40-41,
Siddeshwari Circular
Road, Shantinagar,
Dhaka-1217.
Training Center:
212/5/A, West
Rampur, Ulon Road,
Rampura, Dhaka.
Holding-1317,East
Madartek(Hoque
Villa),Krishi Bank
Road,
Sabujbag,Dhaka1214.
ANARKOLI,
AUKPARA, ASHULIA,
SAVAR

Dhaka

7744289/90

0198
5903055

31

Gazipur Technical
School & College

Gachha Road,
Gachha
Board Bazaar

Gazipur

9292311

01711
338351

1733166306

Dhaka

01711
055163

51

SL
32

Name
Sunamganj
Technical School
and College

Address
Village: Hajipara,
P.O. - Sunamganj,
P.S. - Sunamganj .

District
Sunamganj

Phone
87163549

33

Jessore Technical
School & College

Jhumjhumpur,
Narial Road, Post:
Hamidpur

Jessore

0421-68150

34

Dinajpur Technical
School & College
Glamour Boutique
House & Training
Center

Raniganj More

Dinajpur

0531-51061

Bulbul Tower (1st


Floor)
Ghope Jail Road,
Sadar
RRF Bhaban, C & B
Road, Karbala,P.O.
Box- 07
4609 Solmaid,
Vatara, East
Baridhara

Jessore

0421 71657

Jessore

0421-66906,
65663

Dhaka

9898017

02-9021558, 029003100

35

36

37

Rural
Reconstruction
Foundation
Akhtar Furniture
Academy

Mobile

01912
677157

4609 Solmaid,
Vatara, East
Baridhara, Dhaka 1212
38

Mirpur Institute
of Science and
Technology
Singer Sewing
Training Center
(SSTC)

34, Jamal Mansion,


Mirpur- 10

Dhaka

House # 1042,
Dhaka Road East
Barandhi Para

Jessore

1911663939

40

Skus Technical
Training Center

Chittagong

01858
758051

41

Rupantar

42

Saviour

House#6, Road#1,
Katalganj R/A,
Panchlaish
19 Akbarabad
Estate, shrish Nagar
36 Rail Road

43

Dhaka Ahsania
Mission

Mymensin
gh

44

Development
Partner
Momenshahi
Technical Eng.
Institute
The City
Commercial
Training College

House#95/3,
Vhatikashor,
Barobarir More
Monirampur
102, DB Road, Shera
Munshi Bari More,

Mymensin
gh

1718961839

9/1 -C.K. Ghosh


Road, Aziz Plaza

Mymensin
gh

01714
541456

39

45

46

Khulna

01819283733

041-731876

Jessore
091-66348

01713
411120
01711
363395

Jessore

52

SL
47

Name
UCEP Kalurghat
Technical School

48

Maisha Garments
Training Center

49

Bashundhara
Technical Institute

50

Muslim Aid
Institute of
Technology

51

Mobile.com

52

Venguard
Technical Institute

53

TMSS Technical
Institute (TTI)
TMSS Travel and
Tourism Training
Institute.(TTTTI)
TMSS Vocational
training institute
(TVTI)
SAIC Institute of
Management &
Technology

54

55

56

57

58

59

60

Anowara
Voccational
Training Institute
Centre for Mass
Education In
Science (CMES)
Centre fo Mass
Education In
Science (CMES)
Charka
Handicrafts (
Jagoroni Chakra)

Address
UCEP Kalurghat
Region
Wasa Road, Mohra,
Kalurghat
Shop # 24, Haji
Mizan Market,
Baipal, Saver, Dhaka

District
Chittagong

Phone
031 670829

Plot # 8/1,
Shurtaranga Road,
Cheragali, Tongi,
Gazipur
House # 87, Avenue
# 1, Block # B, Kalshi
Road, Pallabi,
Mirpur, Dhaka
148, Fajal Mantion
(2nd floor),
Chandana
Chowrastha, Sadar,
Gazipur
Haque Complex,
BIDC Bazer, DUET,
Sadar, Gazipur
Chadpur, Noongola,
Bogra-5800
TMSS Mohila
Market ,Nowabbari,
Bogra-5800
Foundation Office,
TMSS, Gokul

Gazipur

02-9817594

Dhaka

02-8836221

965, East
Shewrapara, Rokeya
Sarani, Mirpur,
Dhaka
Suihari, Sadar,
Dinajpur

Dhaka

02-8033034

1715016193

Dinajpur

5316684

1715067370

CMES, Satbaria Unit,


Chandanaish,

Chittagong

1711405198

CMES, Haluaghat
Unit, Mymensingh,

Mymensin
gh

1735079599

Jagoroni Chakra
Foundation, 22/C
Mujib Sarak

Jessore

Dhaka

Mobile
01911 051
962

01685497400
01729076626

Gazipur

01715090122

Gazipur

01947994833

Bogra

1713377133

Bogra

1713377133

Bogra

1730726343

0421 68825

53

SL
61

Name
ANANDO

62

Bangladesh
Mohila Unnayn
Samity (BMUS)
Bangladesh
Institute of
Theater Arts
(BITA)

63

Address
Ctg Off: Vill: Balpia
Adam, Post Office :
Khagarchari Sador,
Upazila :
Khagarchari Sador
Dhaka Office: 10-A,
Babar Road,
Mohammadpur,
Dhaka
Dapunia Gouripur
Mymensingh

District
Dhaka

Phone
0371-61528

Mobile
01711284198

Mymensin
gh

29102290

1711350196

0466-00,Old
Bomang Rajbari
Area (Ground floor
of MongnuPrue
Headman), Ujani
Para, Bandarban
Sadar, Bandarban
hill Tract,
Chittagong.
87, M.A Bari Road,
Gallamari

Chittagong

880-31-618562

01711845996

Khulna

(041)812148,733
768

64

CSS Hope
Technical Institute

65

Udvaboni Mohila
Sangstha (UMS)
United
Development
Initatives for
Programmed
Actions(UDDIPAN)

Damudar, Fultala

Khulna

House:09, Road:01,
A, Block-F, Janata
Co-operative
Housing Society
Ltd,Ring
Road,Adabar,Dhaka1207.

