LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET

PREFACE

Money, money and money, money is an important matter nowadays where ever we go and no matter what time is it, if times running inline with money, no problem would it be, right. We need money to live, to eat, to survive and so on. Money is to be use to buy something and to brought something, and in order to organized our money, budget is needed to be think off and write off, in order to prvent us from overspending and to limit our spending. If not people would be easily and likely to take every thing once he/she got to shopping without thinking of a money in its pocket. By others means money brought alive people and cheare their livings. In Library matter budget need to be writen down properly indetailed in order to organized our spending on the library usage, other than that we need to properly write with many research so that our proposal would be accepted by the ministry of finance and approved our budget request. Budget brings library comes alive, Budget is use to buy things, to organized and to maintain library properly. At last this paper would be helpful on the writing up a budget proposal for the library.

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TABLES OF CONTENTS
PREFACE ...................................................................................................................... 1 TABLES OF CONTENTS ............................................................................................. 2 INTRODUCTION.......................................................................................................... 5
LIBRARY VISION & MISION ............................................................................................................................ 5  LIBRARY OBJECTIVE ...................................................................................................................... 5  Budget Narrative .................................................................................................................................. 6  Library Income .................................................................................................................................... 6 Library Materials²Books, Periodicals, Video, Audio and Software .................................................................... 7  From the Long Range Plan of 2009-2013 ............................................................................................. 7  From the 2009-2013 Long Range Plan.................................................................................................. 7 Library Operating Budget Request for SULTAN SAIFUL RIJAL TECHNICAL COLLEGE LIBRARY (A SUMMARY) ............................................................................................................................................ 9

THE LETTER .............................................................................................................. 10 ESTIMATION AND PROPOSAL .............................................................................. 11 
  LIBRARY STAFF BUDGET ............................................................................................................. 11 LIBRARY BUILDING ...................................................................................................................... 12 LIBRARY FACILITIES .................................................................................................................... 12 Figure 1: Above is an example of a library college ............................................ 12

STAFF EMOLUMENTS ............................................................................................. 13
THE POST AND SCALE .................................................................................................................................. 13

RECURRENT ITEMS................................................................................................. 16
ESTIMATE BUDGET ...................................................................................................................................... 16  Budget Allocations Including New Programs...................................................................................... 18 Types and Formats of Materials Collected............................................................................................... 18 Reference Materials ................................................................................................................................ 18 Books ..................................................................................................................................................... 18 Serials .................................................................................................................................................... 19 Electronic Books .................................................................................................................................... 19 Non-Print (Audiovisual Media)............................................................................................................... 20 Maps ...................................................................................................................................................... 20 Subscription Databases ........................................................................................................................... 20 BOOK STOCK................................................................................................................................................. 20  Periodicals ......................................................................................................................................... 21  Audio-visual ...................................................................................................................................... 21

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  Web sites ........................................................................................................................................... 21 Benchmarks for Book Stock ............................................................................................................... 22 Withdrawals....................................................................................................................................... 22

All books removed during weeding will be........................................................................................................ 23  Stock Take ......................................................................................................................................... 23  Periodicals ......................................................................................................................................... 24  Audio-visual ...................................................................................................................................... 24  Web sites ........................................................................................................................................... 24 PERIODICAL AND BOOK BINDING.............................................................................................................. 25 Booking In ............................................................................................................................................. 27 Spine Trimming...................................................................................................................................... 27 Advert Collation ..................................................................................................................................... 27  Sewing Up the Book Text Block ........................................................................................................ 28 Book Sewing Machines .......................................................................................................................... 28 Section Sewing ....................................................................................................................................... 28  Steaming Pressing & Gluing Up the Book Text Block ........................................................................ 29 Steaming ................................................................................................................................................ 29 Heat Pressing.......................................................................................................................................... 29 Gluing Up .............................................................................................................................................. 29 Guillotine Trimming ............................................................................................................................... 29 Rounding and Backing............................................................................................................................ 29 Spine Lining ........................................................................................................................................... 29  Covering ............................................................................................................................................ 30 Hot Foil Lettering ................................................................................................................................... 30 Glue Rolling ........................................................................................................................................... 30 Laying On the Cover .............................................................................................................................. 30 Casing In ................................................................................................................................................ 31 Hydraulic Press ...................................................................................................................................... 31 Checking ................................................................................................................................................ 31  ESTIMATE BUDGET OF BOOK BINDING .................................................................................... 31 INTER-LIBRARYLOAN AND DOCUMENT DELIVERY................................................................................... 32  How interlibrary loan works ............................................................................................................... 32  BUDGET FOR INTERLIBRARY LOAN .......................................................................................... 32 PRESERVATION MATERIALS ........................................................................................................................ 33  Best Practices..................................................................................................................................... 35 1) Minimize exposure to arson ................................................................................................................ 35 2) Use compartmentation to limit the spread of fire ................................................................................. 36 Figure 3: Figure 1. Special Collection Area separated through .........................36 3) Employ fire detection AND water-based fire suppression systems ....................................................... 37 Fire Suppression Systems ....................................................................................................................... 37 Figure 4: Typical Water-based Fire .................................................................... 38 Fire Protection and Cellulose Nitrate Film............................................................................................... 39 Water Protection ..................................................................................................................................... 40 System Avoidance .................................................................................................................................. 40 Vigilance ................................................................................................................................................ 40

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Figure 5: Water Leak Detection under Access Floors. ........................................ 41 LIBRARY SECURITY SYSTEM ........................................................................................................................ 43 Theft and Vandalism Protection .............................................................................................................. 43 Challenges for the Future ................................................................................................................................ 44

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INTRODUCTION

LIBRARY VISION & MISION
TO BRING SULTAN SAIFUL RIJAL TECHNICAL COLLEGE LIBRARY AS A CENTRE OF INFORMATION & TECHNOLOGY SUCCESS IN TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL STUDIES, RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT. 

