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TEACHERS

GUIDE
NOVEMBER 16, 2015
VOL. 36, NO. 4 ISSN 1041-1410
SUPPLEMENT TO SCHOLASTIC MATH

Where Math Gets Real


ISSUE DATES

9/7

9/28

10/26

11/16

12/14

1/18

2/15

3/14

4/11

5/9

www.scholastic.com/math

Registration is required for access to your online resources.


Dear Teacher,
Have you had a chance to check out our newest game offerings? This year,
our goal is to make all of our MATH games more dynamic, more interactive,
andmost importantlymore exciting for your students. We think these
games are a great way to reinforce fundamental concepts like unit rates, ratios,
algebraic expressions, and more. If you havent yet, enter your access code
at www.scholastic.com/math to explore these new additions to the game
archive.
If your students have been playing our new games, let us know what you
think! Wed love to hear your first impressions, suggestions for improvement,
and any skills that youd like us to explore in future games.

Best, The Editors

Skills Guide
PAGE

SKILL & ARTICLE TITLE

WRITING & SOLVING


PROPORTIONS
A Whale of a Job
Lexile: 990L

PERCENT OF
A NUMBER
Grimy Ride
Lexile: 1230L

DEGREE MEASURES
& ROTATIONS
Too Extreme?
Lexile: 1030L

14

WORKING WITH
RATE
How to Survive on Mars
Lexile: 970L

mathmag@scholastic.com

COMMON CORE
STATE STANDARDS

Ratios & Proportional


Relationships: Represent
proportional relationships with
equations.

Ratios & Proportional


Relationships: Find a percent
of a quantity as a rate per 100.

Geometry: Solve real-life and


mathematical problems
involving angle measure.
Ratios & Proportional
Relationships: Use ratio reasoning to convert measurement
units; manipulate and transform
units appropriately when multiplying or dividing quantities.

S
EDITOR

Pick

GAM E

Moto-MATH!
Solve degree measure
questions to win
a motocross race.
ONLINE RESOURCES
scholastic.com/math

Skills Sheets: Proportions in Sampling &


Article Skill Review
Background Video: Counting Minke Whales

Skills Sheets: Scaling Equivalent Fractions &


Article Skill Review
Instructional Video: Percent of a Number

 kills Sheets: Using a Protractor & Article


S
Skill Review
Game: Extreme Degrees

 kills Sheets: Canceling Common Factors


S
& Article Skill Review
Background Video: Mission to Mars
Skills
Sheet

Video

Game

LESSON PLANS
Page 4 WRITING & SOLVING PROPORTIONS

A Whale of a Job

CONTENT STANDARD
Ratios & Proportional Relationships: Represent proportional relationships with equations.

MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE STANDARDS


2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
4. Model with mathematics.

OBJECTIVE
Write and solve proportions using data from observations of
whales to determine the total whale population in an area.

LESSON

In this article, students will learn how researchers use


math to estimate the populations of wild animals that
cant be easily countedlike whales! Go online to
www.scholastic.com/math and open your digital
issue to page 4. Before reading the article, click the
Watch a Video button for background on the minke
whale population study students will learn about.
Read the article aloud. Pause after the fourth paragraph
to explain samples and populations. On a sticky note,
define the words sample (a part of a greater population that can often represent the population) and population (the total count of a specific species in a particular area). Ask: What is the sample being observed
in Kellys research? (the number of minke whales the
team sees on the surface of the water during its survey
of a small, set area) What is the population? (the total
number of whales in and around the Davis Sea) Tell
students that they are going to learn how to use a given
sample to infer information about an entire population.
Then read the remaining paragraphs aloud.

Read steps 1 through 4 aloud to demonstrate how to


solve the example. At step 1, point out that the information about the sample is on one side of the equation, and the information about the population is on the
other side of the equation. Also point out that the units
in the numerators (whales) match, and the units in the
denominators (square kilometers) match. For step 3,
ask: Why are we dividing both sides of the equation
by 1,900? (So that the variable is left by itself on one
side of the equation.)
Have students answer the questions on page 5 in pairs.
Remind them that proportions should be set up with
sample data on one side of the equation, and population
data on the other. Like units should be in the numerators
and denominators. Review answers as a class.

EXTEND THE LESSON


Challenge your students to write a math lesson based on
this article. They can choose one of the math concepts
covered (ratios, proportions, cross multiplication, variables,
or samples and populations) to create a lesson of their
own. They should consider what age group theyd like
to teach, what information theyd like to share, and what
format would work best for their chosen topic.

