FREEPREss

FRIDaY, FEBRUaRY 5, 2016 • Vol. 18, No. 44 • FREE

The

CHAMPION

thechampionnewspaper.com

Serving East Atlanta, Avondale Estates, Brookhaven, Chamblee, Clarkston, Decatur, Doraville, Dunwoody, Lithonia, Pine Lake, Tucker and Stone Mountain.

QUICK FINDER COUNTY PASSES
Business ................................. 17A
Classified ..............................20A
Education............................... 16A
Opinion ......................................5A
Sports ............................... 21-23A

SCHOOL DISTRICT’S
MORATORIUM ON
ACCREDITATION WOES
CERTAIN ZONING PERMITS OVER
LOCAL, 2A

LOCAL, 12A

• A PUBLICATION OF ACE III COMMUNICATIONS •

DUNWOODY WINS
FIRST DEKALB COUNTY
WRESTLING TITLE
SPORTS, 21A

Blasting concerns again halt
work at Snapfinger sewage plant
by Andrew Cauthen
Andrew@dekalbchamp.com
Construction work at the
Snapfinger Wastewater Treatment Plant has been halted by
DeKalb County officials.
The halt for the second
phase of the project comes after
concerns about blasting in the
area.
In a Jan. 29 statement to The
Champion, the DeKalb County
Department of Watershed Management (DWM) officials stated,
“The blasting at Snapfinger
Wastewater Treatment Plant has

been discontinued until further
notice so that DWM can continue to address the surrounding community’s concerns as it
relates to unresolved damage
claims.
“The unintended consequence of discontinuing blasting results in a reduced volume
of work which can be accomplished,” according to the statement.
After more questions about
the status of the project, watershed officials released another
statement to The Champion,
stating, “The Snapfinger project

is not being cancelled. Site preparation has been temporarily
postponed to ensure we provide
adequate notice to surrounding
residents.
“Once proper notice has
been given, work will resume,”
according to the statement.
The Snapfinger project already has had its problems. In
2012, Desmear Systems was
hired to grub and clear land,
excavate rock and soil, and
construct a retaining wall. The
county later terminated its $7.7
million contract with Desmear,
citing a structurally unsound

See Snapfinger on Page 15A

Construction at the Snapfinger Wastewater Treatment Plant,
which county leaders broke ground on in Oct. 15, has been
halted again. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

Police, fire rescue personnel pushing for more pay
by Andrew Cauthen
Andrew@dekalbchamp.com

S

Fire rescue personnel joined police officers Jan. 25 in demanding more pay. Photo by Andrew Cauthen

CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER

CHAMPIONNEWS

gt. Marnie Mercer, a 13-year DeKalb
Police veteran, can no longer afford
to work for DeKalb County.
That’s what she told county officials
Jan. 25 when she and dozens of county
police and fire rescue personnel attended
a Board of Commissioners meeting to
again urge county officials to increase
their pay.
Mercer, who serves as an expert witness on domestic violence cases, said, “I
have heard citizens call for better business
investment in DeKalb County and for
better crime deterrent. Let me ask you,
how will you attract businesses to DeKalb
County if it is not safe to do business in
DeKalb County?
“Who will build your parks and your
libraries if it is not safe to walk on the
streets in DeKalb County? What good
is it to have your potholes filled in if it is
not safe to drive on the streets in DeKalb
County?” she asked.
Mercer said her pay recently dropped
2 percent “because of the increase in pension contributions...which means that
since 2006 I have netted about 1 percent

CHAMPIONNEWSPAPER

See More Pay on Page 15A

CHAMPIONNEWS

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 2A

Smoking pipes:

DeKalb to test sewer system
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com

A four-year project to assess and
rehabilitate the worst of DeKalb’s aging sewer pipes began in late January.
The county’s watershed department began its Priority Area Sewer
Assessment and Rehabilitation Program in compliance with a 2010 consent decree with the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) in
which DeKalb County agreed to allocate approximately $20 million-$30
million to address the causes of excessive sewage spills.
The assessment is part of a
$1.345 billion upgrade to DeKalb’s
water and sewer system. The county
also agreed to pay a $453,000 penalty
as part of the consent decree.
In the assessment, county contractors will be “looking at those
areas that were identified by EPA
as priority areas with a lot of repeat
spills and having problems within
our collection system,” said Margaret
Tanner, the watershed department’s
deputy director for engineering and
construction management services.

The county has identified 48
“sewer sheds” in three sewer groups,
mostly in the western section of the
county, which will be addressed by
contractors “looking at the condition
of our sanitary collection system,”
Tanner said. “We are looking for
things like leaky joints, belly sags or
pipes [that] are sagging [and] that
create problems in our sewer system…[such as] cracked pipes [and]
places where water inflows when it
rains.
“We are also looking at how we
can improve those whether it’s a
point repair or whether we have to
take the pipe completely out and replace it with a new pipe,” she said.
The sewer assessment “is the
largest part of our consent decree
program,” Tanner said. “It took us a
little while to get here but we’re here
now and we’re getting ready to move
forward with this as fast as possible.”
The county’s deadline to conduct
the assessment tests is January 2018
and the rehabilitation must be completed by June 2020.
“We’re going to be moving fast,”
Tanner said. “That’s not a lot of time

and it’s already 2016. So it gives us
four years to go over 700 miles of
pipe, figure out what’s wrong with it,
if anything is wrong, if it has capacity issues…go in there and actually
do all of the repairs that have to be
done.”
The sewer assessments will use
a variety of tests including sonar,
closed circuit television, pole-mounted zoom camera, manhole inspection, acoustic wave, and smoke and
dye.
The “smoke and dye test is probably the biggest impact to residents,”
Tanner said.
In this test, workers “inject an
inert smoke material,” into the pipes,
Tanner said. “It’s not harmful to
people, it won’t harm pets, it won’t
hurt plants.
“But if folks see smoke in the
neighborhood the thought is ‘there
is a fire,’” Tanner said. “That’s usually
the biggest impact to residents.”
When smoke is injected into a
pipe “if there is a break in the pipe
that smoke will come out through
that break and we will be able to pinpoint where…the break is,” Tanner

said.
The white-gray smoke “looks
from a distance like the smoke you
might get from a fire,” Tanner said.
“Fire departments often get called on
smoke testing.”
A technician with identification
and a marked vehicle will be in the
area of any smoke testing, she said.
The testing will be conducted
Mondays through Fridays, 8 a.m. to
5 p.m. Assessment contractors will
distribute door hangers notifying
residents of the smoke testing 72
hours prior to working in the neighborhood.
The watershed department will
hold community informational
meetings about the assessment project on Saturday, Feb. 6, at 10 a.m. in
the Community Achievement Center, 4522 Flat Shoals Parkway, Decatur; and Thursday, Feb. 11, at 6:30
p.m. at Tucker Recreation Center,
4898 Lavista Road, Tucker.
For more information call 1 (800)
968-1108, email projectinfo@dekalbcountyga.gov, or visit www.dekalbconsentdecree.com.

Convenience stores, car repair shops and drive-thru restaurants are among the businesses under a moratorium for special land use permits. Photos by Andrew Cauthen

County passes moratorium on certain special land use permits
by Andrew Cauthen
Andrew@dekalbchamp.com
DeKalb County has issued a 45-day moratorium
on accepting, issuing or
denying special land use permits for certain businesses.
Those businesses include
alcohol outlets, gas stations,
car repair and maintenance
shops, check cashing establishments, convenience
stores, drive-thru restaurants
and pawn shops in commercial districts.
A resolution passed by
the Board of Commissioners
states that the county “needs
time to review its current
ordinances to ensure that its

laws preserve the qualityof-life for citizens while
imposing limited and effective regulations on certain
commercial uses that impact
quality-of-life issues.”
The moratorium is “just
a pause in the process,” Vivian Ernstes, deputy county
attorney, said Jan. 26 during
a Board of Commissioners
meeting. Commissioners
unanimously approved the
moratorium during that
meeting.
“For the next 45 days, the
planning department is not
going to accept special land
use permit applications for
the variety of expansions or
establishments” described

in the moratorium, Ernstes
said.
“It also puts a pause on
your granting or denying applications that have currently
been filed with the planning
department,” Ernstes told
commissioners.
Ernstes said the moratorium is needed “so the
planning department and
the law department can draft
new regulations to clarify the
standards and criteria to be
used when you grant these
special land use permits.”
During the moratorium
county officials will develop
a new ordinance to present
to commissioners.
“If during the course of

that time period we determine...we’re going to need a
little bit longer to enact such
an ordinance and allow for
full vetting before the full
board of commissioners,
what will happen is we will
advertise a longer zoning
moratorium” and hold public hearings before planning
commission and board of
commissioners before the
45-day moratorium expires,”
Ernstes said.
The moratorium ends
March 11.
“This is a very short time
period and under state law
it’s not required to be a public hearing or to be advertised because it’s not a final

zoning decision, it’s simply a
pause in the process,” Ernstes
said.
Andrew Baker, DeKalb’s
planning director, said the
county will look at “the
ways other jurisdiction have
handled alcohol outlets and
convenience stores and so
forth.”
Baker said the county’s
administration will be
“hopefully coming back to
you with a suggested text
amendment that you can approve that will actually give
us more development standards with which to make
our decisions.”

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 3A

AroundDekalb

brookhaven

City to host Valentine’s daddy/
daughter dance
Brookhaven’s Parks and Recreation Department will host a
Daddy/Daughter Valentine’s Dance
Feb. 13, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. at
Lynwood Community Center. The
event will include music, dancing,
giveaways, pictures to take home
and light snacks. The price is $25
per family. Online registration is
encouraged, but walk-up payments
will also be accepted the night of the
dance. For more information, call
(404) 637-0512.

City to host open house

2016 Decatur Rotary Club Community Project Grants. Grant applications may be submitted online
at www.decatur-rotary.org and must
be received by the club no later than
March 1.
The community project grants
fund projects focusing on either
literacy or at-risk youth that are
based in DeKalb County and serve
DeKalb residents. The funds must
be administered by a nonprofit
agency currently maintaining a taxexempt status under section 501(c)
(3) of the Internal Revenue Code
and should be used between June 1,
2016, and May 31, 2017.
Grant criteria and the online
application can be found at www.
decatur-rotary.org.

The Peachtree Creek Greenway
Open House will be held Feb. 16,
from 6 to 8 p.m. at Brookhaven
city hall. City hall is located at 4362
Peachtree Road. For more information, visit www.brookhavenga.gov.

doraville

decatur

Doraville residents are invited
to the Doraville Future Workshop,
the first of several engagement opportunities for Design Doraville, the
process of updating the city’s comprehensive plan
The comprehensive plan is
a policy document that outlines
the long-range vision for the city’s
future and helps shape rezoning
decisions and other strategic activities. A Spanish interpreter will be
present during the workshop to help
facilitate discussion.
The workshop will help set the
framework for the plan update by
gathering input on community
goals and will serve as an opportunity to educate the community
about the role of the comprehensive
plan in the city’s long-term planning
and day-to-day activities. A primary
question for discussion will be:
“What makes Doraville stand out?”
The workshop will be Tuesday, Feb. 9, from 6 to 8 p.m. at the
Salvation Army’s Atlanta International Corps, 3771 Central Avenue,
Doraville.
Parking is available on the Salvation Army campus. This location
is less than a quarter mile from the
Doraville MARTA Station and is
served by MARTA Bus Route 124
(Pleasantdale Road). It is one block
from MARTA Bus Route 39 (Buford
Highway).
For more information on the
Design Doraville Comprehensive
Plan, contact Enrique Bascuñana,
Doraville’s director of community

Commissioner to host
community breakfast
DeKalb County Commissioner
Stan Watson will host his monthly
community breakfast on Saturday,
Feb. 6.  
The breakfast will be in the cafeteria of Southwest DeKalb High
School, located at 2863 Kelley Chapel Road, Decatur, from 9 to 11 a.m.
There is no charge and an RSVP is
not required.
Watson also will use this event
to collect bottled water to send to
the Flint, Mich., community in response to the water crisis there.
In recognition of National Teen
Dating Abuse and Violence Awareness, Solicitor General Sherry Boston will provide information and
resources. Additional guest speakers
include DeKalb County Sheriff Jeff
Mann and Maxine Daniels, director of the DeKalb Voters Registration and Elections.
Additionally, Eston Hood, who
recently retired from the YMCA of
Metro Atlanta, will be recognized.

Decatur Rotary Club accepting
applications for community
project grants
The Decatur Rotary Club is
currently accepting applications for

City seeks input on
comprehensive plan update

development, at (770) 451-8745, ext.
234, or by email at Enrique.Bascunana@doravillega.us.

Stone Mountain. For more information, visit www.tucker2015.com.

lithonia

Countywide

Lambda Epsilon Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Inc. will host a “Pink Goes Red
Zumba Fitness Party” Friday, Feb. 5.
This is a free event open to the
community and will take place at
the Lou Walker Senior Center, 2538
Panola Road, Lithonia, from 6 to 8
p.m.
Members of the community are
encouraged to come out for enjoy
a free Zumba class, CPR Training,
and receive nutritional information
during the Pink Goes Red activity.
The event will help bring awareness to heart disease, promote
physical well being, encourage
positive health changes, and provide
awareness and information on heart
disease, heart attack and stroke.
The event is sponsored by
American Heart Association, Zumba with Tanieka Wyatt and Empowered by Pink Foundation Inc.

Registration for the adult softball
league continues until Feb. 26.
Participants have the opportunity to sign up for adult co-ed or men’s
softball leagues, Monday through
Friday, from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
The season begins in March
and includes 10 regular games. The
registration fee is $420 per team and
a $20 per person fee will be applied
for non-DeKalb residents. To access
online registration, visit the DeKalb
County Parks webpage (apm.activecommunities.com/dekalbcountyrecreation) or register in person at any
DeKalb County recreation center.
Registration is on a first come, first
served basis.
For more information, please
call the Athletics Office at (770) 4142113.

Lambda Epsilon Omega
promotes heart health

tucker
Tucker Civic Association to host
candidate forum
Tucker Civic Association will
host a candidate forum Feb. 9 for
mayoral and city council candidates.
The forum will be held at Tucker
Middle School cafeteria, 2160 Idlewood Road, from 7 to 8:45 p.m.
From 7 to 8 p.m., candidates will
have a table set up where they will
be able to meet voters in their district, answer questions, and provide
any informational handouts. From
8 to 8:45 p.m., the three mayoral
candidates will field questions from
the audience and via a moderator.
For more information, visit www.
tucker2015.com.