LIBRARY OBJECTIVE 
To give quality service to user useful for their needs in all Technical & Vocational specialized being teach here in Sultan Saiful Rijal Technical College.  To collect, to keep and to organized collection to be as a main source of information related to the subject, quality of the product and updated for all program being teach here in Sultan Saiful Rijal Technical College.  To build up a strong collection in new field of technical & vocational studies and in line of our Vision and mission.  Helpful and to increase skill of our library user in an activity of detect, access and also to get correct and quality information.  To bring up our user to fulfilled the level of information relevant, useful and benefited to our country to intuitive creative human brain to create something that can bring something to the community.

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The Sultan Saiful Rijal Technical College Library has seen a tremendous growth in usage over the past few years. In 2008 the library checked out 75,040 items an increase of 12% from the previous year. As of June 30, 2009 the amount of materials borrowed has increased by 10% when compared to the first six months of 2008. In addition, attendance at library programs and the use of library computers has also increased.

Items Borrowed Visits to the Library Internet/Computer Use Attendance at Library Programs

2008 67,000 18,900 9,850 1,143

2009 75,040 20,412 10,441 1,460

Projected 2010/11/12 82,544 22,500 14,000 1,890

The goals and proposals presented in the Sultan Saiful Rijal Technical College Library 2008-9 budget request have been developed to improve library service based upon the using the 20092013 Long Range Plan as a guide as well as data from comparable libraries within our library system area. The comparable libraries had similar population, number of items borrowed, open hours and staffing. 

Budget Narrative
(The detail in narrative should reflect significant changes and the experience of the municipal board with the library budget) 

Library Income
Fines
These funds are generated by overdue fines and fees.

Photocopier and Other Fees
This category includes charges for photocopies and computer printing.

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Library Materials²Books, Periodicals, Video, Audio and Software
The increases in the library materials budget reflect the ongoing efforts of the library to increase these expenditures to level comparable libraries. 

From the Long Range Plan of 2009-2013
Library Materials Goal 1: Enhance the quality of the library collection Objective 1: Bring expenditures for materials up to comparable level libraries.

2007-08-09 EXPENDITURE
YEAR Books (B$) Periodicals (B$) Video (B$) Audio (B$) TOTAL (B$) 50,000 27,000 32,000

2007 2008 2009

15,000 12,000 13,000

10,000 5,000 9,000

15,000 5,000 5,000

10,000 5,000 5,000 

From the 2009-2013 Long Range Plan

Programming & Services²Youth Services Goal 3: Promote reading beginning before birth.

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET Telecommunications The increase in this budget line is for the increase in the usage of the telephone and our T-1 line for the Internet. Equipment Repair This line pays for repairs to the computers, printers and the photocopier. Supplies The budget increase covers the increase in postage and other supplies to maintain the library operation.

Library Operating Budget Request for SULTAN SAIFUL RIJAL TECHNICAL COLLEGE LIBRARY (A SUMMARY)
Operating Income Fines Photocopier and other Fees Operating Income Total Operating Expenditures Salaries and wages Employee benefits Books Periodicals Video materials Audio materials Software and Databases Contracted services Staff and board continuing education Public programming Telecommunications Utilities Equipment repair Supplies Operating Expenditures Total 2009 Actual (B$) $ 850 $ 100 $ 75,000 2009 Actual $ 39,750 $ 11,925 $ 13,000 $ 9,000 $ 5,000 $ 5,000 $ 420 $ 2,200 $ 950 $ 600 $ 1,425 $ 3,800 $ 475 $ 1,425 94,970 2010 Budget (B$) $ 900 $ 100 $ 79,782 2010 Budget $ 41,738 $ 12,522 $ 15,000 $ 5,400 $ 5,000 $ 5,500 $ 425 $ 2,310 $ 1,000 $ 650 $ 1,500 $ 4,000 $ 700 $ 1,500 97,245 2011-12 Budget Request (B$) $ 945 $ 105 $ 84,665 2011-12 Budget Request $ 43,925 $ 13,180 $10,250 $ 5,470 $8,000 $ 1,000 $ 10,000 $ 2,425 $ 1,050 $ 1200 $ 2,575 $ 4,200 $ 5,000 $ 1,800 110,075

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THE LETTER
Ruj: MTSSR/HOD/S/I/A Date: 20 March 2010 MINISTRY OF FINANCE JLN COMMENWEALTH DRIVE BANGUNAN JABATAN-JABATAN KERAJAN BRUNEI DARUSSALAM SULTAN SAIFUL RIJAL TECHNICAL COLLEGE, LIBRARY JLN 59, MUARA BRUNEI DARUSSALAM DEAR SIR/MADAM, 20 March 2010

BUDGET PROPOSAL 2011-2012
With respect this paper are attached with the following Budget needed with the total number of B$25 Billion with the following needed:i. ii. iii. Staff Emoluments Recurrent items Special expenditure (Equipment)

To be sent for your next action.

Sincerely,

(Dyg Mardiah Binti Hasni) Chief Librarian Sulatn Saiful Rijal Technical College

Ac: Assistance principle Registrar

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ESTIMATION AND PROPOSAL
As seen below is a new estimation, and calculation of budget for all Sultan Saiful Rijal Technical College Library staff, Maintenance of Library Building, Collection Development, Service and activity for 2011-2012 Pascal year. This estimation budget is come together with our new proposal to enhance the library services and activity by adding some new things. 

LIBRARY STAFF BUDGET
The total of a library staff nowadays in our library is just three people there are:i. ii. iii. Chief Librarian Assistance Librarian Library attendants

Now with our meeting with the principle and librarian we have planned to request for a new staff with the total number of 9 new staff and below is a budget for our library staff now and our request.
POST NO.OF STAFF ESTIMATION BUDGET (B$) 42,000 (3,500×12) 34,800 2900×12 26,520 (2210×12) 15,000 (1250×12) 118,320 TOTAL(B$) 42,000 (42,000 ×1) 34,800 (34,800×1) 106,080 (26,520×4) 105,000 (15,000×7) 287,880

Chief librarian

Collection Development Librarian Specialized
Assistance Librarian Library Attendants

1 1 4 7

TOTAL

13

So with the calculation above our estimation for library staff budget, for 2011-2012 is B$287,880.

