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Department of Psychological Medicine &

Psychiatry

Psychiatric Research
Student Handbook
2009/10
To be used in conjunction with myCampus Denmark Hill

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Contents
WELCOME TO THE PROGRAMME ............................................................................................................ 5
ABOUT KING'S COLLEGE LONDON ......................................................................................................... 6
GRADUATE SCHOOL............................................................................................................................................ 6

ABOUT THE INSTITUTE OF PSYCHIATRY................................................................................................. 6
TAUGHT PROGRAMMES ....................................................................................................................................... 6
RESEARCH........................................................................................................................................................... 6
OUR GRADUATE ENVIRONMENT .......................................................................................................................... 7
LIBRARIES ........................................................................................................................................................... 7
DEPARTMENT OF BIOSTATISTICS ........................................................................................................................ 7
DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTING AND KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT ....................................................................... 7

ABOUT THE PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH PROGRAMME............................................................................. 7
KEY CONTACTS .................................................................................................................................................. 8
MODE OF ATTENDANCE....................................................................................................................................... 8
PROGRAMME OVERVIEW .................................................................................................................................... 8
Elective modules: ............................................................................................................................................. 8
PROGRAMME AIMS & OBJECTIVES ..................................................................................................................... 8
PROGRAMME STRUCTURE ................................................................................................................................... 9
PROGRAMME COMMITTEE ......................................................................................................................................... 9
CALENDAR 2009/2010 ...................................................................................................................................... 10
TIMETABLE (CORE PROGRAMME) 2009/2010 ................................................................................................... 10
TIMETABLE (SPECIALIST STUDY UNITS) 2009/10......................................................................................................... 13

MODULES DESCRIPTIONS ..................................................................................................................... 14
CORE MODULE: RESEARCH METHODS, ETHICS AND STATISTICS IN MENTAL HEALTH .......................................................... 14
BLOCK A: MEASUREMENT IN MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES .............................................................................................. 15
BLOCK A: SOCIAL PSYCHIATRY ................................................................................................................................ 16
BLOCK A: SYSTEMATIC REVIEW IN MENTAL HEALTH..................................................................................................... 17
BLOCK B: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH METHODS ............................................................................................................ 18
BLOCK B: STATISTICAL METHODS IN PSYCHIATRIC EPIDEMIOLOGY.................................................................................. 19
BLOCK B: PSYCHIATRIC GENETICS ........................................................................................................................... 20
BLOCK C: BRAIN-BEHAVIOUR INTERFACE ................................................................................................................... 21
BLOCK C: MENTAL HEALTH SERVICES RESEARCH: THEORY TO PRACTICE........................................................................ 22
BLOCK D: MENTAL HEALTH ECONOMIC EVALUATION .................................................................................................... 23
BLOCK D: INTERNATIONAL MENTAL HEALTH ............................................................................................................... 24
BLOCK D: NEUROIMAGING....................................................................................................................................... 25
DISSERTATION IN PSYCHIATRIC RESEARCH ................................................................................................................ 26

LEARNING AND SUPPORT FOR LEARNING ........................................................................................... 27
ATTENDANCE........................................................................................................................................................ 27
ACADEMIC AND PERSONAL TUTORIAL SUPPORT ................................................................................................ 27
ESSAY WRITING AND EXAMINATIONS ................................................................................................................ 27
DISSERTATION SUPERVISION ................................................................................................................................... 28
REFERENCING ...................................................................................................................................................... 28
ENGLISH LANGUAGE SUPPORT ......................................................................................................................... 28

COURSEWORK & DISSERTATION .......................................................................................................... 29
COURSEWORK ...................................................................................................................................................... 29
DISSERTATION .................................................................................................................................................. 29
SUBMISSION DEADLINES FOR COURSEWORK AND DISSERTATION.................................................................................... 30
ASSESSMENT ..................................................................................................................................................... 30
Assessment Methods .................................................................................................................................... 30
Assessment Weighting ................................................................................................................................. 31
Assessment Criteria ..................................................................................................................................... 31
CRITERIA FOR MARKING RESEARCH DISSERTATION: ........................................................................................ 31

EXAMINATIONS...................................................................................................................................... 32

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MARKING STRUCTURE ............................................................................................................................................ 32
EXAMINATION BOARD ...................................................................................................................................... 32

STUDENT FEEDBACK & REPRESENTATION .......................................................................................... 34
QUESTIONNAIRES .............................................................................................................................................. 34
PROGRAMME COMMITTEE................................................................................................................................. 34
STUDENTS’ FORUM ........................................................................................................................................... 34
KING’S COLLEGE LONDON STUDENTS’ UNION ................................................................................................. 34
EDUCATION SUPPORT TEAM (SCHOOL OFFICE) ................................................................................................ 34
PERSONAL TUTORS ........................................................................................................................................... 34

ADVICE .................................................................................................................................................. 35
STUDENT ADVICE AND INTERNATIONAL STUDENT SUPPORT ............................................................................ 35
COUNSELLING ................................................................................................................................................... 35
KING’S COLLEGE LONDON STUDENTS’ UNION ................................................................................................. 35
CAREERS ADVICE ............................................................................................................................................. 36
CODE OF CONDUCT ........................................................................................................................................... 37
EQUALITY & DIVERSITY ................................................................................................................................... 37
EQUAL OPPORTUNITIES .......................................................................................................................................... 37
STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES .......................................................................................................................... 38
GRIEVANCE PROCEDURE................................................................................................................................... 38
HEALTH AND SAFETY ....................................................................................................................................... 38

COLLEGE REGULATIONS ...................................................................................................................... 39
APPENDIX 1 – MITIGATING CIRCUMSTANCES & REQUESTS FOR A BOARD OF EXAMINERS TO REVIEW
ITS DECISION ......................................................................................................................................... 40
APPENDIX 2 – COLLEGE STATEMENT ON PLAGIARISM AND RELATED FORMS OF CHEATING ........... 44
APPENDIX 3 – AWARD SCHEME & CREDIT FRAMEWORK ..................................................................... 45
APPENDIX 4 – AWARD GRANTING POWERS ......................................................................................... 46
APPENDIX 5 – THE HARVARD REFERENCING SYSTEM ......................................................................... 47
APPENDIX 6 – NOTABLE DATES AND RELIGIOUS FESTIVALS .............................................................. 49
APPENDIX 7 – BIBLIOGRAPHY / RECOMMENDED TEXTS AND JOURNALS ........................................... 50

This booklet can also be provided in alternative
formats such as large print, tape and on disk
upon request to the Education Support Team.

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Welcome to the Programme
Welcome to the Psychiatric Research Programme. This handbook is designed with you in mind and
you should find here most of the information you will need for the coming academic year. The
handbook includes details of the programme and modules you will be following as well as information
about student welfare and other services offered by King College London. At Postgraduate level we
expect students to take responsibility for their studies, so please make sure you familiarise yourselves
with the programme details and assessment regulations.
We also suggest you consult the main King’s College London website http://www.kcl.ac.uk where you
will find a section for current postgraduate students. Similarly, the Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) website
is a useful resource (http://www.iop.kcl.ac.uk) offering information and advice in pages aimed at
current taught students. The ‘What’s On’ link is also worth checking regularly, as it lists forthcoming
events such as seminars, lectures and conferences, most of which are open to students.
You will spend most of your time at the Denmark Hill Campus, which has excellent learning and
teaching facilities. For more information on the facilities available at Denmark Hill please refer to
myCampus, which you will find in your enrolment pack; additional copies can be requested from the
Education Support Team. All students are automatically entitled to use facilities at the other campuses
including all libraries throughout King's College London.
Studying at Postgraduate level is stimulating and rewarding but it can also be challenging and
demanding. Our aim is to support you in your studies and you will be assigned a personal tutor who
you should meet at least once a term. Don’t forget that other students can also be a valuable source of
mutual intellectual and social support; study groups and reading groups, for example, are good ways to
share ideas and experiences and get to know fellow students.
Whilst we expect you to take your studies seriously, we also hope that you will take full advantage of
the galleries, museums and cultural life that London has to offer. We are fortunate to have good
transport links to many places of interest, including the Tate Modern, South Bank, National Theatre,
Royal Festival Hall, the Millennium Bridge and Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre, all of which can be
reached by train or bus. At Denmark Hill you are a short train journey away from Southwark
Cathedral and on Fridays and Saturdays Borough High Street plays host to one of the biggest and best
food markets in the UK. The interesting shops, cafes and theatres of Covent Garden and the West End
are only a bus ride away and there are lots of good cafés, pubs and places to eat near the campus.
Finally, we hope that you enjoy your time on the Psychiatric Research Programme. Studying can and
should be a pleasurable, interesting experience and we wish you every success on your chosen
programme.

Jane Boydell
Programme Leader

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cognitive behavioural therapies. Graduate School www. neuroscience. museums and research institutes. With 19.uk King’s College London is one of Europe’s foremost research universities. which enables students to become part of the dialogue of their chosen discipline. lectures and. Law. King’s has four campuses within a square mile on the banks of the Thames in central London and one at Denmark Hill. therapists. Based in London – Europe’s knowledge capital – King’s students have access to an unrivalled concentration of libraries.iop.ac. in seminars.About King's College London www. Biomedical and Health Sciences. The Graduate School website is an invaluable resource for current events and details of how to access the skills development programme. addiction and forensic mental health. informally. developing students for careers as clinicians.uk for more information. south London. with an outstanding reputation for teaching and research. encouraging specialist knowledge in topics related to psychiatry. Research The quality of our research has been recognised by our achievement of the highest 5* rating at the last two Research Assessment Exercises and our academics rank among the most influential researchers. information sharing. nationally and internationally. interdisciplinary research culture.000 staff. a graduate skills development programme. psychology. Nursing & Midwifery. many of our academics are involved daily in the care of patients and we consult patient representatives about planning and design of research. One of the two founding colleges of the University of London. as well as at the level of services and national health and social care policies.uk The Institute of Psychiatry (IoP) is a global leader in teaching and research in the sciences relevant to mental health. based at Waterloo Campus. and neuroscience. As a student at the Institute of Psychiatry you will be immersed in a vibrant. Close contact occurs between staff and students throughout the programmes. We have strong connections to the South London and Maudsley Foundation NHS Trust. please contact graduateschool@kcl. and to evaluate their implementation at patient level.ac. whose remit is to support current students through network events.uk/graduate/school The College has a central Graduate School.kcl. in places like the café diner.ac. You will mix with senior staff and fellow students working in complementary fields on a day-to-day basis. the College offers undergraduate and postgraduate courses in nine schools: Institute of Psychiatry. researchers and educators. Genetic & Developmental Psychiatry 6 . Physical Sciences and Engineering. We offer an exceptionally wide range of programmes covering subjects such as clinical psychology. to develop new treatments. the Dental Institute. Research is divided into the following departments: • Biostatistics & Computing • Child & Adolescent Psychiatry • Forensic Mental Health Science • Health Service & Population Research • Clinical Neuroscience • Neuroscience • Psychological Medicine & Psychiatry • Psychology • Social. Medicine. Humanities. Taught programmes Graduate programmes are taught in relatively small student groups.kcl.ac. Social Science and Public Policy. funding opportunities and career progression.700 students and 5. Our work encompasses almost the entire range of disciplines required to understand the causes of mental disorders. About the Institute of Psychiatry www.kcl.