Smoke Rise Community to host
candidate forum
The Smoke Rise Community
Association will host a candidate forum for candidates in District 1 and
all mayoral candidates Feb. 8, from
7 to 8:30 p.m. at Smoke Rise Baptist
Church, 5901 Hugh Howell Road in

Recreation department
registering for adult softball
league

Commissioner to host budget
and bond meetings
DeKalb County Commissioner
Nancy Jester will host three countywide town hall meetings for taxpayers to discuss and offer public input
to the 2016 DeKalb County budget
and the expected $21 million windfall from the refinancing of bonds at
low interest rates.
DeKalb County taxpayers will
have the opportunity to share their
observations on the budget and offer specific issue recommendations
and suggestions for the budget and
how best to use the anticipated $21
million in bond money.
“Every dollar DeKalb County
receives comes from, and belongs
to, the taxpayers of DeKalb County,”
Jester stated in a news release. “It
is important to me that DeKalb
County taxpayers have the opportunity to offer input into the budget
development process. I want to hear
directly from you about your priorities. Our budget demonstrates what
we value.”
The meetings will be Feb. 9 at
All Saints Catholic Church’s social
hall, 2443 Mt. Vernon Road, Dunwoody; and Feb. 23 at Tucker - Reid
H. Cofer Library, 5234 LaVista
Road, Tucker.
Both meetings will be from 7 to
8:30 p.m.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

oPINIoN

Page 4A

Banks should be colorblind
Believe it or not, there are
people who believe that racism does not exist. It doesn’t
look the same as it did in the
1960s and before, but it still
exists.
A look at some recent
class action lawsuits shows
that institutional, financial
racism is alive and well in
America and must addressed.
In September 2015, the
U.S. Department of Justice
and the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau announced
an $18 million settlement
with Fifth Third Bank. The
justice department alleged
that the bank “engaged in
a pattern or practice of discrimination against AfricanAmerican and Hispanic
borrowers in its indirect auto
lending business,” according
to a news release from the justice department.

Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com

Managing Editor

@AndrewChampNews

“The settlement resolves
claims by the department
and the Consumer Financial
Protection Bureau that Fifth
Third discriminated by charging thousands of AfricanAmerican and Hispanic borrowers higher interest rates
than non-Hispanic white
borrowers,” the release stated.

“The agencies claim that Fifth
Third charged borrowers
higher interest rates because
of their race or national origin
and not because of the borrowers’ creditworthiness or
other objective criteria related
to borrower risk.”
A few years ago, my wife
and I each received letters
from the U.S. Department of
Justice notifying us that our
bank, Wells Fargo had discriminated against us. We had
the opportunity to participate in a class-action lawsuit
against the bank.
In February 2012, the justice department announced
that the federal government
and 49 state attorneys had
reached a $25 billion agreement with the nation’s five
largest mortgage servicers:
Bank of America Corporation, JPMorgan Chase & Co.,

Citigroup Inc. Ally Financial
Inc. and our bank Wells Fargo
& Company.
At the time, then-U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder
stated, “This agreement–the
largest joint federal-state
settlement ever obtained–is
the result of unprecedented
coordination among enforcement agencies throughout the
government. It holds mortgage servicers accountable for
abusive practices and requires
them to commit more than
$20 billion towards financial
relief for consumers. As a result, struggling homeowners
throughout the country will
benefit from reduced principals and refinancing of their
loans. The agreement also
requires substantial changes
in how servicers do business,
which will help to ensure the
abuses of the past are not re-

peated.”
Although, my wife and
I received a nice settlement
from that class-action lawsuit,
we would have preferred to
have been treated fairly by our
bank just as all bank customers would prefer and assume
is the case.
We would prefer to be
fairly treated when we get a
mortgage or refinance our
home or buy a car. It is nice
having the justice department
looking out for us, but we
would prefer lending institutions to eschew greed and not
alter their lending practices
based on the color of the skin
of the potential customers.
Maybe one day, banks will
colorblind. In the meantime,
my wife and I have received
notification of another class
action lawsuit that affects us.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

oPINIoN

Page 5A

ONE MAN’S OPINION

And then there were five...
“Let me be clear.  We won
the first round, but this campaign is far from over,” Texas
U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz, in an
overnight communication
to his donors and supporters after handily winning the
Iowa GOP Caucus. 
After what already may
seem like years, especially
on the GOP side of this
race, the voting has finally
started. The Iowa GOP selected from the farthest right
of its standard bearers, and
on the Democratic side, its
most liberal wing spurred to
“Feel the Bern” delivered a
dead heat. The Iowa Caucus
matters, primarily providing a healthy bump of credibility, financial support and
momentum heading toward
New Hampshire to its winners, or in this case, also toward the strong second- and
third-place finishers.
But, the field is about to
winnow considerably. Before
results were finalized on
the Democratic side, former Maryland Gov. Martin
O’Malley suspended his
campaign. The articulate,
attractive mayor of Baltimore and later governor,
who looks like the actors
who portray presidents in
movies, acknowledged what
had already been apparent
for several weeks—that the
Democratic contest is down
to a two-person horse race
for the heart of their party. 
Former Secretary of State

Bill Crane
bill.csicrane@gmail.com

Columnist

Hillary Clinton is pulling a
wagon full of party leadership, super delegates, super
PAC donors and other contributors as well as the full
set of Clinton, indestructible
Samsonite baggage. Though
Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is making this race
more competitive than expected, he has yet to make
significant inroads with
large Democratic Party base
constituencies, chief among
them Black voters, who will
comprise a larger share of the
party’s primary electorate as
the calendar moves on and
south to South Carolina and
the S.E.C. Primary. 
On the GOP side, Cruz
demonstrated the continuing importance of a strong
ground game. In Iowa, Team
Trump was late out of the
gate, learning last week that
there was not a single 15-seat
passenger van available for
rent in the entire state. Most

every available shuttle,
school bus, and probably
more than a few limos, was
called into service by both
parties for caucus night. Another of Iowa’s long-standing
and quirky traditions is that
campaigns also frequently
provide door-to-door service
to their committed supporters, neighbors and likeminded caucus goers. Sameday registration allowed for
many a former Democrat
to participate in the GOP
Caucus, which had a total exceeding 180,000 participants,
and increase of nearly 50
percent over the prior caucus
as well as an all-time GOP
record.
And while Cruz compatriots have much to celebrate,
his chances are not as good
in the more practical/independent minded Granite
State, where the party establishment and newspaper
of record, The Manchester
Union Leader, still matter,
and the Evangelical and Tea
Party segments of the GOP
are much smaller. 
The second biggest story
of this Iowa night may be the
surge by Florida’s junior U.S.
Sen. Marco Rubio. Rubio,
who could give the GOP a
head-start on a fall campaign
warming up to Hispanic
voters (along with Cruz,
Rubio is of Cuban heritage),
was able to win a solid third
place, less than 2,000 votes
behind the no-longer-invin-

cible Trump and only three
points from matching the
combined showings of the
eight other GOP contenders
on this ballot (a total of 26
percent). 
With the 2008 Iowa
Caucus winner, former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee
withdrawing on election
night, the next expected shoe
to drop is the 2012 winner,
former Pennsylvania Sen.
Rick Santorum. Though
Huckabee is rumored to be
endorsing Trump later this
week in Little Rock, Arkansas, a strong argument can
be made that the majority of
future candidate consolidation, possibly excluding Dr.
Ben Carson, is most likely to
benefit Team Rubio.
Trump leads by a healthy
margin in New Hampshire,
but the smart money says
that balloon now has a
puncture wound and will
lose some of its altitude and
height.
Clinton smiled and
insisted she is relieved by
results in Iowa, but Sanders
enjoys a healthy margin in
New Hampshire, and recent
headlines about old emails
have the Clinton machine’s
eyes cutting sideways in that
forced smile in both directions. 
So, although many of
these names will remain
on ballots already printed,
some mailed and heading
overseas, as well as on later

election days, the coming
week, perhaps two, will bring
a significant winnowing of
this field. Iowa again does
not predict, but it still does
separate wheat from chafe, or
in this case, corn.
Bill Crane also serves as
a political analyst and commentator for Channel 2’s Action News, WSB-AM News/
Talk 750 and now 95.5 FM,
as well as a columnist for The
Champion, Champion Free
Press and Georgia Trend.
Crane is a DeKalb native
and business owner, living in
Scottdale. You can reach him
or comment on a column at
bill.csicrane@gmail.com.

F REE P RESS
Let Us Know What You Think!
THE CHAMPION FREE PRESS encourages opinions from its readers. Please
write to us and express your views. Letters
should be brief, typewritten and contain
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Send Letters To Editor, The Champion Free Press, P.
O. Box 1347, Decatur, GA 30031-1347; Send email
to Andrew@dekalbchamp.com • FAX To: (404)
370-3903 Phone: (404) 373-7779 . Deadline for news
releases and advertising: Thursday, one week prior
to publication date.
EDITOR’S NOTE: The opinions written by columnists and contributing editors do not necessarily
reflect the opinions of the editor or publishers. The
Publisher reserves the right to reject or cancel any
advertisement at any time. The Publisher is not
responsible for unsolicited manuscripts.

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John Hewitt
Chief Financial Officer:
Dr. Earl D. Glenn
Managing Editor:
Andrew Cauthen
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Staff Reporter:
Carla Parker
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Inc., • 114 New Street, Suite E, Decatur,
GA. 30030 • Phone (404) 373-7779.

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STATEMENT FROM THE
PUBLISHER
We sincerely appreciate the
discussion surrounding this and any
issue of interest to DeKalb County.
The Champion was founded in 1991
expressly to provide a forum for
discourse for all community residents
on all sides of an issue. We have no
desire to make the news only to
report news and opinions to effect
a more educated citizenry that will
ultimately move our community
forward. We are happy to present
ideas for discussion; however,
we make every effort to avoid
printing information submitted to
us that is known to be false and/or
assumptions penned as fact.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 6A

Sanjeev Anand
Sanjeev Anand is on a
mission.
The 12-year-old student
at Kittredge Magnet School
is trying to collect 10,000
books for the underprivileged before he reaches 12th
grade.
“Right now I have [collected] 5,500,” said Sanjeev,
who started the project in
December 2014.
Sanjeev is collecting the
books for children of migrant
workers in the Southeastern
United States.
He developed the idea for
an international baccalaureate school project, he said.
“I had to select a topic
and write about it and pres-

ent an action plan to [address] it,” Sanjeev said.
“I was intrigued by the
movie The Harvest,” he said.
“It was a story about how
kids have to work in the
fields to help support their
parents. They get almost no
education. Some kids drop

out [of school] before fifth
grade. Some of them die before the age of 5 which is really, really unfair.”
To collect the books, Sanjeev has solicited donations
from various organizations
including Decatur First United Methodist Church and
Centers for Disease Control
and Prevention where his
mother, Priya Srinivasan,
works. He also has purchased
books from consignment
shops.
The books are donated
to the Head Start program
run by Telamon Corporation, a nonprofit organization, that provides assistance
to “Farmworkers and their

families, children born into
poverty, low-income and
elderly residents of rural
America, youth who struggle
with societal challenges, the
dislocated and disenfranchised comprise this universe
of people in need,” according
to Telamon’s website.
Telemon “has been hosting some festivals where
the…migrant children come
in,” Sanjeev said. “Usually
they can do only one festival a year where the kids
can pick out books and take
them home with them and
read.
“With my help and…
all of the other donors, they
have been able to [do] four

festivals [a year],” Sanjeev
said.
The books make the
children “really happy,” Sanjeev said. “They’re excited
because…they have very few
books and this is a really big
thing for them.”
Additionally, Sanjeev
is the vice president of his
school’s national Beta Club
chapter and is a member of
the chess club and Recycling
Cougars, a club that promotes recycling at the school.
“Think big. Let your
dreams fly. Try to help others
as much as you can,” Sanjeev
said about volunteering.

If you would like to nominate someone to be considered as a future Champion of the Week, please contact Andrew Cauthen
at andrew@dekalbchamp.com or at (404) 373-7779, ext. 117.

Annexation bill proposed to fix 911 response issues
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
State Rep. Howard Mosby (D-Atlanta) has proposed
an annexation bill that may
help solve some of the problems with 911 response times.
House Bill 706 would
annex certain communities
in southwest DeKalb into
the city of Atlanta. The areas
include communities surrounding the former Hooper
Alexander School on Memorial Drive, the East Lake community in the McNair school
cluster, parts of Gresham Park
and the area along Moreland
Avenue near Eastland Road.
Mosby said his office has
received reports that there is
a problem with 911 calls from
those areas.
“With the boundaries
issues between DeKalb and
Atlanta sometimes there is a
delay between the caller and
911 getting the right location,”
he said. “Once they do, the
first responders respond [in
a] timely [manner]. It’s just
that small delay between the
time of the call and the 911
center, and the 911 center understanding exactly where the
person is. We want to clean
that up.”
Mosby said DeKalb Memorial Park, off Glenwood
Avenue and Wilkerson Drive,
is in unincorporated DeKalb,
but areas on both sides of the
park are in the city limits of
Atlanta.
“You could be sitting

State Rep. Howard Mosby has proposed an annexation bill to address issues of 911 responses between DeKalb and Atlanta. Map provided

there and something happens
and you call 911, they will
have to determine whether
to send the DeKalb Police
or send the Atlanta Police,”
Mosby said.
The Kroger building on
Moreland Avenue by East
Confederate Avenue is in
unincorporated DeKalb, but
parts of the parking lot are in
Atlanta.
“Pieces of the parking
lot, depending on what space
you are in, [are] in the city of

Atlanta and the space next to
it could be in unincorporated
DeKalb,” he said.
Along with fixing the
boundaries, Mosby said the
state has to look at how the
EMS lines are drawn.
“That is another factor,” he said. “This is kind of
a two-stage process that we
want to look at—how the
state handles segregating
EMS zones, and how boundaries between the city and the
county can be cleaned up.”

The areas in the proposed
annexation map are also included in the proposed city
of Greenhaven. Mosby said
he introduced this bill for
no reason other than public
safety.
“I don’t have another
agenda,” he said. “Nobody
from the city of Atlanta asked
me to do this.”
The bill has been through
two House readings. Mosby
said he is currently having
conversations with residents

in the proposed areas to see if
this is the route they want to
take.
“I’m trying to have meetings around the community
and if this is not the right
thing to do then I won’t move
forward with it,” he said. “I
want the right answer to fix a
problem that makes sense for
the entire community.”