Dhaka

5.81532E+14

67

Bangladesh Nari
Progati Sangha
(BNPS)

Dhaka

8130083,
8124899

68

Ashroy
Foundation
Centre for Mass
Education In
Science (CMES)
Sheba Manab
Kallyan Kendra
(SMKK)

Kolpona Sundor,
13/14 Babor Road
(1st Floor), Block B,
Mohammadia
Housing Estate,
Dhaka 1207
16 Ahsan Ahmed
Road, Khulna
CMES, Kayetpara
Unit, Sreepur

Khulna

041-812113

Khulna Office: SMKK


Office, Dumuria,
Khulna

Khulna

66

69

70

1711476400

Gazipur

1835829834

1929449224
1711802296

0468-62692,

1740912416

54

SL
71

Name
Uttaran

Address
Dumuria, Khulna

District
Khulna

Phone
02-9122302

72

Samadhan

Jessore

422656549

73

TMSS (HRD &


Training)

Bogra

051-78563, 78975 1713377091


Ex.147

74

Jhanjira Samaj
Kallyan Sangstha
(JSKS)

75

Centre for Mass


Education in
Science (CMES)

76

Habibur Rahman
Sweater Training
Center (HRSTC)

77

Community
Development
Association (CDA)
Pollisree

Samadhan Bhaban,
Upazila Road,
Keshabpur, Jessore,
Bangladesh.
TMSS Foundation
Office, Rangpur
Road, Thengamara,
Bogra
Post Office -Jhanjira
Hat, UpazilaDinajpur Sadar,
District-Dinajpur.
Post Office:
Ghantaghar Hat,
Upazila:
Chirirbandar
Jamtoli Garments
Bazar,Chirirbandor,
Dinajpur
Head Office: HRSTC,
Uttara EPZ more,
Songolshi,
Nilphamari
Upa-Shahar, Block #
01, House #51,
Sadar, Dinajpur
Balubari, Sadar,
Dinajpur-5200.
Balubari, Dinajpur

Kanchan Road,
Ghashipara,
Dinajpur -5200,
Bangladesh
Kalitola, Sardarpara,
Dinajpur

78
79

80

81

Mohila
Bohumukhi Shikha
Kendra (MBSK)
Society for
UDDOG

Samaj Unnayan
Proshikhon
Kendra (SUPK)

Dinajpur

Mobile
01711828305
1711131250

Dinajpur

0171219242
8;
0171311576
3
1714020597

Dinajpur

1738051553

Dinajpur

88053164428

8.80171E+1
2

Dinajpur

0531-65917

1713491000

Dinajpur

0531-64433

01716884850

Dinajpur

0531-61883

1713202341

Dinajpur

0531-64654

01716414176

55

SL
82

Name
Singer Sewing
Academy,
Dinajpur

83

Gram Bikash
Kendra-GBK
Bangladesh Social
Development
Academy (BSDA)
Development
Council (DC)

84

85

86

87
88

89

90

91

92

93

Dinajpur Auto
Mobile Training &
Servicing Center
Saiful Auto Mobile
& Driving Center
Centre for Mass
Education In
Science (CMES)

Industry Service
Center, BSCIC,
Rajshahi
TRINAMOOL

Association for
Community
Development
(ACD)
Secchasebi
Bohumukhi
Mohila Samaj
Kalayan Samity
(SBMSS)
Thanapara
Swallows
Development
Society (TSDS)

Address
1. Mrs. Nayar
Sultana, Sewing
Instructress, Plot #
121, Block# 10,
Upashahar,
Dinajpur. Cell
#01926998829
2. Boishakhi,
Maldapotty,
Dinajpur.
Cell#0171273149024
Haldibari Railgate,
Parbatipur-5250
Eidgah Residential
Area, Dinajpur

District
Dinajpur

Phone
9337753,8319216
- Ex 110

Dinajpur

0531 -61208

Vill: Islampara, P.O:


Birampur, P.S:
Birampur, Dist:
Dinajpur
Mirjapur Bus
Terminal

Dinajpur

532256553

Eidgah Residencial
Area, Dinajpur
a. CMES, Damkura
Unit, Paba,
b. CMES Bhatpara
Unit, Charghat,
Rajshahi
Sopura, Rajshahi

Dinajpur

Borokuthi Road,
Rajshahi-6100,
Bangladesh
H-41, Sagarpara,
Ghoramara, Boalia,
Rajshahi-6100,
Bangladesh
F-753, Miapara,
Ghoramara, Boalia,
Rajshahi

Rajshahi

Village: Thanapara,
Post Office: Sardah
(6271), Upazila:
Charghat,

Rajshahi

Dinajpur

Dinajpur

Rajshahi

01713-1635
01855969000
1712545124

01558366845
0531- 61870

01712
682232
01711869590,
01711578527

0721-760514

01715 672695

Rajshahi

Rajshahi

Mobile
01911380680

01711825629
721770660

Rajshahi

1713098200

1715017372

07223 56067

01711 821
173

56

SL
94

95

96

Name
Foundation for
Women and Child
Assistance (FWCA)
Alor Michhil Nari
Kallyan Sangstha
(AMNKS)
Barendra Unnayan
Prochesta (BUP)

97

Niskrity
Foundation

98

Reliable Institute
of Vocational
Training

99

Singer Sewinmg
Academy - Bogra

100

Singer Sewing
Academy, Rajshahi

101

Singer Sewing
Academy - Gazipur

102

Singer Sewing
Academy

103

Singer Sewing
Academy, Khulna

Address
317, Helenabad Girls
School Road,
Rajpara, Rajshahi
630 Ramchandrapur
Basher Road,
Ghoramara
232/2 Uttarapara,
Soto Bangram,
Sopura, Rajshahi
Niskrity Foundation
Seroil, House No92/1
Spondon House
Rajshahi-6100
Bangladesh
Vill- Kanosgary,
Post-Sherpur Road,
Upozila-Bogra Sadar

District
Rajshahi

Tahmina khatun,
Singer Sewing
Instructress, Sherpur
,Bogra
Mrs. Farida Begum,
Singer Sewing
Instructress
,Nipun,Ramchandra
pur, Goramara,
Rajshahi. Cell#
01917-448746
Meherun Nahar,
Singer Sewing
Instructress,
Auchpara, College
gate, Tangi. Gazipur.
Cell # 01729390652
Comilla Garden, 50
New Eskaton
Road,Dhaka - 1000