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LIBRARY BUILDING
With the increasing of Sultan Saiful Rijal Technical College community from year to year we have been proposed of a new building for the library with 4 story level and below are an estimation cost of building new library with 4 story level. 4 story level × Cost of building material = B$550,000 million Above is an estimation of building new library at the land of this college and as predicted and estimate the cost is B$550,000 million. 

LIBRARY FACILITIES

Figure 1: Above is an example of a library college

Other detail on designing of the building will be sent on a paper of Library Building proposal.

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STAFF EMOLUMENTS

THE POST AND SCALE
STAFF POST ESTIMATED AREAS OF RESPONSIBILITY This post is a new post being suggest by our Chief Librarian to be established next year, this is due to our institution is a Vocational & Technical Institution and the needs to know every studies field being teach here must be create in order to fulfilled the needs of the student on every program by a right, relevant and updated collection. 1) Establish policies and procedures, and oversee implementation of said policies and procedures. 2) Assume responsibility for building a current, balanced collection, especially for general and multidisciplinary curricular needs. 3) Review and analyze collections, conduct collection evaluation programs and assess collection strengths and weaknesses in all subject areas.
a. Keep current on new collection development and acquisitions technology and participate in local, regional and national professional activities as deemed appropriate.

1. Collection Development Librarian Specialized
1Post

34,800 (2900×12)

4) Establish, maintain and review relationships with vendors, publishers, and Brunei Government Office, along with the Acquisitions Associate. a. Work closely with the Reference Librarians to select databases and vendors. Review all license agreements for electronic materials. b. Serve as convener of the Collection Development Committee. c. Communicate with donors (with the College Librarian or another appropriate individual as 13 | A B U S Y A H M I A D I B N D / I L M 0 6 / 2 0 1 0

LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET needed) and evaluate gifts for suitability. a. Ensure that written acknowledgements of gifts are promptly dispatched. d. Work with the Preservation Librarian to coordinate preservation policies and establish systems for: a. Review of materials in need of repair, replacement or withdrawal. b. Maintain a general working knowledge of the activities of the Serials Associate. e. Coordinate and manage initiatives that provide access to collections of electronic journals, images, and other electronic materials acquired by user.
1. The 1st officer will be assigned to oversee overall system operation management of The VILIS project at our College Library and to coordinate and integrate this project with the e-Library at the main centre at UBD. He/ She will also responsible to facilitate the digitization project of the Virtual library by identifying relevant electronic resources.

3. Assistant Library Officer 3 Post

26,520 (2210×12)

2. The 2nd officer will be responsible on the linking of computer networking both for LAN proposed or connectivity proposed of the library. Other than that the 2nd officer would also responsible in monitoring all net and LAN activity network of the library and its database. 3. The 3rd officer will be assigned to manage the college archives and college museum efficiently and professionally by ensuring that the information are stored, arranged and preserved accordingly for future reference and use. All types of documents and products produce by college since 1970 will properly recorded, catalogue, organized and made accessible as corporate records of our college. 1. 2nd new post is the Library Attendants; it¶s a new post here in this college but have been applied by other government department.

4. Library Attendants 5 Post

15,000 (1250×12)

2. On average of about 3,500 items were borrowed and returned by library users daily. On top of that about 5,500 items are read and use in house and reshelving are done 3 times daily (morning, afternoon and before library is closed). By at least 4 librarian including our chief

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librarian. This load increases during revision week, by our proposed of new level of library building there are needs to increase the staff to. 3. The 5 library attendants will replace the professional librarians from doing shelving and shelf reading work which are considered non- professional duties. It¶s wired if our chief librarian also does the shelving. 4. The library attendants main duties will be to tidy up, collect and reshelf library material used within the 3 floors of the library and to resehlved books and other materials returned by the library user daily. 5. Their other duties will be to identify damaged items that need to be repaired and to ensured the library shelves, tables, chairs are clean in order. Each of them will be assigned an add responsibilities to managed library lockers, clean AV materials. 6. Other than that there would also be responsible to do binding and repairing of a book after their finished their binding and repairing of printed material courses.

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RECURRENT ITEMS

ESTIMATE BUDGET
ITEMS ESTIMATES (B$) JUSTIFICATION (B$)

Book Stock

100,000.00

The stock budget of 100,000.00 was fully spent in 2009-10. The budget request has taken into account books and other material required for new courses introduced at college and in increase in the number of student¶s population and also National Diploma being offered. Being a premier library in Technical College, there is strong indication by the general public particularly the government officer and professional to view the college library as their main source of getting information due to the limited and outdated collection of the public library.

Reference work

35,000.00

The budget requested reflect the need to updated and enhanced the existing collections by acquiring the latest edition and purchasing general reference works in books and media format as well as specialized CD-Rom and net database to support instructor and other research activity

Annuals, yearbooks, standing order Monographs Periodicals (current & new title

19,000.00

The budget requested is to maintain the existing standing orders such as yearbooks, monographs series, etc, so that it is continuous and outgoing

500,000.00

The total cost for journal subscription in 2009 is 500,000.00. The library expects additional liabilities due to inflation, rising publication costs, handling charges,and other unanticipated causes. Annual average price increase of 10% is expected in 2011 due to inflation and increase in publishing cost.

Periodical & book binding

20,000.00×1.5 (30,000)

The budget is equivalent to the approved budget in 2009 and should be increase by 1.5.

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AV material

5,000.00

The library expected to receive a continuous strong demand for media resources for educational research and so on.

Borneo Collection

10,000.00

The budget request is to reflect the importance of developing comprehensive collection of rare, manuscript, and scholarly materials pertaining to Brunei, Borneo to support courses requirements for our college.