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 7A

Commissioner
collecting water for
Flint, Mich.’s crisis
by Andrew Cauthen
andrew@dekalbchamp.com
A DeKalb County commissioner is collecting
bottled water for the Flint,
Mich., water crisis.
On Oct. 1, 2015, the
Genesee County Board of
Commissioners issued a
public health emergency
declaration for residents using the Flint city water supply due to elevated levels of
lead.
“I’m making a spirited
effort to collect bottled water for the children of Flint,
Mich.,” DeKalb County
Commissioner Stan Watson
said. “We all know the tragedy that happened with the
contamination of drinking
water.
Watson said he wants
to make sure Flint children
have “a necessity that they
don’t have right now and
that’s pure drinking water.”
Watson will be sending
the donated water to Gen-

esee County Commissioner
Brenda Clack, who will
coordinate its distribution.
Flint is in Genesee County.
Clack and Watson served
in their respective state
houses at the same time.
“I was really, really happy
and was gratified to know
that he thought that much
of us in this community to
want to send this water,”
Clack said in a phone interview Jan. 28.
Clack said Flint’s water
problems are “beyond a crisis.”
“What is happening to
our community is inhumane,” Clack said.
At one of many water
distribution sites at a Flint
fire station, Clack said she
recently witnessed “women
getting out of their cars at
6:30 at night in the dark and
putting water in their cars.”
“This is inhumane,”
Clack said. “This should not
be happening in this state, in
this country, unless you’re in

a Third World [country].
“It’s becoming a panic
because mothers are concerned about the future of
their children,” Clack said.
Clack said many mothers
are not bathing their children in the municipal water,
and people have broken out
in rashes.
“It’s becoming a psychoMOVE IN/OUT CLEANNG
CleaningByMarines.com

(404) 975-9002

PUBLIC NOTICE 

NOTICE OF SALES AND USE TAX ELECTION 
TO THE QUALIFIED VOTERS OF THE CITY OF ATLANTA 
 

   YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that Tuesday, March 1, 2016, the date chosen by the Secretary of 
State of the State of Georgia for the presidential preference primary pursuant to Georgia law, a 
[special]  election  will  be  held  in  all  of  the  precincts  of  the  City  of  Atlanta  (the  “City”).    At  this 
election there will be submitted to the qualified voters of the City for their determination the 
question  of  whether  a  special  one  percent  sales  and  use  tax  should  be  reimposed  within  the 
City, upon the termination of the special one percent sales and use tax presently in effect, for a 
maximum period of time of 16 calendar quarters, for the purposes of funding water and sewer 
projects  and  costs,  at  an  aggregate  maximum  cost  of  Seven  Hundred  Fifty  Million  Dollars  and 
Zero Cents ($750,000,000.00). 
   Voters  desiring  to  vote  for  the  reimposition  of  such  sales  and  use  tax  shall  do  so  by  voting 
“YES” and voters desiring to vote against the reimposition of such sales and use tax shall do so 
by voting “NO,” as to the question propounded to‐wit: 
"Shall  a  special  1  percent  sales  and  use  tax  be  reimposed  in  the  City  of 
Atlanta  for  a  period  of  time  not  to  exceed  16  calendar  quarters  and  for 
the  raising  of  not  more  than  ‐  Seven  Hundred  Fifty  Million  Dollars  and 
Zero  Cents ($750,000,000.00) for  the  purpose  of  funding  water  and sewer 
projects and costs?" 
   The several places for holding the election shall be in the regular and established precincts of 
the  City,  and  the  polls  will  be  open  from  7:00  a.m.  to  7:00  p.m.  on  the  date  fixed  for  the 
election. Those qualified to vote at the election shall be determined in all respects in accordance 
and in conformity with the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America and of the 
State of Georgia. 
   This notice is given pursuant to joint action of the City Council of the City of Atlanta and the 
Municipal Election Superintendent of the City. 
Rhonda Dauphin Johnson 
Municipal Clerk/Election Superintendent 
City of Atlanta 

logical panic, also,” she said.
“You’d have to see it to be-

lieve what our people are experiencing. Long lines—you

See WATER on Page 12A

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

Avondale Estate ‘erector
set’ to be demolished
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
The unfinished steel
structure, known by some
as the “erector set” on East
College Avenue in Avondale
Estates, will soon be demolished.
The Avondale Estates
Board of Mayor and Commissioners requested that
Euramex Management
Group, current owner of the
structure, have it demolished. City Manager Clai
Brown said Euramex filed
for a demolition permit on
Jan. 22 and the Board of
Mayor and Commissioners
approved it Jan. 25.
In 2008, a permit was issued for construction of the
building at the corner of East
College Avenue and Maple
Street (2786 East College
Ave.), according to the city.
After construction began, the
economy began plummeting
and the previous developer
was not able to complete the
project.
In late 2014 Euramex
purchased the property after
a multi-year foreclosure, according to the city.
Mayor Jonathan Elmore
said he is happy that Euramex agreed to demolish it.
“Hopefully, we’ll plan
on doing something with it,

but they don’t have any plans
as far as I know,” Elmore
said. “They’re just going to
take that partially finished
building down, and we’ll see
what’s next.”
Euramex also purchased
the 13-acre Fenner Dunlop
property in 2014. The mayor
and commissioners have
been in talks with Euramex
about what they would like
to see on the property.
During a work session
in August 2015 the Board of
Mayor and Commissioners,
discussed the latest plans
presented by Euramex to the
board privately for the property. Elmore said at the Euramex proposed townhouses
and apartments, a parking
deck, greenspace, a grocery
store, retail spaces and a public space for the property.
No definite plans have
been presented publicly by
Euramex, but Elmore said he
hopes plans will be available
soon.
“We’ve been talking with
them a little bit more lately,
going back and forth [on
ideas],” he said. “We’ve had
some really good conversations and they’ve always
been very professional and
positive. We’re very hopeful
about it.”

Lithonia man gets maximum
sentence for murder
A Lithonia man received
the maximum sentence for
killing a 16-year-old and
shooting two other teenagers.
On Jan. 27, DeKalb
County Judge Tangela Barrie sentenced David Frank
Moore to life plus 55 years in
prison.
In December 2015, a
jury convicted Moore of two
counts of felony murder,
three counts of aggravated
assault, three counts of possession of a firearm during
the commission of a felony
and one count of possession
of a firearm by a convicted
felon.
Moore opened fire on a
car containing three teenagers outside his home on
Brown’s Mill Ferry Drive in
Lithonia in July 2014, according to a news release
from the DeKalb County
District Attorney’s Office.

Delray Crittenden, 16, who
was in the backseat of the
car, died after being struck
several times. The 19-yearold driver and 14-year-old
passenger were both struck
several times and testified at
the trial.
The DeKalb County District Attorney’s Office, along
with Crittenden’s mother and
sisters, asked the judge to
sentence Moore to the maximum penalty.
“This was a convicted
felon who was carrying a gun
and selling drugs,” DeKalb
County District Attorney
Robert James stated. “The
jury found that he shot and
killed a teenage boy, as well
as wounded two others.
These are the type of cases
that hurt all levels of our
community and deserve the
maximum punishment as allowed by law.”

    

Page 8A

CITY OF CHAMBLEE, DEKALB, GA 
ADVERTISEMENT FOR INVITATION TO BID 

Sealed bids for the PEACHTREE STREETSCAPE PROJECT NUMBER: P.I. 0009024 will be received by the City 
of Chamblee at Chamblee City Hall, 5468 Peachtree Road, Chamblee, GA, until 3:00 pm on Friday, 
February 19, 2016, and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. Bids received after the 
designated time will not be accepted. (The bid deadline and opening have been changed from Feb. 5th to 
Feb 19th)   
   The project generally includes furnishing all labor, materials and equipment for the construction and 
related improvements for the PEACHTREE STREETSCAPE. This project will provide two travel lanes 11 feet 
wide and 5ft to 6ft wide sidewalks on the east  side, with two foot grass strip. Coordination with utilities 
will be required.    
   The project is located between Pierce Drive and 700 ft North‐East of Chamblee Dunwoody Road along 
Peachtree Road in the City of Chamblee, DeKalb County.  The Georgia Department of Transportation 
Standard Specifications, 2013 Edition, applicable Supplemental Specifications and Special Provisions apply 
to this project.   
   Bid documents may be obtained from the State of Georgia/DOAS website at 
https://ssl.doas.state.ga.us/PRSapp/ and the Procurement Page on the City’s website at 
www.chambleega.gov.   
   If you have any questions regarding this project please contact Marc Johnson, Chamblee City Manager, 
at 770‐986‐5026.  Chamblee reserves the right to accept or reject any or all bids and to waive 
technicalities.     

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 9A

Nonprofit seeks volunteers for tutoring program
 by Kathy Mitchell
Those who operate shelters and group homes make
sure the children in their
care have food, clothing and
a safe place to sleep. Usually
they are unable to provide
extras that children living at
home may take for granted
such as one-on-one attention
and help with school work.
“Living in a group home
or shelter can be very difficult, especially for homeless children trying to keep
up academically with their
peers,” said Nolan Byrnes,
program coordinator for
Project One on One, a
schoolwork assistance program of Children’s Restoration Network, a nonprofit
organization created to help
homeless children and their
mothers.
Started in 2003, the program operates in eight metropolitan Atlanta counties.
Byrnes said with more than
30 shelters and group homes
in DeKalb there is an acute
need for DeKalb volunteers.
“There is a huge need in
DeKalb,” said Cliff Kinsey,
cofounder and CEO of Children’s Restoration Network.
“In DeKalb alone, we have
several hundred children living in group homes—which
is just a fancy term for orphanages. Typically, there are
10 children in each home. It’s

all the staff can do to make
sure each child is fed and
other basic needs are being
met.”
“Last year we were able
to help approximately 350
young people. There are approximately 3,000 who need
help. Through no fault of
their own, these children
have been abused, neglected
or not taken care of properly
in the past. Once they have a
safe place to live, Children’s
Restoration Network wants
make sure these children do

not fail academically,” Byrnes
said.
He said while the program seeks to put children
who are unable to live at
home on the path at academic achievement, it also
seeks to see that they receive
“encouragement and attention that is crucial to healthy
social development.”
“Sometimes the
volunteer can be the
only adult in the child’s
life who isn’t paid to be
there,” Byrnes said. “We

DeKalb County Department of Watershed Management
Public Advisory
SNAPFINGER WOODS SANITARY SEWER CROSSINGS
January 29, 2016
Advisory Issue Date

February 29, 2016
Advisory Close Date

This advisory is issued to inform the public of a receipt of an application for a variance
submitted pursuant to a State Environmental Law. The Public is invited to comment during a 30
day period on the proposed activity. Since the Georgia Environmental Protection Division (EPD)
has no authority to zone property or determine land use, only those comments addressing
environmental issues related to air, water and land protection will be considered in the
application review process. Written comments should be submitted to: Program Manager,
Non-Point Source Program, Erosion and Sedimentation Control, 4220 International Parkway,
Suite 101, Atlanta, Georgia 30354.
Type of Permit Application: Variance to encroach within the 25-foot State Waters Buffer.
Applicable Law: Georgia Erosion and Sedimentation Act O.C.G.A. 12-7-6 ET seq.
Applicable Rules: Erosion and Sedimentation Control Chapter 391-3-7.
Basis under which variance shall be considered: {391-3-7.05(2) (A-J)}: E
Project Location: This project is located on the section of Snapfinger Woods Drive that is
bounded by Rayburn Road to the west and Shell Bark Rd to the east near the city of Lithonia,
GA. Specifically, the site is located in land lots 8 & 9 of the 16th district & land lots 128 &
129 of the 15th district, in DeKalb, Georgia. The site is approximately 800 linear feet north of
Snapfinger Creek’s intersection with Snapfinger Woods Drive. The proposed construction will
include the installation of 132 linear feet of 15 inch sanitary sewer across Snapfinger Creek.
Project Description: The proposed site conditions will include the installation of 132 linear feet
of 15 inch sanitary sewer aerial stream crossing to replace an existing inverted siphon sanitary
sewer under Snapfinger Creek which in a constant maintenance problem. This work is a repair
the existing system that runs along Snapfinger Creek.

have had some volunteers
that have worked with the
same child for many years
and lifelong friendships and
bonds have been formed.
One child who worked with
one of our volunteers told us
his tutor was the only person
who came to see him graduate from high school.” 
Byrnes said volunteers

don’t need to be academic
stars themselves—just caring
committed people. “No prior
teaching experience is required; we just need compassionate individuals willing
to take some time to make a
positive difference in the life
of a child.”
He said most of the children in the program are performing at grade level. “We
try to match children with
volunteers who can meet
their needs; however, if the
volunteer doesn’t grasp the
child’s school assignment, we
have resources to help with
that.
“Most of all we need
caring volunteers who can
encourage and support these
children, showing them that
education is important and
learning can be fun. We want
these deserving children to
feel normal and supported as
they try to achieve academic
success.”
Byrnes said Children’s
Restoration Network asks
that volunteers commit to
one to two hours a week
tutoring and mentoring the
child with whom they have
been matched. “We really
want the volunteer to remain
with the child at least one

See TUTORING on Page 10A

pet

OF THE

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cleopatra id# 30010284 - Nothing beats Cleopatra's
smile! This goofy two year old girl loves anyone and everyone.
She is a great treat catcher and has the most adorable happy
dance. She snorts when she gets excited and is a solid, little
lovebug. Come meet Cleopatra at Lifeline's DeKalb Animal
Services and let her do her happy dance for you!
Cleopatra qualifies for our January "Ring in the New Year
with a New Pet" promotion, where all cats and all dogs over
25 lbs. are only $16! Adoption includes spay/neuter, vaccinations, microchip and more! If you would like more info about
Cleopatra please email adoption@dekalbanimalservices.com
or call (404) 294-2165. All potential adopters will be screened
to ensure Cleopatra goes to a good home.

local

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

Page 10A

Lakeside principal under investigation for alleged racial comments
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Lakeside High School
principal Jason Clyne has
been removed from the
school and is under investigation for possible violation
of policy, according to the
DeKalb County School District.
In a letter sent to Lakeside parents, students and
staff Jan. 27, Superintendent
Stephen Green, stated the
district was made aware of
flyers posted at the school
and on social media of allegations made against the
principal.
The flyer, which The
Champion found on Twitter,
stated, “Last week our principal had a meeting with the
janitors and the security staff.
In the meeting he got mad
at them and told them “You
don’t want to mess with me.

Clyne

I’m a redneck master with a
degree. I run these 40!”
The flyer went on to explain the meaning behind
the phase “forty acres and a
mule.” The flyer also said that
Clyne “was implying that
Lakeside is a plantation, he
is the master, the custodial
staff are ignorant slaves, the

teachers are house slaves and
thus the students are field
slaves.”
In the letter Green said
the district takes the allegations seriously.
“The district has removed the principal from the
school and is conducting an
investigation into the matter,”
Green stated. “Any violations
of district policy or law will
be prosecuted to the fullest
extent.”
Green said an administrative team will handle management of the school while
the district seeks a substitute
principal.
“The outstanding staff
of Lakeside High School
will continue to provide a
high quality education, and
the students will continue
to learn in a manner that
prepares them for college
and career readiness,” Green
said. “The district appreci-

WATER Continued From Page 12A
can go to so many sites in
our city and you’ll see long
lines of people coming to get
water.”
Clack said, “It’s gratifying to know that people…all
around the country people
are concerned about us,”
Clack said. “I know they put
themselves in our position
to say ‘if that were me, what
would I want someone to
do?’
“Thank you to all who
are concerned about us in
this community, who have
reached out to us, because
it is important that people

reach out to us at this point
and show us that they really
care,” she said.
Watson said Flint’s water
crisis reminds “us in DeKalb
County, as we undergo our
watershed capital improvement project, that water is
an important element of our
everyday lives.”
“We need to make sure
our water is pure and people
don’t have to boil water and
they don’t have zinc and lead
in our water,” he said about
the county’s billion-dollar
watershed capital improvement project under way to

ates your continued support
of Lakeside High School and
the DeKalb County School
District.”
Students have either expressed disdain or support
for Clyne, and a hash tag—
#TeamClyne—was created
on Twitter.
One student, a Lakeside
baseball player, became the
center of attention on Twitter
from the Lakeside community after someone posted a
private message between him
and someone else where both
made racial comments about
another person.
In the message, the unknown person asked the
baseball player why Clyne
was removed. The baseball
player responded, “Being
‘racist’ and making ‘racist
comments.’ There’s no proof
but the n*ggers are freaking
out.”
The unknown person

went on to say the N-word
multiple times, once referring to another person who
reads the unknown person’s
message.
The baseball player responded saying, “She can
take her long neck *ss back
to her giraffe tribe in Nigeria.” Once the messages were
made public, the baseball
player later apologized in
multiple tweets.
“I have realized that I
messed up,” one tweet read.
“I am sorry. Not because I
got caught but because I said
stuff that should never be
said by anybody.”
Calls made by The
Champion to Lakeside baseball coach Donnie Hayes
about the player and possible
punishment have not been
returned.

