Illinois College

1101 West College Avenue Jacksonville, Illinois 62650

Preparing Competent and Caring Teachers for Leadership and Service

Professional Semester

Student Teaching Handbook
2005-2006
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Table of Contents
Blue: Student Teaching Calendar Student Teaching Syllabus Role of the Cooperating Teacher Summary of Pathwise Domains Student Teaching Guidelines Portfolio Suggestions for Four Domains

Salmon:

Domains B & C: Classroom Environment & Instruction Observation Guide Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning

Green:

Activities and Employment Form Student Teaching Self-Reporting Log Evaluation of the Student Teaching Experience Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher Cooperating Teacher=s Evaluation of Professional Semester Supervisor’s Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher

Purple:

Class Summary Lesson Plan Format Lesson Plan Rubric

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INTRODUCTION TO BLUE SECTION

This section of the handbook contains information that “introduces” the entire student teaching experience, which is often referred to as the professional semester: 1. The calendar for the semester indicates those dates during which the candidates will be teaching and those dates on which they will be expected to be on campus for seminars and other activities. 2. The syllabus that is included outlines the expectations for the 400 level course for which candidates receive their credits for student teaching. 3. The documents which outline the role of the cooperating teacher are intended to help answer questions about what we expect of those who “mentor” our candidates during their professional semester. 4. The Summary of Pathwise Domains and the Student Teaching Guidelines explain the basis for the criteria which are used to evaluate candidates’ teaching. 5. The final document in this section provides suggestions of artifacts from the professional semester that candidates could use in finalizing their Teacher Competence Portfolios.

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Student Teaching Calendar Spring 2006
See inside pocket of Student Teaching Handbook folder.

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Illinois College

Education Department
Preparing Competent and Caring Teachers for Leadership and Service
EDUC 402, 404, 406, 408 Spring 2006

Student Teaching (12 Semester Hours)
Affirmation of Community Responsibility
Illinois College has adopted the Affirmation of Community Responsibility, the text of which appears below. The intent of the Affirmation is to help establish a culture of learning across our campus, as well as to instill a sense of common responsibility among all members of our campus community .The faculty and administration hope this statement will facilitate intellectual and personal development in our community such that all members of our campus community will understand their respective obligations in campus life. The instructor believes this statement is useful in achieving these ends. Students are expected to understand and comply with this statement. Illinois College is committed to the development and welfare of every member of our community: students, faculty, staff, and administration. To achieve the working and learning environment most conducive to everyone's well. being and growth at the College, all members of the community must assume responsibility. Individually and collectively, we should: • pursue excellence in academic and co-curricular experiences, and in all activities which support the academic program,. • exhibit integrity in intellectual development,. • practice responsible and effective communication,. and • foster tolerance and respect in our community. We affirm that we are all caretakers of our community and recognize that our individual responsibilities are essential for nurturing collaborative relationships, critical exploration, and global awareness in our community. A quality liberal education requires our commitment to excellence, integrity, communication, tolerance, and shared responsibility for the success of Illinois College.

EDUC 402, 404, 406, 408 – Course Description:
Teacher candidates teach and manage a classroom in an off-campus setting while under the supervision of a full-time cooperating teacher and a college supervisor. This experience requires a full semester commitment that includes observations, participation, teaching, and other activities that make a direct contribution to an achievement of basic concepts, skills, and principles in the teaching-learning process. Emphasis is placed on the application and integration of instructional methods and classroom management techniques. The cooperating teacher provides day-to-day assistance and feedback to the teacher candidate; the college supervisor assesses growth across the entire experience, including the teacher candidate’s ability to apply procedures that reflect Illinois College’s Teacher Preparation Program Outcomes identified in the Conceptual Framework and The Illinois Professional Teaching Standards. The “Student Teaching and the Illinois College Conceptual Framework” section of this syllabus (page 3) describes the commitment to diversity and technology.

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Pre-requisites:
All professional courses must be completed with a grade of C or better and a 2.50 GPA requirement must be met. Co-requisite: EDUC 401 – Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction.

Illinois Professional Teaching Standards
At the conclusion of the student teaching experience, the teacher candidate will be able to demonstrate proficiency in the following Illinois Professional Teaching Standards. Concomitantly proficiency in the core standards of Technology, Language Arts, and Special Education (IPTS) should be demonstrated throughout the professional semester. #1 Content Knowledge —The Teacher understands the central concepts, methods of inquiry, and structures of the disciplines and creates learning experiences that make the content meaningful to all students. #2 Human Development and Learning —The teacher understands how individuals grow, develop, and learn and provides learning opportunities that support the intellectual, social, and personal development of all students. #3 Diversity —The teacher understands how students differ in their approaches to learning and creates instructional opportunities that are adapted to diverse learners. #4 Planning for Instruction —The teacher understands instructional planning and designs instruction based upon knowledge of the discipline, students, the community, and curriculum goals. #5 Learning Environment —The teacher uses an understanding of individual and group motivation and behavior to create a learning environment that encourages positive social interaction, active engagement in learning, and self-motivation. #6 Instructional Delivery —The teacher understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to encourage students’ development of critical thinking, problem solving, and performance skills. #7 Communication —The teacher uses knowledge of effective written, verbal, nonverbal, and visual communication techniques to foster active inquiry, collaboration, and supportive interaction in the classroom. #8 Assessment —The teacher understands various formal and informal assessment strategies and uses them to support the continuous development of all students. #9 Collaborative Relationships —The teacher understands the role of the community in education and develops and maintains collaborative relationships with colleagues, parents/guardians, and the community to support student learning and well being. #10 Reflection and Professional Growth —The teacher is a reflective practitioner who continually evaluates how choices and actions affect students, parents, and other professionals in the learning community and actively seeks opportunities to grow professionally. #11 Professional Conduct- -The teacher understands education as a profession, maintains standards of professional conduct, and provides leadership to improve student learning and well being.

Course Content and Goals
The primary goal of the professional semester (student teaching) is to provide teacher candidates with the opportunity to be competent and caring practitioners serving diverse communities of learners who assume, integrate, and refine roles as classroom leaders through reflective practice. As competent and caring teachers, student teachers will be organizing content for student learning (planning), creating an environment for student learning (management), teaching for student learning (lesson execution), and developing their professional skills and relationships (teacher professionalism). They will also be developing several important dispositions and values. These include: 1. Self-reflection, which will enable them to critique, constructively, their performance and to make and support judgments and instructional decisions with respect to the learning of individuals or groups of students. 2. A deeper insight into the nature of the learning process and a greater knowledge of human development. As noted in the Illinois College Conceptual Framework, the thoughtful examination of the unique characteristics of children, adolescents, and adult learners within cultural contexts, allows educators to continuously refine their teaching practices.

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3. An understanding of the roles of the many different individuals engaged in the teaching-learning process and of collaborative partnerships that can work together for common purposes. 4. A realization of the importance of their own personal and professional goals. 5. Proficiency in instructional competencies and classroom management techniques through direct experiences and the thoughtful analysis and continual revision of effective approaches to teaching and learning. 6. Knowledge of the resources and materials available to the classroom teacher and ability to adapt and/or incorporate available resources and materials into the instructional program. 7. Increased skill in performing routine administrative duties including the maintenance of required records and the submission of required reports.

Student Teaching and the Illinois College Conceptual Framework:
The Illinois College teacher candidate should be a competent and caring teacher [prepared] for leadership and service. EDUC 402, 404, 406, and 408 will address many elements of the Illinois College Conceptual Framework throughout the student teaching semester. For example: • Caring: Candidates will be placed in diverse classrooms in Jacksonville and schools in surrounding communities. Each placement will reflect diversity in one or more of the following: socio-economic status, ethnicity, ability levels, and various exceptionalities. Candidates shall identify and develop accommodations for meeting their students' unique needs and abilities, and they should be coached on how to help all children learn. • Competence: Candidates should be knowledgeable in their field of study. They should use the tools of scholarship, including technology, to research their content area before constructing lessons and to research, examine, and become familiar with the state and local standards and performance-based outcomes. • Reflective Practice: For each lesson that candidates teach, they should be asked to summarize the results of their evaluation of student learning. They should identify strengths and/or weaknesses and cite examples. Suggestions for planning future lessons should be included. Candidates should record daily reflections of the strengths and weaknesses of each lesson and how they would improve future instruction. • Collaboration: The student teaching experience will present teacher candidates with a myriad of opportunities to test and refine their competence. These opportunities will include making curriculum decisions, identifying and/or selecting appropriate teaching strategies, identifying and/or selecting appropriate strategies and techniques for classroom management, and identifying and/or selecting appropriate evaluation tools and strategies. They will work in a collaborative arrangement with their cooperating teacher to identify and solve the problems that are a part of the fabric of instruction and management. • Professional relationships: Student teachers are viewed as integral team members of each school's faculty. Teacher candidates should build professional relationships with colleagues to share teaching insights and to coordinate learning activities for students. They should attend faculty meetings, departmental/team meetings, child study team meetings, in- service programs and IEP meetings. They should also be provided with numerous opportunities for communicating with parents/guardians. As appropriate, written, telephone and personal communications should be initiated and maintained with the parents/guardians of students.

Course Objectives:
In addition to emphasizing the Illinois College Conceptual Framework, the student teaching semester is organized with the following outcomes in mind. These outcomes are divided into four sections called “domains.” Each domain (A-D) focuses on a particular dimension of the teaching process. As a result of their experiences in student teaching, teacher candidates will be able to do the following: Domain A: Organize content knowledge for student learning. That is, they will: 1) Become familiar with relevant aspects of students' background; 2) Articulate clear learning objectives which are appropriate for their students;

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3) Demonstrate an understanding of the connections between content learned previously, the current content, and that which remains to be learned in the future; 4) Create or select appropriate teaching methods, learning activities, and instructional materials or other resources; and 5) Create or select evaluation strategies that are appropriate for the students and aligned with lesson objectives. Domain B: Create an environment for student learning. That is, they will: 1) Create a climate that promotes fairness; 2) Establish and maintain rapport with students in ways that are appropriate to their developmental needs; 3) Communicate challenging learning expectations to each student; 4) Establish and maintain consistent standards of mutually respectful classroom interaction and behavior; and 5) Make the physical environment safe and conducive to learning. Domain C: Teach for student learning. That is, they will: 1) Make learning objectives and instructional procedures clear to students; 2) Make content comprehensible; 3) Encourage students to extend their thinking; 4) Monitor students' understanding, provide feedback to assist learning, and adjust learning as the situation demands; and 5) Use instructional time effectively. Domain D: Demonstrate teacher professionalism. That is, they will: 1) Reflect on the extent to which instructional objectives were met; 2) Demonstrate a sense of efficacy; 3) Build professional relationships with colleagues to share teaching insights and to coordinate learning activities; and 4) Communicate with parents or guardians about student learning.

Required Text:
Student Teaching Handbook: This handbook provides information regarding the student teaching program including the candidates’ responsibilities as student teachers and suggestions regarding procedures and activities to employ during the student teaching period. Teacher Work Sample Assignment: This packet provides guidelines for completing the TWS, which must be written after candidates have administered a pre-test, planned and taught a unit, administered a post-test, analyzed test data and reflected upon the effectiveness of their teaching. Teacher Competence Portfolio Guide: This packet provides guidelines for completing all three portfolios that are required of all teacher candidates. At this point candidates will find this information helpful when completing their final, professional portfolio.

Format of the Course:
Over the course of the student teaching experience, teacher candidates should engage in a variety of activities and experiences designed to enable them to apply, adapt, revise, and revisit that which they have learned about teaching and learning and to engage in reflective practice to develop competence and demonstrate caring in the school and community to which they are assigned. Specifically, they should engage in guided observations designed to acquaint them with students, with classroom management techniques and with instructional methods, strategies, and materials. They should plan and implement daily lesson plans, as well as develop and implement larger projects such as an instructional unit. They should be evaluated using criteria that reflect the course objectives; and they should receive feedback, suggestions, and guidance from the college supervisor and the cooperating teacher. Finally, they should engage in self-reflection or reflective practice; i.e., they should engage in thoughtful analysis and continual revision of their approaches to teaching and learning. The following course activities, assignments and requirements are designed for these purposes.

