2008–2009

FULL TIME
PROGRAMS
CALENDAR
Student RecRuitment Office
Email: askanadvisor@nait.ca
Room O117 - South Lobby, Main Campus, Edmonton – 780.471.8874
Toll free in North America – 1.877.627.3377
RegiStRaR’S Office
Email: registrar@nait.ca
Main Campus, Edmonton – 780.471.6248
Toll free in Canada – 1.800.661.4077
Fairview Campus – 780.835.6605
Toll free in Canada – 1.877.299.1623
financial aid
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid
Room O111 – South Lobby, Main Campus, Edmonton – 780.491.1344
awaRdS, SchOlaRShipS + BuRSaRieS
www.nait.ca/scholarships
Room O101 – Main Campus, Edmonton – 780.491.3056
Fairview Campus – 780.835.6654
Student hOuSing
www.nait.ca/housing
Inquiries: Main Campus, Edmonton – 780.471.8855
Fairview Campus Student Residences – 780.835.6652
inteRnatiOnal Student inquiRieS
www.nait.ca/international
Email: international@nait.ca
780.471.7666
SeRviceS tO StudentS with diSaBilitieS
Room W111PB – NAIT HP Centre, Main Campus, Edmonton – 780.378.6133
an inStitute Of technOlOgY cOmmitted tO Student SucceSS
11762 – 106 Street nw, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada t5g 2r1
www.nait.ca
Contact Information
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CAMPUS LOCATIONS
Distribution Centre (Avionics Program)
11311 - 120 Street, Edmonton
Engineering Technologies Annex
10240 Princess Elizabeth Avenue, Edmonton
Fairview Campus
11235-98 Avenue, Fairview
Grande Prairie Campus
10632-102 Ave, Grande Prairie
High Level Campus
10901-93rd Street, High Level
HP Centre for Information and
Communications Technology
10504 Princess Elizabeth Avenue, Edmonton
Main Campus
11762 - 106 Street, Edmonton
Patricia Campus
12204 - 149 Street, Edmonton
Peace River Campus
8106-99 Avenue, Peace River
St. Albert Campus
50B St. Albert Rd. , St. Albert
Souch Campus
10330 - 71 Avenue, Edmonton
At NAIT, we’re proud to offer the best technical education in the country.
NAIT staff bring their expertise and dedication to the classroom and labs every day, giving you the skills you need to make an immediate
impact in the workplace.
Our programs – from Accounting to Telecommunications – are designed to meet the needs of the Alberta economy. That’s why we have a 94
per cent placement rate and great relationships with business and industry. And that’s why we have introduced the Bachelor of Technology
in Technology Management (BTech) degree – the only one of its kind in the province. The BTech, developed in direct response to industry’s
growing need for technical expertise, takes grads from 18 NAIT diploma programs to a whole new level of strategic thinking, to complement
their excellent theoretical and practical know-how. Other baccalaureate degrees are currently in development.
I encourage you to further explore the NAIT advantage. Spend a day with a current student through our Buddy System, drop in to speak to a
student advisor, or join one of our live online chat sessions, where program staff, student advisors and current students can answer all your
questions.
These are exciting times at NAIT. In response to the national skills shortage, we are implementing a myriad of solutions that focus on people,
technology and innovation. Our plans will help us increase student access to high-demand training, and put leading edge technology into the
hands of many more students than ever before.
As you can see, we are positioning NAIT as one of the world’s leading technical institutes. Student success is our number one priority; we
have the people and the programs to help you reach your potential.
On behalf of NAIT’s entire faculty and staff, I wish you all the best in your studies.
W.A. (Sam) Shaw PhD
NAIT President and CEO
Our Vision
TO BE GLOBALLy vALUED FOR STUDENT
SUCCESS, APPLIED RESEARCH, AND
INNOvATION.
Our Mission
EDUCATED, SkILLED, AND
SUCCESSFUL LEARNERS.
Main Campus Map
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www.nait.ca NAIT Full Time Calendar 2008-2009
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Get In On Real
World Education
At NAIt, our style Is hANds-oN, ANd our focus Is oN prActIcAl,
relevANt educAtIoN geAred to the reAl world.
Our instructors are chosen because they
have first-hand experience in their fields,
and want to share those insights with you.
Our labs are ftted with the technology and
equipment currently used by business and
industry, giving you a valuable head start.
And our program curriculum, in addition
to keeping up with the needs of employers,
includes practicum components to give you
the beneft of workplace experience.
All this means that our graduates hit the
ground running when they enter the work
force. They leave NAIT confdent, prepared,
and in demand.
An exciting rAnge
of options
Our broad range of training options provides
flexibility. Get into the workforce quickly
with a one-year certificate or two-year
diploma program, or use those programs
as building blocks to our degrees or other
further education.
We offer an amazing array of programs, in-
cluding apprenticeship training in 36 trades.
Our students train for the industry sectors
that keep our region’s economy strong,
from business, information technology and
the hospitality industry, to manufacturing
and construction technologies, health sci-
ences and the resource sector. Whatever
your career direction, you can be sure you’ll
receive education that is relevant to today’s
workplace.
A “leArn by doing”
ApproAch
At NAIT, theory and practical training are
educational partners. Classroom lectures
are reinforced by extensive hands-on lab
work that simulates the actual situations
and equipment found in the workplace. In
addition, students are involved in regular
formal and informal contacts with business
and industry, feld trips, and career-related
outside projects. Included in the course
of study of most full-time programs is a
practicum, or job placement. This allows
students to apply their skills and knowledge
in real-world situations.
outstAnding fAculty
And stAff
Our faculty members bring valuable real-
world experience to the classroom and
labs. NAIT instructors are supported by a
network of staff members committed to
student success. If you find you need as-
sistance – whether it’s fnancial aid, study
skills, career counselling or just someone
who will listen – you’re sure to fnd a staff
member willing and able to help.
high return on your
investment
NAIT’s tuition stacks up favourably against
other schools across the country. At the
same time, our full-time programs are deliv-
ered on an intensive instructional schedule.
Simply put, NAIT offers more instruction at
a lower cost to the student.
Students also benefit from NAIT’s small
class sizes, allowing for more personal at-
tention from instructors. This combination
of competitive tuition, intensive instruc-
tional schedule and small classes adds up
to exceptional educational value at NAIT.
1 www.nait.ca
Table of
Contents
About this cAlendAr
NAIT has made every effort to ensure that the information in this publication is
accurate and complete at the time of publication. However, the Institute reserves
the right to make changes in its admission policies, procedures, educational costs
and curricula without notice or obligation. Please consult the NAIT website or the
Registrar’s Offce for the most current information.
In general, NAIT does not warrant or guarantee the academic success of any stu-
dent in any program or course.
Quick Facts 4
Great Ways to Get More inFo 5
acadeMic reQuireMents 6
instructional Fees
and expenses 10
Financial assistance 12
services For students 14
campus reads & Needs ...............15
food services ...........................16
International student centre ........16
learning resources ...................17
Northern student education
Initiative (NseI) ......................17
occupational health and
safety (ohs) ..........................17
parking ....................................18
services for students with
disabilities (ssd) ....................18
student counselling ....................18
student employment...................18
student housing ........................18
student Identifcation card ..........19
students’ Association (NAItsA) ....19
tutorial centres.........................19
acadeMic reGulations
and procedures 20
vision ......................................20
Mission ....................................20
guiding principles ......................20
disclaimer ................................20
scope and Authority ...................21
operational Activities .................21
protection of privacy ..................21
retention of documents ..............21
admission requirements and
application procedures ..........21
Admission requirements ............21
defnition and classifcation
of students ...........................22
applications .............................22
Application procedures ...............22
selection for Admission ..............23
Admission to Nait programs and
Appeals of Admission status .....23
program implementation ............24
Advance credit and
transfer credit ......................24
credit for participation in
student Affairs ......................24
transferring Between programs ..24
withdrawing from programs .......25
student Behavior,
responsibilities and rights ......25
student Behavior and
responsibilities ......................25
Academic Integrity .....................25
student code of conduct .............25
student responsibilities
and rights ............................26
2 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
chemical engineering
technology .......................... 105
chemical technology ................. 109
civil engineering technology ...... 115
civil engineering technology
co-op ................................. 119
cNc Machinist technician .......... 124
combined laboratory &
X-ray technology .................. 127
computer engineering
technology .......................... 132
computer Network
Administrator ...................... 137
computer systems technology ... 140
construction engineering
technology .......................... 144
co-operative trades orientation .. 150
culinary Arts ........................... 151
cytotechnology ........................ 154
dental Assisting ....................... 158
dental technology .................... 162
denturist technology ................ 166
diagnostic Medical sonography .. 172
digital & Interactive
Media design ....................... 178
electrical engineering
technology .......................... 181
electronic system Integration .... 186
electronics engineering
technology .......................... 189
emergency Medical technology -
paramedic ........................... 194
engineering design & drafting
technology .......................... 199
entrepreneurship & Innovation
diploma ............................... 205
finance diploma ....................... 209
forest technology .................... 214
general Mechanic -
pre-employment ................... 218
geological technology ............... 220
geomatics (surveying)
engineering technology ......... 226
graphic communications
certifcate ........................... 230
graphic sign Arts .................... 234
harley-davidson technician ....... 236
heavy equipment service
technician ........................... 237
hospitality Management ............ 240
human resources
Management diploma ............. 244
hvAc specialist ....................... 249
Industrial heavy equipment
technology .......................... 252
Instrumentation engineering
technology .......................... 256
Interior design technology ........ 260
landscape Architectural
technology .......................... 264
legal & realtime reporting ........ 269
Machinist - pre-employment ...... 272
Magnetic resonance ................. 274
Management diploma ................ 278
Marine service technician ......... 283
Marketing diploma.................... 284
Materials engineering
technology .......................... 291
Mechanical engineering
technology .......................... 296
Medical laboratory Assisting ..... 301
Medical laboratory technology ... 304
Medical radiologic technology .... 309
Medical transcription ............... 315
Millwork & carpentry certifcate .. 317
Millwright - pre-employment ...... 319
Motorcycle Mechanic -
pre-employment ................... 321
Network engineering technology 323
Nutrition & foodservice
Management diploma ............. 327
offce & records
Administration diploma .......... 331
outdoor power equipment
technician - pre-employment ... 336
personal fitness trainer ........... 338
petroleum engineering
technology .......................... 342
photographic technology ........... 346
power engineering certifcate .... 350
power engineering - 4th class ... 353
power engineering - 3rd class ... 355
power engineering technology ... 357
pre-technology ....................... 361
pre-technology - Aboriginal ....... 362
pre-technology - Accelerated .... 363
project Management diploma ..... 364
radio & television - radio .......... 368
radio & television - television .... 371
respiratory therapy ................. 373
retail Meatcutting .................... 378
telecommunications
engineering technology ......... 380
transitional vocational .............. 384
turfgrass equipment technician .. 387
veterinary Administrative
Assistant ............................ 389
water & wastewater technician . 392
welder - pre-employment .......... 395
apprenticeship 397
continuinG education 398
nait Fact sheet 2006 400
Buddy systeM 2007-08 402
hoW to prepare an
eFFective career
investiGation report 404
dates and contacts 405
post secondary
proGraM cost estiMates
2007-08 acadeMic year 406
student discipline - Academic
dishonesty or student
Misconduct ............................26
Attendance ...............................28
class Interruption ......................28
dress ......................................28
campus sport and wellness .........28
participation in Intercollegiate
Athletics ...............................28
field trips.................................28
Academic evaluation ...................29
Grading systems .......................29
clearance of course defciencies ..29
failure to Maintain satisfactory
Academic standing .................30
prerequisites and co-requisites ...30
certifcation and program
completion requirements ........31
Multiple certifcates/
diplomas/degrees ..................31
certifcation after changes
in program titles ....................31
Academic honours .....................31
student records .......................32
student permanent record .........32
confdentiality of
student records ....................32
responsibility for Accuracy
and currency .........................32
change in personal Information ....32
Full-tiMe instructional
proGraMs 2008-09 33
Accounting diploma ....................34
Aircraft skin & structure
repair certifcate ...................39
Animal health technology -
edmonton ..............................42
Animal health technology -
fairview ................................47
Applied Banking & Business
certifcate .............................51
Architectural technology .............54
Auto Body - pre-employment ........58
Automotive service technician
pre-employment .....................60
Avionics engineering technology ...61
Bachelor of Applied Business
Administration - Accounting .....66
Bachelor of Applied Business -
finance .................................71
Bachelor of Applied Information
systems technology ................74
Bachelor of technology in
technology Management ..........79
Baking certifcate ......................83
Biological sciences technology .....86
Biomedical engineering
technology ............................93
Building environmental systems
technology ............................98
Business - year 1 ..................... 102
3 www.nait.ca
Quick Facts
nAit – the leAder in
Applied educAtion
NAIT is recognized across Canada and
around the world as a leader in technical
training and applied education designed
to meet the demands of industry. Offcially
opened in 1963, NAIT is a cornerstone of
Alberta’s economy and one of the largest
technical institutes in Canada.
More than 250 programs lead to degrees,
diplomas, and certifcates. Apprenticeship
technical training is delivered in 36 trades.
Over 1,200 part-time courses are available
for study on campus and via distance edu-
cation. In addition, NAIT works with a huge
range of companies at home and around the
world, delivering training customized to the
particular needs of their workforce.
eight cAmpus
locAtions
NAIT has four campuses in the Edmonton
area and four more in the Peace River region
of northwestern Alberta. Edmonton’s Main
Campus is home to most full-time programs
and is the administrative centre and hub for
student athletics and activities. Edmonton’s
Souch and Patricia campuses focus on
apprenticeship training; the campus in
nearby St. Albert houses mainly Continuing
Education programs.
NAIT programming is offered in the commu-
nities of Fairview, Peace River, Grande Prairie
and High Level. Fairview Campus offers the
largest number of full-time northern programs
and provides on-campus student residences.
ten schools
NAIT programs are organized into ten
Schools:
Applied Building Science •
Arts, Science and Communications •
Applied Media and Information •
Technology
Electrical and Electronics Technology •
Health Sciences •
Hospitality and Culinary Arts •
JR Shaw School of Business •
Mechanical and Manufacturing •
Technology
Resources and Environmental •
Management
Professional and Continuing Education •
#1 in Apprenticeship
NAIT is Canada’s leading apprenticeship
trainer. More than half of all registered ap-
prentices in Alberta and NWT, and 17 per
cent in all of Canada, are trained here. Our
focus on hands-on skills and our commit-
ment to keeping up to date with the needs
of industry ensure that we are in the fore-
front of trades training worldwide.
expAnding student
AwArds
More than $3.8 million in scholarships, bur-
saries and student awards was presented to
NAIT students in 2006/07, including some
285 Entrance Awards. The number and
value of awards available to NAIT students
continues to grow.
high rAtings from
grAds And employers
Year after year, over 90 per cent of NAIT
graduates are employed shortly after
graduation. Last year, almost half of the en-
tire graduating class had secured jobs even
before they fnished fnal exams.
Ninety-fve per cent of NAIT grads said they
were happy with the overall quality of their
education.
Ninety-eight per cent of employers sur-
veyed say they would hire a NAIT graduate
again.
Nine out of ten employers say NAIT gradu-
ates have the technical skills and knowledge
required for the job.
4 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Great Ways To
Get More Info
visit the nAit website
WWW.nait.ca
The NAIT website is your key source of
information on all the programs we offer.
Click to get updates about full and part-time
programs, learn about campus life, discover
the many student services available, apply
for admission and a whole lot more.
tAlk with A student
Advisor
Student Advisors will give you all the
information you need to decide which pro-
gram best suits you. Drop by the Student
Recruitment office on Main Campus,
Room O-117 – no appointment is necessary.
Individuals are seen on a drop-in basis be-
tween the hours of 8 am and 4 pm. Similar
services are provided at Fairview Campus
for students in the Peace River region.
You can also get your questions answered
online. Email: askanadvisor@nait.ca. Want
to chat? Add that email address to your
Instant Messenger contact list.
Attend A free
informAtion session
Most full-time programs offer information
sessions to discuss course details, career
opportunities and what to expect at NAIT.
The majority of these sessions take place
during Info Week, held annually in February.
Some programs offer additional info ses-
sions at other times throughout the year. For
a complete list of information session dates
and times, please check the NAIT website.
the next inFo Week is
FeBruary 4 - 7, 2008.
Attend nAit’s open
house
NAIT’s annual Open House on Main
Campus introduces you to our wide range
of programs, with interactive demonstra-
tions and hands-on exhibits. Find out what
NAIT is really like by talking to faculty, grads
and current students.
octoBer 12 & 13, 2007
octoBer 10 & 11, 2008 (tentative)
get A buddy
NAIT’s Buddy System provides an oppor-
tunity for prospective students to spend a
day teamed with a NAIT student, attending
classes and lab sessions, asking questions
and experiencing NAIT frst-hand. A list of
Buddy System contacts is published in this
calendar and on the website.
Access other nAit
publicAtions
NAIT Placement Survey. This •
comprehensive booklet details
the employment picture for recent
graduates of all NAIT full-time
programs, and is an excellent career-
planning resource. Get your free copy
at Student Recruitment on Main
Campus or view it at www.nait.ca/ir/
studiesandsurveys.htm
NAIT Student Awards and •
Apprenticeship Awards handbooks.
They contain hundreds of pages of
information on NAIT’s growing list
of scholarship, bursary and award
opportunities. Copies at the Student
Awards offce, Main Campus, or view
at www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Continuing Education calendars. •
Can’t study full time? Check out over
1,200 part-time course offerings,
many of which lead to certifcates
and other credentials. Calendars are
published several times a year and
are available at NAIT campuses and
throughout Edmonton at convenient
neighbourhood locations. Call
(780) 378-5000 to have one mailed
to you, or access the information at
www.nait.ca/parttime.
tAlk to your high
school counsellor
If you are attending high school, your school
may have a counsellor with whom you can
discuss career possibilities. The counsellor
will also have access to a variety of mate-
rials with information about careers and
post-secondary education.
investigAte the cAreer
You can discover a lot about the career that
interests you by talking to someone who
is already working in the occupation. You
could also arrange to visit an employer or
worksite to learn first-hand about the job
and working conditions. By reading the clas-
sified and career sections of newspapers,
you can get an idea of the skills and educa-
tion currently in demand and the salaries
being offered.
contAct An AlbertA
cAreer development
centre
Career Development Centres are located in
many cities and towns throughout Alberta.
Call the Career Information Hotline at
(780) 422-4266 or 1-800-661-3753 for
more information. The Alberta Learning
Information Service website (www.alis.gov.
ab.ca) is also an excellent resource.
contAct the AlbertA
Apprenticeship boArd
An apprentice is someone learning a trade
while he or she is employed. Apprenticeship
is a combination of on-the-job training,
work experience and technical training in
a trade. NAIT is Canada’s leading appren-
ticeship trainer, providing training in 36
apprenticeship trades. To learn more about
apprenticeship training at NAIT, check
NAIT’s website or call (780) 471-8934.
Alberta Apprenticeship and Industry
Training can also provide you with informa-
tion. Call (780) 427-8517 or check online at
www.tradesecrets.org.
5 www.nait.ca
Academic Requirements
Grade 11 (including English and Math)
Grade 10 (including English and Math)
Program length – years, months (M), weeks (W)
Program Name and Campus Location
Grade 12 English
AMath30 or PMath 30 (see note 7)
Science 30 or Physics 30 or Chemistry 30
Additional requirements and competitive selection information
Accounting (E) 2 Successful completion of the frst year of Business Administration.
See Calendar for more details.
Aircraft Skin and Structure Repair (E) 1 • Plus 50% in Grade 11 English, Math 20 (Pure or Applied) and a Grade 11 Science
(Physics 20 recommended).
Animal Health Technology (E, F) 2 • • Plus Chemistry 30 and Biology 30. Last year, successful applicants had a
minimum combined average of 70% (E).
Applicants must have 80 hours of documented work experience.
Applied Banking and Business (E) 1 • Plus Math 20 (Pure or Applied).
Architectural Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 63%.
Auto Body Pre-Employment (E) 12W • Plus 50% in a Grade 10 Science.
Automotive Service Technician Pre-Employment (E) 16W • Plus 50% in a Grade 10 Science.
Avionics Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Bachelor of Applied Business Administration - Accounting (E) 2 A two-year Accounting Diploma from an accredited Alberta post-secondary
institution.
Bachelor of Applied Business - Finance (E) 2 A two-year Business Diploma from an accredited Alberta post-secondary
institution.
Bachelor of Applied Information Systems Technology (E) 2 Plus a two-year Diploma in a computer-related technology and/or Computer
Engineering Technology.
Bachelor of Technology in Technology Management (E) 2 Diploma or degree in an accredited or recognized engineering or applied
science program, with a preferred GPA of 2.3
Baking (E) 1 • Last year, successful applicants had a minimum Grade 11 level.
Biological Sciences Technology (E) 2 • • Plus Chemistry 30 and Biology 30. Last year, successful applicants had a
minimum combined average of 65%.
Biomedical Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 65%.
Building Environmental Systems Technology (E) 2 Successful completion of HVAC certifcate.
Business Administration (E) 2 • •
Chemical Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 70%.
Chemical Technology (E) 2 • • Plus Chemistry 30.
Civil Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 63%.
CNC Machinist Technician (E) 1 • Last year, successful applicants had a Grade 12 standing in English and Math
with a 65% combined average.
Combined Laboratory and X-Ray Technology (E) 2 • Plus English 30-1, PMath 30, Chemistry 30 and Biology 30.
A minimum mark of 60% in each compulsory subject is required.
Computer Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Computer Network Administrator (E) 1 • Plus Science Level 20 and Math Level 20. See Calendar for further details.
Computer Systems Technology (E) 2 • Plus PMath 20; or AMath 30 minimum of 65%.
Construction Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • • Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined average of 65%.
Pure Math 30 preferred.
Cooperative Trades Orientation (F) 19W • English 10 or a Grade 11 English, Math 10 or a Grade 11 Math.
Culinary Arts (E) 1-2 • Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined average of 63% in
Grade 12 level English and Math.
6 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
locAtion legend
e edmonton campus
f fairview campus
gp grande prairie campus
sA st. Albert campus
Grade 11 (including English and Math)
Grade 10 (including English and Math)
Program length – years, months (M), weeks (W)
Program Name and Campus Location
Grade 12 English
AMath30 or PMath 30 (see note 7)
Science 30 or Physics 30 or Chemistry 30
Additional requirements and competitive selection information
Cytotechnology (E) 2 • Plus 60% or better in each of English 30-1, PMath 30, Chemistry 30 and
Biology 30 (Physics 20 also recommended). Last year, successful applicants
had a minimum combined average of 74%.
Dental Assisting (E) 1 • Plus Biology 30 and Chemistry 30, and one of: Science 30, Pure Math 30,
Applied Math 30, Math 31, Physics 30, Social Studies 30 or 30-1, or a 30 level
language other than English. Last year successful applicants had a minimum
combined average of 70%.
Dental Technology (E) 2 • Plus Pure Math 30 or Applied Math 30, Biology 30, and one of: Science 30,
Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Math 31, Social Studies 30 or 30-1, or a 30 level
language other than English. Last year successful applicants had a minimum
combined average of 70%.
Denturist Technology (E) 3 • Plus Pure Math 30 or Applied Math 30, Biology 30, and one of: Science 30,
Chemistry 30, Physics 30, Math 31, Social Studies 30 or 30-1, or a 30 level
language other than English. Last year successful applicants had a minimum
combined average of 67%.
Diagnostic Medical Sonography (E) 28M • Plus 60% in English 30-1; Biology 30; PMath 30; Chemistry 20 and Physics 30.
Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined average of 87%.
See Calendar for details.
Digital & Interactive Media Design (E) 2 • Plus Math 20, (Pure or Applied).
Electrical Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 65%.
Electronic Systems Integration (E) 1 • •
Electronics Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Emergency Medical Technology - Paramedic (E) 2 • Plus Chemistry 30, Biology 30 and Math 10 (Pure or Applied.)
See Calendar for additional requirements.
Engineering Design and Drafting Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Finance (E) 2 Successful completion of frst year Business Administration.
See Calendar for more details.
Forest Technology (E) 2 • • Plus two of Chemistry 20, Biology 20 or Physics 20.
See Calendar for further details.
General Mechanic (F) 1 •
Geological Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Geomatics (Surveying) Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Graphic Communications (E) 1 • Plus 65% in Grade 12 English and 60% in Pure Math 20 or Applied Math 20.
See Calendar for more details.
Graphic Sign Arts (E) 1 • Plus Grade 11 Art or Drafting, or related experience.
Harley-Davidson Technician (F) 15W • See Calendar for more details.
Heavy Equipment Service (F) 2 • Plus Grade 12 Math and a Grade 12 Science.
Hospitality Management (E) 2 • Plus Math 20 (Pure or Applied).
HVAC Specialist (E) 1 • Plus Math 20 (Pure or Applied) and one of Physics 20 (preferred), Science 20,
Chemistry 20.
Industrial Heavy Equipment Technology (E) 2 • Plus AMath 30 or PMath 20, and one of Physics 20, Chemistry 30 or Science 30.
Instrumentation Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 67%.
Interior Design Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 65%.
Landscape Architectural Technology (E) 2 • • • Biology 30 is also an acceptable Science.
7 www.nait.ca
AcAdemic RequiRements (coNtINued)
Grade 11 (including English and Math)
Grade 10 (including English and Math)
Program length – years, months (M), weeks (W)
Program Name and Campus Location
Grade 12 English
AMath30 or PMath 30 (see note 7)
Science 30 or Physics 30 or Chemistry 30
Additional requirements and competitive selection information
Legal and Realtime Reporting (E) 2 • Plus 60% in Grade 12 English, a Grade 12 Science and Social Studies.
Typing speed of net 30 w.p.m.
Machinist Pre-Employment (GP) 16W English 10 or a Grade 11 English, Math 10 or a Grade 10 Applied Math or a
Grade 11 Math.
Magnetic Resonance Imaging (E) 2 Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined average of 80%.
Management (E) 2 Successful completion of the frst year of Business Administration.
See Calendar for more information.
Marine Service Technician (E) 40W •
Marketing (E) 2 Successful completion of the frst year of Business Administration.
See Calendar for more information.
Materials Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Mechanical Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Medical Laboratory Assisting (E) 20W • Plus PMath 10, Chemistry 20 and Biology 20; plus keyboarding skills.
Medical Laboratory Technology (E) 2 • Plus 60% or better in each of English 30-1, PMath 30, Chemistry 30 and
Biology 30 (Physics 20 also recommended). Last year, successful applicants
had a minimum combined average of 76%. See Calendar for details.
Medical Radiologic Technology (E) 2 • • Plus 60% or better in each of English 30-1, Grade 12 Math, Physics 30, and one
of Biology 30, Chemistry 30 or Science 30. Last year, successful applicants had
a minimum combined average of 85%. See Calendar for details.
Medical Transcription (E) 1 • Plus Typing speed of net 30 w.p.m.
Millwork and Carpentry (E) 1 • Last year, successful applicants had Grade 11 English and Math.
Millwright, Pre-Employment (GP) 16W • Plus a Grade 11 Science.
Motorcycle Mechanic, Pre-Employment (F) 1 • See Calendar for details.
Network Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Nutrition and Foodservice Management (E) 2 • Plus Math 20 (Pure or Applied), Biology 20 or any Grade 12 Science.
Offce and Records Administration (E) 2 • Plus Math 20 (Pure or Applied).
Outdoor Power Equipment Technician, Pre-Employment (F) 40W •
Personal Fitness Trainer (E) 2 • Plus Math 20 (Pure or Applied), and Biology 30.
Petroleum Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum overall
average of 80%.
Photographic Technology (E) 2 • • Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined average of 70%.
Power Engineering Certifcate (F) 39W • Plus 50% in Physics 10 or Science 10.
Power Engineering Certifcate - 4th Class (E) 1 • Plus 50% in Physics 10 or Science 10. Last year, successful applicants had
Grade 12 English, PMath 30 plus Physics 30 or Science 30.
Power Engineering Certifcate - 3rd Class (E) 10M • 50% in Grade 10 English, PMath 10, and Physics 10 or Science 10. Plus a
4th Class Power Engineering Provincial Certifcate.
Power Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30. Last year, successful applicants had a minimum combined
average of 65%.
Pre-Technology - Accelerated (E) 17W PMath 20 or Applied Math 30, Grade 11 English plus Science 10.
Pre-Technology - Regular (E) 1 Pure Math 10 or Applied Math 10, English Grade 10 level.
Radio and Television - Radio (E) 2 • Plus 60% or better in Grade 12 English and Math 20 (Pure or Applied),
Gr. 11 Science and Social Studies. Last year, successful applicants had a
minimum mark of 70% in English 30-1, with a minimum combined average of
68% for English 30-1 and a Grade 12 level Math, Science and Social Studies.
8 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
locAtion legend
e edmonton campus
f fairview campus
gp grande prairie campus
sA st. Albert campus
Grade 11 (including English and Math)
Grade 10 (including English and Math)
Program length – years, months (M), weeks (W)
Program Name and Campus Location
Grade 12 English
AMath30 or PMath 30 (see note 7)
Science 30 or Physics 30 or Chemistry 30
Additional requirements and competitive selection information
Radio and Television - Television (E) 2 • Plus 60% or better in Grade 12 English and Math 20 (Pure or Applied),
Gr. 11 Science and Social Studies. Last year, successful applicants had a
minimum mark of 75% in English 30-1, with a minimum combined average of
70% for English 30-1 and a Grade 12 level Math, Science and Social Studies.
Respiratory Therapy (E) 3 • • Plus 60% in Biology 30, Grade 12 Math, Chemistry 30 and English 30-1; current
frst aid and CPR Certifcation. See calendar for selection criteria. Last year,
successful applicants had a minimum combined overall average of 70%.
Retail Meatcutting (E) 20W •
Telecommunications Engineering Technology (E) 2 • • Plus PMath 30.
Transitional Vocational (F) 46W Must be 18. See Calendar for details.
Turfgrass Equipment Technician (F) 38W •
Veterinary Administrative Assistant (SA) 1 • 50% or better in Grade 11 Math.
Water and Wastewater Technician (January intake) (E) 1 • Plus 50% or better in a Grade 11 Math and a Grade 11 Science.
Welding, Pre-employment (GP) 16W •
pleAse note
All students are required to meet the appropriate grade and/or subject level specifed 1.
as a minimum for each program. Student selection is competitive and may be
based on academic achievement beyond these prerequisites if required. Relevant
work experience and/or demonstrated commitment to the career feld may also be
considered. In programs where competition was particularly strong last year, the
academic qualifcations of successful applicants is indicated.
Where specifc Grade 12 sciences are not identifed as prerequisites for an 2.
Engineering Technology program, applicants are advised to obtain a good Physics
background.
A high school diploma is not required; however specifc subject requirements must 3.
be met. Please contact the Registrar’s Offce for details. Please be aware that some
employers require a high school diploma.
The academic levels listed above are subject to change from year to year. Please 4.
note: NAIT reserves the right to suspend or cancel programs, or make other changes
deemed necessary.
Application period: applications are accepted beginning October 1 for the next 5.
academic year. Unless a program has a specifc application deadline, applications will
be accepted until the program flls. To ensure consideration, please apply as soon as
possible. Early admission will be offered to highly qualifed students.
Note that for programs with a March 31 deadline, the application, plus all supporting 6.
documentation, must be received in the Registrar’s Offce by March 31. Confrm
program deadlines on the website.
Transitional Math 101, Algebra 35 (minimum 65%), and the discontinued Alberta 7.
Math 30 will be accepted in lieu of Pure Math 30.
For additional information please see individual program information in the 8.
Full-Time Program Calendar or website www.nait.ca
9 www.nait.ca
Instructional
Fees and
Expenses
Bachelor of Applied
Information Systems .............. $1,800.00
Hospitality Management............ $2,549.94
Marine Service Technician .......... $2,190.60
Personal Fitness Trainer .............. $2,065.62
northern caMpuses
Co-operative Trades
Orientation ................................. $1,538.38
Harley-Davidson Technician .......$5,074.49
Heavy Equipment Service
Diploma ......................................$2,087.49
For details of costs specific to all instruc-
tional programs (books, supplies and other
related program fees), please refer to the
program write-up in this calendar or to the
NAIT web site: www.nait.ca
pArt-time progrAm fees
2007/08 - $9.17 per instructional hour (does
not include Students’ Association fee).
Note: this amount is subject to change;
please check the NAIT web site for current
fees.
Note: Canadian student fees apply to
Canadian citizens and landed immigrants.
internAtionAl students
The tuition fees for International Students
are reviewed on an annual basis in response
to market conditions and costs. Please
contact the Student Recruitment Office
or check the NAIT website for further
information.
notes
Accepted international applicants are 1.
responsible for their own visas, travel
arrangements and fnancial guarantees
for the period of their Canadian
studies as required by Citizenship
and Immigration. The Institute has no
provision for fnancial assistance to
international students.
Fees for international students 2.
enrolled in customized programs
are calculated by NAIT’s Student
Recruitment Offce . Program fees
for sponsored international students
include settlement assistance, training
materials, English language training (if
required), and mentor/tutor fees.
minimum fee for one
semester:
Regardless of the number of instructional
hours, the minimum fee assessment will
be $250.00.
fee vAriAtions
Programs with co-op/work experience/
practicums and applied/bachelor’s degree
programs are assessed additional fees.
Contact the Registrar’s Office for more
information, or check the NAIT website.
Audit fees
Students registered for audit purposes will
normally pay 50% of the regular tuition fee
and Technology fees.
AcceptAnce deposit
Upon acceptance, applicants to NAIT’s
instructional programs will be required to
pay a $250 non-refundable deposit. Non-
payment will lead to cancellation of the
acceptance.
An accepted applicant who cancels or fails to
appear for registration forfeits the deposit.
The entire deposit is credited toward the
applicant’s tuition upon registration.
fee pAyment deAdlines
For current information, please check the
NAIT website at www.nait.ca
tuition fees
The following tuition fee information for
full-time Certifcate, Diploma and Applied
Degree programs listed in this calendar ap-
plies to the 2007/08 academic year. These
amounts may be subject to change; please
check the NAIT website for current fees.
The majority of NAIT’s Certifcate, Diploma
and Applied Degree programs have a
2007/08 tuition fee of $1,760.85 per
semester. Some program exceptions are
presented below.
Consult the chart of Program Cost Estimates
at the back of this book for more details.
edMonton caMpuses
Bachelor of Applied Business -
Administration ......................... $1,800.00
Bachelor of Applied Business -
Finance ....................................... $1,800.00
10 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
students’ AssociAtion
fees
Students’ Association fee per semester:
2007/08 - $111.50 for all full-time and
part-time programs on Edmonton-area
campuses.
For Nor thern campuses, Students’
Association fees per session are as follows:
FairvieW caMpus (2007/08)
Full-time .......................................................$93
Part-time and CTO* program ................ $39
Apprenticeship .......................................... $39
Grande prairie caMpus
Full-time ......................................................... $3
Part-time ........................................................ $2
*Co-operative Trades Orientation
A student may decline membership in the
NAIT Students’ Association (NAITSA).
The student will, however, have to pay the
Students’ Association fee.
other compulsory fees
Technology fee (per academic year): •
$100 plus GST for all programs.
This fee covers the cost of a range of
services that connect NAIT students
with state-of-the-art technology. The
Technology fee makes possible such
resources as MyNAIT, the student
portal that provides access to a host of
services, OOKMail, the Internet-based
student e-mail system, and the NAIT
Academic Technical Support Desk.
The Technology fee also provides for
ongoing maintenance of the NAITSA
Computer Commons and constant
upgrading of computer equipment in all
NAIT classrooms.
Health and Dental fee (per academic •
year): The fee for 2007/08 was $206.00
for all programs ($98.00 for the Health
fee and $108.00 for the Dental fee).
Full-time day students are automatically
enrolled in the NAIT Students’ Association
Health and Dental Plans. Students can
opt out of the plans if they provide proof
of alternate coverage and they opt out
by the deadline date. For more informa-
tion about the Health and Dental Plans
check out the website at www.gallivan.ca/
studentnetworks/members/NAIT
continuing educAtion
fees
Fee information for part-time students is
available in the Continuing Education cal-
endar or from the Registrar’s Offce (phone
780-471-6248).
Fees and Charges for Sponsored Students
Where a Canadian student presents a writ-
ten undertaking addressed to the Institute
by his/her employer or another party
agreeing to pay his/her fees and charges,
such sponsor(s) shall be charged fees in
accordance with the fee schedule.
International students who are sponsored
have their total program training fees set by
the Student Recruitment Offce .
Where the Students’ Association fee is not
paid by the sponsoring agency, it will be the
responsibility of the student.
specific fee exemptions
Tuition fees may be waived or modifed, un-
der special circumstances, at the discretion
of the President. Students sponsored under
the terms of certain approved training pro-
grams shall be exempt from the payment of
tuition fees.
other educAtionAl
expenses
The educational costs for any student
consist of:
Tuition and compulsory fees 1.
Cost of books, supplies and feld trips 2.
Technology fee 3.
Living costs 4.
Commuting costs and parking costs, as 5.
applicable.
monthly living
expenses
Residence accommodation is available at
Fairview Campus – please see the website
for associated costs.
For students not living in residence, monthly
expenses such as rent, food, clothing, trans-
portation and general household supplies
may total approximately:
$897 for a single student living away •
from home
$412 for a single student living at home •
$1,784 for a married student without •
children
$2,212 plus childcare expenses for a •
single parent with one child ($428/
child plus childcare costs)
note
Cost of living estimates based on the
Alberta Student Finance Board guidelines.
The costs of books, supplies, field trips
and other required items vary widely from
program to program, ranging from $300 to
$4,500 per year. Please refer to the specifc
program descriptions contained in this cal-
endar for estimates of such costs.
These estimates, used in conjunction with
the fee schedule, should enable a student
to assess the total cost of his/her education
while at NAIT.
miscellAneous
chArges
Prices include GST and are subject to
change:
Application processing fee (each) ... $40.00
Transcript (each) .................................$10.00
Duplicate diploma (each) ................$20.00
Re-evaluation of course, examination
or assignment (each) ...................$30.00
Duplicate student ID card .................$10.00
Tuition Installment
Payment ..........................$25.00 per term
Late payment ....................................... $25.00
Late registration .................................. $25.00
Cheque returned NSF ........................$30.00
withholding
AcAdemic results
And certificAtion
At the President’s discretion, the Institute
reserves the right to withhold the granting
of offcial transcripts, diplomas, certifcates
and degrees to students who have not
returned Institute property such as text
books, equipment or supplies, or who owe
money to the Institute.
fee refunds
Full-tiMe proGraMs
Any student terminated for disciplinary rea-
sons shall be ineligible for a refund of fees.
Students who voluntarily withdraw before
completing their program of study or reduce
their total instructional hours shall receive
tuition and NAITSA fee refunds as indicated
in the “Fee Refund Schedule for 2005/06
Full-Time Programs” as posted on the NAIT
website.
continuinG education proGraMs
Information on fee refunds for part-time
students is available on the Continuing
Education website or from the Registrar’s
Offce (phone 780-471-6248).
Notwithstanding the above refund provi-
sions, the President may determine the
amount of refund for a student who can
establish that he/she has been incorrectly
enrolled in any program.
sponsored students
In the case of sponsored Canadian students
and those receiving federal or provincial
government student loan assistance, the
refund of fees will be made to the appro-
priate sponsoring agency. The Student
Recruitment Office calculates refunds for
international students who are sponsored.
11 www.nait.ca
Financial
Assistance
Generally, fnancial assistance is available
to assist students with the cost of tuition,
compulsory fees, books and monthly living
expenses. Please note that it may take up to
six weeks to process an application. An ap-
plication can be submitted as early as June
1st, for fall studies, and a student can submit
an application while waiting for formal ac-
ceptance to enter a NAIT full-time program.
For students’ convenience, a financial as-
sistance application form is now available in
electronic format. It is strongly recommend
that students apply on-line to get the most
timely response from the Student Finance
Board about their eligibility. The application
site also provides other detailed information
on applying for and obtaining a student loan
and other assistance.
To apply for financial assistance on-line
please visit studentloans.gov.ab.ca/scripts/
esla.dll
If students have been approved for student
loans prior to the tuition deadline, their
tuition and fees may be requested from the
student loans. Contact 780-491-1344 for
more information or visit our website:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid
note
Cost of post-secondary education is a
shared responsibility among students, par-
ents, spouses, and government. Assistance
is intended to be supplemental to student
and family resources. Assistance is awarded
based on fnancial need.
AcAdemic upgrAding/
bAsic foundAtion
skills grAnt
Students enrolled in programs such as
Academic Upgrading, English as a Second
Language, Literacy/Adult Basic education,
Pre-Career Academic Preparation Training,
Pre- Technology Training and University and
College Entrance preparation are eligible to
receive a Skills Development Grant.
Financial assistance in the form of provincial
grant funding is available to students who
demonstrate financial need and who are
enrolled full-time in an academic upgrading
program. Funding may be provided to cover
the cost of tuition, compulsory fees, books
and monthly living expenses.
post-secondAry
studies
Financial assistance is available for students
attending a post-secondary program on a
full-time basis. Government student loans
and grants can assist students whose per-
sonal resources are insuffcient to cover the
full cost of their post-secondary education.
In Alberta, government student loans
and grants are processed by Students
Finance, a division of Advanced Education.
Services are provided through Alberta
Career Devel opment Cent res and
Canada-Alberta Service Centres located
throughout the province. A student’s eligi-
bility for assistance is based on need and
qualifying students may be awarded the
following:
Canada Student Loan •
Alberta Student Loan •
Alberta Student Loan Relief Beneft •
Canada Millennium Bursary •
Alberta Opportunities Bursary •
Northern Student Supplement •
Maintenance Grant •
Canada Student Grant for “high need” •
students
fINANcIAl AssIstANce for studeNts IN fINANcIAl Need Is
AvAIlABle IN the forM of studeNt loANs, grANts, BursArIes,
AwArds ANd scholArshIps.
12 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
trAining for work
Training for Work provides full-time occu-
pationally-focused training opportunities to
enable clients to get a job or adapt to chang-
ing labour conditions and skill requirements
to sustain employment.
To qualify for funding, a student must:
be 18 years of age or older •
have lived in Alberta for at least 3 •
months
have been out of the regular school •
system for one calendar year
be attending studies full-time •
be willing to work but cannot because •
of lack of skills
set career and employment goals •
and meet with an authorized Career
Advisor at NAIT’s Student Rectuitment
Offce for an assessment.
Contact (780) 491-1343 or (780) 471-8987
for more info.
grAnts for post-
secondAry students
with disAbilities
Students with documented disabilities
may be eligible to apply for grants of
up to $5,000 to assist with the cost of
disability-related services and equipment
costs. Please inquire at your local Career
Development Centre or Canada-Alberta
Service Centre for information. If you are
eligible for grants contact the Office of
Services to Students with Disabilities at
NAIT (780-471-8921) for assistance in
developing an Individual Service Plan out-
lining the services required and the cost of
the services and/or equipment. Please plan
well in advance of the start of the program
as approval for grant funding takes a con-
siderable amount of time.
funding for pArt-time
studies
Alberta Students Finance considers stu-
dents taking less than 60% of a full course
load as part-time. Courses can either be
credit courses or non-credit courses but
must lead to a certifcate or diploma.
Financial assistance is available in the form
of a Canada Student Loan of up to $4,000
for one calendar year, a provincial bursary
of $600 per semester and an additional
Canada Study Grant of up to $1,200 per cal-
endar year for students in high need. Funds
assist with the cost of tuition, books, child-
care and transportation. Students Finance
expects students to have other resources to
cover their living costs.
Apprenticeship And
short-term trAining
Apprentices and individuals receiving or
eligible to receive employment insurance
(EI) can access grant funding to attend
full-time studies. Students who are eligible
for EI benefts and are planning to enroll in a
program of study of twelve months or less
should contact their nearest Alberta Career
Development Centre or Canada – Alberta
Service Centre for an assessment.
Apprentices do not need an assessment
prior to sending their application for fnan-
cial assistance.
For information and application forms for
fnancial assistance contact:
Alberta Career Development Centres or
Canada-Alberta Service Centres
in Alberta: 1-800-661-3753
in Edmonton: (780) 422-4266
or
Contact the NAIT Apprenticeship Offce
(780) 471-7699
nAit student AwArds
And scholArships
To encourage academic achievement and
to provide assistance to those who are in
need, a number of awards are available to
eligible students. The value of the awards
will vary. Each program at NAIT has a
number of awards assigned to it and the
Program selects recipients. In addition,
there are a number of entrance and in-term
awards administered by the NAIT Student
Awards Office for which you may apply.
Selections are made by a committee and
are distributed throughout the year. For
details, access the NAIT Student Awards
Handbook, revised each summer.
For more information visit
www.nait.ca/scholarships or contact:
NAIT Student Awards Offce:
780-491-3056
A Student Line of Credit is available through
major banking centres such as Royal Bank,
CIBC, BMO, Bank of Nova Scotia, TD Bank,
Parkland Savings and Credit Union, and
Alberta Treasury Branch. This is designed
to meet the special needs of a full-time or
part-time student. Contact one of the above
banks for more information.
Alberta Heritage Scholarship Fund provides
several awards to students. The four most
popular scholarships available to Alberta
residents are:
Alexander Rutherford Scholarships 1.
provide up to $2,500 to senior high
school students and is based on
academic achievement in grades 10, 11,
and 12. The new award values are only
available to students who graduate
on or after April 1, 2007. Applicants
must be Alberta residents who plan
to enroll or are enrolled in a full-time
post-secondary program of at least one
semester in length.
The Louise McKinney Scholarships 2.
are valued at $2,500 and are based
on post-secondary academic
achievement. Students are nominated
by the Awards offce. These
scholarships are available to Alberta
residents currently enrolled as a NAIT
student and entering their second year
of studies or to current graduates who
have been accepted to any university
or college to pursue post-graduate
studies.
Adult High School Equivalencies 3.
Scholarships are valued at $500
each and awarded to graduates of an
academic upgrading program at NAIT
based on academic achievement. To be
eligible, students must have been out of
high school for three years.
Jason Lang Scholarships 4. are valued
at $1,000 each and are available to
Alberta residents who have completed
one year of any undergraduate post-
secondary program in Alberta that is at
least 2 years in length. Recipients must
have obtained the equivalent of at least
a 3.2 GPA in their frst year of study.
Students must be in their second
year of a program in order to receive
the award. Jason Lang Scholarship
is now expanded to include students
entering the third or fourth year of their
undergraduate studies.
For more information, contact the NAIT
Student Awards Office or the Alberta
Heritage Scholarship Fund (427-8640 or
www.alis.gov.ab.ca/scholarships)
13 www.nait.ca
Services for
Students
Alumni relAtions
1-800-289-7609
(toll free in North America)
or in Edmonton at: 471-8539
alumni@nait.ca
www.nait.ca/alumni
Welcome to NAIT! As a student of this
great institute, there are alumni benefits
available to you.
Ways to save
NAIT Mosaik MasterCard®
Our Mosaik MasterCard offers low intro-
ductory interest rates and reward programs
including CashBack option. Apply on line at
www.nait.ab.ca/alumnait/mastercard.
Alumni Family Scholarships
Many scholarships are available to you
including scholarships available only to
children of NAIT alumni or returning NAIT
alumni. For details contact Student Awards
at awards@nait.ca or ph: 471-8800
students For a short tiMe …
aluMni For a liFetiMe.
When you graduate, you will automatically
become a lifetime member of the NAIT
Alumni Association. Benefts include:
Free subscription to the NAIT magazine •
Invitations to special events, including •
alumni reunions
Privilege card access to athletic and •
library facilities
Great rates on home and auto •
insurance through TD Meloche
Monnex
Alumni Recognition Awards •
Online community •
stay connected!
Wherever life takes you, let us know
where you are so that we can send you the
magazine, invite you to events and let other
alumni know what you’re up to. Contact us
anytime to update your information.
cAmpus sport And
wellness
Main caMpus
E-134/S-105
General Inquiries: 471-7713
For detailed information on NAIT Athletics
visit www.NAITOOKS.COM
Be Healthy! Be Fit! During your time
here take advantage of the following
opportunities:
Free access to recreation facilities •
(with valid ID)
Fitness and active living classes •
Exercise consultations and personal •
training services
Free access to OOKS athletic games •
(with valid ID)
Intramural Activities •
Detailed program guides are available each
term in E-134, S-105 or E-026.
14 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Get Involved! For more information on
everything Campus Sport and Wellness has
to offer please contact us.
Main Campus offers a wide variety of
activities, including recreation and ftness
classes, intramural sports and competitive
intercollegiate athletics. Facilities include:
hockey arena •
50m pool •
outdoor track •
soccer feld •
gymnasium •
ftness centre/weight room •
racquetball and squash courts •
exercise studio •
A student’s family (spouse and children)
may also use NAIT’s athletic and recre-
ational facilities by obtaining a privilege
pass, at a nominal fee, at the Sports
Equipment Centre, Room E-026 on Main
Campus.
FairvieW caMpus
Excellent recreational facilities are also
available on Fairview Campus. A fully
equipped fitness centre, gymnasium and
squash and racquetball courts are comple-
mented by a three-hole golf course, outdoor
hockey rink, soccer and athletic felds. The
Town of Fairview pool facility is located
just steps away from Campus residences,
with drop-ins and classes available to our
students at their regular rates.
The gymnasium is host to various group
exercise classes, intramural sports and
student activities throughout the school
year. Students also have the opportunity to
join golf, hockey and bowling clubs. There is
always the possibility of starting more clubs
of interest to our students.
Local stage groups use the fully equipped
theater complex on Fairview Campus.
Movies are shown there weekly.
A large indoor riding arena is located at the
Fairview campus. Students in any program
may board their horses at the campus
(space permitting) for a fee. An active
rodeo club offers weekly instruction and
practice. The club participates in intercol-
legiate rodeo events including hosting one
of their own.
athletics
NAIT provides athletes the opportunity to
compete for provincial and national cham-
pionships in a wide range of sports through
its comprehensive Intercollegiate Athletics
program. NAIT is a member of the Alberta
Colleges Athletic Conference (ACAC),
which is a 16-member college conference,
as well as the Canadian Colleges Athletic
Association (CCAA).
NAIT men’s and women’s intercollegiate
teams have strong records in hockey,
basketball, volleyball, soccer, badminton,
curling, golf, swimming and cross-country
running.
cAmpus reAds & needs
Campus Reads & Needs would like to wel-
come all students to visit our Main Campus
store in the South Learning Centre and also
our stores at Fairview, Patricia and Souch
Campuses. We stock all required books and
supplies. We also carry candy, lottery tick-
ets, stamps, clothing, bus passes, and many
other items. We accept Visa, Mastercard,
American Express and debit cards. Normal
hours of operation at our Main Campus
store are 7:30 a.m. until 7:00 p.m. on
Monday, and 7:30 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. on
Tuesday through Friday. We are closed
most Saturdays and Sundays. We will have
extended hours on weekdays during the fall
and spring full-time registrations.
Phone: (780) 471-7717
Website: www.nait.ca/reads&needs
Email: bookstore@nait.ca
caMpus reads & needs custoMer
service stateMent
Campus Reads & Needs endeavors to meet
our customers’ needs by:
providing friendly and effcient •
customer service
helping you fnd what you’re looking for. •
Our customer service representatives
are knowledgeable about the products
in our store
assisting you to locate merchandise •
that is not available in our store. If we
don’t have it, we can help you get it,
with our product research and special
order service
supporting the NAIT Community. •
Ask us how we can help with your
promotional activities.
caMpus reads & needs reFund
policy
We will give refunds on returns of most •
items that are in resaleable condition
with the original receipt or Campus
Reads & Needs warranty card, within
three weeks of purchase.
Items under warranty must be •
accompanied by the original Campus
Reads & Needs warranty card or
receipt. Such items will be repaired or
replaced at the discretion of Campus
Reads & Needs.
All refunds will be credited in the same •
form as payment was originally made.
Items purchased by cheque cannot be
refunded until 10 business days after
purchase.
Appropriate identifcation must be •
presented by anyone requesting a
refund. Students must present their
student ID card.
Refunds will not be given for special •
orders, calculators, computer disks,
video tapes, confectionery, food items,
bus passes, phone cards, lottery
and other tickets, gift certifcates,
valu-cards, graduation gowns, shrink-
wrapped or manufacturer sealed items
that have been opened (including
software and coursepacks), textbooks
that were purchased within one month
of the offcial completion of the relevant
NAIT course or program. These items
may be exchanged if defective and must
be accompanied by the original receipt
or warranty card, and original box and/
or manuals where applicable.
Textbooks that are returned due to •
withdrawals must be returned in
resaleable condition within 21 days
of withdrawal and within 31 days of
purchase and must be accompanied by
the receipt and withdrawal form.
caMpus reads & needs tech store
The Tech Store on Main Campus is located
on the main foor of the NAIT HP Centre by
the Bytes Cafeteria. Our Customer Service
phone number is 471-8390, ext: 1 and our
website is www.nait.ca/techstore.
There are fve great reasons to visit us:
Tech Store Staff 1.
Our friendly, knowledgeable, non-
commissioned staff members are ready
to answer any questions you may have.
We are dedicated to supplying the best
value, giving honest representation and
providing current technical knowledge.
We can identify your needs, provide
you with sound advice and help you
fnd a solution that is right for you!
Academically-priced software 2.
The Tech Store has a special
arrangement with software companies
to sell academic software at a fraction of
the full cost. You save up to 75 per cent
on software while you are a student.
Computer systems 3.
The Tech Store sells prebuilt as well as
custom built computer systems at great
prices. We also sell a variety of laptops
from such popular manufacturers as HP,
Compaq, LG, and Acer to name a few.
Variety of products 4.
We sell printers, scanners, mice,
cables, CD and DVD writers, PDAs,
network products, Apple products,
digital cameras, games, clothing and
accessories. If you don’t see what you
want, we can special order it for you.
15 www.nait.ca
Computer repairs 5.
We can fx what is ailing your computer
or give that old system new life. Our
technical service rates are student
priced!
There are specifc rules for purchasing aca-
demic software:
Purchases made by Continuing 1.
Education students may be made one
week before your course, during your
course and for one week after the
course.
Full-time students in a two-year 2.
program may purchase software only
within the dates of their student cards.
You must present your current student 3.
or staff ID or registration form.
Deposits are required on special orders. 4.
Special order software is non-refundable. 5.
If the software package is opened it is 6.
not returnable.
encAnA AboriginAl
student centre
Location: E-121
Admin. Phone: 491-3917
Liaison Phone: 471-7613
The Aboriginal Liaison Coordinator provides
support and information services for all stu-
dents and staff. The wide range of services
includes:
academic/career advising •
Information on fnancial aid •
student support services •
Aboriginal Student Council •
cultural awareness/elder support •
social gatherings •
referral and advocacy services to •
appropriate resources on campus or
within the community.
food services
the coMMon Market
O124
Monday – Thursday
6:45 am – 8:00 pm
Friday 6:45 am – 3:00 pm
The Common Market is a marketplace
located in central main campus with an em-
phasis on fresh, healthy cuisine. Meals are
offered for breakfast, lunch and dinner and
include in-house and franchise operations
such as Pizza Hut and Mr. Sub.
starBucks
O126 (Common Market Seating Area)
Monday –Thursday 6:45 am – 7:15 pm,
Fridays 6:45am – 3:00 pm,
Saturday 8:00 am – 1:00 pm
We are excited about the addition of
Starbucks which offers a full lineup of all
your favorite beverages and baked items.
the Fresh express
U122
Monday – Friday 7:00 am – 3:00 pm
Closed July and August
The Fresh Express embodies all that is
NAIT, both technical and modern, and
showcases a grill area operated by NAIT’s
Culinary Arts Students and a kiosk where
Food Services staff prepare hearty entrees
and sandwiches. It’s located in the North
end of main campus.