TUTORING Continued From Page 10A
address its sewer system.
Watson said he is working to have the water donation transported to Michigan on Feb. 6.
Bottled water will be
collected at Watson’s free
monthly community breakfast on Saturday, Feb. 6, in
the cafeteria of Southwest
DeKalb High School, located
at 2863 Kelley Chapel Road,
Decatur, from 9 to 11 a.m.
To arrange a pickup of a
donation, call Watson’s office
at (404) 371-3681.

semester—and preferably
a full school year to ensure
some stability for the child.
When a volunteer leaves the
program after a few sessions,
the child may be left feeling
that adults have once again
failed him.
“We understand that
sometimes people’s situations
change and some people decide the program is simply
not right for them, but we do
ask volunteers to stick it out
if possible. These children
have been through a lot. It
may take a little time to build

trust with them, but once
you do the relationship has
great value in their lives,” he
said.  
Volunteers must be at
least 18 years old and willing
to submit to a background
check. The program is ongoing so volunteers may sign
on at any point. Project One
on One has orientations
scheduled throughout February and March.  For orientation dates and information
on registration, visit www.
ChildRN.org.

PUBLIC NOTICE 
 

DeKalb graduates two police academies
DeKalb County’s police academy recently announced 14
of its newest officers.
DeKalb officials, police department, family and friends
joined together recently to celebrate the most recent graduating class.
“I am thankful for your sacrifice and your commitment,”
said interim CEO Lee May. “Your willingness to protect and
serve our county is more than admirable.”

 
EARLY VOTING FOR THE CITY OF ATLANTA 
MARCH 01, 2016 SPECIAL ELECTION 

The City of Atlanta will hold a Special Election on Tuesday, March 1, 2016 in conjunction 
with the Presidential Preference Primary Election.  Voters will be presented with a question of 
whether or not to reimpose a special one percent (1%) sales and use tax, presently in effect, to 
fund water and sewer projects. Those desiring to vote for the reimposition of such sales and 
use tax shall do so by voting “YES” and voters desiring to vote against the reimposition of such 
sales and use tax shall do so by voting “NO.” 
Polls  will  be  open  on  March  1,  2016  from  7:00  a.m.  until  7:00  p.m.  at  all  of  the 
designated precincts/polling places in the City of Atlanta. 
Early  voting  for  the  March  1,  2016  Election(s)  will  occur  February  8,  2016  through 
February 26, 2016 at various locations throughout Fulton and DeKalb Counties.  Please contact 
atlantaelections@atlantaga.gov or (404) 330‐6500 for specific locations, dates and times. 
Rhonda Dauphin Johnson 
Municipal Clerk/Election Superintendent 
City of Atlanta 

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 11A

Tucker city council District 2, Post 1 candidates
Atteberry: “Tucker has
so many amazing volunteers
and volunteer organizations
that have kept the community strong for over a century. It may be a challenge to
coordinate and integrate all
of these organizations so that
we are all providing value
without overlapping, but it is
a nice challenge to have.”

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Leading up to the March
1 special election, The Champion will publish a Q&A with
each candidate in the city of
Tucker elections. This Q&A
segment features candidates
for City Council District 2
Post 1: Katherine Atteberry,
Frank Nix Jr., Matt Robbins
and Thomas Walker.

1) Why did you decide to
run for a city council
seat?
Atteberry: “As a volunteer with Tucker 2015, I listened to the community and
talked about Tucker’s future.
So, when we became a city,
I thought about how I could
continue my service and realized that city council would
be a great way to put our collective vision into action.”
Nix: “To run for city
council did not come as a
great epiphany or sudden
urge. Rather, as a gentle urge
that ‘snuck up’ on me and
began to grow. [My family
and I] have lived in Tucker
since 1971, and I want to do
all I can to see that we get the
new city off to a great start.”
Robbins: “Serving as
councilperson would be a
continuation of my decades
of community involvement
and engagement in Tucker
and DeKalb County. I will
help lay the groundwork for
a high functioning city that
is a model of responsive and
good government. I have the
time and energy to make this
happen.”
Walker: “I wanted to
make sure Tucker places fiscal responsibility first. If fiscal responsibility is not the
top priority, Tucker could
have a deficit as much as $4
million and that would be
fatal to our city. However, if
Tucker operates efficiently,

Atteberry

we will have a surplus and
success.”

2) What are your top three
priorities if elected to
city council?
Atteberry: “No. 1)
Bringing in highly qualified
and enthusiastic city staff to
provide services; No. 2) negotiating the agreements and
transitioning services from
DeKalb County to the city of
Tucker; No. 3) establishing
an infrastructure (physical
and digital) that supports
strong service delivery.”
Nix: “First—get the best
persons for city manager and
other city offices. Second—
improve the city by assisting
Tucker CID to meet their
goals for our area. Third—facilitate planning, zoning, and
code enforcement that [the]
county has been so lax in.”
Robbins: “Residents have
told me what’s important. I
will focus on these priorities:
establish a formal government with highly skilled staff
representative and responsive to all residents, from
businesses and civic associations, to schools and our
nonprofit partners; build effective working relationships;
and make Tucker a model for
robust, sustainable growth.”
Walker: “No. 1) Set up
our city to operate in a fiscal-

reduce
reuse
recycle

Walker

Robbins

ly responsible manner which
means, in part, hiring the
right people. No. 2) Negotiate intergovernmental agreements with DeKalb County
that protect Tucker taxpayers. No. 3) Draft zoning and
a code that is constitutional
and enforceable as intended.”

3) What qualities do you
have that will help you
be a good city council
member for Tucker?
Atteberry: “I grew up in
Tucker and have lived here
for 20 years. My master of
public administration taught
me effective government
management strategies, and I
have worked in local government. I will take my knowledge of Tucker, apply my real
world experience, and get
Tucker off to a smart start.”
Nix: “I believe everyone
who knows me would say,
‘He is honest, ethical, truthful, trustworthy, financially
responsible, law abiding
(except for speed laws), tem-

perate, sense of humor, hardworking and fair.’”
Robbins: “As a councilperson I would bring years of
experience creating policies,
procedures, best practices,
and models that work in
government. I am committed
to listening to all residents
and developing relationships
necessary to move the city
forward. I work well under
stress and bring a calming
influence to partnerships.”
Walker: “Having practiced law for 24 years, I listen
to my clients and place their
concerns first; this will carry
over to constituents. In addition, I am experienced in
statutory interpretation and
have negotiated, reviewed,
drafted and litigated contracts. Moreover, I work well
with others. Finally, I am a
tireless worker.”

4) W 
hat do you believe
some of the challenges
will be for Tucker?

Nix: “Getting the three
areas we are responsible for
off to the best start possible.
Working with the county
to assure our revenue is
received as outlined in the
feasibility study. [And,] to
provide for growth while still
maintaining the small town
sense of community.”
Robbins: “Any and every challenge Tucker faces
is also an opportunity. From
economic development to
sustainability and smart
growth, we can develop a city
that works for everyone. I am
committed to a responsive
government relying less on
bureaucracy and more on
strategies and best practices.
Tucker will meet the challenges!”
Walker: “Negotiating our intergovernmental
agreements and purchasing
our park land from DeKalb
County could be difficult. In
addition, hiring a city manager with the right experience for the right contract
may be a challenge. Finally,
we will not know the exact
amount of our revenue and
expenditures until operating.”

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING AND REVISION OF DATE
The DeKalb County Board of Commissioners will hold Public Hearings on the
2016 Proposed Budget at the times and places listed below, the second of
which reflects a revised date:
Tuesday

February 9, 2016

10:00AM

Maloof Center Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur

Thursday

February 25, 2016 10:00AM

Maloof Center Auditorium
1300 Commerce Drive, Decatur

All interested citizens are invited to attend these hearings and have the right to
present comments pertaining to the proposed budget.
The recommended budget is available for public inspection in the Office of
Management & Budgeting, 6th Floor, Maloof Center, at all DeKalb County
Libraries during normal business hours, and electronically at
www.dekalbcountyga.gov.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

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Page 12A

Alida Brown (second left) and Tyler Sylvester (center) were winners of an essay contest formed by Southwest
DeKalb alums India Ali (second right) and Omari Crawford (far right).

SWD alums give back
through mentorship
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com
Two Southwest DeKalb
High School seniors are
recipients of a $250 scholarship after winning an essay
contest.
Alida Brown and Tyler
Sylvester wrote the best essays on what the first amendment means to them and
how it applies to their lives.
Both students were excited
about winning the award.
“I feel special,” Sylvester
said.
“I am actually very surprised,” Brown said. “I’m
happy that I won and I feel
proud that I won because I
was honestly talking about
the importance of everything
in my life and how the first
amendment makes me feel
like I’m important.”
Students of Dr. Kenyatta
Arnette’s business and computer science classes were
given the assignment by
Southwest DeKalb alums
India Ali and Omari Crawford.
Ali and Crawford, who
are both now attorneys, returned to their alma mater in
September to form the Project L.I.F.E (Learning Is For
Everyone) program with the
purpose of exposing students
to various professions.
The two, who have
known each other since they
were 8 years old, graduated
from Southwest DeKalb in
2004. After both received
their juris doctorade and
M.B.A degrees from North
Carolina Central School of
Law in 2013, they returned
to Atlanta to begin their law
careers and to find a way
to give back to their high
school.
“One of the things we

talked about is the fact that
many students from certain
neighborhoods don’t have
the same exposure to professionals as other neighborhoods,” said Crawford, who
works at The Cochran Firm.
“I came from a home with
two working parents, who
were college-educated, but
I didn’t have access to an attorney—someone I could
call on the phone or sit down
with and call a mentor until I
got to college—undergrad at
Florida A&M. That’s the first
time I really had the opportunity to sit and talk with an
attorney.”
Crawford said he and
Ali, who works for The
Law Offices of Stephen H.
Robinson, thought it would
be beneficial if they came
back to the school that they
were involved in and teach
the students about the legal
world.
“It’s about coming back,
giving back and teaching and
making sure the students
have the opportunity to learn
something that might be a
field they would like to get
into,” Crawford said.
“From what we’ve been
told, from whenever we
just come up to the school
to watch a basketball game,
we’re always being told that
[the student body] is different now,” Ali said. “The students are different and they
need more people who have
graduated and have gone on
to do successful things, to
come back and talk to the
kids because it’s a different
generation. They are more
exposed to things that we
weren’t exposed to as far as
social media and all of these
other things that we didn’t
have to grow up dealing
with.”

Although there are mentors in the community, Ali
said students would benefit
more from those who have
walked the same halls as they
are walking at Southwest
DeKalb.
“I think [the students]
can get ‘lost in the sauce’
because they’re paying more
attention to what’s on the
television or social media—
the things that are popular,”
Ali added. “And maybe they
don’t have direct access to
somebody who went to this
school, who understands
what they’re going through
and someone they can relate
to. We’re not that far removed from the school.”
Arnette, who taught
Crawford during his senior
year, said having the former
students come back to mentor current students is the
highlight of a teacher’s career.
“They’ve become success stories and to see them
come back is a great honor,”
Arnette said.
Brown said having Ali
and Crawford around has
further expanded her horizon about potential future
opportunities.
“They’ve also helped
me further understand the
things that I can do,” Brown
said. “Seeing a person in a
position that you want to be
in is inspirational and gives
you a higher belief that you
can do something,”
“I loved it,” Sylvester
said. “The L.I.F.E Program
is amazing. Every time they
came it was very live. They
were hands on and made it
fun, made the class better.”
Ali and Crawford hope
to expand the program to
other schools.