Bogra

Mrs. Maya Rana


Saha, Sewing
Instructress, 45,
Khan Jahan Ali Road,
Khulna. Cell #
01816-292028

Phone
0721 772804

Mobile
01711
043511

Rajshahi

1720192830

Rajshahi

01711
708373

Rajshahi

01711302286

Bogra

9337753,8319216
Ex-110

0171506737
0,
0193600585
5
01911380680

Rajshahi

9337753,8319216
Ex-110

01911380680

Gazipur

9337753,8319216
-Ex- 110

01911380680

Dhaka

9337753,8319216
-Ex 110

01911380680

Khulna

9337753,8319216
-Ex 110

01911380680

57

SL
104

Name
Singer Sewing
AcademyChittagong

105

Social
Advancement
Networking
Community
Organization
(SANCO))
Aloer Pothe

106

Address
Mrs. Nowshaba
Taslim, Singer
Sewing Instructress,
52 South Nalapra,
Chittagong. Cell 01819-889535
Khan monjil,
Shibbati road,
Kalitolahat, Bogra

District
Chittagong

Phone
9337753,8319216
-Ex- 110

House- 22, Road- 15,


Uposhahor, Bogra
Katnarpara,
Corneation school
lane, Bogra

Bogra

051- 63 872

Bogra

0581- 61 871

Bogra

Mobile
01911380680

01712- 57
00 09

01717- 01
67 58
01712- 92
35 23

107

Program for Eco


Social
Development
(PESD)

108

Venture
Foundation

Village & PostMoria, UpazillaGabtoli, Bogra

Bogra

01716- 86
09 71

109

Grameen Alo

Bogra

01716- 00
93 92

110

Pollee Unnyon
Prokolpo (PUP)

111

Mathura Samaj
Kallyan Porishod
(MSKP)

Nuruli vila, Kalitola


main Road, Shibbati,
Bogra
Khanik Niloy,
Chalklokman, Bogra
Sadar, Bogra -5800.
Village- Mathura,
Post- Chadmuhahat,
Upazilla- Bogra
Sadar, Bogra

Bogra

01712- 00
85 35

112

Mathurapara
Mohila Unnayon
Sanstha (MMUS)

Bogra

01712- 25
02 82

113

Aso Kaj Kori


Mohila Unnyon
Sanstha (AKKMUS)

Village & PostMathurapara,


UpozillaShariakandi, Bogra
Village- Ulipur
Natunpara, UpazillaSherpur, Bogra

Bogra

01712- 21
82 79

114

Nari O Shishu
Bikash Kendro
(NSBK)
Bace Mitali
Training Center
Mohila Prosikhan
Kendra (MKP)
Professinal
Technical College

Anchol,
Malotinagor, Bogra
sadar, Bogra
Jagdal, Birgonj,
Dinajpur
218 Industrial Area,
Sopura, Rajshahi
Noyabari, Vatara,
Dhaka

Bogra

01712- 68
44 55

Dinajpur

01716
718048
1199188729

115
116
117

Bogra

Rajshahi
Dhaka

5165703

0721 861658

1733700000

01914
567317

58

SL
118
119

120

Name
REHAB Training
Insitute
The Master
Training and
Testing Center
(MTTC)
East West Training
Center

Address
44/14, West
Pathpath, Dhaka
H#4&6, R#17, DIT
Project, Merul
Badda, Dhaka

District
Dhaka

Phone
02 9662114

H#51, B#D,
Bamnartek, Bottala
Bazar, Kamar para,
Turag, Dhaka
Kazihata, Greater
Road, Rajpara,
Rajshahi

Dhaka

Rajshahi

0721 810979

01716
007485

02 981635

01914
861046

Dhaka

Mobile
01755
555307
01971
156313

01713
131043

121

Youth
Development and
Computer Training
Academy (YDCTA)

122

Montage Training
& Certification
(Bangladesh)

142, 143
Mirashpara, BSCIC,
Tongi, Gazipur

Gazipur

123

Amin Technical
Training Center

Dhaka

01780
737375

124

Skills
Development
Training Institute
RELATION ( A
sister concern of
DODY Group)

1318, Moynertek,
Ziabagh, Uttarkhan,
Uttara, Dhaka
Chandpara,
Uttarkhan, Uttara,
Dhaka
1/1/1, South Begun
Bari, Tejgoan 1/A,
Dhaka

Dhaka

01957
975335

H#13/A, 7/A, Babor


Road, Block#B,
Mohammadpur,
Dhaka
344, Cocacola Road,
Naya Nagar, Vatara,
Dhaka

Dhaka

01552
403007

Dhaka

01818
383179

25/7/4/1, East
Mothetek, Adorsho
para, Basabo, Dhaka
1214
43, Shahid
Sangbadik Selina
Parvin Sarak
(Opposite to
Mouchak Market),
Dhaka -1217
41/2/A Senpara
Parbata, Mirpur-10

Dhaka

01944
466444

Dhaka

01678
029032

125

126

Forum for
Development
Association (FFDA)

127

Skill Power
Training Institute

128

GAZI Institute

129

AMDA Training &


Exam Center

130

The New St.


Mary's Training
Insitute

Dhaka

02 -8170269

01914
701703

Dhaka

59

SL
131

Name
Society For
Underpriviledge
Families (SUF)

Address
475 Noyatola,
Mogbazar, Dhaka1217

District
Dhaka

132

Sohay

Gazipur

133

RISDA Institute of
Technology (RIT)

134

Ahsania Mission
Vocational
Training Institute,
Mirpur, Dhaka
Sonali Boutiques

House# 3/39, Flat#


A-1 Shorok kunjo,
Royer Bazar, Dhaka.
Head office: Khash
Villa 280 Dokkhin
Khan , Uttara,
Dhaka.
House# 18 Road# 1
Block # B Section # 6
Mirpur Dhaka.
House-Plot-M/1-C,
Section-14, Mirpur,
Dhaka-1216

Dhaka

01736323313

954, Mollhapara
,Bashtolla, Jessore
Sector#7,A/14,Dhak
a Road,New Town
Jessore.

Jessore

1912170122

Bonani, Bogra

Bogra

P.o-Rajghat,
Nowapara Municipal
Area, Abhaynagar,
Jessore, Bangladesh
142, 143,
Mirashpara, Bscic
Shilpo Nagori, Tongi,
Gazipur.
House#53, Block-D,
Ward-2, Road#7,
Vatulia,
Turag(Uttara),Dhaka
House-231 Road-12
Block-B Sec-12
Pallabi,Mirpur,Dhak
a-1216
White House,
Suihari (Near of
Eidgah Math), PTI
Road, Dinajpur.
Plot # 04, Road# 5,
Block # A, Section #
11, Mirpur, Dhaka 1216

Jessore

422271426

Gazipur

9816351-2

Dhaka

(02) 988 2280

135
136

137
138

Muslim Aid
Institute Of
Technology
(MAIT),Jessore
Textile Vocational
Institute
Bandhu Kallyan
Foundation

139

Montage Training
& Certification
(Bangladesh)

140

Bismillah
Technical Training
& Testing Institute

141

Suchana
foundation

142

Minal Computer
Training Academy

143

Social and
Economic
Enhancement
Programme-SEEP

Phone

Mobile

Dhaka

Jessore

0421-67513

1711838071

1715090042

Dhaka

Dinajpur

Dhaka

1712388208

88028032243

1711450979

60

SL
144

Name
23147-Bandhu
Computer Training
Center

Address
Institute Code:
23147,Bandhu
Computer Training
Center, U.P
Road,Post-Puthia6260, P.sPuthia,Rajshahi.