uk/departments/?locator=992 The computing side the Department is responsible for network. See the link above for information about the computer rooms available for student use. the Psychosis Centre and a Centre for Forensic Mental Health.kcl. About the Psychiatric Research Programme http://www.iop. to as many as sixty-two other specialised libraries within the University of London. Libraries http://www.ac. Programme Leader and Muriel Walshe. Contact details are given below. as are microform readers and photocopiers.000 electronic journals. A number of special collections are housed in the library. The library is the largest psychiatric library in Western Europe.uk The Institute of Psychiatry has a Department of Biostatistics which runs a statistical consultancy service.ac. Department of Biostatistics http://biostatistics. file servicing and image processing services. Students are also able to join the University of London Library. Professor Robin Murray. Training is offered free to library members on the use of data-bases and electronic information sources. Department of Computing and Knowledge Management http://www. the MRC Neurodegeneration & Clinical Neuroscience Centre.iop. holding 3000 print journal titles. 38.Our graduate environment The Institute of Psychiatry has recently undergone major refurbishment work. Four exciting new centres have opened recently. Ample seating for readers is available on three floors of the library and facilities for online computer-based literature searches are provided. The manuscript collections and the Guttman-Maclay collection of psychopathological art are housed in the archives building of the Bethlem Royal Hospital.kcl. at the Denmark Hill Campus. Information Services and Systems (ISS) offers a range of services to students including those delivered through Public Access Workstations Service (PAWS). M2.ac. All students are automatically entitled to membership of all the libraries of King's College London.kcl. 7 . students on the Psychiatric Research Programme have access to the Institute’s library and Weston Education Centre. and to libraries at other King’s College London campuses. The service is intended to provide initial project advice and technical support with carrying out the statistical aspects of a research project. 550 of which are current subscriptions. Programme Co-ordinator are all based in the main IoP Building. the Programme Administrator is based within the Education Support Team.uk/iss/library As students of the Institute of Psychiatry. The statisticians in the Department of Biostatistics provide statistical advice to staff and students from all other Institute of Psychiatry departments free of charge.iop.mscpsychiatricresearch. which holds general medical literature. along with newly refurbished facilities for Biostatistics and Epidemiology. including items formerly belonging to key figures in the historical development of British Psychiatry. We have access to over 13. Jane Boydell. and CD-ROM/video training materials. Use the link above to find out more about the statistical services offered to students at the Institute of Psychiatry. Any items not held can usually be requested via a rapid inter-library lending service. This membership provides further access to a number of special collections. specialist research facilities with state-of-the-art equipment and laboratories. Access may be arranged.000 books. You will be offered information retrieval training sessions during the first term to help you improve your searching skills. In addition. Use the link above to find out more about statistical courses 2009/10. if required. You are advised to make use of this vast resource whenever possible. Dr. offering courses in statistical techniques and software applications. the CCBB (Centre for Cellular Basis of Behaviour).ac.uk Linda Daley.kcl.21 of the Main IoP Building and can be contacted on 020 7848 0497. including the nearby King's College Hospital library. extending the purpose-designed. Programme Director. including the British Psychological Society Library and the library of the Royal Statistical Society.

evaluation and problem solving. 1 year 1 day per week. web database exploration. and four elective modules. individual time management.m.uk Mode of attendance • • Full time Part time 2 days per week. design studies and conduct psychiatric research in health and social care settings. Systematic review methodology. presentation. We make every effort to run all of these but final decisions are made according to viability and levels of interest. • Intellectual Skills: Skills in univariate statistics and epidemiological and social research methodology as applied in psychiatric research.ac. neuroimaging. The programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate knowledge and understanding and skills in the following areas: • Knowledge and understanding: A grounding in the ethical and scientific principles common to all mental health research disciplines. ethical committee applications and consent from construction. Elective modules: • • • • • • • • • • • Neuroimaging Qualitative Research Methods Social Psychiatry Statistical Methods in Psychiatric Epidemiology Mental Health Economic Evaluation* Measurement in Mental Health Services Research Brain-Behaviour Interface Mental Health Service Research: Theory to Practice* Systematic Review in Mental Health Psychiatric Genetics International Mental Health * Only by prior agreement with Programme Leader Programme Aims & Objectives To provide advanced training in the ethical and scientific principles common to all mental health research disciplines. policy and an understanding of the context in which it takes place. which is run by the Division of Psychological Medicine & Psychiatry.boydell@.daley@iop. To provide an in-depth practical and theoretical knowledge base to guide the practice and interpretation of research in the field of mental health. Psychiatric Research consists of six modules: two compulsory modules (Research Methods. logistic and ethical issues • Generic / Transferable Skills: The ability to conduct a supervised research project and to present the findings in the form of a dissertation.ac. understanding of Social Psychiatry methods. group working. Ethics and Statistics and Dissertation in Psychiatric Research).ac. critical appraisal. skills in database handling and evaluation. several statistical and presentation packages.uk 020 7848 0497 linda.Key Contacts Name Job Title Contact Details Professor Robin Murray Dr Jane Boydell Dr Muriel Walshe Linda Daley Programme Director Programme Leader Programme Co-ordinator Programme Administrator 020 7848 0100 robin.walshe@kcl. biological and psychiatric genetic research techniques.uk 020 7848 0057 muriel. together with skills in statistics and epidemiological and both biological and social research methodology.kcl.murray@kcl.uk 020 7848 0497 jane. is based at the Denmark Hill Campus of King’s College London. comprehension and dissemination of research findings. statistical package use up to regression methods.ac. an ability to work in a multidisciplinary environment 8 . 2 years Programme Overview The Psychiatric Research Programme. awareness of practical. the ability to appraise and critique research • Practical Skills: An ability to formulate research questions. The elective modules offered for 2009/10 are listed below and are described in more detail later in this handbook.kcl. appraisal and report writing skills. assimilation.

The membership of the Programme Committee is: Programme Chair Programme Leader Programme Team Student Representatives Head. • To guarantee that entry requirements. teaching methods. assessment procedures and provision of support are suitable for both the programme and students. • To liaise with the Institute’s Teaching Committee and consider any business required by that committee. In practice. Programme Leaders and members of the teaching staff. Students should choose one module from each of blocks A. including syllabus and assessment criteria. • To ensure that assessment procedures are fair and consistent and that the award conferred is appropriate to both programme and student performance. Semester 2 4 Block Study Modules (15 credits each). • To enhance and develop the curriculum in line with current trends in the subject. • To ensure the programme falls within the remit of the Institute's academic profile. Education Support Team Head of Department Dean Institute Secretary Professor Martin Prince Dr Jane Boydell Module Leaders Students are nominated once the course has started Karen Langridge Professor Robin Murray Professor Shitij Kapoor Richard Barnard The responsibilities of the Programme Committee are: • To consider feedback from students on the programme. • To ensure that the programme is academically sound and compares favourably with other similar programmes. C and D: Block A Measurement in Mental Health Services Research Social Psychiatry Systematic Review in Mental Health Block B Qualitative Research Methods Statistical Methods in Psychiatric Epidemiology Psychiatric Genetics Block C Brain-Behaviour Interface Mental Health Services Research: Theory to Practice* Block D Mental Health Services Economic Evaluation* International Mental Health Neuroimaging *Students may only take these modules by prior permission of the Programme Leader if they can demonstrate prior competence in the learning outcomes of the other module(s) within this block. which comprises of the Programme Chair. • To make sure adequate resources are made available to the programme. responsibility for day-to-day shaping of the programme is devolved to the Programme Learning and Teaching Group. Ethics and Statistics in Mental Health (Core module: 60 credits). B. Dissertation in Psychiatric Research (Core module: 60 credits) Semester 3 Programme Committee The programme committee has overall responsibility for overseeing the programme.Programme Structure Compulsory units to be taken in each year 1x60 credit core module 1x60 credit core dissertation Optional units to be taken in each year 4x15 credit optional modules Semester 1 Research Methods. 9 .

17.30–10. 27th September 2010 – Friday.30 Ethics 1: Intro to ethical principles in biomedical research.00 Thursday 07/10/2010 9. Jane Boydell Systematic Review Lecture/Practical Computer Room A 14:00– 17:00 Systematic Review Lecture/Practical Computer Room A 9.00 IoP Induction Induction Wolfson Lecture Theatre 9.30 14.00 . 26th August 2011 Timetable (Core Programme) 2010/2011 Week 1 Monday 27/10/2010 Week 2 Monday 04/10/2010 14.00 Week 3 Monday 11/10/2010 9.45 Introduction to Psychiatric Research Jane Boydell Introduction to MHSR Graham Thornicroft Introduction to Study Design Rob Stewart Statistics 1: descriptive stats practical Rina Dutta Statistics 2: Data Processing Rina Dutta Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Computer Practical Lecture/Computer Practical Computer Room A 11:15 -12:30 14.30–12. 17th December 2010 Spring Term Monday. 24th February 2011 Block C Thursday. 22nd April 2011 Summer Term Monday.30–12.17.00 Thursday 14/10/2010 Week 4 Monday 18/10/2010 Computer Room A 10 .30–12. 28th April 2011 Block D Thursday.30 Basic Research Concepts 1: chance & bias and study design practical Rob Stewart Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 11:00–12:30 14. 24th February 2011 Block B Thursday.00 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 9. 25th April 2011 – Friday. 26th August 2011 Examinations Date Summer Examinations Thursday. 28th April 2011 Dissertation Friday.30–11. Jane Boydell Ethics 2: Applying to an ethics committee Ethics Office Ethics 3: Identifying ethical issues/informed consent. 10th January 2011 – Friday.00 .00-17.Calendar 2009/2010 Term Dates Week commencing to week ending Autumn Term Monday. 19th May 2011 Submission deadline for assessed course work Date Block A Thursday.17.00 .

00 Thursday 22/10/2010 9. Assessing Relationships between continuous variable for confounding variables.30–12:30 14.00–17:00 Week 6 Monday 1/11/2010 9.Theory Practical: paper review Jane Boydell Sampling and generalisability Sampling Weights Michael Dewey Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Study Design 2: Cohort studies Theory Practical: paper review James McCabe Study Design 2: Cohort studies Application in mental health Cohort study design practical James McCabe Statistics 7: Correlation and regression 1 Assessing relationships between continuous variables Sabine Landau Statistics 8: Correlation and regression 2. Jane Boydell Study Design 3: case-control studies. Theory/Practical: paper review.00 .30–12:30 14.17.00 Week 5 Monday 25/10/2010 9. Application in Mental Health case control study design practical.17.30–12:30 14:00– 17:00 Week 7 Monday 08/11/2010 9.00 .17.30–12:20 14.00 Thursday 11/11/2010 9:30 – 12:30 14:00– 17:00 Week 8 Monday 15/11/2010 9.30–12:30 14.00 . Sabine Landau 11 .30–12:30 14.17.00 Basic Research Concepts 2: confounding and study design practical James McCabe Statistics 3: Inference Proportions Confidence Intervals Paul Walters Statistics 4: Inference Means Means Practical Paul Walters Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Computer Room A Lecture Practical Computer Room A Study Design 1: Cross-Sectional surveys Theory/Practical: Paper review Study Design 1: Cross sectional surveys application/ Survey Design Statistics 5: stratified analysis Stratified analysis practical Avi Reichenberg Statistics 6: Data analysis Strategies/Strategies Practical Chin-Kuo Chan Lecture/Classroom Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Classroom practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Classroom practical Computer Room A Lecture/Classroom practical Computer Room A Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Computer Practical Computer Room A Lecture/Computer Practical Computer Room A Study Design 3: case-control studies.17.30–12:30 14.00 .00 Thursday 4/11/2010 9.00 . Jane Boydell Statistics 9: What test where? Theory Practical applications Avi Reichenberg Power Calculations Rob Stewart Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Computer Room A Lecture/Practical Computer Room A Study design 4: ecological studies.00 Thursday 28/10/2010 9.14.00-17.

Thursday 18/11/2010 9.00–17:00 Week 9 Monday 22/11/2010 9:30 – 12:30 14:00– 17:00 Thursday 25/11/2010 9.00 13:00–14:00 Thursday 09/12/2010 Measurement Validity coefficients Martin Prince Research logistics Planning and implementing a study practical Avi Reichenberg 9.30–12:30 14.00 .00– 17:00 Week 11 Monday 06/12/2010 Introduction to Psychopathology 1 Robin Murray/Paul Allen Introduction to Psychopathology 2 Affective disorders Jane Boydell/Carmine Pariente Anxiety Disorders Paul Walters Critical Appraisal Craig Morgan Analysis for Critical Appraisal Craig Morgan Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Computer Room A Lecture/Practical Computer Room A Introduction to Psychopathology 3 Child Psychiatry Jenny Parker Lecture Seminar Room 1 11:30– 12:15 Concept of diagnosis in psychiatry Jane Boydell & Muriel Walshe Challenges and opportunities in providing health care Graham Thornicroft Service User Research Felicity Callard Revision study design Paul Walters Revision statistics Paul Walters Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture Seminar Room 1 Lecture/Practical Seminar Room 1 Revision Day Seminar Room 1 Revision Day Computer Room B End of Term Assessment Jane Boydell Mock Exam Seminar Room 1 15:00– 17.30–12:30 14:00– 17:00 Week 12 Monday 13/12/2010 Study design 5: Randomized controlled trials Theory Practical: paper review Stuart Lancashire Study Design 6: other designs Other trial designs Interpreting trials practical Jane Boydell Study design 7: qualitative studies Theory Practical Craig Morgan Interpreting logistic regression Chin-kuo Chan Lecture/Practical 9.30– 11.00 Week 10 Monday 29/11/2010 9.30 14.30–12.13:00 12 .30– 12:30 14:00– 17:00 Thursday 2/12/2010 9:30 – 12:30 14.17.30 .00 9.