Accreditation woes
over for school district
by Andrew Cauthen
The DeKalb County School District is fully accredited
again.
In a Jan. 28 letter, AdvancED, parent company of
Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS), the
agency that accredits the school district, announced that
the school district has taken the final three action steps
necessary to move from “accredited under review” to “accredited.”
“I am proud of the hard work and diligent effort on
the part of the teachers, staff, and the board of education
to return the district to full accreditation,” said Superintendent Stephen Green in a statement. “The DeKalb
County School District will be relentless in sustaining
the work completed and remain focused on the quality of
instruction in the classroom and thereby raise the bar for
teaching and learning. Our students will rise to the level
of expectation that we set. We are locked in on this mission.”
In December 2012, the DeKalb school district was
placed on accreditation probation by SACS. The school
board hired former Georgia Labor Commissioner Mike
Thurmond as an interim superintendent.
The accreditation probation triggered a state law
granting the governor the authority to remove school
board members. Acting on the recommendation of the
Georgia Board of Education, Gov. Nathan Deal suspended six of the nine members of the DeKalb school board in
February 2013 and later replaced them.
The DeKalb school district had 14 required actions to
complete to retain its accreditation.
“We could not have done this without the collaboration and cooperation of the board and community working together to select Dr. Green as the leader of this district,” said school board chairman Melvin Johnson, in a
statement. “Now, we can continue our number one focus
on student achievement.”
In December 2015 the school district submitted a
progress report addressing final three actions steps that
needed to be completed. The report was reviewed by an
evaluation team.
“In recognition of the progress made to date and acknowledgement of the continued work needed to sustain
the required actions,…the DeKalb County School District’s accreditation status will be changed from ‘accredited under review’ to ‘accredited,’” AdvancED stated in the
letter to the school district.
Although progress has been made, “it is incumbent
upon the school system to continue to sustain the progress accomplished by engaging in the AdvancED continuous improvement process,” the letter added.
The school district’s SACS accreditation expires June
30, 2017. To maintain accreditation, the DeKalb district
must “conduct a thorough internal review in preparation
for an onsite external review to be held during the 201617 school year,” the letter stated.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 13A

WEEKinPICTurES
Members of the Atlanta Chinese Dance Company held a free educational performance at the Clarkston Library Jan. 30. The performance was presented in celebration of the
upcoming Lunar New Year. Photos by Travis Hudgons

Decatur High School inducted six member to the City Schools of Decatur Wall of Honor during a ceremony Jan. 29. The inductees were: Bob Reinhart, Michael Maddox,
Richard Wilson, Jack Williams, Tom Jones and Frank Jones. Photos by Travis Hudgons

Bob Reinhart

23

Michael Maddox

Elizabeth Wilson received
the honor for her deceased
son Richard Wilson

Jack Williams

Tom Jones

Coach Frank Jones

PHOTOS BROUGHT TO YOU BY DCTV
DCTV Channel 23
@DCTVChannel23

Get your front row seat to all things DeKalb County
through your EMMY Award-winning station

DeKalb County Gov
Ustream.tv/channle/DCTV-Channel-23
VISIT US AT WWW.DCTVChannel23.tv

E-mail us at DCTV@DeKalbCountyGA.gov

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 14A

Five arrests made in
2015 Lithonia murder

Lithonia officials approves budget

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

The Lithonia City Council approved a $1.2 million budget for fiscal
year 2016 on Feb. 1.
The council passed the budget on a 4-1 vote with Councilman William Ric Dodd voting nay.
In December, the city projected the 2016 budget to be $1,062,618,
which would have been .52 percent or $5,528 more than the projected
2015 budget of $1,057,090.
The increase to $1,210,588 was due in part to salary adjustments in
the police department, according to City Administrator Eddie Moody.
Two officers went from parttime to fulltime, bringing the total personal
service salaries amount to $442,300 from the project $428,694.
Stormwater expenses also increased from $4,200 to $36,000 in the
budget.
“Towards the end of the year we had a $25,000 payout for stormwater
expenses,” Moody said. “That kind of elevated the amended budget side.”
The budget also includes installation of a swipe card machine at the
city clerk’s window to increase the methods of payments for permits; developing an Indigent Defense Policy for court services to determine the
needs of defendants; and relocating the public works department to an
existing city structure and demolition of the current facility.
The budget also will cover a license plate reader for one additional
police car through a nationwide program. Although the program calls for
a 50 percent sharing of revenue, it saves the city $25,000 on the purchase
of new equipment, according to the city.

The Lithonia Police Department has identified six
suspects and arrested five in the May 3, 2015, murder
of 26-year-old Leevon Daniels.
Police arrested 18-year-old Mohamed Kamara,
17-year-old Christay Eady, 17-year-old Dawson Phillip Brown, and two 16-year-olds.
Police are still looking for another 16. Lithonia Police Chief Roosevelt Smith said he believes Chaney is
hiding somewhere in Decatur.
Daniels was shot and killed outside the Red Hills
Club on Main Street, where police believed he attempted to attend a party. A passerby saw Daniels’
body lying on the side of the road and notified an offduty officer working part-time at the club.
The officer discovered Daniels had multiple gunshot wounds to his body.
Smith said police received a tip from someone
who had information on a suspect. They were able to
find that suspect, who later identified the other suspects, according to Smith.
The three older suspects have been charged with
felony murder and felony armed robbery. Smith said
he will try to get all suspects tried as adults.

by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

Eady

Brown

Kamara

NEWSBRIEFS
DeKalb officials team up for food
drive
Five DeKalb County officials
are sponsoring a food drive to help
replenish the shelves at the Atlanta
Community Food Bank.
DeKalb County Commissioner
Kathie Gannon, Solicitor General
Sherry Boston, Clerk of Superior
Court Debra DeBerry, Tax Commissioner Irvin Johnson and Clerk
of State Court Melanie Wilson are
sponsoring a food drive that runs
through Feb. 19.
“After the holidays the pantry
shelves at the Atlanta Community
Food Bank are looking bare,” Gannon said in a statement. “This year
we have enlisted the help of the
DeKalb public libraries and we hope
DeKalb citizens will help restock the
shelves of the Atlanta Community
Food Bank.”
“We are asking DeKalb citizens
and employees to donate food for
DeKalb families in need,” Boston.
The news release stated that
hunger is a problem in metro Atlanta with approximately 17 percent
of the households and 28 percent of
children in the area served by the Atlanta Community Food Bank, which
includes DeKalb, not always knowing where their next meal is coming

from.
“In this day and age, no one in
DeKalb County should go hungry,”
DeBerry said.
The most needed items include
canned tuna, peanut butter, fruit
juices, canned vegetables and paper
products. Residents can bring food
donations to any of the libraries or
three tax commissioners’ offices.
“In the past our Food Drive has
relied upon DeKalb County employees and they have responded generously,” Boston said. “I know this
year we will exceed past donations
because the citizens of DeKalb can
easily donate at libraries.”
Last year the county food drive
collected more than one ton of food
for the Atlanta Community Food
Bank.

Local child advocates to attend
CASA Day at the Capitol
Approximately 10 child advocates from DeKalb County Court
Appointed Special Advocates
(CASA) plan to attend CASA Day at
the Capitol on Feb. 9.
An annual event hosted by Georgia Court Appointed Special Advocates Inc., the day centers on CASA
volunteers, board members and staff
from across the state meeting with
members of the Georgia Legislature

to share their concerns about the
abused and neglected children in
foster care that their CASA programs
serve.
This year’s event includes remarks and a legislative briefing,
meeting with legislators, and a luncheon to thank the legislators for
their support of the CASA organization and child welfare issues.
The CASA organization in Georgia is embarking on a three-year
growth plan with a goal of serving 75
percent of the children in foster care
at the end of three years. This year’s
legislative strategy includes a funding
increase request to support the statewide growth plan.
Last year, more than 2,100 CASA
volunteers in Georgia served more
than 9,700 abused and neglected
children. Locally, 137 CASA volunteers served 315 children in DeKalb
County during fiscal year 2014.
For more information about
CASA, contact DeKalb County
CASA at (404) 378-0038 or dekalbcasa@dekalbcasa.org.

State representative introduces
Pursuing Justice for Rape
Victims Act
Rep. Scott Holcomb (D-Atlanta)
has introduced House Bill 827, the
Pursuing Justice for Rape Victims

Act, which would require hospitals
and law enforcement to inventory
and deliver all untested sexual assault
kits to the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI).
This would allow the GBI to audit the number of untested kits and
pave the way for their forensic examination.
“There are currently an unknown
number of untested sexual assault
kits in the state of Georgia, placing a
roadblock in the way of law enforcement’s ability to prosecute offenders
and prevent future sex crimes,” states
a news release about the proposed
bill.
This bipartisan bill, which currently has 78 cosponsors, would also
require that hospitals notify local
law enforcement when they receive
a sexual assault kit, and require that
law enforcement to deliver the kit to
GBI within 30 days.
“We need to do everything we
can to bring perpetrators of sexual
assault to justice,” Holcomb said in a
statement.
“Although this bill is a modest
first step toward helping us solve previous crimes and prevent future offenses, it is a necessary one that will
bring us closer to advancing justice
for victims who are too often overlooked,” he said.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Page 15A

snapfinger Continued From Page 1A

DeKalb police and fire rescue personnel stand in solidarity to ask the DeKalb County Board of Commissioners
for more pay. Photo by Andrew Cauthen

MORE PAY Continued From Page 1A
overall but lost that to decreases in our paychecks.
“I want to be able to stay in DeKalb
County, but $40 a paycheck is a lot of groceries and I have four children,” she said. “I can’t
afford to stay with DeKalb County.”
Interim CEO Lee May said in a recent
interview with The Champion that as he
promised in 2013, all sworn public safety
personnel received a 3-percent incentive
and in 2014 all county employees received a
3-percent cost-of-living adjustment.
Erik Heimer, a DeKalb Police sergeant,
said Blue DeKalb, a group of police officers
and residents seeking to improve officers’
pay, wants three things: “an 8 percent pay
raise for officers to equal one percent per
year that police did not receive a raise; reinstatement of the 10 percent pay raise for promotions to sergeant and lieutenant that was
taken away from us;” and the establishment
of “a merit and raise system based on officer
development and community commitment.”
Blue DeKalb wants to “fix the problem
of officer retention and officer recruiting, to
provide a safer environment for the citizens
and an appealing place for commerce, and a
return to professionalism of our law enforcement agency,” said Heimer, adding that each
of these goals can be achieved through pay
increases for police.
“DeKalb County officers have not received a raise solely for police officers since
2006,” Heimer said. “As a result, this once
proud police department has lost veteran,
talented officers to occupations with better
financial opportunities.”
Decatur resident David Light spoke
about the state of the fire department.
“As an appraiser I look at things in terms
of value and costs associated with that value,”
Light said. “Last year DeKalb County hired
100 new fire recruits. The cost to train these
individuals was $60,000 each. That means we
put in $6 million as in investment.
“Last year we also lost 61 firefighters
resigning and going to other departments—

Sandy Springs, Dawson County, Cobb
County,” he said. “That’s an investment that
we lost. We won’t see a return on that value.
That’s $3,600,000 that left last year.
“When we lose 61 trained individuals to
other departments, they take that knowledge
and experience,” Light said. “That is not a
return on investment. That is a cost to us that
we don’t get back.”
Light said, “These brave men and women
haven’t had raises in over seven years. They
haven’t had merit increases, no cost-of-living
adjustment and, at the same time, their insurance and pension contributions have increased each year.
“Every day when they go to work, they go
to work prepared to make the ultimate sacrifice—laying down their lives if asked to,” he
said. “I think it’s time to sacrifice... in return
to give the salary and compensation they deserve.”
Community activist Joe Arrington said
there are none “more deserving” than public
safety personnel for a pay increase.
Arrington urged county officials to put
DeKalb’s first responders “on an equal basis
with the city of Atlanta’s police department
and other jurisdictions which are taking
away our good officers as fast as we can train
them.
“We’ve become an excellent training
school...to make good police officers and
then we don’t have the resources to keep
them,” Arrington said.
“Consider what your priorities for this
county are and I can think of none higher
than the police department and after them
the fire department and after them potholes,”
Arrington added.
Capt. Alex Mears, a DeKalb Police officer of more than 20 years, said, “Today the
time has come to invest in the police department.
“Now is the time to say ‘I am willing
to give raises and give public safety officers
what they deserve to help us retain the best
and brightest among them,’” Mears said.

retaining wall, numerous
water violations and accidents at the construction site.
Residents near the site complained also complained at
that time of damage caused
by blasting.
In October 2015, DeKalb
County officials ceremonially broke ground on Phase 2
construction of the Snapfinger Advanced Wastewater
Treatment Plant, which is
being touted as the largest watershed project in the
county’s history.
County officials said the
Snapfinger plant expansion
is designed to improve the
wastewater treatment process
and return clean, high-quality water to the South River.
Additionally, the new facility
will help reduce noise levels,
odor and light produced by
the plant in the surrounding
community.
The current Snapfinger
facility processes up to 36
million gallons per day of
wastewater. The facility is
being expanded to treat an
average of 54 million gallons
per day.
The project is a part
of the county’s $1.3 billion
capital improvement project
(CIP) and is expected to be
completed in late 2017.
Margaret Tanner, the
watershed department’s deputy director for engineering
and construction management services, said during
a Jan. 27 news conference
that the county is “moving
forward with quite a few”
watershed capital improvement projects,” but is in the
“process of reprioritizing”
others.
“The CIP was originally
developed during the hous-

ing boom,” Tanner said.
“Of course we had a
bust,” she said. “While [development] is picking back
up, it’s focusing more toward
the urban areas, so we really
need to reprioritize what our
needs are. We are in the process of reevaluating that, but
we still have priority needs
and problematic areas that
we are moving forward with
as fast as we can.”
Tanner said the county
is “rebalancing” the projects
“based on where the current
growth is happening and
not where it was supposed
to happen five years ago and
didn’t.”
The county is redeveloping its watershed master
plans by “looking at our capacity issues,” she said.
“We’ve got hydraulic
models for both our collection system and our distribution systems that are under
development,” Tanner said.
“They’re going to let us know
where we have capacity constraints and where we need
to be focusing our work.
“We’re hoping to have
that completed before the
end of the year,” she said.
“That doesn’t mean we’re
not working because we’re
moving forward with priority projects,” she added. “We
have problematic water lines
that we’re going to go ahead
and move forward with.”
When asked whether the
reprioritization of projects
would delay the CIP, Tanner
said, “No. Not really.
“We’re going to be moving forward with what’s already been planned, which
are the areas which have the
repeated breaks,” she said.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

education

City Schools of Decatur’s Renfroe Middle School is being expanded to address the city’s
growing population. Photo by Andrew Cauthen

Page 16A

The first phase of construction is expected to be completed by the 2016-17 school year.
Photo by Travis Hudgons

Renfroe Middle School construction addresses district’s growth
by R. Scott Belzer
The whirring of tractors,
clanging of hammers and
other sounds of expansion
have echoed throughout
the halls of Renfroe Middle
School since summer 2015.
It’s nearly impossible to
drive down West College
Avenue near downtown Decatur without seeing obvious signs of construction–a
slew of large trucks, WildCat
bulldozers, or even a crane
or two.
However, according to
Noel Maloof, chief operations officer (coo) for City
Schools of Decatur, students,
faculty and staff have not
been negativity affected by
long-term construction, valued at $34.7 million.
Maloof said the project is
expected to address issues of
overcrowding and growth.
“This is one of those
projects we can safely say
we wish all other [construction projects] were like,” said
Maloof Jan. 26. “We wish all
projects we did had such a
strong team behind it and
were met with such a positive
response.”
The Dectaur middle
school–located along West
College Avenue near Agnes
Scott College–has been undergoing an indepth transformation over the past two
and a half years. Changes
involving extra buildings, a
new bus drop-off area, renovations and an overall facelift
are all on their way to Renfroe, with the earliest benefit
being seen by July 2016.
“We’re expecting to be
done with the first phase of
construction by the beginning of the 2016-17 school
year,” Maloof said. “By then,
we will begin to work concurrently on the second
phase. ”
Concerns involving what
Maloof termed as “astronomical growth” led to the

School officials say the existing school building is overcrowded. Photo by Travis Hudgons

middle school’s hefty facelift,
but the district’s COO is confident students, faculty and
staff will begin reaping rewards during the 2016 school
year without hampering the
education process.
“Even with a non-scientific look at the growth in our
city, it’s pretty clear we’re experiencing a growth pattern
that most school districts
ever see,” Maloof said. “We’re
trying to stay ahead of the
curve. The school will instantly see the benefits at the
beginning of next school year
with 14 new classrooms.”
While temporary learning environments are not
ideal, Maloof said the 12
trailers included as part of
the overall plan were a necessary inclusion for such a
large project.
“These will allow us to
relieve the pressure from
construction and allow us
to continue operating as incoming growth happens,” he
said. “We were actually able
to reduce the master plan’s 24
proposed temporary learning
environments to 12.”
The COO said the year’s
unpredictable weather has
not slowed construction.
Maloof also reassured that
contingency days and “bad
weather days” come as part
of any major construction
project, especially as big
as the one facing Renfroe
Middle.
“We always build in time

for weather days,” he said.
“We’ve been working with
all weather predictions and
we’re right on track.”
The changes come as
one of four options that have
been mulled over since the
question of construction was
put before the school board
in 2013, according to City
Schools of Decatur’s website.
According to a presentation published by City
Schools of Decatur, design

firm Cooper Carey and engineering firm Kimley Horn,
this option groups classrooms by grade, preserves
most of the existing trees on
campus, makes supervision
of hallways easier on staff,
makes the most use of the
existing building, provides
the most natural light, maintains green space, offers the
potential of further expansion, and leaves the school’s
gym untouched.