District
Rajshahi

Phone
1817381835

Mobile
1716123696

145

IDSL Technical
Training Institute Wing Organization
of Anukul
Foundation

Plot # 61, Block #


'KA', Road # 03,
Pisciculture Housing
Society, Shyamoli,
DhaWka - 1207.

Dhaka

02 8127746, 02
9142645

01914
860234

146

Ahsania Mission
Sayed Sadat Ali
Memorial
Education &
Vocational
Training Center
Ahsania Mission
Vocational
Training Institute
AHSANIA MISSION
VOCATIONALTRAI
NING INSTITUTE
,GAZIPUR
Dhaka Ahsania
Mission
Vocational
Training Institute

House-113/Ka,
Road-05, Piciculture
Housing Society,
Shyamoli, Dhaka1207

Dhaka

01710828803

House # B/91, Road


# E/2, Eastern
Housing, Pallabi
TELIPARA T&T STAFF
COLLEGE
ROAD,GAZIPUR
SADAR .GAZIPUR
Dhaka Ahsania
Mission Vocational
Training
Institute,Vekutia
Sadar, Jessore.
VTI, Sheskh Hati,
Babbla Tola.

Dhaka

1711042730

Gazipur

1716413784

Jessore

01711178179

Village: Mollickpur;
Post Office:
Sunamganj; Upazila:
Sunamganj sadar;
Zila: Sunamganj
House# 298, Road #
02, Baitul Aman
Housing Society,
Adabor, Shyamoli,
Dhaka-1207
Plot 19, Block A,
Amulia Model Town,
Demra
41/2 SWAMIBAGH,
DHAKA 1203,
BANGLADESH

Sunamganj

147

148

149

150

151

Govt.Textail
Vocational
Institute
Sarkar Khudro o
Kurtir Shilpa
abong Training
Center

152

Bangladesh
Development
Service
Center(BDSC)

153

Greenland
Training Centre
Ltd.
ENLIVEN ICT &
TECHNICAL
TRAINING
INSTITUTE

154

Jessore

0421-720053

01716732778
01552 775
577

Dhaka

8121826

01712 186
611

Dhaka

888 1836-43

01847 100
852

Dhaka

9573341

01711 140
679

61

SL
155

Name
Peace and Rights
Development of
Society (PRDS)

Address
Plot # I-46/47, Lane20/1, Block-D,
Section-12, Pallabi,
Mirpur, Dhaka-1216

District
Dhaka

Phone
9016860

Mobile
01943 096
382

156

Assistance for
Slum Dwellers
(ASD)

Dhaka

9118475

01711 943
827

157

Saimon Technical
Training Institute

158

DHRUBO SOCIETY

159

CHRIST CHURCH
TRADE SCHOOL
(CCTS)

6/4, A, Sir Syed


Road,
Mohammadpur,
Dhaka-1207
House- 3 ,Road no 1 ,Block- ka
,Section- 6 ,Mirpur 2,Dhaka-1216
H 10 = NOYMILE
SHAJAHANPUR
Smith Road,
Bokultala, Jessore
Sadar, Jessore

Jessore

0421-66849

01717 839
909

160

Parul Garden

Dhaka

02 8059216

01920 061
849

161

Shananda Beauty
Parlor and
Training Centre
SANCRED Welfare
Foundation (SWF)

Aptt. 2C, 83/2


Barobag, Mirpur-2,
Dhaka 1216
Kapuria Patty, Ali
Plaza ((2nd. Floor),
Jessore, Bangladesh
SANCRED Bhabon,
Surovi R/A,
Hassonnagor,
Sultanpur,
Sunamgonj-30000

Jessore

0421-51064

01716886331

Sunamganj

(0871)55846,615
40

01713 032
190

A.K.Khan CRPChittagong Centre,


Kalurghat, Mohara,
Chandgaon
Shreepur, Ashulia,
Savar, Dhaka-1349
183 Baitul laj, Green
Road, Dhanmondi,
Dhaka-1215
215 Sher-E-Bangla
Road, Rayer Bazar,
Dhaka-1209

Chittagong

031-2573412

Dhaka

7789227

Dhaka

02-9138137

Dhaka

8110495,
8110254

556, North
Ibrahimpur, Kafruld,
Mirpur, Dhaka.
50, Pauro BPC DS
Road
Bandon-41, Uttor
Arpinnagor, P.O+P.S
& Dis. : Sunamgonj

Dhaka

28151916

162

163

A.K.Khan CRPChittagong Centre

164

CRP- Ganakbari

165

Griha Sukhan

166

CDL Vocational
Training Centre

167

Satabdi Fashion
Design.

168

Sunamganj
Training Center
Akeya Design &
Training Center

169

Dhaka

1712094935

Bogra

Sunamganj
Sunamganj

01730 059
525
01911 323
346

01771 103
577
01716 114
557
01715 388
742

62

SL
170

171

Name
Grameen ShikkhaCISU Vocational
Training program
Nazarath
Technical School

172

C & C Garments
Training Center

173

Rupsha Garments
Training Center

174

DiBA Training
Institute (DTI)

175

Bangla -German
Sampreeti

Address
B 12/12, Thana
Road, Talbagh, Savar

District
Dhaka

Phone

Mobile
01732 122
252

Charch of
Bangladesh, 32/2, A,
Anandapur, Savar,
Dhaka-1340
Alif Super Market,
West Zirabo, Savar,
Dhaka
Hazi Sufia vila,
Zirabo, Dewan
Idrish, Savar- 1341

Dhaka

7745685

01712 649
867

House # 17, Road #


08, Block# B, Section
# 06, Mirpur Dhaka1216
4/16 (2nd Floor),
Block B, Humayun
Road,
Mohammadpur

Dhaka

01703 496
777

Dhaka

01925 384
546

Dhaka

01918 100
542

Dhaka

9124318

01750 700
200

63

Annex V: List of Enterprises20


No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

Vai Furniture

Morakata, Bogra

Bogra

01724141290

Achol Butik

Maltinagar, Bogra.