Bytes
W103
Monday – Thursday 6:45 am – 8:00 pm,
Friday 6:45 am – 4:00 pm,
Saturday 8:00 am – 2:00 pm
This stunning facility in NAIT’s HP Centre
features Tim Hortons coffee and baking,
a Pita Pit kiosk, e.terra (food with interna-
tional fair), and a wide array of grab and go
items.
chai’s
located in the X wing across from the
Bookstore
Monday – Friday 7:30 am – 3:00 pm
Closed July and August
Chai’s is the exotic stop on the main cam-
pus and offers a menu with a European and
eastern fair serving items such as Samosas,
Stromboli, Naan Bread, unique soups, fresh
baking, specialty coffees and a wide variety
of loose leaf teas.
Bistro!
L203
Monday – Friday 7:15 am – 2:30 pm
Closed July and August
This café in the Engineering Technologies
building boasts a broad menu including an
appetizing daily lunch feature at the Corner
Grill, Mr. Sub sandwiches, hot and cold bev-
erages, fresh-baking and grab and go items.
plates
P126
Monday – Friday 6:45 am – 2:00 pm
Closed July and August
Si tuated i n the Patri ci a Campus i n
Edmonton’s west end, this location offers
a tasty daily lunch feature, breakfast and
lunch grill items, Mr. Sub, fresh baking,
confections, coffee, slurpees, and a grab
and go area.
eleMents
Z157
Monday – Friday 6:45 am – 2:00 pm
Closed July and August
This recently expanded location in the new
Waiward Centre for Steel Technologies in
South Edmonton offers gourmet burgers,
unique grill items, a hearty lunch feature,
and a selection of grab and go items all to
be enjoyed with Starbucks coffee.
eMBers
Y118
Monday – Friday 6:45 am – 2:30 pm
Closed July and August
This eatery in NAIT’s newest building pro-
vides a great selection of trendy and hearty
food and beverages. Hot meal selections
include our signature BBQ Pulled Pork
and Best in the West burgers to satisfy
the heartiest of appetites. Quick choices
include grab and go soups, sandwiches, and
salads, confections, Starbucks coffee, tea,
and whipped hot chocolate.
Beyond excellence caterinG
U114
Available all year
NAIT Catering Services offers full-service
catering options and we’re here to serve the
NAIT community. We present delicious and
affordable menus and professional services
that can be designed to meet your needs.
tiMe out concession -
E142 & the Arena
Open during scheduled events
Our concessions are available at the gym
and arena during NAIT events. Confections,
hot dogs and hot & cold beverages are of-
fered for your enjoyment!
FairvieW caMpus
Fairview
Monday – Friday 7:15 am – 2:00 pm;
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm dinner service
Closed July and August)
The cafeteria in the beautiful Fairview
campus is operated by Chartwells, under
the umbrella of NAIT Food Services. The
friendly staff focuses on northern hospital-
ity with a menu that features home style
cooking and meals prepared from scratch.
internAtionAl student
centre
Main Campus, HP Centre W301
Phone: 378-5030
378-5399
Welcome to all new and returning interna-
tional students. The International Centre is
your home on campus. It provides a setting
for interaction and a place where students
can feel comfortable, seek help and infor-
mation in making their transition into NAIT/
Edmonton a great experience.
Some of the services available include:
Academic/Career Advising •
Personal support services •
International Student Club “NIC” •
16 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Orientation and campus tours •
Immigration issues •
Work and volunteer opportunities •
Social events and gatherings •
Information on fnancial aide, medical •
and accommodations
ESL tutoring service. •
leArning resources
nait liBraries
Website: www.nait.ca/tci/library
McNally Library: 780 471-8844
McNally Library Toll Free: 877 222-1722
Fairview Campus Library: 780 835-6641
NAIT Libraries offer access to information
resources in all formats for your learning
and research. Use the website as your gate-
way to information to reach:
The Catalogue • to fnd books, online
resources, journals, newspapers,
videos, and materials placed on
Reserve by your instructors
Subject specifc databases • in which you
can fnd periodical articles and other
information that you can read online
Research Guides • on everything from
job search to statistics
Online Reference • sources such as
dictionaries, directories, and citation tips
Program Resource Guides • highlighting
some of the most useful resources for
your program of study, many of which
are available via the Internet.
Fairview Campus Library serves students on
other northern campuses, which also offer
local Learning Resources Rooms. McNally
Library is the home library for Edmonton
and area campuses. You can access many
Library services and information resources
without ever actually stepping foot in the
physical Library. For example, we deliver to
a location near you! You can order library
resources online through the catalogue and
we will deliver them to other campuses or
to different locations on Main Campus,
including the NAITSA Computer Commons
(open 24/7). If you are studying at a dis-
tance, please ask us about special services
available to you.
If you need additional resources, we can
borrow materials for you from other librar-
ies or provide you with a free TAL Card
(The Alberta Library Card). The TAL Card
will give you borrowing privileges to more
than 350 libraries, including the University
of Alberta, Grande Prairie Regional College
and Edmonton Public.
NAIT Libraries’ friendly staff looks forward
to providing you with help in locating,
selecting and obtaining the information re-
sources you need. Come in, phone, Instant
Message or use Ask A Question, a virtual
reference service available on our website.
As well, we offer classes on information
research, including effective use of the
Internet. If you prefer, you can use Online
Tutorials available on the NAIT Libraries’
website.
NAIT Libraries offer computers for you to
access information resources, the Internet,
online courses, and e-mail as well as other
software (check our website for details),
laser printers and photocopiers. You’ll
find audiovisual equipment for viewing
and listening to materials from the collec-
tions. Of course, you’ll also fnd a variety of
study areas. McNally Library offers both
a wireless environment as well as carrels
equipped with ports to NAIT’s network for
your notebook computer.
project Factory
Website: www.nait.ca/tci/projectfactory
Phone: (780) 471-8705
Location: U210, Main Campus
The Project Factory offers a number of
resources that students can utilize to make
their experience at NAIT more successful.
The Project Factory is equipped with 40
computer workstations loaded with a
wide variety of software (Offce, Autodesk
and Adobe included) and our friendly
knowledgeable staff is available to provide
assistance when you need to print colour
documents or make transparencies. Our
large format inkjets are excellent for print-
ing banners, and we also have photocopiers,
scanners and DVD burners for student use.
We also offer laminating, faxing, and Cerlox
binding services. As well as selling a variety
of stationary supplies, The Project Factory
sells VALU Cards and can assist students
when printing using their Preo Print credits.
In addition, we also offer equipment loans
on items you might need to prepare your
class assignments such as digital cameras,
graphing calculators, or 8mm camcorders.
The Project Factory is also a wireless access
point.
So, if you have a big project to do but don’t
know where to start, stop by U210 and we’ll
do our best to help you out.
naitsa coMputer coMMons
Website: www.nait.ca/tci/computers
Phone: (780) 378-5068
Location: W203, Main Campus
The NAITSA Computer Commons is a
self-serve lab equipped with 111 computer
workstations (Office and Autodesk in-
cluded) and is open 24 hours a day, 7 days
a week. NAIT students can drop in at any-
time to work on their assignments or print
out their reports on our colour or B&W laser
printers using their VALU Card or Preo print
credits.
The NAITSA Computer Commons is also a
wireless access point.
northern student
educAtion initiAtive
(nsei)
The NSEI Advisor assists students from the
N.W.T. and Nunavut through the process of
organizing and utilizing resources available
on Main Campus and in the Edmonton area.
Student needs are assessed on an individual
basis and assistance and support is pro-
vided accordingly. The NSEI Advisor’s offce
is located in the EnCana Aboriginal Student
Centre, Room E-121 on Main Campus.
Phone: (780) 491-1363
Fax: (780) 471-7614
occupAtionAl heAlth
And sAfety (ohs)
Main Campus - South Lobby Rm O119
11762-106 Street – Phone: 471-8733
Hours: Monday to Friday
7:30 am. - 5:00 pm.
(8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. July - August)
Patricia Campus - Rm P130
12204-149 Street – Phone: 453-5438
Hours: 7:30 am - 3:30 pm Monday - Friday
Closed Tuesday morning and every other
Wednesday (Closed July - August)
Souch Campus - First Aid Room Z139
10330-71 Ave – Phone: 430-5117
Hours: Tuesday 7:30 am - 11:30 am
(Closed July - August)
health services
For health concerns of a minor, non-urgent
nature, Campus Reads and Needs is well
stocked with common over-the-counter
medications and products to assist you.
If you are reporting an emergency due to
illness or injury, contact the following num-
bers based upon your location.
Main Campus - from emergency or internal
phones – 2400
Other Edmonton-area campuses and when
using a cellular phone or an external phone
– 471-7477
Fairview, High Level, Peace River, Grande
Prairie – 911
All incidents must be reported immediately
to your instructor/supervisor and to NAIT
Health and Safety. Health Services staff will
work with your instructor/supervisor and
security to provide:
assessment and treatment •
transportation to a hospital, if required •
referrals to doctors, dentists or other •
agencies.
17 www.nait.ca
In the event Health Services staff are not
immediately available to address urgent
health concerns, please access the nearest
medical centre or emergency department.
The closest clinic to NAIT’s Main Campus
is the Medicenter on Jasper Avenue and the
closest hospital is the Royal Alexandra. For
other locations, consult the Yellow Pages
for the clinic or hospital nearest to your site.
In addition, the following services are avail-
able in Health Services (note some of these
services may not be available outside of the
Main Campus):
vision and hearing tests for designated •
positions and programs (as required)
special assistance if you have medical •
problems
immunizations are required for some •
programs. These services are provided
at NAIT Health Services on Main
Campus. Fees for immunization services
at NAIT will be charged at the rate of
$20.00 per immunization visit. Fees
may be higher for those who do not
qualify for provincially funded vaccine.
Please note: Instructors may delay
your participation in laboratory classes
and/or practicums if immunization
requirements are incomplete.
saFety services
The department also supports the coordi-
nation of services aimed at minimizing staff
and student injuries and accidents. These
programs include accident and incident in-
vestigation and reporting, chemical safety,
fire prevention, occupational hygiene,
(indoor air quality, noise monitoring), ergo-
nomic assessment, workplace inspections
and participation in the NAIT Joint Worksite
Health and Safety Committee.
Students and staff are encouraged to re-
port all safety hazards to (780) 471-7536.
health care insurance
Health care insurance is available to all
Alberta residents. Out-of-province students
are normally covered by health care insur-
ance in their home province.
accident insurance
Students can receive information about
the accident insurance plan and any other
student health benefits by contacting the
Student Benefit Office at 471-7730 or by
visiting the offce, which is adjacent to the
NAITSA offce on Main Campus.
Students are covered by the Workers
Compensation Board for work or course
related accidents. All injuries must be
reported to Health Services as soon as
possible for treatment and/or reporting
purposes. Students should notify their
instructor immediately of work or course-
related accidents.
pArking
Parking Services
Room: O112, Main Campus
Phone: (780) 471-7539
Website: www.nait.ca/security/parking.htm
hoW and When to apply For
parkinG
Parking Services is able to offer more park-
ing to Main Campus students than ever
before. Access to the Municipal Airport
Parkade and a bus to shuttle students
to Main Campus has been set up. More
information on the Municipal Parkade is
available through our website or by con-
tacting Parking Services. Parking on Main
Campus, however, is still limited. Parking
Permits are sold on a frst-come, frst-served
basis. It is highly recommended to apply as
early as possible. Registration dates vary
each year; therefore contact the Parking
Office for applications and specific dates
and times for acceptance.
disaBility parkinG
Disability parking is available for stu-
dents with a permanent or temporary
disability. To apply, please bring support-
ing documentation from your physician to
Health Services, Main Campus Room O118,
South Lobby or call at 471-8733.
services for students
with disAbilities (ssd)
Location: Main Campus, HP Centre W111PB
Phone: 378-6133
Fax: 471-7093
TTY: 474-5883
Email: counselling@nait.ca
Web: www.nait.ca/ssd
Offce Hours:
Monday-Friday 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
What is services For students
With disaBilities (ssd)?
SSD staff coordinate assistive services that
are available to students with disabilities
based on their individual needs. Services
available through SSD include assistance
with note-taking, sign language interpret-
ing, exam accommodations, tutoring,
academic strategist services, specialized
assistive technology, assistance accessing
disability-related funding, and referrals to
other community agencies.
hoW do i access services
throuGh ssd?
If you are currently a student and feel you
may require disability-related services,
please drop by the SSD offce and speak to
an SSD Advisor. Students should be apply-
ing for disability-related services 6 months
prior to their program start date and/or
academic year to ensure effective delivery
of their disability related services.
student counselling
Room: W111-PB, HP Centre
Phone: 378-6135
Web: www.nait.ca/counselling
Offce Hours:
Monday to Friday, 8:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Counselling Services are available to en-
hance your success as a student at NAIT.
Our services include:
individual counselling •
academic counselling •
career counselling •
personal counselling •
on-line and printed information •
peer tutoring •
seminars •
student employment
Location: Main Campus, E134
Phone: 471-8899
Fax: 471-7614
E-mail: careers@nait.ca
Web: www.nait.ca/jobopportunities
Do you need help fnding work?
Job posti ngs for NAIT students and
graduates.
Add your resume to the on-line resume
database.
Register for Job Alert to be notifed of jobs
related to your program.
Job search strategies, resume consultations,
interview tips.
On-line resources and free job search
publications.
Connect with employers at Career Events.
student housing
edMonton-area caMpuses
Main Campus: Room E-131
Phone: (780) 471-8855
Website: www.rentingspaces.ca
There is no student housing available
on NAIT’s Edmonton-area campuses.
However, listings of rental room and board,
house and apartments are available from
NAITSA or on the web.
FairvieW caMpus
The Fairview Campus offers a variety of
modern, comfortable living accommo-
dations designed to meet the needs of
students, including dorms, apartments and
newly constructed townhouses. The nine
fully furnished residence buildings provide
a variety of accommodation:
enforced quiet buildings •
18 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
family apartments, fully equipped •
drinking and non-drinking facilities •
cooking facilities optional in some •
dorms.
ALL student residences are non-smoking.
For student leisure time, the Notley Square
lounge is equipped with large-screen televi-
sion, games and pool tables. Entertainment
and recreation activities are planned
weekly. Our helpful Residence office staff
can answer your questions and help you
coordinate the facilities and services that
will ensure you have a comfortable home
while at Fairview Campus.
student identificAtion
cArd
Main Campus: Room E-134
Phone: (780) 471-7713
Northern Campuses: Room AC-117,
Fairview Campus
Phone: (780) 835-6666
Your Student Identification Card, bearing
your identifcation number and photograph,
is issued during NAIT registration. It is
required to obtain instructional materials,
athletic equipment, and to participate in
NAIT Students’ Association (NAITSA) ac-
tivities. It may also entitle you to discounts
in purchases at several businesses in the
area. If you lose your identification card,
be sure to report the loss to the Registrar’s
Office as soon as possible. There is a $5
charge for replacement cards.
In programs where cooperative training
with the employment sector is necessary
to meet the NAIT certification require-
ments (for example, in Medical Laboratory
Technology), you may, upon request, have
your identification card validated for the
duration of the cooperative training period.
Requests for the validation should be di-
rected to the Registrar’s Offce.
All cards for students in Edmonton-area
programs are issued from Student Services
office E-134, Main Campus. Cards for
students on northern campuses are issued
from the Coordinator, Recruitment and
Student Life offce, Room AC-117, Fairview
Campus.
students’ AssociAtion
(nAitsA)
Room: E131, Main Campus
Phone: (780) 471-8855
www.naitsa.ca
As a student-led organization, NAITSA
provides students with exceptional ser-
vices so you can get the most out of your
post-secondary experience, excel in your
studies, and stick within your budget.
NAITSA focuses on student advocacy and
representation. We protect your rights and
interests by speaking up on your behalf at
meetings and events where student repre-
sentation is crucial and the outcome will, in
the end, affect you.
We’re also proud to promote a more ‘social’
community. Whether it’s within the NAIT
campus communities or externally through
interaction with the public, we know how
rewarding community involvement can
be for NAIT students. We work to get the
word out, get you involved, and get you
prepared for today’s socially aware, vibrant
global community.
Among its many activities and responsibili-
ties, NAITSA:
represents students on issues •
pertaining to post-secondary
education •
acts as a mediator involving academic •
grievances
organizes extra-curricular events for •
students
governs full-time technology societies •
and student clubs
publishes the student handbook and •
newspaper (The Nugget)
owns and operates The Nest, NAIT’s •
Main Campus restaurant and bar,and
games rooms on main and satellite
campuses
provides mandatory Student Health •
and Dental Plans.
naitsa student BeneFits plan Fee
Offce: Room E125, Main Campus
Phone: (780) 471-7730
Full-time daytime students (taking 192
hours per semester) are automatically en-
rolled in the Students’ Association Student
Benefts Plan (excluding International and
northern campus students). This is an an-
nual plan, but for the convenience of the
student it is levied in equal installments in
the Fall and Winter semesters. The annual
premium provides insurance coverage from
September 1 to August 31 of each year.
Full details of the plan are available from
the Student Benefits Plan Office on Main
Campus, room E125, phone (780) 471-
7730 or check the website at www.gallivan.
ca/studentnetworks/members/NAIT. The
fee is applied to your tuition at the time of
registration, as with any other fee. If this fee
appears on your fees owing when you go to
pay your tuition, you must pay it.
The fees for the plan are designed to avoid
any noticeable increases from year to year.
Arrangements to waive this fee upon con-
firmation of comparable coverage can be
made only through the Student Benefits
Plan Office. They alone are responsible
for administration of the health and dental
plans. To waive these benefits you must
have comparable coverage with another
plan (not basic healthcare) and must pro-
vide confirmation of such coverage. Bring
your confirmation of coverage and com-
plete a waiver form to be submitted before
the deadline for the semester in which you
begin your full-time studies.
Your waiver status is carried forward for
each year you are eligible for the plan(s);
you must notify the plan administrator
if your coverage situation changes to
activate your coverage under the Student
Benefts Plan. If at any time your program
status changes contact the benefts offce
immediately.
tutoriAl centres
NAIT maintains three tutorial centres where
students receive assistance in a variety
of academic areas. The centres provide
tutoring on a drop-in basis at no charge to
the student. Students are asked to present
their student ID card. Students requiring
more intensive tutoring may decide to hire a
peer tutor through the Peer Tutoring service
provided by Counseling Services, W111PB,
Main Campus.
The location and regular hours of operation
for the Tutorial Centres from September to
June are:
Main caMpus
Room: A-133
Phone: 491-3126
Hours: Monday to Friday
7:30 am to 5:30 pm
patricia caMpus
Room: P152, 12204 – 149 Street
Phone: 453-5400
Hours: Monday – Thursday
2:45 pm – 5:45 pm
souch caMpus
Room: Z139A, 10330 – 71 Avenue
Phone: 378-1000
Hours: Monday – Thursday
2:00 pm – 4:30 pm
19 www.nait.ca
Academic
Regulations and
Procedures
vision
To be an outstanding technical institute
committed to student success in a global
economy
mission
To anticipate and meet the needs of
students and the economy by combining
outstanding applied education with a hu-
man touch
guiding principles
Our principles guide the actions of the NAIT
community and are the ideals to which we
hold ourselves accountable:
people are our Most valuaBle
resource.
Support, development and recognition •
for all staff
Pursuit of excellence •
Respect for the individual •
leadership Makes a diFFerence.
Fairness and openness in the learning •
and working environment
Sharing of knowledge and lifelong •
learning
Pride in our work and achievements •
resources are used in a
responsiBle Manner.
Effective, effcient and fexible use of •
resources
Decision making at the most logical •
level
technoloGy is an enaBlinG tool.
Innovative and supportive use of •
technology in our work and learning
environments
disclAimer
NAI T’s Academi c Regul ati ons and
Procedures can be accessed at http://www.
nait.ab.ca as part of the online calendar. In
the event of any disagreements or incon-
sistencies between the Web and printed
versions of the Academic Regulations, the
Web version shall be taken as correct.
NAIT reserves the right to make revisions to
the Academic Regulations and Procedures
without prior notice and they shall take ef-
fect at the time of revision unless a later date
is specifed when the revision is approved.
In the event of revisions, the policies, pro-
cedures, regulations and requirements in
effect will prevail over the provisions printed
in the Academic Regulations or in the NAIT
calendar or in the NAIT Student Handbook.
NAIT will provide as much notice of the
revision as it considers the circumstances
will permit, and will endeavor to incorpo-
rate the revisions in the next printing of
the Academic Regulations and Procedures.
Revisions shall include additions, deletions
and changes.
In general, NAIT does not warrant or guar-
antee the academic success of any student
in any program or course.
Although NAIT provides a safe educational
environment, thefts from lockers and other
areas do occur. Goods may also be vandal-
ized, damaged or lost. Students and other
individuals attending classes or visiting
NAIT for any reason whatsoever are solely
responsible for their goods and belongings.
NAIT shall not be responsible for theft or
loss of any goods for any reason. It is the
responsibility of the student or other indi-
vidual to ensure that their goods are stored
safely and that their owner’s or tenant’s
insurance policy provides for replacement
of goods or possessions that may be stolen,
vandalized, damaged or lost. The best in-
surance against loss is to leave articles that
are not needed at home or for the student
to carry valuables with them at all times.
Valuables should never be left in lockers
overnight.
20 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
scope And Authority
scope
NAIT offers a comprehensive range of
career-oriented training, classifed as:
Degree, Diploma and Certifcate •
programs
Apprenticeship programs, and •
Continuing Education and International •
Education courses and programs.
authority
The President is the Chief Executive Offcer
of NAIT and as such is responsible for the
general supervision over and direction of
NAIT’s operations including its policies,
programs, employees and business af-
fairs. The President may, from time to
time, delegate in writing any of his powers
and duties to any employee or employees
of NAIT. Where these Regulations and
Procedures state that the power and duty
to carry out actions hereunder is vested in
any other employee or employees of NAIT
the President has, by signing in the place
provided at the end of these Regulations
and Procedures, delegated those powers
and duties to such employee or employees.
Notwithstanding such delegation of power
and duties the President may, in any given
case, elect to act himself instead of the
employee or employees to whom the power
and duty has been delegated. The President
may, at his sole discretion, approve excep-
tions to these Regulations and Procedures
when he considers appropriate.
These Regulations and Procedures are
made pursuant to Section 61(1) of the Post-
secondary Learning Act and constitute rules
made thereunder.
Throughout these Regul ati ons and
Procedures, reference to a Program Leader
denotes a staff member designated as head
of a program or who has similar responsibil-
ity for the administration, coordination or
supervision of one or more programs.
The expression “business days” is used
throughout this document. In all cases, busi-
ness days are Monday to Friday and exclude
days on which the Institute is declared to be
offcially closed. These closed days may in-
clude statutory and other holidays as well as
other days to be specifed from time to time.
operAtionAl Activities
Operational activities shall include, but not
be limited to:
Offering educational courses or •
programs of instruction or training
of a general, academic, vocational,
technical, cultural or practical nature,
including but not limited to, applied
degree programs, diploma and
certifcate programs, short courses,
short programs, training to meet the
needs of special interest groups and
programs or courses required with
respect to a trade designated pursuant
to the Apprenticeship and Industry
Training Act, as amended from time
to time or such other statute as may
supplement or supercede the same;
Granting of degrees, certifcates, •
diplomas, honors, awards, scholarships,
prizes and/or bursaries;
Determining the eligibility of individuals •
to participate in NAIT programs or
courses;
Responding to and dealing with student •
conduct and academic dishonesty
matters;
Doing all such other things that are •
necessarily incidental to the foregoing.
protection of privAcy
NAIT collects and maintains information
used for the purposes of its operating
activities, including admission, registration
and other fundamental activities related
to students being members of the NAIT
community.
Upon admission to NAIT, students are
advised that the personal information they
provide, and any other information placed
in the student records will be used and
protected in compliance with Alberta’s
“Freedom of Information and Protection of
Privacy Act”, as amended, or such other
statute as may supplement or supercede
the same.
Personal information may include, but not
be limited to:
Name, home or business address or •
home or business telephone number;
Academic marks and student conduct; •
Gender, age, marital status or family •
status;
An identifying number, symbol or other •
particular assigned to the student (e.g.,
student identifcation number);
Fingerprints, blood type or inheritable •
characteristics if required by the
program;
Health and health care history, •
including information about a physical
or mental disability; if germane to the
program being undertaken;
Educational, fnancial, employment •
or criminal history including criminal
records except where a pardon has
been given;
Anyone else’s opinions about the •
individual;
Personal views or opinions, except if •
they are about someone else.
retention of
documents
Disclosure of personal information col-
lected for completion of a program shall
be shared with third parties responsible for
providing the work experience component
of a specifc program and with third party
employer sponsors of students.
The information on a student’s application
form and other documents and materials
provided for admission to NAIT will be
retained by NAIT for at least one year from
the date of registration for the program,
following which they may be destroyed.
Irreplaceable documents will be returned to
a student if the student requests the return
when he or she applies for admission or
upon graduation. Such a request shall be
made in writing to the Registrar’s Offce.
AdmissiOn
RequiRements
And APPLicAtiOn
PROceduRes
Admission
reQuirements
All applicants should be 16 years of age or
older, except individuals applying solely
for courses intended for younger students.
Exceptions may be approved by the appro-
priate Dean.
enGlish lanGuaGe proFiciency
As English is the primary language of instruc-
tion in all programs at NAIT, an adequate
knowledge of written and spoken English is
a prerequisite for admission. Other language
requirements may be a prerequisite for some
other programs. Regardless of country of
origin or of citizenship status, all applicants
must demonstrate profciency in the English
language prior to acceptance.
This requirement may be demonstrated as
follows:
Successful completion of the specifc named
prerequisite English course or an approved
alternative English course deemed to be
equivalent to the specifc English require-
ment PLUS a minimum of three (3) years of
full-time education in English in Canada or
in a country where English is the principal
language.
Applicants not designated as meeting
the above requirement shall be required
to present successful completion of the
specifc named prerequisite English course
or an approved alternative English course
deemed to be equivalent to the specific
21 www.nait.ca
English requirement PLUS a satisfactory as-
sessment by the NAIT English as a Second
Language Department or a satisfactory
score on the Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL) or equivalent. Some
programs may also require a satisfactory
score on the Test of Spoken English (TSE),
which may be shown by the TSE examina-
tion or other acceptable test. This additional
requirement will be outlined within Institute
publications. Another test of English lan-
guage proficiency may be substituted by
the Registrar’s Offce.
acadeMic reQuireMents
Prerequisites are determined to provide the
best opportunity for success in the student’s
chosen program and career. Specifc grade
and subject requirements are listed in the
current NAIT calendars. Selection criteria
in addition to program prerequisites may be
prescribed, as noted in these Regulations
and Procedures.
High school graduation is not required by
NAIT. However, some employers and post
secondary institutes may require high
school graduation as a condition of employ-
ment or an entry requirement. Specific
subject prerequisites are still required to
be considered for NAIT programs. (Refer
to the current Application Form). All other
program admission requirements will con-
tinue to apply.
Medical Questionnaire and
naitsa Medical insurance
A medical examination is not required for
admission to NAIT, but NAIT does reserve
the right to require a student to submit a
medical certifcate at any time. This infor-
mation will enable NAIT Health Services
to serve the medical needs of the student
more effectively.
It is the student’s responsibility to have
adequate hospital and medical insurance
coverage. Failure to provide adequate insur-
ance information will result in the student
being charged directly for services rendered.
Students who are not citizens or permanent
residents of Canada should contact a pri-
vate insurance company for coverage.
Full-time students are required to par-
ticipate in the compulsory insurance
program as managed by the NAIT Students’
Association prior to commencement of
their program of study. The NAIT Students’
Association has authority for exempting
entire academic programs or students from
the insurance program. Students may also
opt out of the compulsory insurance pro-
gram if they can provide documented proof
at the time of registration that they are cov-
ered under another insurance program. Fees
payable for insurance coverage are payable
with the student’s tuition fees.
color vision and hearinG
Certain types of laboratory and/or shop
work require normal hearing and color
vision. Deficient hearing or color vision
may affect the student’s ability to perform
course work or to gain employment after
graduation. Color vision and hearing tests
are available free at NAIT Health Services.
students With special
reQuireMents or needs
NAIT endeavors to provide services as
needed to all students. In order to pro-
vide special services that have funding
implications, applicants and students
should inform NAIT as to special needs at
the earliest possible time, generally three
months in advance of admission. Failure to
report need may result in postponement of
training or even cancellation of application
or termination of registration if funding can-
not be resourced.
definition And
clAssificAtion of
students
A NAIT student is defned as a person who
is registered to attend a course or group
of courses, which have been approved by
the administration of NAIT, and which are
offered at any campus or NAIT approved lo-
cation. Student status continues during the
approved academic period for the course or
group of courses and ceases upon the ear-
lier of the date of termination for any reason
or the last day of the approved academic
period for the course or group of courses.
reGular student
A student in a full-time program taking the
program as described in the full time pro-
gram calendar.
special student
A student in a full-time program taking
a course load that departs from that de-
scribed in the calendar. Such a departure
may be a different series of courses and/
or a lightened course load. Special students
are accommodated subject to availability
of space and resources and approval of the
Program Leader or designate.
audit student
A student in any program/course who
observes designated course activities,
but whose work is not evaluated and
grades are not awarded. Approval of the
Program Leader (or the Dean, in the case
of Continuing Education credit courses) is
required to register. Approval is subject to
the availability of space, impact on other
students and such other factors as may be
deemed important by NAIT. Audit students
generally pay ffty (50) per cent of regular
fees. A grade of AU will be reported on the
student’s transcript.
apprenticeship Branch student
A student in an apprenticeship program.
Any student in an apprenticeship program
or a journeyman registered in a technical
enrichment program.
continuinG education student
A student registered in a program/course
offered through Continuing Education.
international student
A student who is not a Canadian resident
or Landed Immigrant and who possesses a
valid student visa or becomes eligible for a
student visa upon acceptance to NAIT.
APPLicAtiOns
ApplicAtion
procedures
application to Full-tiMe
proGraMs
Application for admission must be made
on the application form available from
the Registrar’s Office or from the NAIT
website.
A non-refundable application processing
fee shall be payable with the application for
admission. Individuals who apply to more
than one program will pay the application
processing fee for each application.
All applicants to full-time programs must
arrange to have transcripts for all prior
education or, where applicable, proof of
relevant work experience sent directly by
the school, college, university, or agency to
the Registrar’s Offce.
Applicants currently in high school or cur-
rently taking courses to upgrade high school
marks shall submit all available marks (e.g.,
previous grades, mid-term marks, etc.) and,
on completion of high school or upgrading,
have transcripts sent to the Registrar’s
Offce at least one month prior to the pro-
gram start date.
Applicants are required to investigate the
careers they intend to pursue before ap-
plying for admission to the NAIT program
in order to familiarize themselves with the
career feld and the program. Applicants are
required to submit a Career Investigation
Summary that will be used in selecting
applicants for oversubscribed programs.
All applicants are strongly encouraged to
complete a career investigation.
Applicants are responsible for the accuracy
and completeness of information pro-
vided on their application and supporting
documents. Applicants who either submit
22 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
applications with false information or fail
to provide sufficient relevant information
will be denied admission. If information is
discovered to be false after admission, the
student may be terminated from the pro-
gram or course (see 4.5.2).
sponsored applicants
Some employers and agencies assume
responsibility for the cost of training under
a variety of arrangements. In such cases the
applicant shall arrange to have a letter of
sponsorship sent by the agency/employer
to the Registrar’s Offce outlining the extent
of financial support for fees, books, sup-
plies, etc.
international student
(student-visa applicants)
The admission of international applicants is
subject to quota limitations of the program
and the number of acceptable applications
received. A proportion of the quota for most
programs is set-aside for international ap-
plicants until May 15 of each year and for
intake to the next academic year. Unfilled
international quota is flled from Canadian
applicants after that time. International
applicants who are accepted into NAIT pro-
grams and who require student visas will be
provided with a letter of acceptance.
International applicants shall submit
official documents to the International
Qualification Assessment Service (IQAS)
to determine academic admissibility. They
will also be requested to provide proof of
proficiency in English in accordance with
these Regulations and Procedures.
continuinG students
Students who have successfully completed
all of the first year courses in a two year
NAIT program need not formally apply for
admission into year two of the program.
Registration dates and times will be posted
on the NAIT website. Please refer to NAIT’s
website (www.nait.ab.ca) for current data.
Students who do not successfully complete
year one of a two-year program must meet
with the Program Leader to determine the
conditions of continuing status and/or may
be required to withdraw.
ForMer students
Some students may find it necessary to
discontinue their studies for personal, fi-
nancial, medical or academic reasons. Such
individuals may seek readmission at a later
date, subject to space availability.
Students terminated by the Institute for
breaches of academic regulations through
misconduct may reapply for admission as
specified in the condition of termination
and with permission of the Registrar, in
consultation with the Dean, and subject to
space availability.
For readmission, the student shall submit a
new application form with the appropriate
application fee. The Registrar may request
that the applicant be interviewed by the
Program Leader, as changes in curriculum or
technology may have occurred since the ap-
plicant last attended. Generally, graduation
requirements are published in the current
NAIT full time programs calendar.
The readmitted student must complete the
program requirements as detailed by the
Program Leader.
applyinG to continuinG
education/part-tiMe proGraMs
and courses
Application for most Continuing Education
programs and courses may be made by
visiting our website at www.nait.ab.ca, tele-
phone, fax, by postal mail, electronic mail or
in person through the Registrar’s Offce.
applyinG to apprenticeship
proGraMs
Apprenticeship training is a combination
of on-the-job and technical training lead-
ing to certification as a Journeyman. The
Apprenticeship and Trade Certification
Division direct this training.
The applicant must first find suitable
employment with a Journeyman in the
student’s chosen trade or with a company,
which employs a Journeyman in that trade.
Once hired, the employee should discuss
apprenticeship training with the employer,
obtain appropriate approvals, and enter
into a contract. This contract is then regis-
tered with the Apprenticeship and Industry
Training Branch, which will issue an identif-
cation card, a course outline booklet, and an
apprenticeship record book.
The apprentices will receive a card from
Alberta Learning during the month of May.
The card will outline all training opportuni-
ties available for the trade for the academic
year commencing July 1 of that year and
ending June 30 of the next year. The card
will be accompanied by an information
package from NAIT that outlines the pro-
cedures for application and admission to
the appropriate apprenticeship program at
NAIT.
The apprentice must contact NAIT to apply
for an intake. Full tuition fees are due and
payable at the time of application.
The apprentice will attend NAIT on the
registration date specifed on the card or as
may be modifed by NAIT in writing. Failure
to register will lead to cancellation of the
admission.
selection for Admission
proGraM/course Quotas
All programs/courses at NAIT are subject to
quota limitations based on an assessment
of employment opportunities and available
NAIT resources.
selection criteria
NAIT reserves the right to determine
criteria for selection in all of its programs/
courses.
Student sel ecti on i n oversubscri bed
programs may be based on academic
achievement beyond the prerequisites
identified in the calendar, written career
investigation, personal interview, relevant
work experience, and demonstrated com-
mitment to the career field. In the case
of applicants who have relevant post-
secondary education, selection will be
based on high school grades or relevant
post-secondary grades, whichever are
higher, subject to maintaining appropriate
accessibility to both high school graduates
and those with post-secondary experience.
Selection criteria used in the previous
academic year are available on the current
application form, the website or by contact-
ing the Registrar’s offce.
Operationally, selection will normally focus
on achievement at the prerequisite level or
relevant post-secondary level.
NAIT may use interviews for student selec-
tion in certain circumstances. Applicants
may be interviewed to obtain additional
information or to clarify/verify some aspect
of the application. Such circumstances are
to be reviewed and approved by the Dean.
proGraMs With external
selection MechanisMs
Selection committees established by the
cooperating hospitals conduct selection
of applicants to a number of medical and
health science programs. Applications to
these programs shall be submitted to NAIT.
The Registrar’s Offce checks prerequisites
and determine applications that are ac-
ceptable to be forwarded to the external
selection committee.
Admission to nAit
progrAms And AppeAls
of Admission stAtus
adMission to institute proGraMs
The authority to accept applications and
admit students to NAIT programs in compli-
ance with these Regulations and Procedures
rests with the Registrar. The Registrar may
delegate acceptance decisions to staff in
the Registrar’s Offce.
23 www.nait.ca
Qualified applicants will be admitted to
NAIT programs subject to quotas, resource
limitations, and selection mechanisms.
Program leaders and other NAIT Officers
may recommend exceptions based on
extraordinary considerations and qualifca-
tions of the applicant that are equivalent
to current prerequisites but have been
achieved through some other process.
The Registrar reserves the right to refuse
potential applicants on the basis that, in his
opinion, the applicant poses a threat to the
health, safety or well being of the student
body, faculty or administration.
Some programs, especially but not limited
to health sciences, require a satisfactory
criminal record check as a condition of
acceptance to NAIT or admission to work
experience.
appeal oF adMission status
Any applicant who believes that his/her
application for admission may have been
unfairly considered has recourse through
the following appeal procedure:
The applicant will outline his/her appeal
in writing to the Registrar on an “Appeal
of Admission Status” form (or by written
letter), within ten (10) business days of
receipt of a Notice of Denial of Admission.
The Registrar’s Office shall then refer the
request to the appropriate Dean. The Dean
will convene a committee of at least three
members (including the Dean) and make
such inquiries and review as considered
necessary and inform the Registrar’s Offce
of the decision within ten (10) business
days of receipt of the student request. The
Registrar will communicate the outcome of
this review to the applicant within ten (10)
business days of receipt of the Dean’s deci-
sion. The Appeal of Admission Status form is
available on NAIT’s website or by contacting
the Registrar’s Offce. There is a fee of ffty
dollars ($50) for appeal of admission and
this fee must be included with the appeal
form or letter. This fee is for re-appraisal of
the application and is non-refundable.
The Decision of the Dean will be fnal and
binding; and the applicant shall have no
further right of appeal.
Appeal of admission status because of
alleged false records or misrepresentation
is not subject to the procedure as outlined
above. In this case, the applicant may appeal
in writing to the Vice President, Academic
and Student Services, whose decision will
be fnal and binding.
reGistration
Each accepted applicant to a full-time or
an apprenticeship program is required to
report for registration on the date and at the
time and location indicated on the notice
of acceptance. Each accepted Continuing
Education/part-time student is expected to
report to the frst scheduled class.
Failure to report for registration, in the case
of full time or apprenticeship students, or to
attend the frst scheduled class, in the case
of all students, will result in the cancella-
tion of admission unless prior permission
has been sought and agreed to by the
Registrar’s Offce. Permission will normally
be in writing.
PROGRAm
imPLementAtiOn
AdvAnce credit And
trAnsfer credit
Advance Credit may be granted in a course
or courses and/or a program or programs
on the basis of formal and informal learning
experiences including one or more of the
following:
Work experience; •
Maturity/life experience; •
Unstructured educational experiences •
such as self-study, and/or
Structured educational activity. •
Upon receipt of sufficient documentary
evidence provided by the student confrm-
ing previous relevant training or life/work
experience, the Program Leader may grant
advance credit towards program require-
ments. The Program Leader shall advise the
student with notifcation forwarded to the
Registrar’s Offce. A student who is denied
advance credit shall be informed of the
reason(s) for the denial.
The Program Leader, after review of items
noted above, may require a student to chal-
lenge an appropriate examination in order
to assign course credit.
Transfer credit is advance credit that may
be awarded on the basis of structured
educational activities at a post-secondary
institution and may result because of a
transfer agreement between NAIT and
another post secondary institute.
Although an individual may qualify for ad-
vance credit and may complete the process
for receiving advance credit, NAIT will only
recognize advance credit upon successful
completion of one or more terms of study at
NAIT by the individual.
A student who qualifes for advance credit
or transfer credit should discuss the impli-
cations of accepting such credit with the
Program Leader since it may infuence eligi-
bility for student fnance, semester honors,
Dean’s Honor Roll, an honors diploma/
certifcate or awards.
Students given advance credit and/or
transfer credits or admitted under transfer
agreements shall be granted the same
rights and privileges as other students.
NAIT students must successfully complete
at least ffty per cent (50%) of their applied
education from NAIT, to be determined by
the number of credits earned as a ratio of
total credits required for completion. See
Section 5.4.4 Residence Requirements and
Time Limits for Program Completion.
credit for
pArticipAtion in
student AffAirs
NAIT encourages students to participate in
the NAIT Students’ Association (NAITSA)
and student club affairs; as such participa-
tion contributes directly and indirectly to
personal development and preparation for
the business world and industry.
The Program Leader may grant appropriate
course credit where a student can dem-
onstrate that these activities will provide
a learning experience consistent with a
designated subject within the program.
Such credit granted shall be communicated
to the student in writing and shall be en-
tered on the student administration system
by the Program Leader.
trAnsferring between
progrAms
transFers involvinG Full-tiMe
proGraMs
A student may be granted transfer to
another program/course after initial regis-
tration, provided:
The student meets the prerequisites •
of the program/course into which the
student wishes to transfer;
A place is available in the receiving •
program/course; and
In the case of a full-time program, the •
Program Leaders of both programs and
the Registrar approve the transfer.
A student who is accepted into one pro-
gram and requests transfer to another
oversubscribed program may be denied the
transfer if a position becomes available and
another fully qualifed applicant, who was
previously denied entry into the receiving
oversubscribed program, now wishes to
enter.
transFers involvinG continuinG
education proGraMs and
courses
Requests for transfers between Continuing
Education courses must be made prior to
the second scheduled class or, in the case
24 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
of short courses/seminars, prior to class
commencement. Additional fees may be
assessed or refunds made if there are fee
differentials. Only one such transfer is per-
mitted per course registration.
transFers FroM a continuinG
education proGraM to a Full-tiMe
proGraM
Many of the courses offered through
Continuing Education are equivalent to
NAIT’s full-time courses. A student wishing
to transfer to full-time student status should
discuss the process with the appropriate
Program Leader of the respective full-time
program.
Several diploma programs can be com-
pleted in their entirety through Continuing
Education. The appropriate Program Leader
will review the student’s record to deter-
mine eligibility for graduation and so inform
the Registrar’s Offce.
withdrAwing from
progrAms
WithdraWal FroM Full-tiMe
proGraMs
When a student finds it necessary to
withdraw from a program, his/her Program
Leader shal l compl ete a Cl earance
Withdrawal Form and have the student
present the original form to the Registrar’
Office together with the student’s NAIT
identifcation card.
The Registrar’s Offce shall amend the stu-
dent’s record. The Registrar’s Office shall
determine any tuition refund that might be
owing to the student.
Failure to clear
The Program Leader will, by letter or note,
contact any student who has been absent
from classes without notifcation for at least
fve consecutive days of classes. The letter
or note will state that the student must con-
tact program staff and will be copied to the
Registrar’s Offce. If no response is received
within a reasonable period (normally ten
business days), program staff will contact
the Registrar’s Office, who will complete
a Clearance Withdrawal Form. The date
of withdrawal is recorded on the student
record and the student will not be entitled
to a tuition refund.
WithdraWal FroM continuinG
education courses/proGraMs
The student must make requests for with-
drawal, in writing, to the Registrar’s Offce.
Any fee refund will be calculated using
NAIT’s current Continuing Education fee
refund policy (see www.nait.ab.ca). The
student will be awarded a grade of W or
WF.
notice oF student WithdraWal to
external aGencies
When a student has withdrawn, the Registrar
‘s Offce will, where applicable, notify the ap-
propriate sponsoring and fnancing agencies.
These may include but are not limited to the
Student Finance Board, Employment and
Immigration Canada and sponsors.
student BeHAViOR,
ResPOnsiBiLities
And RiGHts
student behAvior And
responsibilities
The instructional process and climate at
NAIT are intended to prepare students for
roles that they will eventually fill in busi-
ness and industry. Students are, therefore,
expected to conduct themselves in a re-
sponsible manner.
While students are on work experience,
they are expected to behave according to
that agency’s policies and procedures in ad-
dition to the NAIT Academic Regulations.
NAIT is committed to providing a healthy
and safe environment to ensure and promote
the well being of students and staff. Should
a student exhibit medical or psychological
symptoms contravening this philosophy,
medical proof of fitness to remain in an
educational environment may be required.
The Program Leader, in consultation with
Counseling and Health Services, may recom-
mend to the Dean that it is in the best
interests of the student to obtain such proof
in order to maintain and continue his/her
student status. The Dean shall make the
decision within 10 business days, copy the
Registrar and notify the student in writing.
AcAdemic integrity
Students and staff share the responsibility
for the academic standards and reputation
of NAIT. Academic integrity is the basis for
the growth and acquisition of knowledge
and skills. Failure to maintain standards of
academic integrity is harmful to the values
of NAIT and discouraging to the majority
of students who pursue their studies with
integrity.
While NAIT endeavors to inform students
of special criteria of academic integrity
pertinent to the class or course, failure to
provide such special information does not
in any way exempt a student from penalties
imposed by or on behalf of NAIT.
The following examples, though not exhaus-
tive, represent activities that constitute a
breach of academic integrity:
Cheating which includes but is not •
limited to any form of fraud, deceit,
omission or misrepresentation of
information including, but not limited
to, the use or attempted use of
unauthorized material in examinations,
representing oneself as another in an
examination, classroom or lab related
activity, or being represented by
another;
Plagiarism, which includes but is not •
limited to taking the work of another
person and passing it off as one’s own
work. Consequently, no student shall
submit the words, ideas, images or data
of another person as the student’s own
in any academic writing, essay, project,
laboratory or assignment in a course or
program;
Falsifcation or misrepresentation of •
documents or credentials which are
subject to academic evaluation;
Using or attempting to use other •
student’s answers or providing answers
to other students on any document,
whether written or electronic, which is
subject to academic evaluation.
student code of
conduct
NAIT is committed to provide an educa-
tional environment that supports respect
and safety within its community. The
student code of conduct outlines the
responsibility of students to support the
academic community, defnes inappropriate
student conduct and provides procedures
and penalties if students engage in such
unacceptable behavior.
Fighting is not tolerated on NAIT property or
practicum sites. All parties will immediately
be suspended and are subject to expulsion
at the prerogative of the President.
The following are examples but are not an
exhaustive list of activities constituting
student misconduct:
Threatening to subject or subjecting •
any student or staff member to
physical or mental harassment,
indignity, defamation, injury, or
violence;
Disturbing, disrupting, or otherwise •
interfering with studies, laboratories,
lectures, work, or other activities of
fellow students or staff;
Unauthorized access to or misuse of •
computers or computer networks,
photocopiers, tape recorders and/
or unauthorized taping of lectures,
classroom or meeting discussions,
copying of computer software or data
fles, and course packs for any purpose;
25 www.nait.ca
Use of materials to which the student •
holds no rights, such as pirated
software and illegal photocopies of
textbooks or course materials;
Intentionally defacing, damaging, •
destroying, or moving without
authority or permitting to be defaced,
damaged, destroyed, or moved without
authority the property of NAIT, the
NAIT Students’ Association, or of any
student or staff member;
Unauthorized use of Institute property •
or entry to such property in an
unauthorized manner;
Participation in unauthorized and/or •
hazardous and/or illegal activities on
NAIT premises;
Failure to obey the lawful instructions •
of any NAIT offcial or employee acting
in the performance of his/her duty,
and failure to obey all published or
posted procedures relating to the use
of and entry to Institute buildings and
facilities;
Forgery, misuse, theft or alteration of •
any NAIT document or record in paper
or electronic form;
Failure to obtain approval, permission, •
or otherwise follow Institute policies,
guidelines, and procedures;
Libelous or indecent statements, •
unfounded allegations, or statements
harmful to personal dignity;
Failure to maintain proper dress •
code for the course or program and
neglecting safety procedures/practices
or intentionally creating safety hazards;
Harassment of any kind; •
Illegal activities of any kind; •
For-proft activities not sanctioned by •
NAIT; and
Conduct in contravention of NAIT •
Guidelines for Internet Use and Security
Standards, as amended, replaced or
updated from time to time. Guidelines
are available online at www.nait.ab.ca.
student
responsibilities
And rights
The fol l owi ng l i st outl i nes student
responsibilities:
Students are responsible for their •
conduct as it affects the Institute
community;
Students are responsible to inform •
themselves of course and program
requirements and the availability of staff;
Students are responsible to inform •
themselves of procedures respecting
class rescheduling or replacement;
Students are responsible to attend •
classes regularly and to maintain
satisfactory achievement in their
course/program;
Students share responsibility for •
maintaining communication with
instructional staff;
Students shall conduct themselves in •
a manner that refects a positive image
of NAIT when representing NAIT in
offcial and co-curricular activities;
Students are responsible to provide •
written consent for NAIT to release
or receive personal information for its
operating and program activities and as
required by legislation;
Students are responsible to observe all •
health and safety procedures outlined
for classrooms, laboratories, feld trips
and work practicum’s;
Students are responsible to comply •
with conditions under which resource
material (e.g., a programmable
calculator) may be brought into an
examination or use of a tape recorder
in lectures and meetings; and
Students are responsible for producing •
photo identifcation upon demand by
any NAIT staff during an examination
or at any time while on NAIT premises.
Personal electronic devices are not •
allowed in examinations unless
expressly permitted by the instructor.
The following list outlines general student
rights:
Students shall have the right to lawful •
assembly;
Students shall have the right to a •
healthy and safe educational climate;
Students shall have the right to •
freedom of expression and opinion,
subject to limitations outlined in these
Regulations and Procedures and shall
have the right to make representation
to any advisory or decision making
body, subject to NAIT procedures;
Students shall have the right to •
confdentiality in their dealings with
NAIT and shall have access to their
personal records and information in
compliance with Alberta’s Freedom of
Information and Protection of Privacy
Act;
Students shall have the right to •
organize into a students association.
Any affliation of an association with
inter-institutional organizations shall
not deprive student associations of
recognition by NAIT authorities;
Students shall have the right to an •
autonomous student press, subject
only to normal legal and administrative
constraints as developed by NAIT
Administration. The students
association shall be legally and morally
responsible for information printed by
it in the student press;
Students shall have the right to •
receive information descriptive of the
educational services to be provided.
The student shall be advised, prior to
registration, of the expenses likely to
be incurred at NAIT and the services to
be provided by NAIT. The student shall
be advised, at the commencement of
each academic term/semester, of the
availability of staff and services to be
provided during that term/semester;
and
Students shall have access to •
statements of NAIT policies, guidelines
and procedures that have an impact
upon them.
The following list outlines student academic
rights:
Students shall have the right to •
be informed of the content and
requirements of their instructional
courses and programs, including
course content, methods of student
evaluation, attendance, punctuality
requirements, and schedule of
assignments and tests (including
assigned mark weighting);
Students shall have the right to •
obtain their completed and graded
assignments and examinations (except
where advised in advance of departures
from this practice);
Students shall receive grade •
statements and certifcation within the
time frame, under the conditions, and
in the forms established by NAIT;
Students shall have the right to change •
course registration or to transfer
programs within conditions established
by NAIT;
Students shall have the right to be •
advised of methods by which course/
program failures and defciencies can
be cleared and shall be informed of
examination challenge opportunities,
where appropriate and if available; and
Students shall have the right to be •
advised of redress and grievance
procedures available to them.
student discipline -
AcAdemic dishonesty
or student misconduct
Academic integrity is important to both the
staff and students of the Institute. Students
have a responsibility to exhibit academic in-
tegrity in their own endeavors and to refrain
26 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
from actively assisting other students who
are dishonest.
acadeMic dishonesty in course
Work
When a course instructor or supervisor
believes that a student in one of his/her
courses has been academically dishonest,
the course instructor may take one or more
of the following actions:
Require the student to re-do the work; •
Assign a zero on the exam, assignment •
or lab;
Impose a failing mark for the work; •
For second or subsequent offences •
– assign a zero on the course OR
recommend termination from the
program.
When an instructor or supervisor suspects
an offense in an examination setting the
student shall:
Be advised of the circumstances •
and the unauthorized material shall
be removed together with the work
completed to that point; and
Be provided with another examination •
to be completed.
Following completion of the examination,
the instructor or supervisor shall record the
academic dishonesty in writing and report
the transgression to the Program Leader.
The Program Leader, in consultation with
the instructor, will determine the penalty
and inform the student.
False records or
Misrepresentation oF inForMation
When the Registrar has reasonable grounds
to believe that any document has been
falsified or a misrepresentation made that
may create an incorrect perception of an
applicant’s academic credentials used for ap-
plication, the Registrar will refuse admission
to NAIT and within thirty (30) business days
of identifying the falsifcation, outline in writ-
ing to the applicant the reason for the refusal.
If falsifed documentation or misrepresenta-
tion is not discovered until after admission, it
will be reported to the Registrar who will de-
termine the penalty and inform the student.
student Misconduct
Incidents of student misconduct that are
not resolved informally shall be reported to
the Program Leader. The Program Leader
will investigate the circumstances of the
incident and meet with the student and take
one or more of the following actions:
Seek an informal resolution; •
Issue disciplinary action; •
Assess and recover costs of repair •
to damage caused by the student, if
applicable.
penalties For student
Misconduct
Penalties imposed by NAIT for student
misconduct may include one or more of
the following: A warning, removal of tape
recorders or calculators, written reprimand,
exclusion from access to specified NAIT
services and premises, financial hold on
student accounts and files, restitution or
other corrective measures, suspension or
expulsion from NAIT.
In the case of apprentices penalties will be
imposed in consultation with the Executive
Director, Apprentice and Trade Certifcation
Division.
Criminal behavior prior to registration
or outside the environs of NAIT and not
involving any student or employee at NAIT
will normally be treated as the responsibility
of the civil authorities.
NAIT reserves the right to take action where,
in the view of the Vice President, Academic
and Student Services, the conduct of the stu-
dent is prejudicial to the safety of the NAIT
community and its operations or reputation
or so prejudicial to the student’s progress that
it constitutes unacceptable student conduct.
This includes any instance of alleged criminal
or disruptive behavior on NAIT campuses or
practicum sites. In such event, the student
may be subject to reprimand, suspension, or
termination/expulsion.
authority levels For iMposinG
penalties
Decisions regarding violations and subse-
quent penalties for academic dishonesty
or student misconduct will be made at the
following levels:
The instructor for reassessment or re-do
of the work; mark penalties or failure on a
particular assignment; written reprimand,
removal of unauthorized equipment (e.g.,
tape recorder, calculator);
The Program Leader or designate, in consul-
tation with the Dean, for failure of a course;
forfeiture of financial awards or financial
assistance, student misconduct;
The Dean, for restitution in the case of
property damage; suspension from a course
or program; misrepresentation of academic
credentials;
The Dean, in consultation with the Vice
President, Academic and Student Services
for denial of admission or readmission;
termination or expulsion from NAIT. The
Executive Director, Apprentice and Trade
Certification Division shall be consulted
in advance in the case of suspension, ter-
mination or expulsion of apprenticeship
students.