Timetable (Specialist Study Units) 2009/10 Block A Teaching Monday 04/01/10 11/01/10 18/01/10 25/01/10 01/02/10 08/02/10 Home study Tuesday 05/01/10 12/01/10 19/01/10 26/01/10 02/02/10 09/10/10 Coursework submission 18th February 2010 Block B Teaching Thursday 07/01/10 14/01/10 21/01/10 28/01/10 04/02/10 11/02/10 Home study Friday 08/01/10 15/01/10 22/01/10 29/01/10 05/02/10 12/02/10 Coursework submission 18th February 2009 Block C Teaching Monday 22/02/10 01/03/10 08/03/10 15/03/10 22/03/10 29/03/10 Home study Tuesdays 23/02/10 02/03/10 09/03/10 16/03/10 23/03/10 30/03/10 Coursework submission th 8 April 2009 Block D Teaching Thursday 25/02/10 04/03/10 11/03/10 18/03/10 25/03/10 01/04/10 Home study Friday 26/02/10 05/03/10 12/03/10 19/03/10 26/03/10 02/04/10 Coursework submission th 8 April 2009 13 .

compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1FMHPGT (Full-time) PTMS2FMHPGT (Part-time) MSc in Psychiatric Research I C O X PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other / Private Study 72 hours 60 hours 48 hours 90 hours 330 hours Assessment pattern Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. Cross-sectional surveys. King’s College London Paul Walters & Jane Boydell paul.uk jane. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Unseen written examinations 2 3 hours each 50% At least one 50% each Other (please specify) Written assessment and critical appraisal at end of first term: NOT contributing to final marks Method 14 . Understand the theory and application in Psychiatry of the following research methods 4.ac. Ethics and Statistics in Mental Health Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR100 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry. Understand the theoretical basis for statistical analysis and its application in research 7. Appreciate issues concerning sampling and measurement in mental health research and the logistics of carrying out a research study 6. Be proficient in the critical appraisal of research reports Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I).uk 020 7848 5070 020 7848 0415 Educational aims of the module The aims of the first semester teaching are to provide an advanced understanding of methods and ethics in mental health research. Understand concepts underlying research and its application in mental health 2. Ecological and time-series studies.boydell@.kcl. disseminate and apply research findings. 5 and 6. Case control studies. Cohort studies. an in depth practical knowledge of their application and of univariate statistical procedures. Be proficient in univariate statistical analyses. and be able to interpret stratified analysis and linear regression 8. Understand ethical principles to be considered in designing and conducting research 3.ac. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of this module students will: 1. Clinical trials 5.kcl.Modules Descriptions Module title Core Module: Research Methods. In addition the student will be able to critically appraise.walters@iop.

Module title Block A: Measurement in Mental Health Services Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details -7PAGRMMH Psychiatric Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry. King’s College London Cleusa Ferri. 2. Be able to devise and structure a simple questionnaire 4. Understand classical and IRT scaling theory.ac. 5 and 6. the CIS-R and CIDI. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2.uk 020 7848 0340 Educational aims of the module 1.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 15 . new technologies. and be able to a) assess the psychometric credentials of a measure for use in a particular context and b) devise suitable methods for establishing validity and reliability of a measure 3. To equip students with the skills needed to design. conduct and analyse measures used mental health services research.ferri@kcl. Receive a basic training in the administration of two contrasting fully structured lay clinical assessments. and densely repeated measures. 6. Understand the historical development and current status of the concept of a case in mental health research. including incorporation of biological assessments into epidemiological research. and be familiar with the essentials of developing and validating a new scale 5. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will have a critical understanding of: 1. Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). To provide students with advanced understanding and knowledge of the research measures used in psychiatric research. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1FMHPGT (Full-time) PTMS2FMHPGT (Part-time) I C O X MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. c. particularly as it is operationalised through internationally standardised diagnostic criteria and structured clinical assessments 2. Be introduced to some emerging themes in measurement. Understand what is meant by validity and reliability.

in particular epidemiological designs such as cohort. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. How the social. 6. To provide a detailed introduction to the theoretical. culture. case-control and ecological studies. King’s College London Craig Morgan craig. have been operationalised in research 8. 5 and 6. social capital. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will have a critical understanding of: 1. 2. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code I C O MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1FMHPGT (Full-time) PTMS2FMHPGT (Part-time) X MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. conceptual and methodological foundations of social psychiatry. 5. The need to distinguish different levels of analysis. This module has two primary aims: 1. 4. including social class. biological and psychological have been integrated in theoretical models and research. Core concepts in social research: inc. To provide an in-depth understanding of the key issues in conducting social research in relation to mental illness. and gender.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 16 . 7. The distinctive contribution. and limitations.morgan@kcl. culture and stress. including the individual.Module title Block A: Social Psychiatry Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details Psychiatric Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry. measurement and analysis. and the inferences that can be drawn from them. How social psychiatry relates to biological and psychological research 3. The particular challenges of measuring aspects of the social environment reliably and validly Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). ethnicity. course and treatment of mental illness. family and societal levels. focusing on study design. of social psychiatry 2. The strengths and weaknesses of a range of study designs and methods in researching the relationship between the social environment and the onset and course of mental illness. social class.ac. How aspects of the social environment.uk 020 7848 0351 Educational aims of the module Social Psychiatry is concerned with the relationship between the social environment and the onset.

500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 17 . Be able to prepare a full systematic review Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). Understand the reasons for doing a systematic review 2. Understand how data can be used in meta-analyses 9. Formulate questions appropriate for systematic reviews 3. particularly RCTs.walters@kcl. and the problems and limitations associated with this type of research method. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will be able to: 1. Understand the potential impact of strengths and weaknesses of studies in a 7. although reviews of other types of study design will be discussed. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. Understand the role and work of the Cochrane Collaboration 10.ac. King’s College London Paul Walters paul.Module title Block A: Systematic Review in Mental Health Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR103 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry.uk 020 7848 5075 Educational aims of the module To provide students with an advanced understanding and practical knowledge of systematic reviews. 5 and 6. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research MSc in Psychiatric Research I C O PTMS1MHRPGT X PTMS1RMPPGT X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. The course will focus on systematic review procedures for intervention studies. Critically appraise studies for inclusion in a systematic review 6. Design and undertake comprehensive searches for relevant studies 5. systematic review 8. Develop a protocol for a systematic review 4. Produce a publication standard protocol for a systematic review 11.

Module title Block B: Qualitative Research Methods Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR102 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry.ac.murray@kcl. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will be able to understand and apply: 1. conduct and analyse qualitative research in the mental health field. Methods of qualitative data analysis. including practical use of computer software 6. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research MSc in Psychiatric Research I C O PTMS1MHRPGT X PTMS1RMPPGT X Prerequisites (please list all the modules for which the proposed module is a pre-requisite) Module code Module PHPR109 Research Dissertation – Psychiatric Research Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other / Private Study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. The complementary roles of qualitative and quantitative methods of enquiry 2. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. How to apply these methods to developing and evaluating mental health services 5. drawing on research studies conducted by the course tutors. The approach will be pragmatic.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 18 . Dissemination of findings 7. The strengths of the qualitative approach to understanding beliefs and behaviours from the subjects’ perspective 3. 5 and 6.uk 020 7848 5056 Educational aims of the module To provide students with an in depth understanding of qualitative research and skills needed to design. King’s College London Joanna Murray joanna. Critical appraisal of qualitative research Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). The main qualitative methods of data collection applicable to mental health services research 4.

50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2.dewey@kcl. mediation and effect modification. Understand the conceptual basis for multivariate analysis in epidemiological research. Understand and be able to apply the following procedures in the analysis of epidemiological date: linear regression.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 19 . Understand the uses and conceptual basis for multi-level modelling and the techniques and packages available. and ability to perform. logistic regression. Cox regression) and to develop an appreciation of the appropriate circumstances under which to apply these techniques. Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). King’s College London Michael Dewey michael. 3. ANOVA and generalised linear modelling. linear and logistic regression. confounding. Cox proportional hazards modelling. 5 and 6. in particular concepts relating to causal pathways. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will be able to: 1. 2.ac. complex statistical techniques (such as multivariate analyses.uk Educational aims of the module To equip the student with an in depth understanding of. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code I C O MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1MHRPGT X MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other / Private Study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4.Module title Block B: Statistical Methods in Psychiatric Epidemiology Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR105 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry.

Module title Block B: Psychiatric Genetics Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHPR102 Psychiatric Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry. The interplay between genetic and environmental factors 3. Family studies 2. King’s College London David Collier david. During practical sessions.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% ¬ 20 . 5 and 6. types and application of genetic research methods in psychiatry. The changing role of genetic factors in different stages of development from infancy to old age.ac. • • • Students will understand the different outcome measures in behavioural genetics (diagnostic measures and personality dimensions).collier@kcl.uk 020 7848 0631 Educational aims of the module • To equip the student with an advanced understanding of the principles. Twin studies 3. students will have performed genetic model fitting analyses of both continuous and categorical traits (liability to threshold models) Students will understand the theory and application of molecular genetics in mental health research and its contribution to the field. • To gain a detailed understanding of the interaction between genetic and environmental factors and their application in research. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will understand the principles and limitations of the major study designs in Behavioural Genetics: 1. The relative contributions of genetic and environmental factors 2. Adoption studies Students will understand the application of these research designs in investigating 1. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework) 1 2. Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) I C O X MSc in Forensic Mental Health Science PTMS1MHRPGT (Full-time) PTMS2MHSPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4.

Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module.ac. Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I).pariante@kcl. students should be able to: 1. 5 and 6. To approach a scientific question in the field with both the theoretic and technical knowledge required to design an experimental study. King’s College London Carmine M Pariante carmine. 2.Module title Block C: Brain-Behaviour Interface Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details 7PAGRBBI Psychiatric Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1FMHPGT (Full-time) PTMS2FMHPGT (Part-time) I C O X MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. understand and interpret the scientific literature on the biological basis of behaviour and of psychiatric disorders.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 21 .uk 020 7848 0807 Educational aims of the module To provide students with an in depth understanding of the preferred research methods as well as the approaches and designs used to understand the biological basis of behaviour. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. Read.

Describe the key components of an evidence-based approach to dissemination 11.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 22 .2.Module title Block C: Mental Health Services Research: Theory to Practice Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR101 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry.haddad@. Develop an evidence-based strategy for dissemination Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). Formulate a research question 3. using the Medical Research Council Framework for Complex Health Interventions.uk 020 7848 0056 Educational aims of the module To provide students with an in depth knowledge and extended skills in mental health services research interventions. Develop testable models of complex interventions 6. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme Programme title Programme code I C - MSc in Mental Health Services Research X - MSc in Psychiatric Research O X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. Understand the theoretical framework for undertaking mental health services research 2.kcl. Develop a protocol for a definitive RCT 10.ac. Use electronic databases to identify relevant evidence 4. Develop a protocol for an exploratory trial 8. Differentiate between an exploratory trial and a definitive randomised controlled trial RCT) 9. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will be able to: 1. Define a ‘model’ 5. 5 and 6. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. King’s College London Mark Haddad mark. Identify methods of investigating health service interventions 7.

Understand the economic requirements for the measurement of outcomes 6. measuring and valuing costs 5.byford@kcl. Assess the relative strengths and limitations of the methods of economic evaluation 3. Understand the theoretical underpinnings of economic evaluation 2.ac. Design of economic evaluation for application in the mental health field Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1MHRPGT MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT I C O X X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 23 . Critically appraise the strengths and weaknesses of published economic evaluations 9. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will be able to: 1. Understand the methods of identifying. Understand the complexities of applying economic techniques to mental health care 8. King’s College London Sarah Byford sarah.Module title Block D: Mental Health Economic Evaluation Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR104 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry.uk 020 7848 0043 Educational aims of the module To provide students with an introduction to health economics and in depth knowledge and the skills needed to critically appraise and design economic evaluations in the mental health field. Assess the appropriateness of alternative study designs and perspectives 4. Combine costs and outcomes so as to inform resource allocation decisions 7. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework) 1 2. 5 and 6.