Bogra

01712684455

Badsha Electric
House Wiring

Mohisbathad, Bogra.

Bogra

01750305496

Choyonika Ladis
Tailors

Rafiq Khan New Market, Bogra.

Bogra

01723723190

4
5

Faiem Electric

Ghoradhaphat, Bogra.

Bogra

01724622118

Haider Furniture
& Kena Becha

Kanosgari, Sherpur Road, Bogra.

Bogra

01911135433,
01814742168

Hena Steel House

Ghoradhap Bazar, Bogra.

Bogra

01923478674

Jewel Motorcycle
Reparing House

Matidaly Bazar, Bogra.

Bogra

01719737844

8
9

Jhinuk Enterprise

Kanosgari, Sherpur Road, Bogra.

Bogra

01712271461

Jihad Furniture
House

Gokul Bazar, Bogra.

Bogra

01916888638

10

Kamal Suta &


Rong Ghor

Rafiq Khan New Market, Bogra.

Bogra

01712829518

11

Maa Borka House


& Ladis Tailors

Rafiq Khan New Market, 1st floor,


Bogra.

Bogra

01984684279

12
13

Maa Furniture

Mohasthan Goare, Gokul, Bogra.

Bogra

01956718150

Mactel Mobile
Technology

TMSS Mohila Market

Bogra

5169736

14
15

Megh Telecom

TMSS Mohila Market, Bogra.

Bogra

01931175294

16

Mim Ladis Tailors

Rafiq Khan New Market, Bogra.

Bogra

01716542050

Minhaj Honda
Reparing

Baghopara Bazar, Bogra.

Bogra

01734754605

17
20

This list consists of only enterprises that provided their response to the survey questionnaire. In addition,
Swisscontact has collected contact information of more than 21000 enterprises that may potentially cooperate
to provide OJT and employment support to graduates of SD projects. The contacts can be collected from
Swisscontacts South Asia Regional Office in Dhaka.

64

No.

Enterprise Name
Monir Engineering
Workshop

Dottobari, Bogra.

Bogra

01711235461

18

Nantu Welding
Workshop

Baghopara, Gokul, Bogra.

Bogra

01785558949

19

Dottobari, Bogra.

Bogra

01711141614

20

New Jhatika
Engineering
Workshop
New Sumayia
Furniture

Ghoradhap Bazar, Bogra.

Bogra

01737897336

21

Morakata, Kukrul, Bogra.

Bogra

01534972075

22

New Vai Vai


Motorcycle
Reparing Center

Baghopara, Gokul, Bogra.

Bogra

017292957

23

M/S. Rahman
Welding
Workshop
M/S. Rana
Motorcycle Center

Matidaly, Joypurpara, Bogra.

Bogra

01711451131

24
25

Ranju Telecom

Ghoradhap, Bogra.

Bogra

01737256228

26

Rasel Mobile Care

TMSS Mohila Market, Bogra.

Bogra

01712572777

Sha Sultan
Furniture

Baghopara, Bogra.

Bogra

01728112233

27
28

Sovon Furniture

Mohasthan Goare, Gokul, Bogra.

Bogra

01710906703

Vai Vai Electric &


Mobile Servicing

Thengamara, Bogra.

Bogra

01982157924

29
30

Vai Vai Workshop

Baghopara, Gokul, Bogra.

Bogra

01725824316

M/S. Kamal
Machine Tools

Salimpur, Sadar, Bogra

Bogra

051-64000

31
32

Rahima Furniture

Hall Bondor, Mohasthan

Bogra

01718855980

TMSS Handicrafts

TMSS foundation Office,


Tangamara

Bogra

Palli Sheba Tailors

SA College, Bottola, Gabtoli,


Bogra.

Bogra

33

34

Address

District

Contact

01716128190

65

No.

Enterprise Name
Shah Fateh Ali
Welding workshop

Gokul Bazar

Bogra

35

Mayer Doa Steel


& Welding

Sherua Bottola, Sherpur, Bogra.

Bogra

01748976639

36
37

Vai Vai Welding

Kundarhat, Nondigram, Bogra.

Bogra

01740969983

TMSS Welding
Sector

Thengamara, Rangpur Road,


Bogra.

Bogra

051-78563 Ex. 176

38

Sanjida Beauty
Parlor

Nimtola, Shibjong Bazar, Bogra.

Bogra

01714513132

39

Katnarpara.

Bogra

01751895201

40

Ek Jholok Beauty
Parlor &
Embroydari House
Kabita Beauty
Parlour

Gov.Mujibur Rahman Mohila


College Road.

Bogra

01913361022

41
42

Jasmin Tailors

Sukan Pukur,Gabtoly

Bogra

TMSS Sawmill and


Furniture

Thengamara, Rangpur Road,


Bogra.

Bogra

01713377231

43

Eity Electric
Workshop

Ghoradhaphat, Bogra.

Bogra

01718057571

44

Habib Engineering
Works

Joypurpara, (Near BSCIC, Bogra),


Bogra Sadar

Bogra

01925790957

45

TMSS Foundation Office, TCB-1,


Rangpur Road, Thengamara,
Bogra

Bogra

5169985

46

Building
Construction
Limited (BCL)
Furniture King

60, Pathantuli Road, Nazirpul,


Chittagong

Chittagong

01819-828956

J. M. G
International

528, Nasirabad I/A, B B Road,


Nasirabad

Chittagong

031-2580327

48

New Universal
Furniture

Shahid Saifuddin Khaled Road,


Ashkerdighi(North)

Chittagong

01819342828

49

M/S. Shafiq
Enterprise

D/8, Block#A, BSCIC I/A,


Sholoshahar, Baijid Bostami

Chittagong

50

47

Address

District

Contact

66

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

125/A, Motijheel C/A, Islam


Chamber (10th Floor)

Dhaka

956-6315

51

Bengal
Development
Corporation Ltd.

56/1/B, Lake Circus, West


Panthapath, Dhaka-1205,
Bangladesh.

Dhaka

8118519

52

Bangladesh
Foundry &
Engineering
Works
GBB Limited

Momtaz Plaza, House # 7, Road #


4, Dhanmondi

Dhaka

8623417

Joint Venture
Engineers Ltd.