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Course Activities/Assignments/Requirements
1. Instructional (“Phase-In”) Schedule: This schedule is flexible and dependent on decisions made by the cooperating teacher, the teacher candidate, and the college supervisor. The teacher candidate and the cooperating teacher are encouraged, early in the semester, to make long-range plans for the term. However, the degree to which planned schedules are followed should be determined by the overall readiness of the student teacher to assume the next level of responsibility. 2. College Supervisor Evaluation Time: Teacher candidates will be observed a minimum of five (5) times by the college supervisor. Two of the visits will consist of (1) an observation of the teacher candidate teaching a complete lesson, (2) a short conference with the cooperating teacher, and (3) a conference with the teacher candidate. Three of the visits will be formal evaluations of lessons. These visits will consist of (1) the student teacher submitting a formal lesson plan (Instructional Plan for a Single Lesson) via Live Text, (2) a pre-observation conference, (3) the college supervisor conducting a formal observation, (4) the student teacher completing the Reflection After Teaching form on the lesson plan template, (5) the college supervisor conducting a conference with their student teacher during which they discuss items on the Formal Observation Summary instrument, and (6) the college supervisor conducting a conference with the cooperating teacher. 3. Cooperating Teacher Evaluations: Teacher candidates will be informally observed by the cooperating teacher throughout the semester. The cooperating teacher should take special care to communicate any concerns to both the student teacher and to the college supervisor. The cooperating teacher should conduct formal observations of the student teacher by following the same procedures and using the same forms outlined above (see item 2). Results of these observations should be shared with the college supervisor. 4. Full-Time (Solo) Teaching Responsibility: The teacher candidate, in order to successfully complete the student teaching experience, will complete a minimum of two weeks in which s/he has the full responsibility for the classroom. Although both the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor will monitor this time, the teacher candidate will plan, teach, evaluate, etc., as if s/he were the teacher. Moving the student teacher into solo teaching is based upon the assumption that the candidate has demonstrated proficiencies which indicate that he or she is ready for those responsibilities. 5. Weekly Teaching Schedule: The teacher candidate will provide the college supervisor with a weekly teaching schedule by 8:00 a.m. every Monday via LiveText. Deviations from regular schedules should be called to the supervisor’s attention. 6. Lesson Plans: The teacher candidate is expected to keep detailed lesson plans on LiveText with copies placed in a three-ring binder which will be available to the college supervisor and cooperating teacher at all times. The lesson plan will follow the format found in the student teaching packet and on LiveText. Lesson plans will be submitted to the college supervisor prior to each classroom observation via LiveText. Please see provided sample lesson plan forms for the required components. The teacher candidate will generally be expected to provide formal lesson plans at the following times: a) when a lesson is being formally observed, b) when a new class (or subject) is being taught, and c) for all lessons which are part of the Teacher Work Sample. Ordinarily, student teachers will not be preparing more than two sets of formal lesson plans at the same time. NOTE: “Abbreviated” lesson plans may be approved by the college supervisor and cooperating teacher after the teacher candidate has demonstrated satisfactory planning skills. 7. Teacher Work Sample: The main source of information for completing the TWS is the booklet entitled Teacher Work Sample Assignment, which is available from your instructor, from your college supervisor, and on line. Since all candidates have completed a TWS during Junior or

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Secondary Block, it is expected that they will be able to complete this assignment somewhat independently. In addition, the instructor for EDUC 401 and the college supervisors will be able to answer questions that might arise. While this unit is taught during student teaching, the final work sample document is assessed in the EDUC 401 course. 8. Reflective Journal: The teacher candidate is required to keep a journal for reflective self-evaluation of his or her teaching progress. Each entry should identify a problem or an issue and a thoughtful analysis of the outcome, including alternative solutions. The journal should reflect personal analysis of events including interaction with students, classroom procedures, lesson designs and presentation, and any other concerns about the experience of teaching. The purpose of the journal is to provide a venue for thoughtful evaluation and reflective analysis of professional progress. This journal should be available to the college supervisor and cooperating teacher at all times. NOTE: Journal entries, which should be written at least once a week, should be shared with the cooperating teacher for his or her comments and feedback. The teacher candidate will write the journals on LiveText and share them with his or her supervisor. Copies of journal entries should be kept in the work folio. 9. Supporting Classroom Learning: At least one of the following should be completed: a. One bulletin board, approved in advance by the cooperating teacher, and directly related to the lessons, will be designed and displayed in the classroom, when appropriate. The teacher candidate should identify the primary learning outcome to which the board pertains. The bulletin board may be interactive (containing material that will actively involve the students) or informative. b. A learning center, approved in advance by the cooperating teacher, may be planned to complement teacher work sample or other current classroom objectives. The teacher candidate should identify the primary learning outcome and instructional use. c. A website may be created to complement the teacher work sample or other current classroom objectives. The teacher candidate is to identify the primary learning outcome and instructional use. d. A website may be created to communicate with family members by sharing student work and information pertaining to the classroom activities. e. Another “Supporting Classroom Learning” activity related to current classroom objectives that have been approved by the cooperating teacher and college supervisor. 10. Videotaped Self-Assessments: The teacher candidate will videotape himself or herself teaching one lesson during the first three weeks of the student teaching semester. Optional “Videotape SelfAssessment” form and “Permission Form for Videotaping” are included in the student teaching packet or the Teacher Preparation Program Handbook for Student Teaching. For each taped lesson, the teacher candidate will submit a lesson plan and a critique of his/her performance. Analysis will identify (a) three teaching behaviors perceived to be areas of strength; (b) three teaching behaviors perceived to be areas for improvement; and (c) three recommendations for improving the behaviors identified in (b) above. The appropriate form is provided in the Handbook for Student Teaching. 11. Self Assessments: Following the formal post-observation conferences, the teacher candidate will complete a critique of his/her teaching performance at the mid-term and final week of the student teaching 12-week period. The critique will include three parts: (1) teaching strengths, (2) needed improvements, and (3) specific suggestions for improvement. Forms are available in the Handbook for Student Teaching.

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12. Student Teaching Work Folio: The teacher candidate will maintain a student teaching work folio. The folio will be available to the cooperating teacher and the college supervisor at all times. The work folio should be organized according to the following sections: a. Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning (Domain A) b. Creating an Environment for Student Learning (Domain B) c. Teaching for Student Learning (Domain C) d. Teacher Professionalism (Domain C) See the “Suggestions for Portfolio Support Materials” located in the student teaching packet for suggested artifacts to include in the portfolio. NOTE: Selected artifacts from this work folio will be included in the professional portfolio, which will represent each candidate’s proficiency in the Illinois Professional Teaching Standards. The Teacher Competence Portfolio is a part of the overall evaluation of the teacher candidate’s performance and a requirement for program completion. Entitlement for the initial teaching certificate is granted upon successful completion of this requirement. 13. Program Summary Essay/Report : Near the end of the professional semester, all candidates are required to write a reflective paper of 12-15 pages in length, in which they describe their growth as a result of having participated in the Teacher Preparation Program. While tracing the dimensions of their personal growth, candidates should also focus upon specific Standards for Illinois Teachers and the outcomes in the Department’s Conceptual Framework. Specific guidelines and the rubric for scoring these essays are included in the packet entitled Teacher Competence Portfolio Guide. This assignment should be turned in to the Director of Teacher Preparation approximately one week before the end of the professional semester. Exact due dates will be set for each semester. 14. Seminar Attendance: The teacher candidate will attend the seminars (in conjunction with the EDUC 401 course), as listed on the student teaching schedule (See the calendar for the semester). Seminar topics include “Issues in Diversity,” “Reflections on the Results of the Teacher Work Sample,” and others deemed appropriate. Attendance at the seminars is mandatory and may require the teacher candidate to leave his/her school early that day.

Course Evaluation:
Evaluation criteria will be based on the Student Teaching Rubric that is located in the student teaching packet. Lesson plans are assessed using the Lesson Plan Rubric. The cooperating teacher’s comments on the formal evaluations and the mid-term and final evaluations, the supervisor’ s observations, the student’s selfevaluations, seminar attendance and participation, and the weekly submissions of required work will all contribute to the candidate’s final grade which will be assigned by the college supervisor. This is a course for which 12 semester credits are awarded. In addition to conferences during routine visits, conferences among the teacher candidate, cooperating teacher, and college supervisor are held at midterm and at the conclusion of the student teaching experience. The college supervisor seeks input from the cooperating teacher; however, the college supervisor has responsibility for assigning the final course grade. The final assessment is based primarily on one’s improvement and performance at the end of the period, not necessarily on early performances.

Attendance Policy
Teacher candidates must be in the school each day for the hours scheduled for the cooperating teacher. Teacher candidates who arrive late, leave early, or are absent without prior notification are subject to removal from the school setting. There should be no absences during student teaching. If absences are necessary due to emergencies or illness, both the school/cooperating teacher and the college supervisor must be notified at the earliest possible time. The teacher candidate will schedule appointments or other business

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so as not to interfere with the school day. WARNING! Absences (even those meeting the above criteria) totaling three days or more require review of the teacher candidate's placement and may result in extension or cancellation of the student teaching experience. Student teachers are to adhere to the cooperating school’s regulations governing teacher behavior.

Special Needs Statement
Students requiring classroom accommodations or modification because of a documented disability should discuss this need with the instructor and his or her supervisor at the beginning of the semester.

Professional Attitude and Behavior
The teacher candidate is expected to exhibit the dispositions that are discussed in the Conceptual Framework and to adhere to the Profession’s Code of Ethics at all times. The teacher candidate should become knowledgeable of the school’s policies and procedures, and respect the boundaries of the profession when working with students, colleagues, and families. The teacher candidate is expected to adhere to the cooperating school’s regulations governing teacher attire and behavior and to the Illinois School Code.

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The Role of the Cooperating Teacher
While each teacher and each classroom are unique entities, basic ground rules for the role that the cooperating teacher assumes as “mentor” are helpful in order that the college supervisor, the cooperating teacher and the student teacher may work together with clarity and goal direction. The cooperating teacher is regarded as the daily role model for the student teacher. The cooperating teacher provides solid examples of how to do the following:
1. Organize content knowledge for student learning, including, but not limited to, the following: • Becoming familiar with relevant aspects of students’ background knowledge and experiences. • Articulating clear and appropriate learning goals for the lesson. • Demonstrating an understanding of the connections between the content that was learned previously, the current content and the content that is to be learned. • Creating or selecting appropriate teaching methods, learning activities, materials and resources. • Creating or selecting evaluation strategies which are appropriate for the students and aligned with the goals of the lesson. 2. Create and maintain a climate that promotes student learning, including, but not limited to, the following: • Creating a climate that promotes fairness. • Establishing and maintaining rapport with students. • Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student. • Establishing and maintaining consistent standards of classroom behavior. • Making the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as possible. 3. Teach for student learning, including, but not limited to the following: • Making learning goals and instructional procedures clear to students. • Making content comprehensible to students. • Encouraging students to extend their thinking. • Monitoring students’ understanding of content through a variety of means, providing feedback to students to assist learning, and adjusting learning activities accordingly. • Using instructional time effectively. 4. Exhibit professionalism, including, but not limited to, the following: • Reflecting on the extent to which learning goals were met. • Demonstrating a sense of efficacy. • Building relationships with colleagues to share insights and coordinate learning activities.

In order to impart both knowledge and experience to the student teacher, a cooperating teacher should attempt to meet the following objectives as the mentor of the student teacher. 1. Get to know the student teacher as an individual.

*Help the student teacher build on her/his assets. *Assist in overcoming any deficiencies. *Learn of his or her hobbies, special skills, previous experiences and current interests may contribute to the student teacher=s capabilities during the professional semester.
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2. Allow your student teacher to do a small amount of teaching from the first.
*Assign your student teacher some teaching duties from the first day forward to the end of the experience (i.e., working with small groups, individual help, etc.). *Student teachers need to observe only for specific behaviors; hopefully, time spent in the classroom prior to this semester will minimize the need to spend time simply observing. Reviewing records and other sources of information about the students is important and should be accomplished on a Aneed to know@ basis. 3. Schedule daily conferences with the student teacher during which you give attention to appropriate topics such as these: *Review activity plans *Analyze instructional delivery *Discuss progress *Brainstorm for new ideas and methods to utilize in working with students. *Short and long range planning *Classroom management *Working with parents *Meeting diverse student needs *Your expectations *Evaluating student learning *Building policies 4. Be aware of the work sample project on which your student teacher is working. You will be asked to sign off on the finished project. 5. Complete several formal observations of the student teacher with written evaluations using the form provided on the website (see example included in this packet) or on LiveText. Copies of this documentation should be shared with the college supervisor. 6. Communicate immediately with the college supervisor if the student teacher appears deficient in ability, responsibility, or maturity in his/her teaching performance. 7. Assuming that the candidate is growing and improving, expect the student teacher to assume a greater share of the planning and direct teaching responsibilities each week. 8. Allow the student teacher to express his/her individuality while keeping within previously established guidelines. When the student teacher tries something new, it should be evaluated carefully and sympathetically. 9. Expect the student teacher to attend professional meetings, staffings, etc.

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Summary of Pathwise Four Domains
Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning Domain A focuses on how teachers use their understanding of students and subject matter to decide on learning goals, to design or select appropriate activities and instructional materials, to sequence instruction in ways that will help students to meet short- and long-term curricular goals, and to design or select informative evaluation strategies. Knowledge of relevant information about the students themselves is an integral part of this domain. How the teacher thinks about the content to be taught is evident in how the teacher organizes instruction for the benefit of the students. The college supervisors will seek evidence for these criteria from the Class Summary Sheet, from information about the instructional profile for the class, and from the pre- observation interview. Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning Domain B relates to the social and emotional components of learning and focuses on the human interactions in the classroom. These interactions include teacher to student, and student to student. Domain B addresses issues of fairness and rapport, of helping students to believe that they can learn and can meet challenges, and of establishing and maintaining constructive standards for behavior in the classroom. It also includes the physical learning environment or setting. All behavioral standards and teacher-student interactions should be grounded in a sense of respect for students as individuals. Supervisors will obtain evidence of these criteria during classroom observations. Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning Domain C focuses on the act of teaching and its overall goal: helping students to connect with the content. Content refers to the subject matter of a discipline and may include knowledge, skills, perceptions, and values in a domain: cognitive, social, artistic, physical, etc. Teachers monitor learning, making certain that students assimilate information accurately and that they understand and can apply what they have learned. Teachers must also be sure that students understand what is expected of them procedurally during the lesson and that class time is used to good purpose. The college supervisors will obtain evidence of these criteria from classroom observations. Domain D: Teacher Professionalism Domain D focuses on the teachers evaluating their own instructional effectiveness in order to plan specific future lessons and to improve their teaching over time. They should be able to discuss the degree to which different aspects of a lesson were successful in terms of instructional approaches, student responses, and learning outcomes. Sharing appropriate information with other professionals and with families in ways that support the learning of diverse student populations is also an important criterion to this domain. The college supervisor will obtain evidence of these criteria during the post-observation interview.