To equip students with advanced skills in epidemiological. The interactions of social capital. The advantages and flaws of international diagnostic systems 8. socio-economic. conflict. such as reproductive health.prince@kcl. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. trial and policy research in cross cultural mental health Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module. Cross-cultural measurement Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). students should be able to: 1. Describe what is meant by mental illness. The influence of social sciences for International Mental Health 5.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 24 . Ethnography of mental illness 3. Understand the application of epidemiological research methods to the study of international mental health 4. population transition.ac. Critically evaluate the influence of cultural. The influence of culture on mental illness 4. The historical evolution of psychiatry 2. Describe how mental health issues are related to and can be integrated with established public health priorities.Module title Block D: International Mental Health Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details PHSR105 Mental Health Services Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry. public health and mental ill health. To understand at an advanced level 1. gender and health system factors on mental illness and mental health service delivery 5.uk 020 7848 0136 Educational aims of the module To provide students with an in depth understanding of the clinical and public health significance of mental health in the international context. and understand the broad classification of major mental disorders. 6. Explain the public health significance of mental illness from an international perspective. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Mental Health Services Research PTMS1FMHPGT (Full-time) PTMS2FMHPGT (Part-time) I C O X MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other/private study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. The contribution of epidemiology and clinical trials for International Mental Health 7. King’s College London Vikram Patel/Martin Prince martin. Be aware of the limits to the existing evidence base on aetiology and treatment of mental disorder 2. 5 and 6. domestic violence and poverty alleviation. drawing on the Global Burden of Disease and World Health Reports 3.

kcl. 5. cognition and emotion in healthy and illness states. Have been introduced to the application of neuroimaging techniques to studying human behaviour. 2. Understand the components in the analysis of neuroimaging data. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1RMPPGT (Full-time) PTMS2RMPPGT (Part-time) I C O X MSc in Forensic Mental Health Science PTMS1MHRPGT (Full-time) PTMS2MHSPGT (Part-time) X Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning Project work Other / Private Study 18 hours 8 hours 16 hours 60 hours 48 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4. Learning outcomes of the module By the end of the module the student will be able to: 1.uk 0207 848 0514 45 60 Educational aims of the module To provide students with a detailed understanding of the principles. Understand some of the ethical implications of neuroimaging research 6. 4.allen@. 5 and 6.ac. Have learned how to prepare a neuroimaging research proposal Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). functional MRI (fMRI). Have learned how to design a neuroimaging study.500 words 50% Mandatory 100% 25 . King’s College London Programme organiser and contact details Dr Paul Allen p. 3.Module title Block D: Neuroimaging Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) PHPR101 Psychiatric Research 15 30 Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Institute of Psychiatry. Understand the principles of physics and physiology underlying magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). practice and application of Neuroimaging techniques. single phototon emission tomography (SPET). 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Assessed coursework 1 2. position emission tomography (PET).

g.Module title Dissertation in Psychiatric Research Module code Subject area Credit value (tick one box only) Teaching institution (if not King’s College) Programme organiser and contact details Psychiatric Research 15 30 45 60 Institute of Psychiatry.g.g. discussion and dissemination • A formal systematic review Critical awareness and appraisal of own work Lucid discussion of bias. 50 for level 7) Mandatory to pass / qualifying mark % of final grade Dissertation 1 10. • Literature review. logistics. 2. PDFTG02 e. Full appreciation of ethical issues raised Programme details (please list all the programmes to which the module contributes and state whether it is introductory (I). Hypothesis generation and testing via one of :• Research protocol preparation. Learning outcomes of the module The student will have acquired an in depth understanding of a particular field within Psychiatric Research and demonstrate an advanced knowledge of: 1. MSc Family Therapy Contact time/directed study Lectures Seminar/ tutorials Field/lab/studio/superv ised learning 20 hours Project work Other/private study 580 hours Assessment pattern Method Number/ amount Duration/ length Pass Mark (40 for level 4.uk 020 7848 0415 - Additional Tutors Educational aims of the module To provide students with the opportunity to demonstrate their acquired knowledge and skills in Psychiatric Research. 5 and 6. ethical issues.000 words 50% Mandatory 100% 26 .boydell@kcl. 3. Professional Development e. compulsory (C) or optional (O) for each programme) Programme title Programme code MSc in Psychiatric Research PTMS1MHRPGT I C O X Prohibited combinations (please list all the modules which cannot be taken in combination with the proposed module and to which programme this relates) Module title Module code Programme e. King’s College London Dr Jane Boydell jane. planned analysis and dissemination.ac. 4. secondary data analysis. confounding and causality.

critical appraisal and research. particularly those who have full-time jobs and families. a systematic (not literature) review or a study proposal. Each group will be allocated to a tutor for the core teaching in semester one of the course. in addition to class contact time. Full-time student groups might arrange to meet with their tutor weekly from week 3 to week 10 of the first semester. orally or in writing. By the end of this semester the student is expected to have identified a research area for their dissertation and a suitable supervisor is identified from within the IOP (usually but not only the Division of Psychological Medicine). You are expected to supplement class work and lecture notes with further reading. or what you know but. In order to get the most out of the course you should arrange to devote at least a day a week to your studies (part-time students) or 2-3 days per week (full-time students). Students find it helpful to do some preparatory reading each week. problematic. In addition. There are useful study guides available on essay writing and preparing for exams.ac. They cover the main topics and key themes in the curriculum of each module. postgraduate courses require independent study and personal commitment and you are expected to dedicate time and energy to your studies. 27 . independent literature searches will extend your knowledge and understanding and increase your chances of success.Learning and support for learning At postgraduate level. For those who have been away from studying for some time. Much of the learning and teaching for this Programme takes place in groups of no more than twenty students. The main purpose of the tutorial groups will be to review with your tutor the flexible learning exercises that you are working on each week. the King’s English Language Centre is a very useful resource for international students (see English Language Support below for more information). secondary data analysis from the many IOP available datasets. The degree of supervision will depend upon commitments of both student and tutor.g. email library. Studying for a postgraduate diploma or master’s degree is a stimulating and enjoyable experience but it can also place challenging demands upon students. Academic and personal tutorial support All students will be allocated to a tutorial group. which are linked to each week’s sessions. Part-time student groups might meet fortnightly over the same period. independent learning is encouraged and the Psychiatric Research Programme is designed to enable you to extend your knowledge and understanding of mental health services and to develop transferable skills. including literature searching.uk for further details. The student then works independently under supervision to produce the final dissertation which may be primary research. this can be a daunting task. Attendance Students are expected to attend all regular teaching events and to notify the programme leader in the event of any unavoidable absences. In addition to taught sessions. The Programme is delivered through a range of teaching and learning methods. sessions are typically interactive and student contributions are encouraged. and many local authorities run short study skills courses. In the second semester the student works with their supervisor to hone their dissertation plans and surmount any logistical issues e. Tours of the IoP library are regularly arranged by staff from Knowledge Management staff. on how you convey your knowledge and understanding. Also you may wish to discuss any aspects of the curriculum that you have found interesting or perhaps. ethics / R&D approval. As well as recommended references. students will be required to submit coursework (e. success depends not just on how much. case analyses and student presentations.enqurieis@iop. Lectures and discussions form the core teaching for each module. Essay writing and examinations As part of the programme assessment process. essays) and/or sit examinations in each module.kcl.g. Attendance will be monitored at regular intervals throughout the taught programme and tutorials. aiming to provide up-to-date coverage of mental health services issues and to offer you opportunities to pursue your own interests through extended essays and the research-based dissertation. In these. and ideas are developed further in small group work.

The system of referencing. closely based on the now widely adopted Harvard System (see Appendix 6). the dissertation is ultimately your responsibility. Subject to availability.kcl. however you need to give them a minimum of two weeks to do this. your supervisor should read and criticise one written draft of your project. so as well as being part of academic discipline. As a general guideline.ac. if you adopt the principles described. Like all systems. which must be used in written work. this does not provide a single. However.Dissertation supervision A key component of the programme assessment is the dissertation which is submitted by the end of the first year (f/t) or second year (p/t). the Centre offers workshops in communication and study skills for students whose first language is English and who have problems with essay writing. The Centre also offers an Advanced English Language course for students wishing to sit the Cambridge Proficiency Examination. In addition.ac.htm The accuracy and thoroughness of referencing are taken into account in assessing written work.uk/teares/nmvc/studyskills/referencing/page_01. Referencing http://www. They are not expected to correct your English.kcl. You should note that although your tutor may provide you with advice and guidance.ac. The exact amount of supervision time will vary between students but we would recommend a total contact time of between 6 and 10 hours. spelling etc. The King’s College London English Language Centre is to there to help international students with any problems they might have concerning their written and spoken English. perfect answer to every unusual case. acquiring the habit of good referencing is in your best interests. It offers tuition in General English (EFL/ESL) and English for Academic Purposes (EAP) courses throughout the year. It will be helpful to agree a timetable of supervision with your supervisor as early as possible. For more details about English language tuition and courses contact the Centre on 020 7848 1600 or email elc@kcl. English Language Support https://www.uk/schools/humanities/depts/elc/ All teaching at the Institute is conducted in English and it is therefore essential that students have a sufficient command of the language to follow their course. you should not go wrong. part-time courses are available free of charge to students who require English language support.uk 28 . is a standardised one. Simplicity and comprehensiveness are the advantages of this system.

year) system (rather than numbering) is generally easiest both for you and markers (see for example the British Journal of Psychiatry). Reference formatting is up to you. Remember to keep a copy for yourself! Dissertation Dissertations longer than 11.500 words.000 words (excluding references) will be penalised Three (3) copies of the dissertation should be handed to the programme administrator by 12noon on Friday 28th August 2009.NO NAME • Typed on A4 white paper with at least 1.g.5 line spacing • Font size 12 • Pages numbered • References in the body of the text must be included in a reference list at the end of the written work • Coursework should be approximately 2.Coursework & Dissertation Please ensure you familiarise yourself with the following requirements. There is a maximum of 3500 words .assignments exceeding this total will be penalised. if the last teaching day of the unit is Thurs 12th Feb then the submission date is Thursday 19th February). Coursework Format and word length Course work should be presented in the following way • Student number on each page . Bound in a clear plastic folder All course work should include a removable front sheet with the following information • Study Unit Name • Student name • Student number • Year of study • Word Count • Full or Part-time course 29 . Journal-standard tables. All course work should include one (1) front sheet with the following information • Study Unit Name • Name of candidate • Student number • Year of study • Word Count • Full or Part-time course • Date of submission Submission Three (3) copies of all course work should be handed to the programme administrator by 12 noon of the Thursday following the end of each study unit (e. Pages numbered References in the body of the text must be included in a reference list at the end of the written work. The dissertation should be presented in the following way: • • • • • • • • • • Student number as a header on each page – NO NAME Typed on A4 white paper with at least one & half spacing Font size 12 Reasonable font type Typing on one side of the paper only Start main sections on a new page. King’s regulations state that failure to do so will result in an automatic failing of that study unit. The (Author.

18th February 2010 Block B Thursday. secondary data analysis. Final Examination: For 2009/10 full-time students and 2008/2010 part-time students. and application of the first semester teaching. a systematic review or a detailed protocol for a proposed study.Submission Deadlines for Coursework and Dissertation Submission deadline for assessed course work Date Block A Thursday. Assessment Assessment Methods Semester 1 At the end of the first semester there will be an informal progress assessment taking place on Monday 14th December 2009 (seminar room 1). 27th August 2010 Late Submission Material for assessment. Students must submit a completed feedback form with the assignment. must be submitted by the dates specified in this handbook. This will enable teaching staff to appraise the students’ progress. The study unit course work will contribute one half of a module toward the total of six modules required for the MSc (i. case studies and dissertations. the final examination will be Thursday 20th May. It will consist of a one and a half hour paper assessing knowledge gained in the first semester. 8th April 2010 Block D Thursday. 1/12 of total marks). Semester 2 Each study unit will set an assignment of approximately 2500 words.000 words or equivalent will be submitted for the Masters degree. which does not count towards the final MSc marks. 18th February 2010 Block C Thursday. The dissertation contributes one third of the final MSc marks. Supervision will be provided by an appropriate research supervisor. if they wish to receive comments with their grades Semester 3: Dissertation A dissertation of 10. including essays. This will consist of two three-hour papers which will examine material from Semester 1 only: • Statistics and Research Logistics and Ethics • Study Design and Critical Appraisal 30 . In addition a critical appraisal will be set for students to work on over the Christmas break to be handed in by 11th January 2010. for each study they have taken. Material submitted late will normally be failed with a mark of zero unless the candidate has suffered illness or other cause found acceptable to the Board of Examiners (refer to the Mitigating circumstances & requests for a Board of Examiners to review its decision for more details). The dissertation may be a research report.e. 8th April 2010 Dissertation Friday.