ONLINE
GET MORE AT:
www.scholastic.com/math
Your skills sheets include an Article
Skill Review and the Common
Core reproducible Proportions in
Sampling, which demonstrates how to
use the information from a sample to infer
characteristics about a population.
Watch a background video about Kellys minke
whales study.

3

Enlarge the Writing and Solving Proportions box on


page 5. Read the introduction and the example aloud.
Ask: What is the sample number of whales counted?
(36) What is the area of the sampled region? (1,900
square kilometers) What is the total number of whales
in the population? (We dont know.) What is the total
area of the study? (20,000 square kilometers) What
can we do to find the value that we dont know? (Assign
the value a variable, set up a proportion, and solve it.)

ADDITIONAL WEB RESOURCES:


more about minke whales at:
Learn

http://acsonline.org/fact-sheets/minke-whale
Practice solving proportions at:
www.ixl.com/math/grade-7/solve-proportions
an instructional video on cross multiplication
Watch

and other methods for solving proportions at:
www.mathvillage.info/node/72

DIGITAL ISSUE KEY:


show all
pages

home

T2 Scholastic MATH Teachers Guide

mask
tool

digital
sticky
notes

text
highlighter

drawing
tool

game

pop-up

video
player

LESSON
PLANS
LESSON PLANS
Page 6 PERCENT OF A NUMBER

Grimy Ride

CONTENT STANDARD
Ratio & Proportional Relationships: Find a percent of a
quantity as a rate per 100.

MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE STANDARDS


4. Model with mathematics.
7. Look for and make use of structure.
8. Look for and express regularity in repeated reasoning.

OBJECTIVE
Find percent of a number to learn more about the DNA
from different life-forms that researchers found in the NYC
subway system.

LESSON

This article is about a recent analysis of thousands of


DNA samples taken from the New York City subway
system. Have students raise their hands if they have
ever been on a subway; if they have, ask them to describe their experience. Do they think of subway stations
as dirty or clean? Did they see any interesting critters in
the stations? If your students are not familiar with public
transit systems, you can access a photographic timeline
of the NYC subway system by clicking the blue Web
Links button.
Go to www.scholastic.com/math and open your
digital issue to page 6. Have students read the article
individually. Then test comprehension by asking: How
did the scientists collect their data? (They swabbed
ticket machines, handrails, benches, turnstiles, and platforms of different stations, and then analyzed the DNA
on the swabs.) What did the scientists learn from the
study, and how can they apply their findings in the future? (They learned more about commuter habits. Their
microbe map could someday help track the spread of
diseases.) Ask students to share any information that
surprised them.

Enlarge the Percent of a Number box on page 7.


Read the introduction and the example aloud. Then
click the Watch a Video button for a video lesson
on understanding and calculating percents. Pause for
questions. If students are comfortable with the given
method for finding percent of a number, ask if they can
explain an alternate method.

Have students work individually to answer the


questions. When they are finished, have them pair
up to compare their answers. If students disagree,
they should analyze each others work by considering
each step of the example. They can ask themselves:
At which step did my partner and I have different
answers? Which answer is correct, and why?
In closing, ask: Did you notice any patterns or use
any shortcuts as you completed your work? Some
students may have noticed a shortcut for Step 1: To
convert a percent into a decimal, drop the percent
sign and shift the decimal point two places to the left.
If time permits, lead a quick discussion about converting decimals to percents. Students can multiply the
decimal by 100 or shift the decimal point two places to
the right, then add a percent sign.

S.T.E.M. CONNECTION
A Wall Street Journal interactive map allows readers to
investigate the microbiomes of specific subway stations.
Give students time to explore this interactive graphic at
http://graphics.wsj.com/patho-map/?sel=stn_311.
Then call on volunteers to share what they like or dislike
about how this graphic presents the studys data. Is there
anything students would change?

ONLINE
GET MORE AT:
www.scholastic.com/math
Your skills sheets include an Article
Skill Review and the Common
Core reproducible Scaling Equivalent
Fractions, which provides a method for
scaling fractions to find their equivalent
percents.
Watch an instructional video on finding percent of
a number.

ADDITIONAL WEB RESOURCES:


a slide show of images of the New York City
See

subway system from 1910 to the present at:
www.nytimes.com/interactive/2010/10/21
/nyregion/20101021-ny-subway-historicalphotos.html
finding percent of a number at:
Practice

www.mathplayground.com/percent01.html

November 16, 2015

T3

LESSON PLANS
Page 8 DEGREE MEASURES & ROTATIONS

Too Extreme?

To complete questions 1 through 7, read each question


aloud, then pause for partners to think-pair-share about
how to solve the problem. Then call on a volunteer to
solve each problem. Note: For questions 2 and 6b,
which involve partial rotations, students may find it
helpful to mark up the circle graphic on page 11.