Penalties imposed by NAIT for breaches
of academic integrity standards or student
misconduct may include one or more of
the following: a warning, a written repri-
mand, failure on a particular assignment,
failure in a course, denial of admission or
readmission to NAIT, forfeiture of awards
or financial assistance, suspension, ter-
mination of registration in a program of
studies or expulsion from NAIT. At the time
of termination or expulsion, the conditions
or circumstances under which the student
may apply to NAIT in the future as well as
the appeal process will be outlined.
A student whose registration in a program
of studies is terminated will normally be
allowed to apply for and register in other
courses or programs of studies at NAIT,
subject to any special conditions imposed
at the time of termination.
A student who is expelled from NAIT is not
allowed to apply for and register in other
courses or programs of studies at NAIT
Determination of Penalties
In deciding on the appropriate sanction to
be imposed for an act of academic dishon-
esty or student misconduct, consideration
may be given to the following factors:
Extent of the dishonesty or misconduct; •
Deliberate nature of the dishonesty; •
Importance of the work in question as a •
component of the course or program,
Whether the act in question was an •
isolated incident or part of repetitive
acts of academic dishonesty or student
misconduct; and
Any other mitigating or aggravating •
circumstances.
notice to students and
appeal process For acadeMic
dishonesty and student
Misconduct
In all cases of academic dishonesty or
student misconduct, the student will be
informed in writing of any penalty within
ten (10) business days of the date of the
offense or the date that NAIT offcials be-
come aware of the offense. All reports will
form part of the official record of the stu-
dent. Further, in the event of further reports
of academic dishonesty or misconduct, any
reports on fle may be used in determining a
penalty for a subsequent offence.
The letter to the student imposing the pen-
alty shall include a statement on the rights
of appeal and timelines.
The Registrar’s Offce is the custodian of the
offcial student fle containing documenta-
tion relating to academic dishonesty or
student misconduct.
27 www.nait.ca
Any information and records relating to an
appeal will be handled by NAIT in compli-
ance with Alberta’s Freedom of Information
and Protection of Privacy Act.
The student may appeal the charges and/or
the penalty imposed. There are two appeals
possible. 4.5.6.1 is an appeal of the fndings
and penalty but does not include appeal
of program termination or expulsion for
reasons of academic dishonesty or student
misconduct. 4.5.6.2 is a specific appeal
process for program termination or expul-
sion from NAIT for reasons of academic
dishonesty or student misconduct.
acadeMic dishonesty and
Misconduct appeals
If the student wishes to appeal, the student
may present the case in writing to the Dean
as a formal appeal within ten (10) business
days of the date of notifcation of the pen-
alty imposed.
The Dean shall conduct such a review
of the appeal as considered appropriate
under the circumstances. The Dean shall
communicate the outcome of the review
to the student in writing within twenty one
(21) business days of receipt of the written
appeal with a copy of the decision to the
Registrar’s Offce.
appeal oF proGraM suspension
or expulsion FroM nait
A student who is suspended or expelled
for reasons of academic dishonesty or
misconduct may appeal the suspension or
expulsion in writing and to the attention of
the Vice President, Academic and Student
Services (VPA) within 10 business days of
receiving the letter of suspension or expul-
sion. Upon receipt of the letter of appeal, the
VPA will convene an Appeal Committee.
This Committee will include a member of
the NAITSA executive (or their designate),
a student from another program, one Dean
or designate and an instructor from another
school. The Dean or designate to be chosen
by the VPA based on the specifc details of
the suspension or expulsion. In the event
that the named positions cannot participate
on this Committee, the VPA may designate
substitutes.
It is understood that the student may bring
one person to support his/her appeal. The
student will present information to the
Committee that addresses the appeal. In
turn, the Dean who sent the suspension or
expulsion letter will also present his/her case
to the Committee. The Appeal Committee
will either uphold the decision of the Dean or
recommend to the VPA an alternate action
to the suspension or expulsion.
The Committee recommendation will be
given to the Vice President, Academic and
Student Services for confrmation and fnal
decision. The decision will be given or sent,
in writing to the appealing student, within
twenty one (21) business days of the receipt
of the appeal. A copy of the results of the
appeal will be sent to the Registrar’s Offce
for the student fle.
The deci si on of the Vi ce Presi dent,
Academic and Student Services is fnal.
AttendAnce
Instruction at NAIT is intensive and involves
training in specifc skills and techniques that
the graduate will need in business and indus-
try. The student’s success will be enhanced
by regular attendance. Each program pre-
scribes specifc attendance requirements.
Students receiving training allowances or
other forms of financial assistance are ex-
pected to be aware of and comply with the
conditions of their sponsorship, which gener-
ally require regular attendance. The student
is responsible for providing attendance re-
quirements directly to the sponsoring agency
to ensure continued fnancial assistance.
Attendance is mandatory for apprentices. A
cumulative total of three days of unauthor-
ized absences may result in termination of
training and training allowances.
clAss interruption
NAIT shall make reasonable efforts to
ensure that its classes and courses proceed
on a regular basis and without interruption.
Program Leaders or designates reserve the
right to cancel or change the timetable for
their classes and will take reasonable steps
to provide notice of any cancellation or
change. NAIT will not be responsible for any
cancellation or change nor be responsible
for the interruption or termination of any
class or course that occurs despite NAIT’s
efforts, or for failure to give notice of the
interruption or termination.
dress
Students are expected to conform to dress
and safety standards consistent with those
of the career field for health, safety, and
sanitary reasons. NAIT reserves the right to
establish codes of safety and health dress
standards in addition to government/ pro-
fessional standards.
cAmpus sport And
wellness
Campus Sport and Wellness is an important
part of NAIT’s training objectives as they
relate to the development of the student’s
immediate as well as life-long physical
and emotional well-being. NAIT is able to
serve a wide range of interests in recreation,
sports, and athletics.
Participation by all students in a suitable
program of physical and leisure activities is
strongly encouraged. Although participa-
tion is not an Institute-wide requirement,
it may be a requirement in some programs
to develop the physical ftness required in
some vocations or to develop teamwork.
The Dean, on the recommendation of the
Program Leader, may:
Prescribe recreation and sport activities
as a program requirement in a specified
program, in which event it shall be regarded
equally important to other program compo-
nents in that:
The activity shall be a requirement for pro-
gram completion; and
It shall appear on the student transcript.
OR
Choose to make recreation and sport activi-
ties optional, in which case:
Students can avail themselves of the op-
portunity for participation in recreation and
sport activity programs during lunch breaks
and/or other open time slots.
Recreation and sport activity programs
shall be included in program descriptions if
required for program completion.
pArticipAtion in
intercollegiAte
Athletics
Students are encouraged to participate in
intramural and intercollegiate athletics, as
these greatly contribute to their personal
development. However, students must
balance their extra-curricular activities with
their academic activities.
Any student who, in the opinion of the
Program Leader, is experiencing academic
difficulties, may be denied permission to
participate in intramural and intercollegiate
athletic activities until such time as the stu-
dent regains a satisfactory standing.
field trips
Field trips contribute to relevant business
and industrial experience. Such trips shall
therefore be regarded as planned integral
elements of the program, providing ex-
periences unobtainable in the classroom,
laboratory, or workshop.
Students are advised of such field trips in
advance and are responsible to ensure that
they are in possession of valid medical and
hospital insurance coverage prior to going
on feld trips.
Students shall be required to sign a release
and waiver form in accordance with NAIT
practice.
28 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
AcAdemic evAluAtion
Student grades are determined by academic
achievement throughout the instructional
term. Consideration is given to all facets of
the learning process, such as but not limited
to examinations, assignments, laboratory
work, shop work, reports, projects, field
trips, and classroom participation.
A student may be refused permission to write
a fnal examination in a program/course on
the recommendation of the instructor, in con-
sultation with the respective Program Leader
or Dean, in the following circumstances:
The student has failed to complete a
substantial portion of his/her written
fundamental assignments, or has attended
insuffciently in a program/course in which
class participation is a necessity; and/or
The student has not participated in a suf-
fcient amount of the practical or laboratory
work in a program/course in which partici-
pation is necessary.
The Program Leader in consultation with the
course instructor may raise student grades
at the end of a term or year.
The disposition of marks, assignments and
examinations will be as follows:
Marks will be posted in an area •
identifed by the instructor, in random
order by student identifcation number;
Graded assignments and examinations •
shall generally be returned to students
as promptly as possible;
Departures from this practice shall be •
noted, in advance, to the students;
In those instances where assignments •
and examinations are not to be
returned and where the class has been
so advised, the student shall have the
opportunity to review graded work with
the instructor within 40 business days
(seven (7) business days in the case
of apprenticeship programs) of writing
the examination or submitting the
assignment, and
In those instances where assignments •
and examinations are returned to and
retained by the student, the right to
appeal as outlined in these Regulations
and Procedures is forfeited.
The Program Leader or designate shall
ensure that students are informed at the
beginning of the instructional term of the
evaluation practices which will be applied
in each course/program. This information
will include the grading system to be used,
the distribution of marks, the methods by
which course/program deficiencies may
be cleared and the criteria for academic
honours and awards. Students will also be
advised of grievance/appeal procedures.
GRAdinG sYstems
Student achievement will be evaluated and
recorded using one of the systems outlined
below. A program will use the system most
compatible with the curriculum.
Valid codes will include the following:
All students withdrawing from a •
course within the frst two (2) weeks
shall have all reference to the course
removed from records;
All students withdrawing from a course •
between the beginning of week three
(3) and the end of week twelve (12) will
receive a “W”;
Students offcially withdrawing after •
the “W” period but before the fnal
examination shall receive a “WF except
in the case of a documented reason for
withdrawal that is acceptable to the
Program Leader, in which case a “W”
may be assigned;
Students who write the fnal •
examination shall receive the grade for
the course, accompanied by an “F” if
the course is failed;
“W” and “WF” shall not be used in •
calculation of the student’s average;
“CR” indicates course credit awarded •
in accordance with advance credit and
transfer credit policies;
“AU” indicates a student is auditing a •
course. No credit is given; and
The incomplete code (“IN”) may be used
at the discretion of the Program Leader or
designate to grant the student a limited
time extension to complete specifed course
work.
alpha GradinG systeM
Courses with a pass mark of D (50 per cent
on the percentage system) will use the fol-
lowing scale.
Percentage Letter Grade Point
90-100 A+ 4.0
85-89 A 4.0
80-84 A- 3.7
77-79 B+ 3.3
73-76 B 3.0
70-72 B- 2.7
67-69 C+ 2.3
63-66 C 2.0
60-62 C- 1.7
55-59 D+ 1.3
50-54 D 1.0
0-49 F 0.0
course With a pass Mark hiGher
than 50 per cent
Courses with a pass mark higher than 50%
will follow the above grading guide but the
meaning of the letter grade and grade point
will change. For example, if 85% is the pass
mark and the student has a mark of 83%,
then they would receive an A- in the Letter
Grade and 0 for credits attained.
The Alpha Grading System is implemented
effective July 1, 2004. For the first year,
transcripts will have two marks (actual per-
centage achieved and letter grade) as well
as the credits and hours for each course. A
GPA for the term will be included to indi-
cate the weighted grade point average per
semester.
The percentage grade along with hours will
be used for calculating Dean’s Honor Roll,
Awards and Scholarships and marks for
posting.
The percentage column for grades will be
phased out after the 2004/05 academic
year.
alphaBetic systeM
Each grade will be coded honours (“H”),
pass (“P”) or incomplete (“IN”).
This system of evaluation is applicable to
those programs that have developed and
implemented a unitized competency-based
curriculum.
Adoption and implementation of this
system by a program will require the ap-
proval of the Dean and the Vice-President,
Academic and Student Services. The
Program Leader shall identify, in advance,
the competency standards required to ob-
tain each grade.
The alphabetic grading system shall use the
following criteria:
Honours (“H”) to indicate superior •
achievement;
Pass (“P”) to indicate fully satisfactory •
performance;
Incomplete (“IN”) to indicate that •
the student has not met competency
standards or withdrew from the course
after completing half or more of the
course hours.
cleArAnce of course
deficiencies
It is the responsibility of the Program
Leader, in consultation with the appropriate
Dean, to prescribe the manner by which a
student who has not fulfilled all program
requirements shall rectify deficiencies in
course work.
Methods available to clear deficiencies
include the challenging of examinations
(when available), the completion of ad-
ditional assignments, continuing education
courses, equivalent courses, and special
arrangements of a less formal nature. It is
the responsibility of the Program Leader to
29 www.nait.ca
determine the most appropriate method
by which defciencies can be cleared. The
Program Leader shall outline the decision in
writing to the student.
Every deficiency that has been cleared
shall be reported in a timely manner by the
Program Leader to the Registrar’s Offce on
a Mark Correction Form to aid in the pro-
duction of transcripts.
fAilure to mAintAin
sAtisfActory AcAdemic
stAnding
Students are expected to maintain satisfac-
tory performance and achievement levels
in all elements of their program including
classroom, laboratory/shop, work experi-
ence practicums, feld trips, assignments,
tests, and examinations. The Program
Leader shall determine and communicate
to the students the criteria for satisfactory
performance.
actions FolloWinG
unsatisFactory standinG
The weighted average is the primary
determinant of a student’s academic
standing. Students whose weighted aver-
age is less than 50% (or other approved
minimum standard) in programs based on
the Numeric System or the applicable pre-
defned standard in programs based on the
Alphabetic system may at the discretion of
the Program Leader be subject to a range of
outcomes such as:
Termination from one or more courses; •
Assignment of probationary status •
(i.e., being allowed to continue under
prescribed conditions); and
Termination from the program, in •
consultation with the Dean.
The decision to terminate the student or
place the student into “special student”
status with a reduced course load is based
upon the circumstances of each case. The
following should be considered:
Can the student apparently beneft •
from remaining at NAIT on some
modifed status?
Can the student remain in class(es) •
without disruption to other students
and without placing an extraordinary
fnancial burden on NAIT or time
demands on staff?
Are there extenuating circumstances •
which contributed to unsatisfactory
performance and do these
circumstances continue to prevail?
Is the student fully aware of the •
implications of termination or
continuation as a special student? For
example, the student’s certifcation
may be delayed, or the student may
be prevented from proceeding into
subsequent phases of the program.
At the time of termination the Program
Leader will advise the student in writing
of any special conditions which must be
met for the student to be considered for
readmission.
acadeMic appeal
When a student feels inaccurately assessed
for one course, the student should discuss
the matter directly with the Instructor
involved. If satisfaction is not achieved, the
student may take up the concern with the
Program Leader.
When a student is considering re-evaluation
of the entire term or semester’s work, in a
course or an entire program, the student
will initiate discussion with the Program
Leader.
Failing a satisfactory resolution at the
Program Leader level, the student may ask
the Registrar for a re-evaluation.
For appeal of a single course or the entire
term’s work, a request will be by letter
or completion of the Registrar’s Office
Re-evaluation Request Form and will be
received by the Registrar’s Office within
twenty-one (21) business days of the day of
examination/assignment. A re-evaluation
fee is assessed. The Registrar’s Offce shall
then refer the student request to the ap-
propriate Dean. The Dean may establish a
review committee. Where the Dean does
not consider a review committee necessary
or appropriate, the Dean will make such in-
quiries and review as considered necessary
and inform the Registrar’s Offce of the de-
cision within twenty one (21) business days
of receipt of the student request. If either
the Dean or a review committee struck by
the Dean determines that any re-evaluation
increases marks, the re-evaluation fee shall
be refunded to the student.
When a committee is struck to review
an entire term or semester’s work, it will
include the Program Leader, at least one
instructor not involved in the original
evaluation and one student. The terms of
reference will include:
Review of evaluation methods;
Distribution of marks;
Reassessment of the marks achieved in
each examination, assignment, etc.; and
Derivation of total marks.
The Committee’s recommendations shall
be reviewed by the Dean and forwarded to
the Registrar’s Offce for written presenta-
tion to the Student.
In the case of program termination for aca-
demic reasons, the student may appeal, in
writing, to the Dean. The appeal must be re-
ceived by the Dean’s offce within ten days
of receipt of the program leader’s decision.
The Dean’s decision is fnal on all academic
matters.
readMission
A student who is terminated from a
program due to unsatisfactory academic
standing, continues to remain eligible for
subsequent readmission. Readmission is
subject to space availability and compliance
with the conditions imposed at the time of
termination.
If readmitted, the student is granted credit
for the course content previously passed
provided the previous course content is
substantially similar to the current course
content. The student shall be advised of the
program/diploma requirements that prevail
at the time of readmission.
NAIT programs must be completed within
seven (7) years of the student’s initial start
date from NAIT.
prereQuisites And
co-reQuisites
A prerequisite relationship exists if course
“A” must be completed satisfactorily before
enrolling in course “B”. A co-requisite rela-
tionship exists if course “A” must be taken
concurrently with course “B”.
The Program Leader or designate may waive
prerequisite and co-requisite requirements
if satisfed that the student is able to meet
the demands of a course.
The identifcation of any course or program
as a prerequisite or co-requisite to any other
course or program shall not be construed as
a representation that successful completion
of the prerequisites or co-requisite will as-
sure success in any subsequent related or
unrelated course or program.
Similarly, meeting any or all of the eligibility
or entrance requirements with respect to
any course or program shall not be con-
strued as a representation that the student
will thereby necessarily be successful in
that or any other course or program.
transcripts
The transcript is a complete and unabridged
educational record of a student. It lists
all the studies undertaken to the date of
issuance and whether these studies were
successfully completed. A transcript is an
official cumulative mark statement bear-
ing the NAIT seal and the signature of the
Registrar or designee.
The transcript may be requested by the
student upon completion of a Transcript
30 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Request Form available at the Registrar’s
Offce and payment of the applicable fee.
Students and graduates may obtain copies
of their cumulative mark statement by log-
ging into their NAIT mailbox.
Students should note that most educational
institutions and many employers require
that the transcript be mailed directly to
them by the educational institution. A
transcript released to the student will be
stamped “Released to the Student”.
Students whose files have been desig-
nated as “Financial Hold” as a result of
indebtedness to NAIT will be excluded from
registering in programs/courses. In addition
NAIT may decide not to release official
transcripts of academic records, diplomas
and certifcates. NAIT reserves the right to
retain the services of a collection agency to
settle any outstanding indebtedness by a
student.
certificAtion And
progrAm completion
reQuirements
deFinition oF a Graduate
A graduate is an individual who has suc-
cessfully completed requirements for a
certifcate, diploma or degree as specifed
by the NAIT Board of Governors.
certiFication deFinition
NAIT awards appropriate certification
based on successful completion of program
requirements with no outstanding failures
or incompletes in required courses. The
authority to confer any certification rests
with the President.
Institute certification takes the following
forms:
A Degree is awarded for completion of •
approved and written requirements for
a degree;
A Diploma is awarded for completion •
of a two-year or three-year program or
its equivalent. An Honour’s Diploma
is awarded to recognize superior
performance;
A Certifcate is awarded for completion •
of a program of up to twelve (12)
months’ duration or its equivalent.
An Honour’s Certifcate is awarded to
recognize superior performance;
A Continuing Education Diploma is •
awarded for completion of a cluster of
related courses that is equivalent to
two years of full time study;
A Continuing Education Certifcate is •
awarded for completion of a cluster of
courses offered through the Continuing
Education Division. An Honour’s
Certifcate may be awarded to
recognize superior performance;
An International Education Certifcate •
is awarded to an international student
who has completed a prescribed
program of studies that is different
from the NAIT diploma or certifcate
programs;
A Joint Certifcate is awarded for •
completion of a prescribed program
offered jointly by NAIT and another
organization.
proGraM coMpletion
reQuireMents - special students
A student may enter/re-enter training
with appropriate credit without having to
repeat subject matter in which the student
is competent, providing that in the process
the integrity of NAIT’s programs and cer-
tification is fully protected and sufficient
resources are available.
residence reQuireMents and tiMe
liMits For proGraM coMpletion
All courses listed on the NAIT website may
not be offered each term.
NAIT recognizes the validity of both •
formal and experiential applied
education which students may have
taken prior to attending programs at
NAIT. However, to ensure academic
integrity, NAIT students must
successfully complete at least ffty per
cent (50%) of their applied education
from NAIT, to be determined by the
number of credits earned as a ratio of
total credits required for completion;
NAIT programs must be completed •
within seven (7) years of the student’s
initial start date from NAIT.
multiple certificAtes/
diplomAs/degrees
A student holding a NAIT Certificate,
Diploma or Degree in one program may, by
receiving advanced credit and/or complet-
ing additionally prescribed courses, become
eligible for a second Certifcate, Diploma or
Degree in less than the time normally pre-
scribed for such completion.
A student contemplating such a course of
action shall, at the earliest opportunity, con-
sult with the Program Leader or designate
of the program in which the student would
like to enroll.
The Program Leader or designate shall
determine from the documentation the ap-
propriate advance credit and forward to the
Registrar a detailed statement of advance
credit and program completion require-
ments along with a completed application
form.
certificAtion After
chAnges in progrAm
titles
NAIT reserves the right to change program/
course titles; which changes may reflect
shifts in program/course emphasis or the
adoption of descriptors more consistent
with general practice. Such changes shall
have appropriate approvals by NAIT. NAIT
recognizes that a change to a program/
course title may be of consideration to those
who graduated under the former program/
course title. However, it is the prerogative
of NAIT to change a program/course title
and define the form of certification to be
awarded.
NAIT shall not be required to reissue certif-
cation with the new program/course title to
former graduates. The Registrar may issue,
upon request, a statement describing the
circumstances surrounding the title change
and the equivalence of programs/courses.
AcAdemic honours
Academic honours are awarded to those
students who, in pursuing a full program
of studies, have demonstrated superior
academic achievement at NAIT.
The following recognition categories exist:
Students will be granted Semester •
Honours for each semester of their
program in which they attain a
weighted average of 80% or better
while maintaining an 80% course
load or equivalent with no audits,
withdrawals, failures or incompletes;
Students enrolled in a Diploma •
program will be placed on the Dean’s
Honour Roll if, at the end of their
frst year of studies (two semesters,
they attain a weighted average of
80% or better while maintaining an
80% course load or equivalent with
no audits, withdrawals, failures or
incompletes;
Students will be granted an Honour’s •
Certifcate if they successfully
complete the certifcate program and
attain a weighted average of 80%
or better with no recorded audits,
withdrawals, failures or incompletes;
Students will be granted an Honour’s •
Diploma if, they successfully complete
the diploma program with no recorded
withdrawals or failing grades; and
Attain a weighted average of 80% or •
better in courses constituting the fnal
year of the program, OR
Attain a weighted average of 80% or •
better in all courses (both frst and
second year combined)
31 www.nait.ca
Students with special circumstances, for
example a reduced course load, may be
eligible for academic honours at the pre-
rogative of the Dean.
Recognition programs and honour’s cer-
tificates or diplomas for programs with
alphabetic evaluation will be granted at the
prerogative of the Dean. The criteria will be
communicated to the student at the begin-
ning of the program.
acadeMic aWards
NAIT maintains an Academic Awards
Program that recognizes both student
achievement and fnancial need. A student
eligible for academic honours is not neces-
sarily eligible for an award.
types oF aWards
Three types of awards are available to stu-
dents and/or graduates.
Scholarships: awarded primarily on the •
basis of academic excellence.
Prizes: awarded in the form of cash, •
books, and/or medals to students
with outstanding general profciency
or accomplishment in special felds of
interest.
Bursaries: awarded to students who •
have maintained satisfactory academic
standings and are in need of fnancial
assistance to continue their education.
selection criteria
To be eligible for an award a student must
have completed one or both years of the
program with 80% or more of the course
load or its equivalent, and with no failures
or incompletes.
Further information is available from the
NAIT Financial Aid and Awards Offcer.
student RecORds
student permAnent
record
Full-tiMe proGraMs
An individual permanent record is main-
tained in the Registrar’s Office for each
full-time student containing a summary
of the student’s pre-admission academic
records and a cumulative record of the stu-
dent’s academic performance at NAIT.
For purposes of operational activities, the
respective Program Leader may access
these permanent records.
The document maintained by the Registrar’s
Offce is the offcial Student Record. Mark
Statements are available to students on the
NAIT website.
Transcripts are issued only at the student’s
request and upon payment of the appro-
priate fee. Official transcripts may not be
issued if the student is on “Financial Hold”
and indebted to NAIT.
continuinG education/part-tiMe
courses
A permanent record is maintained by the
Registrar’s Offce for most CED registrants.
The permanent record consists of the
same data that is recorded for an official
transcript.
No permanent record is maintained for
some recreation and general interest
courses.
Continuing Education program certifcates
or letters indicating incomplete status are
issued to students, as appropriate and
based on data maintained by the Registrar’s
Offce.
confidentiAlity of
student records
conFidential records
estaBlished at nait
A record means a record of information in
any form and includes books, documents,
maps, drawings, photographs, letters,
vouchers, papers and any other information
that is written, photographed, recorded or
stored in any manner, but does not include
software or any mechanism that produces
records.
The following is a tabular summary of
NAIT student records and offcials who are
responsible for their security.
Generally, the Registrar’s Office will keep
student records. Periodically, Health
Services, Counseling and Security may cre-
ate special purpose records.
puBlic record
The information available to the public
concerning a NAIT student is limited to
verifcation of:
Whether the student was enrolled in a •
specifc program between given dates;
and
Whether a student received a specifc •
credential, honour or award.
Written permission from the student is
required for the release of any other infor-
mation including references and attendance
on specifc days.
If a student has a specifc concern regarding
security and does not wish to even confrm
enrolment, the student may make special
arrangements with the Registrar’s Offce.
responsibility
for AccurAcy And
currency
The Registrar’s Offce bears responsibility
for the accuracy and currency of the student
record.
The Program Leader ensures that appropri-
ate information on the student is conveyed
accurately and promptly to the Registrar’s
Offce.
chAnge in personAl
informAtion
The student must complete the Notice of
Change Form whenever there is a change
in the student’s name, address, or marital
status.
The Registrar’s Offce amends the student
permanent record and forwards the relevant
information to appropriate NAIT staff.
Type of Offcial Record Form of Record Responsible
Health Services Health Questionnaire,
physician's medical
Supervisor, Health
Services.
Student Counseling Record of counseling/ SSD session Manager, Counseling
Registrar's Records Application Form,
Registration Form,
Permanent Record,
student statistics,
student loan
information,
academic violations
Registrar
32 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Full-Time
Instructional
Programs
2008-09
33 www.nait.ca
AccOuntinG
diPLOmA
The management of fnancial resources and
the provision of management information
continues to assume greater importance
as business and management techniques
become more complex. Administrators of
business, industrial, and governmental or-
ganizations need staff with specifc training
in accounting.
The objectives of the program are to provide
the student with a good working knowledge
of accounting and information systems, and
the accountant’s role in those systems: famil-
iarity with computer applications in business,
capability in the use of quantitative analysis
techniques and the ability to derive meaning-
ful relationships in fnancial data.
The Accounting Program provides practical,
specialized training, enabling the student
to operate in business with competence,
whether utilizing handwritten books or
computerized systems. The special training
is balanced with courses designed to pro-
vide the student with suffcient managerial
training to move into supervisory positions.
This program is recommended for those
who want to pursue careers in accounting,
who expect to make extensive use of ac-
counting in their jobs, or wish to use their
expertise as fnancial managers.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Business & Administrative
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Continuing Education, Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
August 29, 2008
coNtActs
judy kushnir
Student Advisor
Accounting Program
Phone: (780) 471-8967
jkushnir@nait.ca
Bozena poMorski
Student Advisor
Business Year One
Phone: (780) 471-7599
bozenap@nait.ca
peter nissen
Chair, Accounting Program
jaMes Guthrie
Associate Chair, Accounting Program
perri steuBer
Associate Chair, Accounting Program
Brian yahn
Associate Chair, Accounting Program
Room T403
11762 - 106 Street
T5G 2R1
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Year 1, Semesters 1 & 2 consist of a common
set courses for each of the four streams
offered in Business Administration. This
consists of 10 courses totalling 640 hours,
spread over two 16 week semesters. Stu-
dents have the option of taking courses at
the Main Campus.
Year 2, Semesters 3 & 4 is the second year
for the Accounting major containing core
courses totalling 528 hours, and elective
courses of 128 hours or more. This is spread
over two 16 week semesters.
Students graduate from the daytime pro-
gram at the end of Semester 4, which can be
April or December each year. Some students
complete studies to graduate through NAIT
Continuing Education course offerings.
Although students may continue into year
two after successful completion of eight
courses, all ten frst year courses must be
completed for graduation.
certiFication
Business Diploma - Accounting
accreditation
Although Business Administration Year One
is the frst year of a two-year diploma, many
of the courses are recognized for credit by
various Alberta universities and colleges
(refer to the Alberta Transfer Guide) and
are recognized by both the CMA/CGA for
possible exemptions.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Acct106
Accounting
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The student is introduced to the accounting
equation and to the effect various transac-
tions have on it. An introduction to the ac-
counting cycle, ledger, trial balance, income
statement and balance sheet is presented.
Accounting for merchandise operations,
inventory and cost of sales, internal control
and cash are introduced and examined indi-
vidually. Prerequisite: None
ecoN186
Microeconomics
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The question of how individuals and frms
use their scarce resources to attain eco-
nomic goals is examined. The central prob-
lem of scarcity is introduced. A brief study
of how different economic systems try to
solve this problem is undertaken. The mar-
ket system is investigated: how supply, de-
mand and price determine what and how
much is produced. Elasticity of demand
is examined in the context of effectively
setting prices for different products. How
business frms make decisions and conduct
themselves in the marketplace is examined.
Price and output termination for firms in
pure competition, monopoly, monopolistic
competition, and oligopoly is studied us-
ing theory and case studies. The economic
functions of government in a “mixed” capi-
talistic system are examined. Applications
to current events are discussed wherever
appropriate. Prerequisite: None
34 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
orgB191
organizational Behaviour
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course provides an introduction to the
signifcance of organizations and the infu-
ence of the manager and the employee on
the organization and work. The emphasis
is on managing individual differences for
increased productivity and job satisfaction.
As well, a framework for understanding be-
haviour in the workplace is studied. Case
problems are solved by groups using the
rational decision-making process. Prereq-
uisite: None
coMM121
Business communications
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course introduces the student to the
complexity of the communication process.
The student learns business writing strat-
egies and techniques and applies them to
two categories of business letters/memos.
Students will use word processing com-
puter software to compose, edit and revise
assignments. Letters/memos will be as-
signed and completed in class within pre-
scribed time limits. Each student is required
to write an informal, informational report.
Emphasis will be placed on research and
documentation. As well, students will learn
and practice fundamental presentation
skills. Prerequisite: None
MAth117
Business Mathematics with excel
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course is designed to provide students
with knowledge of the fundamental princi-
ples and concepts of business mathematics,
and to develop their abilities to apply these
principles and concepts to solve practical
business problems, particularly in market-
ing and fnance. Includes an introduction to
the use of Microsoft Excel with an applied
application to using Excel to solve Business
Mathematics problems. Prerequisite: None
seMester 2
Acct107
Accounting
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Capital assets are discussed with reference
to recording acquisition cost, amortization
in subsequent periods, and disposal. Short-
term and long-term liabilities, partnerships,
corporations, share capital, and the state-
ment of cash fows/cash fow analysis are
introduced and examined individually. Gen-
erally accepted accounting principles are
examined throughout the course, as they
relate to the specific subject areas. As a
fnal integration, the student will study the
analysis of fnancial statements. Prerequi-
site: ACCT106 (BUS106). Course re-num-
bering - effective July 1, 2006.
ecoN187
Macroeconomics
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The overall health of the economy, as
measured by gross domestic product, un-
employment rates, inflation rates, inter-
est rates, the balance of payments and
exchange rates is the prime focus of this
course. Keynesian and monetarist theo-
ries of income and employment are used
as a framework for analyzing government
monetary and fscal policies. The role of the
Bank of Canada and the chartered banks in
determining the money supply and interest
rates is described. Current debates relating
to the public debt and supply side econom-
ics are evaluated. International economic
issues including free trade and the balance
of payments are also examined. Wherever
appropriate, current events are introduced
and topics are reinforced and enhanced
through computer applications. Prerequi-
site: ECON186 (BUS186). Course re-num-
bering - effective July 1, 2006.
MgMt156
Introduction to Business strategy
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
In this course, the student develops an
understanding of setting the strategy for
the business and recognizes how the tools
learned can be used to support the imple-
mentation of that strategy. The course en-
courages the student to think as a leader
with an entrepreneurial mindset and an
integrated view of the entire organization.
Integrated with the concurrent frst and sec-
ond term courses and using the case-study
method, this course creates opportunities
for students to develop analytical, prob-
lem-solving, critical thinking, teamwork,
and communication skills by analyzing and
presenting solutions to typical business
problems. Students also develop and utilize
problem-solving and decision-making skills
both individually and in small groups within
the scope of the basic concepts of the busi-
ness strategy process: planning, organizing,
staffing, directing, controlling, communi-
cating, and leading within a global business
environment. Prerequisite: None Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
BlAw161
Business law
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The focus of the course is to empower the
students to succeed in business by display-
ing how knowledge of the law can give them
an advantage. Beginning with an introduc-
tion of Canada’s legal systems, the course
proceeds to examine how laws are made,
who makes laws and how laws are enforced.
The Alberta court system is examined. Stu-
dents are taught how to sue in the Provin-
cial Court, Civil Division and how to collect
a judgment. Civil procedure in the Court of
Queen’s Bench is also examined. The vari-
ous forms of alternative dispute resolution
are reviewed. Constitutional Law, including
an examination of the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms, follows. Human rights legislation
is similarly evaluated. The development of
tort law is traced, with an emphasis on the
tort of negligence. Forms of business organi-
zations (sole proprietorships, various types
of partnerships and corporate entities) are
compared and contrasted. Employment law,
including the common law and the relevant
legislation, is delineated. Insurance law is
then briefy addressed. Finally, the forma-
tion and performance of contracts is evalu-
ated. Prerequisite: None
35 www.nait.ca
MArk166
Marketing
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory course, covering the
fundamental principles and concepts of
marketing. Major emphasis is placed on the
marketing mix and its strategic application
to an increasingly complex business envi-
ronment. In particular, the detailed areas
of product, promotion, price and distribu-
tion are examined in reference to achieving
company objectives. Prerequisite: None
Note: Course re-numbering - effective
July 1, 2006.
optional
Bus200
NAItworking
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
NAITworking integrates students’ course
study with specifc work experiences. Par-
ticipation in NAITworking is entirely volun-
tary although fnal selection for a placement
is dependent upon a successful evaluation
and fulfillment of the prerequisite condi-
tions. Students who begin the Business
Administration program in September may
participate the following May (between
second and third semester) while students
who begin the program in January may
participate between third and fourth se-
mester. Please be aware that NAITworking
(BUS200) is not an approved elective for
any of the second year programs, hence
does not count in the total hours needed for
graduation. The number of positions avail-
able for each work experience term will be
determined by the participating employers
prior to commencement of Semester Two.
NOTE: The experience term may vary and
will be determined by the participating or-
ganizations each January. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of Year One (no course
deficiencies) and a minimum grade point
average of 60%.
seMester 3
Acct206
Intermediate Accounting 1
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The course commences with a review of In-
troductory Accounting, including review of
the Income Statement, Balance Sheet and
generally accepted accounting principles.
It then proceeds to a detailed study of the
theory and current practices applicable to all
balance sheet components, including cash,
marketable securities, receivables, invento-
ries, long-term investments, fxed assets and
intangibles. Prerequisite: ACCT107 (BUS207)
Students enrolled in ACCT206 (BUS306)
may not take ACCT220 (BUS320). Note:
Course re-numbering effective July 1, 2006
Acct207s
Accounting seminar
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
By means of a series of guest lecturers and
workshops, students will be exposed to the
job search process, resume preparation,
employment interviews, and continuing
education opportunities with professional
accounting bodies and within NAIT’s AAC
Program. Field trips or guest speakers may
also be arranged in the areas of Public Ac-
counting, Manufacturing Accounting, and
Government Accounting. Some time in
the course will also be devoted to coun-
selling students in curriculum selection.
Note: Restricted to second year Accounting
students.
Acct211
Management Accounting 1
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The course provides the student with the
basic knowledge of Management Account-
ing. It includes a comprehensive study of
cost accounting fundamentals and an in
depth look at some of the tools that man-
aging accountants use for planning and
control. Prerequisites: ACCT106 (BUS106),
ACCT1 07 (BUS207) Co- requi si t e:
ACCT206 (BUS306) Students enrolled in
ACCT211 (BUS311) may not take ACCT220
(BUS320). Note: Course re-numbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
cMIs241
computer Applications for Business
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course will provide students with in-
troductory to intermediate level skills in
business productivity tools, including MS
Access and Excel. In addition, the course
will examine basic database management
theory and concepts including SQL. Stu-
dents apply this theory through the use of
MS Access to build a database and create
queries, forms and reports. The spreadsheet
component of the course will focus on tools
that are most often used to plan, analyze,
design, develop and test business solutions
with MS Excel. Basic business web-page
design and the role of business web-pages
will also be examined. In addition, students
will learn internet research skills applicable
to both academic and business settings.
Prerequisite: ACCT107 (BUS207) Co-req-
uisite: STAT218 (BUS118) Note: Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
stAt218
Business statistics
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory level course designed
to give students a working knowledge of de-
scriptive and inferential statistics. Topics
covered include uses of statistics; meth-
ods of sampling, collecting and presenting
data; measures of center and variability;
positional measures; probability theory
and expected value; normal, binomial, and
Poisson distributions; sampling distribution
of means; confidence interval construc-
tion for means and proportions; sample
size calculations; process control charts;
tests of hypotheses for means and propor-
tions, including one sample, two samples,
and paired samples; analysis of variance
(one-way); analysis of crosstabulated data;
simple linear regression; polynomial regres-
sion; analysis of residuals; multiple linear
regression; stepwise regression; correlation
analysis; time series analysis and forecast-
ing. Each topic is motivated by a practical
business problem and is reinforced through
hands-on experience with a statistical soft-
ware package. Prerequisite: none
tAXX202
Income tax
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
A brief introduction to Canadian income tax
law followed by a comprehensive study of
the tax law related to employment income,
income from property, calculation of income
from business; capital gains, other income,
other deductions, personal tax credits and
calculations of capital cost allowance. Cal-
culation of taxes payable for an individual
and a corporation will be covered. Prereq-
uisite: ACCT106 (BUS106) Note: Course
re-numbering effective July 1, 2006
seMester 4
Acct208
Intermediate Accounting 2
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The study of the Balance Sheet is com-
pleted by examining the liabilities, long-
term investments, and the capital structure
of corporations. The course continues on to
examine areas of a more specialized nature,
including earnings per share, income taxes,
pensions, leases, changes in accounting
methods, incomplete records, disclosure
and reporting, and Statement of Cash
Flows. Prerequisite: ACCT206 (BUS306)
Note: Course re-numbering effective
July 1, 2006
36 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
cMIs240
Accounting software
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course involves the application of Sim-
ply Accounting as the primary software for
recording and reporting of fnancial activi-
ties in a business. Students will use the soft-
ware to set up both a new company and an
existing company. They will record fnancial
activities, using most of the modules avail-
able in Simply Accounting. Modules include
Accounts Receivable, Accounts Payable,
Payroll, Inventory, and others. Resulting re-
ports will be examined from a management
perspective, integrating concepts learned in
other courses. Concepts from subjects such
as Management Accounting, Finance, and
E-Commerce will be included. The student
will also have an opportunity to compare
Simply Accounting with other software cur-
rently available in the market. A hands-on
case will be included as one of the many ac-
tivities. Prerequisites: ACCT206 (BUS306)
or ACCT220 (BUS320) Note: Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
fNce223
corporate finance
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course is a study of the fnancial and
investment decisions from the corpora-
tion’s perspective. The key topics covered
in the course include the valuation of fnan-
cial assets, determining the cost of capital,
the analysis of capital budgeting decisions
and working capital management. Prereq-
uisites: ACCT106 (BUS106), MATH117
(BUS117), STAT218 (BUS118), ACCT107
(BUS207). Co-requisite: ACCT211 (BUS311)
or ACCT220 (BUS320) i.e.: Students en-
rolled in FNCE223 (BUS323) may not take
FNCE222 (BUS422). Course re-numbering
- effective July 1, 2006.
electives
Acct212
Management Accounting 2
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course provides the student with a
thorough understanding of relevant costing
pricing, joint costing, process costing, and
costing systems. Prerequisites: ACCT107
(BUS207), ACCT211 (BUS311) Note: Course
re-numbering effective July 1, 2006
cMIs244
Accounting Information systems
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory course designed to
provide the student with an understanding
of the information systems environment in
business today. Topics include systems the-
ory, systems documentation tools, business
processes, e-commerce, internal controls
and security. The system development life-
cycle approach, including systems analysis
and design concepts, are also included. A
combination of lectures and interactive exer-
cises will support these theoretical concepts.
Prerequisites: CMIS241 (BUS441) Co-requi-
sites: CMIS240 (BUS340) Restricted to Se-
mester 4 Accounting students Note: Course
re-numbering effective July 1, 2006
fNce280
Investments
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The course provides a basic understanding of
the stock market in Canada. Topics covered
include investment terminology, portfolio
construction, purchasing stocks and bonds,
and the impact of fscal and monetary poli-
cies upon the investment process. By using
fnance information available on the internet
guidelines for choosing common stocks are
identifed. Through lab assignments students
learn to follow the market regularly, and to
analyze the performance of common stocks.
Completion of this course provides an excel-
lent introduction to the world of investing,
Prerequisites: MATH117 (BUS117), ACCT107
(BUS207). Course re-numbering – effective
July 1, 2006.
fNce282
financial planning
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The student will develop fnancial planning
and counselling skills in wealth building for
themselves and future clients in the grow-
ing financial services employment sector.
Focus is on how to set fnancial goals, how
to assess and allocate resources, and how
to develop diversifcation strategies, strong
portfolio management skills. Investment
alternatives, such as real estate, mutual
funds, insurance products, and RRSP op-
tions will be covered. Practical debt man-
agement and consumer credit techniques
including mortgages will be examined. The
course will develop the needed knowledge
and skills necessary to allow the graduate
to effectively market and promote finan-
cial products and services. Prerequisite:
MATH117 (BUS117). Course re-numbering
- effective July 1, 2006.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Entrance to the Year 2 Accounting Program
requires completion of NAIT’s Business
Administration, Year 1 Program or similar
business course equivalency from other
Alberta post-secondary institutions. Other
special situations should be discussed with
a Program Chair (see Program Contact in-
formation).
selection criteria
Competitive selection criteria is included on
the application form.
advanced/transFer credit
For more information on Advanced or
Transfer Credit, contact:
James Guthrie
Associate Chair
Accounting Diploma
(Accounting Year 2, January intake)
Phone: (780) 471-8303
jamesg@nait.ca
Perri Steuber
Associate Chair
Accounting Diploma
(Accounting Year 2, September intake)
Phone: (780) 491-1381
perris@nait.ca
37 www.nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms provide tables and chairs to
accommodate lectures and group discus-
sions. Computer labs are fully equipped
with current business software and access
to the internet. School of Business students
are supplied with e-mail accounts.
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in class per week:
20 scheduled class hours per week is typical.
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: A further
20 hours of study time per week outside the
class is typical.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
inFo sessions
Daytime Information Sessions
Applicants with no business education
background should attend sessions offered
by Business Year 1.
Applicants who have completed the equiv-
alent of one year post secondary business
education may contact either Program
Chair directly.
Evening Information Sessions: offered by
Business Year 1.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Business Diploma - Accounting
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Graduates may obtain advance credits
toward the Certified General Accountant
(CGA) and Certifed Management Accoun-
tant (CMA) designations.
Most of the courses in the CGA and CMA
programs are also available in NAIT’s Ac-
celerated Accounting Certifcate Program,
which is offered in both day and evening
course formats designed for part-time
study.
A Management Program diploma with
course specialization in Human Resource
Management satisfies the educational
component for granting the Certified Hu-
man Resource Professional (CHRP) desig-
nation from the Human Resource Institute
of Alberta.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Most graduates find employment in train-
ing-related areas and apply their training and
skills as accountants: accounting technicians,
cost analysts, payroll accountants, and later,
as supervisors in related areas. They enjoy
employment opportunities at many different
levels in fnancial accounting, internal audit-
ing, fnancial analysis, cost accounting with
industrial concerns, public accounting frms,
and government departments.
Further career enhanceMent
courses
After obtaining a diploma, graduates can
continue in the third year of the Bachelor
of Applied Business Administration - Ac-
counting degree program.
advanced credit possiBilities
A Management Program diploma with
course specialization in Human Resource
Management satisfes the educational com-
ponent for granting the Certifed Human Re-
source Professional (CHRP) designation from
the Human Resource Institute of Alberta.
Graduates may be granted advance credit
by the University of Alberta, University of
Calgary, the Institute of Canadian Bankers
(ICB) and the Canadian Institute of Book-
keeping (CIB in Toronto, Ontario).
deGree options
NAIT offers a Bachelor of Applied Business
- Accounting degree program for graduates
of two year Accounting Diploma Programs.
NAIT also offers a Bachelor of Applied Busi-
ness - Finance degree program for graduates
of two year Business Diploma Programs.
University transfer agreements with the
University of Lethbridge (Edmonton, Cal-
gary or Lethbridge campuses), Athabasca
University, Concordia University College
of Alberta (Edmonton) and the Open Uni-
versity in British Columbia specify that two
years of credit will be recognized toward the
Bachelor of Administration or Bachelor of
Management Degrees upon completion of
any of the NAIT Business Diplomas.
Some academic conditions apply.
Major skills acQuired
Specialties depend on electives chosen by
student:
- Financial Accounting
- Management Accounting
- Taxation
- Corporate Finance
- Management
- Business Math & Statistics
For further information, please contact:
Career Services - (780) 471-8874
E-Mail careers@nait.ab.ca
elective suBjects:
Management Accounting 2
Accounting Information Systems
Investments
Financial Planning
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Government, industry, accounting firms,
banks, hospitals, consulting frms.
career opportunities
Most graduates find employment in train-
ing-related areas and apply their training and
skills as accountants: accounting technicians,
cost analysts, payroll accountants, and later,
as supervisors in related areas. They enjoy
employment opportunities at many different
levels in fnancial accounting, internal audit-
ing, fnancial analysis, cost accounting with
industrial concerns, public accounting frms,
and government departments.
38 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
AiRcRAft skin &
stRuctuRe RePAiR
ceRtificAte
This program is designed primarily for those
people seeking employment as an aircraft
structures technician. Mechanical aptitude
and the ability to work to close tolerances,
as well as the ability to work with your
hands are important elements for success
in this program.
The curriculum is designed to provide a
broad basic knowledge of the principles in-
volved in modern aircraft structural repairs.
Classrooms, labs, and shops contain a vari-
ety of functional training components. Once
students demonstrate satisfactory knowl-
edge levels and skills, training progresses
to include work on actual aircraft parts and
aircraft, restoring them to airworthiness
as per Transport Canada standards. This
program is structured towards attaining an
AME “S” category license after successful
work experience time credit is concluded
and documented, and Transport Canada
examinations are written.
NOTE: There may be some feld trips dur-
ing this program. Students are required to
attend, as feld trips are valuable enhance-
ments to the total program.
NOTE: This is a Transport Canada Accred-
ited Program, TC 2004-03-2002. Daily
attendance in this program is regulated by
Canadian Aviation Regulation Standards
(CARs Part V) - AWM566.12(j) Student at-
tendance control: “Students having missed
more than 5% of the course through ab-
sences, shall not qualify for experience
credit from a basic training course.”
Students are advised that daily attendance
in this program is compulsory.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Mechanical & Industrial
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
1 year (2 semesters of 16 weeks, 1 semester
of 11 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
First day of class
coNtActs
dave Mcintosh
Aircraft Skin and Structure Repair , Chair
TEL: (780) 378-5185
email: dmcintos@nait.ab.ca
Career Services: (780) 471-8874
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
THIS IS A THREE SEMESTER PROGRAM -
One year (two semesters at 16 weeks and
one semester at 11 weeks), 43 weeks - total
of 1290 hours.
certiFication
Aircraft Skin and Structure Repair Certifcate
accreditation
Students meeting all Transport Canada Ac-
creditation requirements will receive the TC
2004-03-2002 number on their certifcate.
This means that the student meets the
Technical Knowledge requirement of Stan-
dard 566.03(4)(c)for obtaining an AME ‘S’
license.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Met131
Non-destructive Inspection
and Materials
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
This course is instructed at Main Campus.
The course provides the student with a ba-
sic knowledge of metal properties, mechan-
ical testing of metals & non-destructive
testing methods used in aircraft inspection.
Subjects include the study of the following:
• Aluminium alloy types • Ferrous metals •
Tensile, hardness, impact & fatigue testing
• Heat treatment of metals • Radiography,
liquid penetrant, magnetic particle, ultra-
sonic, eddy current & thermography test
methods
ssr101
shopwork I: Manufacturing and
structural repairs (practical)
Hours: 214 Credits: 13.0
This course provides basic knowledge of
materials and processes used in the fabrica-
tion and repair of sheet metal aircraft struc-
tures. Students will make several projects to
gain practical experience with aluminium &
steel in the following areas: • Hand tools &
shop equipment • Filing • Cutting • Bending
• Calculation of bend allowance • Drilling •
Riveting
ssr103
Aircraft theory I
Hours: 92 Credits: 5.0
This course provides a general introduction
to the aviation industry. Students will de-
velop a basic understanding of the following
subjects: • Theory of fight • Basic aircraft
systems • Technical manuals • Canadian
Aviation Regulations • Corrosion identifi-
cation and control • The affects of Human
Factors in Aviation Maintenance
ssr104
Aircraft drawings and Blueprint
reading I
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course provides the student with the
basic concept of aircraft blueprint reading.
Students will develop an understanding
of the following subjects: • Orthographic
projection • Isometric projection • Work-
ing drawings • Detail drawings • Sectional
views • Auxiliary views
ssr105
Measurement Methods and
practices I
Hours: 26 Credits: 2.0
This course explores a variety of measure-
ment methods and shop practices used in
aviation. Students will develop an under-
standing of the following subjects: • Health &
Safety regulations affecting aviation • Good
workplace safety practices • Basic shop
mathematics • Precision measurement tools
such as vernier callipers & micrometers
ssr113
standard shop practices I
Hours: 26 Credits: 2.0
This course is a combined shop and theory
class developing knowledge required to
succeed in SSR 101. It consists of the fol-
lowing subjects: • Basic aircraft hand tools
principles • Standard solid aircraft rivets •
Acceptable riveting practices • Bend allow-
ance calculations
39 www.nait.ca
ssr191
Basic structural welding I
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
This course provides basic knowledge of
materials and processes used in the inspec-
tion and repair of tubular aircraft structures.
A good portion of this course is hands-on in
nature. This course also includes the basic
theory of welding. Students will perform the
following: • MIG welding • TIG welding • In-
spection/repair of tubular structure
seMester 2
ssr201
shopwork II: Manufacturing and
structural repairs
Hours: 386 Credits: 23.0
This course builds from the skills developed
in frst semester SSR 101 shop. A simulated
aviation work environment provides a real-
istic study of the following: • Sheet metal
fabrication & repair • Inspection of aircraft
parts to determine serviceability • Installa-
tion and removal of special aircraft fasteners
• Corrosion removal & control procedures •
Aging aircraft & abnormal occurrence in-
spections • Performing structural repairs on
aircraft • Utilizing Structural Repair Manu-
als • Completing documentation of struc-
tural repairs
ssr203
Aircraft theory II
Hours: 28 Credits: 2.0
This course builds from the knowledge de-
veloped in SSR 103 and includes the study
of the following subjects: • Certification of
aircraft parts • Aircraft Maintenance License
(AME) requirements • Internet search of the
Canadian Aviation Regulations • Reciprocat-
ing engines • Turbine engines • Propellers
ssr204
Aircraft drawings and Blueprint
reading II
Hours: 28 Credits: 2.0
This course provides the student with the
opportunity to apply the basic concepts
learned in SSR 104 to manufacturers tech-
nical manuals. This course includes the
following subjects: • Aircraft design phi-
losophies • Various forces acting on an air-
craft in fight & on the ground • How to use
a Structural Repair Manual • Utilizing elec-
tronic structural repair data • Performing a
shop sketch
ssr205
Measurement Methods and
practices II
Hours: 14 Credits: 1.0
This course studies the various aircraft in-
spection practices. This course includes the
following subjects: • Basic visual inspec-
tion requirements • Damage assessment
• Heat damage • Aging aircraft inspection
programs Also included in this course is
proper resume development and job search
strategies.
ssr213
standard shop practices II
(practical and theory)
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.0
This course builds from the knowledge
learned in SSR 113. It provides a more de-
tailed study of the following processes: •
Aircraft sealants • Special fasteners • Cold-
working • Peening • Painting • Shrinking &
stretching
seMester 3
MIc361
Aircraft wood structures III
(practical and theory)
Hours: 60 Credits: 4.0
This course is instructed at Main Campus.
The course provides basic knowledge of ma-
terials and processes used in the fabrication
and repair of wood aircraft structures. A good
portion of this course is hands-on in nature.
Subjects instructed include: • Selecting qual-
ity aircraft wood • Power & hand tools used
for aircraft wood structures • Fabrication &
repair of aircraft wood structures
ssr321
composite structures III (practical)
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course utilizes the classroom theory
learned in SSR 323 and puts it to practice
in the shop. The student practices the basic
processes used in the fabrication and repair
of composite aircraft structures. Some of
the subjects covered include: • Proper han-
dling & storing of aircraft composite mate-
rials • Specialized composite hand tools •
Specialized composite equipment such as
vacuum bagging & hot bonding • Fabrica-
tion & repair procedures using fibreglass,
Kevlar and graphite material • Inspection/
repair/replacement evaluations
ssr323
composite structures III (theory)
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.0
The course provides basic knowledge of
materials and processes used in the fab-
rication and repair of composite aircraft
structures. This course includes the follow-
ing subjects: • Proper handling & storing of
aircraft composite materials • Specialized
hand tools & equipment • Fabrication &
repair procedures • Inspection/repair/re-
placement evaluations
ssr351
Aircraft fabric covering III
(practical and theory)
Hours: 36 Credits: 2.0
This course examines the techniques of
aircraft fabric covering and repair. A good
portion of this course is hands-on in nature.
This course includes the following subjects:
• Inspection, test & repair procedures •
Rib stitching • Application of fabric dope •
Fabric covering • Special reinforcements &
fasteners
ssr371
fluid lines, fittings and conduits III
(practical and theory)
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
This course studies the components used
in aircraft fuid carrying lines. A good por-
tion of this course is hands-on in nature.
Subjects include the following: • Fluid line
materials & fttings • Single & double faring
• Beading & installation of fareless fttings •
Tube bending • Fabrication of fexible lines •
Inspecting & testing fuid lines
ssr381
windows and lenses III
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.0
This course examines the characteristics
of transparent thermoplastic materials.
A good portion of this course is hands-on
in nature. Subjects include the following: •
Proper thermoplastic storing & handling
procedures • Inspection, restore & repair
of aircraft windows • Fabricate an acrylic
component using heat-forming techniques
• Perform a prism inspection
40 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Grade 11, with 50% in English 20 or 23,
Math 20 or 23, and a Grade 11 Science
(Physics 20 is recommended). Other rel-
evant aircraft courses and experience will
be considered.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
It is advised that students entering this pro-
gram complete a “Career Investigation” to
fully understand the personal commitment
needed to be successful in this career.