The presentation also
mentions construction will
bring the campus’s total
square footage to 207,328, for
the approximate 1,100 students attending Renfroe.
The overall involvement
and response from the public–including Decatur residents and Renfroe Middle
parents–in regards to the
project has been nothing
but positive, according to
Maloof.
“So far, so good,” Maloof
said. “In regards to everything–weather, the school
operating as normal–we have
had nothing but support.
We’re hoping as the overall
process continues we’ll be
met with the same positivity.”
For more information on
Renfore Middle School’s construction, visit City Schools
of Decatur’s website at www.
csdecatur.net or call (404)
371-3601.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

Business

Page 17A

Merger unites building products companies
by Kathy Mitchell
 
Merging two established
Atlanta area building supply
companies, Construction
Resources Inc., and Builder
Specialties Inc., creates a
“one-stop shop” for those
building and remodeling
residential and commercial buildings, according to
Mitch Hires, who was CEO
of Construction Resources
Inc. and is now CEO of the
combined company.  
The merger, announced
Jan. 14, is the result of a
transaction with Monomoy
Capital Partners II, L.P.,
which finalized the purchase
of both companies. The
combined entity, known as
Construction Resources, is
now the largest independent provider and installer
of building products in the
Southeast region, Hires said.
The original Construction Resources is a 45-yearold Decatur-based company.
Builder Specialties was
started in Atlanta in the
mid-1960s. Both companies,
Hires said, have a history of
excellence in the building
supply industry and longstanding customer relationships throughout the Southeast region.
“There was no overlap in
the two companies’ products
and services, but they were
complementary. Construction Resources specialized
in kitchen and bath materials while Builder Specialties focused on appliances,
fireplaces, mantels, garage
doors, lighting, and outdoor
products. We often worked
with the same clients and
had great respect for each
other. The merger just made
sense,” Hires said.
“In choosing products
needed for a project, a customer might have had to go
to 10 locations over a period
of perhaps two weeks,” he
said. “Our goal is to simplify
that process. The customer
can find everything at one
of our design centers and arrange installation all in one
stop.”
Hires said the new
company will have a physical presence in four states
with an enhanced ability to

service the South and MidAtlantic region. It will also
leverage the expanded distribution network and has
plans to integrate all nine
product categories into their
design centers. The new
Construction Resources will
operate from 27 locations,
including design centers,
showrooms and distribution
facilities.
The newly established
company will continue all
current lines of business,
offering 55 major brands
across nine product categories, including appliances,
countertops, garage doors,
hearth products, tile and
flooring, glass and mirror, lighting, cabinets and
specialties. It also provides

installation and aftermarket
services, he said.   
“We’re not a lumber and
mortar company. We deal in
those things customers see
and touch,” Hires explained,
adding that the company
does fabrication, but not
heavy construction.
Both companies, he said,
started as family-owned
businesses. “In 1970, my dad
started the company that became Construction Resources in Decatur near Agnes
Scott College. It later moved
to Avondale Estates and is
now near DeKalb Farmer’s
Market. I grew up in DeKalb
County and I’m proud our
company will remain here.”
Hires said that he and
his brother, Sonny Hires,
who is vice president of sales
for the new company, went
to Tucker High School. The
brothers worked in the business as they attended high
school and college and in
time took over its operations,
expanding and diversifying
the company.

Originally, the
company worked with
builders, designers,
remodelers, general
contractors and property managers. “The economic downturn that started
in 2008 hit the construction
business hard. Like everyone
else in construction-related
businesses we were struggling to survive,” Hires recalled.
During that period, the
company expanded its customer base to include retail
customers. “It proved to be a
good move,” Hires said, “but
it didn’t come from inspiration; it came from desperation.”
“As the housing market
continues to improve, particularly in greater-Atlanta and
surrounding regions, we see
a significant opportunity to
expand and grow our business,” David Haun, president
of Construction Resources,
stated in a news release announcement of the merger.
“By merging our complementary businesses, we can
enhance the way we operate
and serve our customers to
a degree that is well beyond
any other building products

supplier in our market.”
The new company will
retain what Hires called the
“strong management teams”
of the merging companies.
“Our staff is our business’
strength. Knowledgeable,
determined people are the
reason these companies

Collaboration

were able to keep going during tough times when many
other companies failed.
“It is not clear yet how we
will handle redundant functions. This company is still
in its infancy. There are still
a lot of things to be worked
out,” he said.

DeKalb Chamber of Commerce • Two Decatur Town Center, 125 Clairemont Ave., Suite, Decatur, GA 30030 • 404.378.8000 • www.dekalbchamber.org

59,220

(5,779)

Fund Balance

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
Licenses and permits
Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
Fines and Forfeitures
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Proceeds of general long-term liabilities
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
General Government:
Chief Executive Officer
Board of Commissioners
Law Department
Ethics
Geographic Information
Risk Management
Facilities Management
Purchasing
Human Resources & Merit System
Information Systems
Finance
Property Appraisal
Tax Commissioner
Registrar and Elections
Civil and Criminal Court System:
Sheriff
Juvenile Court
Superior Court
Clerk Superior Court
State Court
Solicitor State Court
District Attorney
Child Advocate
Probate Court
Medical Examiner
Public Defender
Magistrate Court
Public Safety:
Public Safety Admin & Communications
Animal Control
Police
Fire & Rescue
Planning & Development
Public Works:
Directors Office
Economic Development
Public Services - Library
Health and Human Services:
Extension Services
Public Board of Health
Community Service Board
Family and Children Services
Human and Community Development
Citizen Help Center
Capital Improvement
CIP
GO Bonds - Parks
Non-Departmental
Debt Service
Grants
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Transfers To Other Funds
Total Expenditures

1,103
2,318
4,188
129
1,902
16,225
2,716
3,243
18,101
5,945
4,655
6,933
1,785

77,918
6,772
8,757
7,069
13,700
6,751
12,742
2,258
1,580
2,450
8,585
3,225

3,728
2,280
7,819
1,513

336
623
13,683

590
4,056
1,984
1,278
2,967
-

14,063
2,705
30
5,823
9,197
293,725

79,331
6,875
9,241
7,206
14,316
7,168
13,628
2,355
1,630
2,455
8,703
3,158

3,927
4,177
9,031
1,744

493
1,372
14,100

641
4,156
1,984
1,278
3,483
-

15,208
2,705
31,478
13,789
345,483

2015
Actual
200,492
59,168
4,945
2
1,771
45,848
8,925
136
4,059
1,678
25,921
352,945

2,674
-

2,674
(8)
-

(8)

-

-

-

(8)

(97)
89
-

2,459
-

Urban
Redevelopment
Debt Service
Fund
414

1,349
3,366
5,007
215
2,275
17,536
3,047
3,959
21,300
7,653
4,724
7,314
2,106

25,921
345,483

General Fund 100
2015
Budget
202,983
51,575
5,212
4
1,480
43,260
9,009
2,618
3,421

1,344
-

-

-

1,344

-

-

Total Liabilities And Fund Balance

-

2,674

1,344

-

2,674
-

1,344
-

Fund Balance

Liabilities:
Accounts payable
Deferred revenue
Payroll liabilities
Advance payments and deposits
Notes payable
Due to others
Other Accrued Liabilities
Total Liabilities

Assets:
Cash and investments
Receivable
Inventories and prepaid items
Non-Current Assets
Total Assets

2,139
Public Safety
Judicial Facilities
Debt Service
Fund
413

(1,403)

1,610
Building
Authority Bonds
Debt Service
Fund
412

2,459

-

Total Liabilities And Fund Balance

-

3,542

-

2,254
205
2,459

-

1,954
1,588
-

(1,528)
3,667
2,139

1,639
Hotel /
Motel
Tax
Fund
275

7,389

6,990
399
-

725
885
1,610

Police Services
Fund
274

7,261
-

1,633

6

-

2,349

4,912

6
-

1,639
1,639

PEG
Support
Fund
203

2,269

80

7,261
7,261

Development
Fund
201

Liabilities:
Accounts payable
Deferred revenue
Payroll liabilities
Advance payments and deposits
Notes payable
Due to others
Other Accrued Liabilities
Total Liabilities

Assets:
Cash and investments
Receivable
Inventories and prepaid items
Total Assets

Hospital
Fund
273

148,586
-

Fund Balance

Total Liabilities And Fund Balance

10,989
(1,065)
194
79,160
121
(33)
89,366

79,667
64,840
4,079
148,586

Liabilities:
Accounts payable
Deferred revenue
Payroll liabilities
Advance payments and deposits
Notes payable
Due to others
Other Accrued Liabilities
Total Liabilities

Assets:
Cash and investments
Receivable
Inventories and prepaid items
Total Assets

General
Fund
100

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Revenues:
PropertyTaxes
Sales Taxes
Investment income
Intergovernmental Revenue
Transfer from Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Workforce Development
Non-Departmental
Total Expenditures

664
(10,303)
(9,639)

(9,938)
299
(9,639)

2009 ARRA Stimulus Fund 260
2015
Budget

855
202
1,057

907
117
33
1,057

Grants/2005 JAG #10 Fund 257
2015
Budget

(2)
(17,000)
21,255

404
2,213
2,738
117
1,327
1,118
2
910
4,314
313
13,888
1,784
(719)
13
1
5,653
1,455
16
248
21

2015
Actual

1

1

-

383
(5)
378

675
20
33
728

2015
Actual

(569)
1,539
26,080

228
1,024
558
74
232
664
314
1,013
(88)
10,029
705
2,663
1,289
-

7,129
-

3,636

(1)
1,897
3,493

-

1,597

7,129

2,129
5,000
-

7,188
-

6,973

117
215

49
49

7,188

-

Speed

-

-

-

-

-

-

14,530
-

14,341

189

-

189
-

14,530

14,260
270
-

Airport
Construction
Fund
552

COPS
Projects
Fund
351

1,526
-

1,521

5

-

5
-

1,511
15
1,526

Hump
Maintenance
Fund
212

-

1,007

1,007
-

16
3,785
23,206
27,007

2015
Actual

17,166
-

15,929

Host Capital Projects Fund 330
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
335
Intergovernmental
(9,792)
Deferred Revenue
Transfers From Other Funds
312
Fund Balance Carried Forward
301
Total Revenues
(8,844)
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
27,545
Unappropriated
(36,389)
(8,844)

2015
Actual

(1)
323
1,237

628
287
-

17,166

15,447
1,719
-

Stormwater
Utility
Fund
581

191
-

191

-

-

-

191
191

5,193
Public
Safety
Judicial Facilities
Fund
354

4,943

250

-

250
-

4,166
1,027
5,193

Telephone
System
Fund
215

Emergency

811

811

4
301
305

2006 G O Bonds - Parks, Transportation, Libraries Fund 315
2015
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Actual
Investment income
(6,909)
24
Intergovernmental Revenue
(64)
Transfers From Other Funds
(3,285)
6,443
Contributions from private sources
(3,825)
Proceeds from sale of bonds
(3,285)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
32,690
32,690
Total Revenues
15,322
39,157
Expenditures:
Parks
25,837
14,486
Library
5,670
63
Transportation
718
49
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
(16,903)
15,322
14,598

19,410
3,594
23,004

2001 G O Bonds - Parks Fund 314
2015
Budget
1,855
(277)
(183)
(33)
(38)
(1,526)
23,206
23,004

7,402
-

7,402

-

-

-

7,402

7,007
181
-

Airport
Operating
Fund
551

19,815
-

18,621

1,194

-

1,121
53
20

18,808
1,007
19,815

1,818
Capital
Improvement
Projects
Fund
350

1,572

246

-

246
-

1,818

1,473
345

Street
Lights
Fund
211

Revenues:
Investment income
Intergovernmental
Contributions from private sources
Transfers From Other Funds
Proceeds from sale of bonds
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

(6,536)
-

(6,910)

374

-

359
15

7,402
-

(474)
Sanitation
ARRA Capital
Projects
Fund
544

(506)

32

-

32
-

(474)
(474)

Host Capital
Projects
Fund
330

6,971
-

5,588

1,383

878

294
211

6,898
73
6,971

Confiscated
Monies
Fund
210

Law Enforcement

(6,536) -

(6,536)
-

Sanitation
Construction
Fund
542

Sanitation
Operating
Fund
541

24,559

354

-

300
54

24,913
24,913

2006 G O
Bonds - P,T,L
Fund
315

213
-

198

15

-

15
-

213
213

24,913
-

-

Drug Abuse
Treatment
& Education
Fund
209

26,037
-

26,000

37

-

37
-

26,037
26,037

6,405

58,864
-

47,889

10,975

-

10,975
-

58,864

58,864
-

Water &
Sewer
Sinking
Fund
514

-

-

-

-

-

-

2,441

Revenues:
Investment income
Intergovernmental Revenue
Transfers From Other Funds
Deferred Revenue
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Police
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

34
-

30

4

-

4
-

34
34

Juvenile
Services
Fund
208

1993
2001 G O
Bonds - Health Bonds - Parks
Fund
Fund
313
314

42
-

29

13

-

13
-

42
42

Recreation
Fund
207

2015
Actual
178
23,512
1,545
1,511
7,141
33,887

312,845
-

267,104

45,741

40,054
5,481
206

268,749
6,027
38,069
312,845

Water &
Sewer
R&E
Fund
513

1998
Bonds - Jail
Fund
312

283
-

283

-

-

-

283
283

Victim
Assistance
Fund
206

Grant-In-Aid Fund 250
2015
Budget
2,036
15,608
(2,334)
(1,196)
7,141
21,255

325,384
-

318,855

6,529

-

344

6,185

325,384

325,384
-

Water &
Sewer Bonds
Construction
Fund
512

1987 G O
Bonds - Parks
Fund
311

483
-

474

9

-

9
-

483
483

Foreclosure
Registry
Fund
205

Revenues:
Contributions from private sources
Intergovernmental
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
General Government:
Finance
Workforce Development
Civil and Criminal Court System:
Sheriff
Juvenile Court
Superior Court
State Court
Solicitor
District Attorney
Public Defender
Magistrate Court
Police Services
Fire & Rescue
Public Works
Community Development
Parks
Extension Service
Family & Children Services
Sanitation
Community Relations
Fleet Maint.
Animal Control
Bd of Health
Sr Citizen Services
Human Services
Keep Dekalb Beautiful
Arts, Culture, and Entertainment
Registrar/Elections
Water & Sewer
Non-Departmental
Fund Expenditures
Miscellaneous
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