Electronic Database

230,000.00

This request is required to maintain the existing subscription of our resources database.

ILL & Document delivery supply

20,000.00

ILL and DDS is a very popular service with increase in request made every year. The increase would enable to library to accommodate and met more request for research materials The amount required includes costs of searching, viewing, printing and other telecommunications charges.

Specialist Library preservation Materials

10,000.00

The increase in budget request is to reflect increasing requirements for the preservation of antiquarian, rare book, manuscripts, as well as the repair and binding of damage books. At present there is a backlog of over 1250 books required preservation and repair work and the number of damage books to be repaired is increasing daily

Storage Boxes

10,000.00

Special boxes for storage and conservation of newspaper, periodicals, audio video materials, international documents, archive and rare material for one year collection The budget is required to purchase security strip and labels needed for processing the library materials.

Special Stationery TOTAL

10,000.00 979,000

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Budget Allocations Including New Programs
Each area of the curriculum has its own materials budget allocation. Allocations are made by the Librarians Council, which consists of all faculty librarians and the Library Director, and are based on curricular relevance, program size and research needs, publishing costs within specific disciplines, balance of collection, and general overall collection needs. Faculty and staff planning new courses and new programs are encouraged to contact the Liaison Librarian for their discipline. The amount of the Library capital budget reserved for book allocations may fluctuate depending on periodicals and continuations costs.

Types and Formats of Materials Collected Reference Materials
Reference materials support the research needs of College students, faculty, and staff. The reference collection contains, but is not limited to, encyclopedias, dictionaries, atlases, directories, indexes, bibliographies, statistical compilations, and handbooks. Though items selected for this collection primarily support the academic programs offered at Lane, core academic reference works published in other subject areas are also selected when they provide fundamental bibliographic access to, or an introductory overview of, an academic discipline. Items in the reference collection normally do not circulate. The reference collection is reviewed by the librarians annually to insure currency and accuracy. Reference materials are collected in print, electronic, and online formats.

Books
Books that should be frequently updated (test preparation materials) are purchased in paper formats when available. Established literary works and new works receiving critical acclaim in the literary field are considered, especially those works that support literature course offerings. Literary prizewinners are purchased when funds permit.

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Serials
Serials/periodicals/journals/newspapers are publications issued in successive parts bearing numeric or chronological designations and intended to be continued indefinitely. Serials are issued in print, microform, and electronic formats. All formats will be considered in the libraries' purchase and/or access decisions. Serials are acquired via subscription. Individual issues or reprints will rarely be purchased. The selection of serials requires a continuing commitment to the cost of the title, including maintenance, viewing and reproduction equipment, and storage space. The escalating cost of serials subscriptions demands that requests for serials subscriptions be carefully reviewed before they are purchased for the collection and that an ongoing evaluation of current subscriptions be conducted. Since it is often more cost-efficient to purchase electronic access or document delivery services for serials instead of acquisition through print subscription, this delivery method will be chosen when fiscally prudent. Cooperative acquisition (regional and statewide) of electronic serials databases is actively pursued. Electronic serials subscriptions licensing contracts may limit access to currently enrolled students, faculty and staff. The professional library staff reviews local serials collections and accessibility of online titles annually. The serials collection supports the College curriculum as well as providing a core collection of general interest periodicals. Factors to be considered in the acquisition of serials are:
y y y y y y y y y y

Support of academic programs Suitability for intended audience Uniqueness of subject coverage Cost, including rate of price increases, cost of storage, and/or access costs Professional reputation Usage or projected usage Indexing and abstracting in sources accessible to library users Demand for title in interlibrary loan or document delivery requests Accessibility within resource sharing groups, consortia, and/or through document delivery or courier services Full-text availability via electronic access

Electronic Books
Electronic books are considered when they provide the most current and/or cost-effective format, or to support distance education courses and programs. Cooperative lease/purchase of electronic books is pursued as a cost-effective method of providing access to book collections. Duplication is considered for electronic books provided by such cooperative lease/purchase. In addition to general selection criteria and online resources/Internet-based materials selection criteria, consideration is given to the availability of an archival copy of electronic texts purchased in perpetuity. 19 | A B U S Y A H M I A D I B N D / I L M 0 6 / 2 0 1 0

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Non-Print (Audiovisual Media)
Non-print media may be relatively expensive. Because of the size of the Library¶s materials budget, inclusion of these materials in the Library¶s collection should meet the following guidelines in addition to general selection criteria:
y y y

Item has demonstrated applicability in more than one course or discipline Treatment and presentation of subject content are on an appropriate academic level Technical quality of color, sound, continuity, etc. is high

Maps
Maps are a very small part of the collection. Additional maps will be purchased as needed to provide direct support for classroom instruction and only at the request of the instructor. Atlases are included in the reference collection.

Subscription Databases
Subscription to commercial online databases will be considered when they provide the most current and/or cost-effective resources. The following online resources will be actively selected:
y

y

Licensed commercial, fee-based resources and databases will be selected when they provide cost-effective means of providing resources for the Library. These resources may include electronic books; citation, abstracting and full-text databases covering journals, magazines, newspapers or reference materials; and databases providing information portals for specific subject areas. In additional to general selection criteria, the following criteria will be used: o The product compares favorably with similar products o Unlimited or multiple user access is preferred o The interface is user-friendly o Appropriate online help is available o Good technical support is available o Usage statistics are available o The vendor allows a trial of the actual product o The libraries are not required to subscribe to both print and electronic versions of the product, unless this is desired o The license agreement allows normal rights and privileges accorded libraries under copyright law o The license agreement gives the libraries indemnification against third party copyright infringement

BOOK STOCK
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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET The aim of the Library is to provide a stock that will both support and challenge the students, allowing them to develop an ability to extract the relevant information from a variety of sources. This ability is vital as they face the transition from being school students, more directed in their learning, to university students taking responsibility for their own learning. 