covering all the major aspects of the topic. originality and critical evaluation demonstrated by selection and presentation of relevant material. Poor standard of presentation and analysis.66% Overall % of final mark 33. Accurate answer covering most of the major aspects of the topic. that is. organised and systematic answer. Refer to the Appendix for the Scheme for the award of the Master’s degree.33% 8.66% 33.33% 8. logical. Evidence of 31 .33% 16. The weighting for assessments on the Psychiatric Research and associated courses are given below. Overall Equivalent (%) Distinction 70+% Merit 60-69% Pass 50-59% Fail <50% Description Advanced and comprehensive essay. A weak.33% 8. Excellent standard of presentation and analysis. Robust methodology and systematic approach to the project.33% 8. Evidence of independent study. superficial essay.33% 8.33% 8. Some evidence of independent study.33% 8. it constitutes a proportion of the overall mark.33% 8. Good knowledgeable. Incomplete coverage of the subject or with important omissions and mistakes. candidates are required to pass each module with a weighted average mark of at least 50 (the weighted average for the module is the weighted average of all the assessed elements for that module). Ethics and Statistics in Mental Health: Study Design and Critical Appraisal Dissertation in Psychiatric Research % of final mark per unit: 8.33% 8. organised and accurate answer covering most of the major aspects of the topic. Ethics and Statistics in Mental Health: Statistics and Research Logistics and Ethics Research Methods. In order to pass the Programme. Comprehensive understanding of research tools employed. Examinations and other forms of assessment are marked numerically out of 100.33% 33. High standard of presentation and analysis. Logical. Criteria for marking Research Dissertation: Overall Equivalent (%) Description Distinction 70+% Advanced and comprehensive dissertation. Design shows individuality.33% (= 4 modules) 33.Assessment Weighting Each element of assessment carries a particular weighting. Demonstrates a clear and accurate understanding.33% 8. Description Neuroimaging Qualitative Research Methods Social Psychiatry Statistical Methods in Psychiatric Epidemiology Mental Health Services Economic Evaluation* Measurement in Mental Health Services Research Brain-Behaviour Interface Mental Health Services Research: Theory to Practice Systematic Review Psychiatric Genetics International Mental Health Research Methods. The following scheme shows the general criteria used to assess the quality of the work. and some evidence of independent study or critical evaluation.33% (= 2 examinations) 16.33% (= 1 dissertation) Assessment Criteria The tables below show the generic assessment criteria against which all assessed work will be marked.

ensuring that procedures and regulations in relation to examinations are properly carried out. The Programme Boards consider and agree upon the content of examination papers. Examinations Examinations for all modules take place in date – see the Calendar in this handbook. Before any marks are provisionally awarded. Has developed a clear and accurate project. which is responsible for all postgraduate programmes within the IoP. Reassessment A candidate who fails an examination at the first attempt may. It approves the recommendations of the Programme Boards of Examiners with regard to all results including the classification of degree awarded to each student. Good understanding of research tools employed. logical. at the discretion of the Board of Examiners. the Institute Board ensures that comparable standards are applied across the various fields of study within the Institute. A weak. It is responsible for the approval and co-ordination of marking schemes. Examination Board Structure and Functions There are three levels of examination boards: • The College Board of Examiners is responsible for both undergraduate and postgraduate programmes throughout the College. Poor standard of presentation and analysis. Demonstration of a systematic approach to the project. Well written. Excellent standard of presentation and analysis. The marks indicated will be provisional and subject to ratification by the School Board of Examiners. • At Institute level. regulate. High standard of presentation and analysis. However. The Institute Board meets a number of times a year to discuss and decide on matters relating to examinations. be reassessed on the failed element on one further occasion. unless the candidate is affected by serious mitigating circumstances. and membership includes the Chairs of each individual Programme Board of Examiners (see below). Good understanding of research tools employed. Some evidence of independent study. the essay or report (or other assessed item) is judged against a set of criteria to decide the appropriate grade. Incomplete coverage of the subject or with important omissions and mistakes. which meets in November.Merit 60-69% Pass 50-59% Fail <50% independent study and critical evaluation demonstrated by placing research in context of existing literature. Results Results of examinations and coursework undertaken during the 2009/10 academic year will be sent by post to students after the programme exam board meets. advise and to maintain consistent standards throughout the College. Refer to the Appendix in this Handbook for details about the procedure for claiming mitigating circumstances. The Institute Board reports to the College Board of Examiners. Its role is to co-ordinate. there is an Institute Board of Examiners. superficial protocol. results for retakes are capped at 50%. organised and accurate answer covering the design and methodology. A candidate who does not attend an examination will normally fail that examination with a mark of zero. Clearly presented project. Accurate answer outlining a coherent research project covering the main aspects of design and methodology. The final mark for each assessed item is scrutinised by the External Examiners and approved by the Programme Board (see below). makes recommendations on the appointment of Visiting Examiners and on the examination marks for individual students on their degree 32 . • Individual Programme Boards of Examiners are responsible for one or several related programmes. In this way. Marking Structure All examined work for all programmes is marked by at least two internal examiners.

External Examiners are therefore experts (often Professors) in particular fields of study and are drawn from other higher education institutions in the UK. Essentially. Membership of Programme Board of Examiners Chair Vice-Chair Internal Examiners External (Visiting) Examiners Intercollegiate Examiner Head. They also act as adjudicators in individual cases. Programme Boards may also recommend that individual students be permitted to resit failed examinations. are of a standard comparable with those at other universities in the UK. and the grades of degrees awarded. To recommend final degree classification to the Institute Board of Examiners 5. their duties are to: • comment on and approve draft examination papers and advise upon other modes of assessment appropriate to the subject. Gill Livingston Karen Langridge Terms of reference 1. • interview students as permitted by College and programme regulations. and that the examination system is fair and equitably run. Education Support Team Professor Martin Prince Dr Jane Boydell Dr Paul Walters Prof Scott Weich Prof. • approve pass lists. To ensure that marked components are clear and unambiguous and comprise a fair and appropriate reflection of the programme itself 3.programmes. • report formally on the degree programme and its method of assessment so that the Programme Boards and the Institute Board of Examiners can modify their procedures if necessary. • sample examination answer scripts and other assessed material including coursework to ensure an appropriate standard of marking. To report recommendations of the External Examiners to the Programme Committee External (Visiting) Examiners The main functions of External (Visiting) Examiners are to ensure that the programmes offered at the College and the Institute. and to act as adjudicators on borderline pass/fail cases. To ensure comparability of standards with similar postgraduate programmes 4. 33 . To ensure that assessment procedures are fair and consistent and that the award conferred is both appropriate to both programme and student performance 2. The Programme Boards make recommendations to the Institute Board of Examiners on awards to individual students.

The Personal Tutor should ensure that students are aware of the facilities. administrative support and the King’s environment. it can provide confidential advice and support on a range of issues – see the Advice section below for more information about this service. information resources. King’s College London Students’ Union http://www.iop. It offers students the opportunity. Education Support Team (School Office) www. It is not the role of the Personal Tutor to provide academic support.iop. Personal Tutors All students are appointed a Personal Tutor. at the Denmark Hill Campus and is open from 9am to 5pm Monday to Friday. The role of the Personal Tutor is to provide independent advice on a range of issues and act as a point of contact for students experiencing problems not dealt with through the normal process of academic supervision. The Personal Tutor will meet students individually at the beginning of the programme and regularly thereafter.uk/studentforum The Students’ Forum of the Institute of Psychiatry meets on a termly basis and provides students with the opportunity to voice concerns and discuss educational and other matters of mutual interest with key administrative staff. to discuss the programme and raise any issues with members of the programme team.kcl. facilities. social and welfare services at all campuses. 34 . Termly questionnaires Yearly questionnaires Questionnaires Student feedback on the teaching and content of courses is obtained through termly questionnaires which you will be asked to complete anonymously.kclsu. In addition to this.uk/est You can go the Institute’s Education Support Team for advice and information. counselling and financial assistance. We are keen to receive students’ comments and ideas for improving the programme. There are three main ways you can make your views known: • • • Through student representatives (see above). The form covers teaching and learning quality. mechanisms used for assimilating and processing students’ comments and examples of how previous feedback from students has resulted in changes being made to the programme. through their student representatives.kcl. Students are required to take the initiative in approaching their Personal Tutor if an issue arises outside of these times. Students’ Forum www.ac. and incorporate these into programme delivery where feasible. Included as part of this report is a summary of the feedback received from students. the Institute and King’s through student representatives on the Programme Committee and in person at Student Forum meetings. Staff are on hand to help you with any problems and can usually point you in the right direction for obtaining advice and assistance if they cannot help directly. Student feedback also forms a large part of the annual monitoring process.ac. KCLSU exists to represent the interests of all students at King’s and provide a wide range of high quality recreational. Analysis of the questionnaires by the Programme Leader will allow your views to be integrated into the future development of the programme.org/ All students are automatically members of King’s College London Students’ Union (KCLSU). All programmes are required to produce a report on the operation of the programme each year. resources and service offered by the Institute and the College in relation to health care. Programme Committee The Programme Committee meets at least twice a year. and has space for any other comments. It is situated in the main Institute building.Student Feedback & Representation Students have the opportunity to provide their views on their programme.

or email counselling@kcl.uk. In addition. Academic Hearings. Institute of Psychiatry and King’s College London Welfare Advisers offer free.ac. including: • • • • • Academic Queries (e. deposits. every Monday. Emails can be sent to welfare@kcl. by appointment only.g. children/childcare. For confidential or more complex matters it is therefore advisable to book an appointment to see an adviser.ac. confidential and impartial advice and information on a range of subjects. marriage. For more information please contact Becky Cooper (Student Support Officer) on 020 7848 0237. The Student Support Officer on the Denmark Hill Campus is based in the Education Support Team. housing rights.g. Disciplinary Hearings. divorce.uk for initial inquiries or to request information. lasting about 10 minutes. 35 .org/ King’s College London Students Union (KCLSU) offers advice services to King’s students primarily through the Advice Centre and the VP Education and Representation. attack. etc).kclsu. Problems with Programme/Lecturers. The Advice Centre is an independent organisation run through the Students’ Union. Problems with Halls (e. including finance and money management.g. but students may also wish to talk to someone from outside their programme. etc). Legal Advice (e. on the second floor of the main IoP building. etc). Counselling http://www. and appointments can be made for more detailed queries.uk.ac.kclsu. Personal Queries (e.kcl. which offers free.uk/about/structure/admin/acareg/studentservices/counselling The College operates a counselling service which aims to enable students to make the most of their opportunities by helping them cope with any problems or difficulties that may arise of a personal or emotional nature. employee's contracts.ac. rights to repair. The counselling service at the Denmark Hill Campus is based in the Western Education Centre.uk or welfare@kcl. harassment. However.kcl.ac. tenancy agreements. For appointments telephone 020 7848 1731. confidential advice and guidance on a range of practical issues for current students. social security and disability benefits. or email: rebecca. The team includes professionally trained counsellors. The Student Advice Line (Tel: 020 7848 6858) operate between 10am and 4pm – Monday to Friday (between 1pm and 4pm on Thursday) and also in the summer term. How to Change Programme/College.ac.org.g.kcl. Employment Issues (e. basic help and referrals. group analysts and a psychiatrist. appointments can be made using the online form on the KCLSU website www. it must be noted that e-mails are not strictly confidential as other authorised members of the College can obtain access.cooper@. Drop-in sessions. the Academic Advisor offers appointments at all other College campuses. consumer law and immigration issues. take place regularly in the Student Welfare and Support Office.g. The Advice Unit is staffed by the Academic Caseworker and is based in the KCLSU Resource Centre on the first floor of the Strand Site.org or by emailing advice@kclsu.uk/welfare Personal Tutors are available to discuss a range of problems that students may encounter. etc).Advice Student Advice and International Student Support http://www. seeking work. King’s College London Students’ Union http://www. All of the help offered is strictly confidential. situated by the Café Lounge.