125,373
-

104,701

10,635
2,599
20,672

7,212
15
211

125,373

(7,638)
128,543
4,468

Water &
Sewer
Operating
Fund
511

730
-

730

-

-

-

730
730

337
Rental Motor
Vehicle Excise
Tax
Fund
280

337

-

-

-

337
337

County Jail
Fund
204

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION BY FUND
As of December 31, 2015
(In thousands of dollars / unaudited)

This statement is published in accordance with Section 19 (b) of the DeKalb County Organizational Act of 1981, p. 4304.
Report will be published in the Champion Newspaper on Feb. 4, 2016
DEKALB COUNTY, GEORGIA

-

-

61,241
-

31,840

28,000
29,401

1,401
-

61,241

41,793
19,448
-

Vehicle
Replacement
Fund
621

2,772
-

3,265

(493)

-

173
(777)
111

2,687
85
2,772

HUD Section
108 Loan
Fund
357

(1)
-

(1)

-

-

-

(1)
(1)

Grants
2009 ARRA
Fund
260

-

19,122
-

10,254

6,008
8,868

2,860
-

19,122

1,482

17,640

Risk
Management
Fund
631

-

-

-

-

-

-

4,039
ARRA
Capital
Projects
Fund
360

1,738

2,301

(2)

1,065
1,238
-

1,218
2,821
4,039

Fire
Fund
270

-

12,341
-

(580)

12,921

-

12,921
-

12,341

12,341
-

Workers
Compensation
Fund
632

2,923
-

2,800

123

-

123
-

1,681
128
1,114
2,923

Debt
Service
Fund
410

462
-

(854)

1,316

(1)

738
579
-

(628)
1,090
462

Designated
Services
Fund
271

Special Tax

8,334
134,217
159,111
49,095
350,757

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Proceeds from sale of bonds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Fund Expenditures
CIP
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

66,763
38,713
105,476

Water & Sewer Sinking Fund 514
2015
Budget
541
51,728
53,207
105,476

Water & Sewer R & E Fund 513
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
15,858
Miscellaneous
(46)
Transfers From Other Funds
(63,269)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
223,438
Total Revenues
175,981
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
142,811
Unappropriated
33,170
175,981

Water & Sewer Bonds Construction Fund 512
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
Proceeds from sale of bonds
(17,477)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
402,972
Total Revenues
385,495
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
279,264
Unappropriated
106,231
385,495

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Finance
Water and Sewer
Fund Expenditures
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Water & Sewer Operating Fund 511
2015
Budget
600
257,602
116
92,439
350,757

748
89
837

66,735

66,735
-

2
251
61,164
53,207
114,624

2015
Actual

21,632
(527)
21,105

10
64,761
223,438
288,209

2015
Actual

84,654

84,654

537
402,972
403,509

2015
Actual

251,265

7,804
116,534
163
126,764

257
262,773
497
92,439
355,966

2015
Actual

747
747

Urban Redevelopment Agency Bond Debt Service Fund 414
2015
2015
Budget
Actual
748
650
89
89
837
739

(495)
-

(2,583)

551
2,088

1,537
-

(495) -

(2,400)
1,905

Vehicle
Maintenance
Fund
611

2,241
-

2,031

210

-

200
10

2,241
2,241

Urban
Redevelopement
Agency
Fund
356

224
-

350

(126)

-

34
(160)
-

224
224

Grants
2005 JAG #10
Fund
257

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Transfers out
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

8,945
-

8,890

55

-

55
-

8,945

7,604
1,341
-

Stormwater
Construction
Fund
582

422
-

422

-

-

-

422
422

14,732
Building
Authority
Juvenile Court
Fund
355

7,807

6,925

-

1,186
5,636
103

11,115
3,617
14,732

GrantIn-Aid
Fund
250

-

Special Tax

1,246,705
-

991,237

109,960
5,976
9,072
79,160
11,838
39,462
255,468

958,318
232,357
17,961
38,069
1,246,705

Total
All
Funds

(6,058)
-

(6,759)

701

-

701
-

(7,067)
1,009
(6,058)

56,440
GO Bonds
STD
Debt Service
Fund
411

2,074

54,366

29

520
51,145
2,672

4,932
51,508
56,440

District
Unincorporated
Fund
272

Juvenile Services Fund 208
2015
Budget

Recreation Fund 207
2015
Budget

Victim Assistance Fund 206
2015
Budget

137
7
144

28
116
144

838
1
839

880
(41)
839

67
783
850

450
350
50
850

437
426
863

5,299
1,300
6,599

4,450
2,149
6,599

Street Lights Fund 211
2015
Budget

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Emergency Telephone System
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

12,886
1,020
13,906

Emergency Telephone System Fund 215
2015
Budget
7
9,851
4,048
13,906

Speed Humps Maintenance Fund 212
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Charges for Services
290
Investment income
3
Fund Balance Carried Forward
1,415
Total Revenues
1,708
Expenditures:
Public Works-Roads & Drainage
379
Unappropriated
1,329
1,708

Revenues:
Sales Taxes
Investment income
Charges for Services
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Public Works-Transportation
Unappropriated

Law Enforcement Confiscated Monies Fund 210
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
Intergovernmental
1,366
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
6,697
Total Revenues
8,063
Expenditures:
Police
6,070
Sheriff
1,272
District Attorney
186
Transfers To Other Funds
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
535
Total Expenditures
8,063

191
191

296
1
1,415
1,712

5,270
5,270

4,693
2,149
6,842

2,294

1,911
260
101
22

5
1,162
18
6,697
7,882

314

314

292
220
512

9,441

9,441

4
4
10,328
4,048
14,384

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

100
7
107

21
116
137

872
872

933
9
(41)
901

18
783
801

550
484
50
1,084

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

411

411

208
677
885

Foreclosure Registry Fund 205
2015
Budget
186
677
863

2015
Actual

1,034
1,034

1,149
18
1,167

188
188

1
86
1,734
1,821

3,863
23
800
4,686

7,167
2
(2)
353
2,078
9,598

135
1,236
1,371

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

110
1,057
1,167

County Jail Fund 204
2015
Budget

1,047
768
1,815

1
80
1,734
1,815

PEG Support Fund 203
2015
Budget

4,861
800
2,569
8,230

6,132
2
(2)
20
2,078
8,230

Drug Abuse Treatment & Education Fund 209
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
Fines and Forfeitures
225
Fund Balance Carried Forward
220
Total Revenues
445
Expenditures:
Health and Welfare
391
Unappropriated
54
445

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Juvenile Court
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Parks and Recreation
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Fines and Forfeitures
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Victim Assistance
Transfers To Other Funds
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Planning & Development
Unappropriated

Intergovernmental
Fines and forfeitures
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Transfers To Other Funds
Unappropriated

Revenues:

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
PEG Support
Unappropriated

Expenditures:
Planning & Development
Public Works- Director's Office
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated

Revenues:
Licenses and Permits
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Charges for Services
Transfers To Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues

Development Fund 201
2015
Budget

49,202
7,144

50,509
7,289
15
1,917
59,730

12,372
12,066
6,402
35
2,710
36,798

3
3,053

34,999

13,622
12,076
6,210
35

562
2,617
2,152
5,221
1,905
15
2,515
14,987

32,864
19,864
17,594
(57,809)
2,474
14,987

2015
Actual

3
3

-

-

Revenues:
Investment income
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

1993 G O Bonds - Health Fund 313
2015
Budget
3
3

-

-

-

-

-

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

517
517

679
1,247

2015
Actual
568

2,311
3,467
5,778

2015
Actual
6,165
2,072
8,237

13,940
92,324
33
106,297

2015
Actual
46,228
13,434
7
449
439
19
113
39,086
5,119
104,894

25,113
25,113

2015
Actual
15,486
4,904
(7)
(1,049)
19,334

11,145

543
108
1,661
2,841
4,096
1,881
15

30,437
19,404
(29)
10,438
(5)
(49,500)
2,474
13,219

-

Revenues:
Investment income
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

1998 G O Bonds - Jail Fund 312
2015
Budget

1987 G O Bonds - Parks Fund 311
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
(19)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
(19)
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated
(19)
Total Expenditures
(19)

Rental Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Fund 280
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Other Taxes
477
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
679
Total Revenues
1,156
Expenditures:
Development Authority
708
Unappropriated
448
1,156

Hotel / Motel Tax Fund 275
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Other Taxes
7,200
Fund Balance Carried Forward
2,072
Total Revenues
9,272
Expenditures:
Convention Bureau
3,150
Transfers To Other Funds
4,050
Unappropriated
2,072
9,272

Police Services Fund 274
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Property Taxes
48,090
Sales Taxes
16,925
Other Taxes
1
Licenses and Permits
593
Charges for Services
385
Investment income
Miscellaneous
87
Transfers From Other Funds
46,154
Fund Balance Carried Forward
5,119
Total Revenues
117,354
Expenditures:
Non-departmental
14,126
Police Services
97,273
Unappropriated
5,955
117,354

Hospital Fund 273
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Property Taxes
15,946
Sales Taxes
4,350
Intergovernmental
Investment Income
Proceeds of general long term liabilities
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
(1,049)
Total Revenues
19,247
Expenditures:
Health and Welfare-Hospital
18,545
Fund expenditures
Unappropriated
702
19,247

Revenues:
Charges for Services
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
Licenses and Permits
Investment income
Fines and Forfeitures
Miscellaneous
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
General Government:
Chief Executive Officer
Finance
State Court
Recorders Court
Planning & Development
Non-Departmental
Transfers From Other Funds
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Special Tax District - Unincorporated Fund 272
2015
2015
Budget
Actual

Public Works - Roads and Drainage
Parks and Recreation
Arts, culture & entertainment
Non-Departmental
Transfers to Other Funds
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

2015
Actual
14,536
4,352
4
649
276
13,029
1,299
34,145

16
56,362

2015
Actual
43,532
12,753
8
(5)
757
47
1,008
58,100

2015
Budget
44,970
13,087
1
631
33
1,008
59,730

Fire Fund 270

Special Tax - Designated Services Fund 271
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Property Taxes
15,011
Sales Taxes
4,134
Licenses and Permits
Investment income
Intergovernmental
Charges for Services
624
Miscellaneous
346
Transfers From Other Funds
15,384
Fund Balance Carried Forward
1,299
Total Revenues
36,798
Expenditures:
Public Safety - Police
Public Works - Transportation
3,213

Revenues:
Property Taxes
Sales Taxes
Other Taxes
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Public Safety-Police
Public Safety-Fire
Non-Departmental
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

-

422
422

412
412

603
603

-

-

618
3
3,293
3,914
1,114
1,114

2,328
1,609
3,937

27,521
27,521

2015
Actual
13,117
2
7,643
20,762

1,550
1,329
2,879

1,535
1,535
Public Safety Judicial Facilites Authority Debt Service Fund 413
2015
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Actual
Investment income
(1)
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
3,178
3,178
Total Revenues
3,178
3,177
Expenditures:
Debt Service
925
503
Transfers out
2,253
Total Expenditures
3,178
503

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Unappropriated

Building Authority Revenue Bonds Debt Service Fund 412
2015
2015
Budget
Actual
2,704
2,704
175
175
2,879
2,879

GO Bonds STD Debt Service Fund 411
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Taxes
11,679
Investment income
Miscellaneous
10,000
Fund Balance Carried Forward
7,643
Total Revenues
29,322
Expenditures:
Debt Service
27,540
Transfers out
1,782
Total Expenditures
29,322

2015
Actual

GO Bonds Debt Service Fund 410
2015
Budget
644
3,293
3,937
Revenues:
Property Taxes
Investment income
Interfund Transfers
Proceeds of general long term liabilities
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Debt Service
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated

-

2015
Actual

975
4
979

777
1
3,466
4,244

2015
Actual

2,189

2,189

10
4,210
4,220

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

2015
Actual

41
2,617
6,776
182
189
6
7
11,961
25,566

153
1,324
18
1,258
110
924
-

2015
Actual
8,555
29
70
10,701
24,832
44,187

ARRA Capital Projects Fund 360
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
Intergovernmental
(315)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
(315)
Expenditures:
Capital projects
34
Unappropriated
(349)
(315)

HUD Section 108 Loan Fund 357
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Intergovernmental
(6,223)
Investment income
Miscellaneous
9,100
Fund Balance Carried Forward
3,466
Total Revenues
6,343
Expenditures:
Capital projects
2,094
Unappropriated
4,249
6,343

2,836
1,374
4,210

Urban Redevelopment Agency Fund 356
2015
Budget
4,210
4,210

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital projects
Unappropriated

421
1,206
1,627

Building Authority - Juvenile Court Fund 355
2015
Budget
(56)
1,261
422
1,627

Revenues:
Investment income
Proceeds of long-term Liabilities
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital projects
Unappropriated

Public Safety - Judicial Facilities Fund 354
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
(1,744)
Deferred Revenue
Fund Balance Carried Forward
603
Total Revenues
(1,141)
Expenditures:
Capital projects
17
Unappropriated
(1,158)
(1,141)

COPS Projects Fund 351
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment Income
1,419
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
1,419
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated
1,419
1,419

856
78,384

107
5
2,978
1,255

378
7,690
265
2,796
450
1,038
200
(86)
1,408
17,460
600
21,083
17,767
841
1,293

Capital Improvement Project Fund 350
2015
Budget
32,673
433
(13)
3,555
20
16,884
24,832
78,384

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Investment Income
Contributions from private sources
Miscellaneous
Charges for Services
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Board Commissioners
GIS
Facilities Management
Fleet Maintenance
Information System
Finance
Clerk Superior Court
Sheriff
Police
Library
Transportation
Property Appraisal
Host Capital Outlay
Road & Drainage
Parks
Planning & Development
Community Development
Economic Development
Extension Service
Non-Departmental
Fire
DFACS
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures
14,942
19,887
34,829

(4,937)
3,061
(7,998)
(4,937)

80,618
223
76
80,917

Revenues:
Taxes, Service Charges, Income & Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Fund Balance Carried Forward (for encumbrances)
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Approved Budget
Encumbrances rolled forward from 2011
Total Appropriations

ALL TAX FUNDS

Workers Compensation Fund 632
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Charges for Services
18,386
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
(8,536)
Total Revenues
9,850
Expenditures:
Non-Departmental
12,059
Unappropriated
(2,209)
9,850

Risk Management Fund 631
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Charges for Services
8,400
Miscellaneous
Payroll deductions and matches
95,550
Fund Balance Carried Forward
4,830
Total Revenues
108,780
Expenditures:
Risk Management
118,395
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
(9,615)
Total Expenditures
108,780

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Vehicles
Interfund transfers
Unappropriated