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Student Teaching Guidelines
Criteria for Four Domains

Domain A – Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning (Planning)
The Competent and Caring Teacher organizes content knowledge for student learning.
A-1: BECOMES FAMILIAR WITH RELEVANT ASPECTS OF STUDENTS’ BACKGROUND KNOWLEDGE AND EXPERIENCES.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Develop a CLASS/GROUP PROFILE. Observe students and take notes on each student, considering developmental levels and unique characteristics and features. Use a special notebook reserving at least one page for each child. Develop and complete a Class Summary Sheet-- identify special students who need accommodations Talk to students, cooperating teachers, parents, specialists, and support personnel. Study cumulative files, portfolios, IEP's, student journals, report cards, etc. Conduct an INTEREST SURVEY

A-2: WRITES CLEAR LEARNING GOALS/OBJECTIVES FOR THE LESSON THAT ARE APPROPRIATE TO THE STUDENTS.
1. 2. 3. 4. Write general goals for each lesson. Formulate differentiated objectives based upon the Class Summary Sheet and other considerations. Do not confuse objectives with activities which are the tools used to attain the objectives. Align objectives with the state standards.

A-3: DEMONSTRATES AN UNDERSTANDING OF CONNECTIONS BETWEEN THE CONTENT THAT WAS LEARNED PREVIOUSLY, THE CURRENT CONTENT, AND THE CONTENT THAT REMAINS TO BE LEARNED IN THE FUTURE.
1. 2. 3. 4. State what was taught in the previous lesson(s). Indicate if it is an introductory lesson introducing a new concept/topic/unit. State what will be taught in the future lesson(s). Indicate if it is a final lesson of a concept/topic/unit. Explain how the lesson fits into larger goals of the discipline. Explain how other content areas are connected to this lesson.

A-4: CREATES/SELECTS TEACHING METHODS, LEARNING ACTIVITIES, AND INSTRUCTIONAL MATERIALS OR OTHER RESOURCES THAT ARE APPROPRIATE TO THE STUDENTS AND ALIGNED WITH THE GOALS OF THE LESSON.
1. 2. Use a variety of methods, activities, and materials appropriately taking into consideration the age, needs, interests, learning styles and exceptionalities of your students. (Multiple Intelligences/Gardner.) Consider the Constructivist approach when planning methods and activities. Respect what students know and build on it. Allow students to discover and develop the concept/skill by themselves under your skillful guidance. Use the inquiry approach in all content areas not only in science. Develop scenarios and materials that will encourage students to discover concepts/skills instead of lecturing, talking and telling. Plan a multi-sensory approach for all lessons in all content areas. (visual, auditory, kinesthetic, and tactile strategies/Dimension of Learning.) Use the cooperative learning approach for a variety of purposes, not only during practice sessions. Instead encourage your students to discover patterns and develop concepts in pairs and groups as part of the instructional input as a motivational activity. Consider the social and academic skills in planning, implementing, and evaluating this type of lesson. Differentiate assignments for students or groups by actually developing different activities rather than assigning less/more of the same. Use contracts, centers, and choice of activities, peer tutoring to individualize. Fill out section on student characteristics with care; describe the exceptionality of the students and design appropriate accommodations.

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A-5: CREATES AND SELECTS EVALUATION STRATEGIES THAT ARE APPROPRIATE FOR THE STUDENTS AND THAT ARE ALIGNED WITH THE GOALS OF THE LESSON.
1. Your evaluation strategies must tie into your specific objectives. They should be ongoing, systematic, and performance related. Look for evidence of goal mastery all along, instead of waiting for the traditional Friday quiz or end of unit test to measure instructional success. Develop charts that list students' names and specific objectives (concepts/skills) for each content area. Carry a clipboard and chart while circulating. Design simple rubrics and evaluate while you assist/check students during independent practice and group activities. This allows for immediate reteaching and remediation. Develop special evaluation criteria for cooperative group work that include additional elements such as readiness, focus on task participation, effort, etc. The students under your guidance may develop these criteria. Involve students in self- and peer- evaluations. These techniques are quite successful when evaluating products such as projects, reports, and oral presentations. Develop specific evaluation forms that must reflect the criteria of the assignment. Evaluation should consider each student's needs and abilities.

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Domain B - Creating an Environment for Student Teaching
The Competent and Caring Teacher creates an environment for student learning that serves diverse classroom communities.
B-1: CREATES A CLIMATE THAT PROMOTES FAIRNESS B-2: ESTABLISHES RAPPORT WITH STUDENTS
1. 2. Show interest and genuine concern. Talk to students and listen to them. Show respect for each student's inner dignity as a unique and worthwhile human being. Avoid speaking "down to students". Do not need to speak louder or harsher with them just because there are so many of them and or because they are children; avoid developing a loud impersonal teacher's voice. Speak with a natural, friendly, and respectful intonation. Make eye contact when speaking; smile and use a sense of humor. Respect students' differences in background and appearance. Be happy with students. Work with them and celebrate with them creating high points and occasions to look forward to. Make sure physical contact and humor are age-appropriate; avoid sarcasm on the elementary level. Don't carry grudges; "wipe the slate clean" and make a fresh start each day, no matter what happened the previous day. Share some age-appropriate, personal experiences.

3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

B-3: COMMUNICATES CHALLENGING LEARNING EXPECTATIONS TO EACH STUDENT
1. 2. 3. 4. Convey to students that school is a place to learn and that all students can learn. Communicate high expectations to each individual student; learn about each student's innate potential, in order to adjust expectations to a realistic level. Communicate confidence in each student's ability. Encourage students to verbalize and formulate their own goals and expectations. Examples: Individual goal charts in the Writing Project; journal entries which formulate goals set and met, etc.

B-4: ESTABLISHES AND MAINTAINS CONSISTENT STANDARDS OF CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR
1. Establish a basic classroom philosophy, which demonstrates to the students the essential elements of respect for all students and teachers as people in general, and the respect for the right of each student to learn in the least restrictive school environment possible. Set specific standards for acceptable classroom behavior which are grounded in this philosophy of mutual respect and of each student's right to learning. Involve students in the development of these standards and the articulation of rules, procedures, and resulting consequences.

2.

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3.

4. 5. 6. 7.

Take into account a variety of considerations when formulating the standards such as at the students' developmental levels, cultural backgrounds, lesson types, etc. For instance, interaction during inquiry group sessions may allow for different levels of noise or informality. Develop specific strategies and techniques for transitions. Systematically teach expected behavior by modeling desired behavior patterns, by discussing reasons for rules, and by reviewing rules and consequences daily. Accentuate the positive; be proactive by participating and avoiding conflict. Apply elements of various researched discipline models. Be able to identify the models that were used.

B-5: MAKES PHYSICAL ENVIRONMENT AS SAFE AND CONDUCIVE TO LEARNING AS POSSIBLE
1. Shape the physical environment of the class to reflect learning by exhibiting student work and content taught. Develop and pose teaching charts, attractive posters for rules and procedures, word walls examples of student work, and projects, etc. Involve students actively in creating bulletin boards and display. Give them an important role in planning and executing displays. Form bulletin board committees, etc. Reflect the diversity of the student population in the physical setting of the classroom. Display pictures of all ethnic groups, reading materials, centers, posters and stations that reflect minority issues such as "Women Scientists", "Famous Civil Rights Leaders", etc. Consider student safety when arranging access to tools and materials. Make sure all materials used are nontoxic. Organize the physical space of the class considering special physical needs of all students. Children with poor eye sights or hearing problems should be seared in front of the room, accommodation for wheel chairs need to be considered, etc. Set aside a discovery area/space where students are invited to interact with challenging materials of all sorts, which are rotated, and backgrounds, lesson types, etc.

2. 3.

4. 5.

6.

Domain C - Lesson Execution
The Competent and Caring Teacher recognizes diversity and teaches for Student Learning
C-1: MAKES GOALS/INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES CLEAR TO STUDENTS
1. 2. In traditional direct instruction lessons, goals/objectives are stated explicitly at the beginning of a lesson by the teacher: "Today we will…..". The constructivist approach allows students to infer the lesson objective. The teacher creates a motivational activity that allows students to eventually identify and formulate the goal and purpose of the lesson by themselves. The instructional procedures and specific expectations need to be clearly communicated to all students (STSC) by: a. Verbalizing steps/information clearly, in simple language b. Visualizing steps/information on chalkboard c. Having steps/information repeated by individual students and/or groups in unison (whispering, shouting, rapping, using movements, clapping when appropriate.) Ask a struggling student to repeat directions. Verbalized and visualized expectations need to include the following specific aspects: a. Length of assignment ("Draw at least 5 different…, write at least 10 sentences…") b. Time limit ("You have 15 minutes…, …until the big hand is on the …") c. Expected behavior and noise level d. Provisions for students who finish quickly (special folders, centers, etc.)

3.

C-2: MAKES CONTENT COMPREHENSIBLE TO STUDENTS
1. Involve students actively. a. Avoid lecturing, telling, and talking too much. Students need to be encouraged to discover, understand, and verbalized in response to your prompting, and as a direct result of interacting with materials and each other (GROUP WORK/COMPLEX INSTRUCTION/INQUIRY). b. Make sure students are active listeners. When teachers are busy at the board and their students are sitting passively, listening to individuals contribute ideas in response to teacher prompts, make sure the group is involved in a meaningful fashion. Ask them to take notes, list new facts, and

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2.

3.

4.

5.

information while watching movies or film strips, judge what they saw, hear (What I liked, what I did not like, what I found interesting, why, etc.) c. Respect the students' contributions. Write their ideas on the board/chart as often as possible. Initialing each idea as a motivating effect will result in increased productivity. Model and extend guided practice. Avoid assigning independent activities/practice before students are secure and understanding exactly what to do. Continuously check for understanding. Learn to use an overhead projector and don't forget homework also needs to be modeled and explained extensively. Use closure to have students review and judge what they learned, and predict what they might learn next. Utilize a wide variety of approaches. a. Consider individual and developmental needs - learning types and intelligences, attention spans, exceptionalities, etc. (See planning domain.) b. Apply a variety of instructional formats; change the younger students' positions frequently; avoid having children sit passively on the carpet listening for long periods of time; find out developmental attention spans; build a short movement/song/game periods; alternate between whole group activities, individual exploration, group work, working in pairs, peer instruction, projects, research, etc. c. Use manipulatives and concrete/authentic materials in all content areas. Manipultatives and materials can be commonly available items such as pasta, buttons, newspapers, menus, schedules, old telephone books, catalogues and their order forms, programs, etc. d. Encourage students to formulate questions in verbal and written form. Examples: Ask them to write their own questions after reading a story, compile these and use a comprehension follow-up for class. Students formulate questions in KWL situations, science and math journals about content they many not have understood or want to explore further. e. Always ask students to justify and explain their thinking in oral and written words. f. Use role playing/dramatization to practice and review in all subjects, in language arts, reading, mathematics, social studies, and science ("I am an insect and I have three body parts…" Explain long division to a Martian acting out a conversation, etc.) g. Created learning charts. Visualize essential concepts as they are developed. Examples: 1. For a lesson on a silent e changing short vowels to long vowels: Create a chart that includes the definition of long vowel sounds, depicts the process, rules and examples. 2. For a lesson on long division: Illustrate on a chart the exact steps using descriptive labels and different colors. These charts are excellent tools for practice and review. h. Encourage students to draw, sketch, construct three-dimensional models, compile booklets, travel brochures, recipe books, posters, bulletin boards, etc to enhance comprehension and to internalize concepts. Examples: Students illustrate examples of similes and metaphors, depict a conversation including the three different models of direct quotes in writing, form clay models of stages of metamorphosis, create a model of their own fantasy plant based on learned concepts, etc. Suggestions for mathematics a. Start week/each class with a think problem; this could be the theme of a bulletin board. b. Start week/end class by reviewing skills; students could plan and implement this session c. Create problem-solving opportunities that establish a purpose and need to use the mathematical skills and concepts to be taught. Problems need to be within the students' range of interest and be part of their everyday lives. Use order blank, newspaper articles, graphs, maps, advertisements, etc. d. Encourage students to develop and apply strategies. Illustrate steps of different strategies on a chart, so students can refer to them when necessary. e. Require students to write in math class. Let them create their own problems. Compile them and use in class. Encourage them to write definitions, justifications, questions, procedures, etc. f. Decrease excessive rote learning and practice. Place the emphasis upon thinking and reasoning. Suggestions for writing and reading a. Mini lessons are often too short to introduce an important writing or reading skill and thoroughness. To avoid superficial treatment of an important skill or concept, expand mini lessons into maxi lessons or divide the presentation into several mini lessons. b. Sharing is very important and should occur daily if at all possible. Not only finished pieces should be shared; the technique of sharing should be used in an ongoing informal fashion for the purpose of encouragement, modeling, and inspiration. Students need to be instructed in the etiquette of sharing. Children who share should be trained to expect positive comments from their peers but more importantly need to be encouraged to ask for constructive, helpful suggestions: "I am

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c.

d.

e.

stuck…I need help…" Sharing should also be viewed as an opportunity to apply and review taught mini lesson skills. "Let's listen for colorful words, details, exciting introductions, smooth transitions, etc." Introduce specific reading concepts/skills through special lessons and align activities that allow students to apply the learned concepts and skills. Examples: trace the development of characters, settings, plot, and problems/conflicts and their resolutions. Use charts (large for whole group input, individual activity sheets for each child). Ask students to sequence, summarized, predict (write down predictions and compare to actual events), to identify main ideas, messages and moral, etc. Empower students to a certain extent to determine their own vocabulary and spelling development by encouraging them to compile personal glossaries ("My Challenge Words", "Words I Stumbled Over", "Tricky Words", etc.). These lists can be compiled during reading, entered into a chart that asks for definitions and the application of the word in a sentence. Avoid the exclusive use to the traditional whole group read-aloud technique. Instead give students a purpose for reading, set goals for them, allow them to read in pairs, etc.