Dr Terry Jones terry. where Information officers can help you find the information you need.ac.jones@kcl. Copies of the weekly Job Opportunities Bulletin are available from the Information Services Centre in the Franklin Wilkins Building. keeping you up-to-date with latest news and event from the University of London Careers Service For further information please contact: King’s College London Careers Service Room G43.uk 36 . A vast range of information about careers. employers.ac. postgraduate programmes.kcl.Careers Advice www.ac. Ground Floor James Clerk Maxwell Building 57 Waterloo Road London SE1 8WA Tel: +44 (0)20 7848 4053 Email: careers@kcl.uk) from KCL Careers Office is available to students on Thursdays at the Denmark Hill Campus. and job vacancies is available in the information library (Waterloo campus).uk/careers The College has a Careers Service which provides careers counselling and information on a wide range of careers and postgraduate programmes.

nationality. Maintain a quiet atmosphere during the lecture by ensuring that your mobile phone. In order to achieve this aim. To make an appointment for advice. Equality & Diversity www. 37 .ac.ac. If the lecture is delayed because students are late. 7. The Department has a number of useful web pages providing up to date information such as the College's Race Equality Policy and disability-related information sheets. Late arrivals distract the lecturer and other students. If you have a question. the College seeks to: • ensure that prospective and current students. • communicate to staff. religious belief. 2. It is essential to have a quiet atmosphere to allow the lecturer to make an effective presentation and the students to concentrate on the lecture. citizenship. You should not leave a lecture before it ends unless asked to or given the option by the lecturer. colour.College Policies www. the Disability Co-ordinator and the Disability Support Officer. ethnic origin. disability. • promote good relations between individuals from different groups. social and economic status.uk/equal_opps The Equality & Diversity Department provides information and advice for staff and students on equality issues. 4. You can contribute to the success of lectures by adhering to the following guidelines: 1. The Department includes the Director of Equality and Diversity. sexual orientation. Equal Opportunities King’s College London is committed to promoting and developing equality of opportunity in all areas of its work. information and/or specialist support or student assessment services call 020 7848 3398 (tel/text) or 020 7848 3490 (fax) or email the Department at equality@kcl.uk.ac. Concentrate on the material that is being presented. job applicants and members of staff are treated solely on the basis of their merits. If you are more than five minutes late you should not enter the lecture unless you can do so without causing any disturbance. family circumstances. • monitor progress towards achieving equality of opportunity on a regular basis. sex. students. abilities and potential without any unjustified discrimination on grounds of age. valuable time is lost and this may result in the lecture running over time into the break. recognise and develop the diversity of skills and talent within both its current and potential staff and student body. 3. Do not talk while the lecturer is talking. you should attract the lecturer’s attention by raising your hand.uk/college/policyzone Code of Conduct Lectures are for the benefit of students. • foster a culture based on trust and mutual respect. Arrive punctually so that the lecture can start on time. associates and others the promotion of equal opportunities and College procedures to sustain it. Lecturers who are disturbed by disruptive or interfering behaviour have a right to ask offending students to leave.kcl. race. bleep or pager is switched off. Feedback should be constructive to help the lecturer improve the quality of teaching. • undertake a programme of action to make equality policies effective. and are discourteous and inconsiderate. 5. You should complete evaluation forms or offer feedback as requested by the lecturer. 8.kcl. 6. marital status or other irrelevant distinction.

the student should approach the Chair of the Teaching Committee. Where the Institute shares the occupation or control of premises with another employer then the safety policy and detailed arrangement will be jointly co-ordinated to ensure the health and safety of all occupants.ac. rearranged time-tables. long book loans. to be referred to one of the following: • • • Programme Committee Students’ Forum Teaching Committee In the event of the student being unable to resolve the grievance to their satisfaction. The correspondence between the Dean and the student will form part of the evidence that the student has exhausted all local mechanisms in respect of Section 5:5.uk/equal_opps/ or from the Education Support Team and Equality & Diversity Department.kcl. assistive technology and extra photocopying costs. students and visitors working at the Institute. The policy applies to all staff. 38 .kcl. extra time for examinations and extra support from staff. handouts or booklists in advance. This is a financial package which helps to cover the extra costs of studying with a disability such as notetakers. Students whose grievances arise from allegations of sexual or racial harassment from members of staff or other students should seek redress using the procedures set out in the College’s Code of Practice on Sexual and Racial Harassment.onwumere@iop.uk. Where Institute staff or students undertake any work on premises under the control of another employer then the policy and arrangements of that employer will apply. students should first speak to their Programme Leader or Personal Tutor. King’s has funded Dyslexia Assessments for students through the Hardship fund.2.uk. the Disability Support Team at King’s and an IoP based Disability Advisor can assist you in a number of ways. This is available online at www. If the grievance still remains unresolved to the satisfaction of the student then the student may submit a request for redress in writing to the Dean. More detailed information for students with disabilities can be found in the College's Disability Handbook: An individual's guide. you may be eligible for the Disabled Students’ Allowance. To Make and appointment to see the IoP Disability Advisor please contact Juliana Onwumere: juliana. Students must register with a doctor and dentist in the area where they live. Grievance Procedure In the event of an academic grievance.1 of the College's Grievance procedure for students.kcl. who will make an initial response within fourteen working days. If you are a home-domiciled postgraduate student. Overseas students and their dependants are entitled to free health care under the National Health Service providing that their programme of study is full time and lasts for more than six months.ac. To make an appointment to see the Disability Support Officer or the Disability Co-ordinator contact 020 7848 3398 (tel/text) or email equality@kcl. If you suspect that you may have dyslexia or learning difficulties.Students with Disabilities If you are a disabled student. In the past. Contact the Disability Support Team for more information regarding eligibility and details on how to apply. or you are experiencing temporary or sudden onset of a disability.ac. In addition. your Department may be able to provide the following: special seating. It may be appropriate for a student’s complaint.iop. Health and Safety www. the Disability Support Team can provide advice and guidance. particularly if it is of a general rather than a personal nature.uk/departments/?locator=409 The Institute has a Health and Safety policy which aims to ensure safe working conditions and practices and to assign managerial and functional responsibilities in order that accidents and other losses are prevented or reduced.ac.

kcl. For additional copies.ac. please contact the Education Support Team (educationsupport@iop. which was included in your enrolment pack. Students from European Economic Area countries should complete Form E111.uk/about/governance/regulations/students.html Please refer to the College Regulations booklet.uk) or visit the College Regulations pages on the King’s College website.kcl. College regulations http://www. Students from countries outside of the EEA which have no reciprocal arrangements with the United Kingdom should ensure that they take out medical insurance prior to leaving their home country.ac. 39 .Overseas students who are on programmes of study of less than six months are not entitled to free health care under the National Health Service.

and for that decision to be communicated to you. if you feel that due to circumstances beyond your control you are not properly fit to enter an examination or to submit an assessment by the deadline.ac. You would normally be expected to enter this replacement examination at the next available opportunity. that you seek to be withdrawn from that examination or request an extension to the deadline for the submission of an assessment.g. When such things occur close to your examinations or an assessment deadline. then by doing so you are declaring yourself fit to take that examination or to undertake that assessment.kcl. s/he will accept your mitigating circumstances and agree to your request. The procedure for doing this is as follows: • You must submit a Mitigating Circumstances Form (MCF) or an Extension Request Form (EFR). you were ill several months before the examination or assessment deadline. Only in very exceptional circumstances will a mark awarded be annulled if you have sat the examination or submitted the assessment. These are standard forms. ii) That your mitigating circumstances constitute ‘good cause’ – this means that s/he will need to be sure that the circumstances were outside your control and constitute a good reason for not taking the examination or submitting the assessment. It is therefore not sufficient if.pdf You must complete the form in full. Provided that the Chairman is satisfied that all of these criteria have been met. are going to a wedding in Australia the week before the assessment deadline. Request for Withdrawal / Extension It is therefore essential. You must submit the form at least 7 days before the start of the first examination from which you wish to be withdrawn. you will be ‘deferred’ in that examination and will be offered a replacement examination. An overarching principle of the College’s assessment policy is that if you present yourself for an examination or submit an assessment. Such circumstances might include illness. your MCF and/or ERF will be logged and forwarded to the Chairman of your Board of Examiners. iv) That your mitigating circumstances would have a significant and adverse impact on your performance in the examination or assessment. or that they would otherwise prevent you from entering the examination or undertaking the assessment by the deadline. and submit it to your School Office (or equivalent) together with all supporting documentary evidence (e. for example. • Where the Chairman accepts your mitigating circumstances and agrees to withdraw you from an examination. or are playing in a sporting fixture on the day of the exam! iii) That your mitigating circumstances would render you unfit to enter the examination or to complete the assessment by the deadline. the College has mechanisms in place to ensure that you will not be disadvantaged in any way provided that your need is genuine and that you follow the procedures approved by the College. 40 . This 7 day rule is to allow sufficient time for a decision to be made. The Chairman is required to satisfy him/herself of the following before s/he is able to accept your mitigating circumstances and grant your request: i) That your mitigating circumstances are true – it is therefore necessary that you submit as much supporting documentary evidence as possible. The Chairman’s decision will be notified to you as soon as possible. • Once received by your School Office (or equivalent). the death of a close relative. available from your School Office (or equivalent) or downloadable from the College website: http://www. doctor’s certificate). or an accident. and therefore whatever mark you are awarded will stand.Appendix 1 – Mitigating circumstances & requests for a Board of Examiners to review its decision What do I do if my examinations or assessment are affected by circumstances outside my control? From time to time circumstances arise which are outside your control and which may prevent you from performing to your potential.uk/college/policyzone/attachments/ERF%2007-08%20Final%20version. you may feel that your performance will suffer as a result. or 7 days before the assessment submission deadline. However.

If you do not. The procedure is as follows: • You must submit a MCF. the Board of Examiners must satisfy itself: v) That you were unable. to request to be withdrawn before the exam or to request an extension before the deadline. You must submit the form in advance of the meeting of the Board of Examiners at which the result of your examination or assessment will be considered. it will not usually be possible to consider your request in advance. you will have to consider how serious and genuine your circumstances are and. i. In this case. The mark of zero will be annulled.Where the Chairman accepts your mitigating circumstances and agrees to an extension to a deadline for the submission of an assessment. make a judgement as to how likely it will be that your mitigating circumstances will be accepted. again to your School Office (or equivalent) together with all supporting documentary evidence (e. Provided that the Board is satisfied that all of these criteria have been met. and very importantly. in this case your mitigating circumstances will not be considered until the next meeting of the Board of Examiners.g. • Where the Board accepts your mitigating circumstances and agrees to retrospectively withdraw you from the examination. • Once received by your School Office (or equivalent). the Board of Examiners must satisfy itself of the following before it is able to accept your mitigating circumstances and grant your request: i) ii) iii) iv) That your mitigating circumstances are true That your mitigating circumstances constitute ‘good cause’ That your mitigating circumstances rendered you unfit to enter the examination or to complete the assessment by the deadline. Additionally. the same as any other student who fails to enter an exam or submit an assessment. you will receive a mark of zero for that examination or assessment. you will be required to enter the examination or submit the assessment by the deadline. the Chairman may determine the new deadline or may allow you to negotiate a new deadline with the assessment organiser. or for good reasons unwilling. referring to the criteria above. ‘Good reasons’ would include the circumstances arising less than 7 days before the exam or assessment deadline. You should also bear in mind that if you choose to enter the exam or submit the assessment you will be deemed to have considered yourself fit to do so. You would normally be expected to enter this replacement examination at the next available opportunity. and will be considered by the full Board and not just the Chairman. Request for Retrospective Withdrawal/Extension1 If your circumstances arise within 7 days of the examination or the submission deadline. The Chairman will also report his/her decision to the next meeting of the Board of Examiners. or you are otherwise unable to submit your request at least 7 days before these dates. you will still have an opportunity to submit your mitigating circumstances and to request to be ‘retrospectively’ withdrawn from the examination or granted an extension or alternative assessment. That your mitigating circumstances would have had a significant and adverse impact on your performance in the examination or assessment. doctor’s certificate). However. If you choose not to enter the examination or not to submit the assessment. the Board may determine the new deadline or may allow you to negotiate a 1 Retrospective extension requests must be submitted on a MCF not an ERF 41 .e. and the replacement will be considered to be your first attempt (provided that the exam was itself your first attempt). Your mitigating circumstances must meet exactly the same criteria as if you had submitted them in advance. as listed above. Therefore if you cannot demonstrate that you had a good reason for not having submitted your mitigation in advance. and any mark awarded to you will stand regardless of the strength of your mitigating circumstances. it will accept your mitigating circumstances and agree to your request. you will be ‘deferred’ in that examination and will be offered a replacement examination. Where the Board accepts your mitigating circumstances and agrees to an extension to a deadline for the submission of an assessment. or if you were ill and in hospital up until 7 days before the exam or deadline and therefore not able to submit the MCF or ERF. • Where your mitigating circumstances do not meet the above criteria and your request is consequently rejected. or that they otherwise prevented you from entering the examination or undertaking the assessment by the deadline. your mitigating circumstances will be rejected and you will be awarded a mark of zero for that exam or assessment. your MCF will again be logged and will be presented to the meeting of the Board of Examiners.