This program is compliant to and meets
or exceeds Technical Knowledge Standard
566.03(4)(c)as required by Transport
Canada.
advanced/transFer credit
Visit www.nait.ca for information.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms - Shops - Labs, (Located at Pa-
tricia Campus, 12204 - 149 Street.)
Field Trips as arranged. Computerized
Structural Repair Mauals (SRM’s) located
in McNally Library data retrieval systems.
Building Location(s): Patricia Campus,
12204 - 149 Street, Edmonton Alberta,
Canada T5V 1A2
classrooM and study hours
30 hours per week classroom/shops
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: As required
(approximately 10 to 15 hrs.) or more.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to attend
classes and laboratory sessions, to ask ques-
tions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Arrange to attend the Buddy System or
Group Information Sessions at NAIT. Con-
tact, NAIT Career Services (phone 471-
7499), or the Registrar’s Offce (471-6248).
The Buddy System is designed to help you
make a career decision. you can spend up
to one day attending this program. It allows
you to experience this program frst-hand,
and see for yourself what you will study and
how you will be taught. You will be paired
with a NAIT student and there is a good
chance to ask all the questions you may
have about this program and about student
life at NAIT, too.
inFo sessions
Daily general information sessions are also
offered through Career Services from 1:15
- 2:15 pm. in Room O-117 on NAIT’s Main
Campus.
Attend NAIT Open House, which is held
around mid-October each year.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Aircraft Skin and Structure Repair Certifcate
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
The nature or aircraft repair work requires
that graduates work in a team environment.
A strong ‘positive attitude’ for all aspects
of this occupation is a most desireable at-
tribute.
Major skills acQuired
Shop workplace practices •
Proper use of aircraft hand-tools, air •
powered tools and general aircraft
fabrication equipment.
Riveting and numerous other aircraft •
fastener removal and installation
procedures.
Fabricate, repair and inspect aircraft •
sheet metal structures.
Fabricate, repair and inspect aircraft •
composite structures.
Fabricate, repair and inspect wood. •
Fabricate, repair and inspect tubular •
structural components.
Fabricate, repair and inspect fabric •
aircraft.
Interpret aircraft blue prints nd •
technical drawings.
Use of electronic aircraft structural •
repair manuals.
Special processes used in aircraft •
repair.
Utilize precision measurement tools. •
Perform various aircraft inspection •
techniques.
Introduction to aircraft systems and •
the Canadian Aviation Regulations.
Fabricate and repair aircraft windows •
and lenses.
Fabricate aircraft fuid lines and •
fttings.
Basic MIG and TIG welding techniques. •
cAreer opportuNItIes
career opportunities
Entry-level employment with small and
large fxed wing aircraft, helicopter, repair/
overhaul companies; as well as aircraft
manufacturing industries.
Students are advised that there are employ-
ment opportunities with many smaller com-
panies that provide aircraft related services.
41 www.nait.ca
AnimAL HeALtH
tecHnOLOGY -
edmOntOn
Please note that NAIT offers two Animal
Health Technology programs - Edmon-
ton and Fairview. Both produce skilled
graduates who find employment quickly.
Transferring between the two programs is
currently unavailable.
An Animal Health Technologist (AHT) is a
valuable member of the animal health care
team who performs a large range of nurs-
ing skills, diagnostic procedures and client
interactions to assist veterinarians in the
diagnosis, treatment and prevention of ani-
mal diseases.
Prospective students must be highly mo-
tivated and have a genuine interest in
animals and their welfare. Animal Health
Technologists are required to handle ill or
injured animals. Physical demands involve
lifting, bending and restraint of animals.
Good communication skills and the ability
to interact effectively with people are es-
sential to success in the program and in the
career feld.
Students receive theoretical and clinical
training in laboratory work, radiology, surgi-
cal assisting, anesthesiology, nursing care
and management of the veterinary hospital.
A number of course hours are completed
off campus and involve weekends and
shiftwork. Transportation is the student’s
responsibility.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Animal Studies
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (3 semesters of 17 weeks, 1 semes-
ter of 18 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
eva kozicki
Program Administrative Assistant
NAIT - Main Campus - E206
11762 - 106 Street
Edmonton, AB T5G 2R1
Phone: (780) 471-8922
Fax: (780) 471-8770
E-mail: evak@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Students must complete all courses and
practicums in the Animal Health curriculum
in order to graduate.
certiFication
Diploma in Animal Health Technology
accreditation
The Animal Health Technology program
is accredited by the Canadian Veterinary
Medical Association. The program holds a
Good Animal Practice Certifcate through
the Canadian Council on Animal Care. The
Animal Clinic is certifed under the Alberta
Veterinary Medical Association Practice In-
spection Program.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Aht100
Animal diseases I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
An overview of selected diseases affecting
dogs and cats in which the student is pro-
vided with some background knowledge as
to cause, clinical signs, treatment and pre-
vention.
Aht110
clinics I
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Students spend one hour a week in small
groups working with actual client animals
practicing various clinical skills including
animal restraint, physical examination,
blood sampling and injections.
Aht120
Anatomical pathophysiology of
domestic Animals I
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Both external and internal anatomy, and
body function (physiology), is presented in
this course. The cat is used as the basic an-
atomical model, with comparisons made to
the dog and to farm livestock. Species other
than the cat are periodically examined to
enhance this comparison. This is a practical
course, emphasizing applied anatomy, use-
ful in surgery and radiology, physical exami-
nation and disease states.
Aht130
reproduction
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Following anatomy and physiology of the
reproductive systems of the various ani-
mals encountered in veterinary practice,
this course discusses breeding patterns and
management, pregnancy diagnosis, pla-
centation, parturition and dystocia and its
management, and problems and diseases
of the male and female reproductive tract
with their management.
Aht140
Medical terminology
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to familiarize the
student with the terminology used in the
Health and Medical Sciences.
Aht160
Animal Behaviour
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Basic normal behaviour of dogs, cats, horses
and cattle will be covered. The common
behavioural problems of companion ani-
mals will also be explored. This course also
teaches recognition of the common breeds
of dogs, cats and livestock commonly seen
in Western Canadian veterinary practices.
Aht170
human workplace relations
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students learn basic communication skills
and practice these in small groups. Subject
matter also includes effective written, e-
mail and verbal communication and other
communication issues valuable to the grad-
uate AHT.
42 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Aht180
Medical and surgical Nursing I
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is designed to familiarize the
student with the instruments, supplies and
basic surgical and medical procedures in-
volved in veterinary practice. Subject mat-
ter includes the identification, care, use
and maintenance of surgical instruments,
electrical equipment and instruments used
in diagnostic workups. The treatment tech-
niques, medical and surgical skills and com-
petencies which are necessary to become a
useful technologist are discussed. In addi-
tion, students learn their role in client edu-
cation, assessing an animal’s condition and
giving emergency aid.
Aht190
veterinary Medical overview
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course will provide the animal hus-
bandry background needed for all other
courses. It includes animal care, health, ba-
sic management and terminology of small
and large animals.
Mlt150
clinical laboratory procedures I
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
The emphasis of Laboratory Procedures I
will be placed on ensuring that the students
are able to perform a complete blood count
and microscopic urinalysis. In Semester
1, testing will be done on the canine and
feline (equine, ovine and bovine will be
examined in Semester 2). During the labo-
ratory sessions, emphasis will be placed on
developing correct techniques in specimen
handling, microscope use and care, labora-
tory safety and cleanup.
seMester 2
Aht200
field studies I
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This practical hands-on course is designed
to provide the student with small animal
and large animal experience. The student
will complete work shifts at an Emergency
Hospital, the Dairy Barn at the University
of Alberta and the Canadian Animal Blood
Bank. Transportation to these sites is the
responsibility of the student.
Aht210
clinics II
Hours: 26 Credits: 1.5
This course provides the opportunity to
assist a veterinarian/instructor with exam-
inations, restraint, care, treatment and diag-
nostic procedures under circumstances that
resemble an actual veterinary practice.
Aht220
Anatomical pathophysiology II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
A continuation of Anatomical Pathophysiol-
ogy I.
Aht230
computer Applications
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course is designed to give students
hands on experience with computers and
computer software that is commonly used
in veterinary clinics.
Aht240
dentistry
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Dental procedures in dogs and cats are a
large part of small animal practice. Ani-
mal health technologists perform dental
prophylaxis procedures while maintaining
the animal under general anesthesia. This
course will focus on the skills needed for
clinical competency. The practical compo-
nent will occur in clinics III and IV. Equine
dentistry will also be covered.
Aht250
Anesthesiology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course is designed to describe general
principles of anesthesia and anesthetic
monitoring in domestic animals. This course
covers the following topics: pre-anesthetic
medication, assessing the depth of general
anesthesia, injectable anesthetic drugs,
inhalation anesthetic drugs, practice of in-
halation anesthesia, pulmonary ventilation,
anesthetic complications and emergencies,
local anesthetics, species variations, post-
operative care and anesthetic management
in stressed animals.
Aht260
parasitology
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
A lecture/lab class with the main emphasis
being competency in performing topical and
fecal examinations for parasitic infestations
in both small and large animal veterinary
practice. The life cycle, as well as recogni-
tion, of the various parasites is presented,
along with control measures.
Aht270
cow/calf field studies I
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
This course provides experience on a work-
ing cow/calf ranch off campus and includes
fall herd processing (vaccination, ear tagging,
deworming etc.) as well as a number of 8-
hour shifts during calving season to identify
and assist with dystocia, and management of
newborn calves. Off-campus transportation
is the responsibility of the student.
Aht280
Medical and surgical Nursing II
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Continuation of Medical and Surgical Nurs-
ing I. This course will continue the theory,
but also add in more practical skills to be
applied in the laboratory sections (AHT110,
AHT210, AHT310, AHT410). Emergency
medicine and other specifc treatment situ-
ations are also covered.
Mlt250
clinical laboratory procedures II
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Laboratory Procedures II is a continuation
of Laboratory Procedures I. Emphasis will
be placed on the processing of blood for
various chemical compounds and complete
blood count. Urine will be analyzed both
microscopically and macroscopically. This
section will introduce the student to small
clinical analyzers. The student will be ex-
posed to specimens from the canine, feline,
equine, ovine and bovine.
43 www.nait.ca
seMester 3
Aht310
small Animal clinics III
Hours: 91 Credits: 5.5
This course provides the opportunity to as-
sist a veterinarian/instructor in the NAIT
Animal Clinic with examinations, restraint,
care, treatment, surgery and diagnostic pro-
cedures under circumstances that resemble
an actual small animal veterinary practice.
In small groups, the students rotate through
reception, anesthesia, surgery, laboratory
duties and dentistry which are part of the
day to day routine in a veterinary hospital
Aht311
large Animal clinics III
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
This course provides the student the oppor-
tunity to gain large animal practical skills.
The large animal labs take place off cam-
pus (transportation is the responsibility of
the student) and includes such skills and
techniques as handling & restraint, physical
exam, injections, blood sampling, oral medi-
cation administration, Intravenous Catheters,
dehorning, local anesthesia and radiology.
Aht320
practice Management
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course is designed to familiarize stu-
dents with business operation, manage-
ment and jurisprudence. Basic topics related
to business, management, client relations
and marketing will be covered. In addition,
ethics and legal responsibilities and obliga-
tions of the animal health technologist and
the veterinarian will be considered.
Aht330
pharmacology
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will allow the student to be-
come familiar with the commonly used
drugs in veterinary medicine. Major classes
of drugs will be discussed and described
with emphasis on client education when
dispensing medications and felding inqui-
ries concerning side effects, contraindica-
tions and withdrawal times.
Aht350
radiology I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Students learn the basic principles of ra-
diography and X-ray equipment. Students
also learn the fundamentals of darkroom
procedures and processing. Students be-
gin to assess X-ray exposure requirements,
set machine controls, take X-rays, process
the flms and assess techniques. Radiation
safety is stressed.
Aht360
Animal diseases II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
An overview of selected diseases affecting
ruminants, horses and hogs in which the
student is provided with some background
knowledge as to cause, clinical signs, treat-
ment and prevention. Also, the course will fa-
miliarize the student with methods by which
cattle, sheep, hogs and horses would typi-
cally be raised and managed by the clients of
a veterinary practice in Western Canada.
Aht390
large Animal Nutrition
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course reviews nutrition of farm ani-
mals under different management situa-
tions and production schedules.
Aht430
pocket pets - husbandry
and diseases
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The emphasis for this course is safe han-
dling procedures for rodents, rabbits, exotic
house pets and birds. Nutrition, clinical
pathology and disease prevention for each
species is presented. The principles of the
management of animals housed for re-
search, facility design, environmental con-
trols for the animal model, biohazards and
zoonoses are discussed. Ethical consider-
ations for research animals are explored.
This course serves as an introduction to yet
another career opportunity for AHT’s.
Bss370
Microbiology
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Lecture sessions cover general morpho-
logical, growth and pathogenic character-
istics of bacteria and viruses with specifc
reference to medically significant genera.
Laboratory sessions emphasize lab safety,
biohazards and routine procedures in the
microbiology lab, and aseptic collection of
clinical specimens.
seMester 4
Aht290
small Animal Nutrition
Hours: 36 Credits: 2.0
This is a practical course from which the
student will emerge with knowledge of the
proper feeding of small animals at all stages
of life, from neonate to geriatric. Evaluation
of the adequacy of pet diets, management
of the obese patient, and knowledge of spe-
cial diets for certain disease conditions is
included.
Aht410
small Animal clinics Iv
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
Continuation of Small Animal Clinics III
(AHT310)
Aht411
large Animal clinics Iv
Hours: 15 Credits: 1.0
Continuation of Large Animal Clinics III
(AHT 311). Transportation to off campus lo-
cations is the responsibility of the student.
Aht440
Immunology
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
This class discusses the principles of how
the body protects itself and fghts against
disease. An understanding of antigens,
the humoral and cell mediated immune re-
sponses, and active and passive immunity
is used to discuss vaccination protocols and
response to disease.
Aht450
radiology II
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
This course will provide the student with an
opportunity to practice the theory learned
in Radiology I, emphasizing the techniques
used in veterinary practice. The major em-
phasis of this course involves the proper po-
sitioning of the animal, determining proper
exposure factors, taking, processing and
evaluating the radiograph.
Aht460
cow-calf field studies II
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
A continuation of Cow-Calf Practicum I.
44 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Aht470
field studies II
Hours: 212 Credits: 12.5
The practicum is designed to provide an
opportunity to the student to gain practical
experience in clinical, technical, adminis-
trative, client relations and other aspects
of Animal Health Technology, thereby in-
creasing the acceptability of the graduat-
ing student in the workforce. This course is
taken at a local veterinary clinic or approved
related facility in year two of the program.
The student also completes shifts at an
Emergency Hospital and the NAIT satellite
of the Canadian Animal Blood Bank.
Aht480
clinical laboratory procedures Iv
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
This course provides the student the oppor-
tunity to respond to clinical scenarios where
the skills learned in other Clinical Labora-
tory Procedures courses will be utilized.
Also, some new diagnostic methods will be
added or incorporated from other courses
such as Parasitology.
Mlt350
clinical laboratory procedures III
Hours: 72 Credits: 4.0
Laboratory Procedures III is a continuation
of Laboratory Procedures I and II. The em-
phasis will be placed on multiple specimen
processing. The student will be presented
with various blood and urine specimens
and asked to perform specifc tests on each
specimen. This section will amalgamate
all the previously learned skills. This sec-
tion will also include vaginal cytology of the
bitch, abnormal hematology and various
diagnostic kits.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
The applicant must have English 30-1 (Eng-
lish 30) or English 30-2 (English 33), Math
30 (Applied or Pure), Chemistry 30 and
Biology 30.
A complete application includes:
A completed Application Form •
including fee.
Transcripts •
A “Verifcation of Work-Related Hours •
and Experience” form. This form
confrms the applicant has at least
80 hours of meaningful animal health
work experience at a veterinary clinic.
A Career Investigation Report •
additional reQuireMents and
inForMation
In order to be successful in the Animal Health
Technology program at the Northern Alberta
Institute of Technology basic computer skills
must be acquired by the student prior to
admission. Basic computer skills are con-
sidered to be word processing, presentation
skills (power point), e-mail usage, and basic
knowledge of spreadsheets. Instructional
staff will expect that students enrolled in this
program will have these basic skills and may
expect learning, submission of assignments,
and some educational interaction to occur
while using basic computer skills.
All applicants are encouraged to obtain a
high school diploma as some employers
may still require a high school diploma. Ap-
plicants with a credential in another NAIT
Health Science Program may be given some
preference in the selection process.
For students with a minimum of 80 hours in
a veterinary clinic, Chemistry 20 and Math
20 may be considered in lieu of Chemistry
30 and Math 30. Students with Math and
Chem 20 will not be considered until after
all applicants with Chem 30 and Math 30
have been given frst priority.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
international applicants
As English is the language of instruction in
all programs at the Institute, an adequate
knowledge of written and spoken English is
a prerequisite for admission. Regardless of
country of origin or citizenship status, all ap-
plicants must demonstrate profciency in the
English language prior to acceptance.
This requirement may be demonstrated as
follows: successful completion of the specif-
cally named prerequisite English course or an
approved alternative English course deemed
to be equivalent to the specific English re-
quirement PLUS a minimum of three years of
education in English in Canada or in a coun-
try where English is the principal language.
Applicants who do not meet this require-
ment will be required to do the following:
a) successfully complete the specifically
named prerequisite English course or an ap-
proved alternative English course deemed
to be equivalent to the specifc English re-
quirement.
b) TOEFL Internet Based Test (TOEFL – iBT)
Applicants must achieve a minimum overall
score of 83 broken down as follows: speaking
component with a minimum of 23; reading
component with a minimum of 20; listening
component with a minimum of 20; and writ-
ing component with a minimum of 20.
If the testing score is based on the older
testing version, Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL), applicants must achieve
a minimum score of 230 and Test of Spoken
English (TSE) must be a minimum of 40.
Foreign credentials must be evaluated by the
International Qualifcation Assessment Ser-
vices Branch of Alberta Labour (IQAS). The
phone number for IQAS is (780) 427-2655.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Current Tetanus, Diphtheria and Rabies im-
munizations are necessary. These can be
updated at NAIT after registration.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include aca-
demic achievement beyond the minimum
prerequisite identifed in the NAIT calendar
or application form. Minimum academic
achievement for competitive selection in
2006/07 was a combined average of 70%
or more in English 30-1 (English 30) or Eng-
lish 30-2 (English 33), Math 30 (Applied
or Pure), Chemistry 30 and Biology 30. As
well an assessment of the Career Investi-
gation and Work Experience hours will be
performed.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT.
A career investigation must accompany an
application for the program. The applicant
must have at least 80 hours of meaningful
animal health work experience at a veteri-
nary clinic. A “Verifcation of Work-Related
Hours and Experience” form must be com-
pleted by the supervisor and submitted.
This form is also available by calling the
AHT administrative assistant at 471-8922.
45 www.nait.ca
advanced/transFer credit
The consideration of Advanced Credit re-
quests will be completed upon successful
entry into the program during the frst two
weeks of each semester.
Advanced Credit can be awarded in the
School of Health Sciences at the request of
a student, and is based on NAIT receiving
relevant information indicating that the stu-
dent’s previous formal learning is equivalent
(or substantially equivalent) to the learning
outcomes contained in NAIT courses.
It is the responsibility of the student to:
Decide which courses(s) to apply for •
Advanced Credit.
Gather the appropriate records and •
documentation including transcripts,
course outlines and course objectives
of previous courses taken.
Meet with the course instructor to •
have course equivalency assessed.
If approval is given, the Associate
Chair will notify the student.
Understand that successful application •
for Advanced Credit may affect
eligibility for semester honours, the
Dean’s Honour Role, and honours
diploma/certicates or awards.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
In addition to the more traditional lecture
and laboratory settings students will also
gain clinical experience in a variety of loca-
tions both on and off Campus.
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Students can expect to attend classes
for an average of 29 hrs/week, over the
course of the two year program. During the
fve week practicum, students are expected
to work a 40 hour work week at the practi-
cum site.
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: Students
should expect to spend at least two hours
every evening in study, assignment comple-
tion and research. The average student also
spends approximately 8 hours on the week-
end, for a total of 15-20 hours per week.
co-op & Work experience
Dates: During April/May of the second
year, students are required to successfully
complete a practicum.
Length: 5 weeks
Type of experience: Most students select a
small or mixed animal practice in Alberta as
the best site to practice the maximum num-
ber of skills which they have learned in their
program studies.
Salary: Since this is part of the educational
experience, salaries are not paid to students.
Relocation: Any relocation expenses incurred
are the responsibility of the student. Avail-
ability of practicum placements varies from
year to year. There are always sites available
in Edmonton and the greater metropolitan
area so that relocation is not necessary.
Who facilitates the placement:
Dr. Jenifer Parks, Associate Chair
Telephone: (780) 378-5333
Fax:(780) 471-8770
E-mail: jparks@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Please call the program administrative as-
sistant at (780) 471-8922. Leave your
name, phone number and some suggested
dates and your call will be returned.
inFo sessions
Two evening sessions are available in Febru-
ary of each year.
Another opportunity to learn about the Ani-
mal Health program is NAIT’s Open House
held each year in mid-October. (For 2008,
October 10 and 11, 9 am - 4 pm both days).
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Animal Health Technology
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
After successful completion of training,
graduates are eligible to write the Veterinary
Technician National Exam (VTNE) certifca-
tion examination. Successful completion of
this examination and membership in good
standing with AAAHT is required for em-
ployment in Alberta.
Active membership with the Alberta As-
sociation of Animal Health Technologists
(AAAHT) is compulsory (under the Prov-
ince of Alberta’s Veterinary Act and Gen-
eral Regulation). Successful completion of
an examination set by the AAAHT is one
of the requirements for active membership.
Membership requirements may vary from
province to province; therefore, please con-
tact your appropriate provincial association
for further information.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
An Animal Health Technologist (AHT) must
have a genuine interest in animals and their
welfare. A successful graduate should have
the ability to remain calm under pressure,
be a self starter, have strong leadership
attributes, and sound decision making skills.
An AHT requires excellent interpersonal
skills with strong oral and written commu-
nication abilities.
An AHT is physically active. A typical day
involves lifting, bending and restraint of
animals.
46 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates of the NAIT Animal Health
Technology program are eligible for credit
towards a Bachelor of Science degree Pro-
gram at Athabasca University, University of
Alberta and University of Lethbridge.
proFessional association
courses
Both the Alberta Association of Animal
Health Technologists (AAAHT) and the
Alberta Association of Veterinary Medicine
(AVMA) offer continuing education courses
at different locations throughout Alberta.
Graduates may become members of the
North American Association of Veterinary
Technicians (NAVTA) which also hosts nu-
merous continuing education events.
Major skills acQuired
Animal nursing care; diagnostic imaging;
surgical assisting; laboratory procedures;
office procedures; knowledge and appli-
cation of basic principles of microbiology,
nutrition, immunology, pharmacology; use
and maintenance of clinical apparatus;
knowledge of anatomy and physiology and
medical terminology.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Companion Animal Practices •
Large and Mixed Animal Practices •
Animal Laboratories •
Humane Shelters •
Federal and Provincal Regulatory •
Agencies
Zoo and Wildlife Facilities •
Livestock Operations •
Pet Stores •
Pharmaceutical and Feed Companies •
career opportunities
Graduates of the program generally find
employment with veterinarians in private
practices concerned with pet animals, farm
animals, horses or a combination of these.
The graduate will undertake a variety of
tasks that may include laboratory analysis
of blood, urine and fecal samples; assisting
and performing radiographic procedures;
performing sanitation and sterilization pro-
cedures; assisting in the examination and
treatment of animals; assisting in anesthetic
and surgical procedures; and helping in the
administrative duties required in the smooth
operation of the veterinary practice.
Employment is not restricted to private
veterinary practice, however. Positions may
be found in related felds, such as research
animal facilities, federal and provincial regu-
latory agencies, zoos and other animal-ori-
ented areas in the public and private sector.
AnimAL HeALtH
tecHnOLOGY -
fAiRView
The Fairview Campus (Formerly Fairview
College) Animal Health Technology pro-
gram has a long-standing reputation for
producing highly skilled and capable pro-
fessionals. Our two-year diploma program
is accredited by the Canadian Veterinary
Medical Association.
Students receive training in animal nursing,
surgical assistance, anesthesiology, labora-
tory procedures, diagnostic imaging, phar-
macology and dental procedures. Studies
include animal diseases, animal behavior,
parasitology, nutrition, microbiology, hema-
tology, ethics, anatomy, physiology, pathol-
ogy and terminology. Students also practice
communications, offce procedures and cli-
ent relations.
Our campus features a working farm with
a variety of large animals plus companion
animals on site. These provide our students
with many opportunities to gain experi-
ence in handling, treating and caring for live
patients of all sizes. Practical expertise is
emphasized and complemented with rel-
evant theory and taught by highly qualifed,
skilled and experienced veterinary profes-
sionals. Students also have the opportunity
to spend time in veterinary clinics and other
veterinary facilities.
Graduates of our AHT program are eligible
to write the Veterinary Technician National
Examination (VTNE) for membership in the
Provincial Association. However, member-
ship requirements may vary from province to
province. Therefore students must contact
appropriate provincial associations for their
specifc requirements and cost of the exam.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Animal Studies
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
Two years (four semesters) including a six-
week work experience component at the
end of second year.
location
Fairview
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
September 02, 2008
First day of class
coNtActs
rik vandekerkhove d.v.M.
Associate Chair Animal Health Technology
Program
Nait Fairview Campus
Phone: (780) 835-6703
Phone: 1 888 999-7882 ext.703
Fax: (780) 835-6626
E-mail: rikv@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Students must complete all required courses
with a Grade Point Average of no less than
2.00 with no “F” grades. Students must also
satisfactorily complete the work experience
component in order to receive a diploma.
certiFication
Diploma in Animal Health Technology
accreditation
The program is accredited by the Canadian
Veterinary Medical Association.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Ah112
Animal Behavior and restraint
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Normal animal behavior and specifc behav-
ior problems of different species and breeds
will be covered. Students will learn about
human-animal bonding and basic physio-
logical requirements of animals. The ability
to handle and restrain small and large ani-
mals is taught with emphasis on safety for
patient and handler. Discussion on codes
of practice, animal rights and welfare and
CCAC regulations are included.
47 www.nait.ca
Ah141
Anatomy and physiology I
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
The AHT student will develop proper ana-
tomical and physiological terminology.
Instruction of cellular biology and physiol-
ogy will progress into an understanding
of organization of cell into tissues, organs
and body systems. A working knowledge
of body systems will include basic compo-
nents and functions, gross anatomical fea-
tures, common abnormalities, interactions
with other systems, surgical and diagnostic
imaging considerations and location and/or
palpation in live animals or cadavers. The
student will learn the names, location and
function of important anatomical structures
in common domestic animal species with
an emphasis on the application of practical
anatomical knowledge required for mastery
of subsequent courses in medical and surgi-
cal nursing, x-ray technology, etc.
Ah142
laboratory procedures 1
Hours: 160 Credits: 9.5
Students will develop profciency in care and
use of lab equipment, performing dilutions,
conversions and quality control. Features
of bacteria, fungi and viruses are discussed
and basic microbiological lab procedures
are introduced. Students are introduced to
hematological procedures and will learn to
identify normal blood parameters and cells.
Ah143
Animal science
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
The AHT student will become familiar with
the characteristics and purposes of various
breeds of small and large animals and some
of the non-traditional farm animals. Animal
production systems and methods of indi-
vidual identifcation for both large and small
animals will be discussed.
Ah144
offce procedures
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Students will develop computer skills to
prepare posters, fyers, mailing lists and pre-
sentations. Use of veterinary software will
develop skills in entering data, client and pa-
tient records, inventory maintenance, online
ordering and fnancial records. Offce duties
such as handling cash or credit card transac-
tions, preparing deposits and fling records
will be learned. Maintaining the cleanliness
and orderliness of the offce facility and dis-
plays is part of the student responsibility.
Students will also develop a solid foundation
of utilizing medical records to promote con-
tinuity of quality animal care.
Ah160
communications
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
The student will learn principles of various
forms of communication. Skills in written
forms of communication will be developed
through projects to extract data, compile
reports and prepare correspondence. Oral
presentations and impromptu speeches will
develop oral communication skills. Students
will learn to participate and communicate in
situations where group dynamics and inter-
actions with co-workers or employers are
involved.
Ah171
veterinary terminology and Applied
Mathematics
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
Proper use of medical nouns, verbs and ad-
jectives, includes background in root words
and development of prefx, suffx and plural
variations. Students will learn to provide
defnitions of medical terms and use correct
abbreviations or symbols. Mathematical
concepts that are frequently encountered
by the AHT will be covered and a working
knowledge of common measurement sys-
tems and conversions is developed. Accu-
rate calculations using correct notation and
units are required.
seMester 2
Ah220
clinical hematology
Hours: 72 Credits: 4.5
A review of the CBC in the lab and lecture
will improve the student’s ability to perform
hematological tests. The student will learn to
evaluate the erythron, leukon and hemosta-
sis by recognizing and interpreting abnormal
results and identifying possible causes of
those results. Hemopoietic neoplasia is dis-
cussed. Case studies will be used extensively
in presentation of course material.
Ah221
clinical Microbiology
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Principles of pathogenesis by microbiologi-
cal agents are covered. Students will learn to
group bacteria and fungi according to stain-
ing results, morphology and characteristics.
Practical microbiological procedures will be
performed or discussed to help differentiate
common microbiological pathogens. Impor-
tant veterinary infectious diseases and their
clinical signs, treatment and human health
implications are discussed. Case studies will
be used in presentation of course material.
Ah241
Anatomy and physiology II
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
The AHT student will develop proper ana-
tomical and physiological terminology.
Instruction of cullular biology and physiol-
ogy will progress into an understanding
of organization of cell into tissues, organs
and body systems. A working knowledge
of body systems will include basic compo-
nents and functions.
Ah242
ethics and client relations
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
Skills in personal management, professional-
ism, communications with clients, co-work-
ers and employers will be taught. Students
will learn to provide client education and
grief counselling. The student is required to
discuss relevant legislation and provisions
with respect to ethics and jurisprudence.
Ah243
laboratory and exotic Animals
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
Students will learn basic husbandry, com-
mon nursing care procedures and diseases
of rabbits, rodents, birds, reptiles and other
exotic animals. Human health implications
of handling and working with these ani-
mals will be discussed. Students will gain
a knowledge of regulations and protocols
involved in working with laboratory and ex-
otic animals.
Ah244
Nutrition
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Instruction on basic nutritional require-
ments, nutrients, additives and preser-
vatives is given. Variations in nutritional
considerations for different physiological
conditions and for small and large animals
are discussed. Normal rations and indica-
tions for prescription or specialty diets will
be identifed. The student will learn to make
recommendations to clients and educate
them as to their animal’s particular needs.
Ah245
parasitology
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
Life cycles of signifcant nematodes, trema-
todes, cestodes, arthropods and protozoa
are covered. Instruction includes patho-
genesis of common veterinary parasites,
treatment and control measures and hu-
man health implications. The students will
learn to prepare samples and identify these
parasites and their ova or oocysts using
common laboratory techniques.
48 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Ah246
Animal Nursing I
Hours: 44 Credits: 2.5
Proper identifcation, use, care and mainte-
nance of all equipment is emphasized. Basic
grooming procedures, hoof, nail, ear and eye
conditions and care are taught. Students
will learn about physical therapy, bandag-
ing, splinting, casting, and wound healing.
Recognition and treatment of complications
of improper techniques are covered.
Ah247
pathology
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
Basic principles and terminology of pathol-
ogy will be taught. The infammatory pro-
cess and tissue response to disease or injury
will be covered briefy. Students will receive
hands-on instruction in necropsy proce-
dures for small and large animal species.
Proper collection, handling and submission
of samples and transportation of dangerous
goods is discussed or demonstrated.
Ah248
procedural review I
Hours: 12 Credits: 0.5
All students will be given a review of the
courses they have completed and shown
how to apply the skills they have learned.
Students will receive special presentations,
guest speakers and discussion of cases or
rounds on the clinic rotations when possible.
seMester 3
Ah340
Anesthesiology
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.5
Instruction on the commonly used anes-
thetic agents will include their modes of
action, human health implications and WH-
MIS considerations. Students will learn to
perform a pre-anesthetic work up, calculate
and administer pre-anesthetics, induce and
maintain general anesthesia using different
agents, techniques and systems. Moni-
toring of patients includes recognition of
anesthetic stages and proper use of moni-
toring devices. Appropriate responses to
anesthetic complications and emergencies
will be covered. Appropriate analgesics and
analgesic protocols will be discussed.
Ah342
laboratory procedures II
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
Students will develop knowledge and skills
covered in previous lab courses, as well as
learning to collect and prepare and evaluate
samples for clinical chemistry and cytology.
Ah343
diagnostic Imaging
Hours: 86 Credits: 5.0
Students will learn the principles of radi-
ography, fuoroscopy, ultrasonography and
endoscopy. Identification, use, care and
maintenance of equipment and supplies
is covered with emphasis on safety. Stu-
dents will learn to position patients, operate
equipment and develop images that pro-
duce diagnostic quality results.
Ah344
Applied Immunology
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
A review of the purpose, functions and
normal variations of the immune system is
covered. Disorders of the immune system
will be classifed into broad categories and
includes discussion of clinical signs, diag-
nostic procedures and treatment principles
of some common immunologic conditions.
Students will learn the concepts and ap-
plication of basic immunologic tests and
vaccination procedures. Principles of blood
grouping and transfusions are covered.
Ah345
clinic procedures I
Hours: 83 Credits: 5.0
Review of skills learned throughout the pro-
gram by performing the tasks and responsi-
bilities of an AHT in a clinic and pharmacy
setting. The student will perform reception
duties, book, admit and discharge patients,
perform laboratory tests, administer medi-
cations, monitor patients and discuss cases
on rounds, maintain records, files and in-
ventories and many other duties required of
an AHT in a private practice. The student is
expected to demonstrate teamwork and co-
operation at all times.
Ah346
Animal Nursing II
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.5
Proper identifcation, use, care and mainte-
nance of all equipment is continued. Admin-
istration of medications by different routes
is taught. The student will learn techniques
for venipuncture, catheterizations and urine
and vaginal sample collection. Fluid therapy
is covered in depth, instruction includes
general nursing care of hospitalized pa-
tients, orphans, newborns, post-parturient
dams, and principles of pain management.
The student will be instructed on basic pro-
cedures such as vaginal exams, care of tra-
cheotomy, pharyngostomy and chest tube
sites, preparation of wounds and abscesses
for treatment. The student will be able to
discuss and/or perform all procedures cov-
ered and identify any common complica-
tions. Students will learn veterinary frst aid
procedures and emergency protocols. Hu-
mane euthanasia and maintenance of legal
record and log books is covered.
Ah347
surgical Assistance I
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
Identifcation, use, care and maintenance of
surgical instruments, equipment and sup-
plies is covered in detail. Students learn to
prepare facilities, patients and equipment
for surgical procedures with strict adher-
ence to principles of sanitation and steril-
ization. Students will participate in surgical
procedures as a surgical assistant and will
learn to pass instruments, care for exposed
tissue and provide suction or cautery. Stu-
dents become responsible for post opera-
tive clean up of the patient, equipment and
facilities and follow up with patient moni-
toring and surgical records.
seMester 4
Ah441
dental procedures
Hours: 33 Credits: 2.0
The student is expected to use proper den-
tal terminology and identify normal tooth
anatomy, function, eruption and dental for-
mula. The student learns to instruct clients
on dental home care procedures. Common
dental problems and diseases are covered
with emphasis on small animal and equine
patients. Proper use, care and maintenance
of dental equipment is covered. Principles
of dental radiography are discussed. Pro-
fciency in basic dental prophylaxis will be
developed using live animals and cadavers.
49 www.nait.ca
Ah442
Animal diseases
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
The AHT student will be able to discuss dis-
ease based on classifcation as metabolic,
nutritional, inherited, toxic, endocrine or
other. Common diseases of domestic ani-
mals will be discussed with respect to etiol-
ogy, specifc hosts, diagnostic techniques,
treatment and prevention and human health
implications.
Ah443
theriogenology
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
Principles of cell division and inheritance
are discussed. A review of anatomical and
hormonal components of male and female
reproduction systems prepares students to
learn about breeding behaviors and com-
mon diseases or conditions of the reproduc-
tive system in various animals. Techniques
used to assess or manipulate reproduction
in veterinary medicine will be discussed
and/or demonstrated. Instruction on gesta-
tion and parturition will be the main focus.
Ah445
pharmacy and pharmacology
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
Basic pharmacological principles are taught
and students learn to recognize different
groups of drugs and their basic actions. In
the pharmacy, the student will become fa-
miliar with common veterinary drugs and
their indications, administration and side
effects or toxic actions. Legal implications
of dispensing drugs and risks associated
with off label or improper use are discussed.
Students learn to prepare and dispense vet-
erinary preparations and educate clients
about their use.
Ah446
procedural review II
Hours: 12 Credits: 0.5
All students will be given a review of the
courses they have completed and shown
how to to apply the skills they have learned.
Part of this course will cover preparation
for the VTNE exam. Students will receive
special presentations, guest speakers and
discussion of cases or rounds on the clinic
rotations when possible.
Ah447
practicum
Hours: 240 Credits: 4.5
Students will be placed, individually, in an
on-the-job training position with a private
veterinary practice for six weeks at the end
of session IV. The student will be evaluated
by the employer according to criteria de-
termined by the Fairview campus Animal
Health Technology Programs as a pass/fail.
Ah455
clinic procedures II
Hours: 134 Credits: 8.0
Review of skills learned throughout the pro-
gram by performing the tasks and responsi-
bilities of an AHT in a clinic and pharmacy
setting. The student will perform reception
duties, book, admit and discharge patients,
perform laboratory tests, administer medi-
cations, monitor patients and discuss cases
on rounds, maintain records, files and in-
ventories and many other duties required
of an AHT in a private practice. The student
is expected to demonstrate teamwork and
cooperation at all times.
Ah481
field trip
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
The feld trip may include attendance at the
Animal Health Technologist Conference
and/or tour of veterinary clinics and related
facilities. Students will be required to cover
feld trip personal expenses.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
The applicant must have the following pre-
requisite courses: English 30-1 (English 30)
or English 30-2 (English 33), Biology 30,
Chemistry 30, Math 30(Applied or Pure).
additional reQuireMents and
inForMation:
Applicants presenting other Math courses,
for example the previous Alberta Learning
designates of Math 30 and Math 33, will
be considered on an individual basis by the
registrar.
For students with a minimum of 80 hours in
a veterinary clinic, Chemistry 20 and Math
20 may be considered in lieu of Chemistry
30 and Math 30. Students with Math and
Chem 20 will not be considered until after
all applicants with Chem 30 and Math 30
have been given frst priority.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
The applicant must have at least 80 hours
of meaningful animal health work experi-
ence at a veterinary clinic or equivalent. The
applicant must provide a completed Verif-
cation of Work Experience form. This form
is available by calling the program’s admin-
istrative assistant at (780) 835-6630.
All applicants are encouraged to obtain a
high school diploma as some employers
may still require a high school diploma. Ap-
plicants with a credential in another NAIT
Health Science Program may be given some
preference in the selection process.
Application deadline will remain open until
the program is full.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
A Career Investigation report is not required
for the AHT - Fairview program, however,
the applicant must have at least 80 hours of
meaningful animal health work experience
at a veterinary clinic. A “Verifcation of Work
Experiences” form must be completed by the
supervisor and submitted. This form is avail-
able by calling the Fairview AHT administra-
tive assistant at (780) 835-6630.
advanced/transFer credit
Visit www.nait.ca for information.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
In addition to the more traditional lecture
and laboratory settings students in second
year will do rotations in the on-site small
animal clinic.
BuildinG location(s)
Animal Science building on the Fairview
Campus
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Students can expect to attend classes
for an average of 35 hrs/week, over the
course of the two year program. During the
six week practicum, students are expected
to work a 40 hour work week at the practi-
cum site.
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: Students
should expect to spend at least one to two
hours every evening in study, assignment
completion and research. The average stu-
dent also spends approximately 8 hours
on the weekend, for a total of 15-20 hours
per week.
50 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
co-op & Work experience
Dates: At the completion of second year stu-
dents are required to complete a practicum.
Length: 6 weeks
Type of experience: The students have
numerous practicum sites from which to
chose. They can opt to gain their practicum
experience at one of the following: small an-
imal clinic, large animal clinic, mixed animal
clinic, referral or emergency clinic.
Salary: Since this is part of the educational
experience, salaries are not paid to students.
Relocation: Any relocation expenses in-
curred are the responsibility of the student.
Who facilitates the placement:
Dr. Art Schatz, Practicum Coordinator
Telephone: (780) 835-6701
Fax: (780) 835-6626
E-mail: aschatz@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Animal Health Technology
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Graduates of the program must comply
with the Animal Health Technologist Asso-
ciation of the province in which they will be
practicing. Membership requirements vary
between provinces. Students are encour-
aged to become student members while
attending the program.
Graduates of the AHT program are eligible
for credit towards a Bachelor of Science de-
gree at Athabasca University, University of
Alberta and University of Lethbridge.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
An Animal Health Technologist (AHT) must
have a genuine interest in animals and their
welfare. A successful graduate should have
the ability to remain calm under pressure,
be a self starter, have strong leadership at-
tributes, with sound decision making skills.
An AHT requires excellent interpersonal
skills with strong oral and written commu-
nication abilities.
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Both the Alberta Association of Animal
Health Technologists (AAAHT) and the
Alberta Association of Veterinary Medicine
(AVMA) offer continuing education courses
at different locations throughout Alberta.
Graduates may become members of the
North American Association of Veterinary
Technicians (NAVTA) which also hosts nu-
merous continuing education events.
Major skills acQuired
Animal nursing care; radiographic proce-
dures; surgical assisting; laboratory proce-
dures; office procedures; knowledge and
application of basic principles of microbiol-
ogy, nutrition, immunology, pharmacology;
use and maintenance of clinical apparatus;
knowledge of anatomy and physiology and
medical terminology.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Companion Animal Practices •
Large and Mixed Animal Practices •
Animal Laboratories •
Humane Shelters •
Federal and Provincial Regulatory •
Agencies
Zoo and Wildlife Facilities •
Livestock Operations •
Pet Stores •
Pharmaceutical and Feed Companies •
APPLied BAnkinG
& Business
ceRtificAte
Are you looking for a rewarding career with
a lot of promotion potential? If you have fu-
ency in English, recognize the need for team-
work, have a keen appreciation for accuracy
and detail, and enjoy being actively involved
in the marketing services, Applied Banking
and Business could be the perfect ft!
Using intensive banking lab and class-
room settings, students develop the skills
required by employers such as customer
service, sales and referral ability, work ethic,
and effective communication. Skills in en-
try-level bookkeeping/accouting and in-
troductory mathematical principles and
concepts for fnancial problem solving are
also developed.
Initially, training is focused on developing
the techical skills but ultimately, the pro-
gram focuses on developing the integrated
use of interpersonal skills in daily business.
A number of areas are focused on in the
process. These skills include effective cre-
ative and critical thinking, problem solving,
confict resolution, and teambuilding.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Business & Administrative
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
1 year (2 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
August 29, 2008
coNtActs
rosanna anderson
Phone: (780) 471-7861
Fax: (780) 471-8367
E-mail: rosannaa@nait.ca
alternate contact
Kathi Maitre, Instructor
Phone: (780) 471-7012
Fax: (780) 471-8367
E-mail: kathim@nait.ca
51 www.nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Program Length: One year (two semesters
of 16 weeks each)
certiFication
Applied Banking and Business Certificate
(Cert. Bus.)
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
Program is under revision. Changes may
occur.
seMester 1
ABB101
Accounting
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The course introduces the student to the
basic accounting cycle. The principles of
double entry accounting, accounting re-
cords, and fnancial statements provide the
student with a foundation to build specifc
skills. Emphasis is placed on the accounting
cycle, and the understanding of how and
why a particular statement is prepared. The
student will be able to function in an entry-
level bookkeeping/accounting position to
provide effective service relating to clients’
needs. Prerequisite: None
ABB110
Banking principles
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The course provides the student with an
understanding of banking practices and
issues through bank regulations, organiza-
tion, security, administration, structure and
operations. The course examines the major
economic roles of banks and other types
of financial institutions that comprise the
Canadian fnancial system. The course also
examines personal fnance and consumer
lending analyses. Prerequisite: None
ABB111
Business communications
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The course introduces the student to com-
munication theory and its application to so-
cial and business situations. It is designed
to upgrade the student’s effectiveness in
oral and written communications. The ma-
jor project of the course is the preparation
of resumes and cover letters. Word will be
used for the written projects and Power-
Point will be used for the oral presentations.
Prerequisite: None
ABB136
Banking lab
Hours: 160 Credits: 10.0
The lab provides the student with practice
in cash operation emphasizing security, ac-
curacy, integrity, teamwork, deposit trans-
actions, and exceptional customer service.
An understanding of banking operations
is developed through the processing of
cheques, deposits and other common bank
products. The student operates an on-line
computer to process daily banking transac-
tions. Prerequisite: None
ABB191
organizational Behaviour
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The course focuses upon individual and
group behaviour to assist the students in
understanding themselves and others. From
this study of behaviour, students are able to
acquire skills in teambuilding, confict reso-
lution, problem-solving, goal setting and
assertiveness and then apply these skills to
provide exceptional customer service and
to meet and exceed customer expectations.
Prerequisite: None
AsM107
Business Mathematics
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course is designed to provide students
with knowledge of the fundamental princi-
ples and concepts of business mathematics,
and to develop their abilities to apply these
principles and concepts to solve practical
business problems, particularly in market-
ing and fnance. Excel will be used to do f-
nancial calculations. Prerequisite: None
seMester 2
ABB202
Accounting
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
The course develops the student’s compe-
tence in specifc accounting techniques. Ac-
counting for cash, accounts receivable, bad
debts, and fnancial statement analysis are
examined. The skills learned are reinforced
by the completion of a case study research-
ing a Canadian corporation. The material
presented will enable the student to func-
tion at an entry level bookkeeping/account-
ing position. Prerequisite: ABB101
ABB212
Business communications
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The course introduces the student to the
development of competence in business
writing and the practical application of
communication concepts and skills. Busi-
ness letters and the job interview are cov-
ered in addition to increased emphasis on
oral communication, particularly telephone
communications Pre-requisite: ABB111
ABB237
Banking lab
Hours: 192 Credits: 12.0
The lab is a continuation of ABB136 stress-
ing customer service and the marketing of
financial services. Through the operation
of a simulated banking branch, training
and practice emphasizes relationship sell-
ing and referal, teambuilding, fraud and
security, and individual performance excel-
lence. Note: A four-week work placement
is included in the 192 credit hours for this
course. Prerequisite: ABB136
ABB250
Marketing concepts
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The course introduces the students to the
four P’s of marketing (product, price, place
and promotion) and how these concepts
apply to a service environment. The course
emphasizes the process of personal selling
including self and customer analysis, prod-
uct knowledge and effective selling tech-
niques and strategies in a fnancial setting.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Applicants must have:
English 30-1 or English 30-2 •
Math 20 (Pure or Applied). •
Minimum academic achievement for com-
petitive selection in 2005/2006 was a
mark of 50% in English 30-1 or English 30-2
and Math 30 (Pure or Applied).
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Because of the compulsory Banking Lab
practicum, applicants to the Applied Bank-
ing and Business program at NAIT must
be bondable. This means that you DO
NOT have a criminal record for FRAUD or
THEFT (including shoplifting). If you have
any inquiries or need clarification about
whether you are bondable, please contact
Rosanna Anderson, Program Coordinator, at
(780) 471-7861 or Counseling Services at
(780) 471-7499.
52 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
career investiGation
Completion of a Career Investigation report
is strongly recommended for the Applied
Banking and Business program.
advanced/transFer credit
Rosanna Anderson, Associate Chair
Telephone: (780) 471-7861
Fax: (780) 471-8367
E-mail: rosannaa@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
Classrooms - desks, tables and chairs to ac-
commodate lessons and group discussions
Banking lab - an on-line banking system for
processing banking transactions
Computer lab - access to Microsoft Offce
Suite and the Internet
classrooM and study hours
Semester 1 - 16 weeks with 28 hours per
week
Semester 2 - 16 weeks (12 weeks at 27
hours per week, 4 weeks at 37.5 hours per
week)
co-op & Work experience
Students are placed with various fnancial
institutions in order to provide the student
with a variety of experiences necessary
to meet practicum competencies and the
needs of employers.
Dates: Approximately April 1 - April 30
Length: 4 weeks
Salary: Nominal rate of $1/hour to offset
transportation and miscellaneous ex-
penses.
Who facilitates the placement:
Rosanna Anderson, Associate Chair
Telephone: (780) 471-7861
Fax:(780) 471-8367
E-mail: rosannaa@nait.ca
Required component of ABB237 - Banking
Lab
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The Buddy System provides an opportu-
nity for prospective students to spend a
day teamed with a NAIT student to attend
classes and laboratory sessions to ask ques-
tions and experience NAIT frst hand. Buddy
Days are only available between September
and March each academic year.
To arrange a Buddy Day with Applied Bank-
ing and Business, contact:
Yvette Labiuk, Student Advisor
Telephone: (780) 471-7611
Email: yvettel@nait.ca
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Applied Banking and Business Certifcate
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Individuals who have complete fluency in
the English language, who recognize the
need for teamwork, have a keen apprecia-
tion for accuracy and detail, and enjoy being
actively involved in the marketing of ser-
vices usually do well in the program.
advanced credit possiBilities
Applied Banking and Business students may
transfer to Semester II of NAIT’s Business
Administration Year I. Additional credit for
two courses may be given if the student en-
ters the Business Administration - Finance
in the second year.
additional post certiFication
diploMa courses
Accounting Diploma •
Finance Diploma •
Management Diploma •
Marketing Diploma •
Personal Financial Planner Certifcate •
proFessional association
courses
Institute of Canadian Bankers •
National Credit Union Accreditation •
Major skills acQuired
Customer service and relationship •
banking
Referral and sale of fnancial products •
and services
Effective communication •
Cash and security operations •
Computer – Windows applications •
Accounting and Math profciency •
cAreer opportuNItIes
career opportunities
Graduates have fexibility in career choice
because the training is divided between the
fnancial and business aspects.
Those preferring the fnancial side typically
fnd work in customer service areas of:
Banks •
Trust companies •
Credit unions •
Those who prefer the business setting fnd
positions in the cash control or general cus-
tomer service areas of:
Large or small businesses •
Government offces •
Accounting frms •
Brokerage frms •
53 www.nait.ca
ARcHitectuRAL
tecHnOLOGY
Architectural Technologists assist in the
translation of design concepts into graphic
images, then into technical drawings and
specifcations that ultimately result in the
creation of the built environment. Students
learn free-hand sketching techniques but
manual and computer-aided drawing skills
are emphasized.
Students are readied for the workplace by
extensive training in building products and
materials, structural analysis and design,
building science, mechanical and electrical
systems and more.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
Two years (four semesters of 16 weeks
each)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
Garth Bell, chair
(780) 471-7415
Email: garthb@nait.ca
roy kotylak, associate chair
(780) 491-3048
Email: royk@nait.ca
scott sMith, associate chair
(780) 471-7064
Email: ssmith@nait.ca
susan Ward-cornish, associate
chair
(780) 378-6162
Email: susanc@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years (four semesters of 16 weeks
each)
certiFication
Diploma in Architectural Technology
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Arc101
construction drawings I & cAd I
Hours: 112 Credits: 7.0
Introduction to AutoCAD and drawing
techniques required for the computer pro-
duction of working drawings for a residen-
tial building.
Arc105
detailing I
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Introduction to detailing residential light
frame wood construction components in
assembly, using a freehand graphic format.
Arc110
design & presentation I
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The study of fundamental elements and prin-
ciples of design with instruction in presenta-
tion techniques in a variety of media. Basic
design fundamentals are applied to simple
abstract and practical problems. Basic free-
hand drawing skills will be developed.
Arc120
products & Materials I
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This course provides a brief introduction to
the nature of the basic building construction
materials. Organizational methods (Mas-
terFormat ), regulations, and associations
for building materials will be discussed.
Major topics of earthwork, foundations, site
preparation, wood, and heavy timer will be
talked about while learning to analyse the
mechanical, thermal, electrical, and chemi-
cal properties of building materials.
Arc140
structures I (Mechanics)
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This is an introductory course in structural
mechanics. It includes the basic engineering
principles and structural systems as they
apply to building forms. Principles relating
to elementary statics will be introduced. In
this way the student will be able to identify
and analyze structural systems, forces, and
loads.
Arc150
computer Applications
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course introduces students to four
software packages: WORD, EXCEL, POW-
ERPOINT and PHOTOSHOP. File manag-
ment concepts will be introduced through
the use of WINDOWS.
Arc160
history of the Built environment
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
An introduction to the evolution of the built
environment from ancient civilizations up to
the present international scene. Numerous
historical periods are reviewed which in-
clude highlights of signifcant achievements
in architecture, interior design, landscape
architecture and urban planning specifc to
each era. Constructions and projects are pre-
sented along with the context of their time,
place and culture to explain the reasons for
their specific characteristics and contribu-
tions to the art of design and building.
Arc170
professional practice I
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This course introduces the student to the
key participants and processes which gen-
erate the built environment. It describes the
roles, responsibilities and inter relationships
of professionals and technologists in Plan-
ning, Architecture, Interior Design, Land-
scape Architecture and Construction.
Ase109
effective communications I
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
ASE109 provides an introduction to busi-
ness and technical communication. Topics
include English grammar, punctuation, ef-
fective sentences, paragraph development,
correspondence, and oral presentations.
MIc130
light frame construction
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Introduction to the principles and require-
ments of light frame construction and vari-
ous building components of assembly in
scale model format.
seMester 2
Arc201
construction drawings II & cAd II
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
The intent of this course is to develop fur-
ther the AutoCAD skills and knowledge re-
quired to produce a complete set of working
drawings for a commercial building.
54 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Arc205
detailing II
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Introduction to detailing non-residential
wood frame and masonry components in
assembly, using a freehand graphic format.
Arc210
design & presentation II
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course enables the students to develop
skills in the production of architectural pre-
sentation drawings including axonometric
and perspective constructions, using pencil,
ink and felt markers. This course assists stu-
dents to understand and apply the design
process to simple buildings. Realistic plan-
ning and design situations are investigated.
Arc220
products & Materials II
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
Products and materials and related informa-
tion pertaining to concrete, masonry, met-
als, plastics and glazing will be presented in
this course.
Arc230
sustainable Building practice
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
An introduction to “Sustainable” build-
ing and land development practices that
discusses the impact of current global en-
vironmental and resource issues on the
construction industry. The primary content
of the course is focused on the exploration
of typical methods, techniques and termi-
nology used for the design and creation
of “High-Performance Green Buildings”
and Eco-Friendly Developments along
with some discussion and review of green
building assessment systems such as LEED
(Leadership in Energy and Environmental
Design) Built-Green Alberta and Green
Globe Canada.