Vehicle Replacement Fund 621
2015
Budget
10
25,894
15,900
39,113
80,917

Vehicle Maintenance Fund 611
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Intergovernmental
246
Charges for Services
30,103
Miscellaneous
80
Fund Balance Carried Forward
(255)
Total Revenues
30,174
Expenditures:
Fleet Maintenance
30,210
Interfund Transfers
(36)
30,174

Stormwater Utility Construction Fund 582
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Contributions from private sources
187
Intergovernmental
1,258
Charge for Services
392
Interfund Transfers
3,200
Fund Balance Carried Forward
4,365
Total Revenues
9,402
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
10,098
Unappropriated
(696)
9,402

20,373
3,005
7,670
31,048

Stormwater Utility Fund 581
2015
Budget
12
14,769
16,267
31,048
Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Stormwater Utilities
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Airport Construction Fund 552
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Investment income
Intergovernmental
(2,346)
Deferred revenue
Interfund Transfers
663
Fund Balance Carried Forward
10,915
Total Revenues
9,232
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
17,420
Unappropriated
(8,188)
9,232

2,919
4,005
6,247
13,171

4,769
8,402
13,171

Airport Operating Fund 551
2015
Budget

Revenues:
Investment income
Miscellaneous
Interfund Transfers
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
DeKalb-Peachtree Airport
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

Sanitation ARRA Capital Projects Fund 544
2015
Revenues:
Budget
Intergovernmental
Interfund Transfers
(12,339)
Fund Balance Carried Forward
7,402

Revenues:
Intergovernmental
Contributions from private sources
Transfers From Other Funds
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Capital Projects
Interfund Transfers
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

586,397
41,617
628,014

2015
Budget
581,627
4,770
41,617
628,014

5,764
5,764

2015
Actual
9,709
4,011
(8,536)
5,184

79,495

75,630
3,865

2015
Actual
11,919
10
72,990
4,830
89,749

35,097

34,874
223

13
26,006
1,805
39,113
66,937

2015
Actual

28,461
350
28,811

184
26,193
106
(255)
26,228

2015
Actual

(134)

(134)

1,391
3,000
4,365
8,756

2015
Actual

15,164

12,159
3,005

6
14,820
16,267
31,093

2015
Actual

696

696

1
121
4,000
10,915
15,037

2015
Actual

6,554

2,549
4,005

12
5,113
8,402
13,527

2015
Actual

-

7,402

7,402

2015
Actual

8,450

8,450
-

1,000
(4,844)
1,540

2015
Actual
5,384

255
67,440
1,270
68,965

224
72,198
1,377
(842)
72,957

Sanitation Construction Fund 542
2015
Budget
6,000
1,200
32,473
(4,844)
34,829

(4)
63,954
553
57
8,041
72,601

2015
Actual

Sanitation Operating Fund 541
2015
Budget
63,682
1,053
181
8,041
72,957

Revenues:
Investment income
Charges for Services
Transfers From Other Funds
Miscellaneous
Fund Balance Carried Forward
Total Revenues
Expenditures:
Finance
Sanitation
Interfund Transfers
Fund Expenditures
Unappropriated
Total Expenditures

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The

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The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

sports

Page 21A

wrestling
McNair Junior Qadir Romero (top) pinned Stephenson’s Lance Foucha to win the 113-pound division.

Lakeside’s Gordon Lewis (top) pinned Dunwoody’s Daniel Gothard
to win the 285-weight division.

Miller Grove’s Gary Freeman, who win the
152-pound division, was named the Venable Best
Wrestler Award winner.

Dunwoody junior Chris Solo won the 126-pound
division after pinning Southwest DeKalb’s Alfonza
Farley.

Redan’s Tirice Cramer takes down Dunwoody Ben
Williams in the 160-pound division championship.

Dunwoody wins first DeKalb County wrestling title
by Carla Parker
carla@dekalbchamp.com

For the first time in program history, the Dunwoody
Wildcats wrestling team has claimed the title of DeKalb
County champions.
Dunwoody scored 252 points to win the 2016 William
S. Venable DCSD Wrestling Championship on Jan. 26 at
Druid Hills High School. Dunwoody outscored runner-up
McNair by 49.50 points, the largest margin win since 2011.
Dunwoody coach Luke Mcsorley said he was excited
to bring Dunwoody its first county wrestling title.
“Dunwoody High School wrestling has come a long
way in the last three years and we’re getting better each
year, and this county tournament is like icing on the
cake,” Mcsorley said.
Dunwoody wrestlers participated in seven of the 14
championship matches. Five wrestlers won their championship matches and 12 wrestlers placed sixth or higher.
Junior Chris Solo won the first gold medal of the night
in the 126-pound division, pinning Southwest DeKalb’s
Alfonza Farley.
Junior Max Tuch won the 145-pound division with a
3-2 decision over McNair’s Terrance Perdue.
After suffering a nasty take-down by Redan’s Tirice
Cramer, senior Ben Williams came back from a 6-2 deficit to defeat Cramer 10-8 in the 160-pound division. The
match was voted as the Jerun Tillery Best Match of the
Championships.
Mcsorley said he was proud of how Williams fought
back.
“He was hurt [after the take-down], and I asked him,
‘Can you go?’ And he said ‘yeah’ and he came back and
won,” Mcsorley said. “He’s a tough kid.”
Junior Constantine Gaulas won the fourth gold for
the Wildcats with a pin over Decatur’s Matthew Gilchrist
with 30.7 seconds left in the 170-pound division championship.
Senior Darwin Osario won the final gold medal of
the night for Dunwoody with a 10-3 decision over Decatur’s Deaundre Wilson in the 182-pound division.
This is the second championship win this season for
Dunwoody; the team won the Area 6-AAAAA Duals
championship on Jan. 9. Mcsorley said the county win
gives Dunwoody more momentum heading into region

Dunwoody won its first DeKalb County wrestling title. Photos by Travis Hudgons

and state tournaments.
“Our goal is to win the region, so this gives us a lot of
momentum going into [the area tournament].”
McNair (202.50 points) had three gold medal winners and nine wrestlers to place sixth or better. Sophomore Terran Hairston won the 106-pound division
with a 13-3 win over Dunwoody’s Jacob Starks. Junior
Qadir Romero pinned Stephenson’s Lance Foucha with
29.9 seconds remaining in the first period to win the
113-pound division.
Junior Tyrese Perdue won the 138-pound division

with a 5-2 win over Arabia Mountain’s Khyree Alexander.
Third-place finisher Southwest DeKalb (168
points) had one gold medalist, two silver medalists and
five bronze medalists. Senior Robert Thomas won
the 220-pound division with a 4-3 win over Decatur’s
Dearies Wilson.
Lakeside, finished fourth with 167 points and had
three gold medalists—Spencer Wilson (132-pound division), Kamal Feracho (195-pound division) and Gordon
Lewis (285-pound division).

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

sports

Page 22A

swimming

Chamblee, Dunwoody Repeat as county swim and dive champions
events to make herself a
three-time county individual
champion having won the
100 a year ago.

by Mark Brock
The Chamblee Bulldogs
and Dunwoody Lady Wildcats successfully defended
their DeKalb County Swimming and Diving titles Jan.
28 at Chamblee High.
The Bulldogs grabbed
nine gold medals and 12
medals overall (two silver,
one bronze) in swimming to
a 264-216 win over Lakeside
to win their fourth consecutive championship and
fourth overall. Prior to this
four-year run (2013-2016),
the Bulldogs had finished
second nine times, the last
coming in 1999.
Dunwoody was third
with 179 points and Decatur
was the only other team with
over 100 points with 137 for
fourth.
Chamblee had three
swimmers double up on gold
medals to account for six of
the gold medals brought in
by the team.
Liam Bell set a record
in the 100-yard breaststroke
breaking the 58.64 record
of Lakeside’s Justin Wingo
(2000) set 17 years ago with
a time of 57.60. He had earlier won the 200-yard individual medley with a time of
1:56.29.
Noah Oh doubled up in
the 200 freestyle (1:43.51)
and 500 freestyle (4:47.40)
for the third consecutive year
to make him an eight-time
county individual champion,
that includes the 2013 and
2014 100-yard freestyle titles.
John Mitchell swept
the speed events taking the
50 freestyle (21.15) and 100
freestyle (48.86) to go with
a gold medal in the 100 in
2015 to become a three-time
gold medalist for the Bulldogs.
The Bulldogs have dominated the relays for the past
five seasons winning the
200 medley relay and 400
freestyle relay all five seasons and winning the 200
freestyle relay for the fourth
consecutive time.
Louis Cardot, Bell, Alex
Perry and Theo Hardy put
together a gold medal winning time of 1:40.44 in the
200 medley relay to start
this year’s event and extend
Chamblee’s winning streak
in the event to five.
Oh, Perry, Bell and
Mitchell combined for a

The Chamblee boys swim team won its fourth consecutive DeKalb County Swim and Dive championship.

The Dunwoody Lady Wildcats won their second consecutive DeKalb County title and 14th overall.

time of 3:25.16 to give the
Bulldogs five straight gold
medals in the 400-yard relay
while Alexander Miretsky,
Oh, Hardy and Mitchell captured the Bulldogs fourth
consecutive 200-yard relay
with a time of 1:31.03.
Dunwoody’s Christopher Thames won his
second straight gold medal
in the 100-yard backstroke
in a record setting time of
51.15. He broke the record
of 51.46 set by Tucker’s Cash
DeLoach in the 2014 championships.
Lakeside which finished
as the runner-up for the
fourth consecutive season

had a pair of gold medalists
in Mark Rotolo in the 100
butterfly (53.65) and Sam
Witcher broke a three-year
run by Chamblee in the onemeter diving by compiling
368.30 points to take the
diving gold medal. Lakeside
finished with 11 medals (two
gold, four silver, five bronze).
The boys’ competition
combined for 51 state qualifying times and six diving
qualifiers for next week’s
GHSA State Swimming and
Dive Championships at
Westminster.
The Dunwoody Lady
Wildcats collected eight gold
medals and four silver med-

als on the way to their second consecutive county title
and 14th overall by a score
of 243-207 over Chamblee.
Lakeside was third with 187
and Decatur a close fourth
with 183.
Allie Reiter became a
five-time individual champion as she swept the 200 individual medley (2:09.94) and
100 breaststroke (1:07.05)
for the second consecutive year. She also won the
2014 breaststroke giving her
a three-year streak in the
event.
Kaleigh McGrady swept
the 50-yard (25.18) and 100yard (55.12) freestyle speed

Abbey Yates claimed her
fourth consecutive county
gold medal in the one-meter
diving by compiling an impressive 430.90 points for the
win. The point total was 45
points better than her best in
the prior three years.
Megan Johnson won her
first individual gold medal
by taking the 500 freestyle
crown with a time of 5:40.24.
Dunwoody swept the
200 medley relay (1:54.22)
and 200 freestyle relay
(1:43.81) for the second consecutive season. It was the
third consecutive win in the
200 freestyle relay and the
time set by Laura Spratling,
Reiter, Hannah Robison and
McGrady (the same team
that won the medley relay)
was just 1/100th of second of
tying the record set by Dunwoody in 2014.
Chamblee which claimed
its only county title in 1985
finished second for the 14th
time since the 1971 inaugural event for the girls as the
team claimed 11 medals (two
gold, four silver, five bronze).
Julia Von Biberstein
won the 200 freestyle
(2:04.26) and Jade Foelske
won the 100 butterfly (58.81)
to claim the two gold medals
for Chamblee.
Lakeside’s Rachel Hu
claimed her first gold medal
since her freshman season
(2013) in taking the 100
backstroke gold (1:02.66) to
become a three-time gold
medalist. Hu had won the
200 individual medler and
100 breaststroke in 2013.
Decatur’s strong fourth
place finish was fueled by the
gold medal winning team of
Lisa Studstill, Jane Pfeufer,
Nadine Abrahamse and
Torey Brierley (50 freestyle
champ in 2015) in the 400yard freestyle relay with a
time of 3:48.65 to prevent a
Dunwoody sweep of the relay events.
The girls’ competitors
combined for 38 state qualifying times in the meet and
seven divers set state qualifying scores.

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

sports

Page 23A

Weekend basketball scores
Friday, Jan. 29
Boys
Lakeside 64, Alcovy 55
Tucker 78, Lovejoy 67
Clarkston 62, M.L. King 54
Miller Grove 90, Druid Hills 47
Southwest DeKalb 76, Creekside 51
Stephenson 61, Dunwoody 59
Lithonia 56, St. Pius X 48
Chamblee 58, Arabia Mountain 54
Redan 64, Marist 45
Grady 56, Columbia 52 (OT)
Decatur 44, Blessed Trinity 42
North Clayton 83, McNair 44
South Atlanta 87, Towers 36
Paideia 47, Galloway 36

Decatur center Janay Williams prepares to shoot a free throw. Photos by Travis Hudgons

Girls
Tucker 64, Lovejoy 33
Alcovy 55, Lakeside 37
M.L. King 56, Clarkston 33
Miller Grove 64, Druid Hills 37
Southwest DeKalb 61, Creekside 13
Arabia Mountain 48, Chamblee 34
Columbia 46, Grady 27
Marist 44, Redan 34
St. Pius X 71, Lithonia 33
Stone Mountain 78, Cross Keys 28
Decatur 49, Blessed Trinity 46
Jackson 53, Cedar Grove 34
North Clayton 70, McNair 21
South Atlanta 62, Towers 21
Paideia 44, Galloway 31

Saturday, Jan. 30
Boys
Druid Hills 49, Chamblee 41
Dunwoody 38, McNair 29
St. Pius X 86, Cross Keys 29
Greenforest 74, King’s Ridge 45
W.D. Mohammed 87,
Landmark Christian 82 (3OT)
Stratford Academy 50, Paideia 39
Girls
Tucker 59, Holy Innocents 53
Norcross 70, Southwest DeKalb 60
Chamblee 56, Druid Hills 38
St. Pius X 71, Cross Keys 9
Landmark Christian 62,
W.D. Mohammed 33
Stratford Academy 48, Paideia 31

Monday, Feb. 1
Boys
Columbia 51, Marist 24
Greenforest 100,
Eagle’s Landing Christian 44
W.D. Mohammed 61,
Drew Charter 58
Our Lady of Mercy 58, Paideia 57

Decatur senior Kierra Edge (center) shoots over Blessed Trinity defenders.

Decatur guard Taylor Jones looks to pass.

Girls
Greenforest 42,
Eagle’s Landing Christian 28
Our Lady of Mercy 56, Paideia 50
Drew Charter 43,
W.D. Mohammed 32

The Champion FREE PRESS, Friday, Feb. 5, 2016

local

Today ’s family traditions
become tomorrow’s family history.
Whether you’re passing down recipes and traditions, stories or advice,
feeding into future generations is a great way to maintain your family’s legacy.
So celebrate this Black History Month by not only remembering African American
history makers, but also by passing down your own family’s history.
When you add family, tradition, (and a little love) to the ingredients you’ll find at
Publix, we think you have the perfect recipe. Thank you for inviting us to the table.

Page 24A