Have students solve question 8 individually. Call on


volunteers to share their answers and clearly explain
them to the class.

If your students are ready to explore an extension


involving more-complex rotations of geometric figures,
click the blue Web Links button for helpful resources.

CONTENT STANDARD
Geometry: Solve real-life and mathematical problems
involving angle measure.

MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE STANDARDS


1. Make sense of problems and persevere in solving them.
3. Construct viable arguments and critique the reasoning of
others.

OBJECTIVE
Calculate the number of degrees in a given number of
skateboarding or snowboarding rotations.

LESSON
Ask students: Which sports do you consider to be

2
3

extreme? (surfing, skateboarding, rock climbing,


windsurfing, snowboarding, bungee jumping, etc.)
What makes a sport extreme? (Its dangerous; tricks
or stunts are involved; it requires specialized gear;
it may involve extreme heights or weather.) In this
article, students will read about the rotations that
athletes attempt in these types of sports.
Go to www.scholastic.com/math and open your
digital issue to page 8. To preview the article, click the
blue Web Links button for a video of skateboarder
Tony Hawk attempting a 900 rotation at the X Games.
Have volunteers take turns reading the article aloud.
When finished, call on volunteers to name the pros and
cons of kids participating in extreme sports; record
these in a T-chart on a digital sticky note. Check comprehension by asking: What new policies do experts
suggest to help protect athletes in these sports?
(requiring helmets and having medical staff on call for
competitive events) What benefits does Bryan Fiese
notice in kids who take part in extreme sports?
(increased physical activity and more confidence)
Enlarge the Degree Measures and Rotations box on
page 11. Ask students: How many degrees are in a
circle? (360) Read the introduction and the example
aloud. Explain that division is the appropriate operation to use for the example, because you are trying to
determine how many equal sets of 360 make up a
total of 540.

T4 Scholastic MATH Teachers Guide

COMMON CORE CRITICAL THINKING


Have students use the pros and cons T-chart to write an
opinion essay on whether extreme sports are appropriate
for kids. Their essays should include a thesis statement and
three or four clear topics for supporting paragraphs. You
can use this exercise as an opportunity to teach students
about counterarguments; explain that effective opinion
essays bring up opposing viewpoints and then dispel them.

ONLINE
GET MORE AT:
www.scholastic.com/math
Your skills sheets include an Article
Skill Review and the Common
Core reproducible Using a Protractor,
in which students will practice measuring
angles.
Play a game to find degree measures in a motocross race!

ADDITIONAL WEB RESOURCES:

Watch Tony Hawk attempt a 900 rotation at the


X Games at: www.youtube.com
/watch?v=e4QGnppJ-ys
about how the X Games has influenced the
Learn

Olympic Games at: http://discoverykids.com
/activities/best-of-the-x-games/
students to rotations of geometric figures
Introduce

at:
http://planetnutshell.com/project
/math-shorts-episode-2-rotation
www.mathwarehouse.com/transformations
/rotations-in-math.php

LESSON
PLANS
LESSON PLANS
Page 14 WORKING WITH RATE

Read question 1a aloud. As a class, write an expression to represent the problem on a sticky note. Show
the cancellation of like units and simplification of
numerical terms.

CONTENT STANDARD

Have students finish question 1 and work on the


remaining questions in pairs. When they have finished,
ask them to share their solution pathways, paying extra
attention to multistep problems (2b) and questions that
could be solved using a method other than unit rates
(1b). Where students did not use unit rates, challenge
them to do so after completing the problem their own
way. Before wrapping up, retake the poll from Step 2:
After doing the math, do students think Watney can
survive?

How to Survive
on Mars
Ratios & Proportional Relationships: Convert a quantity from one unit of measure to another by multiplying the
quantity by different unit rates.

MATHEMATICAL PRACTICE STANDARDS


2. Reason abstractly and quantitatively.
6. Attend to precision.

OBJECTIVE
Using unit rates, determine what an astronaut needs to
survive on Mars by converting a quantitys unit of measure.