C-3: ENCOURAGES STUDENTS TO EXTEND THEIR THINKING
Students can be encouraged to think creatively, critically, and independently in response to open-ended questioning and prompting techniques and through the involvement in challenging tasks and activities. Structure a teaching style in a fashion that invites students to do the following: a. Analyze - categorize, compare/contrast, infer "Tell why you think….., what you learned….., what is true/real…..", etc. b. Synthesize - create something new, invent, develop, build/construct, "What else….., what would be better….., pretend what will come/happen next, think up…..", etc. c. Evaluate/judge - summarize, prove, explain, decide, rate, predict, "Tell why you agree/disagree/….., why you think it is better/worse…..", etc. Often these opportunities arise spontaneously throughout instructional situations. Nevertheless, these specific questioning techniques need to be employed and practiced deliberately, and activities need to be planned with care to ensure the inclusion of these very important instructional strategies. C-4: MONITORS STUDENTS' UNDERSTANDING OF CONTENT Teachers need to be constantly aware of their students' various responses during the learning process and need to acquire the flexibility to adjust lessons. To accomplish this, teachers must be willing to do the following: a. Listen informally to nonverbal or verbal cue such as general restlessness of class, whispered conversations, students looking at neighbors' papers, stunned silence, frustrated outbursts, and/or refusals to do assignment in extreme cases, etc. "What did she say? I didn't get it…..show me…..", etc. b. Ask questions or do informal group surveys to ensure comprehension before assignments. c. Circulate and take anecdotal notes or fill in check lists to pinpoint and document problems. d. Maintain ongoing and accurate records of student learning/progress. e. Give encouraging feedback to students who are on the right track, share their work to model for the class in ongoing, informal fashion. f. Tutor individual children or form small flexible groups for immediate reteaching. g. Stop the activity of the whole class and re-explain, using a different approach or additional visualization and student repetition.

C-5: USES INSTRUCTIONAL TIME EFFECTIVELY
To ensure time on task and to make the most of valuable instructional time, consider the following suggestions: a. All essential lesson elements need to be present and paced appropriately, considering the students' developmental and personal needs and the character of the content. Avoid introductions that are too long; make sure to allow time for thorough concept development and plan for closures. b. Learn to watch the clock, respect the schedules of others. Set a timer and/or appoint a "time watcher.”. c. Avoid spending excessive time on non-instructional processes such as disciplining individuals in front of the class and prolonged, unstructured transition periods. Accelerate the smooth, efficient running of the class by reestablishing well though out routines for all non-instructional processes. d. Identify genuinely valuable teachable moment or what simply constitutes an (often deliberately student-designed) moment of instructional irrelevance.

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e.

Develop a fast paced personal teaching style; don't allow students to get bored, "sweep them off their feet" with enthusiasm, and a high level of expectations for them, and rapid questioning/prompting style. However, allow for sufficient wait time; it’s a difficult balancing act!

Domain D - Professionalism
The Competent and Caring demonstrates reflective practice and teacher professionalism D-1: REFLECTS ON THE EXTENT TO WHICH THE LEARNING GOAL WERE MET
1. Reflections will be executed in verbal and written form. a. Discuss issues and concerns with the cooperating teacher before and after teaching a lesson and with the college supervisor during his or her visits. b. Analyze all instructional aspects of each lesson in writing utilizing the given format at the end of a lesson plan. c. Include elements of success and aspects of necessary improvement in all areas when reflecting. Student evaluation should take into consideration the needs and abilities of individual student groups. Evaluation results should be the basis for future lesson planning; they will determine the necessity for reteaching, remediation, reinforcing, and expansion.

2. 3.

D-2: DEMONSTRATES A SENSE OF EFFICACY
1. 2. 3. 4. Assume full responsibility for the development of the students in the class, always considering and respecting students' special needs and backgrounds. View difficulties as a professional challenge. Search actively for the very best solutions and techniques to assist students in developing their potential to the fullest. Avoid making excuses, scapegoating, and placing blame on other factors. This attitude will weaken teaching efforts. The students in the class are the professional responsibility of the teacher. Persevere in the search for alternatives. Be positive and optimistic! There is a way to solve each problem! Through careful observation and collaboration, creative thinking and research one can find a solution.

D-3: BUILDS PROFESSIONAL RELATIONSHIPS WITH COLLEAGUES TO SHARE TEACHING INSIGHTS AND TO COORDINATE LEARNING ACTIVITIES FOR STUDENTS
1. Collaborate by asking other teachers and professionals for help. Ask for materials and advice in all areas related to teaching, For instance, a posting a note in the teachers' lounge may help solicit materials for a new unit. Librarians and specialist teachers will be able to assist in enriching instructional programs. Art and music teachers may be able to supply materials or may even be willing to plan presentations and lessons of their own to enrich a unit. Collaborate by coordinating programs and lessons that involve other classes and different grade levels: a. Work with different grade levels and classes in peer reading, tutoring, and pen pal programs. b. Direct volunteers and paraprofessionals. c. Collaborate with other teachers in developing integrated science and social studies units d. Plan and consult with special education teachers in mainstreamed instructional settings. e. Ask specialist teachers to teach lessons to the class which are aligned with the topic of the integrated unit. f. Invite classes or special groups for guest spear presentations, plays, etc.

2.

D-4: COMMUNICATES WITH PARENTS OR GUARDIANS REGARDING STUDENT LEARNING
1. View parents/guardians as true partners in the process of their children's educational process. Communicating with parents is one of the most essential ingredients to ensure academic success in working with students and is the foundation for establishing an effective discipline program. Parents need to be informed and involved, in order to be able to function as true partners. Parents are interested in hearing about things, such as these: a. Their children's academic progress and social-emotional development b. Their children's specific curriculum and new trends in education in general c. The discipline program, its rules and consequences, established in the class and school d. Special events and happenings in their children's class

2.

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3.

4.

Their assistance needed in the daily school life that may involve them as resource persons, helpers, organizers, and tutors. Communication can assume many forms. a. Telephone calls are an important way to communicate with parents. b. Newsletters communicate newsworthy information concerning the classroom. Teachers often write newsletters, but the best results are achieved if students are involved in the process. Ask the class to prepare shapes that are to contain the newsletter, to write part of the newsletter by reporting on school events and achievements, or organize the class to manage the reporting to parents independently, with teacher guidance. c. Parent/teacher conferences, written notes, point cards, weekly progress reports, homework books and, or course report cards are some additional forms of parent communication. All forms of communication need to emphasize the underlying philosophy of partnership in education and need to be handled in a non-threatening way that reflects respect for all aspects of cultural diversity in the community.

e.

PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES - DISPOSITIONS
P1: ORGANIZATION means keeping things in good order.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Preparing materials and having them ready before students enter building Straightening up room after each lesson and at the end of the day Organizing student work (filing, labeling, folders, trays, box lids, etc.) Keeping student teaching notebook organized (most recent lesson plans on top) Using a calendar to organize workload, due dates, seminars, events, etc.

P2: INITIATIVE means doing such things as these:
1. 2. Getting involved with students immediately (interact; observe; take anecdotal notes; study students' portfolios, writing folders, files IEPs, etc.) , Volunteering, offering without being told to do these things: a. Plan and prepare materials b. Organize field trips, guest speakers for entire grade level, etc c. Assist with housekeeping duties d. Assist with extracurricular activities (Family Night, school carnival, open house, Math League, Science Olympiad, etc.) Generating, implementing and offering new ideas, such as these: a. Classroom management b. Physical environment c. Organizational structure of class d. Introduce parent communication strategies such as take-home folders, newsletter station, authors' Teas, Garden parties, Poetry Readings in the Class Coffee House, etc. e. Do research, find resources and materials to share with colleagues f. Provide unique experiences for students g. Using technology creatively in the classroom Getting involved with parents, staff and peers a. Use parent communicators b. Share with colleagues c. Share at seminars and workshops Discussing any concerns with the cooperating teacher and supervisor. Familiarizing oneself with materials, resources, and programs in a classroom and district. Exhibiting energy, excitement, and enthusiasm.

3.

4.

5. 6. 7.

P3: WRITES COHERENTLY WITH CORRECT GRAMMAR P4: ARTICULATES CLEARLY USING CORRECT GRAMMAR P5: MANAGES TIME AND WORK EFFECTIVELY
1. 2. Giving lesson plan to cooperating teacher at least two days prior to teaching Submitting weekly schedule on time

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3. 4. 5. 6.

Being punctual (arriving at least 15 minutes before teachers are expected to be in the building; arriving at seminars and ETE workshops on time; submitting assignments on time Grading, recording grades and returning student work in a timely fashion Handing in assignments on time

P6: RESPONSIBILITY (See A-1)
1. 2. 3. 4. Attending all school events and district and university meetings Attending parent/teacher conferences during the school day and in the evening Staying with cooperating teacher after school for planning and coaching/mentoring Avoiding doing personal work/assignments during the school day. Whenever the cooperating teacher is teaching, observe, take notes, collect ideas, monitor the class, etc. 5. Meeting with cooperating teacher prior to placement as requested 6. Responding to coaching/suggestions in a professional manner 7. Notifying cooperating teacher and coordinator of schedule changes (assemblies, appointments, etc.) ahead of time 8. Presenting a professional product (professional format, proofreading, and organization) 9. Listening respectfully to presentations during meetings and workshops 10. Accepting assignments and the total workload with a positive, professional mindset (no excuses or negative comments)

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Suggestions for Portfolio Support Materials for the Four Domains
While each of the three portfolios has a different focus, candidates are encouraged to keep all four standards in mind at all times and to watch for relationships among the different standards and to take advantages of opportunities to use artifacts more than once. The information below is intended to help candidates think about what kinds of materials might be used as artifacts for the four domains of criteria that are used to evaluate their student teaching. Although they are not exactly the same, the four domains do parallel the 4 Standards discussed in our Conceptual Framework. Since this is a student teaching handbook, it seems appropriate to provide the following list of support materials that candidates will create and/ or encounter during that professional semester. These materials may be used to replace artifacts that were included in portfolios one and two and, thus, perhaps strengthen the overall portfolio, or they may be used to prepare the final professional portfolio. Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning A1: Students’ background, knowledge, experience 1. 2. 3. 4. Student interest inventories Student biography projects Student journal entries Class profiles

A2: Articulation clear/appropriate learning goals for the lesson 1. Lesson plans that include student-centered activities, questioning and teaching techniques and assignments that lead to higher level thinking, and goals and objectives that are linked with state and national standards A. Student-centered activities B. Questioning and teaching techniques C. Assignments that lead to higher level thinking D. Goals and objectives that are linked with state and national standards 2. Reflective paragraph on how these plans worked and how you would increase student achievement the second time you taught this lesson A3: Connections between previous, current, future content 1. A week’s overview of goals, objectives, activities, evaluations 2. A timeline for a unit 3. Address in a paragraph, diagram, or event sequence how you identify prior knowledge and how you tap into it for your lessons 4. Include lesson extensions that move students on to the next topic of the curriculum A4: Creating/Selecting teaching methods, learning activities, instructional material etc. appropriate for students and aligned with the goals 1. Evidence demonstrating methods learned during the block experience, i.e. discovery, inquiry, collaborative learning, etc. 2. Evidence demonstrating use of multiple evaluation and assessment methods 3. Evidence that represents the variety of instructional materials that were employed during any field experience

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A5: Creating or selecting evaluation strategies appropriate for students and aligned with goals of the lesson. 1. A rubric created to assess an assignment. Include the assignment, the rubric, and any adaptations to meet needs of diverse learners 2. Evidence demonstrating use of multiple evaluation and assessment methods 3. Evidence of alternative assessments used that reflect student achievement

Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning B1: Creating a climate that promotes fairness 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Gender neutral assignments, activities, language Inclusive assignments, activities, language Evidence provided by cooperating teacher, method’s instructor, or peer A copy of how you assigned seating in the room to promote fairness Evidence of the use of multicultural aspects in your subject area Evidence of what you introduced or taught to students that promoted understanding diverse cultures

B2: Establishing and maintaining rapport with students. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Evidence of attendance at extra-curricular activities/participation in school wide activities Evidence of personal communication with students (notes, letters) A compilation of comments on student papers/projects Evidence provided by cooperating teacher, methods instructor, peer Phone log of calls mode to parents or concerned adults about students A copy of a letter sent to parents introducing candidate and what he or she intends to do Summaries of meetings with students, the purpose of the meeting and the outcome

B3: Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student 1. 2. 3. 4. Projects that include alternatives for various learning styles, intelligences, abilities Evidence provided by cooperating teacher, methods instructor, peer Copy of information sheet given to all students that lists candidate’s expectations for the class Copy of the letter to parents that identifies candidate’s classroom rules and consequences

B4: Establishing and maintaining consistent standards of classroom behavior 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. A case study involving issues of classroom behavior A candidate-created discipline plan with expectations and consequences Candidate created class rules/expectations/policies within a content area Evidence provided by cooperating teacher, methods instructor, peer Copy of candidate’s behavior log: what happened and what the consequences were

B5: Making the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as possible 1. Room plan (seating chart, teacher station, computers, etc.) for candidate’s vision of an ideal classroom 2. Reflective piece on room arrangement of field experience including diagram of room

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Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning C1: Learning goals and instructional procedures clear to students 1. 2. 3. 4. Syllabus of assignment sheet for a unit Scripting or transcription of introduction, instructions, conclusion to a lesson Capturing in writing or transcription of audio of student(s) reaction to a lesson Evidence provided by cooperating teacher, methods instructor, peer

C2: Making content comprehensible to students 1. 2. 3. 4. Evidence of use of manipulatives Evidence of use of demonstrations Evidence of use of case studies Evidence of use of groups, cooperative learning styles

C3: Encouraging students to extend their thinking 1. 2. 3. 4. Evidence of elaboration, use of extensions to lessons Evidence of using questioning to achieve higher level thinking Evidence of use of alternative assessment techniques Evidence of students being encouraged to explore a concept through a variety of learning styles

C4: Monitoring student’s understanding of content through a variety of means, providing feedback, adjusting learning activities as situation demands 1. 2. 3. 4. Evidence of feedback to students through a compilation of remarks/methods Evidence of a changed lesson plan or reteaching of a concept Copies of student work that represent student achievement Copies of candidate’s grading rubrics and how the candidate responded to student work using these rubrics 5. Copies of candidate’s records of student achievement

C5: Using instructional time effectively. 1. A timeline for a class showing planned timing & real time of teaching/learning activities. 2. Evidence of back-up activities linked to the lesson created as enrichment for use when activities are accomplished before the class has ended. 3. Copies of Ausabelian advanced organizers used in candidate’s classes.

