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SAFE ANCHORING & MOORING

MACGREGOR deck machinery by PUSNES and HATLAPA


June 2015 Nils Jrgen Walle & Steinar Eliassen

Cargotec Corporation

Marine

June 2015

Terminal

Load Handling

MacGregor in brief

MacGregor is the one of the world's leading brands on


engineering solutions and services for handling marine
cargoes and offshore loads

MacGregor products serve the maritime transportation,


offshore and naval logistics markets, in ports and
terminals as well as on board ships and rigs

Revenue 2014: EUR 1,034 million

Approximately 2 700 employees

June 2015

MacGregor solutions

Hatch covers,
container lashings

Cranes

RoRo access
equipment

Port and terminal


solutions

Marine
selfunloaders

Offshore load
handling

Marine loading
arms

Deck machinery

Steering gear

Mooring Systems

Offloading
systems

Bow loading
systems

June 2015

MacGregors journey with key milestones until today


1937
MacGregor & Company formed
1957 Navire company formed

1983
MacGregor merged with
Navire to form
MacGREGOR-Navire and
became part of Kone

1969 Navire Cargo


Gear AB formed

June 2015

1993 Incentive acquired


MacGREGOR-Navire.
Hgglunds Marine and
MacGREGOR-Navire
were combined to form the
MacGREGOR Group

2005
Kone acquired
MacGregor
International AB
Kone demerged and
Cargotec was listed

2005
MacGregor acquired
All Set Lashings

1992 MacGREGORNavire acquired


1998
Conver-OSR
Industri Kapital acquired
the majority of the
MacGREGOR Group
shares from Incentive
6

2007
Plimsoll and
Hydramarine
acquired for
entering offshore
business

2014
Acquisition
of Pusnes
MLS*

2013
Acquisition
of Hatlapa

(*) Pusnes/Porsgrunn/Woodfield

MacGregor organisation

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Auxiliary and Machinery Systems


AMS Norway,
Arendal

AMS Norway (Pusnes/Porsgrunn)

AMS Germany (Hatlapa)

Revenue 2014: ~EUR 80 million / ~350 shipset

~110 employees (excluding workshop in Germany)

June 2015

AMS Germany,
Uetersen

Auxiliary and Machinery Systems


MacGregor Auxiliary & Machinery Systems supplies Hatlapa, Porsgrunn and Pusnes branded deck
machinery, steering gears and compressors

Deck machinery
Hydraulic low pressure drive
Hydraulic high pressure drive
Electric pole change drive
Electric frequency control (VFD) drive

Steering gear
Piston type
Ram type
Rotary vane type

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Compressors
Water-cooled
Air-cooled

HATLAPA & PUSNES


branded deck machinery

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Our history

Pusnes was established in 1875

Pusnes delivered its first steam driven winch in 1891

Hatlapa was established in 1919

From the 1950s we delivered the first electric DC winches

From the 1960s we delivered the first electric AC winches with multi-speed motors (2-/3-speed)

From the 1970s we delivered the first hydraulic winches based on ring main system

From the 2000s we delivered the first electric AC frequency controlled (VFD) winches

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Product range

MacGregor offers Hatlapa and Pusnes


branded deck machinery for all kinds of
merchant and offshore vessels from about
5.000 DWT and up

Windlasses suitable for chain sizes 34


mm up to 142 mm (Grade 3)
Mooring winches with a nominal pull from
5 tons up to 40 tons
Capstans with a nominal pull from 2 tons
and up to 15 tons
Chain stoppers suitable for our whole
windlass range

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Our segments

Products based on size

Bulkers

Container

Tankers

LPG

LNG

PCC

Ro-Pax/
Cruise

Drillship

AMW: 58-81 mm K3 chain


MW: 125-160 kN pull

15-84k
DWT

1-4.000
TEU

15-75k
DWT

22-35k
CBM

30-50k
GT

AMW: 84-100 mm K3 chain


MW: 160-250 kN pull

84-150k
DWT

4-7.000
TEU

75-150k
DWT

64-84k
CBM

~5-8000
Units

50-100k
GT

~100k
DWT

AMW: 102-142 mm K3 chain


MW: 250-350 kN pull

150-400k
DWT

7-21.000
TEU

150-400k
DWT

145-250k
CBM

100-200k
GT

Hydraulic and electric drives available for all sizes.


Note that electric systems on tankers/gas carriers may require EX-certified systems.
Electric drives may be recommended for vessels operating in arctic conditions.

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Purpose of deck machinery


1.

Anchor the vessel safely at sea

2.

Mooring of the vessel along the quay side

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Typical deck arrangement on an Aframax/Suezmax tanker

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Design

Our products are designed in Germany (Uetersen) and Norway (Arendal and Porsgrunn)

Equipment design and documentation is based on the following standards unless otherwise
required in the customer Purchase Order Specification (POS):
ISO3730 Shipbuilding Mooring winches
ISO4568 Shipbuilding Sea-going vessels Windlasses and anchor capstans
ISO6482 Shipbuilding Deck machinery Warping end profiles
ISO7825 Shipbuilding General requirements
IACS UR S27

IACS Common Structural Rules (CSR) for Tankers (if applicable)


OCIMF Mooring Equipment Guidelines rev.3 (MEG3) (if applicable)

Applied classification society

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New rules or regulations?