Periodicals
A range of daily and weekly newspapers is designed to provide a range of views. Subscriptions to journals and magazines are taken out at the request of departments. General interest magazines are provided according to Library staff¶s perception of students¶ interests and the balance of the collection. 

Audio-visual
Non-book stock, such as videos, audio-cassettes and digital resources will be selected according to the same criteria as books. 

Web sites
Web sites offer a slightly different set of circumstances. Appropriate web sites can be bookmarked and made available to students in a variety of ways. y y y y y y y placed in the Library section of the student intranet publicized on Library leaflets catalogued on the Library OPAC alongside other resources promoted on Library notice boards Recommendations by teaching staff Selections by Library staff, based on their professional expertise Recommendations by students (after being checked by Library staff)

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Benchmarks for Book Stock
Reference books:y y Encyclopedias - at least two paper-based sets at different levels, less than 10 years old Atlases ± the collection should include road atlases, world atlases and data atlases, none more than 8 years old and at least one as recent as possible. Older atlases can be kept for historical interest but should not be shelved with the current stock. y y Yearbooks and gazetteers ± they should be regularly updated, with yearbooks replaced at least every two years as funds allow. Dictionaries ± this collection should include schools, concise, shorter and multi-volume dictionaries in English, specialist dictionaries, e.g. of slang, abbreviations etc, and duallanguage dictionaries in all languages taught in the Academy and as far as possible all mother languages spoken by students.

Non-fiction books:We will aim to develop a book stock, 80% of which was published less than 10 years ago. This will allow for 20% for older books which are either out of print or are of particular significance.

Fiction books:All fiction books should be in editions no more than 20 years old unless they are in good condition and their appearance is not a disincentive to their use. 

Withdrawals
To this end we will implement a programme of stock weeding as follows:

Non-fiction
y y Stock will be weeded in a rolling programme through the Library Of congress (LOC) sequence according to the Book Development Action Plan All damaged stock will be removed, repaired if possible or discarded

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET y y y All very shabby stock will be removed and replaced, if necessary, by a new copy All stock unused for at least 5 years will be withdrawn unless there is a compelling case for its retention All stock published more than 10 years ago will be examined. Computer, science and technology books will be replaced by a newer edition unless subject matter is not affected by the age of the book. Arts and humanities books published earlier than this may remain if they are still deemed relevant

Fiction
y y y y Stock will be weeded once a year All damaged stock will be removed, repaired if possible or discarded All very shabby stock will be removed and replaced, if necessary by a new copy All stock published more than 20 years ago will be examined. If the book is still relevant to the fiction collection, staff will consider whether a newer edition with cleaner pages and a contemporary cover would be appropriate, unless they are in good condition with classic covers

All books removed during weeding will be
y deleted from catalogue giving one of these reasons ± damaged; out of date; not relevant; unused y y y y treated as instructed in Withdrawal Procedures in Procedures Manual offered to charity shops, Book Aid or staff members ONLY IF they are in good condition and the information is up to date but just not relevant to present LRC needs thrown away (this applies to almost ALL of weeded stock) sold to students in very limited circumstances 

Stock Take
Every four years there will be a complete stock check of all books. This will take place over the summer break, using the facilities of the Library Management System and possibly using a hired

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET portable bar code reader. The database will be updated. Statistics of the number and value of books lost will be recorded. 

Periodicals
Newspapers are kept for 2 weeks and then discarded. Subject journals and magazines back issues are kept for one year for weekly editions and two years for monthly or termly editions. Back issues can be passed to departments. The decision on whether to renew subscriptions will be taken by assessing usage and consulting with departments. 

Audio-visual
Audio-visual material will be weeded using the same criteria as those for books. 

Web sites
All bookmarked and recommended web sites will need to be checked for availability and continued relevance through the Website Maintenance Procedure. Displays and Library guides and leaflets will be reviewed annually and links checked during this review.

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PERIODICAL AND BOOK BINDING
An example of a book binding available in the world wide market:Leather Bound Visitors Book Leather Bound Condolence Book

A leather bound visitor book completed in 2005 for the Lord Major of Leeds. The tan leather cover is finished with corner embellishments and the city crest embossed in gold foil on the front board. The spine has been decorated with raised bands to complete an elegant looking binding. Bespoke Clam Shell Presentation Box

These condolence books have been bound in black Kaduna leather, with marbled endpapers and silk ribbons. > specialist binding > leather colour swatch

Bespoke Guest Books

Our clam shell boxes are ideal for corporate and marketing presentations, reports,

These guest books were produced for the Princes trust and have been bound in crimson leather, with embossed logo, silk ribbons, and

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET archival storage, and other types of paper. > specialist binding > buckram colour swatch Clam Shell Box Slip Cases marble endpapers.

A navy blue buckram bound clam shell box. The cover lettering uses a large font size and contains the company logo in gold foil blocking.

Slip cases are idea for storing volumes of books. We can produce slip cases for any of our bindings, or to meet your bespoke requirements. Slip cases are also ideal for videos, magazines, and CDs. Facsimile Bindings

Bound Theses

We offer a wide range of options for students wishing to bind theses, dissertations and reports. The selection above shows a variety of bindings in just some of the different colours and styles that we can provide.

Scanned books can be digitally reprinted and bound to produce an accurate facsimile reproduction. The examples above are bound in buckram with embossed company logos, and printed on fine quality cream paper. > book scanning

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET > thesis binding Bound Periodicals > facsimile binding Laminated Books

Through our periodical and journal binding service collections can be combined into bound volumes that are stronger and more durable for your library shelves. > periodical / journal binding

We can provide laminate hardcover conversion for softbound books and paperbacks. This is an ideal way of adding life to your precious book collections. > laminate conversion

Booking In

Spine Trimming

Advert Collation

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1. Jobs are unpacked and given a unique job ticket at our goods in station, where we have specialist software to track items through the bindery. 2. The old binding adhesive is removed with an automated guillotine. All the latest safety features are present with these machines, including laser light barriers to protect the operator, and ball-bearing air floatation beds to make handling of work easier especially when cutting large and heavy items. 3. Adverts are manually removed from the journals, and remain on our premises for 4 weeks should they be needed. For laminated paperbacks the covers are removed and sent to our reprographics department for reproduction. 