Domain D: Teacher Professionalism D1: Reflecting on the extent to which the learning goals were met 1. 2. 3. 4. Journal entry reflecting upon student learning based upon an assessment Post-conference summary with cooperating teacher or peer on the success of a lesson Email exchange concerning issues in teaching Pre & post assessment of students on learning or on candidate’s performance in the field experience. 5. Copies of student reflections on their learning

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D2: Demonstrating a sense of efficacy 1. Evidence of adjusting lesson plans to meet special needs 2. Original and revised lesson plans showing adaptations based upon perceived and real student needs and learning 3. Capturing the process of building a case study 4. Compilation of journal entries capturing ideas to improve teaching 5. Evidence provided by cooperating teacher, methods instructor, peer 6. Evidence of the transfer of research in content or methodology that enhances student learning D3: Building professional relationships with colleagues to share teaching insights and to coordinate learning activities for students 1. Evidence of collaboration on lesson plans within content area or across the curriculum 2. Evidence of team or collaborative teaching 3. Interviews with teachers on classroom practices and philosophies with accompanying reflections by the candidate 4. Summary of a scenario with teacher, support personnel, special education colleague about a student 5. Summary of inservice that candidate attended with a signature from cooperating teacher as evidence of attendance D4: Communicating with parents or guardians about student learning 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Letter of introduction to parents Copies of notes to parents concerning student achievements/behavior Examples of a telephone log or email log with parents Classroom newsletter Summaries of meeting for Problem Solving, Parent/Teacher conferences Reflections on parent night attendance and programs

NOTE: Candidates are reminded to refer often to the rubric that is included in the Teacher Competence Portfolio. Those criteria can be helpful when candidates are selecting artifacts and writing rationales.

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INTRODUCTION TO THE SALMON-COLORED SECTION

This section contains just two documents. Both are intended to help keep the candidates focused as they observe their cooperating teachers. The first form relates directly to the criteria in Domain B, and the second relates directly to criteria in Domain C.

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DOMAIN B & C - Classroom Environment & Instruction Observation Guide
Student Teacher _______________________________________________ Observer _______________________________________ Date ________________ School ___________________________________________________ Class/Period _____________________________ Subject Area ____________________

Domain B- Classroom Environment B1: Creating a climate that promotes fairness: • Teacher demonstrates fairness in interactions with students by giving all students the opportunity to participate. • Teacher helps students feel valued through positive responses to student contributions. • Students demonstrate caring for one another as individuals and as students. • Teacher makes appropriate accommodations for specific students based on need. B2: Establishing and maintaining enthusiasm for learning/rapport with students: • Teacher attempts to positively relate to students through use of humor and friendly interventions. • Teacher shows concern for students through comments and actions. • Teacher treats students with dignity while maintaining age appropriate interactions. B3: Setting high expectations: • Teacher creates a culture which values learning and hard work. • Teacher’s learning expectations are challenging but attainable. • Teacher enables students to take intellectual risks. • Teacher conveys the message that each student is capable of achieving by expending his or her best effort. B4: Establishing and maintaining consistent standards of classroom behavior: • Behavior standards are established and applied consistently. • Teacher models respectful and appropriate behavior standards. • Behavior standards are appropriate for students’ developmental level. • Teacher responds appropriately to inappropriate and/or serious behavior problems. • Teacher encourages students to monitor their own behavior. • Behavior expectations are appropriate for the instructional model used. B5: Organizing for instruction: • There is a clear match between lesson activities and furniture or room configuration. • Space is arranged so everyone has access to learning. • Teacher uses physical resources to enhance learning. • Grouping decisions are dictated by learning requirements.

Domain C- Instruction C1: Communicating objectives and procedures clearly and accurately: • Teacher gives clear directions for instructional procedures and anticipates possible student misunderstandings. • Teacher’s spoken and written language are correct. • Teacher communicates clearly what students will learn, how they will learn it and why. C2: Making content comprehensible to students: • Teacher connects new learning to student’s knowledge and previous learning. • Teacher presents content clearly and accurately. • Lesson is designed and delivered in ways which are comprehensible and coherent. • Lesson is designed so students are actively involved with the lesson material. • Lesson is designed to challenge students to construct understanding. C3: Encouraging students to extend their thinking: • Teacher engages students in exploration of content through skilled questioning. • Teacher uses content to stimulate independent, creative and critical thinking. • Teacher leads dynamic class discussion which extends knowledge. • Teacher structures learning activities to encourage higher levels of thinking by probing for elaboration and clarification C4: Monitoring students’ understanding, providing feedback, adjusting learning activities: • Teacher monitors understanding. • Teacher equitably provides students with substantive feedback. • Teacher adjusts learning activities as needed.

C5: Using instructional time effectively: • Pacing enables students to remain on task and engaged in learning. • Established routines and procedures maximize instructional time. • Instructional time is resumed effectively if interrupted. • Students are given meaningful work for the entire period of instruction.

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Observing the Cooperating Teacher Domain B: Creating an Environment for Student Learning Student Teacher Cooperating Teacher: Date: Class:

Observe your teacher for a period of time and answer the following questions about creating an environment for student learning. 1. List examples of fairness demonstrated by the teacher.

2.

How does the teacher establish and maintain rapport with students?

3.

List ways the teacher shows by words, actions, or attitude that each student is capable of tackling challenging tasks.

4.

How does the teacher establish and maintain consistent standards of classroom behavior?

5.

How does this classroom reflect a safe environment?

6.

List ways the classroom is conducive to learning.

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Observing the Cooperating Teacher Domain C: Teaching for Student Learning

Teacher Candidate: Cooperating Teacher:

Date: ___________________________ Class: __________________________

Observe your teacher or another teacher teach a lesson. Record your answers to the following questions about the lesson you observed.

1. How does the teacher focus the learners on the topic, establish a mind set, and/or review?

2. How does the teacher make learning objectives clear to students?

3. What motivational techniques does the teacher utilize?

4. How does the teacher ensure that all students understand the procedures (academic, routine)?

5. List the ways the teacher communicates content clearly and accurately.

6. What methods does the teacher use to check for student understanding?

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7. How is the environment or process organized for lessons that are not teacher directed?

8. What techniques does the teacher use to expand independent, creative, and/or critical thinking?

9. List the ways the teacher monitors student learning?

10. How does the teacher provide feedback to students and adjust instruction, if necessary?

11. Describe closure techniques used by the teacher.

12. Describe ways the teacher uses time effectively (pacing, interruptions, providing for maximum learning time).

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INTRODUCTION TO GREEN SECTION

The green section of this handbook contains various ancillary forms which need to be completed at the beginning or end of the semester by all parties: the student teacher, the cooperating teacher, and the college supervisor. The directions on each sheet specify who should complete the form and when it should be submitted.

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Activities and Employment Form
The student teaching semester is the most important semester in the professional teacher preparation program. The student teaching semester demands and should receive full attention. Unlike the field experiences, the student teaching experience will require the student to be a teacher five days a week, eight hours a day, for the entire semester. However, it will soon be discovered that the teacher’s day does not end at 4:00 p.m. Lesson plans, preparation and grading will require continued work far beyond the eight hour day. To be successful in the student teaching semester, the student teacher should plan to sharply curtail other employment and involvement in college activities, including literary societies. It is wise to remember that the final evaluations, written by the cooperating teacher and college supervisor, are placed in the career placement file and will be reviewed by all potential employers. The Education Department requests that your time and energy be focused on this demanding, but most exciting and rewarding experience. Student teachers are required to be on duty at their assigned school for the complete school day during the entire in school days outlined in the student teacher syllabus. Complete school day is defined as the duty day for teachers in the building where the assignment is made. The professional day also includes inservice and parent conferences. Student Teacher_____________________________Semester________________Year________ School________________________________Subjects/Grade Level_______________________

During student teaching, I will be employed and/or participating in the following activities and for the number of hours listed each day. If my activities and/or employment hours are increased at any time between now and the last day of student teaching, I will notify my cooperating teacher and supervisor immediately of this change. Activities and/or employment Mon. Tues. Wed. Thurs. Fri. Sat. Sun. Total

Signatures
Student Teacher________________________________________________Date___________________ College Supervisor______________________________________________Date__________________ Cooperating Teacher ____________________________________________Date___________________

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STUDENT TEACHING SELF-REPORTING LOG
STUDENT TEACHER DATE:

College Supervisor:
Student teachers are required to complete this form and turn it in to the college supervisor at the end of the semester.
Weeks Number of Days Absent from School (Illness) 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

Days Excused from School

Days Substituting for Cooperating Teacher (under supervision) Days Solo Teaching (with or without cooperating teacher present) Field Trips Planned Number of Other School-related Events Attended Units Taught (Identify)

Participation in Parent-Teacher Conferences Participation in preparation of Report Cards or Pupil Evaluation Participation in MultiDisciplinary Committee Conferences/IEPs

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Illinois College Evaluation of the Student Teaching Experience
Name___________________________________________________ Date______________________________ Cooperating Teacher__________________________________________________________________________ Subject/Grade____________________________ School_____________________________________________ The student=s reactions to and evaluation of the student teaching experience is of considerable value to the Education Department in constantly upgrading all phases of our Teacher Preparation Program. Please give your reactions (use back of form if needed) to your student teaching experience including the following: 1. Did the College adequately orient you to the goals of the program and your role as a student teacher? A. It was informative and complete. B. It was complete. C. It was adequate. D. It was less than adequate. E. It was poor. Suggestions: ____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 2. How well did the College prepare you for your role as a cooperating teacher? A. Well prepared. B. Adequately prepared. C. Partially prepared. D. Less than adequately prepared. E. Not prepared. Suggestions: ___________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 3. How would you rate the ongoing communication between you and the college supervisor? A. Outstanding B. Complete C. Adequate D. Less than adequate. E. Poor Suggestions: _____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ 4. How would you rate the ongoing communication between you and the cooperating teacher? A. Outstanding B. Complete C. Adequate D. Less than adequate. E. Poor

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Suggestions: ____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

5.

How would you evaluate your performance as a student teacher? A. Outstanding B. Complete C. Adequate D. Less than adequate. E. Poor Suggestions: ____________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

6.

Please list what you feel are the strengths and weaknesses of our Teacher Preparation Program. ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________

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Education Department Illinois College Teacher Preparation Program

EVALUATION OF COOPERATING TEACHER

Student Name: ________________________________________________________________________ Cooperating Teacher Name: _____________________________________________________________ Semester: Year: School: _______________________________________

Grade Level(s) or Subject(s): DIRECTIONS: Please mark the scales provided by circling the appropriate number: 5 = 4 = 3 = 2 = 1 = NA = always (or whenever appropriate) usually sometimes seldom never not applicable

My cooperating teacher did the following things: 5 5 5 5 4 4 4 4 3 3 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 NA NA NA NA 1. 2. 3. 4. Discussed purposes and objectives of lessons. Required and discussed written lesson plans. Provided time for cooperative planning. Observed my teaching and provided helpful feedback on my lesson. Provided time for follow-up conferences. Helped identify problems and plan several possible alternative solutions. Helped me plan a variety of teaching techniques. Allowed me to make independent decisions in my teaching. Kept me informed of my strengths and weaknesses throughout the term.

5 5

4 4

3 3

2 2

1 1

NA NA

5. 6.

5 5

4 4

3 3

2 2

1 1

NA NA

7. 8.

5

4

3

2

1

NA

9.

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5

4

3

2

1

NA

10. Encouraged openness so that I could question procedures, which I did not understand.

5

4

3

2

1

NA

11. Made me feel comfortable in discussing any problems in connection with my student teaching. 12. Helped me locate and obtain teaching resources and materials. 13. Related my student teaching experience to conditions I would probably meet in my career. 14. Made me feel an integrated member of the school community. 15. Treated me as a colleague. 16. Acquainted me with routine teaching details (i.e., progress reports, fire drills, safety procedures, etc.) 17. Discussed the general scope and sequence of the curriculum I was to teach. 18. Allowed and encouraged me to use a variety of the curriculum I was to teach. 19. Allowed me sufficient opportunity for complete responsibility and management of the class.

5

4

3

2

1

NA

5

4

3

2

1

NA

5

4

3

2

1

NA

5 5

4 4

3 3

2 2

1 1

NA NA

5

4

3

2

1

NA

5

4

3

2

1

NA

5

4

3

2

1

NA

DIRECTIONS: Please respond to the following: My cooperating teacher was most helpful to me by...

My cooperating teacher could have been more helpful to me by...