Macgregor does not know of any specific rule change in the nearest future with regard to deck
machinery

We are monitoring the following issues closely:


Deep anchoring regulations (LR and ABS has already rules handling this issue)
OCIMF MEG 4
New Panama canal regulations
More strict environmental regulations (we have already the EAL requirements for the US)
Further development of the rules with regard to Winterization
DNV GL common rules

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Safe anchoring

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Why are the anchors lost?

Vessel anchoring too deep From the rules we see that by


anchoring much deeper than 100 m it is a great risk that the
windlass will not be able to retrieve the chain and anchor

Vessel anchoring in very rough weather conditions The


windlass is designed for operating at a speed of about 9 m/min
which corresponds to 0,15 m/s. With heavy swells or waves the
vessel can be subjected to accelerations above 1 m/s. If the anchor
is still stuck to the bottom the windlass motor will be overloaded and
crushed

Vessel is drifting during anchoring operations If the vessel is


moving with a speed over ground greater than 9 m/min or 0,3 knots
while the anchor is still stuck to bottom the windlass motor will be
overloaded and crushed

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Windlass design criteria

The class rules are based on anchoring in sheltered areas protected from the open sea!

Basic design criteria


Nominal anchoring depth 82,5 m
Wind 25 m/s (~50 knots)
Current 2,5 m/s (~5 knots)
Waves and swell are not
considered!

IS THIS REAL LIFE?

This is what your windlass is designed for!

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design criteria (cont.)

Windlass nominal lifting force based on Grade 3 anchor chain is given through the formula

F = 47,5 x dc2 [N] (dc = chain diameter in mm)

Nominal lifting force is sufficient to lift a free hanging anchor from a depth of 82,5 m (3 shackles)

Mean speed between 82,5 m and 27,5 m shall be 9 m/min (0,3 knots)

The winch motor should be able to operate at nominal lifting force continuously for minimum 30
minutes

In order to break out the anchor the maximum lifting force shall be 150% of nominal lifting force.
The winch motor should be able to hold this load for minimum 2 minutes.

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Too high tension in chain.

Heave up position.
No tension in chain.

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Break out an embedded


anchor with vessels main
engine and the chain locked
in the chain stopper.

Why are the anchors lost? Critical Maintenance

The windlass brake is not able to stop the rendering chain during anchoring operations
Check the windlass brake adjustment
and wear of brake lining!
Set indicator to marking
(Hydraulic brake only)
Correct

Critical

always to be more than 0 degree


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Why are the anchors lost? Critical maintenance

The windlass driving shaft bearings are overheated due to poor lubrication

The windlass gears are highly loaded due to poor lubrication

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Do you know the anchoring grounds?


Holding power
Type of Anchor

Rock with
Shingle /
Layer of Mud
Sand
and Sand

Soft Mud

Blue Clay

Standard Stockless

3,5

1,8

1,7

3 to 4

High Holding Power


HHP

2,4

10

Anchor weight to be multiplied with actual factor in the table to


achieve anchor holding power.

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Anchor holding power

To obtain a sufficient holding power, the recommended anchoring scope to be between 6 and 10

Normally the chain length onboard is max 14 shackles = 27,5 x 14 = 385 m

Max paid out length will be about 370 m which gives following water depths:
Scope 6
= 370/6
= 62 m
Scope 10
= 370/10 = 37 m
Scope 3
= 370/3
= 123 m

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Solution?

Require windlasses with higher design criteria? Stronger windlasses with higher capabilities may
reduce number of lost anchor incidents

BUT

A better understanding of current design limitations, maintenance issues and operation will also
reduce number of lost anchor incidents as this will:
prevent anchoring at too deep water depths or poor anchoring grounds
make sure the vessel has no speed over ground during the anchoring operations
get the master to decide to leave the anchoring place before the weather gets too bad
make sure that the windlass brakes are correctly adjusted
make sure that the windlass bearings and gears are properly lubricated

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Slide 27

Safe mooring

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Design criteria

Mooring winch selection


Based on OCIMF the correct method for selecting capacity of mooring winch should be as
following;
Example:
Mooring force calculation acc.
to rules

Required MBL of mooring rope

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The mooring force calculation gives


a required MBL = 750 kN per
mooring line.

Selection of design rope


according to OCIMF Table 7.1

According to OCIMF Table 7.1 the


closest design wire rope equal or
above this value is 36 mm wire
with MBL of 817 kN.

Result is size of mooring winch

This design wire rope gives a


mooring winch with 200 kN design
pull and a design BHC of 654 kN.