LESSON

Ask students to share any facts that they know about

This article is about The Martian, a movie in which

the planet Mars. Then go to www.scholastic.com/


math and open your digital issue to page 14. Click the
Watch a Video button for an overview of scientists
study and exploration of Mars. Then ask students:
What characteristics of Mars would make it difficult for
humans to survive there? (Mars is very cold; there is
almost no oxygen; the atmosphere is too thin to block
dangerous radiation.)

an astronaut is stranded on Mars. Have volunteers


take turns reading the article aloud. When finished,
ask: What must the main character Mark Watney do
to survive on Mars until a rescue mission arrives?
(Hell have to stretch the minimal supplies available
to him and figure out how to grow additional food
in an inhospitable environment.) Take a poll before
beginning the math section: Do the students think
Watney can survive and make it home?
Enlarge the Working with Rate box on page 15.
Read the introduction and example aloud. Ask students: When can you cancel out like units? (When
they appear in the numerator of one rate and the denominator of another rate.) Remind students that multiplying a number by a fraction with the same numerator
as denominator is the same as multiplying that number
by 1. Therefore, the numerator and denominator cancel
each other when they are equal. This concept extends
to all units of measure.

S.T.E.M. CONNECTION
Have students measure the weight or length of various
classroom items and the temperature at different locations.
Give them conversion charts, and ask them to convert their
measurements to different units. Hold a discussion about
the difference between converting temperature units (using
a nonproportional formula) and units of weight or length
(using proportional unit rates). Click the blue Web Links
button for a link to conversion tables.

ONLINE
GET MORE AT:
www.scholastic.com/math
Your skills sheets include an Article
Skill Review and the Common
Core Reproducible Canceling Common
Factors, which reviews the method to
cross-cancel factors.
Watch a background video about
the history of humans exploration of Mars.

ADDITIONAL WEB RESOURCES:


more about NASAs Curiosity Mars Rover at:
Learn

www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl

Explore NASAs archive of interactive lessons about


Mars at: http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/participate
/marsforeducators/soi
Find conversion charts at:
www.mathatube.com/converting-betweencustomary-and-metric-units-chart.html
www.csgnetwork.com/temp2conv.html

November 16, 2015

T5

Problem of the Day

NAME

If angle C is complementary to
angle B, what is their sum?

DAY 6

Expand the following decimal:


25.1243

DAY 1

DAY 12

Bacteria associated with pizza


cheese were detected in about
one third of NYCs 466 subway
stations. How many stations is
this? Round your answer to the
nearest whole number.

DAY 2

DAY 13

An art gallery sells 8 paintings for


$x each and 9 paintings for $y
|626| + |-14| =
each. Write an expression for the
total amount the gallery made.

DAY 7

Of the 400 million pounds of


cranberries that Americans eat
each year, 20% is consumed
during Thanksgiving week! How
many pounds of cranberries is
this?

DAY 8

Which has a greater value?:


36 or 63

DAY 3

DAY 19

What is the mode of the following data set?


1, 1, 3, 4, 7, 7, 8, 9, 11

DAY 14

A snowboarder completes a
900 spin on her board. How
many complete rotations did she
make?

DAY 9

If a basketball player makes 300


three-point shots in 150 games,
how many three-pointers did he
sink per game on average?

DAY 4

DAY 20

Part 1 of The Hunger


Games: Mockingjay earned
$337,135,885 at U.S. box
offices. If this months Part 2
makes 1.2 times as much, how
much money will it bring in?

DAY 15

Solve for b:

DAY 10

Where Math Gets Real

DAY 11

Fill in the blank with the correct


symbol ( >, <, or =):
2 5 ___ 5 8

DAY 18

Try one of these quick exercises each day as a fast, fun way to start your math lesson!

Factor the following expression:


22r + 11

DAY 17

DAY 5

DAY 16

What is the volume of a cube


with a base length of 4 inches?

Permission granted by Scholastic MATH to reproduce this page for classroom use only. 2015 by Scholastic Inc. All Rights Reserved.

144 + 64 =

42
b
2,000 = 3,000

22 2 + 1 4 =

What is 46.6% expressed in


decimal form?

Rewrite the following phrase as


an algebraic expression:
17 less than the quotient of
x and y

For active children ages 9 to 13,


the National Institutes of Health
recommend consuming from
1,600 to 2,200 calories daily.
Express this range as an
inequality.

Answers on T8

T6 Scholastic MATH Teachers Guide

ANSWERS
PAGES 2-3
NUMBERS IN THE NEWS
Currys On Point
10x + 26(7) + 3(5) + 1(1) = 1,198; 10x +
198 = 1,198; 10x = 1,000; x = 100
Curry received 100 first-place votes.
See Spot Paint
8($100) m 8($700);
$800 m $5,600
Cran-tastic Growth
405,000 280,000 1.45
Production has increased by a factor of
about 1.5

PAGE 4
A WHALE OF A JOB
6 whales

1a. 1,000 sq km
6 whales

x whales

1b. 1,000 sq km = 15,000 sq km


1c. 90,000 = 1,000x; x = 90 whales
9 whales

x whales

2. 1,500 sq km = 10,590 sq km ;
95,310 = 1,500x; x = 63.54
About 64 whales
8 whales

3. 1,000 sq km =

338 whales
;
x sq km

338,000 = 8x; x = 42,250 sq km


25,000 whales

x whales

6a. 360 2 = 720


6b. 1260 360 = 3.5 rotations
7a. 360 5 = 1800
7b. 360 4 = 1440
8. Student answers will vary but should
include some combination of three full
rotations (flips or spins).