Additional comments:

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Illinois College Cooperating Teacher’s Evaluation Of the Professional Semester Teaching Experience
Name Student School Subject/Grade Date

The Cooperating Teacher’s reactions to supervising a teacher candidate from Illinois College are considerable value to the Teacher Preparation Program. We endeavor to constantly upgrade all phases of our Teacher Preparation Program. Please give your reactions to your recent experience by checking the appropriate response and writing your comments below. 1) I would describe my orientation by Illinois College to the goals of the program and my role as a cooperating teacher as: { A. Informative and complete { B. Complete { C. Adequate { D. Less than adequate { E. Poor 2) The teacher candidate’s preparation for her/his role as a teacher was: { A. Informative and complete { B. Complete { C. Adequate { D. Less than adequate { E. Poor 3) I would rate the ongoing communication between myself and the college supervisor as: { A. Informative and complete { B. Complete { C. Adequate { D. Less than adequate { E. Poor 4.) How would you characterize your experience with the teacher candidate? { A. Beneficial to both the teacher candidate and my classroom. { B. Beneficial to my classroom only { C. Beneficial to the teacher candidate only. { D. Somewhat beneficial { E. No one benefited 5) Please list what you feel are the strengths and weaknesses of our Teacher Preparation Program: (please use back if needed.)

Please mail this form, along with the Professional Semester Evaluation, to the Education Department when completed.

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College Supervisor’s Evaluation of Cooperating Teacher
_____________(Semester), ________(Year) Cooperating Teacher: _____________ _________________School:___________________

Grade/Subject: __________________________________________________________________

Rating Scale

4 – Always 3 – Usually 2 – Seldom 1 – Never NC- No Chance to Observe

Directions: The following instrument is designed to obtain feedback about the performance and your perception of the Cooperating Teacher during student teaching. Please rate each item using the scale at the left.

During the student teaching semester, the Cooperating Teacher: ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ 1. supported the requirements of the program. 2. was willing to spend extra time with the student teacher, as needed. 3. showed genuine interest in the progress of the student teacher. 4. attempted to keep personal bias from entering into dealings with the student teacher. 5. had realistic expectations of the student teacher. 6. enjoyed supervision of the student teacher. 7. allowed the candidate sufficient teaching experiences. 8. supported candidate’s attempts to take risks (for example, try new things). 9. gave the candidate constructive suggestions. 10. pointed out strengths and things the student teacher did well. 11. outlined clear objectives for improvement of the student teacher’s teaching. 12. was fair and objective in evaluating the student teacher’s performance. 13. provided adequate documentation showing status and progress of the student teacher. 14. kept information confidential when necessary. 15. supported candidate’s attempts to provide and maintain effective classroom management.

Would you recommend this Cooperating Teacher to future student teachers? Yes ____ or No_____. Why or why not?

Additional Comments:

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INTRODUCTION TO THE PURPLE SECTION

The purple section of the handbook contains three forms which the student teacher should use as he or she prepares to teach: 1) The Class Summary Sheet which analyzes the makeup of the class, 2) The Lesson Plan Format, and 3) The Rubric for Scoring Lesson Plans that is used by the college supervisor when he or she reviews and/or evaluates lesson plans.

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Class Summary
(Adapted from Pathwise)

Student Teacher: Cooperating Teacher: Subject:

School: Grade: Date:

Please respond to all questions. Please check or print your responses in the space provided. 1. How many students will be observed? Total number Male students Female students

2. 3.

What is the students' chronological age range? ______ to ______ Approximately how many students are in each of the following language categories? English language proficient Limited English language proficient What adaptations do you plan to make for students from any of these groups?

4. Approximately how many students have the following exceptionalities? Blind or visually impaired Gifted Deaf or hearing impaired Learning disabled Developmentally disabled Physically disabled Emotionally or behaviorally disabled Other (please specify) What adaptations do you plan to make for students from any of these groups?

5. Given the following categories, how many students are in each of these categories? African American or Black, non-Hispanic Puerto Rican Asian, Asian American, or Pacific Islander Other Hispanic Mexican American or Chicano White, non-Hispanic Native American, Inuit or Aleut Other (please specify) What adaptations do you plan to make for students from any of these groups?

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6. How do you become familiar with your students' background knowledge in terms of both skills and the cultural resources they bring into the classroom?

7. Is there anything about the learning environment that you think might affect your students or the scheduled observation (e.g., this is not your own classroom; there is new display, pet, or equipment in the room; there is construction going on in the building)? If so, please note.

8. What are the most important classroom routines that will be in operation during the observed lesson (e.g. collecting papers, reviewing homework, safety precautions)?

9. In the space below, please provide a simple sketch of the instructional space for this lesson (e.g., student desks, teacher desk, student work space, playing field or laboratory).

10. Are there any special circumstances that the observer should be aware of in order to understand what will occur during the scheduled observation (e.g. school wide routines or policies, interruptions, behavior patterns of students)? If so, please explain.

11. When you need additional assistance with your teaching skills or when you have difficulties with a student, whom do you talk with (e.g. mentor teachers, other teachers, cooperating teachers, college supervisor, principal, another professors)? How do you coordinate learning activities with your cooperating teacher(s)?

12. How do you communicate with the parents or guardians of students in the class? How do you communicate and for what reasons?

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IC Lesson Plan Format: found as a template in LiveText at (www.livetext.com)
General Lesson Description
Description Use this section to list the title and topic of your lesson, the subject and/or content area of lesson, the expected time the lesson will take, and the grade level. Please also include the target date the lesson is taught (if the lesson is to be taught).

Connections
Making Connections How will you connect the content in your lesson to the subject matter in other courses? If connecting the content to other courses is not possible, how will you make the lesson more meaningful by connecting the course content to your students' lives?

Standards: Objectives

Add standards here

Listed Objectives As appropriate, indicate specifically what you want students: to know to understand be able to do (observable outcomes)

Resources
What significant resources, media, experts will be used to help develop this lesson? Use the next section of this page to insert your lesson's resources. Putting the resources in the next section allows for any that can to be listed as a direct link to the resource (as in United Streaming Video clips and web sites). Resources: additional web based resources

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Materials What materials will you need prepared and ready before you begin your lesson?

Procedure
Review and Introductory Activity How will you activate prior knowledge and/or make connections with other subjects? How will you review previous lessons to solidify prior learning? How will you establish that the students have the prior knowledge needed to understand the new lesson? How will you motivate students to attend and engage in the learning? Developmental Activities What strategies and activities are needed to fully develop the objectives? List as many as you will need. How will you tailor your lesson's activities and strategies to the diverse needs and interests of your students? (exceptionalities, special needs, differences in ethnicity, background, language, socioeconomic status, multiple intelligences, etc.) Concluding Activity How will you end your lesson, in a meaningful, summative way? Technology Usage Describe what types of electronic technology you will use for this lesson and how you will use it. What types of electronic technology, if available, would you use? If not using technology with this lesson, explain your rationale. Adaptations What adaptations will you need to make for students with IEP's or different learning needs or challenges? Assignment What follow up work will you give (if any)? What is the purpose behind the assignment?

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Assessment
What assessment(s) will be used to determine if students mastered the objective?

Reflection (to be completed after teaching the lesson)
Were the objectives accomplished? What went right? What went wrong? Were all students engaged learners? Which of the multiple intelligences (for example: spatial, logical/mathematical, linguistic, interpersonal, intrapersonal, kinesthetic, musical) did you involve? Could the lesson be improved? How? If objectives were not mastered, what follow up or remediation will you utilize?

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IC Lesson Plan Scoring Rubric
Unacceptable/Insufficient Discipline/ Title/ Topic/ Target Three or more are missing. Grade Level/ Text (if used) and Page Numbers (2%) Map related standards here Connections to other content Where connections would be effective, fails to make them. areas/life (4%) Map related standards here State Learner Goals/ Standards and Benchmarks (12%) Map related standards here Needs Meets Expectations/Basic Accomplished/Target Proficiency Improvement/Emerging (1 pt) Proficiency (2 pts) (3 pts) Two are missing. One is missing. All are identified.

Objectives (Learner Outcomes) (12%) Map related standards here

Resources and Materials (3%) Review and Introductory Activities (10%)

Developmental Activities (12%)

Where connections have been Where connections have made to other content areas, the been made to other content links are vague or missing. areas, the links are described in broad, general terms. Missing or inappropriate. Not Vaguely related to the Most are directly related to addressed in the objectives. Alluded to in the the objectives. Adequately procedure/development and procedure/development and addressed in the assessment. assessment. procedure/development and assessment. Are missing or vague. Listed but do not provide a Provide a sense of what clear sense of what students students will know and be will know and be able to do as a able to do as a result of the result of the lesson. Some are lesson. Most are appropriate appropriate for the target grade for the content and the target level. grade level. More than three resources or Two or three resources missing. One resource or material materials missing. missing. Does not provide for review of Review of previous lesson/s is Review of previous lesson/s previous lesson/s. Activation of incomplete an does not provide gives students opportunity to prior knowledge is missing. for check on student's mastery. clarify misunderstandings Does not make focus of lessons Misses some important prior and solidify learning of most clear. knowledge needed to the requisite concepts and/or understand the new learning. skills. Activation of prior Focus of the lesson is vague knowledge addresses the and explanation of the requisite points, but not relevance is vague or missing. thoroughly. Focus and relevance of the lesson are adequately explained. Learning activities do not Learning activities do not Learning activities related to develop the objectives. Sequence provide for development of all all but do not develop all of activities is illogical and of the objectives and some do objectives thoroughly. Most inaccurate. No checks for not relate to the objectives. learning activities are wellunderstanding of skill or Some learning activities are not explained and logically

Where connections have been made to other content areas, the links are well articulated and detailed. All are directly related to the objectives. Thoroughly addressed in the procedure/development and assessment. Provide a clear sense of what students will know and be able to do as a result of the lesson. All are appropriate for the content and the target grade level. All resources and materials listed. Review of and check on students' mastery of previous lesson/s gives students opportunity to clarify misunderstandings and solidify learning. Activation of prior knowledge is complete and thorough. Focus and relevance of the lesson are well-explained and very clear.

Learning activities directly relate to and develop the learning objectives thoroughly. Learning activities well-explained and logically sequenced. Provides checks for

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concept.

Concluding Activity (10%)

No attempt at closure.

well-explained and the sequence is somewhat confusing. Checks for understanding of skill or concept are present but not effective. Closure is attempted.

sequenced. Provides checks understanding of skill or concept. for understanding of skill or concept; some are incomplete or inadequate.

Technology (10%)

Fails to incorporate technology when appropriate for the content. Does not attempt to use strategies to provide for various learning styles/needs. Does not attempt to use strategies to provide support for diverse learners.

Adaptations (12%)

Assessment (12%)

Assessment tools/student products are not identified. No provisions for assessment of student mastery of the objectives. Absence of assessment provides nothing on which to base subsequent instruction. No provisions for assessment of student mastery of the objectives. Absence of assessment provides nothing on which to base subsequent instruction. There would be no point in another teacher using this plan.

Overall Impression (1%)

Closure revisits most of the important points, gives students the opportunity to get some clarification, and solidification of learning. Provides for the incorporation Provides for incorporation of of technology when appropriate technology when but provides no development of appropriate; more its use. development is needed. Attempts to use strategies that Strategies used provide some support different learning support for different learning styles/needs, but does not styles/needs. Uses strategies provide for effective to differentiate instruction implementation. Attempts to and provide support for some use strategies to differentiate of the diverse learners. instruction and provide support for diverse learners; strategies employed are inappropriate or not effectively implemented. Assessment tools/student Assessment tools/student products have been identified products identified and input but students have been provided needed to enable students to only meager input in the produce them is attempted in procedure/development to the procedure/development. enable them to produce the Assessment tools/student products. Assessment products measure student tools/student products do not mastery of most of the measure adequately student objectives. Evidence of mastery of all of the objectives. learning gathered will Evidence of learning gathered provide some information on will provide little information which to base subsequent on which to base subsequent instruction. instruction. Another teacher would have Most of the plan could be some difficulty following this easily followed by another plan. teacher.

Closure revisits the important points, gives students the opportunity to get clarification, and solidify learning. Effective incorporation of technology when appropriate for the content. Uses strategies effectively to provide support for different learning styles/needs. Uses strategies to effectively differentiate instruction and provide support for diverse learners.

Assessment tools/student products identified and input needed to enable students to produce them is provided in the procedure/development. Assessment tools/student products measure student mastery of the objectives. Evidence of learning gathered will inform instruction on an ongoing basis.

Plan could be easily followed by another teacher.

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INTRODUCTION TO THE WHITE SECTION

The white section of this handbook contains three kinds of documents: The Student Teaching Scoring Rubric: This document divides the criteria that are used by college supervisors and cooperating teachers to evaluate teaching performance into the 4 domains that are discussed earlier in this handbook. The Video Taped Lesson Self-Evaluation: This document should be used by the student teacher to evaluate a lesson that he or she teaches during the first week of student teaching. The tape and this form should be shared with the college supervisor. The Pre-Observation Conference Summary*, The Post Observation Reflection/Lesson Assessment Scoring Form, The Formal Observation Feedback Form, The Three-Way Conference Form and The Three-Way Conference Discussion Note Form are all used as part of the formal observation process. *The Pre-Observation form should be completed by the student teacher before the conference with his or her college supervisor. The other forms are to be completed by the college supervisor or by the candidate and the supervisor (together) at the end of a formal conference.