Sewing Up the Book Text Block
Book Sewing Machines Section Sewing

4. Our book sewing machines are able to sew single pages when old glues have been removed. Books are sewn incrementally - building up the book text block in the traditional manner. Each leaf is securely sewn to the next and tapes are sewn on if the binding is particularly heavy. Section Sewing is a traditional method of sewing journals, periodicals and books - tried and tested over the years, and used for sewing through single sheets of paper. However if items are in their original folded section format they are sewn separately using specialist saddle sewing machines.

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Steaming Pressing & Gluing Up the Book Text Block
Steaming Heat Pressing Gluing Up

5. Steam folding is a process applied to books and periodicals which have been oversewn. Remoisturisable adhesive is activated on the sewn edge of each end sheet when steam is applied. 6. Immediately after steaming the binding requires 'nipping' with a press to align end sheets and to square the edges of the book text block. 7. Flexible adhesive is applied to the spines of the sewn, steamed and pressed text blocks. Fans are used to aid the drying process of the spines.

Guillotine Trimming

Rounding and Backing

Spine Lining

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET 8. High precision guillotine machines preserve margins and ensure clean edges on bindings. 9. First the block is rounded to form a convex shape in the binding edge and a corresponding concave format the front edge. This gives the binding a natural shape and achieves an effect similar to a bridge span where stress forces are evenly distributed stopping excessive pulling at the ends. 10. Spine Lining is applied to the spine of each of bound book to strengthen the text block. 11. Next a joint (sometimes called 'a ridge' or 'a shoulder') is shaped on each side of the binding edge. This joint allows a hinge in the cover, meaning that the book can be opened with less strain on the binding as the pages are now securely held in the cover. This type of binding joint means that the pages do not fall forward or sag due to their weight, thickness or type of paper. A book not bound in this traditional way stands a higher risk of failure - inconveniencing readers by being out of use. 

Covering
Hot Foil Lettering Glue Rolling Laying On the Cover

12. One of only a handful of machines to be found in Europe capable of lettering across and down the spine on individual different sizes of materials. Our hot foil lettering machines enables us to produce a bound book quickly with consistent lettering in gold, silver, black or white foil. The very latest in bookbinding technology, extremely dependable in day-to-day operation. Moreover, the book finishing department at Hollingworth & Moss is connected to a main database server pulling information off our databases for automatically setting and stamping of covers. 13. Spine pieces are cut to size for each book text block to complete the cover. The front boards of the book are already present as these were produced at the guillotine trimming stage. 14. Each lettered sheet is placed through a glue roller machine which applies adhesive to the underside of the covers the boards are precision aligned and the cases made by one of our 30 | A B U S Y A H M I A D I B N D / I L M 0 6 / 2 0 1 0

LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET binders.

Casing In

Hydraulic Press

Checking

15. Adhesive is applied to the book end sheets before a hydraulic press is applied to the book cover using heated rods to define the French Joint, which is designed to facilitate the ease of opening. Each sheet of lettered buckram cover is placed through a specialist glue roller machine which applies adhesive to the underside only. Allowing the front boards and spine to be attached to the buckram. 16. Books are then checked and packed, signed out and ready for dispatch. 

ESTIMATE BUDGET OF BOOK BINDING
Estimate budget for book binding is B$30,000.00 to buy this machine to be used in our new building library latter.

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INTER-LIBRARYLOAN AND DOCUMENT DELIVERY
Interlibrary loan (abbreviated ILL, and sometimes called interloan, document delivery, or document supply etc.) is a service whereby a user of one library can borrow books or receive photocopies of documents that are owned by another library. The user makes a request with their local library, which, acting as an intermediary, identifies owners of the desired item, places the request, receives the item, makes it available to the user, and arranges for its return. Although books and journal articles are the most frequently requested items, some libraries will lend audio recordings, video recordings, maps, sheet music, and microforms of all kinds. In many cases, nominal fees accompany interlibrary loan services. The term document delivery may also be used for a related service, namely the supply of journal articles and other copies on a personalized basis, whether these come from other libraries or direct from publishers. The end user is usually responsible for any fees, such as costs for postage or photocopying. Commercial document delivery services will borrow on behalf of any customer willing to pay their rates. 

How interlibrary loan works
Interlibrary loan, or resource sharing, has two operations: borrowing and lending.
y y y

A borrowing library sends an owning library a request to borrow, photocopy, or scan materials needed by their patron. The owning library fills the request by sending materials to the borrowing library or supplies a reason why it cannot fill the request. If the item is sent, the borrowing library notifies the patron when the item arrives. 

BUDGET FOR INTERLIBRARY LOAN
TYPE OF ILL DOMESTIC ILL ESTIMATE BUDGET B$
TOTAL B$ NOTES Surcharge may be changed according to economical issues. Surcharge may be changed according to economical issues.