Arc240
structures II (statics and strength
of Materials)
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory noncalculus course
on Statics and Strength of Materials at the
technology level. The emphasis throughout
is on applications with suffcient foundation
in principles. In this way the Architectural
Technology students will be familiarized
with the fundamental methods of analyzing
structural models. This course of Statics and
Strength of Materials covers the following
topics: basic concepts and characteristics of
forces and force systems, resultant of con-
current forces, equilibrium of a rigid body,
statically determinancy and constraint of
a rigid body, real loading, shear forces and
bending moments of structural members,
force analysis of structures. Moments of
inertia of areas, internal reactions, strain
for axial loads - Hooke’s Law, stress and
strain. Stress-strain relationships, stresses
and deformations resulting from axial and
transverse loads.
Arc260
Building code
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course provides an overview of the
Alberta Building Code, with particular
emphasis on Parts 3 and 9 of the Alberta
Building Code as it relates to safety and fre
protection in buildings of various sizes and
occupancies.
Ase209
effective communications II
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
ASE209 provides students with practice pre-
paring documents relevant to Architectural
Technology. Topics include technical writing
style and format, organizational strategies,
business correspondence, oral communica-
tion, and information gathering skills.
get260
survey/gIs
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This is an introductory course in basic sur-
veying measurements required for an un-
derstanding of maps and plans used by
Architectural Technologists. The course
involves some feld surveying labs and class-
room demonstrations of survey instruments
and equipment. As well, students will be in-
troduced to basic survey calculations related
to survey and architectural plan reading. A
fnal phase of the course will be an introduc-
tion to legal surveys for title to land, and an
overview of geographic information systems
(GIS) as applied to land development.
seMester 3
Arc301
construction drawings III
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course will extend the learner’s ability
to develop a set of architectural working
drawings using AutoCAD for commercial
steel buildings.
Arc305
detailing III
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Introduction to detailing structural steel and
architectural metal components in assem-
bly, using a freehand graphic format.
Arc310
design & presentation III
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course emphasizes the investigation
of the design process in its application to a
variety of architectural projects. Students
will interpret an architectural program, ex-
plore the functional and aesthetic meaning
of a variety of forms and determine materi-
als for their designs based on given criteria.
The communication of concepts are deliv-
ered through presentation drawings as well
as written and oral means.
Arc320
products & Materials III
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Products, materials and related information
pertaining to fnishe, specialties, equipment,
furnishings, special construction, convey-
ing equipment, and the facility services
subgroup of masterFormat 2004 including
mechanical and electrical are the major top-
ics of this course. Selection and specifying of
various materials in some of these areas is
discussed. A brief introduction is given to the
various types and formats of specifcations
used in the building construction industry.
Arc331
Building renovation
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course focuses on some of the basic
characteristics of historical buildings and
the renovation of existing buildings. Ed-
monton’s historical buildings are located,
unique features are identifed, the origin of
the building is recorded and presentations
are prepared on the history and visual ele-
ments of the buildings. Documentation and
renovation of an existing building will be ad-
dressed witht he focus on the construction
process as it applies to the renovation or
addition to the building. Emphasis is placed
on how these reconstructive processes dif-
fer from new construction.
55 www.nait.ca
Arc340
structures III (wood & steel design)
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course enables the student to acquire
technical knowledge related to structural
steel and wood members and their connec-
tions. Behavior and limit states, design of
typical wood and steel members is empha-
sized using industry standard methods. The
course includes a major project in which
students produce a set of structural work-
ing drawings for a steel frame building.
Arc351
cAd III
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The intent of this course is to develop use of
computer software for production of three-
dimensional drawings.
els330
electrical & Mechanical services
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces the student to the
principles of; illumination, lighting funda-
mentals and light sources, electrical instal-
lations and equipmen. Also the application
of heating, ventilating, air condiditioning
and plumbing systems in buildings.
Ase309
effective communications III
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
ASE309 extends the range and depth of
Architectural Technology communication
topics taken in ASE 209. The course covers
research skills and related documentation,
short reports, and formal technical reports
(preparation and presentation).
seMester 4
Arc401
construction drawings Iv
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course is intended to expand the stu-
dent’s ability to produce a set of working
drawings. Cast-in-place and precast con-
crete building elements are introduced and
incorporated into a set of detailed working
drawings.
Arc407
detailing Iv
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Introduction to detailing cast-in-place con-
crete and pre-cast concrete components in
assembly, using a freehand graphic format.
Arc410
design & presentation Iv
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is an introduction to the use
of models as a three-dimensional form of
architectural presentation. Principles of
model construction, including selection of
materials and use of equipment, are learned
through several group projects.
Arc420
Building envelope science
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Principles and details which apply to the
design and construction of an effective
building envelope are studied, along with
products and materials commonly used
and specified in this aspect of buildings.
Materials relating to thermal and moisture
protection and openings are also studied in
relation to their applications in an effective
building envelope.
Arc440
structures Iv (reinforced
concrete design)
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course enables the student to acquire
technical knowledge relating to reinforced
concrete design used in Architecture. Em-
phasis is on behavior and design of cast-
in-place concrete members, reinforcing
steel, reinforced concrete slabs, beams and
columns using design manuals. The course
includes a major project in which students
produce a set of structural working draw-
ings for a reinforced concrete building.
Arc451
cAd Iv
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Building Information Modeling (BIM) rep-
resents the future of building design and is
swiftly becoming an industry standard. The
intent of this course is to develop the use of
BIM computer software for the production
of three-dimensional drawings.
Arc461
estimating
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Estimating skills are required in virtually
every aspect of the construction industry.
This course examines the bidding process
and applies estimating fundamentals used
in preparation of bids for common building
types. Students will use spreadsheet soft-
ware to prepare bids based on the standard
construction stipulated price contract with a
focus on Divisions 0 through 14 of the typical
specifcation and construction drawings.
Arc471
professional practice II
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course provides an in depth look at
the business and legal practice of an archi-
tectural office focusing on the role of the
architectural technologist. Office organi-
zation and administrative procedures are
discussed including the roles of all con-
struction industry participants throughout
the phases of the progress of a building
project. Students will be made aware of
the components and purpose of contract
documents and specifications. Students
will also be introduced to various project
delivery systems, their specific ontracts
and the roles of the construction industry
participants within these delivery systems.
Guest lecturers from industry are arranged
when possible and all students will fulfll a
one week work practicum in the architec-
tural industry.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
High School graduation is not required
by NAIT. However, some employers and
post secondary institutes may require high
school graduation as a condition of em-
ployment or an entry requirement. Specifc
subject prerequisites are still required and
include English 30-1 or 30-2, Pure Math 30,
or a minimum of 65% in Algebra 35 and one
of Physics 30 (recommended), Chemistry
30 or Science 30.
Applicants presenting other math courses,
for example the previous Alberta Learning
designations of Math 30 and Math 33 will
be considered on an individual basis by the
Registrar. Math updating or upgrading may
be required.
The Registrar also requires that a Career In-
vestigation Report be submitted.
Applications must be received before
March 31 to be considered for the follow-
ing fall intake. Applications received after
March 31 may be placed on a waiting list.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
56 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Students are required to have a laptop
computer for the duration of their studies
at NAIT. The use of laptop computers pro-
vides the students with the opportunity to
learn widely used professional software.
Extensive use of computers in industry has
changed the way things are done in offces
by the technologist. Combine this with
changes in the print media industry, and
“the old way of doing things” is not longer
feasible. For more information on the re-
quirements for a laptop computer and soft-
ware, contact the Program offce.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include academic
achievement beyond the minimum prerequi-
sites identifed in the NAIT calendar or ap-
plication form. Academic achievement for
competitive selection in 2006/2007 was a
minimum combined average of 70% in the
prerequisite courses required for admission.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT.
A standard career investigation is required.
The Career Investigation is a report (up to a
minimum of two pages) applicants prepare
as part of the student selection process for
our subscribed full-time program.
Log on www.nait.ab.ca/registrar and click
on “Preparing a Career Investigation”.
advanced/transFer credit
Garth Bell
Program Head
(780) 471-7415
garthb@nait.ca
Roy Kotylak
Assistant Program Head
(780) 491-3048
royk@nait.ca
Scott Smith
Assistant Program Head
(780) 471-7064
ssmith@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms provide tables and chairs to ac-
commodate lectures and group discussions.
Studios are equipped with drafting tables,
complete with parallel rules, side tables and
chairs.
BuildinG location(s)
Engineering Technologies Annex
10240 Princess Elizabeth Avenue
Edmonton Alberta Canada T5G 0Y2
classrooM and study hours
All semesters are 28 hours per week in
length.
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Practicum Placements usually occur
during Week 8 of the fourth semester.
Length: Practicum placements are limited to
a one-week, a fve day industry exposure.
Type of experience: Students are placed in
Architectural offices throughout Edmon-
ton, and at the student’s choice, occasion-
ally Calgary or other cities. It is the intent
to have each student participate in the du-
ties and activities which an Architectural
Technologist would normally perform in an
Architect’s offce. We encourage the Archi-
tects to provide the student with a variety of
work experiences including, where possible,
project meetings with clients/consultants
and/or feld visits.
Salary: The practicum placement is part of
the educational experience, salaries are not
paid to students.
Relocation: Most placements are provided
in the Edmonton area. However, should a
student wish to be placed in offces located
elsewhere, the student shall arrange and be
responsible for the cost of all transportation
and room/board costs incurred.
Who facilitates the placement: Student
Placement is arranged by an Instructor,
prior to commencement of the practicum.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Prospective students are invited to spend a
day in classes with a student currently en-
rolled in the program. Current students are
encouraged to welcome “buddy students”,
discuss the program with them and show
them past assignments.
For Buddy Student information, contact the
Administrative Assistants (Alma Giese or
Pat Smid) at (780) 471-8988.
e-mail: almag@nait.ca
e-mail: psmid@nait.ca
inFo sessions
Evening information session is given in Feb-
ruary of each year. Contact the Registrar’s
offce for date and time.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Architectural Technology
advanced credit possiBilities
No formal arrangements exist between our
program and Schools of Architecture.
industry support
Yearly Advisory Committee Meetings with
industry representatives ensure that pro-
gram courses are current and relevant.
First year students spend one day in archi-
tectural offces as “job shadows”.
Second year students are placed in industry
offces for a one week period to experience
the professional work environment.
proFessional association
courses
The Alberta Association of Architects offers
educational sessions, courses and informa-
tion leading to affliate membership in the
AAA as Certified Architectural Technolo-
gists.
post Graduation
After two years relevant work experience
and meeting other criteria, graduates may
become Affiliate Members of the Alberta
Association of Architects and be titled Cer-
tifed Architectural Technologists.
57 www.nait.ca
Major skills acQuired
Architectural design, detailing and •
drafting.
Freehand drawing. •
Engineering drafting and detailing. •
Graphic and verbal communication and •
presentation.
Knowledge of building products and •
building science.
Specifcation writing, estimating, site •
inspection and project management.
Profcient computer skills in CAD and •
offce automation.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Architectural and drafting frms, civic build-
ing inspector offces, housing and mortgage
agencies, construction companies, products
and material suppliers.
career opportunities
Assistants to architects, engineers and re-
lated design professionals; technical and
managerial positions with building con-
tractors, home design companies, building
component manufacturers and suppliers.
AutO BOdY -
PRe-emPLOYment
The Auto Body Technician Pre-Employment
Program provides graduates with the train-
ing needed to obtain an entry-level position
in the Auto Body Technician trade. Gradu-
ates will have taken all of the technical train-
ing normally obtained in the First Period of a
traditional Apprenticeship program.
Students receive training in the following
areas:
* Industry overview and regulations
* Component removal and installation
* Substrate preparations
* Welding
* Hand skills and basic sheet metal repair
Students shall do a work practicum in an
Auto Body repair shop.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Trades
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
12 weeks (including 4 week practicum)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
First day of class
coNtActs
roB daWson
Chair
(780) 453-5445
rdawson@nait.ca
jiM hoMer
Associate Chair
(780) 453-5423
jhomer@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Twelve (12) weeks, including a four (4)
week work practicum.
certiFication
NAIT Auto Body Technician Pre-Employ-
ment Certifcate
accreditation
Graduates of the program who continue on
in industry as apprentice Auto Body Techni-
cians can receive accreditation from Alberta
Apprenticeship and Industry Training for the
technical training component of First Period
Auto Body Technician training.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
ABp101
Industry overview and regulations
Hours: 12 Credits: 0.5
This course is designed to familiarize the
student with the Apprenticeship system,
safety in the workplace and regulations
which affect the trade. The importance of
a safe work environment and the workers’
rights will be discussed.
ABp102
component removal and
Installation
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
Auto Body repair is a hand skills trade and
requires the workers to have the knowledge
of all the tools associated with the trade. Fas-
teners and materials technology, and com-
ponent assembly/removal will be discussed.
ABp103
substrate preparation
Hours: 66 Credits: 4.0
With the many substrates and refnishing
products involved in the Auto Body repair
industry, all aspects of surface preparation
and products will be discussed. A hands-
on application of fllers, chemical strippers,
abrasives and the application of undercoats
will be experienced.
ABp104
welding
Hours: 72 Credits: 4.0
The development and history of oxy-acety-
lene heating and cutting, as well as gas
metal arc welding, will be discussed and
extensively practiced. Due to the use of re-
cycled components, high strength steel, and
high strength low alloy, consideration must
be given to the heat effect zones.
ABp105
Non-structural panel repair
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The constantly evolving automobile exten-
sively uses lighter body panels and trim.
The Auto Body Technician must be capable
of structurally repairing composite and fex-
ible body parts or sections to pre-accident
conditions.
ABp106
work practicum
Hours: 160 Credits: 2.5
After completing eight weeks of training,
the students will be placed in an actual shop
setting for four weeks. This portion of the
course is designed to expose the student to
the trade in an auto body repair facility. The
student will then employ the knowledge
and skills acquired while attending the Auto
Body Pre-Employment program.
seMester 1
ABp101
Industry overview and regulations
Hours: 12 Credits: 0.5
This course is designed to familiarize the
student with the Apprenticeship system,
safety in the workplace and regulations
which affect the trade. The importance of
a safe work environment and the workers’
rights will be discussed.
58 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
ABp102
component removal and
Installation
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
Auto Body repair is a hand skills trade and
requires the workers to have the knowledge
of all the tools associated with the trade.
Fasteners and materials technology, and
component assembly/removal will be dis-
cussed.
ABp103
substrate preparation
Hours: 66 Credits: 4.0
With the many substrates and refnishing
products involved in the Auto Body repair
industry, all aspects of surface preparation
and products will be discussed. A hands-
on application of fllers, chemical strippers,
abrasives and the application of undercoats
will be experienced.
ABp104
welding
Hours: 72 Credits: 4.0
The development and history of oxy-acety-
lene heating and cutting, as well as gas
metal arc welding, will be discussed and
extensively practiced. Due to the use of re-
cycled components, high strength steel, and
high strength low alloy, consideration must
be given to the heat effect zones.
ABp105
Non-structural panel repair
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The constantly evolving automobile exten-
sively uses lighter body panels and trim.
The Auto Body Technician must be capable
of structurally repairing composite and fex-
ible body parts or sections to pre-accident
conditions.
ABp106
work practicum
Hours: 160 Credits: 2.5
After completing eight weeks of training,
the students will be placed in an actual shop
setting for four weeks. This portion of the
course is designed to expose the student to
the trade in an auto body repair facility. The
student will then employ the knowledge
and skills acquired while attending the Auto
Body Pre-Employment program.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Completed Grade 10 including English,
Mathematics and Science.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Prospective students require excellent
hand-eye coordination and an interest in
automobiles. Since the auto body trade is
looked upon as a craft requiring excellent
hand skills, attendance is critically impor-
tant in order for students to develop their
crafting skills to a level expected by a pro-
spective employer.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include aca-
demic achievement beyond the minimum
prerequisites.
career investiGation
A career investigation is not required but is
advisable. Work in the auto body trade in-
volves a lot of manual labour and students
are advised to speak with a body shop
owner, manager or technician about the
skills and physical stamina required for this
trade before enrolling in the program.
advanced/transFer credit
Contact the Associate Chair at (780) 453-
5423 or fax requests to (780) 453-5405.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
15 hours of classroom theory and 15 hours
of shop work per week.
classrooM and study hours
Home study: The Auto Body program op-
erates a modern, fully-equipped shop fa-
cility. Shop facilities include 3 paint spray
booths, 2 frame straighteners, two comput-
erized paint mixing systems, and a sand/
vacuum system. In addition to the major
equipment, we also hold a large inventory
of specialized auto body tools and equip-
ment. The Auto Body program has enough
shop space and equipment to run 2 differ-
ent classes at the same time.
Students utilize a fully dedicated classroom
for the Auto Body program and also have
access to a computer lab.
Auto body students also have full access to
all facilities located at NAIT’s other cam-
puses, including library, computer labs,
sports facilities, student association and
counselling services.
co-op & Work experience
Type of experience: Students will perform
auto body prep work for a wide variety of
work practicum business partners. As stu-
dents gain experience, most practicum
partners will guide students into more com-
plex tasks.
Salary: Work practicum partners are not
required to pay students for the duration of
the practicum.
Relocation: Students who entered the pro-
gram from another town, city or province
may be able to obtain a work practicum in
their home location. The work practicum in
these circumstances must be mutually ar-
ranged between the student, NAIT staff and
a work practicum partner. Any relocation
expenses incurred in establishing a remote
work practicum are the responsibility of the
student.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with an NAIT student, attend
classes and laboratory sessions, ask ques-
tions and experience NAIT frst-hand.
For more information about the Buddy Sys-
tem contact the Auto Body Associate Chair
at (780) 453-5423.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
NAIT Auto Body Technician Pre-Employ-
ment Certifcate.
apprenticeship inForMation
To challenge the First Period Apprenticeship
Related Theory examination, a Pre-Employ-
ment student must meet the specific at-
tendance and mark criteria as set out by
Apprenticeship and Industry Training. A fee
of $150.00 must be paid to Apprenticeship
and Industry Training.
59 www.nait.ca
Industry overview and regulations •
Component removal and installation •
Substrate preparations •
Welding •
Hand skills and basic sheet metal •
repair
Work practicum •
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Body shop, dealerships, truck repair shops,
industrial painting shops and automotive
supply frms and insurance companies.
career opportunities
Graduates are prepared for entry-level posi-
tions in auto body repair shops and related
businesses.
AutOmOtiVe
seRVice
tecHniciAn
PRe-emPLOYment
The Automotive Service Technician Pre-Em-
ployment Certifcate Program is a goal-ori-
ented program combining applied academic
skills, employability skills and entry level
trade/occupation competencies. This Pro-
gram will increase your employability in entry
level positions in the Automotive industry.
Successful students will have the opportu-
nity to write the First Period Automotive Ser-
vice Technician Apprenticeship exam. This
program has a fall and winter intake.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Trades
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
16 weeks (including 4 week practicum)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
First day of class
coNtActs
denis Guenette, chair
Automotive Programs
(780) 471-7473
progrAM detAIls
certiFication
NAIT Automotive Service Technician Pre-
Employment Certifcate
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Apt150
work practicum
Hours: 160 Credits: 10.0
This portion of the course is design to pro-
vide the students with Automotive hands-
on experience. The students should be able
to apply skills and knowledge obtained dur-
ing Theory/Lab and Shop, working as indi-
viduals, in groups or teams in a real work
environment; demonstrating to employers,
skills leading to employability as an Auto-
motive Service Technician.
Apt151
Materials, tools and safety
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
Identification, use, care and storage of
hand and power tools. Identification and
selection of fasteners. General shop and
lab safety procedures, use of large shop
equipment, housekeeping responsibilities,
personal safety, WHMIS responsibilities.
Identifcation, selection, use, care and stor-
age of precision measuring tools.
Apt152
safe use of oxy-Acetylene and
gMAw welding equipment
Hours: 18 Credits: 1.0
General safety, use of oxy-acetylene and
GMAW equipment and personal protection.
Apt153
drivelines
Hours: 14 Credits: 1.0
Theory, service and diagnosis of drive axle
assemblies, drive shafts, universal joints
and CV joints.
Apt154
suspension and steering
Hours: 133 Credits: 8.0
Theory, design, operation, service and test-
ing of suspension systems and related com-
ponents. Theory, design, operation, service
and testing of vehicle steering systems and
components. Diagnosis of suspension and
steering systems. Identifcation and adjust-
ment of various alignment functions, two-
wheel and four-wheel alignment, steering
column repairs and SIR system precautions.
Construction features and service of wheels
and tires, wheel balancing and diagnosis of
steering problems.
Apt155
Brake systems
Hours: 74 Credits: 4.5
Theory, operation, service, diagnosis and
testing of vehicle brake systems and com-
ponents.
Apt156
electrical
Hours: 58 Credits: 3.5
Electron theory, voltage, current and resis-
tance. Electrical circuits and circuit faults.
Magnetism and related terms, introduction
to electrical systems. Circuit analysis and
circuit electrical measurements.
Apt157
scan tools
Hours: 4 Credits: 0.5
Introduction to scan tools and their opera-
tion.
Apt158
passenger restraint systems
Hours: 14 Credits: 1.0
Component identification, construction,
operation and diagnosis of seat belts, child
safety seats and head restraints. Included
will be maintenance, service, repair and
installation of covered components. Iden-
tifcation, construction, operation and diag-
nosis of passive restraint systems (air bags)
will also be covered, including service and
repair with a major focus on safe handling.
Apt159
New technology
Hours: 4 Credits: 0.5
Introduction to new technologies in the au-
tomotive industry.
60 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A High School Diploma is no longer re-
quired as a prerequisite for entrance into
NAIT programs. However, students should
be aware that some employers may require
a High School Diploma as a prerequisite for
employment.
Alberta Grade 10 or equivalent; prefer
Grade 12 as the Automotive trade is very
technical in nature.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is not required for
this program.
delIvery optIoNs
50% Theory in a classroom setting and
50% in a Lab/Shop environment.
A four week practicum is scheduled at the
end of twelve weeks. Students can expect
to work 40 hours per week during the
practicum.
classrooM or laB settinG
Theory is taught in a normal classroom set-
ting. The lab is equipped with vehicle com-
ponents which students disassemble, study
and reassemble. The shop is a normal shop
setting where students work on customer
vehicles.
classrooM and study hours
Students attend classes in theory/ lab/shop
for a total of 30 hours per week.
Students should study a minimum of two
hours per evening (10 hours per week).
co-op & Work experience
Length: Four weeks (40 hours per week) at
the same work site
Type of experience: Practicums will be ar-
ranged with various vehicle repair shops.
Work site will provide exposure to as many
areas of the program as possible. Travel to
work site is the responsibility of the student.
Salary: No salary will be received.
Relocation: Relocation could be a possibility.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
We encourage prospective students to
make use of the “Buddy System”. Contact
the Program Supervisor at (780) 471-7473
to set a date.
inFo sessions
Evening Information Sessions: Thursday,
February 8th, 2007, 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. in the
NAIT Shaw Theatre
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
NAIT Automotive Pre-Trades Certifcate
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Graduates from this program should be able
to perform at the level of a First Period ap-
prentice. Graduates from this Program will
have completed First Period technical train-
ing. Students should have a basic knowl-
edge of brake work, suspension overhaul,
alignment procedures, basic automotive
electrical, scan tools and passenger re-
straint systems.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Employers of the graduates include: au-
tomotive dealerships, automotive service
centres, independent service shops, fleet
operators, parts merchandisers, and recre-
ational vehicle repair shops.
career opportunities
Many attractive opportunities are available
in the transportation feld. With the rapid in-
crease in technology employed in the mod-
ern vehicle, the challenge to the technician
also increases. This creates an added inter-
est to an employee who is well prepared to
meet that technological challenge.
AViOnics
enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY
The word “avionics” is a contraction of avia-
tion electronics. Avionics technicians are
responsible for the installation and main-
tenance of aircraft electronics systems. In
recent years, the aircraft industry has expe-
rienced an explosive increase in the applica-
tion of digital based communications and
navigation systems. On-board computers
now control vital fight functions of large air-
liners from take-off to automatic controlled
landings. Current employment surveys con-
frm a continually, growing shortfall of trained
personnel in aircraft maintenance technolo-
gies in Canada and throughout the world.
The Avionics program at NAIT is a two-
year Transport Canada accredited diploma
program offered by Electronics Engineering
Technologies. Program graduates meeting
academic and attendance requirements are
recognized as meeting the training compo-
nent necessary to receive an Aircraft Main-
tenance Engineer - Avionics (AME-E) license
from Transport Canada. These students also
receive credit towards part of the experience
requirement of the AME-E license.
Students receive their training at the Elec-
tronics training facilities on the NAIT Main
Campus and at the NAIT Aviation Training
Centre. The Aviation Training Centre con-
tains avionics aircraft and shop facilities
designed to assist the student’s industry
based training.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Information Technology & Electronics
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
August 25, 2008
61 www.nait.ca
coNtActs
Bill Baker, assistant proGraM
chair
(780) 453-7161
bbaker@nait.ca
departMent inForMation
Lorraine Hannah
(780) 471-7663
lhannah@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
The program is two years in length, consist-
ing of four 17 week semesters of instruction.
Students of the program are eligible to par-
ticipate in a 16 week Co-op program during
the summer break between their frst and
second year of training.
Fall intake Without co-op
Semester 1
Semester 2
Break
Semester 3
Semester 4
Fall intake With co-op
Semester 1
Semester 2
Work Term
Semester 3
Semester 4
Students must successfully complete all
required courses as outlined in the Program
Calendar to be eligible for a diploma in Avi-
onics Engineering Technology.
certiFication
Diploma in Avionics Engineering Technol-
ogy, or Diploma in Avionics Engineering
Technology - Co-op Stream.
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program. The
provincial member associations of the Ca-
nadian Council of Technicians and Technol-
ogists, such as ASET in Alberta, recognize
graduates of the program as Technologists.
Graduates of the program who maintain the
required academic and attendance stan-
dards are also eligible for Transport Canada
accreditation of their diplomas.
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
Co-op Work Experience Elective Option –
Co-op participation is available to students
who have completed at least two academic
semesters. Acceptance into Co-op is based
on successful completion of all coursework
with a 2.3 GPA.
Co-op Work Experience - Prerequisite ETC
463-Workplace Preparation or equivalent.
The Co-op program provides training in ca-
reer development. Successful completion
indicates advanced job readiness skills.
Consult with the Co-op Coordinator for the
current fee schedule and more information.
inForMation
LeeAnne Pawluski
Co-op Coordinator
Phone (780) 378-5255
leeannep@nait.ca
seMester 1
est101
Basic electronics theory
Hours: 136 Credits: 9.0
Every field of study has a foundational
course that introduces supporting concepts.
EST101, introduces essential ideas neces-
sary for understanding the mysterious and
invisible world of electricity. Starting with
the basic concepts of voltage, current and
resistance, this lecture course develops
skills in circuit recognition and analysis,
concluding with introductory material on
semiconductor devices; the building blocks
of all modern electronic systems. Co-requi-
site: EST102.
AXt102
Instruments and Measurements
Hours: 136 Credits: 8.5
This course allows students to become
familiar with test equipment found on an
electronics service bench while re-enforcing
the theoretical concepts learned in EST101.
Co-requisite: EST101.
est103
digital fundamentals
Hours: 136 Credits: 8.5
Introduces the concepts behind digital
electronic devices and circuits. Examines
combinational and sequential devices in
theory and in the lab. Number systems and
Boolean algebra are covered. Emphasis is
on understanding the fow and processing
of signals in digital systems with a view to-
ward troubleshooting faulty circuits.
est104
workshop practices
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
One of the unique skills practiced by elec-
tronic technicians is soldering. The sort of
soldering done by modern electronic tech-
nicians is very delicate, precise and often
performed under signifcant optical magni-
fcation. This project course develops high
quality soldering skills with an emphasis
on safety and proper care of tools. Both
through-hole and surface mount techniques
are practiced through the term. Complete
fabrication of a microcontroller system is
the fnal project.
est110
Mechanical systems for electronic
technicians
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is designed to teach skills in the
use of hand tools. The students will disas-
semble and assemble electronic products.
They will study the operation and mainte-
nance of electronic and electro-mechanical
subsystems.
seMester 2
est206
Introduction to Microcontrollers
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The prerequisite for this course is success-
ful completion of EST 101, EST 102 and EST
103 or equivalent. This lecture/lab course
introduces students to the concepts, inter-
facing and applications of micro controllers.
The course uses a Microchip® PIC16F876
device. Students build and program a func-
tioning data logger project in the lab portion
of this course. The PIC16F876 is interfaced
to an LCD display, an I2C temperature sen-
sor, real time clock and SEEPROM. The
data logger is connected via an RS-232 link
to a PC for data upload. Microsoft Excel®
is used to graphically present data logger
mission data. Students learn fundamental
programming concepts including use of an
Integrated Development Environment and
language syntax for Pic Basic Pro®.
62 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
AXt211
standard practices I
Hours: 87 Credits: 5.0
This course provides training on work place
safety, common aircraft and system manual
conventions (including ATA100 coding) and
the proper use of common and specialized
tools. Students perform standard aircraft
wiring procedures, basic sheet metal, work
and the application of common fasteners
and lock wiring. Standard practice skills are
then used as the student performs the in-
stallation of a panel mount Nav/Comm ra-
dio into a sheet metal fxture constructed by
the student. On completion of this project
the student uses standard test procedures
to test and document the functionality
of their project. Pre-requisite: EST104 or
equivalent.
AXt221
electronic communications I
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.5
This course provides the student with an
introduction to electronic communications
systems. Following an investigation of ba-
sic communications concepts, the student
learns of the operational characteristics of
common AM, FM and SSB transceivers and
performs standard test procedures on these
systems. Students also write their Industry
Canada ROR (AERO) radio license exam as
part of this course. Pre-requisite: EST102 or
equivalent.
AXt225
Avionics systems
Hours: 95 Credits: 6.0
The AXT225 course provides an intro-
duction to many of the avionics systems
found on modern aircraft. These systems
include power generation and distribution,
communication systems, radio navigation
systems, air data systems, and emergency
transmission and data recording systems.
Course coverage focuses on the operation
and in many cases, the testing of these sys-
tems. The theory presented in the AXT 225
course is supplemented through practical
ramp testing and component familiariza-
tion labs carried out in the latter half of the
course. Pre-requisites: EST101, EST102 or
equivalent.
AXt231
electroNIc cIrcuIt ApplIcAtIoNs
Hours: 170 Credits: 11.0
This lecture/lab course investigates the ap-
plication of semiconductor devices in elec-
tronic circuits and systems. Emphasis is on
circuit analysis and troubleshooting. Topics
include rectifcation and regulation in power
supply systems; small and large signal am-
plifcation, operational amplifers and their
applications, and oscillators. Pre-requisite:
EST101 and EST102 or equivalent.
AXt261
Aviation familiarization
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
This course introduces the student to fun-
damentals of the aviation maintenance “en-
vironment” and investigates basic aircraft
structures. Topic coverage includes ground
handling practices, airspace and airport
conventions, aircraft structures and plan-
form safety issues, and a brief introduction
to the impact of human factors on the per-
formance of aviation maintenance.
electives
etc584
coop work experience
Hours: 680 Credits: 10.0
Students work 16 weeks in a program-re-
lated, industry position. Components of this
course include two workplace evaluations,
a site visit by a NAIT staff member and a
daily work journal. The work experience
enhances student employability and allows
students to apply academic training in a
work environment. Prerequisite: ETC463
Workplace Preparation or equivalent.
etc463
workplace preparation (coop
students only)
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This seminar based course prepares stu-
dents for the work placement. Topics in-
clude the following: co-op procedures and
policies, resume and cover letter writing,
interviewing strategies and other career
development subjects. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of coursework with a
2.3 GPA.
seMester 3
AXt301
Aircraft Maintenance I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course enhances the student’s under-
standing of the science and maintenance of
aircraft through the study of aerodynamics,
aircraft control systems and the theory of
fight, and the operation and maintenance
of common aircraft mechanical and envi-
ronmental systems. This course also pro-
vides coverage of common quality systems
employed within the aviation maintenance
environment as well as continued study of
the infuences of human factors in aviation
maintenance.
AXt312
standard practices II
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course continues the standard prac-
tices coverage introduced in AXT211. Topic
coverage includes a study of approved
aviation parts and parts systems, equip-
ment installation standards, the usage of
CAD software, the application of standard
adhesives and sealants, metallurgy and
the perfomance of more advanced sheet
metal fabrication techniques. Pre-requisite:
AXT211 or equivalent.
AXt322
electronic communications II
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.5
In this course the student studies RF cir-
cuit theory and the internal (component
level) operation of common AM, FM and
SSB transceivers. The lab component of the
course provides the student with instruc-
tions on the analysis, testing and trouble-
shooting of RF circuits and communications
transceiver systems. Students perform a
troubleshooting exercise and produce a
written technical report based on this ex-
cercise. Pre-requisites: EST201, AXT221 or
equivalent.
AXt326
Nav/comm systems I
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.5
This course follows AXT225 with more
thorough coverage of aviation navigation
and communication systems. These sys-
tems are examined from the point of view
of system signal characteristics, system in-
terfacing, system testing and maintenance,
and component installation. Pre-requisites:
AXT221, AXT225 or equivalent.
63 www.nait.ca
AXt331
circuit Analysis and design
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course investigates the design, analysis
and troubleshooting of audio frequency lin-
ear and non-linear circuits commonly found
in avionics equipment. Students are required
to confirm the operation and demonstrate
an understanding of these circuits through
testing and troubleshooting exercises and
through design and prototyping exercises.
Pre-requisite: EST201 or equivalent.
AXt361
technology studies I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces our students to the
technical writing standards expected of our
Avionics Technology students. This course
also introduces mathematics concepts em-
ployed by technologists.
AXt381
Aircraft electrical systems
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course continues the coverage of
aircraft electrical systems introduced in
AXT225, investigating the individual elec-
trical and electronics components and
assemblies utilized in the modern power
generation and distribution systems, exam-
ining common system architectures, and
analyzing the electrical systems of selected
light and transport category aircraft. Pre-
requisite: AXT225 or equivalent.
AXt382
Instrument systems
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course follows the air data instrumen-
tation coverage of AXT225 with a more
detailed investigation of: aircraft pilot-static
and air data computer systems, the internal
operation of common air data instruments,
common electronic instrumentation cir-
cuitry, and the operation of gyro stabilized
heading and attitude systems and inertial
nav. and reference systems. Pre-requisite:
AXT225 or equivalent.
seMester 4
AXt402
Aircraft Maintenance II
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.5
This course continues the study of aircraft
systems with an examination of aircraft
propulsion systems and the servicing and
maintenance of common aircraft systems.
Pre-requisite: AXT301 or equivalent.
AXt416
system Installation
Hours: 63 Credits: 3.5
During this project course, the student uses
manufacturer’s instructions and accepted
standard practices to perform the installa-
tion, testing and resulting documentation
for common avionics systems. Pre-requi-
sites: AXT312, AXT326 or equivalent.
AXt423
electronic communications III
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This communications systems course de-
velops and explores concepts associated
with digital data transmission and proto-
cols, transmission line and fber optics, RF
wave propogation and antenna theory, and
satellite and microwave communications
concepts. Pre-requisites: EST103, AXT322
or equivalent.
AXt427
Nav/comm systems II
Hours: 170 Credits: 10.5
This course follows up AXT326 coverage
of Nav/Comm systems with block diagram
and component level investigation into
the operation of these systems. Emphasis
is placed on the schematic analysis and
troubleshooting of these systems. Other
communications and navigation systems
are introduced at the system level in this
course. Pre-requisites: EST206, AXT322,
AXT326, AXT331 or equivalent.
AXt451
Auto flight systems
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
This course features typical auto fight prin-
ciples including common operations such
as yaw damper system, mach trim coupler,
auto throttle, auto land, roll axis control
and pitch axis control. Theory topics also
include common auto pilot modes of op-
eration, typical system architecture, Flight
Management System operation, and me-
chanical linkage particulars. Pre-requisites:
AXT326, AXT382 or equivalent.
AXt461
technology studies II
Hours: 61 Credits: 3.0
This course continues the investigation of
higher-level math concepts frst introduced
in AXT361. Other topics of investigation for
this course include project management
tools and occupational health and safety
standards.
AXt462
Maintenance regulations &
standards
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.0
This course begins with an investigation
of the regulatory, advisory and standard
organizations associated with the aviation
industry. This coverage is then followed up
by a detailed study of the Canadian Avia-
tion Regulations. An important component
to this course is the student’s ability to
navigate the Transport Canada web site to
locate regulatory and standards data, and
the ability to interpret the regulations in de-
fense of answers to regulatory issues. Pre-
requisite: AXT261 or equivalent.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
All applicants require the following or equiv-
alent courses: English 30-1 or 30-2, one of
Physics 30, Chemistry 30 or Science 30,
and Pure Math 30 or successful completion
of Transitional Mathematics 101 or Alge-
bra 35 (65%). Applicants presenting other
math courses, for example, the previous
Alberta Learning designations of Math 30
and Math 33, will be considered on an indi-
vidual basis by the Registrar. Math updating
or upgrading may be required. An interest
in and an aptitude for physics is a defnite
asset. In some cases, student selection may
be competitive; based upon criteria that
may include academic achievement beyond
the minimum prerequisite identifed in the
NAIT calendar or application form; a career
investigation report may be required. Con-
tact the Registrar for current information
about selection criteria for this program.
additional reQuireMents
Basic computer and keyboarding skills
would also be an asset.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Basic program entrance requirements apply.
selection criteria
In some cases, student selection may be
competitive; based upon criteria that may
include academic achievement beyond
the minimum prerequisite identifed in the
NAIT calendar or application form. Contact
the Registrar for current information about
selection criteria for this program.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT.
64 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
The standard format for the Career Inves-
tigation is acceptable. Prospective students
should research the kinds of jobs available
in Avionics and related industries and re-
search program statistics at the NAIT’s
Career Services office. Knowledge of why
the student desires to enter this particular
industry will attempt to confrm that their
desires will be fulflled at the conclusion of
their education and training.
advanced/transFer credit
Applicants who have successfully com-
pleted equivalent post-secondary courses
may be eligible for an “advance standing”
(exemption) in selected courses.
Students who wish to exercise this option
must request that a course assessment
be done by the Student Advisor. For the
courses in question, the Student Advisor
will require a:
copy of mark transcripts •
calendar description (or preferably a •
course outline) of said courses.
PLEASE NOTE: Students, who are granted
course exemptions may jeopardize their op-
portunities for scholarships or an honours
diploma. Some scholarships require 100%
loading for eligibility.
In order to qualify for Advance Credit, the
course hours and content of the completed
course must be the equivalent to or more
extensive than the course the student is
seeking exemption for. For more informa-
tion, please call 471-8578.
To apply for advance credit, please bring
documentation to H300 on NAIT Main
Campus or fax to (780) 491-3072. Please
attach a memo briefy outlining educational
history, name and a contact phone number.
All documentation must be received before
an assessment can begin.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
The first year of training is performed at
NAIT’s main campus, in classrooms and
well-equipped computer and electronics
labs. The second year of the program is held
at the Aviation Training Centre, where the
students work in a more industrial environ-
ment.
BuildinG location(s)
Main Campus, 11762-106 Street, Edmon-
ton, AB; Aviation Training Centre, 11311-120
Street, Edmonton, AB
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 30 hours
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 30 hours
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Work placements occur from May
to August.
Length: 16 weeks. (32 weeks available with
program approval)
Type of experience: The type of work place-
ment will vary and will be directly related to
the feld of Avionics.
Salary: Wages are determined by the par-
ticipating companies.
Relocation: No Information Currently Avail-
able
Who facilitates the placement:
LeeAnne Pawluski
Co-op Coordinator
Phone (780) 378-5255
leeannep@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Contact: Cliff Chapman at (780) 453-7193
inFo sessions
Tuesday, February 5th, 2008
General Information Session, 6:00 - 6:15 in
the Shaw Theatre.
The general information session will be fol-
lowed by program specifc information ses-
sions. These sessions will be offered twice
during the evening for your convenience.
Session 1 - 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. room E202
Session 2 - 7:45 - 8:45 p.m. room E202
NAIT Shaw Theatre
11762 - 106 Street
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Avionics Engineering Technol-
ogy, or Diploma in Avionics Engineering
Technology - Co-op Stream
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Students of the program are eligible for
student membership in the Western Air-
craft Maintenance Engineer’s Associa-
tion (WAME) and may apply for associate
membership with the Canadian Aviation
Maintenance Council (CAMC).
Graduates are eligible to join WAME as ap-
prentice members and as full members on
obtaining their AME license.
Maintenance personnel wishing to obtain
their Aircraft Maintenance Engineer “E”
(Avionics) license from Transport Canada
are required to complete specifc training,
and graduates of the program meeting
academic and attendance requirements are
recognized as meeting this training stan-
dard. These accredited graduates are also
eligible to receive experience credit towards
the time required in the feld for license eli-
gibility. Graduates working in the feld may
also apply for CAMC trade certification
once they have completed experience and
task requirements.
Free student memberships in the Alberta
Society of Engineering Technologists (ASET)
are available. Students are also eligible for
student membership in the Institute of Elec-
trical and Electronic Engineering (IEEE).
After two years of suitable work experience
in industry, the graduate may seek certifca-
tion with the Alberta Society of Engineering
Technologists (ASET) to receive the CET
(Certifed Engineering Technologist) desig-
nation and upon further qualifcations, the
RET (Registered Engineering Technologist)
designation.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Recognize the importance of quality •
standards.
Work well in compliance to regulatory •
standards.
Good oral and written communication •
skills to effectively convey scientifc
and technical information.
Work well in self directed and in team •
environments.
Appreciate the value of recurrent •
training.
65 www.nait.ca
Profcient in the usage of test •
equipment and tools.
Good mathematical abilities, and the •
ability to visualize three-dimensional
objects from two-dimensional drawings.
Development solutions to complex •
problems, persistance and excellent
troubleshoot skills.
Good colour vision for distinguishing •
compoenent parts.
Successful Avionics Technologists enjoy
working with tools and equipment at tasks
that require precision, having clear rules and
organized methods to guide their activities,
and analyzing data to solve problems.
apprenticeship inForMation
Avionics Engineering Technology courses
are not equivalent to apprenticeship courses
at this time.
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates who further their studies may be
granted advanced credit at Canadian and
American Universities.
additional post certiFication
diploMa courses
Students and graduates of the program are
eligible for membership in the Western AME
Association (as students, apprentices, or
once licensed, as full members). The WAME
Association occasionally holds update train-
ing sessions. Transport Canada also holds
occasional training sessions for industry
members.
industry support
A Program Advisory Committee, composed
of members of industry, meets on a yearly
basis to discuss industry trends that affect
technical education and advise the institute
of the number of graduates required by the
industry and the skills and knowledge that
graduates should possess.
Note: An intensive program which em-
phasizes broad-based training in both the
theoretical and practical aspects of Aviation
Electronics (Avionics). To develop a broad
base of electronic knowledge, the first se-
mester of the program is common with the
NAIT Electronics Engineering Technology
Program. Second year courses focus on the
developing avionics specialist skills. This
program is accredited by Transport Canada
and Canadian Council of Technicians and
Technologists.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Positions for avionics technicians are found
in the airlines, avionics radio and acces-
sory shops, aircraft instrument shops, and
ground-based communications and naviga-
tion repair.
career opportunities
Two categories exist within the avionics
trade group, the Avionics Line Technician
and the Aviation Shop Technician.
The Avionics Line Technician performs trou-
bleshooting and maintenance on complete
systems within the aircraft. An AME license
is required for certifcation of the mainte-
nance work performed on aircraft.
The Avionics Shop Technician performs
component level troubleshooting and repair
of aircraft communications, navigation, and
autoflight systems, and performs instru-
ment calibration and repair.
BAcHeLOR Of
APPLied Business
AdministRAtiOn -
AccOuntinG
The Bachelor of Applied Business Admin-
istration - Accounting is a four semester
post-diploma Applied Degree. An applied
degree is a credential developed by Alberta
Learning in response to a need to prepare
Albertans for the changing economy. This
degree offers graduates of eligible Di-
ploma programs at NAIT, SAIT, and Alberta
colleges the opportunity to develop the
advanced accounting expertise and man-
agement skills needed in the expanding
and demanding feld of managing fnancial
operations.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Business & Administrative
certiFication
Degree
delivery Method
Continuing Education, Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
August 29, 2008
coNtActs
Glenda Money
Student Advisor
Bachelor of Applied Business
Administration - Accounting
Phone: (780) 491-3942
e-mail: glendam@nait.ca
Marilyn Willie
Associate Chair
Bachelor of Applied Business
Administration - Accounting
address
T400, 11762 - 106 Street
Edmonton AB T5G 2R1
Fax: (780) 491-3020
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Following the completion of a two-year
(four terms) Business Diploma, the student
will complete an additional two years (four
terms) of studies. The program consists
of two academic terms and two Directed
Field Studies (DFS) terms while employed
in a paid full-time accounting position. The
student is responsible, with advice from the
degree program and NAIT Student Career
Services, for procuring employment in the
accounting field during these terms. The
student, NAIT and the employer will sign a
three-party agreement.
Students who have completed course work
required in the degree program prior to en-
tering the program may receive Advanced
Credit. If such a course was part of the pre-
requisite two-year Diploma, additional elec-
tives will be required.
During each DFS term the student will be
enrolled in fve DFS courses designed to link
the academic courses to relevant employ-
ment experience through the preparation
and presentation of papers and attendance
at residency sessions. The residency ses-
sions will be held twice each term, normally
at the end of the second month and the
end of the fourth month of the term, usu-
ally from Wednesday evening through Sat-
urday evening, and will require the student
be away from the workplace during that
time. Instructors from the faculty will work
closely with the student as they complete
the DFS requirements.
This unique combination of classroom train-
ing (10 courses) and on-the-job training (2
directed field study terms over 8 months)
offers students both advanced courses in
accounting and practical, structured work
experience. NAIT students can also progress
through the Certifed General Accountants
(CGA) program of professional studies, or
take senior courses within the pre-profes-
sional program of studies for the Society of
Management Accountants (CMA).
66 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
proGraM ForMat
The Applied Degree in Accounting can
be earned through full-time studies or
part-time evening classes. Students can
complete the two academic semesters as
part-time Continuing Education students.
During the two semesters of directed feld
studies, all participants must be registered
with the School of Business. The combina-
tion of part-time academic studies and full-
time, paid feld studies enables students to
be employed in the workforce throughout
their entire Degree Program.
proGraM lenGth
Students will complete 4 terms of studies,
including two academic terms (Semesters
5 and 8), and two DFS terms (Semesters 6
and 7). Each term is 4 months long. Prior
to entering Semester 6, the student must
have, as a minimum, completed the Semes-
ter 5 courses.
Semesters 5 and 8 are offered in the day-
time beginning in September and January
each year, while Semesters 6 and 7 are of-
fered beginning in September, January, and
May each year.
Academic courses are also available on a
part-time basis through NAIT Continuing
Education for students wishing to continue
full-time employment throughout the pro-
gram.
coMpletion reQuireMents
To graduate with a Bachelor of Applied
Business Administration - Accounting, the
student must successfully complete:
A two year Business Diploma from an ac-
credited Alberta post secondary institution,
plus:
Bachelor of Applied Business Administra-
tion - Accounting, Years 3 & 4:
Semester 5 (5 academic courses, 320 •
hours)
Semester 5 (1 seminar, 16 hours) •
Semester 6 (5 DFS courses, 240 hours) •
Semester 7 (5 DFS courses, 240 hours) •
Semester 8 (1 core academic course, •
64 hours)
Semester 8 (4 elective academic •
courses, one of which must be either
MARK400 or MARK407, 256 hours)
Semester 8 (1 seminar, 16 hours) •
certiFication
Graduates of this program will receive a
Bachelor of Applied Business Administra-
tion - Accounting.
accreditation
Detailed exemptions for degree courses
are available with the Certified General
Accountants Association of Alberta (CGA
Alberta) and the Society of Management
Accountants of Alberta (CMA Alberta) and
the Institute of Chartered Accountants of
Alberta.
This degree meets the degree requirements
of CGA Alberta and CMA Alberta.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 5
Acct300s
field studies seminar I
Hours: 16 Credits: 0.0
This course is designed to prepare students
for their feld study term. It includes topics
such as research methodology, writing pa-
pers, and presentation techniques.
Acct301
Advanced financial Accounting
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course provides an in-depth study of
six major areas of advanced financial ac-
counting: standard setting in Canada and in-
ternationally, fnancial instruments, income
tax allocations, long-term intercorporate
investments, foreign currency translation,
and the consolidation of foreign opera-
tions and non-proft and public sector ac-
counting. Prerequisite: ACCT208 (BUS408
or AAC300) & ACCT240 (BUS340 or
AAC350) Note: Course renumbering effec-
tive July 1, 2006
Acct302
Advanced Managerial Accounting 1
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course focuses on the use of accounting
information in planning and decision making
under conditions of certainty and uncertainty.
Topics include relevant costing for short-
term decision making, linear programming,
capital budgeting, alternative approaches
to product costing, activity-based manage-
ment costing, agency theory, responsibility
accounting; transfer pricing and ethical con-
siderations in decision making. Prerequisite:
ACCT212 (BUS412 or AAC242) & STAT118
(BUS118 or AAC245) Note: Course renum-
bering effective July 1, 2006
Acct303
Auditing
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course begins with an introduction to
the auditing principles and procedures ap-
plicable to both internal and external audit-
ing. Topics include reporting, professional
standards and ethics, legal liability, audit
objectives, audit evidence, planning and
analysis, materiality and risk, internal con-
trol, audit sampling and EDP auditing. The
functions and procedures related to the rev-
enue and collection cycle, acquisition and
expenditure cycle, production and payroll
cycle, as well as fnance and investment cy-
cle are also studied. Prerequisite: ACCT208
(BUS408 or AAC300) & ACCT212 (BUS412
or AAC242) Note: Course renumbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
MgMt300
leadership
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course uses the concepts of organiza-
tional behaviour to explore the current theo-
ries around effective leadership. Alternative
philosophies of leadership will be examined,
as well as moral and ethical responsibilities.
Students will assess their own personal
leadership style and learn how they can de-
velop leadership skills to enhance their own
potential. Prerequisite: ORGB191 (BUS191 &
BUS192 or AAC230) Note: Course renum-
bering effective July 1, 2006
tAXX304
Advanced taxation 1
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course covers the fundamental prin-
ciples, concepts, and application of Cana-
dian federal income tax legislation. Topics
include the concepts of income and liability
for tax; income from employment, business,
and property; shareholder benefts; deduc-
tions; capital gains and losses; computation
of taxable income for individuals and cor-
porations; an introduction to tax planning;
and international taxation. The course em-
phasizes understanding of the conceptual
structure of the Income Tax Act and the ap-
plication of its rules to practical cases. Pre-
requisite: ACCT208 (BUS408 or AAC300)
& BLAW161 (BUS161 or AAC220) Note:
Course renumbering effective July 1, 2006
67 www.nait.ca
seMester 6
Acct340
field studies seminar I
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed
in a feld studies term. The student will at-
tend during the residency sessions and give
presentations and participate in a group
case study. Prerequisite: Semester 5 Note:
Course renumbering effective July 1, 2006
Acct341
field studies in financial
Accounting
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course s completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the content
of its Semester 5 Partner Course ACCT301
(ACCT501 or AAC410 or AAC400) to
relevant business experience. Prerequi-
site: ACCT301 (ACCT501 or AAC410 or
AAC400) Note: Course renumbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
Acct342
field studies in Managerial
Accounting I
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the content
of its Semester 5 Partner Course ACCT302
(ACCT502 or AAC344) to relevant busi-
ness experience. Prerequsisite: ACCT302
(ACCT502 or AAC344) Note: Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
Acct343
field studies in Auditing
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the content
of its Semester 5 Partner Course ACCT303
(ACCT503 or AAC345) to relevant busi-
ness experience. Prerequisite: ACCT303
(ACCT503 or AAC345) Note: Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
tAXX344
field studies in Advanced taxation I
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the content
of its Semester 5 Partner Course TAXX304
(ACCT504 or AAC315 or AAC310) to
relevant business experience. Prerequi-
site: TAXX304 (ACCT504 or AAC315 or
AAC310) Note: Course renumbering effec-
tive July 1, 2006
seMester 7
Acct440
field studies seminar II
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term. The student will attend
during the residency sessions and give pre-
sentations and participate in a group case
study. Prerequisite: Semesters 5 & 6
Acct441
field studies in Accounting theory
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the contents
of its Semester 8 Partner Course ACCT401
(ACCT801 or AAC415) to relevant business
experience. The emphasis is on identifying
issues from a current environmental situa-
tion which relates to specifc areas of study
scheduled in the following term. Prerequi-
site: Semester 6 Note: Course renumbering
effective July 1, 2006
cMIs449
field studies in Advanced
Information systems
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the contents
of its Semester 8 Partner Course CMIS409
(ACCT809 or AAC416) to relevant busi-
ness experience. The emphasis is on iden-
tifying issues from a current environmental
situation which relate to specific areas of
study scheduled in the following term. Pre-
requisite: Semester 6 Note: Course renum-
bering effective July 1, 2006 Prerequisite:
Accounting Information Systems
fNce442
field studies in Advanced finance
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term, and relates the contents
of its Semester 8 Partner Course FNCE402
(ACCT802 or AAC411) to relevant business
experience. The emphasis is on identifying
issues from a current environmental situa-
tion which relate to specifc areas of study
scheduled in the following term. Prerequi-
site: Semester 6 Note: Course renumbering
effective July 1, 2006
MgMt444
field studies in
operations Managment
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is completed while employed
in a field studies term, and relates the
contents of its Semester 8 Partner Course
MGMT404 (ACCT804 or AAC370) to rel-
evant business experience. The emphasis
is on identifying issues from a current envi-
ronmental situation which relate to specifc
areas of study scheduled in the following
term. Prerequisite: Semester 6 Note: Course
renumbering effective July 1, 2006
seMester 8
Acct400s
field studies seminar II
Hours: 16 Credits: 0.0
This course continues into the 8th semes-
ter, and is designed as a capstone to the
directed feld study component of the de-
gree. It includes topics such as business
ethics and various leadership and decision
making strategies. Prerequisite: ACCT300S
(DFS600L) Note: Course renumbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
Acct401
Accounting theory
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course in fnancial accounting includes
in-depth treatment of current issues and
problems in the field. Topics include the
contributions of economics, finance, and
other disciplines to accounting theory; the
practical and theoretical problems of the
present value model; foreign exchange ac-
counting; the process and issues of standard
setting; agency theory; and other topics re-
lated to specifc industries or sectors of the
economy. Prerequisite: Semester 5 Note:
Course renumbering effective July 1, 2006
electives
Acct405
Management Auditing
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course covers objectives, concepts,
principles and techniques of management
auditing. Topics include planning the man-
agement audit; the examination phase of
management auditing, report audit fndings
and follow-up; management audit of pur-
chasing and production, human resource
management, marketing and fnancial man-
agement; and management of EDP sys-
tems. Prerequisite: ACCT303 (ACCT503 or
AAC345) Note: Course renumbering effec-
tive July 1, 2006
68 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Acct406
Advanced external Auditing
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Topics covered include the professional,
legal, and ethical environment of auditing;
the audit engagement; analysis and statis-
tical sampling; internal control in an EDP
environment; computer-assisted auditing
techniques; and audits of small business.