House # 29, Shayesta Khan


Avenue, Sector # 04, Uttara

Dhaka

891 5038

54

21/2 Purana Paltan, 3rd Floor

Dhaka

9568028

55

New Generation
Construction Co.
Ltd
Project Builders
ltd.

PBL Tower (5th Floor), 17, North


Commercial Area, Gulshan-2

Dhaka

989-1143

Shamsuddin Mia
and Associates
LTD

64 Bijoy Nagar

Dhaka

935-6951

MONICO LIMITED

183, West Dhanmondi, Dhaka


1209, Bangladesh

Dhaka

9145261

ICON Engineering
Services

49/1 A, Level-3, Puranapalton

Dhaka

8319710

Anushka Fashion
House

House # 22, Block # E,Line # 06


Section # 11, Mirpur Dhaka.

Dhaka

Kumkum
Embroidery House

House # 25, Block # D,Line # 03


Section # 12,Mirpur Dhaka.

Dhaka

Naima Fashion

House # 15, Block # D,Line # 22


Section # 06, Mirpur Dhaka.

Dhaka

Reshma Fashion

House # 03, Block # B,Line # 14,


Section # 06, Mirpur, Pallabi,
Dhaka.

Dhaka

Razib Fashion

House # 15, Block # B,Line # 03,


Ave # 5, Section # 06, Mirpur,
Pallabi, Dhaka.

Dhaka

53

56

57

58

59

60

61

62

63

64

67

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

Samira ladies
Fashion

Shop # 19, Block # A,Line # 07,


Section # 10, Mirpur, Pallabi,
Dhaka.

Dhaka

Jahid Embroidery
House

House # 03, Block # A,Line # 20,


Section # 10, Mirpur, Pallabi,
Dhaka.

Dhaka

AB Fashion Tailors
and Embroidery

Shop # 424, Section #


11.5,Rangdhanu Complex, Mirpur,
Pallabi, Dhaka.

Dhaka

Taruni Embroidery
Fashion.

House # 09, Road # 04, Block # C,


Section # 06, Mirpur, Pallabi,
Dhaka.

Dhaka

Shamsun Fashion.

Shop # 15,Milk Vita Road, Section


# 07, Mirpur, Pallabi, Dhaka.

Dhaka

Mahmuda Dress
House.

Shop # 19,Block # A, Line # 19,


Section # 10, Mirpur, Pallabi,
Dhaka.

Dhaka

Nahid Fashion.

House # 04, Line # 31,Rupnagar


R/A Rupnagar , Mirpur, Dhaka.

Dhaka

Rokaiya Fashion

House # 01, Line # 03,Block # E,


Section # 12, Mirpur, Pallabi,
Dhaka.

Dhaka

Nakshi Fashion
House

House # 93/6,Golartek, Section #


01, Mirpur, Dhaka.

Dhaka

73

Karudhara Fashion Duaripara,Pallabi, Mirpur, Dhaka.


House

Dhaka

74

H. T. Engineering
Works

54/1, Bonogram Road, Dhaka 1203

Dhaka

01713-042630

75

Ujala Engineering
Works

88/A, Distilary Road, Gendaria,


Dhaka.

Dhaka

01711-622335

76

Akbar Engineering
Works

27, Taherbagh Lane, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-549007

77

R Industries
Limited

House # 9-B/3, Road # 4,


Dhanmondi, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-404826

78

65

66

67

68

69

70

71

72

68

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

Harun Engineering
Works

13, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01922-066100

79

Mitali Engineering
Works

217/10, New Zurain (Natun


Rastha), Dhaka

Dhaka

01715-011203

80

New Ovi Eng.


Work

476/B, D I T Road, Malibagh,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-524709

81

Sabbir Engineering 12, Katherpul Lane, Dhaka - 1100


Works

Dhaka

01711-534853

82

Raju Engineering
Works

15/21, Tipuesultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01710-977711

83

74/1, Lalmuhon Shaha Street,


Dhulaikhal, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-614496

84

Abul Gas Kit And


Engineering
Works
Ibrahim Kadri
Enterprise

44/1, Taherbagh Lane, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-529797

85

Machine Ghor
Engineering

80, Lalmuhon Shaha Street,


Dhulaikhal, Dhaka

Dhaka

01715-416604

86

66, Taherbagh Lane, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-530619

87

Anwar
Engineering
Works

23, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01713-014825

88

Progoti
Engineering
Works
Mafia Engineering
Works

42/2, Khajadawn, 2nd Lane,


Lalbagh, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-286477

89

Dider Engineering
Works

74, H K Das Road, Narinda, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-612521

90

Dhaka

01741-329557

91

Hossain
Engineering
Works
16/1, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-530548

92

Babor Metal
Engineering
Works

93

Asian Tools

42/1/A, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-268873

69

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

New Rupali
Engineering

14, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01712-571816

94

5/A, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-524099

95

Northan
Engineering
Works
Jwel Engineering
Works

15/8-9, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01714-013613

96

38, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01721-780116

97

General
Engineering
Works

20, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01729-152450

98

Gauchia
Engineering
Works
Beauty Molding
Works

67, North Moishundi, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-534413

99

Fatema
Engineering
100 Works

58, Dr. Radhasham Shaha Street,


North Moshundi, Dhaka

Dhaka

01712-257690

Milling Master
Engineering
101 Works

25/3, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01911-080850

M M Engineering
102 Works

78/4, North Zatrabari, Dhaka

Dhaka

01964-198706

Ahammad
Engineering
103 Works

17, Lalchan Mukim Lane, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-528759

104 Nipun Engineering

29/1, Gualghat LAne, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-532225

Haider
Engineering
105 Works

10, Folder Street, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-069675

Union Engineering
106 Works

23/1, Jaykali Mondir Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01825-929290

107 Azad Spring & Co.

15, Taherbagh lane, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-686105

Jane Alam
Engineering
108 Works

13, Juginagar Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01715-164560

70

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

K. S. D.
Engineering
109 Works

437/9, Haji Lalmia Sarker Road,


Muradpur, Jurain, Dhaka

Dhaka

01715-014232

Panch Bhai
110 Engineering

98, Narinda Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-164273

27, West Shilpa Zone, Tejgoan,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01819-215574

Chowdhury
Engineering Co.
112 Limited

181, West Tejkuni Bazer, Tejgoan,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01712-153572

Ashraf Enterprise
113 Pvt. Ltd.