OCIMF MEG 3 Table 7.1

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Winch brakes

The drum brake should in operation be capable of holding between 60-80% of rope MBL

HOW?

By using a spring-applied brake with brake setting indication


Spring package

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What is MACGREGOR
doing to improve
operation and
maintenance?

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Windlass

Windlass brake drum is supplied with stainless steel surface (SUS316)

Windlass brake links are supplied with stainless steel bolts


in stainless steel bushings -> maintenance free

Brake screws of stainless steel

Windlass driving shaft bushings of split type in split housing -> easy maintenance

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Mooring winch

Mooring brake drum of stainless steel rim (SUS304)

Mooring winch brake links are supplied with stainless steel bolts
in stainless steel bushings -> maintenance free

Brake screws of stainless steel

Mooring winch gearbox of horizontally split type

Mooring winch main shaft bearing bracket bushings of split type in


split housing -> easy maintenance

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Standardized product range

SUS brake spindle &


SUS bolts/bushings

Plain bush
bearings

Spherical roller
bearings

Split bush
bearings
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Slide
35

Others

Winch motors of low-speed/high-torque type (mostly STAFFA)

Winch motor control valve block machined as one unit -> compact and
easy maintenance

All bolts/nuts of M10 and below in stainless steel

All pipe fittings and internal piping of stainless steel

All major components are supplied from well-known European suppliers


-> easy and fast access to spare parts

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Safe Chain Stopper (SCS) PATENTED

To increase the safety for vessels when heaving anchor,


Pusnes has developed a new chain stopper which is
patented. safe chain stop

This stopper will arrest the chain if the windlass starts to


render, i.e. when the pulling force in chain is bigger than
the pulling force of
the windlass.

Designed for chain diameters from 60 mm and upwards.

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Pusnes Quick Guide (in English, Chinese, Portuguese, Russian)

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Contracting a new
vessel?

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What to include in shipyard specification (POS)

DOs
Stainless steel brake surface on the windlass (SUS316)
Stainless steel brake rim on the mooring drum (SUS304)
Hydraulically operated band brake on the windlass? We recommend it!
Hydraulically operated clutch on the windlass to force the anchor winch motor into lowspeed/high-torque setting
Specify that the supplier shall have their own world-wide service network with dedicated service
engineers

DONTs
HPUs with stand-by pumps, or increased simultaneous operation Costs a lot of money, but
gives little actual benefit. Spend the money on better things.

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Global Lifecycle
Support
Supporting MacGregor equipment through
its whole life cycle

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MacGregor Global Lifecycle Support - Locations

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MacGregor life cycle support for ships, ports and terminals


This is what we offer

For this equipment

Maintenance and damage repairs

Hatch covers

MacGregor Onboard Care (MOC)


service contracts

Cargo cranes

RoRo access equipment

Spare parts

Port and terminal equipment

Inspections

Lashing bridges and lashing systems

Installations

Training for crew and personnel

Self-unloading, transloading and


bulk handling systems

Modernisations and conversions

Drydockings

Deck machinery, compressors and


steering gears

24/7 support

Consultancy, commissioning and


warranty handling services

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MacGregor life cycle support for offshore industry


This is what we offer

For this equipment

Maintenance and damage repairs

Subsea load handling systems

MacGregor Onboard Care (MOC)


service contracts

Deck handling equipment

Anchor handling, towing and


mooring systems

Spare parts and logistics

Inspections

Offshore loading systems

Installations

Offshore mooring systems

Training for crew and personnel

Modernisations and conversions

Hydro checks, function testing and adjustments

Rental service

OnWatch service

24/7 support

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MacGregor Onboard Care (MOC) contracts

MacGregor Onboard Care is a service contract


concept where MacGregor assumes defined
responsibility for the maintenance of the
customer's cargo handling equipment

MOC concept has four main elements


Availability support, Onboard maintenance,
Spare part management and Customer training
- with specific sales modules under each
element

MOC contract is tailor-made to the customers


requirements from the standard MOC modules
under each of the four elements

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Optimum equipment
availability

Availability
support

Onboard
Spare part
maintenance management

Worldwide service

Customer
training

So, why MacGregor Hatlapa / Pusnes / Porsgrunn branded


deck machinery, steering gear and compressors?

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General
European design
Long experience
Dedication to quality
Well proven and flexible solutions
Close contact with all major classification societies
24/7 world-wide technical support & service

Our questions to you?

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We need your guidelines on the following

SPM operations
How is it done? Split drums / Non-split drums needed?
Will the SPM rope be spooled on top of the mooring rope or will the mooring rope be removed?
Have you experienced any problems with SPM operation?

Panama Canal operations


How is it done? You use the warping ends to hawl in the mooring rope from the locomotive?
Or do you use the mooring drums?
Have you experienced any problems with Panama Canal operation?

ANY DEVELOPMENT YOU NEED OR EXPECT FROM US?


If you have a specific need in order to improve operation, safety or maintenance we would be
happy to discuss this further with you at any time

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