Other areas explored are association assur-
ance and non-audit engagements, special
reports, comprehensive auditing and pro-
spectuses, and a discussion of current is-
sues, controversies, and future directions in
auditing. Prerequisite: ACCT303 (ACCT503
or AAC345) Note: Course renumbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
Acct410
Advanced Managerial Accounting II
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This capstone course in management ac-
counting takes an integrative approach to
a variety of topics, open using a case ap-
proach. Topics include: short-term decision
analysis; operating budgets; quantitative
techniques in cost accounting; pricing;
decentralization; measurement of perfor-
mance; transfer pricing; cost control and
profit analysis. Prerequisite: ACCT302
(ACCT502 or AAC344) Note: Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
Acct411
public sector financial Mangement
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This is an introductory course on fnancial
management concepts, methods, and stan-
dards currently in use in the public sector
more generally, and in the Canadian public
sector more specifically. The focus is on
the federal and provincial governments, al-
though international issues are discussed,
and local government examples used
whenever appropriate. The course begins
with an overview of the political and eco-
nomic environment and how its evolution in
the last few decades has infuenced public
sector financial management. The course
is organized around the following themes:
the public sector environment and how it
differs from the private sector; public sector
accounting and reporting standards; public
sector financial planning and budgeting;
analysis and management of performance
in the public sector; cost and risk manage-
ment and control in the public sector. Pre-
requisite: ACCT208 (BUS408 or AAC300),
ACCT302 (ACCT502 or AAC344),
ACCT303 (ACCT503 or AAC345), and
ACCT303L (AAC346) Note: Course
renumbering effective July 1, 2006
cMIs409
Advanced Information systems
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
An advanced course in analysis, design and
implementation of computer based informa-
tion systems from a management end-user
perspective. Topics include major compo-
nents of a computertized system, identifying
system requirements, the systems develop-
ment life cycle, detailed systems analysis, de-
tailed systems design, and implementation
and management. Prerequisite: CMIS244
(BUS440 or AAC360) Note: Course renum-
bering effective July 1, 2006
fNce402
Advanced finance
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This advanced financial course provides
an in-depth study of issues and tools that
will assist financial managers in making
decisions. Topics include capital budget-
ing under certainty; long-term sources of
funds; capital structure; dividend policy;
special fnancing and investment decisions;
futures, forwards, options and swaps; trea-
sury risk management; fnancial planning;
and long-term planning and strategic issues
in fnance. Prerequisite: FNCE223 (BUS323
or AAC341) Note: Course renumbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
MArk400
e-commerce
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This senior level course is designed to build
awareness and inform students about the
major topics and key concepts of electronic
commerce. E-Commerce offers alterna-
tives to connect suppliers, employees, and
other stakeholders electronically via intra-
nets, extranets, the World Wide Web and
other computer mediated environments.
Participants will explore and use existing
and emerging technologies to effectively
and efficiently transact business. Prereq-
uisite: CMIS241 (BUS441)& MARK166
(BUS166) Note: Course renumbering effec-
tive July 1, 2006
MArk407
International Business
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course builds on the basic concepts of
the Introduction to Marketing course and is
designed to create an awareness of how the
fast-changing international marketing scene
impacts on the Canadian economy and the
creation/loss of jobs in this country; stimu-
late an ongoing interest in media coverage
of foreign and domestic developments that
affect business dealings between nations
and trading blocks; build a sensitivity to
the effects of culture and the uncontrol-
lable environments on product and price,
promotion and distribution in international
marketing; develop a consciousness of the
resources, such as government assistance,
consultants, etc., available to importers and
exporters. Prerequisite: MARK166 (BUS166
or AAC250) Note: Course renumbering
effective July 1, 2006
MgMt404
operations Management
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Operations management is a systematic
look at the design, operation, and improve-
ment of the production/transformation sys-
tems that create the frm’s primary products
or services. Operations management re-
volves around the 5 P’s, which include peo-
ple, plants, parts, processes, and planning
and control systems. Operations priorities
include cost, product quality and reliability,
delivery speed, delivery reliability, ability to
cope with changes in demand, fexibility and
new product introduction speed, and other
criteria particular to a given product. Pre-
requisite: STAT218 (BUS118) Note: Course
renumbering effective July 1, 2006
MgMt408
strategic Management
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course provides a senior management
perspective on the way strategy is formu-
lated an implemented in organizations. Top-
ics include: overview of planning a control
functions; the concept of planning; strategic
planning; strategy implementation; budget-
ing; production, marketing, and personnel
management; project planning and control;
design and implementation of management
control systems. Prerequisite: ACCT301
(ACCT501 or AAC410 or AAC400) Note:
Course renumbering effective July 1, 2006
69 www.nait.ca
tAXX403
Advanced taxation II
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course covers corporate reorganiza-
tions, tax planning, and the application of
tax principles and concepts to complex
tax situations of individuals, trusts, part-
nerships and corporations. Topics include
shareholder benefits, tax planning, intra-
family property transfers, death, trusts,
partnerships, transfer of property to corpo-
rations, corporate reorganizations, purchase
or sale of a business, and anti-avoidance
rules. Prerequisite: TAXX304 (ACCT504 or
AAC315) Note: Course renumbering effec-
tive July 1, 2006
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Applicants must have completed a two-
year Business Diploma from an accredited
Alberta post-secondary institution, with a
minimum GPA of C+. The diploma must in-
clude a minimum of 20 courses and contain
course work in the following areas:
- Intermediate Accounting II
- Management Accounting II
- Taxation
- Accounting Information Systems
- Business Finance
- Marketing
- Business Communications
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
The selection process will be applied only
to students achieving the diploma with the
minimum GPA standards and with course
work in the required areas, and may include
further written requirements and/or inter-
views.
advanced/transFer credit
For more information, contact:
Marilyn Willie
Associate Chair
Bachelor of Applied Business
Administration-Accounting Program
Phone: (780) 471-8950
marilynw@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
part-tiMe options
ACCT301 Advanced Financial •
Accounting
ACCT302 Advanced Managerial •
Accounting 1
ACCT303 Auditing •
ACCT401 Accounting Theory •
ACCT405 Management Auditing •
ACCT406 Advanced External Auditing •
ACCT410 Advanced Managerial •
Accounting II
ACCT411 Public Sector Financial •
Mangement
CMIS409 Advanced Information •
Systems
FNCE402 Advanced Finance •
MARK400 E-Commerce •
MARK407 International Business •
MGMT300 Leadership •
MGMT404 Operations Management •
MGMT408 Strategic Management •
TAXX304 Advanced Taxation 1 •
TAXX403 Advanced Taxation II •
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Graduates of this program will receive a
Bachelor of Applied Business Administra-
tion - Accounting.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Graduates of the Bachelor of Applied Busi-
ness Administration - Accounting degree
program will have the necessary skills to su-
pervise junior accounting clerks and techni-
cians. They will have completed the majority
of the technical content for accreditation as
a designated accountant. The majority of
students will already have or will continue
to work towards a professional accounting
designation after obtaining the Degree.
advanced credit possiBilities
Accounting Degree graduates may receive
advance credit from:
Canadian Universities & Colleges •
(eg.: Concordia University College
of Alberta, Athabasca University,
University of Lethbridge)
Professional Accounting Associations •
(eg., CMA, CGA, CA)
post Graduation
Detailed exemptions for degree courses are
available from the NAIT program offce.
Major skills acQuired
Graduates of the Bachelor of Applied Busi-
ness Administration - Accounting program
will have the necessary skills to supervise
junior accounting clerks and technicians.
They will have completed the majority of the
technical content for accreditation as a des-
ignated accountant. The majority of students
will already have, or will continue to work
towards, a professional accounting designa-
tion, in addition to obtaining the degree.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Government, industry, accounting firms,
banks, hospitals, consulting frms.
career opportunities
Employment will be at many different levels,
from managers to chief financial officers,
in financial accounting, internal auditing,
financial analysis, taxation, or managerial
accounting, with a variety of employers in in-
dustry, government, health and educational
institutions, community organizations, public
accounting frms, and fnancial institutions.
70 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
BAcHeLOR Of
APPLied Business
- finAnce
The Bachelor of Applied Business – Finance
is a post-diploma Applied Degree. Applied
degrees are a new credential developed
by Alberta Learning in response to a need
to prepare Albertans for the changing
economy. This degree offers graduates of
eligible Diploma programs from NAIT, SAIT,
and Alberta Colleges the opportunity to de-
velop the combination of advanced fnancial
expertise and management skills needed in
the expanding and demanding feld of fnan-
cial services. As well, the program assesses
individual international educational creden-
tials for entry into this degree.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Business & Administrative
certiFication
Degree
delivery Method
Continuing Education, Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
August 29, 2008
coNtActs
douG short
Chair,
Finance Programs
Phone: (780) 471-7846
dougs@nait.ca
hardeep Gill
Associate Chair,
Finance Programs
Phone: (780) 471-8858
hardeepg@nait.ca
sandra clarkson
Student Advisor,
Finance Programs
Phone: (780) 471-7479
sandracl@nait.ca
Bachelor oF applied Business
- Finance proGraM oFFice:
T710, Business (Tower) Bldg., Main Cam-
pus, Edmonton
Fax: (780) 471-7425
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Following the completion of a two-year
(four terms) diploma, students will com-
plete an additional two years (four terms)
of studies to obtain a Bachelor of Applied
Business - Finance degree. Each term is four
months long. The program begins with two
consecutive academic terms and ends with
two Directed Field Studies (DFS) terms.
The academic terms include the required
Certifed Financial Planners courses, the Ca-
nadian Securities Course, Business Ethics, Ef-
fective Writing, as well as breadth courses.
The DFS terms are taken via distance edu-
cation while the student is employed. Dur-
ing each DFS term, students will be enrolled
in an on-line DFS course designed to link
the academic courses to their practical em-
ployment experience via research papers,
critiques and case studies.
Students are ultimately responsible for pro-
curing employment during these DFS terms
with assistance from the Degree Program
and NAIT’s Career Services. The student,
NAIT and the employer will sign a three-
party agreement clarifying the nature of the
employment during the two DFS terms.
proGraM lenGth
Students will complete 4 terms of studies,
including two academic terms (Semesters 5
and 6), and two directed feld studies (DFS)
terms (Semesters 7 and 8) in industry. Each
semester is 4 months long.
Semesters 5 and 6 will be offered begin-
ning in September, and depending on en-
rolment numbers, January each year, while
Semesters 7 and 8 will be offered beginning
in September, January, and May each year
(depending on enrolment numbers). It is
possible to complete these 4 terms in as
few as 16 consecutive months.
coMpletion reQuireMents
To graduate with a Bachelor of Applied
Business – Finance degree, the completion
requirements are:
A two year Business Diploma from an ac-
credited Alberta post secondary institution,
plus:
Bachelor of Applied Business - Finance •
Year 3, Semester 5 (6 academic •
courses, 320 hours)
Year 3, Semester 6 (5 academic •
courses, 320 hours)
Year 3, Semester 5 and 6 (minimum •
of 128 elective hours are required,
therefore you may take one (or more)
per semester)
Year 4, Semester 7 (1 online course, •
240 hours)
Year 4, Semester 8 (1 online course, •
240 hours)
Total hours over 2 year applied degree pro-
gram 1,120
certiFication
Graduates of the Applied Degree Program
will receive a Bachelor of Applied Business
– Finance degree.
accreditation
Graduates will have completed the major-
ity of the qualifying courses required to
be eligible to write the Certified Financial
Planner (CFP™) national exam. In addition,
students will have completed the Canadian
Securities course.
Note: NAIT does not award the Certifed Fi-
nancial Planner (CFP™) designation, which is
administered by the Financial Planners Stan-
dards Council (FPSC) to those persons who
have passed the FPSC’s CFP™ Examination
and met its other criteria. In partnership with
Advocis & CCH Canadian Limited (education
providers), NAIT is an accredited deliverer of
the CFP™ Education Program.
In partnership with CSI Global Education
Inc., NAIT is an accredited deliverer of the
CSC® course. NAIT does not award the
CSC® completion certifcate.
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
Applicants must have earned a two year
Business Diploma from an accredited Al-
berta post secondary institution. Credit
from a diploma will account for Semesters
1 through 4 in this applied degree.
seMester 5
fNce300
dfs seminar
Hours: 16 Credits: 0.0
This course is designed to orient students
to the applied degree program. Students are
made aware of course requirements and di-
rected feld studies components. Job search
techniques and the use of NAIT’s Career
Services to assist students in procuring job
placements will be covered.
71 www.nait.ca
fNce313
cfp™ course 3 comprehensive
practices in risk and
retirement planning
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Designed to provide students with a com-
prehensive understanding of the principles
and applications related to the concepts of
managing risk and retirement planning, this
course covers products, issues and practices
in the area of insurance and retirement plan-
ning process moving through the wealth ac-
cumulation phase into retirement. Course
re-numbering - effective July 1, 2006
fNce314
cfp™ course 4 wealth
Management and estate planning
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Students will review the basics of econom-
ics and investing along with an understand-
ing of investment products. Investment
planning and key areas of personal fnancial
management are explored. The course con-
cludes with estate planning fundamentals,
concepts and applications. Course re-num-
bering - effective July 1, 2006.
fNce317
canadian securities course
(csc®) part 1
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course requires the student to register
with the Canadian Securities Institute. An
additional fee to the NAIT tuition fee is re-
quired by the Canadian Securities Institute.
The instructor will go through the CSI regis-
tration process with the student. This is a 2
part course that is intended to help the stu-
dent pass the Canadian Securities Course
exam. Part I covers capital markets, the
Canadian economy and the financial ser-
vices industry. In addition, fnancial state-
ments analysis and investment products.
Prerequisite: FNCE 280 (BUS 380). Course
re-numbering effective July 1, 2006.
fNce319
effective writing
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Effective writing skills for both business and
academic environments will be covered.
Major topics include: formal business re-
ports, research and preparation of a critical
essay, writing for academic purposes, and
examination writing techniques. In addi-
tion, this course will prepare students for
their DFS writing requirements of research
papers, critiques and case studies.
electives
fNce320
financial selling principles
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
An introduction to selling financial prod-
ucts, emphasizing the building of relation-
ships. Topics covered will include the nature
of financial product sales, ethical issues,
knowledge of financial product or service
and skill requirements, the selling process,
negotiating, time and territory manage-
ment, networking, establishing contacts,
and use of technology.
MArk400
e-commerce
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This senior level course is designed to build
awareness and inform students about the
major topics and key concepts of electronic
commerce. E-Commerce offers alternatives
to connect suppliers, employees, and other
stakeholders electronically via intranets,
extranets, the World Wide Web and other
computer mediated environments. Par-
ticipants will explore and use existing and
emerging technologies to effectively and
effciently transact business. Prerequisite:
CMIS241 (BUS441)& MARK166 (BUS166)
Note: Course renumbering effective July 1,
2006
MArk407
International Business
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course builds on the basic concepts of
the Introduction to Marketing course and is
designed to create an awareness of how the
fast-changing international marketing scene
impacts on the Canadian economy and the
creation/loss of jobs in this country; stimu-
late an ongoing interest in media coverage
of foreign and domestic developments that
affect business dealings between nations
and trading blocks; build a sensitivity to
the effects of culture and the uncontrol-
lable environments on product and price,
promotion and distribution in international
marketing; develop a consciousness of the
resources, such as government assistance,
consultants, etc., available to importers and
exporters. Prerequisite: MARK166 (BUS166
or AAC250) Note: Course renumbering ef-
fective July 1, 2006
MgMt300
leadership
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course uses the concepts of organiza-
tional behaviour to explore the current theo-
ries around effective leadership. Alternative
philosophies of leadership will be examined,
as well as moral and ethical responsibilities.
Students will assess their own personal
leadership style and learn how they can de-
velop leadership skills to enhance their own
potential. Prerequisite: ORGB191 (BUS191 &
BUS192 or AAC230) Note: Course renum-
bering effective July 1, 2006
seMester 6
fNce321
Business ethics
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces the students to the
defnition of ethics within the world of busi-
ness. Ethics in Finance, organizations, inter-
national business and whistle blowing are
some examples of topics explored. Various
case studies and ethical dilemmas are pre-
sented to students for analysis. The objec-
tives are to make the study of business ethics
relevant to real-life work situations that the
student may encounter; to better equip the
student with decision-making tools in clarify-
ing their own ethical codes and professional
conduct; and to be made aware of some of
the codes, conducts and practices of profes-
sional fnance institutions.
fNce318
canadian securities course
(csc®) part 2
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This is an intensive investment course that
prepares the student for exam 2 of the
Canadian Securities Course. Students are
required to register with the Canadian Se-
curities Institute and pay an additional fee
to NAIT’s tuition if they have not already
done so in FNCE 317.The key topics covered
include capital markets, the Canadian econ-
omy, listing and regulation, fnancial state-
ments, fixed income securities, equities,
and derivatives. Through lecture, discus-
sion, and on-line exercises the student will
develop the confdence and understanding
of investments to write the second Cana-
dian Securities Course exam. This course
is a continuation to FNCE317. FNCE318 -
CSC® Part 2 covers more investment prod-
ucts analysis, portfolio approaches, mutual
funds, managed products, hedge funds,
fnancial planning and taxation. Prequisite:
FNCE 317(FIN 510) or CSA500. Course re-
numbering - effective July 1, 2006.
72 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
fNce315
financial planning software
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces a goal-based fnancial
planning tool. Students will be able to quickly
specify retirement, education and major pur-
chase goals, and then determine whether
existing strategies can meet those goals. The
goals can be part of a comprehensive plan or
can be introduced as a single concept. Needs
assessment tools for insurance and asset al-
location will also be introduced.
fNce312
cfp™ course 2 contemporary
practices in financial
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces students to basic
income tax laws, moving into a more the
professional and ethical responsibilities as-
sociated with the role of a fnancial planner
and an understanding of the structures and
services within the financial industry are
covered in the course. Different forms of
business structures are explored in-depth,
along with an understanding of trusts. Pre-
requisite: FNCE 211 (FIN 110). Course re-
numbering - effective July 1, 2006.
seMester 7
dfs450
field studies in finance I - online
Hours: 240 Credits: 15.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term. It relates the contents/
topics of Semesters 5 and 6 academic term
courses to the student’s current employ-
ment environment or potential advance-
ment environment. The student, together
with the employer and instructor, will
choose a relevant fnance topic. The student
conducts research and writes a paper on the
topic effectively applying writing skills mas-
tered from the Effective Writing course.
seMester 8
dfs455
field studies in finance II - online
Hours: 240 Credits: 15.0
This course is completed while employed in
a feld studies term. It relates the contents/
topics of Semesters 5 and 6 academic term
courses to the world of business. Case
studies related to Finance are analyzed and
presented by the student. Students may
draw from their own professional dilemmas
or choose a case study in business ethics,
business news, business law, fnancial plan-
ning and fnancial markets.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Applicants must have earned a two year
Business Diploma from an accredited Al-
berta post secondary institution, with a
minimum GPA of 65%, 2.3, 6, or C+ . Their
diploma must include a minimum of 20
courses (60 credits) and contain course
work in the following areas:
Basic Accounting •
Business Math •
Micro and Macro Economics •
Statistics •
Business Communications •
Introductory Computer Skills •
In addition to the above diploma course
requirements, it is highly advised that an
introductory investments and/or fnancial
planning courses be taken prior to the de-
gree program.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Minimum GPA’s for consideration are 65%,
2.3, 6, or C+. The selection process will be
applied only to students achieving the di-
ploma and minimum GPA standards and
may include further written requirements
and/or interviews.
Applicants with a related diploma or cer-
tifcate meeting the basic course and GPA
requirements may be considered.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
delIvery optIoNs
Academic term courses are classroom lec-
ture, computer lab, or a combination of lec-
ture and lab. Directed feld studies courses
are delivered online with visitations by the
instructor to the student’s place of employ-
ment.
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms provide tables and chairs to ac-
commodate lectures and group discussions.
Computer labs are fully equipped with cur-
rent business software and access to the in-
ternet. JR Shaw School of Business students
are supplied with e-mail accounts.
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 20 to 24 scheduled classroom hours
per week is typical.
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: A further
20+ hours of study time per week outside
the class is typical.
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
part-tiMe options
CSA500 Investments - Principles •
CSA510 Investments - Financial •
Analysis
FNCE315 Financial Planning Software •
FNCE319 Effective Writing •
FNCE320 Financial Selling Principles •
FNCE321 Business Ethics •
MARK400 E-Commerce •
MARK407 International Business •
MGMT300 Leadership •
PFP210 Contemporary Practice in •
Financial Planning
PFP310 Comprehensive Practices in •
Risk & Retirement Planning
PFP410 Wealth Management & Estate •
Planning
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Work Experience - Semesters 7 & 8.
Length: Each semester is 4 months.
Type of experience: Finance related position.
Salary: Negotiated between student and em-
ployer.
Who facilitates the placement: Students are
ultimately responsible for procuring em-
ployment during the DFS terms with assis-
tance from the Degree Program and NAIT’s
Career Services. The student, NAIT and the
employer will sign a three-party agreement
clarifying the nature of the employment
during the two DFS terms.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
73 www.nait.ca
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Graduates of the Applied Degree Program
will receive a Bachelor of Applied Business
– Finance degree.
post Graduation
Graduates will have a better chance at suc-
cessfully passing the CFP™ national exam.
In addition to academic knowledge, gradu-
ates of the Bachelor of Applied Business -
Finance degree program will have acquired
the technical, communication and people
skills needed to successfully compete in
the fnancial services and fnancial manage-
ment sectors.
Upon successful completion of the Bachelor
of Applied Business – Finance degree:
1. the graduate will have completed the ap-
proved academic curriculum of the
Financial Planners Standards Council of
Canada and the Canadian Securities
course;
Note: NAIT does not award the Certifed Fi-
nancial Planner (CFP™) designation, which is
administered by the Financial Planners Stan-
dards Council (FPSC) to those persons who
have passed the FPSC’s CFP™ Examination
and met its other criteria. In partnership with
Advocis & CCH Canadian Limited (education
providers), NAIT is an accredited deliverer of
the CFP™ Education Program.
In partnership with CSI Global Education
Inc., NAIT is an accredited deliverer of the
CSC® course. NAIT does not award the
CSC® completion certifcate.
2. the graduate will have demonstrated:
the skills and knowledge that are •
necessary in the demanding feld of
fnancial services;
an ability for effective communication; •
an understanding of what constitutes •
ethical business practices;
an aptitude to work with others. •
cAreer opportuNItIes
career opportunities
Future employment will be at many different
levels within the fnancial services industry.
This includes employment as a financial
planner/advisor/consultant, loans officer
and wealth management consultant.
BAcHeLOR
Of APPLied
infORmAtiOn
sYstems
tecHnOLOGY
The Bachelor of Applied Information Sys-
tems Technology (BAIST) is a four year
degree of which the frst two years is a com-
puter related diploma. Computer Systems
Technology or Computer Engineering Tech-
nology at NAIT or equivalent two year di-
ploma from another College, constitutes the
frst two years of the Degree Program. The
fnal two years of the Degree are comprised
of two semesters of academic training and
two semesters of credit work experience.
Students choose one of two Majors, either
Information Systems or Network Manage-
ment:
inForMation systeMs (i.s.) Major
This major concentrates on the advanced
techniques involved in the analysis, design
and implementation of computer infor-
mation systems using the most current
methodologies and tools. Graduates of this
Major will fll career opportunities as senior
systems analysts and designers, and project
leaders.
In addition to the “Major” courses, students
will complete the Leadership, Project Man-
agement, Managing the IT Portfolio, and
Seminar courses.
netWork ManaGeMent (n.M.)
Major
This major involves highly specialized prepa-
ration geared toward managing the planning,
installation, and operations of computer net-
works in a wide range of companies.
In addition to the “Major” courses, students
complete the Leadership, Project Manage-
ment, Statistics, Finance I and II, and Man-
aging the IT Portfolio courses.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Information Technology & Electronics
certiFication
Degree
delivery Method
Continuing Education, Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
General proGraM inForMation
Jennie C. Asuncion
(780) 378-5307
BAIST@nait.ca
inForMation systeMs Major
Terry Goudreault, Chair
(780) 378-5322
terryg@nait.ca
netWork ManaGeMent Major
Scott Empson, Associate Chair
(780) 378-5243
scotte@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
BAIST is a four-year degree of which the
first two years is a computer related di-
ploma. Computer Systems Technology or
Computer Engineering Technology at NAIT
(or similar programs) constitutes the frst
two years of the Degree program. The fnal
two years of the Degree are comprised of
two semesters of academic training and
two semesters of credit work experience.
The passing grade for all BAIST courses is
60%.
Two plus Two model:
Two years CST, CNT, EET, NET, TET •
program or comparable program.
One year BAIST academic courses. •
One year mandatory work experience. •
Graduation is accomplished after complet-
ing the following:
Information Systems Major:
Twelve academic courses; •
Two terms of Credit Work Experience; •
Obtaining a minimum of 60% in each •
course.
Network Management Major:
Sixteen academic courses; •
Two terms credit work experience; •
Obtaining a minimum of 60% in each •
course.
certiFication
Graduates of BAIST will receive a Bachelor
of Applied Information Systems Technology
Degree. Designation: BAppIST.
74 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
accreditation
Accreditation was granted by the Canadian
Information Processing Society (CIPS) ef-
fective October 4, 2001.
progrAM outlINe
inForMation systeMs seMester 5
BAI506
Architecture & security
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
The defnition of any project requires both
a clear and tested architecture and a clear
security implementation model. This course
will examine a variety of architectures and
their impacts on how projects get con-
structed and how they will perform under
load. Security will be examined from both
network and application perspectives, and
a variety of security solution patterns will
be examined.
BAI507
software engineering
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course in Software Engineering will
examine the process of development within
the Unifed Process environment, concen-
trating on the many of the front-end tasks
within Analysis and Design. It is assumed
that the student has already had an intro-
duction to UP and UML, and so we will take
a more extensive look at some aspects of
the process, such as Business Modeling,
Requirements Capture (including JAD ses-
sions) and UML Patterns.
BAI540
project Management
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Provides the principles, concepts, materials,
and practice that allow a professional to ini-
tiate I.T. projects, conduct project planning,
manage project resources, manage team
situations, control projects over time, man-
age change-and-release procedures and
conduct project closure. When students
have completed this course, they will un-
derstand the project manager’s role in guid-
ing a project to a successful conclusion. The
student will understand how to establish
and scope projects through a project char-
ter, prepare and execute a project plan and
budget using project management software,
manage and control the team environment,
conduct project deliverable quality control
over the course of a project and report on
project status through to closure. Students
will gain knowledge and skills to deal with
unrealistic constraints, problem analysis
and escalation, scope management, issues
management, template generation, risk
analysis, and contingency planning.
BAI552
Business process & enterprise
resource planning I
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course offers an overview of the ERP
topic area. The course examines some of the
major business process found within an ERP
system (Financial, HR, CRM, MRP & SCM)
and looks at the implementations of these
processes within both PeopleSoft and SAP.
It will also look at the development process
inherent in making minor modifications to
the standard business process flows, and
introduce the steps necessary for changing
reports and doing custom validations.
BAI586
system development tools
Hours: 128 Credits: 6.0
This course will examine technical topics
that will provide the student with their main
toolset for constructing internet based sys-
tems and services. This technical toolset
(including VB.NET, ADO.NET, ASP.NET,
XML, SQL Server, Web Services & Wireless
devices) will be used to build components
within a lab-case environment. This course
concentrates on specifc technologies, and
the support skills (design and manage-
ment) will be covered in other courses.
BAI590
seminar I
Hours: 16 Credits: 0.5
This course allows the student to attend a
number of current seminars presented by
industry experts in the information systems
technology feld. Students are to research
and present a seminar topic.
seMester 6
BAI606
database topics
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course will examine advanced features
of Database Management Systems. Topics
will cover both OLTP and OLAP systems.
Included topics will be tuning OLTP system
performance, integrating new components
into very large existing Databases, Data
Warehousing & Data Marts.
BAI652
Businesss process & enterprise
resource planning II
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course examines the developmental
processes and tools used when modifying
the default business processes found within
large scale ERP systems. The course con-
tinues from the BAI552 course and spends
some time examining business processes,
and then uses those processes as the basis
for the developmental labs. The frst half of
the course uses PeopleSoft People Tools and
the second half uses SAP ABAP. The student
will not only gain a good introduction to the
software tools, but they will have a very clear
appreciation of the challenges inherent when
working in the ERP environment.
BAI686
research/project development
Hours: 128 Credits: 6.0
Students will combine their technical and
managerial skills to develop a scalable
enterprise system for a real client. Some
students will have the option (based on
our industry partnerships) to engage in
research work in integrating large system
components into a complex orgainzation.
BAI690
seminar II
Hours: 16 Credits: 0.5
This course allows the student to attend a
number of current seminars presented by
industry experts. Students are to research
and present on future career opportunities.
inForMation systeMs & netWork
ManaGeMent seMester 7 and
seMester 8
BAI700
credit work experience II
Hours: 640 Credits: 10.0
BAI700 and BAI800 represent the ‘ap-
plied’ portion of the Applied Degree. Stu-
dents undertake a four month full-time paid
work experience for each of these courses
(eight months in total). Students are to be
responsible for securing work in systems
development, systems analysis, network
administration, network management,
technical support, or other IT related areas.
75 www.nait.ca
BAI600
credit work experience I
Hours: 640 Credits: 10.0
This course represents the ‘Applied’ por-
tion of the Applied Degree. Students un-
dertake a four-month full-time paid work
experience. Students are to be responsible
for one or more of Systems Development,
Systems Analysis, Network Administration,
Network Management, Technical Support
and/or related areas. Students will main-
tain a portfolio of skills completed on the
job. The student’s employer, together with
NAIT staff, will be actively monitoring the
student portfolio. Prerequisite of BAI600 is
all the semester 5 courses.
seMester 5
BAI530
leadership development
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Focuses on the development of leadership
ability. Using a workshop style the partici-
pant gains an understanding of leadership,
articulates a personal philosophy of leader-
ship, and applies various leadership skills.
Semester 6
BAI604
Management of the It portfolio
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course views information technology
from the perspective of managers at sev-
eral levels - from the CEO to the first line
manager. It provides frameworks and man-
agement principles that current or aspir-
ing managers can employ to cope with the
challenges inherent in the implementation
of rapidly advancing technology. It consid-
ers strategic and operational issues, the sig-
nifcance of rapidly advancing technology,
human, and organizational issues related to
technology introduction and usage within a
business context.
netWork ManaGeMent seMester 5
BAI511
Advanced routing concepts
Hours: 80 Credits: 4.0
This is an integrated theory/lab course cov-
ering switching and routing technologies.
The course will start by covering advanced
IP addressing concepts such as VLSM and
Route Summarization. The next phase of
the course will cover routing theory, proto-
cols and router confguration. Labs will be
used throughout the course to supplement
theory, using equipment from Cisco and/or
Nortel Networks.
BAI512
Advanced operating systems
Hours: 80 Credits: 4.0
The students will learn advanced Win-
dows 2000 and Windows 2003 concepts,
including active directory design, network
infrastructure design, routing and remote
access service and configuring terminal
services. They will also work with advanced
Linux networking features.
BAI513
protocols
Hours: 48 Credits: 2.0
In this course the students will study sev-
eral network protocols that provide the
main foundations of network management.
DNS, WINS, DHCP, SNMP, SMTP, as well as
other protocols are covered in depth. These
protocols are investigated through both the
associated RFCs and the use of SNIFFER
PRO. The students will also learn to manu-
ally decode various network packets to de-
termine its intended function.
BAI514
Network security
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course will introduce the students
to the process of writing and creating Se-
curity guidelines for a company. Labs will
be used to reinforce the tools and con-
cepts discussed during the theory portion
of the course. This course will introduce
the student to various security technolo-
gies, including encryption, authentication,
VPNs and firewalls. Students will be able
to defend their network infrastructure and
corporate assets from both internal ane ex-
ternal attacks.
BAI515
Business consulting fundamentals
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
The Business Consulting Fundamentals
course branches off from the regular network
related lab work to begin investigating some
of the business aspects of today’s computer
and data communications industry. A review
of project management’s principles, a ven-
ture into the importance of ethical behavior
in business through the use of case studies,
discussions and review of contracts, legal
letters and some laws affecting these docu-
ments are all discussed in this course. It also
expands into what it takes to become a con-
sultant today and the basic skills necessary
for any consultant to succeed in today’s busi-
ness environment. At the end of the course
another type of legal document is investi-
gated, the Service Level Agreement and this
leads the students down the road towards
a solid understanding of what is involved
in developing one of today’s most difficult
agreements, the Disaster Recovery Plan. The
course involves high levels of class and group
participation.
BAI520
Budgetary Accounting
fundamentals
Hours: 32 Credits: 1.0
Accounting is a system for measuring busi-
ness activities and communicating those
results to the intended users. Accounting
information is used to assist managers
in making decisions. This course covers:
1. Concepts and procedures used by ac-
countants to make these measurements.
2. Principle reports through which the
measurements are communicated. 3. Tech-
niques used by managerial decision makers.
Upon completion of the course the student
will be able to: 1. Analyze the more common
business transactions and record their ef-
fect in a manual system. 2. Generate and in-
terpret appropriate reports for the users of
fnancial information. 3. Apply managerial
accounting tools and techniques for deci-
sion makers with respect to projects.
BAI570
statistics
Hours: 48 Credits: 2.0
This course introduces the student to de-
scriptive statistics for the Internetworking
and fnancial purposes. The course covers
the following topics: 1. Methods for ag-
gregating discrete and continuous data.
2. Measures of central tendency and vari-
ability. 3. Binomial, Poisson, normal, t, F and
chi-square probability distributions. 4. In-
ferential and bivariate statistics.
seMester 6
BAI630
research projects
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
This course has students performing re-
search and design, creating project plans,
submitting technical reports, and giving a
formal presentation on their leading edge
emerging technology project selected from
a bank of projects. On performing all of the
above, the student will build their design us-
ing state of the art networking technologies.
This course will therefore prepare the stu-
dent to effectively blend into a corporation’s
context.
76 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
BAI620
finance II
Hours: 32 Credits: 1.0
The purpose of this course is to learn how to
use accounting information for planning and
decision-making under conditions of cer-
tainty and uncertainty. Topics in this course
include costs and revenue estimation, re-
gression modeling, trend and risk analysis,
fnancial forecasting, planning and decision-
making models, and others.
BAI615
Network Management
Hours: 64 Credits: 3.0
Using various tools the students will learn
to perform and implement several network
management tasks and processes. Appli-
cation analysis, bandwidth utilization and
baselining functions will be performed by the
students. They will also learn to implement
an enterprise network management system,
such as HP OpenView or CiscoWorks.
BAI614
security II
Hours: 80 Credits: 4.0
This course provides with an opportunity
to implement some of the guide they cre-
ated in BAI514. In addition, student will be
exposed to Security concepts such as Fire-
walls and “Demilitarized Zones”. Labs form
an integral part of this course and will be
tested at the end of the course. This course
covers the advanced security topics of ad-
vanced firewall concepts, DMZs and se-
curity policies. Security counter measures
and intrusion detection strategies are also
investigated and applied by the students.
BAI613
voice over Ip
Hours: 48 Credits: 2.0
Students will study the concepts and tech-
nologies behind Voice over IP networking
and will confgure analog Voice over IP ses-
sions using Cisco 2600 series routers and
Cisco Call Manager and/or Nortel Commu-
nication Server for Enterprise (CSE).
BAI612
Network design
Hours: 48 Credits: 2.0
This course is designed to provide the stu-
dent with the knowledge and skills needed to
achieve introductory level of competency in
network design. It will enable the student to
gather internetworking requirements, iden-
tify solutions, and design the network infra-
structure and elements to ensure the basic
functionality of the proposed solutions.
BAI611
switching and wireless lANs
Hours: 80 Credits: 4.0
This course will cover the various switch-
ing technologies including Spanning Tree
Protocol (STP), VLANs/VTP/Integration,
Inter-VLAN Routing, and Multicasting. The
course will also cover Wireless LANs basics
and configuration. A portion of the Wire-
less LANs section will be delivered using
the newly acquired Cisco Wireless LANs
equipment.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A two-year diploma in computer-related
technologies, and/or computer engineering
technologies is required. This diploma com-
prises the frst two years of the Degree. Op-
portunities for bridging from other diploma
programs are available.
New full time Applied Degree students will
begin daytime classes in September each
year. Bridging courses may be required de-
pending on the Major selected.
Information Systems Major students must
have prior knowledge of Visual Basic or
C++, SQL, HTML/Scripting and Object
modeling.
Network Management Major students
must have prior knowledge of computer re-
pair and maintenance, network cabling and
hardware, communications protocol and
network operating systems.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is based
on criteria that includes academic achieve-
ment and related work experience beyond
the minimum prerequisite identified in the
NAIT calendar or application form. Please
note that an interview and/or entrance ex-
amination may be required for BAIST.
career investiGation
A career investigation report is not appli-
cable to BAIST, instead complete BAIST
Application Form.
advanced/transFer credit
Information Systems Major:
Terry Goudreault, Chair
(780) 378-5322
terryg@nait.ca
Network Management Major:
Scott Empson, Associate Chair
(780) 378-5243
scotte@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
Classroom lectures and computer lab.
Note that there is a significant amount of
group work in all BAIST courses.
classrooM or laB settinG
Information Systems Major
One lab - WA304, 25 workstations •
– networked
Network Management Major
Two labs - WA306 and WA318, each •
15 workstations - networked
IBM and CISCO network equipment, •
Several servers accessible by students •
Paid Credit Work Experience •
comprises the last two semesters of
the Program and thus will be located at
the employer’s place of business.
BuildinG location(s)
HP Centre (W)
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week:
Information Systems Major: 25 hours of
class time.
Network Management Major: 30 hours of
class time.
A passing grade for BAIST is 60% per
course.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 40 - 60 hours
per week equivalent for both Majors.
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
deGree preparation and skills
upGradinG
CNT495 PC Repair and Upgrading •
IST115 Financial Accounting •
IST215 Systems Analysis & Design I •
IST235 Client-Server Programming •
IST245 Database Management •
IST260 Networking I •
IST271 Business Communications •
IST334 J2EE Development •
IST370 Organizational Behaviour •
77 www.nait.ca
inForMation systeMs
developMent Major
BAI506 Architecture & Security •
BAI507 Software Engineering •
BAI530 Leadership Development •
BAI540 Project Management •
BAI552 Business Process & Enterprise •
Resource Planning I
BAI586 System Development Tools •
BAI590 Seminar I •
BAI600 Credit Work Experience I •
BAI604 Management of the IT •
Portfolio
BAI606 Database Topics •
BAI652 Businesss Process & Enterprise •
Resource Planning II
BAI686 Research/Project •
Development
BAI690 Seminar II •
BAI700 Credit Work Experience II •
netWork ManaGeMent Major
BAI511 Advanced Routing Concepts •
BAI512 Advanced Operating Systems •
BAI513 Protocols •
BAI514 Network Security •
BAI515 Business Consulting •
Fundamentals
BAI520 Budgetary Accounting •
Fundamentals
BAI530 Leadership Development •
BAI570 Statistics •
BAI600 Credit Work Experience I •
BAI604 Management of the IT •
Portfolio
BAI611 Switching and Wireless LANs •
BAI612 Network Design •
BAI613 Voice over IP •
BAI614 Security II •
BAI615 Network Management •
BAI620 Finance II •
BAI630 Research Projects •
BAI700 Credit Work Experience II •
co-op & Work experience
Dates: BAIST Internship students are avail-
able for 4 or 8 month periods of time at any
time of the year. Full time paid employment
is expected. Shorter term or part time em-
ployment is acceptable.
September Program intake only for full time,
daytime academic classes.
The passing grade for all BAIST courses is
60%.
Length: Two four-month semesters, for a
total of eight months, are required.
There is no advanced credit granted based on
prior work experience for either of the frst or
second term of Credit Work Experience.
Type of experience: Credit Work Experience
comprises the second year of the BAIST De-
gree Program and is a required component.
Students fnd permanent work in a position
where they can apply what they learned
in their course work. If this is a permanent
position, the first eight months would be
used to fulfill the Credit Work Experience
requirement.
A representative of the BAIST Degree Pro-
gram will do a site visit to the student and
their supervisor approximately in the mid-
dle of each work term.
In order to complete each four month term
of work experience, a student must com-
plete each of the following:
Employer Student Evaluation Pamphlet •
provided by BAIST.
Research Project (ten to ffteen pages). •
Student Credit Work Experience report •
providing feedback on projects worked
on and applications developed and a
review of the learning experience.
Students who take the BAIST Degree Pro-
gram through Continuing Education in the
evening can use their daytime employ-
ment as Credit Work Experience so long
as it meets the criteria. Students must have
completed BAIST semester fve prior to reg-
istering for the frst work experience term.
Contact the BAIST Credit Work Experi-
ence Coordinator to have the planned work
experience evaluated (Neil Lang - 378-
5320).
Salary: Earnings during the work experience
are usually dependent on a person’s prior
education and experience. Earnings average
the equivalent of $19.00 per hour.
Relocation: Students can do their work ex-
perience anywhere.
All reporting by non-Edmonton employers
and students is on the same basis as local
Credit Work Experience and will be marked
accordingly.
Who facilitates the placement:
Neil Lang, Credit Work Experience Coordi-
nator (780) 378-5320 neill@nait.ca
Information Systems Major
Terry Goudreault, Chair
(780) 378-5322
BAIST@nait.ca
Network Management Major
Scott Empson, Associate Chair
(780) 378-5243
BAIST@nait.ab.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
inFo sessions
Scheduled Information Sessions for BAIST
program during Open House 2007:
Friday, October 12, 2007
12:15pm - 1:10 pm
WA314
Saturday, October 13, 2007
1:15pm - 2:10 pm
WA314
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Graduates of BAIST will receive a Bachelor
of Applied Information Systems Technology
Degree. Designation: BAppIST.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Fluency in written and oral •
communications.
Strong reasoning skills. •
Experience with computers and •
networks.
Project Management skills. •
Strategic I.T. planning. •
Research and presentation skills. •
Leadership and team building skills. •
78 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
advanced credit possiBilities
With the Applied Degree, it is possible to
enter some Masters Degree Programs. It
would be best to contact the university of
your choice. Athabasca University, for ex-
ample, will normally require you to have at
least two years of work experience.
proFessional association
courses
Recommend further courses in Project
Management at the Project Management
Institute - http://www.pmi.org/
Phi Theta Kappa - www.leadership.pro-
gram@ptk.org/leaddev/leaddev_intro.htm
Recommend students and graduates to
become members of Canadian Information
Processing Society - http://www.cips.ca/
Major skills acQuired
Skills acquired are primarily based on a stu-
dent’s major. All BAIST students will have
courses in Project Management, Leadership
and Strategic I.T. Planning.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Consulting Companies •
Retail and Manufacturing Companies •
Energy Companies •
Hi-Tech Corporations •
Civic, Provincial and Federal •
Government Departments
career opportunities
Information Systems •
Computer Programmer •
Systems Analyst •
Project Leader •
Computer Analyst •
Web Site Developer •
Network Management •
Network Manager •
Network Analyst •
Network Design •
Network Security •
Network Engineer •
BAcHeLOR Of
tecHnOLOGY in
tecHnOLOGY
mAnAGement
UPDATE - Due to demand, the NAIT Bach-
elor of Technology in Technology Manage-
ment is available through part-time study
during the day for the fall 2007 intake.
Other delivery options will be available
for fall 2008. To discuss delivery options,
please contact Student Recruitment.
NAIT’s new Bachelor of Technology (BTech)
in Technology Management – currently the
only program of its kind in Alberta – offers
graduates of two-year applied science and
engineering technology diplomas the op-
portunity to earn a baccalaureate degree
with only two additional years of study. The
degree was developed in direct response to
industry requests to provide diploma grads
with the added dynamic, multi-faceted
skills needed for management and super-
visory roles.
The BTech degree, which is distinct from a
Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Engi-
neering degree, bridges the gap between
technologists and engineers.
Specializations are currently offered in Re-
sources and Environmental Management,
Applied Building Science, Electrical and
Electronics Engineering Technology, and
Mechanical and Manufacturing Technology,
as well as a General Studies option.
Graduates from the degree will have an
unbeatable combination of advanced
technical skills, industry-focused theoreti-
cal knowledge, and higher-order strategic
thinking, giving them a decided advantage
in the global marketplace.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences
certiFication
Degree
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
Two Years (4 semesters of 17 weeks) Be-
yond a diploma level
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
coNtActs
student recruitMent centre
Phone: 780.471.8874
Fax: 780.471.8448
Toll-free: 1.877.627.3377
E-mail: askanadvisor@nait.ca
reGistrar’s oFFice
Phone: 780.471.6248
Fax: 780.471.8490
Toll-free: 1.800.661.4077
E-mail: registrar@nait.ca
dr. joseph varuGhese, chair
Bachelor of Technology
Phone: 780.378.5982
E-mail: josephv@nait.ca
Gisele toth, adMinistrative
assistant
Bachelor of Technology
Phone: 780.378.5983
E-mail: giselet@nait.ca
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
Elective course offerings in Semesters 3 and
4 are subject to change.
seMester 1
Bte301
statistical Analysis
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is designed to formalize the
student’s understanding of statistics so that
they will be able to apply best statistical
practice in the technological applications
they encounter.
Bte321
critical reading and writing
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Much of the course consists of a structured,
disciplined study of various forms of litera-
ture and flm media as a basis for evaluat-
ing and critiquing business, environmental,
and global issues and concepts. The writ-
ing component of the course focuses on
high-level writing skills including direct,
concise, expressive, and persuasive forms
of communication, as well as on advanced
research, documentation and presentation
skills. Course delivery and evaluation is
in the form of lectures, group discussions,
films, case studies and formal written as-
signments.
79 www.nait.ca
Bte340
Managerial Accounting
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Managerial accounting is an introduction
to accounting techniques used by manage-
rial decision-makers. Students will learn to
apply cost-volume-proft analysis, perfor-
mance evaluation, pricing methods, bud-
geting, and relevant cost analysis. Through
practical case studies, students gain experi-
ence in applying the managerial accounting
skills learned. Students will also learn how
to screen capital investment projects.
electives
Bte313
Quality control system
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Every project should be conceived and man-
aged so that it meets or exceeds customer
requirements. This module addresses quality
approaches that should be used by all proj-
ect managers, especially for quality planning,
quality assurance, and quality control.
Bte420
productivity Improvement I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The course provides the student with a
working knowledge of the Productivity Im-
provement principles, including the effects
of quality on production, service, and our
ability to compete globally. The course in-
cludes an overview of the quality system,
the economics of quality, CQI philosophies,
planning and organizing for quality assur-
ance, quality improvement and problem
solving, human resource management in
the CQI environment, and employee in-
volvement in a participative management
environment.
Bte430
environmental Impact Assessment
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
An Environmental Impact Assessment
(EIA) examines the biological, economic,
and social impacts that are commonly as-
sociated with development activities and
the means used to predict, evaluate, and
mitigate impacts in human and natural
environments. This course is designed to
give students a thorough grounding in the
theory and practices associated with an EIA
including assessment of the environmental
impacts of development projects, plans, and
policies on the decision-making process.
seMester 2
Bte341
human resource Issues and
strategies
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course looks at assessing human re-
source issues and developing systematic
processes for aligning strategic human
resource management with policies and
organizational strategy. In this program
the learner will identify and evaluate hu-
man resource issues and design strategic
policies to achieve competitive advantage
and operational excellence. This course
provides learners with an opportunity to
appraise issues and best practices pertain-
ing to organizational strategy, global com-
petition, technological change, workforce
characteristics, and government regulation
as they relate to the formation of strategic
human resource policies. Emphasis will be
placed on identifying, analyzing, assess-
ing, and evaluating human resource issues
and best practices pertaining to the Alberta
business environment. Learners will de-
velop the skills to assess, compare, choose,
and develop human resource management
processes. Learners will be able to function
in the human resource management area as
human resource specialists, as managers,
or as trade union representative.
Bte302
recent Advances in technology
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course focuses on major issues and new
technology trends that affect business and
industry every day. Students will research
and analyze current and future technological
trends, and present out their fndings on how
companies evaluate new technologies to
solve business and industry problems.
Bte320
ethics and society
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Ethics and Society supports the degree re-
quirements of students through its high-level
focus on personal, social, business, environ-
mental, and international ethics in prepara-
tion for their professional career. Students
prepare themselves to face ethical dilem-
mas by developing a personal code of ethics
based on extensive reading and consider-
ation of the works of acknowledged experts
in the field from the past to the present. In
keeping with the focus and objectives of the
degree program, students apply their code of
ethics to contemporary social issues; to the
application of business practices in Alberta
and Canada; to environmental and natural
resource issues affecting business and soci-
ety; and toward a global, international busi-
ness perspective. Students also review and
critique existing codes of ethics as published
by a variety of provincial and federal techni-
cal organizations. Course material is deliv-
ered using lecture, class discussion, flm, and
case studies.
electives
Bte432
safety and loss Management
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will apply the principles and
practices of providing a safe work environ-
ment in the construction industry. Key areas
of study involve Alberta Health and Safety
legislation; Hazard Assessment and Control;
and Incident Investigation and Reporting.
Relevant parts of the occupational health
and safety acts, regulations, and codes will
be reviewed. This lab/lecture course will
focus on the processes for identification,
assessment and control of hazards in the
workplace. Learners will also analyze the
requirements for investigating and docu-
menting workplace incidents according to
new health and safety legislation.
Bte310
calculus II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
A variety of technologically relevant prob-
lems will be solved using one-dimensional
integration and differentiation, including
areas, length, volume, mass, and surface
area. Problems involving polar and spheri-
cal coordinates, vectors, power and Taylor
series, and frst order differential equations
will also be solved.
80 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Bte403
Introduction to digital signal
processing
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course on digital signal processing
(DSP) aims to introduce the student to el-
ementary signal characteristics and signal
analysis tools, such as statistical analysis,
frequency domain filtering, and frequency
spectrum analysis, with the purpose of
extracting or enhancing information from
available signals. These topics are explored
with representative audio files, using such
popular tools as Matlab, Scilab, and LabView.
Theory addressed in lectures is subsequently
explored with assignments and computer
exercises. The evaluation and enhancement
processing of signals, in order to extract in-
formation of optimal quality, is foundational
to the overall exercise of information and risk
management, and thus requires a proper as-
sessment of signal characteristics, and hence
the process of extracting the valued informa-
tion that they carry.
Bte411
environmental chemistry
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Sources, reactions, transport, fate and
effects of chemical species in the envi-
ronment will be examined. Biochemical,
organic, inorganic and physical chemistries
will be utilized to explain these processes.
Emphasis will be focused on air, water and
soil contamination characteristic of ma-
jor industry activity. A variety of physical,
chemical, and biological control and reme-
diation technologies and their application
will be investigated. Curriculum delivery will
be primarily lecture.
Bte414
environmental Management
systems
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
One of the keys to success in today’s in-
dustry, and its future, is an organization’s
ability to use technology through a systems
approach to address and continually im-
prove its environmental performance. En-
vironmental management systems (EMS)
are a central part of overall management
addressing the environmental components
of operations leading to sound environmen-
tal performance and a process of continual
improvement in sustainable practices. Stu-
dents will develop a working understanding
of the different elements of an EMS (audit-
ing, environmental impact assessment, life
cycle analysis, and environmental perfor-
mance reporting), the range of tools avail-
able for implementation (e.g., ISO 14000
and other software), and the benefts gained
in implementing these systems (e.g., better
risk management, cost savings, regulatory
compliance, reduced footprint). Students
will be expected to familiarize themselves
with the appropriate techniques and meth-
ods, and apply them through specifc exer-
cises and projects.
Bte421
productivity Improvement II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The course builds on concepts learned in
Productivity Improvement I and further
develops process improvement skills. In
addition, the students learn method & time
study techniques, plant layout, and project
planning & control. Students are required to
design a single-product production plant in-
cluding all space requirements for staffng,
office space requirements, receipt of raw
materials, warehousing, production lines,
paint line, final assembly, finished goods
storage, and fnal shipping. The fnal plant
layout complete with a detailed project re-
port are submitted at the end of the course.
seMester 3
Bte342
project Management
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
To ensure all projects are completed on
time, within budget, and to the satisfaction
of all the stakeholders, it is essential that
project managers apply appropriate soft
skills to gain participants’ trust and com-
mitment while applying hard technical skills
to initiate, plan, execute, monitor & control,
and close-out projects.
Bte300
Applied research I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will provide underlying theory
and practical skills for the student in con-
ducting applied research activities including
methodological approaches, information
collection and literacy, proposal writing and
presentation, and numeracy. These skills
will prepare the student for conducting the
capstone project as well as future applied
research activities in their careers.
electives
Bte435
construction Jobsite controls
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This lab/lecture course provides students
with the knowledge and skills to manage a
construction jobsite. Students will become
familiar with jobsite layout and the manage-
ment and coordination of tools, equipment,
documents, materials, labor and sub-trades.
The role of the project manager with re-
spect to the on-site control of projects will
be the course’s primary focus. The general
structure of a typical construction company
will be presented. The roles and relation-
ships between the company and the on-site
manager will be explored.
Bte413
global energy development and
society
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will give the student a global
perspective of the role that hydrocarbon
resources play in the world society and
economy. The strategic role that fossil fuels
have played in major social, economic and
military events in the 20th and 21st century
will be covered. This course also includes an
examination of the social, cultural and eco-
nomic impacts of the current and future oil
and gas exploration and production activities
in developed and underdeveloped regions of
the world and the role that the Kyoto Ac-
cord has played in this development. An
examination of alternate energy sources will
be included and the socio-economic impact
associated with the development of alterna-
tive energy sources. Students will use and
enhance research skills and critical thinking
in this course to expand their understanding
of the global energy industry. Group discus-
sion and debate will utilized to enhance the
learning process.
Bte405
Industrial communications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will discuss common data
communication protocols and models and
examine how they are applied in industrial
control systems. Students will be required
to discuss and design various types of com-
munication networks and their applications.
Software tools will be used to aid design
where applicable. The course delivery con-
sists of lectures with research assignments
and a design project to be submitted.
81 www.nait.ca
Bte404
power generation and distribution
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This advanced course will enable the student
to study different aspects of the electrical
power distribution systems employed in
North America. Computer simulations will
reinforce lectures introducing technical as-
pects of the electrical systems which provide
power for most technological endeavours.
The student will evaluate alternate sources
of “green” energy as to their suitability for
different applications. The pros and cons of
deregulation of electrical power supply will
be analyzed. Techniques of optimization of
energy generation, transmission, distribution
and utilization will be developed and com-
pared. The application of state-of-the-art
monitoring, control and protection systems
will be explained. Through research, discus-
sion and debates the student will develop the
skills to assess technologies used in electrical
power systems.