PAGE 12
A DEFLATED HOLIDAY?
1. D
2. C
$7 $4.75 = $2.25
3. B
(10 lb $7) (10 lb $5) = $20
4. A
5. B
6. C
160 pounds 110 pounds = 50 pounds
7. Weather balloons and blimps
8. 0.06 6,400,000,000 = 384,000,000
cubic feet
$7

9. 150 lbs lb = $1,050


10. (6.6 billion 18 billion) 100 -63%
6.6 billion

PAGE 14
HOW TO SURVIVE ON MARS

4a. 344,400 sq km = 1,000 sq km ;

1a.

25,000,000 = 344,400x; x 72.59


About 73 whales

1b. 900 meals 2 meals = 450 days

500 whales

x whales

PAGE 16
BY THE NUMBERS: THE HUNGER
GAMES: MOCKINGJAY PART 2
Using the order of operations, solve the
equation in this order:
1. Find the quotient inside the parentheses.
2. Subtract the quotient from the first term
in the parentheses.
3. Complete the subtraction.
65 (16 4 2) = 65 (16 2) = 65
14 = 51
So the answer is 51.

3 meals
50 days 6 people = 900 meals
day
1 day

4b. 344,400 sq km = 1,000 sq km ;

2a.

2,000 calories
1 kg
1 potato
770 calories 0.3 kg 1,425 days 12,338 potatoes
day

500,000 = 344,400x; x 1.45


About 1 whale!

2b.

1 kg
1 potato
1,500 calories
770 calories 0.3 kg 1,425 days 9,253 potatoes
day

10,000 whales

x whales

0.006 kg

1 potato

4c. 344,400 sq km = 1,000 sq km ;

3a. day m2 92 m2 0.3 kg = 1.84..., or about 1.8 potatoes per day

10,000,000 = 344,400x; x 29.04


About 29 whales

3b.

PAGE 6
GRIMY RIDE
1a. 0.47 15,152 7,121 samples
1b. 0.002 15,152 30 samples
2. 0.12 562 67 species
3. 0.32 466 149; 466 149 = 317
stations
Alternate solution path:
1.00 0.32 = 0.68 466 317 stations
4. 0.16 62 10 unique species
5. 0.006 466 3 stations

1.8 potatoes
1,425 days = 2,565 potatoes
day

4a. 1,425 days 450 days = 975 days


1

4b. 1,425 days

1 kg
1 potato
1,500 calories
770 calories 0.3 kg 6,331 potatoes
day

1 day m2
0.3 kg
1 potato 6,331 potatoes 111 m2
0.012 kg

4c. Student answers will vary. (But we sure hope he makes it!)

PAGE 8
TOO EXTREME?
1. 360 2 = 720; so its called a 720
2. 900 360 = 2.5 rotations
3

3. 360 4 = 270
4. 360 2 = 180
5. 1080 360 = 3 rotations

November 16, 2015

T7

ANSWERS
PROBLEM OF THE DAY
1. 20 + 5 + 0.1 + 0.02 + 0.004 + 0.0003
1

466

2. 466 3 = 3 = 155.3; 155 stations


3. 36 = 729; 63 = 216; so 36 is greater
4. 300 150 = 2 three-pointers per game
5. 22 2 + 1 4 = (22 2) + (1 4) = 11 + 4 = 15
6. 90
7. $8x + $9y
8. 640
9. 900 360 = 2.5; so the snowboarder made
2 complete rotations.

42

10. 2,000 = 3,000 ; 42 x 3,000 = 2,000 b; 126,000 = 2,000b;


126,000 2,000 = b; b = 63
11. 11 (2r + 1)
12. 2 5 = 0.4; 5 8 = 0.625; so (2 5) < (5 8)
13. 20% = 0.2 400,000,000 pounds = 80,000,000 pounds
14. 1 and 7
15. $337,135,885 1.2 = $404,563,062
16. 46.6% 100 = 0.466
x
17. (x y) 17 or y 17
18. 1,600 c 2,200
19. 4 in. 4 in. 4 in. = 64 in.3
20. 12 + 8 = 20

REAL-WORLD MATH FOR GRADES 6-8. SCHOLASTIC.COM/UNEXPECTEDMATH

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T8 Scholastic MATH Teachers Guide

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