324, Gulbagh, Malibagh, Dhaka

Dhaka

01713-008247

196/A, Bongshal Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-561883

Femous
Engineering
115 Works

48/1/A, Lalmuhon Shaha Street,


Dhulaikhal Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01718-655553

The National
Engineering
116 Complex

19, Katherpul Lane, Banianagar,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01819-467070

Modern Erection
117 Limited

223/B, Industrial Area, Tejgoan,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-524398

Bolaka
Engineering
118 Works

25, (New Road) Shamibagh,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01713-065717

Binimoy
Engineering
119 Works

24/A, Tipusultan Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01912-464621

Mamun
Engineering
120 Works

25/1, Joykali Mondir Road, Wari,


Shutrapur, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-565901

Delwer
Engineering
121 Works

18/C, Ranking Street, Wari, Dhaka

Dhaka

01819-298435

Gear Center
122 Engineering

97, Narinda Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-842926

Usha Traders
111

Belayet
Engineering & Co.
114

71

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

Dimond
Engineering
123 Works

68/2, Taherbagh Lane, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-433254

Jahid Machinary
124 Industry

77, Rishikesh Das Road, Dhaka

Dhaka

01819-505560

M/S, A & A
Fashion

H # 46, Gausul Ajom Avenue,


Sectro # 13, Main Road, Uttara,
Dhaka

Dhaka

01871-010101

M/S, S S Knit
Fashion

Dewan Eddris Road, Kathgora


Bazar, Ashulia, Savar, Dhaka

Dhaka

01674-117888

M/S, Jitu
Bangladesh

192/B, Kuril Bisha Road,


Chowrastha, Vatara, Gulshan,
Dhaka

Dhaka

01712-983485

M/S, Darsi Fashion Shop No # 208, 1st floor,


Ranhdhonu Shoping Complex,
128
Mirpur, Dhaka

Dhaka

01783932389

473/6, Shewrapara, Mirpur,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01715151040

M/S, Blooshoms
Fashion & Home
130 Dcor

H # D-8, R # 2, Mohanagor
Project, West Rampura, Dhaka

Dhaka

01825250000

M/S, Rubina Angel


Beauty Parler &
131 Boutique

KA/22-E, Sharkar Bari, Norda,


Gulshan, Dhaka

Dhaka

01712190404

M/S, Nakshi
132 Bangla Handicraft

63, Shatmoshjid Road,


Dhanmondi, Dhaka

Dhaka

01712093736

133 M/S, Nakshi

76/D, Nayapalton, Dhaka

Dhaka

01726-334967

M/S, Golden Eye


Boutique &
134 Handicraft

54, Dilkusha (I/A), Motijheel,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01819-096560

60/1, Shobujbagh, Bashabu,


Khilgoan, Dhaka

Dhaka

01670-258608

46/1, Kadamtala, Shobujbagh,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01816-752292

125

126

127

129

M/S, Boitoroni
135
M/S, New Ruposhi
Harbal Beauty
136 Parlor

72

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

M/S, Yeasmin
Boutiques and
137 Fashion House

12/E, 3/A, Poribagh, Shahbagh,


Dhaka

Dhaka

01716-121800

M/S, Samina
138 Boutiques

276, Fakirapul, Motijheel, Dhaka

Dhaka

01687-913402

F-31, Anarkoli Super Market,


Shiddheshori, Dhaka

Dhaka

01711-242452

140 Hameem Group

Phoenix Tower (4th Floor)

Dhaka

141 Babylon Group

2-B/1, Darussalam Road, Mirpur

Dhaka

8023462-3

Epic Garments
Manufacturing Co.
142 Ltd.

House-17, Road-15, (Rabindra


Sarani), Sector-3, Uttara

Dhaka

8920266

Sweater Fashions
143 Ltd.

House # 352 (5th Floor), Road # 5,


DOHS, Baridhara

Dhaka

Montex Fabrics
Ltd.

Siaam Tower (Level 9th & 10th),


Plot # 15, Sector # 3, Uttara
Model Town

Dhaka

Fame Sweaters
Ltd.

House 196A (Ground floor), Road


1, Eastern Road, New DOHS,
Mohakhali

Dhaka

Basic Apparels
146 Ltd.

135-138, Abdullahpur (1st & 2nd


floor), Uttara

Dhaka

Impress-Newtex
Composite Textile
147 Ltd.

Evergreen Plaza (6th Floor),

Dhaka

8818490

Niagara Textiles
148 Ltd.

27, Bijoy Nagar, Suite# C-1 (1st


floor)

Dhaka

9352328, 9340945

149 Utah Fashions Ltd.

House # 6, Road # 3,

Dhaka

961 5370

Brothers Furniture
150 Ltd.

Plot-82, Block-J, Progati Sharani,


Baridhara

Dhaka

544/2/C, Begum Rokeya Sarani,


Kazipara, Mirpur

Dhaka

139

M/S, Shithi
Fashion

144

145

Partex Furniture
151

9885358,
9883827,
9882449,
9882719,
8815204,

73

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

Legacy Furniture
152 (Pvt.) Ltd.

60, Gulshan Avenue, Taher


Mansion

Dhaka

9899197

New Nadia
153 Furniture

1409 Ananda Nagar, Merul Badda

Dhaka

8860548

Design &
Technology
154 Center

House 278, Road 14, Block C,


Bashundhara R/A, Baridhara

Dhaka

8401553

Authentic
Furniture

77, West Shewrapara, Begum


Rokeya Sharani, Mirpur

Dhaka

OOTBF

House-68, Road-17, Block-E,


Banani

Dhaka

Ayna Ghor

40/3, ga, Reza Villa, Bashtola,


Baridhara view, 1212

Dhaka

01670122376

POLKA DOTS
158 FASHION LTD.

Shilpa plot no.# M-4/3, Main


Road, Section-14, Mirpur.

Dhaka

8034243

Associated
Builders
159 Corporation Ltd

ABC House (2nd Floor), 8 Banani


C/A, Kamal Ataturk Avenue

Dhaka

8814620

160 Confidence Tailors

Rowson Plaza, Maldahpotti

Dinajpur

161 CK Sweater

Chinirbandor

Dinajpur

162 Grameen Boutiqes

Maldahpotti, Sadar

Dinajpur

Imran Sweater
163 Ltd.

Debigonj, Chinirbondor

Dinajpur

Sumaiya
164 Atumobile Works

Mirzapur Bus terminal

Dinajpur

Presty Homemade
165 Bakary

6/A Uposhohor

Dinajpur

Plot # A/55-56, BSCIC, Kunabari,


Gazipur

Gazipur

155

156

157

M/S, S M S Trims
and Nitting

01714-072758

166

74

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

M/S, Anika
167 Sweater Limited

J-53, Vhugra, Gazipur Sadar,


Gazipur.