Bte402
software simulation tools
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is an introduction to computer
simulation in Electrical and Electronics Engi-
neering. The course will consist of introduc-
tions to software packages, demonstrations
and electronics-oriented computer simu-
lation assignments. Both component and
functional-level simulation will be dealt
with. As well, limitations and recommended
uses for each type of software package will
be discussed. Computer simulation will fo-
cus on small-signal analog electronics, dis-
crete switching circuits, digital circuitry and
electro-mechanical control systems. Types
of simulation packages to be considered in
this course are analog electronic simulation;
digital electronic simulation; and math-
ematical and control-system simulation.
seMester 4
Bte440
capstone project
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
The Capstone Project is a concluding course
of study designed to allow participants to in-
tegrate and apply skills and knowledge gained
from a number of previous courses of study
taken in the B. Tech. These skills are used to
complete an applied design project on a real
world challenge presented by a sponsor.
electives
Bte350
energy and environmental MgMt
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Given the importance of energy in our ev-
eryday lives and industry, this course pro-
vides the student with an understanding of
energy and its manifestation from various
sources, transformations, energy-matter
relationships; and how it can be managed to
environmentally and economically optimize
energy systems, processing, building and
safety technology, and complex technology
systems. The student will also gain practi-
cal experience in the effective handling of
resources including air, water, and other
operating materials; as well as developing
solutions for managing waste in industrial
applications and as part of building technol-
ogy systems
Bte352
enterprise resource planning
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Every business needs to interact with ad-
vanced Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP)
software at some point – either within the
company itself, or with the firm’s custom-
ers and suppliers. This course examines the
business purpose of ERP systems and exam-
ines some of the major business processes
commonly found within an ERP system
– Financial, Human Resource, Customer Re-
lationship Management and Supply Chain
Management. These business processes will
be examined at a reasonably broad level, with
specifc components within those processes
being implemented within an actual ERP sys-
tem. The students will use the ERP system to
learn some standard “best practices” within
these complex business processes and how
to extract appropriate and useful manage-
ment reports. The students will also examine
the general method of how these systems get
customized within an organization, and will
create customized management reports that
can help resolve business issues. This course
will use lecture, practical lab work, business
videos and guest speakers to provide the stu-
dent with a very practical and realistic busi-
ness learning experience.
Bte331
society, environment, and
sustainability
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces students to the So-
cial Scientifc Method of Inquiry and Tech-
niques to ask the diffcult questions facing
business in a dynamic society. Learners will
explore the mechanics of language, cus-
tom, and belief, and examine the role that
cultural changes in Alberta, over the past
millennium, played in urban and rural devel-
opment. Learners will analyze case studies
which explore the many roles that business
plays in leading and shaping society. Learn-
ers will conduct primary and secondary
research and perform critical case analysis
using newspapers, books, periodicals, flms,
and electronic media. Learners will evaluate
the social impact of business operating in
Alberta, Canada, and around the world by
exploring the underlying factors of social
and cultural relationships.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Must be a graduate of an accredited or rec-
ognized Applied Science or Engineering Tech-
nology program with a minimum GPA of 2.3.
Programs include:
Avionics Engineering Technology •
Biomedical Engineering Technology •
Chemical Engineering Technology •
Chemical Technology •
Civil Engineering Technology •
Computer Engineering Technology •
Construction Engineering Technology •
Electrical Engineering Technology •
Electronics Engineering Technology •
Engineering Design and Drafting •
Technology
Geological Technology •
Geomatics Engineering Technology •
Instrumentation Engineering •
Technology
Materials Engineering Technology •
Mechanical Engineering Technology •
Network Engineering Technology •
Petroleum Engineering Technology •
Telecommunications Engineering •
Technology
Other technology programs may also •
be considered
82 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
The BTech program is for you if you are:
Interested in advancing your technical •
education, skills and/or career
options in a familiar and personalized
environment
Interested in advancing/fast tracking •
your career
Interested in developing a global •
perspective on the social, ethical,
environmental and technological issues
key to industry success.
delIvery optIoNs
Currently available full-time or part-time on
Main Campus during the day. Future plans
for alternative delivery modes in 2008. For
those requesting part-time, approval by
Program Chair is required.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
post Graduation
Future opportunities will also be available
to graduates continuing into post-graduate
studies (e.g. MBA and other Master’s pro-
grams) through transfer arrangements with
other post-secondary institutions locally
and internationally.
Major skills acQuired
Graduates of the BTech will expand their
technological skill base and knowledge of
technological theory. The degree provides
a global perspective including social, eco-
nomic, ethical, and environmental issues,
which are key to the success and sustain-
ability of today’s industry.
The baccalaureate will build on research
and communication skills, while ensuring
students also develop effective manage-
ment and supervisory skills (team, planning,
project management). The development of
critical thinking and problem solving skills is
also a key study component essential for in-
novation in today’s economy.
The major focus of the program’s fourth
year is a capstone project, involving ap-
plied research. The project centres on a
real-world challenge requiring technologi-
cal solutions through applied science or
design, and allows students to integrate all
the technological and management skills
acquired in the program. It is completed in
conjunction with a sponsor from industry,
government or other sectors.
cAreer opportuNItIes
career opportunities
Graduates of the BTech program are well-
prepared for rewarding opportunities in a
wide range of careers.
Senior manager (goods, utilities, •
transportation, construction)
Engineering manager (private •
sector/government – engineering and
scientifc research)
Primary industry production •
manager (mining, fshing, oil, forestry
operations)
Construction manager (commercial, •
industrial, residential)
Senior technologist (resource, •
processing, applied research)
Project manager •
Technology research •
BAkinG ceRtificAte
The programs offered by the NAIT School
of Hospitality and Culinary Arts, including
the Hokanson Centre for Culinary Arts, are
showcased online at: www.nait.ca/scho-
olofhospitality/
Students in the baking program receive
training in the art and science of bread, cake
and pastry making, as well as the many as-
pects of cake decorating.
A major portion of the instruction takes
place in a fully equipped bakery training
lab, where many of the required skills are
developed. Classroom instruction involves
students with subjects such as baking
theory, business concepts, emergency frst
aid, communication skills, sanitation knowl-
edge, nutrition, safety and equipment and
trade calculations.
The Baking Program also includes a four-
week work experience section. Students are
placed in bakeries to observe commercial
production facilities and are able to gain
valuable practical experience.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Hospitality & Culinary Arts
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
1 year (2 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
March 14, 2008
coNtActs
alan duMonceaux, chair
(780) 471-8693
adumonce@nait.ca
joanne Gora, adMin. assistant
(780) 471-8678
jcholak@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
One year (two semesters of 16 weeks
each)
83 www.nait.ca
certiFication
Baking Certifcate
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
coB100
Baking theory
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
These courses involve the study of raw ma-
terials and methods used in the production
of a wide variety of baked goods. Many re-
lated subject areas are studied in order to
enhance the understanding of baking pro-
cedures and products.
coB101
practical Baking
Hours: 320 Credits: 20.0
These courses are designed to allow stu-
dents practical hands-on experience in or-
der to develop the knowledge, techniques
and skills necessary to produce a wide va-
riety of baked goods. Working from simple
basics to more complex advanced tech-
niques, students will develop needed skills
as they proceed. Products such as butter-
cream cakes, Artisian breads, cinnamon
buns, fruit pies and many delightful pastries
are practiced in the baking lab.
coB103
trade calculations/Management
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
In these courses, emphasis is placed upon
business mathematics, costing of recipes,
as well as proft and loss calculation and all
other bakery trade calculations.
coB104
Baking safety and equipment
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This course covers the safe operation and
general maintenance of bakery equipment.
WHMIS, fre safety, HACCP and preventa-
tive maintenance are also covered.
fNM101
Nutrition
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
Students will study the role of nutrients in
providing energy and reducing health risks.
Current nutrition guidelines and interpreta-
tion of food labels will be used to determine
healthy food choices. Students will identify
ways to modify recipes and menus to pro-
vide healthy menu choices, and to meet the
needs of customers with nutrition related
health concerns.
fNM102
sanitation
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course will identify standards and pro-
cedures for the maintenance of clean and
sanitary conditions throughout the food
service facility. Students may be eligible to
write the Government of Alberta Certifcate
Exam in Food Sanitation and Hygiene.
seMester 2
coB200
Baking theory
Hours: 44 Credits: 2.5
These courses involve the study of raw ma-
terials and methods used in the production
of a wide variety of baked goods. Many re-
lated subject areas are studied in order to
enhance the understanding of baking pro-
cedures and products.
coB201
practical Baking
Hours: 232 Credits: 14.5
These courses are designed to allow stu-
dents practical hands-on experience in or-
der to develop the knowledge, techniques
and skills necessary to produce a wide va-
riety of baked goods. Working from simple
basics to more complex advanced tech-
niques, students will develop needed skills
as they proceed. Products such as but-
tercream cakes, Artisan breads, cinnamon
buns, fruit pies and many delightful pastries
are practiced in the baking lab.
coB202
communications
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course will assist students with the
development of positive attitudes towards
others and the workplace environment,
self-confidence, criticism, employee and
employer relations, and management of cus-
tomer conficts. Students will also prepare an
effective personal resume and application
letter for employment, and study employ-
ment interview strategies. This course covers
the elements of effective interpersonal com-
munications, telephone techniques, listening
and customer service skills.
coB203
Bakery Management
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
In these courses, emphasis is placed upon all
aspects of starting a small business. Topics
covered include; entrepreneurship, managing
styles, business setup, business plan, fnanc-
ing, equipment purchase and bakery design.
coB204
Baking field lab
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.5
Four weeks out of the 32-week program is
devoted to work experience. Individual bak-
eries are selected for the students in order
that they may gain valuable experience out-
side of NAIT. Two weeks in each of two bak-
eries is spent observing and getting involved
in day to day activities. Quantity baking, va-
riety, and pressures of production in a com-
mercial bakery are noted and reported on by
the student. This experience helps students
to decide upon the type of operation they
would be best suited for in the future.
csw100
emergency first Aid with level A
Adult cpr
Hours: 8 Credits: 0.5
This course is designed to teach you to
recognize and provide intervention for life
threatening emergencies until medical aid
arrives. It includes such topics as artifcial
respiration, how to help someone who is
choking, how to deal with shock and un-
consciousness, severe bleeding, CPR for the
adult casualty and burns. This course meets
the requirements of Alberta First Aid regu-
lations and gives three-year certifcation.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A minimum of Grade 10, including English
and Math, is required for the Baking Pro-
gram. Applicants should have a reasonable
aptitude for mathematics which will be
required in weighing ingredients as well as
formula calculations and costing. Reason-
able reading and writing skills will help the
baking student in the practical shop, the
classroom setting and in industry.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include aca-
demic achievement beyond the minimum
prerequisite requirements identifed in the
NAIT calendar or application form.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed, full-time programs at NAIT.
84 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms accommodate lectures and
group discussions.
Labs are fully equipped with professional
baking production equipment and service
facilities.
BuildinG location(s)
NAIT - Main Campus
11762 106 Street
Edmonton, AB T5G 2R1
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Students are in class approximately
30 hours per week during semester 1 and 2.
During practicum, students can expect
to work an average of 30 hours per week
(hours may include early and late shifts in-
cluding some weekends).
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: 6-8 hours
per week
co-op & Work experience
Length: 120 hour work period must be com-
pleted during this part of the program.
Type of experience: During this time, the
students will be placed in two bakeries for
two weeks each.
Relocation: If a student has a concern about
the place they work during the work experi-
ence, there is possibility for them to be relo-
cated to a new facility.
Who facilitates the placement:
Alan Dumonceaux, Chair
Phone: (780) 471-8693
Fax: (780) 471-8914
E-mail: adumonce@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
For more information on the Buddy System
go to http://www.nait.ca/ProspectiveStu-
dents.htm.
inFo sessions
Please see the following link for more in-
formation: http://www.nait.ca/Prospec-
tiveStudents.htm.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Baking Certifcate
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Successful completion of the program allows
students to challenge the Journeyman exam.
Graduates may elect to indenture as ap-
prentices in bakeries, or other establish-
ments where baking is a major production
factor. Once indentured and after success-
ful completion of their journeyman exam,
the students can challenge the Interprovin-
cial Red Seal exam.
Graduates of the full-time program earn a
Baking Certifcate.
Apprentices who successfully complete the
required examinations and hours of employ-
ment are awarded a Journeyman Certifcate.
Bakers who pass the post-graduate in-
terprovincial examination qualify for the
Interprovincial Red Seal, giving their qualif-
cations recognition throughout Canada.
NAIT baking graduates are recognized na-
tionally for their expertise, self-confdence,
fexibility and skills. Employment opportuni-
ties are very positive for bakers who received
their educational requirements at NAIT as
there is a high demand for our graduates.
apprenticeship inForMation
After completion of the Baking Certifcate
Course, a student may write the Third Year
Apprenticeship Exam for a fee of $150.00.
An additional 4500 hrs of employment will
be completed to become a certified Jour-
neyman Baker.
industry support
BAC - Baking Association of Canada
http://www.bakingassoccanada.com/
The Retailer’s Bakery Association
http://www.rbanet.com/
The Bread Bakers Guild of Alberta
http://www.bbga.org/
The American Institute of Baking
http://www.aibonline.org/
Trade Secrets
http://www.tradesecrets.org/
San Francisco Baking Institute
http://www.sfbi.com/
Alberta Skills Competition
http://www.skillsalberta.com/
proFessional association
courses
BAC - Baking Assocation of Canada
website: http://www.nait.ca/programs/
BAK/www.bakingassoccanada.com
Major skills acQuired
As well as learning to prepare many variet-
ies of bread, cake and pastry, students will
also be trained in the operation, mainte-
nance and cleaning of bakery equipment.
Trade mathematics are an integral part of
a student’s training, allowing students to
calculate formula changes, product costing,
yields and bakers percent.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Successful completion of the program will
give graduates employment opportunities
in many areas. Instore bakeries, private
family businesses, hotel pastry shops, in-
dustrial bakeries, and camp catering frms
have hired NAIT Baking grads. Graduates
also have the opportunity for entrepreneur-
ial ventures as well as research and devel-
opment jobs. Cake decorators and bakery
related sales positions are also possible
career choices.
career opportunities
Successful completion of the program will
give graduates employment opportunities
in many areas. In store bakeries, private
family businesses, hotel pastry shops, in-
dustrial bakeries, and camp catering frms
have hired NAIT Baking grads. Graduates
also have the opportunity for entrepreneur-
ial ventures as well as research and devel-
opment jobs. Cake decorators and bakery
related sales positions are also possible
career choices.
Students can challenge the journeyman
exam. Graduates may elect to indenture as
apprentices in bakeries, or other establish-
ments where baking is a major production
factor. Once indentured and after success-
ful completion of their journeyman exam,
the students can challenge the Interprovin-
cial Red Seal exam.
85 www.nait.ca
BiOLOGicAL
sciences
tecHnOLOGY
QuIck INfo
suBject
Animal Studies, Engineering & Applied Sci-
ences, Environment & Land Management,
Health & Safety, Recreation & Outdoors
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
July 01, 2008
coNtActs
cris chernuka, actinG chair
Phone: (780) 471-7673
Fax: (780) 471-8590
E-mail: crisc@nait.ca
laurie hunt, associate chair
Phone: (780) 491-3914
Fax: (780) 471-8590
E-mail: laurieh@nait.ca
jiM WickWare, associate chair
Phone: (780) 471-7661
Fax: (780) 471-8590
E-mail: wickware@nait.ca
susan coFFin, adMinistrative
assistant
Buddy Student Coordinator
Phone: (780) 471-8586
Fax: (780) 471-8590
E-mail: scoffn@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
The Biological Sciences program, is com-
prised of two years; the frst year (semesters
1/2) is the common Biological Sciences Year
1 and the second year (semesters 3/4) is one
of the three specialized program offerings.
In order to receive a diploma from the pro-
gram students must receive credit for all
frst and second year courses listed in the
current program calendar. Any advance
credit granted towards a diploma, including
prior NAIT course work, must have been
completed within the past fve years of the
current program date.
certiFication
Depending on the area of specialization the
diploma will be:
Biological Sciences Technology - •
Environmental Sciences
Biological Sciences Technology - •
Laboratory and Research
Biological Sciences Technology - •
Renewable Resources
accreditation
The Biological Sciences programs have not
undertaken accreditation at this time.
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
At the end of the common first year, stu-
dents apply for entrance into one of three
programs offered in the second year. Stu-
dent selection for all three second year pro-
grams is based on academic performance
and is established using the rankings of the
student’s weight-averaged marks in the
frst-year courses.
Due to resource and training considerations
the program maintains the following sec-
ond year enrollment quotas: 22 students in
the Laboratory and Research Program, 20
students in the Environmental Sciences
Program and 35 students in the Renewable
Resources Program.
seMester 1
Bsc104
word
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
This introductory course is a hands-on prac-
tical course to provide students with the
skills to use the current version of Windows
to manage fles and to customize the appear-
ance of the graphics user interface (GUI).
Students will use MS Word to write letters,
memos, and technical reports. Basic to in-
termediate skills include importing graphics,
charts and tables; applying standard format-
ting conventions; performing basic desktop
publishing; and mail merge functions.
Bsc105
technical communications I
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students will develop their oral and written
communication skills. Students will write,
edit and review various forms of written
technical communications. These will in-
clude workplace correspondence (business
letters, memorandums, emails) short re-
ports (lab reports, standard operating pro-
cedures, posters) and project proposals.
Bsc115
Botany
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A course dealing with the morphology,
physiology, and taxonomy of plants, includ-
ing a brief phylogenetic survey of the plant
kingdom. Laboratory exercises include
examination of representative groups and
their basic physiological processes. Em-
phasis is placed on the fora of Alberta. This
course is a prerequisite for BSE345.
Bsc125
Invertebrate Zoology
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Students will develop an understanding of
the structure and function of basic cell units.
Embryological development will be explored
as a means of understanding invertebrate
development and resulting phylogenetic
relationships among animal groups. The
student will gain experience in using the
available tools and techniques for group-
ing and classifying animals. The course will
also explore the major invertebrate groups
relevant to Alberta and Canada.
Bsc145
laboratory techniques &
calculations
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This theory/laboratory course focuses on
the principles and basic procedures used
in the laboratory. Topics include laboratory
safety, WHMIS, laboratory calculations,
water quality and reagent preparation, op-
eration and maintenance of microscopes,
balances, pH meters, spectrophotometers
and other related laboratory equipment.
Emphasis will be placed on accurate and
complete documentation methods.
86 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Bsc155
genetics
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
A treatment of the genetic basis of life, in-
cluding Mendelian inheritance, gene struc-
ture and function at the biochemical level,
and population genetics. Gene splicing and
other practical aspects of genetics are intro-
duced. Evolutionary and ecological implica-
tions are stressed.
Bsc205
excel
Hours: 27 Credits: 1.5
The course focuses primarily on providing
practical instruction in Excel. The course
will cover developing and maintaining a
spreadsheet, data entry, formatting, for-
mula generation and data analysis, report
generation, and graphic and chart produc-
tion capabilities.
chs104
Inorganic chemistry
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
The theory begins with a survey of basic
concepts in inorganic chemistry which
includes atomic structure, bonding and
the periodic table, followed by writing and
balancing chemical equations. Calcula-
tions involving the mole, composition and
stoichiometry are presented. Hydrogen ion
concentration (pH) and the theory of buffer
solutions are discussed. Laboratory exer-
cises include gravimetric analysis as well as
acid-base, precipitation, complexation, and
redoxtitrations.
seMester 2
Bsc206
Access
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
The course focuses primarily on providing
practical instruction in Access. The course
will cover developing and maintaining a
database, data entry forms, data query and
retrieval, report generation, and graphic and
chart production capabilities.
Bsc207
digital tools and Applications
Hours: 27 Credits: 1.5
PowerPoint will be used in the development
of effective materials to support presenta-
tions in a group/audience environment.
Students will develop practical skills using
scanners and digital cameras for the capture
and manipulation of digital images and text.
Exposure to software such as VISIO, Photo-
shop, Project and others will allow students
to explore and implement these tools in the
completion of various projects and assign-
ments contained within the program.
Bsc210
technical communications II
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students will further develop their written
communication skills as well as their oral
presentation skills. Students will explore
techniques for gathering and analyzing in-
formation from secondary sources as they
prepare a technical report, and will learn to
create and use appropriate audio/visual aids
in both written and oral communciations.
Students will also prepare various types of
employment search communications.
Bsc215
Microbiology
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A study of microorganisms, including vi-
ruses, bacteria and fungi. Topics addressed
include: structure and function, cultivation
and growth, control, genetics, classifcation
and metabolism of microbes. Laboratory
exercises include media preparation, culture
techniques, sampling methodology, and
clinical and environmental microbiology,
with an emphasis on aseptic technique.
Bsc225
vertebrate Zoology
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A morphologic and comparative study of
the vertebrates. Lectures deal with changes
and adaptations exhibited by various verte-
brates, and how these adaptations relate to
the habitats the vertebrates occupy, within
a system-by-system framework. The exhib-
ited characteristics of chordates and verte-
brates are used to explore the evolutionary
development and classifcation of animals
within this phylum. Laboratory exercises
stress form and function extending from
the cellular to the organ system level of
complexity and are comparative in nature
using fsh birds and mammals as represen-
tative examples.
Bsc235
ecology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
A fundamental treatment of ecological
principles and concepts emphasizing the
ecosystem concept, nutrient cycles, energy
relationships, limiting factors, population
dynamics, and community ecology. The
laboratory portion includes practical stud-
ies of local ecosystems and population dy-
namics.
Bsc245
statistics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This introductory course focuses upon or-
ganizing and interpreting data. Descriptive
statistics from samples and populations are
used to organize raw data from databases
into summaries, tables and charts. Con-
fidence intervals for means, proportions
and regression lines are calculated and in-
terpreted. Normal, Binomial, Poisson, and
Chi Distributions are studied. Hypothesis
tests are conducted on proportions, means
and bivariate data (Z test, dependent and
independent t-tests, one-way and two-way
ANOVA, non parametric tests and correla-
tional analysis). All analyses are performed
using statistical functions within MS Excel.
chs256
organic chemistry
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course focuses on the nomenclature,
structure and the physical and chemical
properties of biological and environmentally
important organic compounds, including
hydrocarbons, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes,
ketones, amines, carboxylic acids and their
derivatives, and carbohydrates. Laboratory
work includes basic techniques for measure-
ment, separation, identifcation, and synthe-
sis of compounds of biological interest.
seMester 3:
environMental sciences
specialization
Bse301
Quality Assurance/Quality control
Hours: 27 Credits: 1.5
A practical course that deals with the re-
quirements for a quality assurance program
within the analytical laboratory. Topic ar-
eas include good laboratory practice, good
manufacturing practice, lab accreditation,
critical control points, standard procedures,
profciency testing and measurement trace-
ability.
Bse310
field techniques
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.0
Sampling and storage protocols for air, soil
and water are emphasized. Samples will be
kept and analyzed in the air, soil and water
courses. Field trips to reclaimed and/or re-
mediated areas are included. Equipment
used in reclamation and bioremediation is
introduced.
87 www.nait.ca
Bse325
Air pollution
Hours: 96 Credits: 5.5
Priority air pollutants are examined in rela-
tion to their sources, factors affecting their
formation and degradation in the environ-
ment, and reasons for concern (including
physiological effects and risks). Laboratory
exercises emphasize standard methods of
analysis for each air pollutant. This course
is a prerequisite for BSE425.
Bse335
water Quality Monitoring and
Analysis
Hours: 96 Credits: 5.5
A comprehensive study of the physical,
chemical, and biological components of
concern in water quality studies as it applies
to streams, lakes, and groundwater. Empha-
sis is placed on the source of contaminants
and their direct/indirect impact on the
quality of water. Sampling equipment, tech-
niques, handling, and methods of analysis
are performed and discussed. Laboratory
exercises involve analysis of a variety of wa-
ter quality parameters while emphasizing
techniques and accuracy.
Bse375
occupational health & safety
Hours: 35 Credits: 2.0
This introductory course focuses upon ba-
sic principles of measuring and evaluation
of hazards in the workplace. Course content
is integrated with basic principles of toxi-
cology and air pollution sampling. Topics
include pertinent legislation, typical work-
place gases, mechanical hazards, noise,
radiation, accidents, ergonomics, stress,
ethics, and workplace safety.
Bse455
environmental site Assessment
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This introductory course will focus upon
the procedures for conducting Phase I and
Phase II site assessments in accordance
with the Canadian Standards Association
(CSA Z768-01) guideline. Typical principles
of hazardous waste transport to receptors
will be presented. Phase III Remediation
principles will be introduced in general
terms. Case studies for remediation of
selected decommissioned sites (salt con-
tamination, upstream oil and gas sites) in
Alberta based upon current Alberta Envi-
ronment remediation guidelines will be pre-
sented. Students will conduct a simulated
Phase I site assessment of a property.
Bse465
soils and vegetation
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course is designed to cover major chem-
ical, physical and biological processes of
soils. The laboratory skills focus on the tech-
niques and procedures used in determining
the chemical and physical properties of soil.
Soil classifcation and description is explored
in both feld and laboratory settings. Vegeta-
tion analysis is introduced through the ex-
ploration of the relationship between plants
and soil types. This course requires the suc-
cessful completion of BSC 115 (or permission
from the Program Head).
Bsr320
global positioning system (gps)
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
Upon successful completion of this course
students will receive certification in GPS
training. The course will include program-
ming of GPS units, collecting, downloading
and correcting data, as well as editing infor-
mation and maps while using various GPS
equipment and supporting software.
chs367
Instrumental Analysis I
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A lecture/laboratory course dealing with
the theory and fundamental laws related
to the instrumental analytical areas of
spectroscopy, including ultraviolet, visible,
infrared, and atomic absorption methods
(including flame and flameless AA and
fame emission).
laBoratory & research
specialization
Bet305
electronics
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
A course designed to provide the student
with a practical orientation to electronic
technology, the principles of electronic
measurement of biological signals and
the application of microcomputers for the
acquisition and processing of biological
signals. Emphasis is placed on the develop-
ment of skills enabling the students to un-
derstand and troubleshoot microcomputer
based electronic measurement systems for
acquiring data.
Bsl315
laboratory Quality Assurance and
Quality control
Hours: 22 Credits: 1.0
A practical course that deals with the el-
ements of a quality assurance program
within a laboratory environment. Topics
include quality systems, accreditation and
certifcation, documentation, validation of
methods and good laboratory practices.
Students will write standard operation pro-
cedures, prepare control charts and apply
appropriate statistical methods of analysis.
Bsl325
Animal care
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course covers the basic principles of
laboratory animal care and handling and
is based on recommendations developed
by the Canadian Council on Animal Care.
In both the classroom and the laboratory
emphasis is placed on housing, nutrition,
handling, restraint, sampling, and pre- and
post-operative care of laboratory animals.
Lectures also deal with the biology and be-
haviour of each species and ethical issues
related to animal use. Laboratory exercises
focus on practical laboratory animal man-
agement.
Bsl335
cell culture
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
A lecture and laboratory course that deals
with the basic methodology of cell and or-
gan culture for plant and animal tissues.
Laboratory exercises for mammalian cell
culture include establishment of primary
cell lines, subculture and maintenance of
cell lines, cell cloning and characterization,
mycoplasma screening, viral culture and
plaque assay, as well as cell preservation by
freezing. During plant cell culture laboratory
exercises, plant callus and explants are re-
generated, in addition to protoplast fusion.
Bsl345
Applied Microbiology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
A theory and laboratory course that deals
with applications of microbiology in industry
and research. Topic areas include growth/
fermentation technology, sampling, isola-
tion, enrichment and enumeration meth-
ods, food and water microbiology, viruses,
bioremediation, toxicity testing methods
and quality assurance in microbiology.
88 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Bsl415
technical presentation
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to allow the stu-
dent to develop oral communication skills.
Students will prepare and present at least
two technical presentations. They will also
develop their critical listening skills as they
critique the work of their peers.
chs357
Biochemistry: An Introduction to
Biological chemistry
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.0
The theory portion of the course outlines
the chemical processes of the living cell.
The structure, biological function and me-
tabolism of nucleic acids, proteins, lipids and
carbohydrates are discussed. Emphasis is
placed on protein structure, the purifcation
of proteins and the properties and actions of
enzymes. The laboratory experiments have
been chosen to illustrate a variety of com-
mon investigative and analytical techniques.
chs367
Instrumental Analysis I
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A lecture/laboratory course dealing with
the theory and fundamental laws related
to the instrumental analytical areas of
spectroscopy, including ultraviolet, visible,
infrared, and atomic absorption methods
(including flame and flameless AA and
fame emission).
reneWaBle resources
specialization
Bsr315
taxonomic Botany
Hours: 75 Credits: 4.5
This is a practical course in identifcation and
classification of vascular plants, with em-
phasis on the Alberta flora. Identifications
are required to the species level. Concepts
about, and the importance of, indicator plant
species and the role of vegetation control on
resource management are examined. Col-
lecting, labeling, preparing and preserving
herbarium specimens to museum standards
are dealt with in the laboratory.
Bsr320
global positioning system (gps)
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
Upon successful completion of this course
students will receive certification in GPS
training. The course will include program-
ming of GPS units, collecting, downloading
and correcting data, as well as editing infor-
mation and maps while using various GPS
equipment and supporting software.
Bsr325
ecological field Methods
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course is designed to familiarize stu-
dents with practical feld experience in rec-
ognizing foral, soil, and animal components
of communities; as well as in measuring, re-
cording and relating environmental variables
to different habitats. Students also receive
instruction in, and hands-on experience with,
GPS, operating and maintaining chain saws,
brushers and hand-tools. Environmental and
ecological assessments are done throughout
the course. (Students are responsible for the
additional costs of food and lodging).
Bsr335
limnology
Hours: 75 Credits: 4.5
This course includes baseline surveys of
lakes and streams including physical and
chemical features, biotic and abiotic rela-
tionships and population dynamics of fo-
ral and faunal communities. Limnological
and fisheries techniques are emphasized.
Laboratory exercises include analysis of
water and practice in the use of limnological
equipment, collection, analysis, and presen-
tation of data in scientifc format. The study
of the biology and classifcation of both ver-
tebrate and invertebrate fauna of aquatic
ecosystems is emphasized.
Bsr345
wildlife Management
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course will introduce the student to
an integration of ecological topics that will
form a basis for wildlife management. Top-
ics such as historical developments, habitat,
population analysis, wildlife biodiversity,
species at risk, management of Alberta’s
game species, and ecological systems will
incorporate how wildlife is managed.
Bsr346
range Management
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course emphasizes range plant identi-
fcation as well as hands-on experience in
determining range utilization and condition.
Principles for proper range management are
included. Natural regions and subregions
and indicator species are covered in detail.
Bsr365
Mammalogy
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This course covers the major mammalian
groups of Canada with an emphasis on Al-
berta’s mammal species. The lectures will
include species identification, taxonomy,
life history, distribution, management, and
selected diseases. Techniques for capturing,
preserving, taking standard measurements,
and identifcation will be emphasized in the
labs.
Bsr370
entomology
Hours: 45 Credits: 2.5
Students will explore the evolution, life
histories, and adaptations that have con-
tributed to the success of Class Insecta.
Beneficial and detrimental relationships
between insects and humans will be dis-
cussed, with emphasis on species that are
important in Alberta agriculture and for-
estry. Students will demonstrate knowledge
of morphological features by classifying and
identifying various insects, and will prepare
an entomology collection using the appro-
priate techniques.
Bsr375
resource law
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course consists of the interpretation
and application of a variety of Provincial and
Federal Acts in addition to regulations per-
tinent to the environment. Collection and
preservation of evidence and knowledge
and understanding of court procedures are
discussed. Familiarization with laws and
regulations is gained, as well as an under-
standing of enforcement protocols, authori-
ties and public relations. An introduction to
Provincial Environmental Impact Assess-
ment protocols are stressed.
get375
remote sensing/surveying/gIs
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
Principles of air photography, remote sens-
ing, and map interpretation. The Third
System of Survey is covered as well as ge-
ometry of the vertical photograph and ste-
reoscopy. The course includes basic theory
and practice of surveying, measurements
of horizontal angles and distances, com-
putations of areas, volumes and directions,
hydrographic surveys, shoreline mapping,
discharge measurements, sounding, and da-
tum. Application to wildlife and vegetation
studies are emphasized, including features
of air photographs, digital image processing
and geographic information systems.
89 www.nait.ca
seMester 4:
environMental sciences
specialization
Bse306
workplace skills development
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
In this course, students will further de-
velop their oral and written communication
techniques required for the workplace. In-
terpersonal and teamwork skills will be de-
veloped through the research, preparation,
and presentation of technical reports. Peer
evaluation will be implemented to assess
these skills. Students will be introduced to
organizational behaviour, and will explore
dynamics between various groups in and
around the workplace (employer, employee,
co-workers, members of the scientifc com-
munity, and the public at large).
Bse355
Industrial waste Management
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Common industrial processes contributing
to the provincial economy are described
and characteristic wastes identifed. Man-
agement, control, treatment and disposal of
the various waste streams are examined.
Bse365
environmental toxicology
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course focuses on the principles of
toxicology with emphasis on natural and
man-made toxicants of environmental con-
cern. Lecture material deals with the chemi-
cal nature of environmental toxicants, their
interaction with biological systems and
detection using both analytical methodol-
ogy and bioassays. Laboratory exercises
reinforce the principles and techniques ac-
quired in BSE315. The course emphasizes
the important aspects of safety evaluation,
risk assessment, and toxicity testing.
Bse405
environmental law and ethics
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Significant federal and provincial statute
law, as well as environmentally-related tort
law is examined. Federal and provincial reg-
ulatory boards related to the environment
are also discussed. Topics in environmental
ethics are discussed from both a theoretical
and applied viewpoint.
Bse425
Air Quality Monitoring & Analysis
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Air pollution meteorology, dispersion mod-
eling, source and ambient monitoring meth-
ods, and methods of pollution control are
examined. Laboratory exercises introduce
operation and calibration of continuous
analyzers and sampling, preparation and
analysis of samples using gas and liquid
chromatography. This course requires the
successful completion of BSE 325 (or per-
mission from the Program Head).
Bse440
reclamation & remediation
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course concentrates on the detailed
components of reclamation and remediation
of contaminated sites in Alberta with focus
on upstream Oil & Gas sites,the Alberta Tier
1 & 2 Guildlines and the CCME guideline
values for Water, Air & Soil quality . Reme-
diation options include both engineering
methods and bioremediation. Soil and vege-
tation management topics include: bioassay
techniques, screening methods, compost-
ing, fertilizers, soli additives, and herbicide
application. Weed identifcation and classi-
fcation are emphasized and typical methods
of weed control are presented. Students are
provided with comparative costs associated
with standard remediation processes.
chs468
Instrumental Analysis II
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A lecture/laboratory course dealing with
the theory and fundamental laws related to
the instrumental analytical areas of chro-
matography (predominantly gas liquid and
high performance liquid chromatography).
A detailed examination of how computing
integrators work will also be included.
Laboratory & Research Specialization
Bsl410
Animal physiology
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course is designed to provide the stu-
dent with an understanding of the principles
of Animal Physiology. Labs are designed to
demonstrate the operation, calibration and
measurement of physiological parameters
using computer interfaced recording de-
vices. Laboratory data are collected, stored
and merged into reports which supplement
each exercise.
Bsl425
Immunology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This immunology course stresses the fun-
damental concepts of innate and specific
immunity, including the biology of lympho-
cytes, the structure and diversity of antibod-
ies, the applications of immunoassays, and
clinical immunology such as hypersensitiv-
ity, immunodeficiencies and autoimmune
disorders. Laboratory exercises involve cell
differentials, purification of immune sera,
agarose and polyacrilamide gel electro-
phoresis and staining of proteins, Western
blotting and a variety of immunoassays
including precipitations, agglutinations, im-
munodiffusions and ELISA.
Bsl430
project Management
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Students will work in teams to plan and
complete a simple project using the basic
principles of project management. Ele-
ments of quality, budgeting, time manage-
ment and background literature searches
will be applied to project development. The
student teams will then prepare and pres-
ent a fnal report.
Bsl435
radiation safety
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
The information covered in this course in-
clude the principles and types of radiation.
The uses of radioactive elements and ra-
dioisotopes in the various felds of biology
are also discussed. Emphasis is placed on
safety measures related to handling radio-
active materials.
Bsl455
Molecular Biology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course focuses on the concepts of re-
combinant DNA technology and its applica-
tions in biotechnology. Differences between
prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems will be
explored. In the laboratory students will
isolate plasmid DNA, genomic DNA and
RNA, perform horizontal and vertical gel
electrophoresis, transformations, restric-
tion enzyme analyses, hybridizations and
PCR techniques.
90 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
chs468
Instrumental Analysis II
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
A lecture/laboratory course dealing with
the theory and fundamental laws related to
the instrumental analytical areas of chro-
matography (predominantly gas liquid and
high performance liquid chromatography).
A detailed examination of how computing
integrators work will also be included.
Renewable Resources Specialization
Bsr401
fisheries field techniques
Hours: 38 Credits: 2.0
This course consists of the applications
of field techniques discussed in preced-
ing courses. Special emphasis is placed on
stream survey techniques for the purpose
of conducting fsh population estimates and
the assessment of fsh habitat. Students are
required to prepare and submit a summary of
all data collected in technical report format
immediately following the feld trip. Hands
on experience gained during the electrofsh-
ing exercise will allow the student Alberta
certification as Electrofishing Crew mem-
bers. Students are responsible for the cost of
food during the week of the course.
Bsr405
project Management
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Students will work in teams to plan and
implement a simple project using the basic
principles of project management. Elements
of quality, budgeting, time management and
background literature searches will be ap-
plied to project development. The student
teams will then prepare and present a fnal
report.
Bsr415
technical paper presentation
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
An oral presentation of a standard techni-
cal or scientifc report. The purpose of this
course is to train the student in correct pro-
cedures for oral presentation.
Bsr425
fisheries Management
Hours: 96 Credits: 5.5
This course places emphasis on identifca-
tion, life history, management and ecology
of major Canadian freshwater and marine
fshes. Special topics include hatchery pro-
cedures, fsh stocking programs, collection
techniques, data analysis, and habitat devel-
opment and protection. Guest lecturers may
be invited to discuss various topics pertaining
to current fshery management techniques
and research. Laboratory exercises and feld
trips allow hands-on application of many of
the techniques discussed in lecture.
Bsr435
soils
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course is designed to cover major
chemical, physical and biological properties
involved in soil formation processes and the
development of soil groups as described by
the Canadian Soil Classification System.
Basic management techniques and their
associated problems are covered including
fertilization, irrigation, drainage and desali-
nization. Laboratory exercises emphasize
the analysis and classifcation of soils.
Bsr455
outdoor recreation and parks
Management
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course deals with outdoor recreation
and leisure in contemporary situations. The
role of parks and recreation agencies in the
provision of physical areas and facilities to
accommodate the recreational user will be
studied. Topics will include manipulation of
vegetation for recreational areas; urban and
wildland site selections for recreational use;
unit designs; visitor manipulation and con-
trol. The relationships of recreation to other
land uses will be discussed. The laboratory
sessions are designed to familiarize the stu-
dent with parks planning and operations,
and techniques for outdoor interpretation
programs. Certifcation as Alberta Conser-
vation Education Instructors and the safe
care and handling of frearms are included
in this course.
Bsr465
ornithology
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course emphasizes the identifcation,
distribution, life histories, and management
of Alberta bird species. Use of identifcation
keys, species identifcation, standard mea-
surement techniques, and song recognition
will be practiced in the lab. Major classi-
fication groups, species of management
concern, avian diseases, and bird capture
techniques will be covered in the lecture.
Bsr485
small Motor Mechanics
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
A course dealing with basic functioning, re-
pair and maintenance of small motors. The
course is delivered in 13 three-hour blocks.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
English 30 or 33, Chemistry 30, Biology 30
and one of Applied Math 30, Pure Math 30,
Math 30 or Math 33.
Successful completion of the NAIT PreTech
Program (Stream 5) is considered equiva-
lent to the specifically listed entrance re-
quirements.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Laboratory and Research students are re-
quired to have their immunization for red
measles up-to-date. Proof of immunization
must be provided to NAIT Health Services
upon commencement of the school year.
Proof of immunization can include either
a copy of your immunization records indi-
cating that you have received 2 doses of
read measles vaccine or proof of immunity
(blood test) documented by your family
physician. Individuals born before 1970 are
considered to have immunity and need to
present proof of birth date only.
Environmental Sciences students have no
non-academic requirements for entry into
the program. Students should be able to
physically function within a laboratory and
feld environment.
Renewable Resources students have no
non-academic requirements for entry into
the program. Students should be able to
physically function within a laboratory and
feld environment.
91 www.nait.ca
selection criteria
Student entrance into the each of the three
specialized program offerings in the second
year of the program is based on academic
performance. The selection process is
based on a ranking that is calculated using
the student’s weight-averaged marks in the
frst-year courses of the Biological Sciences
Program. Due to resource and training con-
siderations the Laboratory and Research
program maintains a quota of 22 students;
the Environmental Sciences program main-
tains a quota of 20 students; and the Re-
newable Resources program maintains a
quota of 35 students.
advanced/transFer credit
For more information on advanced credit/
transfer credit, contact:
Laurie Hunt, Associate Chair
Telephone: (780) 491-3914
Fax: (780) 471-8590
E-mail: laurieh@nait.ab.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
The Biological Sciences program maintains
6 dedicated instructional laboratories for
the delivery of program curriculum. These
labs contain an extensive inventory of sci-
entific equipment for investigative and
instructional purposes. These facilities are
supported by a technical support team
comprised of fve skilled and dedicated in-
dividuals. The program also utilizes various
lecture and computer facilities throughout
the institute.
classrooM and study hours
An average student will be required to
spend approximately 15 to 20 hours per
week on study and course assignments
outside of schedule class time.
The average number of hours in classroom
per week varies:
Environmental Sciences
Semester 3: approximately 31 hours •
per week.
Semester 4: approximately 26 hours •
per week.
Laboratory & Research
Semester 3: approximately 30 hours •
per week.
Semester 4: approximately 28 hours •
per week.
Renewable Resources
Semester 3: approximately 29 hours •
per week. Note: In semester 3 the
students will be on a feld trip for
approximately 2 weeks during the
middle of September.
Semester 4: approximately 26 hours •
per week. Note: In semester 4 the
students will be on an extended feld
trip for 1 week at the end of April.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Contact:
Susan Coffn
Telephone: (780) 471-8586
Fax: (780) 471-8590
E-mail: scoffn@nait.ab.ca
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Depending on the area of specialization the
diploma will be:
Biological Sciences Technology - •
Environmental Sciences
Biological Sciences Technology - •
Laboratory and Research
Biological Sciences Technology - •
Renewable Resources
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Students in the Environmental Sciences,
Laboratory and Research, and Renewable
Resources Programs are eligible for student
membership in ASET (Alberta Society of
Engineering Technologists).
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Graduates must be able to demonstrate the
ability to work as an effcient member of a
workplace team with strong interpersonal
skills and the ability to communicate ef-
fectively. They must recognize that further
training and acquisition of additional spe-
cialized skills may be required to fulfll the
needs of their employer or position.
Employment opportunities are not always
found locally therefore successful gradu-
ates must willing to re-locate to various
geographical locations within the province
and perhaps western Canada.
A very important key to obtaining success-
ful employment is the assertive promotion
of yourself as individual as well as a trained
and valuable technologist.
AdvANced credIt
possIBIlItIes
university transFer - General
inForMation
Graduates of the Biological Sciences pro-
gram will fnd that universities will grant ap-
proximately one year of credit toward a four
year degree program. The exact amount of
credit will vary with both the university and
faculty involved.
royal roads university -
victoria, B.c.
If you’ve completed the Biological Sciences
- Renewable Resources or Environmental
Sciences program at NAIT and have credit
in one full year course of a first or second
year university level or equivalent math, you
may qualify for admission to the BSc degree
program in Environmental Management at
Royal Roads.
92 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
university oF alBerta
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - En-
vironmental Sciences program will receive
approximately 51 units of course weight to-
wards the BSc in Environmental and Conser-
vation Sciences, Land Reclamation program
or towards the BSc in Environmental and
Conservation Sciences, Conservation Biol-
ogy program.
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - En-
viromnetal Sciences program will receive
approximately 54 units of course weight to-
wards the BSc in Environmental and Conser-
vation Sciences, Land Reclamation program
or towards the BSc in Environmental and
Conservation Sciences, Conservation Biol-
ogy program.
Forest technoloGy - nait
Upon completion of the Biological Sciences
- Renewable Resources program there is the
opportunity for a maximum of 5 students to
transfer directly into the second year of the
Forest Technology program. Upon comple-
tion of that second year students receive a
full diploma in Forest Technology.
lakeland coMMunity colleGe
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - Envi-
ronmental Sciences program are eligible for
entry into the Bachelor of Applied Integrated
Environmental Management. This is a post-
diploma applied degree program, directed at
the monitoring, reclamation and remediation
areas of the environmental protection sector,
and developed in collaboration with Olds
College and the Northern Alberta Institute of
Technology (NAIT).
lethBridGe coMMunity colleGe
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - Re-
newable Resources program are qualifed to
enroll in the one year post-diploma certifcate
in Fish and Wildlife Technology or an Applied
Degree in Conservation Enforcement
university oF lethBridGe
NAIT graduates who have obtained a two-
year diploma in Biological Sciences - Renew-
able Resources and have achieved a grade
point average of 2.75 or higher (on a 4.0
scale) are eligible for entry to the two year
post diploma B.Sc. in Environmental Science
at University of Lethbridge.
university oF Montana
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - Re-
newable Resources program may receive up
to two years credit toward a Bachelor of Sci-
ence degree in Wildlife Biology (Terrestrial or
Aquatic Biology options) from the University
of Montana in Missoula, Montana. Credit
depends on academic performance, course
selection and approval of course equivalen-
cies by the U of M’s School of Forestry.
university oF northern British
coluMBia
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - Re-
newable Resources program may receive
up to 1.5 years credit toward a Bachelor of
Science degree in Natural Resource Man-
agement at the University of Northern Brit-
ish Columbia (UNBC). Credit depends on
academic performance, course selection
and approval of course equivalencies by
the UNBC Program Leader of Forestry for
degree specializations (Forestry, Fisheries,
Wildlife and Outdoor Recreation).
lakeland coMMunity colleGe
Graduates of the Biological Sciences - En-
vironmental Sciences program are eligible
for entry into the Bachelor of Applied Inte-
grated Environmental Management. This
is a post-diploma applied degree program,
directed at the monitoring, reclamation and
remediation areas of the environmental
protection sector, and developed in collabo-
ration with Olds College and the Northern
Alberta Institute of Technology (NAIT).
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Environmental Sciences Program:
Graduates of the Environmental Sciences
program may fnd employment in analyti-
cal laboratories, environmental consulting
companies and industries which are in-
volved in the monitoring and testing of en-
vironmental parameters. Some of the past
employers have included ATCO, ALS Labo-
ratories, Gov’t of Canada, HSE Services, Le-
hder Environmental Services Ltd., Maxxam
Analytics Inc., AMEC Earth and Environ-
mental, EcoMark and PSC Analytical Inc.
Laboratory & Research Program:
Graduates of the Laboratory and Research
program may fnd employmment in analyti-
cal laboratories, research laboratories phar-
maceutical companies and biotechnology
companies. Some of the past employers have
included Capital Health, Gov’t of Alberta,
Maxxam Analytics, Norwest Labs, Norwest
Soils Research, and Universtity of Alberta.
Renewable Resources Program:
Employment can be found with provincial
and federal government conservation and
resource management agencies such as
Parks, Fish and Wildlife, Environment, For-
estry and Fisheries. Non-government em-
ployers include environmental consulting
firms, resource development companies
and private conservation organizations.
BiOmedicAL
enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY
The healthcare industry has experienced
an explosive increase in the application
of sophisticated medical diagnostic and
therapeutic equipment. The extensive use
of technology in medicine has resulted in an
increased dependency of the medical pro-
fession on individuals capable of bringing
technical expertise to the safe and effective
application of patient care technology. Out
of this need has evolved the field of Bio-
medical Engineering Technology.
The Biomedical Engineering Technologist
assists the medical profession by maintain-
ing medical equipment (e.g. heart moni-
tors, surgical lasers, defibrillators, etc.),
educating users on appropriate equipment
practices, developing improved equip-
ment designs, providing consultation on
equipment selection, and ensuring codes,
laws and regulations pertaining to medical
equipment are adhered to.
The Biomedical Engineering Technology
Program provides students with the skills
of an electronic technologist while focus-
ing specifically on biomedical equipment
technology. In addition to courses in basic
electronics, computer systems, industrial
electronics, digital communications and
control systems, the program includes
courses in three major areas of medical
equipment application: biomedical instru-
mentation, X-ray and diagnostic imaging
equipment, and medical laboratory instru-
mentation. Supplementary courses in anat-
omy and physiology and medical equipment
management complete the medical spe-
cialization. Fourth semester field practice
placements and clinical guest lectures at
hospitals in the region are integrated with
a one month practicum to provide students
with a practical foundation for employment
in the feld.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
93 www.nait.ca
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
August 25, 2008
coNtActs
dennis Morland,
Assistant Program Chair
(780) 471-8419
dmorland@nait.ca
roy sharplin, instructor
(780) 471-7038
roys@nait.ca
departMent inForMation
Lorraine Hannah
(780) 471-7663
lhannah@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
The program is 2 years in length, consisting
of four 17 week semesters of instruction.
Students of the program are eligible to par-
ticipate in a 16 week Co-op program during
the summer break between their frst and
second year of training.
Fall intake Without co-op
Semester 1
Semester 2
Break
Semester 3
Semester 4
Fall intake With co-op
Semester 1
Semester 2
Work Term
Semester 3
Semester 4
Students must successfully complete all
required courses as outlined in the Program
Calendar to be eligible for a diploma in Bio-
medical Engineering Technology.
certiFication
Diploma in Biomedical Engineering Tech-
nology, or Diploma in Biomedical Engineer-
ing Technology - Co-op Stream
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a Technologist by the constitu-
ent associations of the Canadian Council of
Technicians and Technologists.
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
Co-op participation is available to students
who have completed at least two academic
semesters. Acceptance into Co-op is based
on successful completion of all coursework
with a 2.3 GPA.
Co-op Work Experience - Prerequisite ETC
463-Workplace Preparation or equivalent.
The Co-op program provides training in ca-
reer development. Successful completion
indicates advanced job readiness skills.
Consult with the Co-op Coordinator for the
current fee schedule and more information.
Information
LeeAnne Pawluski
Co-op Coordinator
Phone (780)378-5255
or email: leeannep@nait.ca
seMester 1
etc111
workshop
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course develops soldering and de-sol-
dering skills. Students also perform simple
trace repairs, etch and drill a printed circuit
board, and assemble their own surface-
mount circuit and microprocessor board.
Students will also construct a small sheet
metal project.
etc131
Basic electricity
Hours: 170 Credits: 10.5
This course will provide the student with the
opportunity to know and use fundamental
electrical quantities, laws, mathematical
equations relating to electronic circuits, and
to learn the proper use of basic measure-
ment instruments. This knowledge will then
be applied to describe the behaviour of vari-
ous circuits, perform circuit analysis, build,
troubleshoot, test, and measure basic cir-
cuit properties. Topical coverage includes:
basic electric quantities, energy and power,
series-parallel DC circuits, sources of EMF,
DC network theorems, alternating current,
electrostatics, capacitance, magnetism and
electromagnetism, inductance, series-par-
allel AC circuits, power in AC circuits, reso-
nant circuits and transformers. Students will
use PSpice simulation software (Cadence)
to enhance their understanding of circuit
principles. Lab reports which integrate
Word, Excel and Cadence are a mandatory
training component of this course.
etc141
digital fundamentals
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This lab-lecture course introduces the basic
principles, techniques and conventions of
digital electronics. A practical orientation
to analysis, design and troubleshooting
is emphasized. Topics include: introduc-
tion to Boolean algebra, number systems,
codes and arithmetic, logic families and
characteristics, combinational logic analy-
sis and design, combinational MSI devices,
introduction to sequential logic, MSI coun-
ter- and register-based circuits, memory
devices, and programmable logic.
etc151
c++ programming 1
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This course provides an extensive cover-
age of the fundamentals of high-level lan-
guage programming using Microsoft Visual
C++ to create console applications. Course
topics include: introduction to PCs; intro-
duction to the “C” language; “C” operators
and expressions; conditional statements;
looping statements; top-down program
development; functions; arrays and strings;
and string functions. Lab exercises will be
undertaken throughout the course on IBM
PC compatible computers.
etc161
productivity skills
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
The goal of this course is to prepare the stu-
dent to use the personal computer as a tool,
and to provide the student with basic word
processing, spreadsheet, fle manipulation,
and survival skills.The basic computer skills
course topics include: Introduction to Win-
dows XP, an overview of MS Office, using
the Internet, introduction to Word, intro-
duction to Excel with statistical analysis,
and integrating Excel and Word together.
Student survival skills that will be presented
are notetaking, concentration and reading,
memory skills, time management and read-
ing, exam preparation and writing skills.
AsM104
Mathematics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.5
The aim of this course is to review and ex-
tend those topics in algebra and trigonom-
etry which are necessary for electronics
and telecommunications technology. Top-
ics include: scientifc and engineering nota-
tion, graphs, systems of linear equations,
matrices, trigonometric functions, complex
numbers, exponential and logarithmic func-
tions, plane analytic geometry, and differen-
tial calculus.
94 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
seMester 2
Ase238
effective communication
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.5
This course begins with a review of the
principles of English structure and usage. A
foundation in effective communications will
also be provided. Each student will com-
plete case studies that encompass common
writing forms. This course also offers an op-
portunity for practice in technical writing
and oral presentation techniques.
AsM200
calculus
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course reviews the study of differen-
tial calculus started in ASM104/ASM106,
and develops the concepts of integral cal-
culus, continues with a study of differential
equations and concludes with the study of
infinite series. The approach is geared to
applications in electronics. Topics include:
differentiation, partial differentiation, inte-
gration of polynomials and transcendental
functions, applications of the derivative and
integral, solution of differential equations
using the Laplace transform, responses of
linear systems, MacLaurin series, and Fou-
rier series. Prerequisite: ASM104/ASM106
or equivalent.
Bet232
Instruments
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course will teach you how to use elec-
tronic test equipment to perform fast, ac-
curate, and repeatable measurements.
Theoretical fundamentals and practical ap-
plications of electronic instruments are pre-
sented. Coverage includes Digital Storage
Oscilloscopes (DSO), waveform generation
and analysis and Electrical Safety Analyzers.
etc233
electronic devices and circuits
Hours: 153 Credits: 10.0
This nine hour per week lab-lecture course
covers basic solid-state physics, diodes,
basic transistor operation and switching,
simple discrete transistor amplifiers and
develops the theory required to analyze and
design various op-amp application circuits.
Additional topics covered in this course in-
clude: op-amp frequency response, Butter-
worth active flters, linear power supplies,
linear voltage regulators and A/D and D/A
conversion. Laboratory exercises are under-
taken throughout the course to verify the
theoretical concepts and to provide experi-
ence with various measurement techniques.
Pre-requisite: ETC131 or equivalent.
etc294
pc hardware & software
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
The purpose of this course is to bring to-
gether the topics covered in various other
courses in the program in relation to ac-
tual operation and application of computer
systems. The platform to be studied is the
“IBM’-style machine, although reference
will be made to other platforms such as Ma-
cintosh, DEC and SUN. The purpose of the
course is to expose the student to various
computer architectures, components and to
give the student an opportunity to assem-
ble, troubleshoot and upgrade computers
typically used for LAN Workstations. This
knowledge is then applied to basic Network
components and Network troubleshooting.
Topics include: CPUs, hard drives, floppy
drives, CD-Roms, tape and zip drives, RAID
concepts, video monitors, operating sys-
tems, LAN components, Workstation and
Network troubleshooting. Suggested pre-
requisites: ETC141, ETC151 or equivalent.
electives
etc584
coop work experience
Hours: 680 Credits: 10.0
Students work 16 weeks in a program-re-
lated, industry position. Components of this
course include two workplace evaluations,
a site visit by a NAIT staff member and a
daily work journal. The work experience
enhances student employability and allows
students to apply academic training in a
work environment. Prerequisite: ETC463
Workplace Preparation or equivalent.
etc463
workplace preparation (coop
students only)
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This seminar based course prepares stu-
dents for the work placement. Topics in-
clude the following: co-op procedures and
policies, resume and cover letter writing,
interviewing strategies and other career
development subjects. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of coursework with a
2.3 GPA.
seMester 3
Bet301
water processing and dialysis
Hours: 45 Credits: 2.5
This course is designed to provide the BET
student with a practical orientation to wa-
ter purification, renal failure and dialysis.