you will receive a mark of zero for that examination or assessment. The Board may also require you to undertake an alternative assessment in place of the original assessment. for good reason. i. • The same procedure and criteria apply if you enter and examination but are unable to complete it due to falling ill. as listed above.new deadline with the assessment organiser. You must again submit the form in advance of the meeting of the Board of Examiners at which the result of your examination or assessment will be considered. Additionally. you will be deemed to have considered yourself fit to do so. • Where the Board accepts your mitigating circumstances and agrees to an extension to a deadline for the submission of an assessment. The mark achieved will be annulled. and enter that exam or submit the assessment. and the replacement will be considered to be your first attempt (provided that the exam was itself your first attempt). Your mitigating circumstances must meet exactly the same criteria as if you had submitted them in advance. the same as any other student who fails to enter an exam or submit an assessment. again to your School Office (or equivalent) together with all supporting documentary evidence (e. the Board may determine the new deadline or may allow you to negotiate a new deadline with the assessment organiser. The Board may also require you to undertake an alternative assessment in place of the original assessment. However where the Board is satisfied that all of these criteria have been met. However. the Board of Examiners must satisfy itself: v) That you were. as follows: • You must submit a MCF. You would normally be expected to enter this replacement examination at the next available opportunity. and so any mark you achieve will stand. you will be ‘deferred’ in that examination and will be offered a replacement examination. and very importantly. The mark achieved will be annulled. the Board of Examiners must satisfy itself of the following before it is able to accept your mitigating circumstances and grant your request: i) That your mitigating circumstances are true ii) That your mitigating circumstances constitute ‘good cause’ iii) That your mitigating circumstances rendered you unfit to enter the examination or to complete the assessment by the deadline iv) That your mitigating circumstances had a significant and adverse impact on your performance in the examination or assessment. due to your state of mind.g. doctor’s certificate). and the new submission will be considered to be your first attempt (provided that the original submission was itself your first attempt).e.g. due to the nature of an illness). your MCF will again be logged and presented to the meeting of the Board of Examiners. in very exceptional circumstances you may request to be retrospectively withdrawn from that exam or assessment. unable at the time of entry or submission to recognise that you were unfit to enter the examination or undertake the assessment by the deadline (e. • Where your mitigating circumstances do not meet the above criteria and your request is consequently rejected. and the new submission will be considered to be your first attempt (provided that the original submission was itself your first attempt). you genuinely did not appreciate that you were not properly fit to enter the exam or to undertake the assessment. it will accept your mitigating circumstances and agree to one of the following: • Where the Board accepts your mitigating circumstances and agrees to retrospectively withdraw you from the examination. • Once received by your School Office (or equivalent). Therefore if you cannot demonstrate that. 42 . your mitigating circumstances will be rejected and the mark you achieved in that exam or assessment will stand. What If I Have Entered the Exam or Submitted the Assessment? If you have not been withdrawn from an examination or granted an extension to the deadline for the submission of an assessment. The mark of zero will be annulled.

uk/college/policyzone/attachments/EDR2%20FormSept06.• For final year students where the Board accepts your mitigating circumstances and the offer of a replacement examination/assessment is deemed inappropriate it may decide to consider your circumstances at the final award stage when classifying your degree. 43 . Even where the criteria for a review are met. the mark achieved will stand. You are also advised to consult Regulation A2 14.2 of the General regulations for examinations. If you believe that you have a sufficiently strong case. The criteria which must be satisfied before a Board of Examiners will agree to reconsider or review a decision which it has made are very precise.kcl. typically with 28 days of the publication of the results. within a further two to three weeks. EDR2 forms are available from School Offices (or equivalent) or can be downloaded from the College website at www. if you have entered an examination or submitted an assessment. where it is logged and forwarded to the Chairman of the appropriate Board. the most important criterion that your representation will need to meet is that you will need to demonstrate that there is new information which you were not able to bring to the attention of the Board before it made its original decision. communicated to you by the Deputy Registrar’s office. What If I Don’t Agree With My Results? All students at King’s have the right to request a review of a decision of a Board of Examiners. If your representations do not meet the criteria equally precisely. together with all relevant mitigation and supporting documentation.doc The EDR2 form also gives details of other grounds on which you are entitled to request a review of a decision of a Board. Completed EDR2 forms must be submitted to the Deputy Registrar’s office. and wish to request a review of a decision of a Board of Examiners. The Board will then meet to consider your request. a Board can not reconsider or review the decision in question. but wish to challenge your mark or result on the basis of mitigating circumstances that you did not previously submit to the Board. but also demonstrate that you had a good reason for not having submitted your mitigating circumstances to the Board before it reached its original decision. Therefore. a form is provided for this purpose (EDR2). that is to say because your view of your performance in any examination or assessment differs from that of the Board. a review by a Board of Examiners does not necessarily mean that the Board will change its original decision. However a decision of a Board of Examiners cannot be challenged on academic grounds.ac. and you should hear the Board’s decision. within 14 days of the publication of the results of the Board. In relation to mitigating circumstances. you will not only have to satisfy the Board that all the criteria listed above are met (see What if I have entered the exam?). Where your mitigating circumstances do not meet the above criteria and your request is consequently rejected.

collusion or conferring with others during an examination. Paraphrasing . impersonation of another candidate. A substantiated charge of plagiarism will result in a penalty being ordered ranging from a mark of zero for the assessed work to expulsion from the College. they are required to sign and attach a statement to each piece of work submitted for assessment indicating that they have read and understood the College regulations on plagiarism. Students should take particular care to avoid plagiarism and collusion in coursework. the author of images and audiovisual presentations must be acknowledged. Collusion is another form of cheating and is the unacknowledged use of material prepared by several persons working together. judgements. leaving an examination without permission or supervision and returning to the examination. Credit can only be given once for a particular piece of assessed work.Appendix 2 – College Statement on Plagiarism and related forms of cheating Plagiarism is the taking of another person’s thoughts. ideas.using other words to express another person’s ideas or judgements must also be acknowledged (in a footnote or bracket following the paraphrasing) and referenced. Students are reminded that all work that they submit as part of the requirements for any examination or assessment of the College or of the University of London must be expressed in their own words and incorporate their own ideas and judgements. Examination Offences The following shall be regarded as examination offences. including that of other students. Students are advised to consult School and departmental guidance on the proper presentation of work and the most appropriate way to reference sources. All allegations of plagiarism will be investigated and may result in action being taken under the College’s Misconduct Regulations. and presenting them as your own. In the same way. Plagiarism is a form of cheating and a serious academic offence. failure to observe the regulations or instructions for the examination. The guidance given does not purport to be exhaustive. handling or consulting of unauthorised material or aids during an examination. although other types of offence or irregularity which are not prescribed here may also constitute an offence. especially when using electronic sources or when working in a group. Students should be aware that academic staff have considerable expertise in identifying plagiarism and have access to electronic detection services to assist them. Unacknowledged collaboration may result in a charge of plagiarism or in a charge of collusion. etc. essays and reports. Students should also take care in the use of their own work. words. plagiarism. Direct quotations from the published or unpublished work of others. the introduction. 44 . Submitting the same piece of work (or a significant part thereof) twice for assessment will be regarded as cheating. must always be identified as such by being placed inside quotation marks with a full reference to the source provided in the proper form. but is provided for the information of staff and students: • • • • • • • prior disclosure of questions for an unseen examination. results.

e.g. and ii) a mark of 70 per cent or better in any dissertation module Merit In addition to the requirements for a pass. ii) a mark of at least 50 in 90 credits (postgraduate diploma) or 30 credits (postgraduate certificate) and a mark of at least 40 in the remainder An overall weighted average mark of less than 50 for each module. with marks for any piece of assessment falling below 40 Confirmed marks of 69. transferring into the second or third year of study will be subject to the same regulations as the other students in their cohort). a candidate must achieve. a Programme Board of Examiners. 59. Any proposal must be made in writing to the Chair of the relevant School Board of Examiners which will reach a final decision in the matter. may propose a change to the class of a candidate who has not met the requirements for the award of merit or distinction (as set out above) within a 2 per cent margin of either the overall weighted average mark across all elements or the dissertation mark but not both. The credit framework requires programmes and their component modules to be described in terms of their level (i. difficulty) of study. and ii) a mark of 60 or better in any dissertation module. a candidate should achieve at the first attempt a weighted average mark of 70 or better across all modules. at the first attempt: i) a weighted average mark of 70 or better across all modules. a candidate should achieve at the first attempt a weighted average mark across all modules between 60 and 69. a candidate should achieve: i) an overall weighted average mark of 50. a candidate must achieve. Pass An overall weighted average mark of at least 50 for each module. In order to be eligible for the award of a postgraduate diploma or postgraduate certificate. Credit framework regulations From September 2007 all new students joining one of the College’s taught programmes. In cases of disagreement. candidates must satisfy the following requirements: Award MSc requirements for the award Distinction In addition to the requirements for a pass. Fail An overall weighted average mark of less than 50 for each module. with marks for any piece of assessment falling below 40 In order to be eligible for the award of a Postgraduate Diploma degree or Postgraduate Certificate degree candidates must satisfy the following requirements: Award Distinction Merit Pass Fail PgDip / PgCert requirements for the award In order to be eligible for the award of a postgraduate diploma or postgraduate certificate with Distinction. apart from some very limited exceptions. and 39 will be taken to indicate the agreement of the Examiners that a script or other form of assessment is not deserving of the class above. the notional time/learning hours needed for the associated 45 . Examiners should refer to the External Examiner(s). will be governed by the credit framework (students transferring to a programme that has already commenced. Under exceptional circumstances. 49.e. with the agreement of its appointed External/Intercollegiate Examiners. and their credit volume (i. e. at the first attempt: i) a weighted average mark across all modules between 60 and 69.Appendix 3 – Award Scheme & Credit Framework In order to be eligible for the award of a Masters degree. with no mark for any piece of assessment falling below 40. In order to be eligible for the award of a postgraduate diploma or postgraduate certificate with Merit. with no mark for any module falling below 40.

teaching. As a general guide one credit equates to 10 hours of notional learning. 20. while remaining as a constituent college of the University. reflection and assessment).uk/about/structure/admin/acareg/stureg/docs/degreawardingpowers.kcl. It is expected that these changes will be enacted early in the session. and possibly some at level 6 Credit volume of modules = combination of 15. there is a need over and above the Privy Council decision to make amendments to the Medical and Dental Acts. the College successfully applied to the University of the London to award its own degrees. 45 or 60 credits Masters degree Level = M Credit volume of programme overall = 180 Credit level of modules = level 7. 10 and 11 cover the award requirements (Regulation 10 for undergraduate programmes and Regulation 11 for taught postgraduate programmes). Undergraduate honours degrees are usually composed of modules at levels 4.5 details the College pass marks for the level of study of a module (although there may be additional qualifying marks required by specific programmes). 40. 45 or 60 credits In addition to the credit volume of the programme overall. the teachers of the methods of teaching. Subsequently. and possibly some at level 6 Credit volume of modules = combination of 15. MSci. Regulation 6.g. each programme specifies the minimum amount of credit that has to be achieved at a particular level in order for a student to be eligible for the particular award. There are two exceptions: one is the small number of degree programmes (in the School of Humanities). The enactment of this change in awarding authority will not affect the degree programme curricula.html In July 2006 the Privy Council granted the College degree awarding powers in its own right. MEng will additionally include level 7 modules and taught postgraduate programmes are composed of modules at level 7 and sometimes level 6. Appendix 4 – Award Granting Powers http://www. 30. 40. for example Table 1 shows the levels of all the College’s awards and Table 2 provides the minimum credit requirements (both level and volume) for each type of award.kcl. the other concerns Medical and Dental undergraduate degrees. at which time these students will be registered for College awards. 20. or the high quality of the academic and associated support provision. private study. 30. compulsory.ac. and 6. In this latter case. which are currently organised and examined under the federal system of the University of London and will remain University of London awards for the time being. section 8 details the amount of credit required for progression for undergraduate programmes. 5. 5. The enactment of this change in awarding authority will not affect College awards.uk/college/policyzone/ ) provide more detailed information. The credit framework regulations (available from the Policy Zone http://www. 6 and 7 Credit volume of modules = usually 15 or 30 credits and maybe 60 credits at level 7 Postgraduate diploma Level = M Credit volume of programme overall = 120 Credit level of modules = level 7. For example (choose example as appropriate for the particular handbook) Four year integrated masters degree Level = M Credit volume of programme overall = 480 Credit level of modules = levels 4. and sections 9. 46 .ac. requisite and optional modules or credit requirements over and above the College minimum can be found in the relevant programme specification. Specific programme details relating to core. integrated masters programmes e. From September 2007 new students will be registered for awards made by the College. the modes of assessment.