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Student Teaching Scoring Rubric
Criteria DOMAIN A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning
A1: Becoming familiar with relevant aspects of students’ background knowledge and experiences • How is this information obtained? • How does the student teacher explain the importance of this information? • How does the student teacher become aware of each student’s background? A2: Articulating clear learning goals for the lesson that are appropriate to the students • How does the student teacher state the goals? • How does the student teacher provide a rationale for the goals? • How does the student teacher differentiate goals? A3: Demonstrating an understanding of the connections between the content that was learned previously, the current content, and the content that remains to be learned in the future • How does this lesson connect to past experiences? • How does the student teacher explain these connections? The student teacher demonstrates a lack of understanding of why it is important to become familiar with students’ background experiences, does not know how to find this information and lacks familiarity with students’ background experiences. The student teacher demonstrates some understanding of why it is important to become familiar with students’ background experiences, describes one procedure used to obtain this information, and has limited familiarity with the background knowledge and experiences of students in the class.

(Revised 6/05) 3 Proficient 4 Distinguished

1 Unsatisfactory

2 Basic

The student teacher demonstrates general understanding of why it is important to become familiar with students’ background experiences, describes one or more procedures used to obtain this information, and has some familiarity with the background knowledge and experiences of students and uses it to help plan instruction.

The student teacher demonstrates a comprehensive understanding of why it is important to become familiar with students’ background experiences, describes several procedures used to obtain this information, and demonstrates a clear understanding of students’ background knowledge and experiences and uses it to plan effective instruction. The student teacher articulates clear learning goals and provides a well-thought-out explanation of why they are appropriate for the students OR the student teacher articulates clear learning goals that are appropriate to the students and are differentiated for groups or individual students in the class. In addition to the requirements for proficient, the student teacher accurately explains how the content of this lesson fits within the structure of the discipline.

The student teacher does not articulate clear learning goals OR the student teacher has chosen goals that are inappropriate for the students.

The student teacher articulates one learning goal that is clear and/or appropriate for the students. He or she provides limited or no rationale for the goal.

The student teacher articulates two or more learning goals that are generally clear and/or appropriate for the students. He or she can generally provide rationale for each goal.

The student teacher does not explain how the content of this lesson relates to the content of previous or future lessons OR the explanation given is illogical or inaccurate.

The student teacher accurately explains how the content of this lesson relates to the content of previous or future lessons.

The student teacher can explain with some clarity how the content of this lesson relates to prior knowledge, future lessons, and students’ lives.

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A4: Creating or selecting teaching methods, learning activities, and instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate to the students and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson • How are the methods, activities, and materials aligned with the goals? • How are they appropriate for the students’ developmental levels? • What types of materials and methods did the student teacher consider when planning A5: Creating or selecting evaluation strategies that are appropriate for the students and that are aligned with the goals of the lesson • How is the evaluation plan aligned with the goals? • How is the evaluation appropriate to the students? • How does the student teacher describe how he will use the results?

Methods, activities, or materials* that are generally unrelated to the goals of the lesson OR the methods, activities, or materials* are clearly not appropriate to the students. *“Materials” includes all resources that the student teacher might use. If the lesson requires no materials, there is no penalty to the student teacher for not using them.

Some methods, activities, or materials* are aligned with the goals of the lesson and are appropriate to the students in general.

Most methods, activities or materials are clearly aligned with the goals of the lesson and are appropriate for the whole class, as well as for some of the subgroups and/or individuals in the class.

In addition to the requirements for proficient, the student teacher chooses methods, activities, or materials* that allow a differentiated learning experience for all individuals or groups that need adaptations, OR the student teacher provides a sound explanation of why the single teaching method or learning activity in the lesson was appropriate for all students.

The student teacher has not provided for systematically evaluating student learning OR the evaluation planned is clearly inappropriate either to the goals of the lesson or to the students.

The student teacher has a plan that somewhat systematically evaluates student learning, is aligned with some of the goals of the lesson, and is appropriate for the students.

The student teacher has a plan for systematically evaluating student learning, that is clearly aligned with the goals of the lesson, and is appropriate for the students.

In addition to the requirements for proficient, the student teacher has, as appropriate, made adaptations in assessment for subgroups and/or individuals and can describe how he or she will use the results of the evaluation in planning future instruction.

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DOMAIN B: Creating an environment for student learning
B1: Creating a climate that promotes fairness • How does the student teacher demonstrate fairness? • How does the student teacher provide learning opportunities for all students? • What, if any, evidence is there of stereotypes or bias? • How do students demonstrate fairness toward each other? B2: Establishing and maintaining rapport with students • How does the student teacher relate with students? • How is the student teacher’s rapport with students appropriate to their developmental levels? B3: Communicating challenging learning expectations to each student • How does the student teacher show that each student is capable of achieving? • How do the students demonstrate an understanding of the student teacher’s expectations? • Are the expectations challenging, yet reasonable? B4: Establishing and maintaining consistent standards of classroom behavior • How is the student teacher

1 Unsatisfactory
The student teacher is unfair in treatment of students and/or tolerates obviously unfair behavior among students.

2 Basic
The student teacher is occasionally fair in the treatment of students and sometimes does not accept obviously unfair behavior among students.

3 Proficient
The student teacher is generally fair in the treatment of students and generally does not accept obviously unfair behavior among students.

4 Distinguished
The student teacher is consistently fair in the treatment of students and actively encourages fairness among students.

The student teacher is unable to or does not attempt to establish rapport with students, or the attempts are inappropriate based upon students’ developmental needs or diverse backgrounds.

The student teacher establishes a basic level of rapport with the students in ways that are appropriate to the students’ developmental needs and/ or diverse backgrounds.

The student teacher establishes and maintains a comfortable level of rapport with the students in ways that are appropriate to the developmental needs and/or diverse backgrounds.

The student teacher establishes and maintains a very effective rapport in ways that are appropriate to students’ developmental needs, diverse backgrounds and, as appropriate, to any individual needs.

The student teacher communicates low expectations for students or indicates in some way that they are incapable of learning the material.

The student teacher makes students feel that they can meet at least some of the learning expectations and that they are generally capable of learning the material.

The student teacher has set reasonably challenging learning goals and generally communicates high expectations for the attainment of those goals.

The student teacher has set reasonably challenging learning goals, can articulate indicators of when those goals have been reached,, and actively encourages all students to meet those learning expectations.

The student teacher makes no attempt to respond to disruptive behavior and/or responds to it in a way that shows disrespect for students.

The student teacher appropriately attempts to respond to disruptive behavior, demonstrating respect for students.

The student teacher generally uses interventions effectively to minimize negative effects of inappropriate or disruptive behavior and/or student behavior

In addition to the requirements for proficient, the student teacher responds to minor behavior with consistent effectiveness and in ways that demonstrate respect for

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consistent with students? How does the student teacher demonstrate respect for students? How do the students demonstrate respect for the student teacher? How does the student teacher respond to behavior problems? The student teacher overlooks student’s needs relative to the physical environment and/or allows it to interfere with learning. The student teacher creates a physical environment that does not interfere with learning.

is generally appropriate during the lesson.

student OR student the behavior during the lesson is consistently appropriate.

B5: Making the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as possible • How does the student teacher ensure the safety of the physical environment? • How is the allocated space used for this lesson? • How does the physical environment support learning?

The student teacher generally makes the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as possible.

In addition to meeting criteria in “proficient,” the student teacher uses the physical environment as a resource to facilitate learning. Provisions are made to accommodate all student, including those with special needs. If the student teacher does not control the physical environment; he or she effectively adjusts the activities to the physical environment.

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DOMAIN C: Teaching for student learning
C1: Making learning goals and instructional procedures clear to students • How are the learning goals communicated to students? • How does the student teacher make the directions clear? • Are the students able to carry out the procedures?

1 Unsatisfactory
Information provided by the teacher before and/or during the lesson regarding objectives and/or procedures is either absent, confusing or inaccurate.

2 Basic
Some information provided by the student teacher regarding objectives and/or procedures is accurate and complete. Some students appear to understand and are able to carry out procedures.

3 Proficient
Most information provided by the student teacher regarding objectives and/or procedures is accurate and complete. Most students appear to understand and are able to carry out procedures.

4 Distinguished
In addition to the requirements for proficient, all students seem to understand the learning goals fully. The student teacher ensures that all students, including those who may initially have trouble, understand and can carry out the instructional procedures for the lesson. In addition to the requirements for “proficient,” the lesson as a whole has a logical and coherent structure that augments consistent student engagement.

C2: Making content comprehensible to students • How is the content communicated clearly to all students? • To what extent are students engaged with the content? • Describe the structure of the lesson.

Lesson content appears incomprehensible and/or lesson material is inaccurate.

Lesson content is generally accurate and comprehensible, but delivered with some lack of coherence or a few parts of the lesson are inaccurate and/or incomprehensible.

All content is accurate, effectively presented and comprehensible to students. Student teacher can discuss rationale for lesson structure.

C3: Encouraging students to extend their thinking • How does the student teacher help students extend their thinking? • How does the student teacher encourage critical thinking? • How is the lesson structured to help students extend their thinking? C4: Monitoring students’ understanding of content through a variety of means, providing feedback to students to assist learning, and adjusting learning activities as the situation demands • How does the student teacher

The student teacher does not structure lessons to help students think independently creatively, or critically.

The student teacher offers some encouragement for thinking independently, creatively or critically relative to lesson content but does not plan for its occurrence.

The student teacher generally causes students to think independently, creatively and critically throughout the lesson. Preparations for extended thinking are apparent.

The student teacher uses activities or strategies that are specifically designed to actively encourage student to think independently, creatively, or critically about the content being taught. Student teacher can discuss rationale for various levels of thinking employed by students.

The student teacher makes no attempt to determine whether students understand and gives no feedback.

The student teacher occasionally monitors student understanding and gives feedback and assistance.

The student teacher generally monitors student understanding, provides appropriate feedback to assist students’ learning, and adjusts activities as the situation demands.

The student teacher consistently monitors individual students’ or groups of students’ understanding of the content and makes appropriate instructional adjustments if necessary. All students receive substantive and

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• •

monitor understanding throughout the lesson? What types of feedback does the student teacher provide? Does the student teacher adjust the lesson as needed? Substantial amounts of time are spent on meaningless or noninstructional procedural activities and/or pacing is inappropriate so that students are off task most of the time. Some of the lesson time is spent on meaningful content. Part of the lesson is appropriately paced so students remain on task part of the time. Few transitions are handled efficiently. Most of the lesson time is spent on meaningful content and is appropriately paced so students remain on task the majority of time. Most transitions are handled efficiently.

specific feedback according to their or their subgroup’s needs.

C5: Using instructional time effectively • How is the lesson paced? • How well do students understand the routine? • Are students engaged during the entire time allocated for this lesson?

The student teacher keeps students consistently engaged by providing activities of instructional value for the entire instructional time, and paces them appropriately. Any necessary noninstructional procedures and transitions are performed efficiently.

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DOMAIN D: Student teacher Professionalism
D1: Reflecting on the extent to which the learning goals were met • How does the student teacher accurately judge if the learning goals were met or not? • How does the student teacher support this judgment? • How does the student teacher explain any deviations from the original plan? • How does the student teacher articulate how this lesson might be changed in the future?

1 Unsatisfactory
The student teacher cannot accurately identify strengths and weaknesses of the lesson in relation to the learning goals.

2 Basic
The student teacher describes a few strengths and weaknesses of the lesson in relation to the learning goals and describes to a limited extent how he or she could use the experience from this lesson in future instruction.

3 Proficient
The student teacher describes most strengths and weaknesses of the lesson in relation to the learning goals and can specify how he or she could use the experience from this lesson in future instruction.

4 Distinguished
In addition to the requirements for proficient, the student teacher supports his or her judgments with specific evidence from the observed lesson.

D2: Demonstrating a sense of efficacy • What actions does the student teacher suggest for working with struggling students? • How does the student teacher take responsibility for his effective and ineffective actions?

The student teacher makes no attempt to find ways to help students who are not meeting the learning goals.

The student teacher attempts to find ways to help specific students who are not meeting the learning goals, but cannot suggest any specific practical actions that he or she has not already tried.

The student teacher suggests specific, practical actions that he or she intends to take to help most students who are not meeting the learning goals.

The student teacher suggests specific, practical actions that he or she intends to take to help all (specific) students who are not meeting the learning goals. He or she can provide rationale based on best practices and/or research.

D3: Building professional relationships with colleagues to share teaching insights and to coordinate learning activities for students • How does the student teacher use colleagues in the building for instructional advice?

The student teacher demonstrates no knowledge of resources available through colleagues in the school district, OR the student teacher is aware of such resources, but does not attempt to use them, despite an obvious need.

The student teacher demonstrates knowledge of resources but makes limited attempts to consult with colleagues when necessary on matters related to learning and instruction, or does not use advise after acquiring it.

The student teacher generally demonstrates knowledge of resources available to him or her, is effective in consulting with colleagues and effectively applies what has been learned through collaboration.

In addition to the requirements for “proficient, “ the student teacher collaborates with colleagues outside of his or her own classroom to coordinate learning activities or to address other concerns related to teaching. He or she can discuss rationale for

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What types of relationships does the student teacher have with colleagues? What types of collaboration does the student teacher engage in outside of the school?

success or failure of insights gained through collaboration and tried in the lesson.

D4: Communicating with parents or guardians about student learning • What strategies does the student teacher have for working with families? • How does the student teacher appropriately communicate with families when necessary?

The student teacher demonstrates no knowledge of forms of communication that she or he can use to communicate with parents or guardians, OR the student teacher makes no attempt to communicate with parents or guardians, even when it is clearly necessary to do so.

The student teacher demonstrates knowledge of forms of communication that she or he can use to communicate with parents or guardians of students for various purposes. Communications have been neglected and/or limited in their effectiveness.

The student teacher generally demonstrates knowledge of forms of communication that she or he can use to communicate with parents or guardians and has usually been effective in carrying out one or more of these forms of communication.

In addition to the requirements for “proficient, “the student teacher describes multiple situations in which she or he has communicated or would communicate with parents or guardians regarding specific students, indicates the forms of communication she or he has used or would use, and the rationale for selecting that form. When completed, communications have been effective.