Gazipur

01915-398213

M/S, Karubangla
168 Bags

Vhararul, Dhirasram, Sadar,


Gazipur

Gazipur

01819-022283

Liz Fashion Ltd.

Building2, holding1, blockC,


Shaheed mosharraf Hossain road,
purba Chandora, Shafipur, kalikoir

Gazipur

Hop Lun (BD) Ltd.

03, Dhaka Mymenshing Road, ST


Tower, East Gazipura, Tongi

Gazipur

170
171 Viyellatex Group

297 Khairtul, Tongi

Gazipur

172 Multifabs Ltd.

Kashempur, Konabari

Gazipur

8861806, 8853758

Turag Garments &


173 Hosiery Mills Ltd

South Panishail, Zirani Bazar,


Kashimpur

Gazipur

8931738

Masihata
174 Sweaters Ltd.

South Panishail, BKSP, Kashimpur

Gazipur

Sharmin Fashion
175 Ltd.

East Narashinghapur, Ashulia,


Savar

Gazipur

Ehsana Moonlight
176 Garments Ltd.

Kunia Pachar (Targach)

Gazipur

Mondol Knit tex


177 Ltd.

Nayapara, Kashimpur

Gazipur

Jamuna Knitting &


178 Dyeing Ltd

Jarun, Kashimpur Road, Konabari

Gazipur

01914876204

Modina Metal
179 Industries

Plot No # 1, BSCIC, Sadar, Jessore

Jessore

01711-316546

Charulipi
180 Boutiques

Holding No # 1187, Old Koshba,


Sadar, Jessore

Jessore

01716-981782

Modern Furniture
181 Mart

Ruchi Pal Bari More

Jessore

Bangladesh
182 Apparels Products

84, Naldanga Road, Basepara

Jessore

01739 45309

183 Rong Handicrafts

34 Mujib Sarak

Jessore

42167037

184 Dhara Mega Shop

34 Mujib Sarok

Jessore

0421-69064

169

92919372-4

75

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Bangladesh
Apparel Products
185 (BAP)

74 Mujib Sharok

Jessore

BK Motorcycle
186 Servicing Center

Arobpur,Jessore.

Jessore

Babul
187 eng.Workshop

Arabpur Mor

Jessore

Shaks Tailors and


188 Fabrics

H M M road.

Jessore

Ria Motorcycle
189 Servicing Center

Sujoipur, Arobpur

Jessore

New Ochena sur


Electical
190 Workeshop

Narangali Bazar.

Jessore

FNF Electrical
191 Workshop

Arobpur Mor.

Jessore

192 Abumanjer Touhid

Balia Vekutia, Arobpur

Jessore

193 Classic Furniture

22/23, K.D.A. Avenue, Sheikhpara

Khulna

Shuvo Steel and


Engiarring
194 workshop

Tala Bazar

Khulna

Kormokar
195 Furniture

Paikgacha Road,Dumuria

Khulna

196 Allahrdan Auto

Tala Bazar

Khulna

Rofique
197 Electronics

Tala Bazar

Khulna

198 Bunon Tailors

Chuknagar Bazar,Dumuria

Khulna

199 Sara Electric

Chuknagor Bazar ,Dumuria

Khulna

Electric Engineer
200 works

Chuknagor,Jatin Kashem
Road,Dumuria

Khulna

Selim Motocycle
201 Workshop

Chuknagar Bazar,Dumuria

Khulna

202 Suchona Furniture

Chuknagar Bazar,Dumuria

Khulna

Contact

041 732422

76

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Contact

203 Ripa Boutiqes

Mirzapur Road

Khulna

204 Banani Furniture

6 KDA Avenue

Khulna

Exclusive Beauty
205 parlour

37 Samsur Rahman Road

Khulna

206 Sheraton Tailors

6 Akhter Chember

Khulna

M/S, Asgor & Sons


207 Steel Industries

BSCIC, Maskanda, Mymensing

Mymensingh 01711-647340

M/S, Ruhul
208 Enterprise

BSCIC, Masakanda, Mymensing

Mymensingh 01713-536310

M/S, Minimax
209 Enterprise

BSCIC, Masaknda, Mymensing

Mymensingh 01922-698415

M/S, Progoti
210 Enterprise

BSCIC, Maskanda, Mymensing

Mymensingh 01724-758312

Khan Furniture
211 Galary

Godhuli Market StationRoad,


Shiril

Rajshahi

Mamoni
212 Enterprise

Damkurahut

Rajshahi

Nuraiya Welding
213 Works

Korhar,Darusha Road,Poba.

Rajshahi

214 Sohel Traders

Damkurahati, Shitolai road,poba.

Rajshahi

Emon Eng.
215 Workshop

Dausha Baar,Poba.

Rajshahi

216 Maa Metal

Damkura Hut ,poba

Rajshahi

Jannatul Welding
217 & Furniture Mart

Kashia danga,Rajpara

Rajshahi

Bismillah Auto
218 Workshop

Damkurahut,Kakon road,Poba.

Rajshahi

Al-Amin Furniture
219 Mart

Uttar Balia

Rajshahi

Noton Mdhupur, Dabkurahut,


Poba

Rajshahi

Razib Telecom
220

77

No.

Enterprise Name

Address

District

Perfect Vidio &


221 studio

Fashia Danga Mor,Sofi potti Bazar

Rajshahi

Noyan Telecom
Electrical &
222 Electronics

Damkudahut, Poba

Rajshahi

223 Mayer Doa

Horipur,Poba

Rajshahi

Eutopia Boutiques
224 & Fashion

A/193 Uposhohor

Rajshahi

Somonnoy
225 Furniture Index

Uposhohor

Rajshahi

226 Piyash Handicrefts

Dhamila, Damkurahut, Godagari.

Rajshahi

Emamgong,Damkurahut,
Godagari.

Rajshahi

227
228 Nishita Tailors

Damkurahut, Poba

Rajshahi

229 Jamal Tailors

Damkurahut, Poba

Rajshahi

Madina Naksha
230 Ghor

Damkura, Poba

Rajshahi

Babul Eng.
231 Workshop

Plot# 68, BSCIC I/A

Sunamganj

United Auto Eng.


232 Workshop
Babul Engineering
233 workshop

Plot # A-1,2, B-1, BSCIC I/A

Sunamganj

Old Bus Stand

Sunamganj

Sathi Handicrafts

Contact

78

Annex VI: Timeline of the survey

79