INTERNATIONAL ILL

Cost of postal × Transportation 1.50× 50 (2.00) =2.50 Weight count, 1 KG = 50C Cost of postal × Transportation 2.50× 1.00 (3.50) = 4.00 Weight count, 1 KG = 50C

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PRESERVATION MATERIALS
Preservation is a branch of library and information science concerned with maintaining or restoring access to artifacts, documents and records through the study, diagnosis, treatment and prevention of decay and damage. It should be distinguished from conservation which refers to the treatment and repair of individual items to slow decay or restore them to a usable state. Conservation is occasionally used interchangeably with preservation, particularly outside the professional literature. Although preservation as a formal profession in libraries and archives dates from the twentieth century, its philosophy and practice has roots in many earlier traditions. In library science, preservation is treated as an active and intentional process, as opposed to the passive sense of preservation that might be applied to paleontological or archaeological finds. The survival of these items is a matter of chance, from an information science perspective, while the preservation of them after their discovery is a matter of intentional activity. Addressing collection preservation as part of library building design helps to protect the collection against catastrophic loss and to reduce library expenses by extending the collection¶s service life. The purpose of collection preservation is to manage risk to an acceptable level, while acknowledging that avoiding risk altogether is impossible. The collection is the library¶s single largest asset; designing the building that houses it to maximize protection against major losses, including earthquake, fire, water damage, and theft, is responsible management of public resources. Designing an indoor environment (including temperature, humidity, air quality, and light levels) conducive to preservation extends the collection¶s service life by slowing down its rate of physical deterioration. Books and documents intended to be kept in the collection permanently will not need to be replaced as often, saving the library money. 33 | A B U S Y A H M I A D I B N D / I L M 0 6 / 2 0 1 0

LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET Preservation costs money to save money; it requires an initial investment in building features and systems to increase protection and reduce deterioration. The library¶s return on its investment comes as cost avoidance in the years that follow: fewer losses and longer service life. To minimize upfront costs, actions to protect the collection and actions to optimize the collection environment should be addressed separately. Some collections have to last forever; many libraries have ³special´ and ³local history´ collections they want to last centuries, if possible. These collections largely are irreplaceable and therefore need additional features from the building design to maximize their service lives. However, most collection materials in most publicly funded libraries are not added to the collection with the expectation that they will continue to be part of the collection indefinitely. Opportunities to minimize preservation-related construction and operating costs accrue from distinguishing between the needs of general and special collections. If the two types of collections can be segregated for storage and use, the higher cost solutions needed for special collections can be addressed without incurring the cost of applying the same solutions to the general collections. For example, irreplaceable special collection materials might be stored in a very secure part of the building where there are no emergency exits from the building decreasing the risk of theft, and without water lines or other utilities, decreasing the risk of water damage. Special collection materials could be used in reading areas where sight lines from service desks are unobstructed, providing a sense of vigilance and security for the collection. The relatively challenging environmental conditions needed for storage of special collections might be met more readily and less expensively by locating special collections away from exterior walls and windows where environmental control is more difficult and more costly.

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Best Practices
Below is a Current best practices to preserve our library collection in the new proposed of library building by using this technology. i. Minimize exposure to arson which are accountable for nearly a third of all library fires; use compartmentation to limit the spread of fire; ii. Employ fire detection AND water-based fire suppression systems for collection protection.

1) Minimize exposure to arson
Exterior doors in library buildings (public, staff, and emergency egress doors) need to be well attended and controlled, and they usually are. Windows, however, too often are left unattended during library open hours, and left unlocked or open when the library is closed, providing an arsonist with an opportunity to start a fire by tossing into the building burning rags, wadded up paper, or even (on record) Molotov cocktails. Windows that do not open eliminate this risk, or the risk can be reduced by the use of screening to cover windows that can be opened. A second major exposure to arson comes from book returns that penetrate the exterior wall into library space. A book return built into the wall of a library gives an arsonist easy access to the interior, and often is provided with a convenient fuel source in the form of other books that previously have been deposited in the book return. Much damage has been done by book return fires, including damage from smoke that spreads throughout the building. Best practice is to use stand alone book return bins located outside and away from the perimeter of the building.

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2) Use compartmentation to limit the spread of fire

In any book stack, the risk of major damage to or loss of the entire collection is reduced by introducing ³compartmentation,´ i.e., subdividing the book stack by constructing fire-resistant walls, ceilings, and floors to limit the spread of fire, smoke, and to some extent, water. Compartmentation is a highly successful method of reducing risk if barriers are designed and installed properly. Fire ratings must be appropriate for book stacks, and there can be no breaks or interruptions to the barriers. Points often overlooked in the use of compartmentation are

Fire-Rated Doors on Automatic

Fire-Rated Seals at Material 2-Hour Fire-Rated Walls

Figure 2: Figure 1. Special Collection Area separated through

continuation of the walls above drop ceilings to the floor above, installation of automatic dampers in air handling systems, sealing of gaps around utility tunnels, and use of automatic fire doors; all are measures designed to help isolate compartments from one another to prevent the spread of fire, smoke, and water. Vertical openings between floors for services, stairwells, and

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET elevators need to be sealed if each floor is to become a separate compartment and barrier to the spread of fire. Special collection storage areas often are especially suitable for compartmentation; the collection usually is housed in closed stacks (not accessible directly by library patrons) and often has additional security and environmental requirements that dovetail well with the use of compartmentation for fire protection.

3) Employ fire detection AND water-based fire suppression systems
Fire detection systems include those based on heat sensors, smoke sensors, and products of combustion sensors. Fire detection systems can detect fires prior to triggering the suppression system and, consequently, can buy an extremely valuable few minutes for fire department response. Among fire detection equipment options, products of combustion sensors can detect fires sooner than heat or smoke detectors, so have been recommended when water damage from the suppression system is to be avoided if at all possible.

Fire Suppression Systems
Most fire suppression systems in libraries are water-based sprinkler systems, but non-aqueous gas, expansion foam, and chemical powder suppression systems also are available. Non-aqueous fire suppression systems based on the use of carbon dioxide are not used in libraries because people can be suffocated by the system when it discharges. Non-aqueous systems based on use of fluorocarbons have been outlawed due to the damage the fluorocarbon discharge can do to the environment.