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VIDEO-TAPED LESSON SELF-EVALUATION FORM

Name: Grade Level: Subject Area:

Date Lesson Was Taped: Lesson Topic:

1. List the ILS and your objectives/learner outcome(s) for the lesson.

2. Were the learner outcomes met? How do you know?

3. What were the positive elements of the lesson’s design and delivery?

4. How do you think you could have improved the lesson?

5. Did you incur any management problems? If so what were they and how did you plan for them?

6. Did you incur any discipline problems? If so, what interventions did you use? How successful were they?

7. What areas do you feel you need to concentrate on?

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Student Teaching Pre-Observation Conference Summary
Observer (Check one of the following) ____ Cooperating Teacher ____ College Supervisor Student Teacher: School: College Supervisor: Cooperating Teacher: Grade Level Date of Observation: Subject:

What, if any, changes have occurred in your lesson plan or in the information on your Class Summary Profile since you filled out those forms? NOTE: These questions are designed to promote additional discussion about your lesson plans and your teaching. When discussing the points under Domain A, participants should concomitantly review

the lesson plan itself. Then refer to these questions as they pertain to different parts of the lesson plan. DOMAIN A: Planning and Preparation
DIRECTIONS: These questions are to be completed by the student teacher prior to the preobservation conference and submitted to the college supervisor at the time of the conference or to the cooperating teacher if he or she is doing the observing. LESSON PLAN: Description - Review - Introduction Why are you teaching this lesson? How does it fit into the body of work being studied? Describe the learning which might come before this lesson and the learning which might come after the lesson.

What background knowledge or experiences do students have in regard to the key concepts or issues? Which of the multiple intelligences (logical, spatial, musical, linguistic, kinesthetic, inter or intrapersonal) might be involved?

LESSON PLAN: Resources: What content knowledge do you possess in this area?

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STANDARDS/ GOALS/OBJECTIVES Are there any special circumstances that the observer needs to be aware of that might have influenced your choice of standards/goals/objectives?

On what specific area(s) would you like the observer to focus during the observation? (e.g., sequencing of activities, on/off task, gender equity, questioning)

STUDENT GROUPING (LESSON PLAN: Developmental Activities)
How will you group students for instruction? Why have you chosen this grouping?

Do you anticipate any management problems? How do you plan to address them?

METHODS (LESSON PLAN: Developmental Activities)
Why have you chosen this method or these methods for teaching this lesson?

ACTIVITIES AND PROCEDURES (LESSON PLAN: Developmental Activities) In the space below estimate the time allocation for each activity you have planned. Activity

Time Allocated

What are the important ideas you will be addressing with your questioning? What are some of the questions that will help you? Which questions will require higher levels of thinking? (Bloom’s Taxonomy)

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How will you monitor learning during lesson implementation?

Do you anticipate any student misconceptions? What adaptations will you need to make?

LESSON PLAN: Concluding Activity/Assignment

How will you check for understanding at the close of the lesson? How will you involve all students?

Why have you chosen the assignment you have in your lesson plan? Will it be adapted for any learners?

MATERIALS and RESOURCES
List the materials and resources that will be needed for this lesson. Which required special effort to prepare or to have on hand?

ADAPTATIONS What accommodations will be made for children with special needs (i.e. teaching, evaluation, etc.?) Consider others in addition to “allow more time.” Have you checked IEPs?

EVALUATION (LESSON PLAN: Assessment) (See lesson plan for discussion of assessments.) Are all of your objectives or outcomes aligned with some part of your assessment? (Have you assessed everything that you said you wanted students to know, understand, and/or do?) Do you consider assessments to be formative or summative?

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GENERAL REFLECTION AFTER THE OBSERVATION
1. If you were going to teach this class again to the same students, what would you do differently? What would you do the same? Why?

2. Based on what happened today, what do you plan to teach next to this class?

3. Please add any other comments, reactions, or questions about the lesson. For example, is there anything that you felt particularly good, frustrated or confused about?

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Post-Observation Reflection and Formal Lesson Assessment Scoring Criteria
Student Teacher: School: Observer: Class/Period: Subject: Date:

SCORING SCALE
1. 2. 3. 4. Does NOT understand/demonstrate the basic requirements of this criterion. Understands/demonstrates some of the skills. Understands/demonstrates many of the skills of this criterion but not at a high level of effectiveness. Understands/demonstrates the skills of this criterion and has become highly effective.

Domain A: Organizing Content Knowledge for Student Learning ________________
____A1: How familiar was candidate with relevant aspects of students’ background knowledge and experiences? • Knows how to obtain this information. • Explains the importance of this information. • Understands how students in classroom develop and grow. • Applies knowledge of multiple intelligences and learning styles appropriately. Classroom Observation Notes: Post-Observation Conference Notes

____A2: How clear and appropriate were the learning objectives? • Selects appropriate State Learning Standards. • Accommodates individual differences and special circumstances. • Provides evidence of extent to which objectives were accomplished. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____A3: Does candidate demonstrate an understanding of the connection between the content that was learned previously, the current content, and the content that remains to be learned? • Demonstrates appropriate level of knowledge of the lesson’s subject matter and current research. • Explains how the content of this lesson fits within the structure of the discipline and the body of work being studied. • Demonstrates the ability to integrate content across the curriculum. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

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____A4: Does candidate create or select effective teaching methods, learning activities and instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the students and that are aligned with the objectives? • Can discuss level of effectiveness of lesson(s). • Chooses methods that are aligned with the goals of the lesson. • Chooses groupings that are appropriate for the needs of the students. • Chooses methods that allow a differentiated learning experience for individuals or groups of students OR can explain why the method used was appropriate for all students. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____A5: Can candidate create or select evaluation strategies that are appropriate for the students and that are aligned with the objectives? • Evaluates student learning systematically using specific criteria. • Can explain how results will be used to plan future instruction. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

Domain B- Classroom Environment ______________
____B1: Can candidate create a climate that promotes fairness? • Demonstrates fairness in interactions with students by giving all students the opportunity to participate. • Helps students feel valued through positive responses to student contributions. • Demonstrates caring for one another as individuals and as students. • Makes appropriate accommodations for specific students based on need. Classroom Observation Notes: Post-Observation Conference Notes

____B2: Can candidate establish and maintain enthusiasm for learning/rapport with students? • Attempts to positively relate to students through use of humor and friendly interventions. • Shows concern for students through comments and actions. • Treats students with dignity while maintaining age appropriate interactions. • Helps motivate students with own enthusiasm. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

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____B3: Can candidate set and maintain high expectations for learning and behaviors? • Creates a culture that values learning and hard work. • Has learning expectations that are challenging but attainable. • Enables students to take intellectual risks. • Conveys the message that each student is capable of achieving by expending his or her best effort. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____B4: Can candidate establish and maintain consistent standards of classroom behavior? • Establishes and applies behavior standards consistently. • Models respectful and appropriate behavior standards. • Has behavior standards that are appropriate for student and instructional model. • Responds appropriately to all behavior problems. • Encourages students to monitor their own behavior. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____B5: Can candidate effectively organize physical aspects of the classroom? • Aligns lesson activities with furniture or room configuration. • Arranges space so everyone has access to learning. • Uses physical resources to enhance learning as appropriate. • Decides groupings according to learning requirements. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

Domain C- Instruction ________________
____C1: Can candidate communicate objectives and procedures clearly and accurately so as to establish a mind set for the lesson? • Gives clear directions for instructional procedures and anticipates possible student misunderstandings. • Uses spoken and written language correctly. • Communicates clearly what students will learn, how they will learn it and why. Classroom Observation Notes: Post-Observation Conference Notes

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____C2: Can candidate make content comprehensible to students? • Connects new learning to student’s knowledge and previous learning. • Presents content clearly and accurately. • Designs and delivers lesson in ways which are comprehensible and coherent. • Can evaluate effectiveness of materials and resources. • Designs lesson to challenge students to construct understanding. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____C3: Can candidate encourage students to extend their thinking? • Engages students in exploration of content through skilled questioning. • Uses content to stimulate independent, creative and critical thinking. • Leads dynamic class discussion that extends knowledge. • Structures learning activities to encourage higher levels of thinking by probing for elaboration and clarification. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____C4: Can candidate monitor students’ understanding, provide feedback, adjust learning activities? • Monitors understanding and effectiveness of lesson. • Provides students with substantive feedback. • Adjusts learning activities as needed based upon feedback/monitoring. • Uses effective closure that summarizes/checks for understanding. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____C5: Can candidate use instructional time effectively? • Enables students to remain on task/engaged in learning through effective pacing. • Maximizes instructional time through established routines and procedures. • Uses transitions effectively. • Gives students meaningful work for the entire period of instruction. • Assigns and explains appropriate follow-up activities (homework). Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

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Domain D – Student Teacher Professionalism ______________
____D1: Can candidate reflect upon lesson’s effectiveness? • Identifies and provides supporting evidence of students meeting learning goals. • Identifies and provides supporting evidence of students NOT meeting learning goals. • Identifies strengths and weaknesses of the lesson in relation to the learning goals. • Can describe how he or she could use the experience from this lesson to improve future instruction and/or assessment strategies. Classroom Observation Notes: Post-Observation Conference Notes

____D2: Does candidate demonstrate a sense of efficacy, purpose and responsibility? • Accepts full responsibility for the learning of all students. • Identifies specific, practical actions that he or she intends to take to help specific students who are not meeting the lesson objectives. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____D3: Is candidate able to build professional relationships? • Uses the cooperating teacher for instructional advice. • Demonstrates knowledge of various resources (including use of volunteers and paraprofessionals when available). • Collaborates with colleagues outside his or her own classroom to coordinate learning activities or to address concerns related to teaching. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

____D4: Does candidate communicate with parents/guardians regarding student learning? • Demonstrates knowledge of forms of communication that he or she can use to communicate with parents or guardians. • Describes situations in which he or she has communicated or would communicate with parents or guardians regarding specific students. • Can describe the forms of communication he or she has used. Classroom Observation Notes:

Post-Observation Conference Notes

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Formal Observation Feedback Reflection
This form is to be completed by the student teacher at the end of the post-observation conference. Student Teacher: Lesson Focus Observer: Title: Subject Grade Date of Lesson Date of Conference

Supportive Feedback (strengths of the lesson)

Corrective Feedback (areas that could be improved)

Goal(s) Set (things to work on)

__________Cooperating teacher __________ College supervisor
This form is to be completed within 24 hours and attached to the observation form every time a formal conference occurs. (Supervisors use this information to rate Domains D.)

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3-Way Conference
____ Mid-Term Evaluation ____ Final Evaluation Conference

Student Teacher: Cooperating Teacher:

Grade Level Supervisor:

School: Date:

SCORING SCALE
1.
2. 3.

Does NOT understand/demonstrate the basic requirements of this criterion.
Understands/demonstrates some of the skills. Understands/demonstrates many of the skills of this criterion but not at a high level of effectiveness.

4.

Understands/demonstrates the skills of this criterion and has become highly effective.
1 2 3 4

Domain A – The Competent Teacher, Organizes Content Knowledge for Student Learning Based on State Standards
A1: Becomes familiar with relevant aspects of students’ background knowledge and experiences. A2: Writes clear learning objectives that are appropriate for the students. A3: Demonstrates an understanding of the connections between the content that was learned previously, the current content, and the content that remains to be learned in the future. A4: Creates or selects appropriate teaching methods, learning activities and instructional materials or other resources that are appropriate for the students and that are aligned with the objectives. A5: Creates or selects evaluation strategies that are appropriate for the students and that are aligned with the objectives. COMMENTS:

Domain B – The Caring Teacher Creates an Environment for Student Learning That Serves Diverse Classroom Communities
B1: Creates a climate that promotes fairness (e.g., conveys attitude that all students are of equal importance). B2: Establishes and maintains enthusiasm for learning/rapport with students in ways that are appropriate to the students' developmental needs. B3: Communicates challenging learning expectations to each student. B4: Establishes and maintains consistent standards of mutually respectful classroom interaction and behavior. B5: Makes the physical environment as safe and conducive to learning as possible. COMMENTS:

1

2

3

4

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DOMAIN C – The Competent and Caring Teacher Teaches to Accommodate Diverse Student Learning
C1: Makes learning objectives and instructional procedures clear to students. C2: Makes content comprehensible to students. C3: Encourages students to extend their thinking. C4: Monitors students' understanding of content through a variety of means, provides feedback to students to assist learning, and adjusts instruction as the situation demands. C5: Uses instructional time effectively. COMMENTS:

1

2

3

4

DOMAIN D – The Competent and Caring Teacher Demonstrates Reflective Practice and Teacher Professionalism
D1: Reflects upon lesson effectiveness. D2: Demonstrates a sense of efficacy. D3: As appropriate, builds professional relationships with colleagues to share teaching insights and to coordinate learning activities for students. D4: Communicates with parents/guardians regarding student learning. COMMENTS:

1

2

3

4

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PERSONAL ATTRIBUTES P1: Organization P2: Initiative P3: Writes coherently with correct grammar and spelling P4: Articulates clearly using correct grammar P5: Manages time and work effectively P6: Demonstrates responsibility COMMENTS:

Needs Improvement

Improving

Effective

Student Teacher

Date

Cooperating Teacher

Date

Illinois College Supervisor

Date

__________Cooperating teacher __________College supervisor

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THREE-WAY CONFERENCE DISCUSSION NOTES Date: Student Teacher: Cooperating Teacher: College Supervisor:

1.

SUPPORTIVE FEEDBACK (strengths)

2.

CORRECTIVE FEEDBACK: (areas that need improvement)

3.

GOALS: (things to work on for improvement)

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