the name of the author comes first. N. name them but if there are more than three authors write 'et al': Example: Silverman and Treffers (2001) and Bowden et al (1994)… Where you use a reference that is cited by an author whose book/article you are using. The text that is your source is listed in your bibliography. Articles follow the same format. followed by the date of publication in brackets. Example: ‘This is. then the whole reference should be in brackets.C and Hoenck. often the case with …’ Where you want to insert a reference without it interrupting the flow of text. ‘Adjustment disorder in adolescents and adults. (1980). Quotations If you want to quote directly from a text. Bibliography All the texts (books. 47 . Example: “Compared with the risk associated with alcoholism and other drug abuse. Example: Warner (1994:3) argues that schizophrenia is an illness which is shaped by political economy. reports that suicidal intent… 2. you must make this clear: Examples: 1. Do not list in the bibliography: works which you have not read or references that you have obtained through your source texts and which have been mentioned in the body of your essay. They should be indicated by giving the author's name. P. When there are joint authors. 1166-70. then you need to indicate this by using quotation marks followed by (author date: page no. the title of the Journal and the page number are listed. The bibliography should list texts in alphabetical order by author. In the example above. For books. title of chapter (not underlined). Parnas et al 1993). Chapters used in books are listed in the bibliography as follows: author(s) of chapter. except that instead of place of publication and publisher. publisher. as distinct from referring to it. not in a footnote.’ Archives of General Psychiatry 37. mental health status makes at best a trivial contribution to the overall level of violence in society. Gelder (2001) is the source of your references. place of publication and publishers. project etc.R. not the article/text that you have referred to (see section on bibliography). followed by the author's initial and then the date of publication in brackets. the risk associated with major mental disorders such as schizophrenia and affective disorder is modest indeed. Clearly. Studies of communication in families of schizophrenic patients have given rather conflicting results (Hirsch and Leff 1975. cited in Gelder 2001:360). Author (date: page number). Hawton (2000) cited by Gelder (2001).” (Monahan 1992:510). If you want to refer specifically to page numbers or sections. In the bibliography book titles should be italicised titles of articles should be in 'single inverted commas' titles of journals should be italicised Example: Andreason.at the end of your essay. 'in'. Example: Reports of an excess of unipolar depression in first degree relatives of patients with schizophrenia has not reliably been confirmed (Kendler et al 1993. followed by the title. as Davies & Craig (1998) and Murray (1995) have shown. The sources of these should have been cited in the essay (see previous section). articles. reports etc) which you have used directly in researching and writing your piece of work must be listed under one heading – Bibliography . The bibliography is a list of your sources. page numbers of chapter. title of book (underlined).) Quotes of more than about 25-30 words (or three lines) should be indented as a separate paragraph. name of editor '(ed)'. place of publication. then do so like this. year.Appendix 5 – The Harvard Referencing System References References should be indicated in the text. Two or more references should be separated by a semi-colon.

In The New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry (eds.. suppl 10. A. and Andreason A. New York: Julian Press. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 60.G.Benjamin. 48 . Chapter 5.J.J.B.R. Gelder. Treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder. and Frances. Lopez-Ibor J. E. (1999b). Obstetric and gynaecological conditions associated with psychiatric disorder. I. M.T. (2000).A). The transsexual phenomenon. Brockington.Oxford University Press. Davidson.Oxford:. (1966). Foa. J.. H.

Western Advent Sunday Christmas Day Ash Wednesday Palm Sunday Good Friday Easter Sunday Ascension Day Whit Sunday Trinity Sunday 29 Nov 2009 25 Dec 2009 17 Feb 2010 28 Mar 2010 2 Apr 2010 4 Apr 2010 13 May 2010 23 May 2010 30 May 2010 All Saints’ Day Immaculate Conception (Scotland & Ireland) Christmas Solemnity of Our Lady Epiphany (not Ireland) St Patrick (Ireland) St Joseph (Scotland) Ascension Corpus Christi Assumption 15 Feb 2010 4 Apr 2010 23 May 2010 Christmas Day Bank Holiday Boxing Day Bank Holiday New Year’s Day Good Friday Bank Holiday Easter Monday Bank Holiday Early May Bank Holiday Spring Bank Holiday Summer Bank Holiday 2 Sep 2010 17 Oct 2009 12 Feb 2010 Islamic Ramadan (1st Day) Eid-ul-Fitr (end of Ramadan) Eid-ul-Adha Al Hijra (Islamic New Year) Ashura Milad al-Nabi (Prophet’s Birthday) Lailat al-Isra wal Miraj 11-18 Dec 2009 28 Feb 2010 29 Mar 2010 18 May 2010 1 Nov 2009 8 Dec 2009 25 Dec 2009 1 Jan 2010 6 Jan 2010 17 Mar 2010 19 Mar 2010 13 May 2010 3 June 2010 15 Aug 2010 Secular Hindu Janmashtami Diwali Mahashivratri 2 Oct 2009 Roman Catholic – Holy Days of Obligation Christian – Eastern Orthodox Lent Monday Easter Day Pentecost 18 Sept 2009 27 Sep 2009 11 Aug 2010 20 Sep 2009 27 Nov 2009 18 Dec 2009 25 Dec 2009 29 Dec 2009 1 Jan 2010 2 Apr 2010 5 Apr 2010 3 May 2010 31 May 2010 30 Aug 2010 Sikh Diwali Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur Birthday of Guru Gobind Singh Ji Vaisakhi Birthday of Guru Nanak Dev Sahib Martyrdom of Guru Arjan Dev Sahib 27 Dec 2009 26 Feb 2010 8 July 2010 49 17 Oct 2009 24 Nov 2009 5 Jan 2010 14 Apr 2010 14 Nov 2009 16 June 2010 .Appendix 6 – Notable Dates and Religious Festivals Buddhist Wesek (Buddha Day) Dharma Day Jewish 27 May 2010 26 July 2010 New Year (Rosh Hashanah) Day of Atonement (Yom Kippur) First Day of Tabernacles (Sukkot) Festival of Lights (Hanukkah) Purim First Day of Passover (Pesach) Feast of Weeks (Shavuot) Chinese Lunar New Year (3 days) Lantern Festival Dragon Boat Festival Mid-Autumn Festival 14 Feb 2010 28 Feb 2010 16 June 2010 3 Oct 2009 Christian .

Systematic reviews. Hill P. An introductory session is planned to discuss the structure of mental health services in the UK for the benefit of those students with no previous mental health experience and for those students coming from settings with very different approaches. Hotopf M. Oxford University Press 2001. teaching on mental health services research tends to use European and North American examples. CUP. Creed F. Cambridge 2003. Lopez-Ibor J. Ford T. Economic evaluation). Textbook of Community Psychiatry. Benjamin S. Its objective is not to be comprehensive (and certainly not to be compulsory) but to provide a starting point for students who wish to read up topics in advance or explore areas of interest in more detail. Psychiatry – an Oxford Core Text. 2nd edition. Psychiatry at a Glance. Oxford Universtity Press 2000 Murray RM. Jones PB. Stewart R. Introductions to general research methods As far as we are aware. Cambridge University Press 1997. Psychiatry in Medical Practice. However there are excellent textbooks on general health research which are well worth using as additional references: • Shorter texts Hennekens CH. Essentials of Postgraduate Psychiatry. 3rd edition.uk However the following is also a helpful reference for information in this area: • Thornicroft G.g. the course handbook (Prince et al. Susser E.mind. The book particularly covers first term’s core teaching material but also contains chapters relevant to some of the specialist units (e. referenced above) is the only text which focuses specifically on research methods in mental health. While we try not to assume any prior knowledge of specific disorders. BMJ Books 1998 Katona C. Oxford University Press 1998 Goldberg D. Textbook of Psychiatry. & Szmukler G. The Epidemiology of Schizophrenia. Murray RM. All students are provided with a free copy of the following book at the beginning of the course: Prince M. Buring JE. Oxford University Press. Measurement in mental health. Brown 1987 50 . Blackwell Scientific 1997 • Basic. Introduction to mental health services Because of the background of teachers at the IoP and the settings in which most research has been carried out. van Os J and Cannon (Eds). Andreasen N. New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry. One of the problems with research in mental health has been the lack of a teaching programme specific to mental disorders (hence this MSc) and the lack of source material addressing these issues (hence this book). Routledge 1997 Rees L. Lipsedge M. McGuffin P. Qualitative research. Mayou R. ABC of Mental Health. Little. Practical Psychiatric Epidemiology. Epidemiology in Medicine. Arnold 1997 • Large texts for reference Gelder M. students may find a basic textbook helpful and informative. The following books are pitched at a medical student level and are good summaries of key disorders: • Introductory texts Davies T & Craig TKJ. Geddes J.Appendix 7 – Bibliography / Recommended texts and Journals Semester 1 The reading list below has been produced following interest expressed by previous students on this course. 2002. Introductions to mental disorders Some students will not have previous experience in mental health. A very useful guide to UK mental health services is at the MIND website www. Genetic research. Ball C. but slightly more in-depth Gelder M.org.

Maudsley Monograph Series. Thornicroft G (2001) Measuring Mental Health Needs (2nd edition). Williams J. Modern Epidemiology. • Mental Health Services Research Knudsen H. 2nd Edition Buckingham: Open University Press 1999. Realistic evaluation. Weinberger D. Oxford University Press 2002. MRC (2000). Interventions and Outcomes in Mental Health Research David Pilgrim and Anne Rogers. 2nd edition.Bowling A. Behavioral Genetics. McCullough. Mental Health Service Evaluation. However the following are all excellent and probably as readable as is possible in this area: Kirkwood BR. SPSS for Psychologists. & Thornicroft G. Essentials of Medical Statistics. London: Sage 1997 (esp. Measuring Mental Health Outcomes Gaskell. Download from: http://www. Greenland S. Altman D. London 2001. A Sociology of Mental Health and Illness. McGuffin P. Brunner-Routledge.uk/Utilities/Documentrecord/index. Oxford University Press 2002. Royal College of Psychiatrists. Gaskell. Palgrave MacMillan. Systematic reviews in health care. Research Methods in Health: Investigating Health and Health Services. London: BMJ Books 2001 • Neuroimaging Research Fu C. Davey Smith G. Martin Dunitz 2003 • Genetic Research Plomin R. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins 1998. BMJ books 2000 Statistics For students starting without previous experience in statistics. Chapter 4) • Systematic Reviews Egger M. How to read a paper: The basics of evidence based medicine. Oxford University Press 2001 Pawson & Tilley. (See also her books on “Measuring Health” and “Measuring Disease”). Social Research Methods. BMJ Books 2000 Brace et al.htm?d=MRC003372 Jenkins. April 2000. and Parker Developing a national mental health policy (2002). Worth Publishers. • Measurement in Mental Health Farmer A. Murray R. 2000 Specialist topics During the second semester. Friedli. Alan Bryman. The Pocket guide to Critical Appraisal. Blackwell Science 1988 Altman D et al Statistics with Confidence.ac. 51 . 4th edition. • Reference Rothman KJ. New York 2001. McGuffin P. A Framework for Development and Evaluation of RCTs for Complex Interventions to Improve Health. DeFries JC. Russell TA. Measuring Psychopathology. BMJ books 1996 Greenhalgh T. McClearn GE. However the following reading matter may be of interest to students: • Social Concepts. • Critical appraisal Crombie I. students will be attending specialist study units. Background reading may well be issued by unit leaders prior to the unit start dates. Royal College of Psychiatrists. Cambridge University Press 1996 Thornicroft G and Tansella M. it is probably best to use the following books as references during the course rather than for reading in advance. London. London 2001. Neuroimaging in Psychiatry. The course focus is more on the application of statistics (through computer practicals) rather than the theoretical basis and there is no need to purchase any textbooks.mrc. Senior C.

British Medical Journal. Health economics: an introduction for clinicians. 107. The New Oxford Textbook of Psychiatry. Ox 52 . Oxford University Press. (2001) Social Research Methods.• Economic Evaluation Drummond MF (1987). In Gelder M. Andreasen (eds). 8892 Knapp M. 311 42-5 Bryman. Chisholm M (1998). A. Lopez-Ibor J. • Qualitative Research Methods Pope C & Mays N (1995) Reaching the parts other methods cannot reach: an introduction to qualitative research. Oxford: Oxford University Press. Annals of Internal Medicine. Economic analysis of psychiatric services.