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET Water-based fire suppression systems utilize a range of delivery technologies from ³wet pipe´ to ³dry pipe´ to high pressure ³water mist´ systems. Wet pipe systems keep the sprinkler pipes filled with water at all times and use temperature-triggered sprinkler heads that open the sprinkler valves at a predetermined temperature (140-155rF). The wet pipe system has proven to be very reliable in many library installations for three reasons: it works when needed, it is unlikely to discharge when not needed (short of someone accidentally breaking off a sprinkler head), and it requires the least maintenance of all types of fire suppression systems. Part of the

Sprinkler Piping

Sprinkler Head

Figure 3: Typical Water-based Fire

success of the wet pipe system is due to its simple technology and relatively low maintenance requirements; staff knowledge of suppression systems often is limited, and maintenance schedules are notorious for being deferred to higher priority needs. "On/off" sprinkler heads, once a popular technology designed to limit the amount of water discharged by automatically turning on and off the flow of water, no longer are available from domestic manufacturers following failures and recalls of some designs in the late 1990s.

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET ³Water mist´ systems are similar to wet pipe systems in design except that they deliver water under high pressure to specially designed nozzles, creating a fog of fine water droplets that quickly lowers the temperature below that needed to support combustion. The water mist system is designed to use the least water and cause the least water damage, but has not yet been widely deployed for the protection of library collections, so little is known about its long-term performance. However, the monetary and historical value of some special collections may justify investigation of the latest developments in this fire suppression technology. ³Dry pipe´ systems are filled with air rather than water until the fire detection system senses a fire, at which point the pipes fill with water. Alternately, a sprinkler head is tripped and opened, which releases the air from the pipes. The pipes fill with water, and water is discharged from the sprinkler head(s) that opened. Dry pipe systems suffer some disadvantages from the preservation perspective: they are slower to respond to a need for suppression than wet pipe systems, and they require more attention to maintenance. In the absence of the required maintenance, they are more likely to fail.

Fire Protection and Cellulose Nitrate Film
Cellulose nitrate film decomposes over time, becoming less stable and more combustible, a process exacerbated by elevated temperatures and storage in concentration. Early motion picture films were made of cellulose nitrate and most commonly have been stored in rolls in film cans. Many special collections have significant holdings of early cellulose nitrate sheet film (as distinct from motion picture film), much of it in protective paper sleeves or interfiled with related paper documents and in quite serviceable condition.

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Water Protection

With the exception of the use of water to extinguish fire, water damage to collections is a consequence of a failure of a building system to work as intended. The roof, the windows, the plumbing, the heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, and rarely, the fire sprinkler system, cause water damage because they have failed. In addition to using well designed and constructed systems, there are two building-related approaches to optimize water protection for the collections: system avoidance and vigilance.

System Avoidance
System avoidance entails eliminating any systems from collection storage areas unneeded to meet the operational requirements for collection storage. While the primary concern usually is water damage, systems that could create a fire also should be reviewed for elimination. Unnecessary windows, restrooms, utility sinks and other utility plumbing, and roof drains that pass through the building should be eliminated from areas designed primarily to store collections. If areas are multi-use, including collection storage, compromises will need to be made to accommodate the multiple functions, but at increased risk to the collections.

Vigilance
Vigilance in the form of routine inspection and maintenance is an effective form of water protection. Routine inspection of gutters for clogging leaves, roofs for cracks, the support structure below for telltale water stains, joints on plumbing for evidence of corrosion and slow leaks, and interior drains for sluggish performance are among the often deferred facility services. An alternative solution to some routine inspection is installation of automatic monitoring systems 40 | A B U S Y A H M I A D I B N D / I L M 0 6 / 2 0 1 0

LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET that detect water; equipment is available to monitor for roof leaks, water buildup on floors, and wet walls, with options for either local alarms or automated notification to 24/7 monitoring services. A search on the World Wide Web for ³water detection´ will yield a range of equipment designed for this purpose.

Siting HVAC Equipment

Locate Water Sensor Cables and Water Leak Detection Devices under Access Floor.

Water Leak Detection Device
Figure 4: Water Leak Detection under Access Floors.

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LIBRARY MANAGEMENT: BUDGET Placing the HVAC equipment on the roof over the collection area is undesirable for two reasons. Vibration from the equipment can cause fractures to the roof¶s surface, leading to AVOID Locating HVAC Equipment above Stack Areas

AVOID Roof Penetrations for Ducts above Stacks

AVOID locating shelving ranges parallel to windows to minimize damage from light exposure.

leakage, and the equipment itself can provide water an entry point through the roof to the interior below. Further, the discharge of water from the system has been known to back up until it overflowed into the building. For both reasons, siting the HVAC equipment alongside the building is better than any roof location, and failing that option for aesthetic or space reasons, siting it away from collection areas is recommended. From my estimation this technology cost B$ 25 Million to be install in new purposed library building when it finish built then.

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LIBRARY SECURITY SYSTEM
Theft and Vandalism Protection
Managing access to and egress from the storage and reading areas is essential for provision of good service and protection of collections. Unobstructed sight lines for staff observation of user behavior are a good deterrent to theft and vandalism, as well as beneficial for staff and patron safety. The design and layout of service desks need to consider points of entry and exit from the library. Key or card access to special collections areas needs to be different from that to the general collections areas to ensure that only authorized staff has access to the facilities and collections. Budget for installing library security is including the budget of developing the VILIS project.

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Challenges for the Future
In October 2009, College appointed the Scholarly Information Program Task Force with a charge to articulate a structure of vision and goals for post-Partnership resource development, thus beginning a new cycle of strategic planning. Among the challenges to be confronted at this time are:y y Continued price inflation and the ongoing need to encourage change in the economics of scholarly publishing A new budget crisis compounded from the State's inability to fully fund the library components of the Partnership Agreement, as recounted above, and the significant shortfall in State revenues, beginning in 2002-03, that will seriously affect the University's budgetary prospects over the next few years. The emerging need to review the role(s) of the campus library, including the use and management of physical facilities and collections, in the light of changing demands and the evolving capabilities of shared collections and services, and reassess the roles and relationships among the elements of shared infrastructure (including, for example, the CDL and the RLFs) and the campus libraries. Opportunities and expectations for leveraging online assets for educational/instructional and public advantage

y

y

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