Lecture periods emphasize the theoretical
principles, standards, and safety programs
associated with renal replacement technol-
ogies. Laboratory excercises centre on the
operation, functional testing and preventa-
tive maintenance of these technologies.
Bet381
Biomedical control systems
Hours: 45 Credits: 2.5
This course examines the components
and principles of control systems with an
emphasis on motor control applications.
Topics include: control system terms and
defnitions, transducers, motors, basic me-
chanical dynamics, feedback principles,
system response, control system trouble
shooting, digital measurement and control
systems. Pre-requisites: ETC233, ASM200
or equivalent.
Bss335
Anatomy and physiology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This lecture/laboratory course deals with
human anatomy and physiology. Systems
emphasized are those which are com-
monly monitored or regulated using medi-
cal diagnostic and life-support equipment.
Concepts in anatomy and physiology are
reinforced by laboratory exercises.
etc334
electronic circuits II
Hours: 136 Credits: 9.0
As the second course in the study of analog
electronic devices and circuits, ETC334 frst
revisits several topics introduced in ETC233
but at a more comprehensive level. With
this deeper understanding of analog circuit
operation, this course then presents several
analog integrated circuits as building blocks
in small signal circuits, as well as topics in
higher power analog circuits. It provides fun-
damental information on circuit operation
and applications of several analog IC’s and
power control circuits. Topics include circuit
analysis technicques, multistage amplifers,
feedback, operational amplifers, active fl-
ters, oscillators, timer circuits, power supply
characteristics and AC power control. Pre-
requisite: ETC233 or equivalent.
95 www.nait.ca
etc371
Introduction to data
communications
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This course begins with an overview of data
communications, then proceeds through
a variety of related subjects including the
internet, media types, the telecommunica-
tions system with emphasis upon digital
communications (i.e. T1, ISDN, ADSL, etc.),
RS232, asynchronous and synchronous fle
transfer protocols, modems (including stan-
dards and testing/troubleshooting), and a
number of topics related to local and wide-
area networking fundamentals. Recent ad-
vances such as Bluetooth technology, RFID
and VOIP will also be studied. In addition,
there is coverage on using a local area type
network operating system. Pre-requisite:
ETC294 or equivalent.
Mlt391
Medical laboratory Instrumentation
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This lecture/laboratory course is designed
to expose the student to many instrumental
methods of analysis in the medical labora-
tory. Some quality assurance procedures
will also be covered. The student is pre-
sented with the theory of quantitative anal-
ysis in lecture format, with reinforcement of
each principle through hands-on laboratory
sessions.
seMester 4
Bet400
Biomedical Instrumentation
Hours: 187 Credits: 12.0
This course is designed to provide the BET
student with a practical orientation to many
of the common pieces of medical instrumen-
tation found in a modern acute-care hospi-
tal. Emphasis is placed on the development
of working skills common to the biomedi-
cal equipment service industry. Learning
experiences centre around laboratory exer-
cises involving operation, function testing
and preventative maintenance of a variety
of medical instruments (e.g., heart moni-
tors, defibrillators, ventilators, etc.). Lec-
ture periods serve to provide the necessary
theory and background information to the
laboratory exercises. Pre-requisites: BET232,
BSS335, ETC334, BET381 or equivalent.
Bet431
equipment Management
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.5
This course blends the systematic and
technical skills of engineering with the or-
ganizational skills of management in order
to provide the BET student with the knowl-
edge and skills necessary to perform the
functions of a clinical engineering program
in a hospital. The course incorporates a sig-
nifcant project related to the effects of EMI
on medical devices. Pre-requisite: ASE238
or equivalent.
Bet444
Micro Applications
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.5
The objective of this course is twofold. The
frst is to give the student an understanding
of the operation of microcontrollers, and the
second is to give the student an appreciation
for the applications possibilities of micro-
controllers. This course is intended for users,
not designers. The student will construct a
microcontroller system that will include such
capabilities as: digital inputs, digital outputs,
analog inputs and analog outputs. Program-
ming of the microcontroller will be done
mainly in C. Many programs will be written
to test hardware additions as they are made
as well as to demonstrate working applica-
tions. Pre-requisites: ETC141, ETC111, ETC151,
ETC233 or equivalent.
Bet451
specialty Imaging
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
This lecture/laboratory course is designed to
provide the BET student with a practical ori-
entation to ultrasound imaging, CT scanning,
and MRI technology. Lecture periods empha-
size the theoretical principals, standards, and
safety programs associated with each tech-
nology. Laboratory exercises center on the
operation, functional testing, and preventive
maintenance of these technologies. Pre-req-
uisite: ETC371, MRT455 or equivalent.
Bet455
X-ray systems
Hours: 25 Credits: 1.5
This lecture/laboratory course is designed
to provide the BET student with a practical
orientation to Medical Radiographic and
Fluoroscopic systems. Lecture periods em-
phasize the theoretical principles, standards,
and safety programs associated with each
technology. Laboratory exercises center on
the operation, functional testing, and preven-
tive maintenance of these technologies.
Bet460
work experience practicum
Hours: 160 Credits: 2.5
This is a second-year, one-month practicum.
The primary purpose of the work experi-
ence practicum is to provide BET student
interns with practical, job-related, hands-on
experience. This experience is to be gained
directly from organizations involved in the
field of medical instrumentation. It is in-
tended that this program be of value to both
the students and the participating employ-
ers. Pre-requisites: Successful completion of
all year one and two courses. Students must
also be fully immunized against Hepatitis
and Tetanus prior to attending their practi-
cum placement.
Mrt457
Medical Imaging systems
Hours: 50 Credits: 3.0
Students learn the basics of diagnostic im-
aging. Students learn about image recording
devices, film processing, x-ray generating
equipment, and quality control procedures.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
All applicants require the following or equiv-
alent courses: English 30-1 or 30-2, one of
Physics 30, Chemistry 30 or Science 30,
and Pure Math 30 or successful completion
of Transitional Mathematics 101 or Alge-
bra 35 (65%). Applicants presenting other
math courses, for example, the previous Al-
berta Learning designations of Math 30 and
Math 33, will be considered on an individual
basis by the Registrar. Math updating or
upgrading may be required. In some cases,
student selection may be competitive based
upon criteria that may include academic
achievement beyond the minimum prereq-
uisite identifed in the NAIT calendar or ap-
plication form; a career investigation report
may be required. Contact the Registrar for
current information about selection criteria
for this program.
additional reQuireMents
An interest in and an aptitude for physics
is a defnite asset. Basic computer and key-
boarding skills would also be an asset.
96 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Students must receive a vaccination for
Hepatitis “B” and Tetnus prior to the com-
mencement of the 2nd year. NAIT Health
Services will provide this service for a fee.
Students must successfully complete all
semester 1, semester 2 and semester 3
courses in order to enroll in BET 460 and
BET 400 in the fourth semester of the
program. These are associated courses
that entail direct industry involvement and
knowledge of all courses taught in the frst
three semesters are vital to success in the
fourth semester.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Basic program entrance requirements apply.
selection criteria
In some cases, student selection may be
competitive; based upon criteria that may
include academic achievement beyond
the minimum prerequisite identifed in the
NAIT calendar or application form. Contact
the Registrar for current information about
selection criteria for this program.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
The standard format for the Career Inves-
tigation is acceptable. Prospective students
should research program statistics at the
NAIT Career Services offce. Knowledge of
why the student desires to enter this par-
ticular industry will attempt to confrm that
their desires will be fulflled at the conclu-
sion of their education and training.
advanced/transFer credit
Applicants who have successfully com-
pleted equivalent post-secondary courses
may be eligible for an “advance standing”
(exemption) in selected courses.
Students who wish to exercise this option
must request that a course assessment
be done by the Student Advisor. For the
courses in question, the Student Advisor
will require a:
copy of mark transcripts •
calendar description (or preferably a •
course outline) of said courses.
PLEASE NOTE: Students, who are granted
course exemptions may jeopardize their op-
portunities for scholarships or an honours
diploma. Some scholarships require 100%
loading for eligibility.
In order to qualify for Advance Credit, the
course hours and content of the completed
course must be the equivalent to or more
extensive than the course the student is
seeking exemption for. For more informa-
tion, please call 471-8578.
To apply for advance credit, please bring
documentation to H300 on NAIT Main
Campus or fax to (780) 491-3072. Please
attach a memo briefy outlining educational
history, name and a contact phone number.
All documentation must be received before
an assessment can begin.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms are either lecture or computer
lab styles. In addition, several courses in-
volve lab room settings.
BuildinG location(s)
Main campus
NAIT Campus Map
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 30 hours
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 30 hours
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
continuinG education
ETC131A Basic Electricity I •
ETC131B Basic Electricity II •
ETC141 Digital Fundamentals •
ETC151 C++ Programming 1 •
ETC232 Instruments •
ETC244 Micro Applications •
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Work placements occur from May
to August.
Length: 16 weeks. (32 weeks available with
program approval)
Type of experience: The primary purpose of
the work experience practicum is to provide
BET student interns with practical, job-re-
lated, hands-on experience. This experience
is to be gained directly from organizations
involved in the feld of medical instrumen-
tation. It is intended that this program be of
value to both the students and the partici-
pating employers.
Salary: Wages are determined by the par-
ticipating companies.
Who facilitates the placement:
LeeAnne Pawluski
Co-op Coordinator
Phone (780)378-5255
leeannep@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to attend
classes and laboratory sessions, to ask ques-
tions and experience NAIT frst hand. Con-
tact: Dennis Morland at (780) 471-8419
inFo sessions
Tuesday, February 5th, 2008
General Information Session, 6:00 - 6:15 in
the Shaw Theatre.
The general information session will be fol-
lowed by program specifc information ses-
sions. These sessions will be offered twice
during the evening for your convenience.
Session 1 - 6:30 - 7:30 p.m. room E021 or
Session 2 - 7:45 - 8:45 p.m. room E021
These program specific information ses-
sions will offered once again later in the
week on Thursday February 7th, at the fol-
lowing times and room allocations.
97 www.nait.ca
Session 1 - 6:30 - 7:30 p.m.
room X215/H207 or
Session 2 - 7:45 - 8:45 p.m.
room X215/H207
NAIT Shaw Theatre
11762 - 106 Street
Edmonton, AB
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Biomedical Engineering Tech-
nology, or Diploma in Biomedical Engineer-
ing Technology - Co-op Stream
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Free student memberships in the Alberta
Society of Engineering Technologists
(ASET) are available. Students are also
eligible for student membership in the Insti-
tute of Electrical and Electronic Engineering
(IEEE).
After two years of suitable work experience
in industry, the graduate may seek certifca-
tion with the Alberta Society of Engineering
Technologists (ASET) to receive the CET
(Certifed Engineering Technologist) desig-
nation and upon further qualifcations, the
RET (Registered Engineering Technologist)
designation.
After two years of successful experience in
the medical equipment industry, the gradu-
ate may also seek certifcation as a Certifed
Biomedical Engineering Technologist with
the International Certifcation Commission.
CBET certification in Canada is adminis-
tered by the Canadian Medical and Biologi-
cal Engineering Society. CBET candidates
must frst obtain certifcation as engineer-
ing technologists (CET) with the Alberta
Society of Engineering Technologists.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Successful graduates of the Biomedical En-
gineering Technology Program have the fol-
lowing attributes:
Excellent Problem Solving Skills •
Logical Thinking •
Learn Quickly and Effciently •
Excellent Communication Skills •
Excellent Team Player •
apprenticeship inForMation
Biomedical Engineering Technology courses
are not equivalent to apprenticeship courses
at this time.
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates who further their studies may be
granted advanced credit at Canadian and
American Universities.
industry support
A Program Advisory Committee, composed
of members of industry, meets on a yearly
basis to discuss industry trends that affect
technical education and advise the institute
of the number of graduates required by the
industry and the skills and knowledge that
graduates should possess.
proFessional association
courses
See ASET home page for further informa-
tion. http://www.aset.ab.ca/
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Positions for Biomedical Engineering tech-
nologists are found in hospitals, with bio-
medical equipment service organizations,
and with medical equipment manufacturers
in both sales and service.
career opportunities
Most Biomedical Engineering Technology
graduates begin their careers as equipment
service personnel with hospitals or private
service organizations. Technologists in the
field may work with a team of technical
professionals, but might also be expected
to work independently. Graduates must be
able to work and communicate with profes-
sionals in both engineering and medicine.
With experience, technologists are fre-
quently required to supervise or coordinate
the activities of other technical personnel.
Graduates may be involved in a wide variety
of functions, including: preventive main-
tenance, repair and installation of medical
equipment, equipment application and op-
eration, education of medical and nursing
staff, maintenance of codes, laws and stan-
dards, planning and renovation of equip-
ment and associated facilities, coordinating
equipment acquisition, research and devel-
opment of technology, or medical equip-
ment sales. Equipment sub-specializations
exist for x-ray and diagnostic imaging, labo-
ratory and dialysis equipment. New career
opportunities are developing in networking
medical instrumentation with hospital in-
formation systems.
BuiLdinG
enViROnmentAL
sYstems
tecHnOLOGY
NAIT’s Building Environmental Systems
Technology (BEST) program provides
training in the Heating, Ventilation, Air
Conditioning and Refrigeration Industries
(HVAC&R).
The BEST Diploma program combines
NAITs’ one-year HVAC Specialist Certifi-
cate program with the second year BEST
Diploma program. This offering is intended
to provide greater educational access and
flexibility, as well as enable candidates to
focus their training on many facets within
the broad HVAC&R job market-place.
The two-step training model provides stu-
dents with job readiness after completion
of the frst year HVAC Specialist Certifcate
program and then continuing with more
advanced studies with an additional year
of training in the Building Environmental
Systems Technology Diploma program. The
Building Environmental Systems Technol-
ogy program prepares graduates to assume
important and positive roles in industry and
to excel in the areas of troubleshooting,
system analysis, system design/engineer-
ing, leadership or sales in the HVAC&R and
Building Automation felds. Alberta Industry
Training recognizes graduates of the BEST
program for full training credit and partial
feld hours towards certifcation in the Re-
frigeration Mechanic trade. For more in-
formation on apprenticeship credit see the
applicable sections in the BEST program’s
web page.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Mechanical & Industrial
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
1 year (2 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 27, 2007
application deadline
First day of class
98 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
coNtActs
GilBert reQuena
Chair
(780)378-1200
jiM BassinGthWaite
Associate Chair
(780)378-1217
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
The Building Environmental Systems Tech-
nology (BEST) program incorporates the
HVAC Specialist Certifcate program. Build-
ing on the this previous training, students in
the second year focus on the engineering
theory, and conceptual aspects of HVAC
systems.
Advanced trade related refrigeration
courses are included.
The program is tailored to those candidates
who are looking for advance credit in the
refrigeration trade or engineering-related
employment in the technical/professional
sector of the HVAC&R industry. The two-
year diploma provides more advanced ca-
reer opportunities than are available with the
one-year HVAC Specialist Certifcate. Typical
employers include design engineers, building
automation companies, energy consultants,
product representatives, and contractors.
certiFication
Building Environmental Systems Technol-
ogy Diploma
accreditation
Trade Certifcation credit •
HVAC Specialist Certifcate: •
Building Environmental Systems •
Technology
Visit www.nait.ca for information.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 3
Ase330
effective communications
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
ASE330 is a practical post-secondary course
in technical communication. In addition to
preparing basic business correspondence,
and their employment dossiers, students will
be expected to manage a technical project
successfully, producing a formal technical
report as well as the accompanying oral pre-
sentation utilizing PowerPoint.
AsM310
technical Mathematics I
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course identifes the fundamentals of
mathematics, enabling the student to solve
technological problems. The student will
acquire knowledge in topics including alge-
bra, areas and volumes, graphing functions,
trigonometric functions, triangle solutions,
linear equations, and exponential and loga-
rithmic functions.
Asp352
physics II sound and vibration
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course covers fundamental sound con-
cepts, hearing and noise acceptability, mea-
surement of acoustic properties, calculating
noise levels and principles of noise control.
Bes301
refrigeration vI
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
This course will introduce the student to
packaged rooftop heat/cool units used in
our industry. Control systems required to
operate commercial & industrial refrigera-
tion equipment will also be examined. Time
will be spent to ensure that students are
able to design & troubleshoot these sys-
tems, as this technique is important to the
success of a program graduate. The student
will take an advanced look at electric and
electronic economizer operation as it ap-
plies to packaged HVAC equipment.
Bes310
Air conditioning III
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
This course is focused on air system design
and selection as well as the complexities of
thermal load prediction and advanced psy-
chromatric processes. Aspects of building
load dynamics will be addressed in relation
to system suitability while considering en-
ergy and comfort parameters. The student
will develop skills in major component se-
lection and the use of software designed to
facilitate load calculations.
Bes342
AutocAd I
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This is an entry level course in CAD (Com-
puter Aided Drafting) in which students will
be required to produce, edit and plot 2D
drawings using AutoCAD2000i software.
Topics include basic drawing and editing
tools, viewing, automatic dimensioning
and plotting. An introduction to Windows
fle management software will also be dis-
cussed.
Bes343
AutocAd II
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
This course provides additional exposure to
CAD to increase drafting skills with the use
of higher level CAD tools and techniques
used to produce details and design draw-
ings related to the HVAC industry.
Bes360
Building sciences
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course covers an in-depth study of
construction methods used for commer-
cial buildings. Emphasis will be placed on
the relationship between building design,
environmental control, mechanical system
operation and occupant comfort levels. Ba-
sic building envelope arrangement, includ-
ing roof assemblies and fenestration will be
discussed. The student will become familiar
with the building code requirements as re-
lated to comfort conditions, effcient energy
usage, smoke and fre control. Building de-
sign features of interest to HVAC systems,
concerns will be exposed to the conse-
quences of building shading for reduction,
and relating to condensation, infiltration
and insulation issues will be dealt with and
air/vapor barrier concerns identifed.
Bes390
plumbing design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course will familiarize the student with
all aspects of plumbing system design in-
cluding storm, sanitary, and potable water
systems. National Plumbing Code require-
ments will be addressed and terms and
defnitions discussed. The student will also
become familiar with the diagrammatic rep-
resentation of piping systems and will be ex-
posed to common system confgurations.
Bes430
system control II
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course provides detailed design and
operational set-up for various microproces-
sor based building automation control sys-
tems. The student will become familiar with
the processes involving the microprocessor
control strategies and system program-
ming. Engineering design of automation
systems will be reviewed with several of the
mainstream controls platforms. Building
system networking and configuration will
be demonstrated with a focus on total all
encompassing building systems control.
99 www.nait.ca
seMester 4
Bes340
hydronics II
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course addresses the design, layout,
sizing and selection of hydronic systems
and components for commercial build-
ings. Glycol and chilled water loop appli-
cations will be discussed. An overview of
low temperature hot water radiant systems
and natural gas radiant systems will be pro-
vided. The student will also develop skills in
the selection and performance evaluation
of pumps and pumping circuits. Piping con-
fgurations and system accessories will be
presented and explained as they relate to
common installations.
Bes400
refrigeration vII
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course will provide the student with in-
formation concerning commercial multi-plex
refrigeration systems used in a supermarket
environment. An advanced look at evapo-
rator and compressor balance will be com-
bined with discussion on system effciency.
Participants will become familiar with the
installation, start-up, service and repair of
air-conditioning equipment. Refrigeration
chillers and their operation will be described,
inclusive of evaporative condensers and
cooling towers. This offering will include feld
trips out into industry to observe the above
listed equipment in operation.
Bes401
refrigeration vIII
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This refrigeration course deals with food
process control and refrigerated storage
for design and calculation of coolers and
freezers. Design considerations involving
low temperature systems, as well as su-
permarket multi-temperature/compressor
systems will be discussed. Energy effcient
heat pump design and operational sequenc-
ing using various heat-sink mediums will be
discussed. This course includes a look at
the B-52 mechanical code specifications
involving safety, installation and operation
of various refrigerant types. The course cul-
minates with a major refrigeration cooler/
freezer design project.
Bes411
hvAc computer software Appl.
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course is specifcally designed to famil-
iarize students to HVAC specifc software.
This includes heating and cooling load es-
timation, line sizing, equipment selection
and psychrometric analysis. The course
directly supports BES490 Mechanical De-
sign. Participants are expected to have ba-
sic computer proficiency before entering
the course.
Bes420
Air flow III
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course deals with the complexities of
ventilation system design in commercial
and institutional applications. All param-
eters for appropriate system performance
will be considered including room air distri-
bution, system effect and building pressur-
ization. The student will also develop skills
in centrifugal fan selection and performance
evaluation. All aspects of high and low ve-
locity duct design, installation, duct sealing,
air balancing, terminal boxes, distribution
and exhaust systems will be addressed.
Bes441
thermodynamics
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course will provide the student will a
good understanding of concepts relating
to pressure, fow, work and conservation of
energy as these concepts relate to HVAC
applications. Included are laws of thermo-
dynamics, the reverse Carnot cycle, gas
relationships and concepts of enthalpy and
entropy. The course also includes molecu-
lar motion theory, phase change, measure-
ment of energy, energy requirements and
measurement of various processes.
Bes461
estimating
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course familiarizes the student with
the different aspects of mechanical system
estimating and project submission pro-
cesses. Included are organization and plan-
ning strategies, blue-print and specifcation
analysis, common estimating procedures
and submittal requirements. An on site tour
and training session for estimating tender-
ing process and legal project requirements
will be covered. Sample estimating projects
will be undertaken to reinforce recom-
mended standard industry practices.
Bes463
energy Auditing & Management
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
Energy Auditing and Management covers
fundamental processes involved in mea-
suring, monitoring and managing energy
consumption in buildings. The student is
familiarized with processes involved with
cost control and customer expectations in
building design and operation. The impact
of current energy rate structures will be ex-
amined. Various direct and indirect energy
management and cost reduction strate-
gies such as load shedding, power factor
correction, thermal storage, heat recovery
and performance contracting will be intro-
duced. ASHRAE standards 62, 55 and 90.1
will be reviewed with respect to optimizing
and maintaining an acceptable indoor en-
vironment while observing various energy
management strategies. The fnal segment
of the course deals with concepts relative to
group relationships, Quality Management
process, and team management.
Bes490
Mechanical design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course allows the student the oppor-
tunity to prepare complete mechanical
system design for a low rise commercial
building. The project includes the chrono-
logical development of the mechanical
system design, calculations, drawing that
is consistent with real world engineering
requirements. The students are responsible
for compiling a complete system assess-
ment design including mechanical system
calculation and specification document
binder. Also, a complete set of supporting
CAD design drawings will be produced as
part of the design course.
pIp400
gas controls
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course begins with a look at gas related
safety practices along with a look at the
gas code sections covering general, instal-
lation & field construction of appliances.
The student will be provided with informa-
tion on troubleshooting as it applies to gas
fred equipment. Emphasis will be placed on
understanding direct-fred make up air sys-
tems, their application & operation. Pack-
aged heat/cool units will be visited again
with a focus on the gas heating section and
its components.
100 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Successful completion of HVAC Specialist
Certifcate program. Equivalent education
and experience may be considered.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Students should possess some mechanical
aptitude and have a basic understanding of
Microsoft Windows.
career investiGation
A standard career investigation is recom-
mended but not required.
advanced/transFer credit
Gilbert Requena, Program Head
(780) 378-1200
Fax: (780) 471-7054
gilbertr@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 33 hours per week during each se-
mester.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 15 - 30 hours
per week.
classrooM and study hours
Classrooms are incorporated into Lab areas
and provide a comfortable learning environ-
ment.
Labs are fully equipped with training units
and digital control systems. Computer Labs
are linked through a main server and most
courses incorporate computer generated
curriculum.
BuildinG location(s)
Main Campus - main lab room A-188 staff
offce is C-103
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Gilbert Requena, Program Head
(780) 378-1200
Fax: (780) 471-7054
gilbertr@nait.ca
inFo sessions
Contact Gilbert Requena at 378-1200 or
Tim Lloyd at 378-1217 for a personal tour of
the program facilities anytime.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Building Environmental Systems Technol-
ogy Diploma
apprenticeship inForMation
Successful completion of the frst and sec-
ond level of training gives the graduate sub-
stantial credit towards their trade ticket as a
Refrigeration Mechanic. The HVAC special-
ist program is the prerequisit to the BEST
program. Upon completion of the 1st year
HVAC specialist program and the 2nd year
BEST (“Building Environmental Systems
Technology Diploma”) program the student
can expect the following:
Credit of all four periods of technical
training.(ie: students are exempt from all
four years of trade school)
Credit of 660 hours frst period work expe-
rience.
Credit of 660 hours second period work
experience.
Upon completing required work experi-
ence time; be allowed to challenge the third
period Provincial Apprenticeship Training
exam.
Upon successful completion of third period
exam and required work experience time;
be allowed to challenge the fourth period
Provincial Apprenticeship Training exam.
(Journeyman certifcate)
Write the Inter-provincial Examination for
“Red Seal” certificate, upon receiving the
Journeyman Certifcate.
Required to complete the following work
experience time:
First Period - 900 hours work experience
Second Period - 900 hours work experi-
ence
Third Period - 1560 hours work experience
Fourth Period - 1560 hours work experi-
ence
advanced credit possiBilities
As the B.E.S.T. program is a new offering no
university transfer credit is pre-approved
as of yet. This may be an option in the near
future.
Major skills acQuired
Knowledge of industry terminology and •
practices.
HVAC&R equipment and systems •
awareness.
Piping/ductwork installation familiarity. •
Mechanical blueprint reading. •
Air balancing and air distribution •
strategies.
Training in Electro/pneumatic controls •
and device troubleshooting.
Common equipment maintenance •
procedures.
Basic technical and business •
communication skills.
Awareness of building code •
requirements related to mechanical
systems.
Exposure to gas heating appliance •
systems.
Knowledge of electrical distribution •
and power generating systems.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Mechanical design, and consulting firms.
Mechanical service contracting firms.
HVAC&R equipment servicing, wholesalers
and manufacturers. Mechanical system bal-
ancing and commissioning frms. Building
operations and management companies.
Mechanical operations departments for in-
stitutional and similar facilities.
101 www.nait.ca
career opportunities
Successful completion of the Building En-
vironmental Systems Technology (BEST)
diploma program may:
provide entry into building mechanical •
design and commissioning industry.
lead to employment in building •
systems evaluation, project
management and inspection.
lead to employment in building •
systems contracting and consulting.
provide entry into the building controls •
design and servicing industry.
provide a position in technical •
engineering sales.
provide a lead-in into the refrigeration •
trade certifcation program.
provide a lead-in into the Power •
Engineering 4th Class Certifcate and
related industry.
provide a lead-in into mechanical and •
sheet metal estimating.
provide a stable position in industry •
specifc wholesale business.
provide a position in the HVAC&R •
equipment design and manufacturing
industry.
Business - YeAR 1
Find the Business Career that Suits You
In your frst year of Business, you will take a
common core of ten courses in order to gain
an appreciation of the wide assortment of
careers possibilities related to each of our
diploma and/or degree programs.
Near the end of your second semester, you
will select a specialization that best suits
your personal interests and career goals.
Our diploma options include:
Accounting •
Entrepreneurship & Innovation •
Diploma
Finance •
Human Resource Management •
Diploma
Management •
Marketing •
Project Management Diploma •
If you complete an additional two years of
studies, you can also earn a degree at NAIT
or another University. Degree options at
NAIT include:
Bachelor of Applied Business •
Administration - Accounting
Bachelor of Applied Business - Finance •
Your Success is Our Business
Our number one concern is your success.
Through our small class sizes, we offer a
personalized learning environment, where
instructors are focused on your individual
interests and academic progress. Other
benefts include:
a curriculum that focuses on everyday, •
real-life business situations
instructors with frst-hand work •
experience in their felds of
specialization
fexible scheduling and frequent start •
dates
the latest business and educational •
technologies
Upon graduation from the NAIT Business
programs, you will be readily employable
and career ready.
Mastering your Technology skills!
You have the option of taking your first
year of Business in one of the Notebook
(Laptop) sections. In order to participate in
the laptop sections, students are required
to own a Notebook (laptop). Contact Hard-
eep Gill at 471-8856 for specifcations.
eLearning online at a distance offered!
Starting January 2008, the following eL-
earning Business courses will be offered
online at a distance;
ACCT106 Accounting •
BLAW161 Business Law •
ECON186 Microeconomics •
MATH117 Business Mathematics with •
Excel
ORGB191 Organizational Behaviour •
Visit www.nait.ca for more information.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Business & Administrative
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Continuing Education, Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semester) if taken full-time
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
January 7, 2008
application deadline
December 21, 2007
coNtActs
Full-tiMe inForMation
Arun Bhardwaj
Phone: (780) 471-7793
E-mail: arunb@nait.ca
Hardeep Gill
Phone: (780) 471-8858
E-mail: hardeepg@nait.ca
Jim Doucette
Phone: (780) 471-7708
E-mail: jimd@nait.ca
Brian Yahn
Phone: (780) 471-7459
E-mail: briany@nait.ca
part-tiMe inForMation
Phone: (780) 471-8943
international applicants
Ernie Jacobson
Phone: (780) 471-8838
E-mail: erniej@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Each full-time Business Diploma (Dipl. Bus.)
typically takes two years (four semesters)
to complete. Each semester is scheduled
over a 16 week period and students partici-
pate in fve courses at the same time.
The frst year curriculum is the same for all
students in the Business Program and in the
second year students specialize in Account-
ing, Finance, Management and Marketing.
Students also have the opportunity to com-
plete an Applied Degree in Accounting or
Finance.
Full-time Customized Timetable:
Based on your own individual situation you
may need a customized timetable. You have
the option of starting our full-time program
every September and January. In every se-
mester of full-time study, you will typically
have the option for a schedule that pro-
vides a full morning or full afternoon free of
classes every day of the week.
Continuing Education:
Many opportunities are available to attend
evening and weekend credit courses.
eLearning Distance Courses:
Starting January 2008, 5 eLearning first
year Business courses will be offered online
at a distance for your convenience.
102 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
accreditation
NAIT business graduates have the option to
transfer to the third year of Business/Man-
agement Degree programs at the University
of Lethbridge, Athabasca University and
Concordia University College of Alberta.
Course by course transfer credits exist to-
wards other Alberta and Canadian Univer-
sity Degree programs.
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
There are both September and January in-
takes for frst year students.
seMester 1
Acct106
Accounting
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The student is introduced to the accounting
equation and to the effect various transac-
tions have on it. An introduction to the ac-
counting cycle, ledger, trial balance, income
statement and balance sheet is presented.
Accounting for merchandise operations,
inventory and cost of sales, internal control
and cash are introduced and examined indi-
vidually. Prerequisite: None
coMM121
Business communications
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course introduces the student to the
complexity of the communication process.
The student learns business writing strat-
egies and techniques and applies them to
two categories of business letters/memos.
Students will use word processing com-
puter software to compose, edit and revise
assignments. Letters/memos will be as-
signed and completed in class within pre-
scribed time limits. Each student is required
to write an informal, informational report.
Emphasis will be placed on research and
documentation. As well, students will learn
and practice fundamental presentation
skills. Prerequisite: None
ecoN186
Microeconomics
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The question of how individuals and frms
use their scarce resources to attain eco-
nomic goals is examined. The central prob-
lem of scarcity is introduced. A brief study
of how different economic systems try to
solve this problem is undertaken. The mar-
ket system is investigated: how supply, de-
mand and price determine what and how
much is produced. Elasticity of demand
is examined in the context of effectively
setting prices for different products. How
business frms make decisions and conduct
themselves in the marketplace is examined.
Price and output termination for firms in
pure competition, monopoly, monopolistic
competition, and oligopoly is studied us-
ing theory and case studies. The economic
functions of government in a “mixed” capi-
talistic system are examined. Applications
to current events are discussed wherever
appropriate. Prerequisite: None
MAth117
Business Mathematics with excel
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course is designed to provide students
with knowledge of the fundamental princi-
ples and concepts of business mathematics,
and to develop their abilities to apply these
principles and concepts to solve practical
business problems, particularly in market-
ing and fnance. Includes an introduction to
the use of Microsoft Excel with an applied
application to using Excel to solve Business
Mathematics problems. Prerequisite: None
orgB191
organizational Behaviour
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course provides an introduction to the
signifcance of organizations and the infu-
ence of the manager and the employee on
the organization and work. The emphasis
is on managing individual differences for
increased productivity and job satisfaction.
As well, a framework for understanding be-
haviour in the workplace is studied. Case
problems are solved by groups using the
rational decision-making process. Prereq-
uisite: None
seMester 2
Acct107
Accounting
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Capital assets are discussed with reference
to recording acquisition cost, amortization
in subsequent periods, and disposal. Short-
term and long-term liabilities, partnerships,
corporations, share capital, and the state-
ment of cash fows/cash fow analysis are
introduced and examined individually. Gen-
erally accepted accounting principles are
examined throughout the course, as they
relate to the specific subject areas. As a
fnal integration, the student will study the
analysis of fnancial statements. Prerequi-
site: ACCT106 (BUS106). Course re-num-
bering - effective July 1, 2006.
BlAw161
Business law
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The focus of the course is to empower the
students to succeed in business by display-
ing how knowledge of the law can give them
an advantage. Beginning with an introduc-
tion of Canada’s legal systems, the course
proceeds to examine how laws are made,
who makes laws and how laws are enforced.
The Alberta court system is examined. Stu-
dents are taught how to sue in the Provin-
cial Court, Civil Division and how to collect
a judgment. Civil procedure in the Court of
Queen’s Bench is also examined. The vari-
ous forms of alternative dispute resolution
are reviewed. Constitutional Law, including
an examination of the Charter of Rights and
Freedoms, follows. Human rights legislation
is similarly evaluated. The development of
tort law is traced, with an emphasis on the
tort of negligence. Forms of business organi-
zations (sole proprietorships, various types
of partnerships and corporate entities) are
compared and contrasted. Employment law,
including the common law and the relevant
legislation, is delineated. Insurance law is
then briefy addressed. Finally, the forma-
tion and performance of contracts is evalu-
ated. Prerequisite: None
ecoN187
Macroeconomics
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
The overall health of the economy, as
measured by gross domestic product, un-
employment rates, inflation rates, inter-
est rates, the balance of payments and
exchange rates is the prime focus of this
course. Keynesian and monetarist theo-
ries of income and employment are used
as a framework for analyzing government
monetary and fscal policies. The role of the
Bank of Canada and the chartered banks in
determining the money supply and interest
rates is described. Current debates relating
to the public debt and supply side econom-
ics are evaluated. International economic
issues including free trade and the balance
of payments are also examined. Wherever
appropriate, current events are introduced
and topics are reinforced and enhanced
through computer applications. Prerequi-
site: ECON186 (BUS186). Course re-num-
bering - effective July 1, 2006.
103 www.nait.ca
MArk166
Marketing
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory course, covering the
fundamental principles and concepts of mar-
keting. Major emphasis is placed on the mar-
keting mix and its strategic application to an
increasingly complex business environment.
In particular, the detailed areas of product,
promotion, price and distribution are ex-
amined in reference to achieving company
objectives. Prerequisite: None Note: Course
re-numbering - effective July 1, 2006.
MgMt156
Introduction to Business strategy
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
In this course, the student develops an
understanding of setting the strategy for
the business and recognizes how the tools
learned can be used to support the imple-
mentation of that strategy. The course en-
courages the student to think as a leader
with an entrepreneurial mindset and an
integrated view of the entire organization.
Integrated with the concurrent frst and sec-
ond term courses and using the case-study
method, this course creates opportunities
for students to develop analytical, prob-
lem-solving, critical thinking, teamwork,
and communication skills by analyzing and
presenting solutions to typical business
problems. Students also develop and utilize
problem-solving and decision-making skills
both individually and in small groups within
the scope of the basic concepts of the busi-
ness strategy process: planning, organizing,
staffing, directing, controlling, communi-
cating, and leading within a global business
environment. Prerequisite: None Course re-
numbering effective July 1, 2006
optional
Bus200
NAItworking
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
NAITworking integrates students’ course
study with specifc work experiences. Par-
ticipation in NAITworking is entirely volun-
tary although fnal selection for a placement
is dependent upon a successful evaluation
and fulfillment of the prerequisite condi-
tions. Students who begin the Business
Administration program in September may
participate the following May (between
second and third semester) while students
who begin the program in January may
participate between third and fourth se-
mester. Please be aware that NAITworking
(BUS200) is not an approved elective for
any of the second year programs, hence
does not count in the total hours needed for
graduation. The number of positions avail-
able for each work experience term will be
determined by the participating employers
prior to commencement of Semester Two.
NOTE: The experience term may vary and
will be determined by the participating or-
ganizations each January. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of Year One (no course
deficiencies) and a minimum grade point
average of 60%.
seMester 3 & 4
Select Specialization in Accounting, Fi-
nance, Management or Marketing
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A High School Diploma is not required,
however, applicants should have:
English 30-1 or 30-2 (60% or better) •
and
Applied Math 30 or Pure Math 30 •
(60% or better) or equivalent
Minimum marks are 50%. As the Business
Program is usually oversubscribed, marks of
60% or better are recommended.
delIvery optIoNs
We provide fexible scheduling. Many stu-
dents need a custom timetable that con-
siders individual needs. We do our best to
accommodate each situation.
You have the option of taking your first
year of Business in one of the Notebook
(Laptop) sections. In order to participate, stu-
dents are required to own a Notebook (lap-
top). Contact Hardeep Gill for specifcations.
distance delivery options
Starting January 2008, 5 frst year eLearn-
ing Business courses will be delivered online
at a distance for your convenience.
classrooM and study hours
Hours in the class:
20 hours per week for a full load
Hours of homework:
One to three hours per classroom hour
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
part-tiMe options
ACCT106 Accounting •
ACCT107 Accounting •
BLAW161 Business Law •
COMM121 Business Communications •
ECON186 Microeconomics •
ECON187 Macroeconomics •
MARK166 Marketing •
MATH117 Business Mathematics with •
Excel
MGMT156 Introduction to Business •
Strategy
ORGB191 Organizational Behaviour •
co-op & Work experience
NAIT business programs have a voluntary
four week placement that takes place be-
tween the frst and second year. Based on
the opportunities available, we will place
you in a work environment to suit your ca-
reer goals. For further information, please
refer to the NAITworking (BUS200) course
for further details.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
Grant inForMation
Due to recent changes in government pol-
icy, diploma students entering their first
year in Business are eligible for student
loans. These grants do not have to be paid
back and can be used towards tuition, other
mandatory fees and living expenses.
Financial aid
Can’t afford college? Think again. Find out
the latest information on grants, scholar-
ships and loans by visiting www.nait.ca/
fnancialaid. web page. There are also many
awards which are available to JR Shaw
School of Business students.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
inFo sessions
eLearning Business Courses
New starting in January 2008.
For you convenience, we will be offering
online Business eLearning courses at a
distance.
104 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Technology oppurtunity!
In the first year of the Business program,
you now have the option of being enrolled
in a laptop section. For more information
contact Hardeep Gill at (780) 471-8858 or
hardeepg@nait.ca
NAIT Open House
October 10 & 11, 2008
NAIT Info Week
Febuary 2 - 5, 2009
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
First year of the Business program leads to
the following:
Diploma in Accounting, Finance, Manage-
ment, and Marketing
Applied Degree in Accounting or Finance
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Successful graduates of the Business pro-
gram have the following attributes:
Excellent problem solving skills •
Professional attitude •
Critical thinking skills •
Learn quickly and effciently •
Strong team player •
Excellent communication skills •
Ability to work under pressure •
Assertiveness and self confdence •
Innovative, adaptive and creative •
abilities
Profcient in business software •
applications and technology
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates who wish to further their stud-
ies may earn a degree at NAIT. Other op-
tions for NAIT business graduates include
transferring to the University of Lethbridge,
Athabasca University and Concordia Uni-
versity College of Alberta to earn a degree.
cAreer opportuNItIes
career opportunities
Are you looking for a rewarding professional
career that suits your personal interests and
abilities? In Business we provide you with a
wide assortment of careers offered through
our diploma and degree programs.
Accounting •
Finance •
Management •
Marketing •
Bachelor of Applied Bus Admin - •
Accounting
Bachelor of Applied Business - Finance •
cHemicAL
enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY
Chemical Engineering Technology is a
two-year diploma program that prepares
the graduate for employment in the hydro-
carbon and chemical processing industry
(downstream petroleum industry). The
program deals with the processing of oil,
natural gas and bitumen into fnal products
such as motor gasoline, diesel fuel, jet fuel,
propane, butane, utility gas and others. The
program includes studies of the production
of secondary petrochemicals such as ethyl-
ene, vinyl chloride, methanol and others.
The expanding oil sands development sec-
tor also provides tremendous opportuni-
ties for Chemical Engineering Technology
graduates.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences, Mechani-
cal & Industrial
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
August 25, 2008
First day of class
coNtActs
Phone (780) 471-8999
Fax: (780) 471-8831
Bruce Reinders, Chair
Ikhtyar Omar, Associate Chair
Rick Dickenson, Associate Chair
Laurie Semotiuk, Associate Chair
Maria Martinez, Administrative Assistant
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years (four semesters of 17 weeks
each)
certiFication
Diploma in Chemical Engineering Technology
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a Technologist by the constitu-
ent associations (ASET)* of the Canadian
Council of Technicians and Technologists.
*The Association of Science and Engineer-
ing Technology Professionals of Alberta
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Ase132
technical communications I
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Topics include writing grammatically cor-
rect statements in technical English, pre-
paring correctly formatted memoranda
and letters, learning and using appropri-
ate techniques for obtaining employment
(letters, resumes, interviews, job search
techniques), delivering oral presentations
to groups, and developing effective listen-
ing skills. Word processing software will be
used throughout the course.
AsM147
technical Mathematics I
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This is a course in technical mathematics.
Topics include units of measurement, ap-
proximate numbers, trigonometric func-
tions, right and oblique triangles, vectors,
graphs of trigonometric functions, factoring,
quadratic equations, exponents, logarithms,
semi-log and log-log plots, systems of linear
and quadratic equations, and progressions.
chs105
general chemistry
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Topics include naming and completing
simple chemical reactions for organic com-
pounds, performing stoichiometric calcula-
tions, performing basic chemical laboratory
skills and analysing and interpreting ex-
perimental results, corrosion (reactions,
monitoring and control), adsorption theory,
calculations associated with gases, liquids,
and liquid-gas solutions.
105 www.nait.ca
cMt154
fluid Mechanics
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course introduces the principles and cal-
culations in fuid mechanics. The course be-
gins with a review of basic physics concepts
and fluid physical properties will be exam-
ined. The student will perform calculations
utilizing these concepts including buoyancy,
fow rate and velocity. Laminar and turbulent
fow will be examined prior to using the gen-
eral energy equation to solve for pressure
losses in piping systems. Equipment used in
fuid piping systems will be examined includ-
ing centrifugal pumps, positive displacement
pumps, pump seals, fow meters, fttings and
piping. The proper operation of this equip-
ment will be covered. The effects of water
hammer will be examined.
cMt162
safety studies
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
The course deals with the industrial worker in
the context of promoting a safe and healthy
workplace and environment. Topics include
TDG, WHMIS, and Safety Engineering items
in the mitigation of workplace hazards. A
certificate from the Alberta Construction
Safety Association will also be obtained.
edd194
technical drawing Interpertation
and creation
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course will introduce the student to
process plant drawings including fow dia-
grams, process and instrumentation draw-
ings (P&ID) and isometrics. Students will
learn how to read and interpert these draw-
ings as well create them using VISIO.
poe420A
power eng 4th class-section A
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Topics include applied mathematics, el-
ementary mechanics, elementary thermo-
dynamics, sketching, administration codes
and standards workplace hazardous mate-
rials and safety. Prepares students to write
the ABSA 4th Class examination.
seMester 2
Ase232
technical communications II
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Topics include technical writing forms, ef-
fective meetings, formal technical reports
(research, organization, writing, formatting
and presentation), oral presentations, and
formatting of documents such as letters,
memoranda, technical reports. Computers
will be used throughout the course.
AsM247
technical Mathematics II
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course presents the fundamental prin-
ciples of statistics and analytical geometry
dealing with straight lines, circles and pa-
rabolas. The basic concepts of differential
and integral calculus will be developed.
Topics will include differentiation and in-
tegration of elementary functions and the
applications of the derivative and integral to
practical technological problems.
AsM280
computers
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course provides the beginner-level user
with the basic skills necessary to start func-
tioning on a microcomputer in the Windows
NT environment, using Microsoft Access,
Microsoft Excel, Microsoft PowerPoint, and
Microsoft Project.
Asp255
Applied science
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Topics include properties of measured
quantities (accuracy and precision), solving
problems in mechanics, thermodynamics,
electricity and magnetism, circular motion,
nuclear physics.
chs240
organic and oil chemistry testing
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Topics include origin, occurrence, develop-
ment and uses of hydrocarbons, physical
and chemical properties of conventional
and non-conventional hydrocarbons, prop-
erties and specifcations of fuels and lubri-
cants and processes for refning crude oil.
cMt110
Industry overview
Hours: 38 Credits: 2.0
This introductory course provides an un-
derstanding of the different aspects found
in the hydrocarbon based energy industry
from the source to end-products. Topics can
include Canada’s place in the industry, res-
ervoirs fuids, petroleum leases and tenure,
Dominion Land Survey (LSD) system, arti-
fcial lift, oil & gas processing, oil refning,
petrochemical processes, pipelines, heavy
oil technologies, and oil sands geology, ex-
traction, and upgrading.
cMt211
Industrial stoichiometry &
thermodynamics
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Students will develop the concepts of ma-
terial and energy balances and apply these
concepts to plant processes. These pro-
cesses will include reactive and non-reactive
systems as well as those containing recycle
and purge streams. Thermodynamic con-
cepts will be developed and energy balance
calculations performed. Ideal thermody-
namic processes and cycles will be exam-
ined and calculations performed. Emphasis
will be placed on rankine and refrigerant ion
cycles. Steam tables and Mollier diagrams
will be used to perform thermodynamic
calculations. Heat transfer will be covered
with emphasis on process heat exchang-
ers, including types, sizing, components and
troubleshooting.
pMg150
first Aid and cpr
Hours: 16 Credits: 0.0
Students will acquire the knowledge and
skills necessary for providing rescue breath-
ing, control of bleeding, immobilization of
fractures and the immediate treatment of
numerous other injuries and illnesses. Basic
CPR skills are covered.
pMg260
h2s Alive
Hours: 10 Credits: 0.5
Students who successfully complete the
H2S Alive course will receive an H2S Alive
Certifcate issued by the ENFORM (Petro-
leum Industry Training Service). Topics in-
clude the physical properties and potential
locations of H2S, exposure limits of H2S,
response strategy for an H2S release, mea-
surement and detection devices for H2S,
breathing appratus use (SCBA/SABA) in an
H2S environment, basic rescue techniques
and artificial respiration of H2S victims.
Certifcate valid for three years.
poe420B
power eng. 4th class-section B
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Topics include plant fre protection, environ-
ment, materials and welding, piping, high
pressure boiler design, high pressure boiler
parts and fttings, high pressure boiler op-
eration, and feed water treatment. Prepares
students to write the ABSA 4th Class ex-
amination.
106 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
seMester 3
cMt310
unit operations
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Topics include components and their func-
tion in distillation processes, applications
and troubleshooting of distillation columns,
distillation and absorption design calcula-
tions (binary and multicomponent), bubble
and dew point calculations, humidity, dry-
ing and two-phase hydrocarbon property
determination. Prerequisite: CMT 211.
cMt340
Natural gas and petrochemical
processing
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
The course, Natural Gas and Petrochemical
Processing, will cover the terminology, pro-
cesses and operation of facilities used for
the production and purification of natural
gas and in the production of petrochemicals
in Alberta. This course includes a pilot plant
scale laboratory including processes such
as distillation, absorption/stripping, heat
exchange, blending, pipeline/pump opera-
tion and gas compression. This laboratory
utilizes state of the art distributed control
systems such as Honeywell Experion, Hon-
eywell TDC 3000, Siemens APACS and
Fisher-Rosemount Delta V.
cMt365
project Management and economics
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The focus on this course is on the different
management processes used in industry
such as quality, people, time, corporate,
fnancial, and project management. Topics
include Total Quality Management, SPC
Tools, ISO 9000, group action skills, time
management, company organization, man-
agement styles, financial report analysis
and project management.
cMt380
computer Applications
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course deals with CMT industry-re-
lated applications involving Microsoft Excel
and Project. An introduction into the Chem-
ical Engineering simulation program HYSYS
will also be done.
Iet303
Basic and Analytical
Instrumentation
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Topics include fundamentals of process
measurement and control devices, evalu-
ation of characteristics of measurement
and control devices, selecting and sizing
measurement and fnal control devices and
principles of radioactive measurement.
Met381
Materials and equipment design
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Topics discussed will provide the student
with an understanding of the factors in-
volved in materials utilization, equipment
design and construction of pressure vessels.
Topics will cover the determination of ma-
terials properties, basic welding principles
and the applicable codes, standards and
engineering specifcation used for materials
specifcation in the hydrocarbon industries.
Common NDE testing procedures used on
equipment and corrosion identification,
monitoring and control are discussed.
poe420c
power eng 4th class-section c
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Topics include prime movers and engines,
pumps and compressors, lubrication, elec-
tricity, controls and instrumentation, heat-
ing boilers, and steam and water systems.
Prepares students to write the ABSA 4th
Class examination.
seMester 4
cMt410
process design
Hours: 70 Credits: 4.0
This course emphasizes solving engineer-
ing problems involving process design and
equipment specifcation utilizing both hand
calculations and computer aided engineer-
ing software packages. Design consider-
ations and design reviews such as HAZOPs
are examined. Teamwork skills are strength-
ened by operating as a member of a process
design team for assignments, process de-
sign reviews and a design project. Process
simulation sofware (HYSYS) will be used
with a focus on process design and trouble-
shooting. Prerequisite: CMT380.
cMt440
plant processes
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.0
Topics include refning of conventional and
non-conventional crude oils, properties and
specifcations of fuels and lubricants, termi-
nology of pulping feedstocks and products,
and common pulping processes.
cMt450
oil and gas pipelines
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.0
Topics include reliable operation of pumps
and compressors, calculation of flow re-
quirements for fow control valves, pressure
relief devices, pumps, turbo-expanders and
compressors, water hammer, valve noise,
calculation of pressure drops in single-
phase and two-phase systems, pipe sizing,
solids fuidization and transport. Prerequi-
site: CMT154.
cMt470
technical report
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students will prepare a major technical re-
port on a topic related to the Alberta petro-
chemical/petroleum industry.
cMt481
work experience
Hours: 80 Credits: 4.5
The Work Experience program is adminis-
tered to all eligible second year Chemical
Engineering Technology students. Each
CMT student will be placed in a CMT re-
lated industry for a period of two weeks in
the fourth semester. The student will be
given the opportunity to acquire varied in-
dustrial experiences that will help comple-
ment and supplement what is learned in the
NAIT academic environment. A log book,
oral report, executive summary and perfor-
mance feedback from the placement will be
done as part of the successful completion
of this course.
cMt490
environmental Management
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.0
This course focuses on environmental leg-
islation, assessment & approval processes
for project activities, and commonly used
remediation technologies.
cMt491
equipment optimization and
process trouble shooting
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
Students will complete hands-on activities
in the Oil and Gas Production Facilities at
the ENFORM (Petroleum Industry Training
Service) Facility at Nisku. During this ses-
sion the students participate in operational
procedures and perform calculations asso-
ciated with the production and processing
of crude oil and natural gas.
107 www.nait.ca
Iet407
process control
Hours: 84 Credits: 5.0
Topics include analysis of static and dy-
namic characteristics of processes, trouble
shooting process instruments, statistical
process control, adjusting controller tuning
parameters and advanced control systems.
poe420d
power eng 4th class-section d
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
Topics include heating boiler and system
controls, auxilliary building systems, vapors
compression refrigeration, absorption re-
frigeration, air conditioning, air conditioning
systems, boiler maintenance and types of
plants. Prepares students to write the ABSA
4th Class examination.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A High School Diploma is no longer re-
quired as a prerequisite for entrance into
NAIT programs, however; students should
be aware that some employers may require
a High School Diploma as a prerequisite for
employment. All applicants must have Eng-
lish 30-1, 30-2, 30 or 33, Pure Math 30 or
Math 30 or a minimum of 60% in Math 33,
and one of: Science 30, Physics 30, Chemis-
try 30. The Chemical Engineering Technol-
ogy program is classifed as over subscribed
and entrance into the program is academi-
cally competitive.
additional reQuireMents
Normal colour vision is an asset.
An interest in and aptitude for applied sci-
ences, especially those with a chemistry
and physics base, is a defnite asset to any-
one considering this program.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include aca-
demic achievement beyond the minimum
prerequisite identifed in the NAIT calendar
or application form.
Priority will be given to students entering
with Pure Math 30. Applicants presenting
Applied Math 30 will be assessed and up-
grading may be required.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT.
Career investigation is the frst step an appli-
cant should take. In doing so, the applicant
would become familiar with the work envi-
ronment, types of duties, and responsibilities
that are associated with Chemical Engineer-
ing Technologists. Also, this investigation
would serve as an indicator of the student’s
motivation to succeed academically.
There are many avenues that an applicant
could take to achieve career investiga-
tion. Phoning frms and companies that do
function in Chemical Engineering/Process
Operations field, and getting information
from Chemical Engineering Technologists
employed with these frms is one. Another
option might be talking to a relative or a fam-
ily friend that works, or is familiar with this
particular feld.
advanced/transFer credit
Students who have successfully completed
other post secondary courses may be eli-
gible for advanced standing in related PGC
courses. Students wishing to investigate this
option must present the following to the Pro-
gram Head.
a) mark transcripts of the previous related
training
b) course outlines or adequate description of
the courses
The content and hours of the in-coming
course is evaluated and if enough of a simi-
larity exists, credit will be granted, providing
the student has achieved a 70% or better
(discretion of the Program Head) in the in-
coming course (6 on a 9 point scale). Con-
tact Bruce Reinders for advance credit details
(471-7776).
Advanced credit will only be evaluated once
the student has been fully accepted into the
program.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Course delivery is based on the Lecture/Lab
model supported by field trips and guest
lecturing. 30 hours per week attendance
in classroom and lab settings is expected.
Classroom lectures are 40 to 45 students.
Lab sessions are 20 to 25 students.
Students have access to well equipped recre-
ational and athletic facilities which includes
weight room, racquetball courts, swimming
pool and an ice Hockey rink. Student involve-
ment in intramural and intercollegiate activi-
ties is encouraged.
BuildinG location(s)
A large number of classes are taught in the
Engineering Technologies Annex - Building
“L” on the campus map. Specialized labs in
other buildings on main campus are also
used.
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Students will attend lectures or labs
about 30 hours per week in all sememsters.
During the 4th semester, students attend
a 1 week course at the Enform Nisku Train-
ing Centre for hands on learning in Gas/Oil
Production and Gas Processing. A two week
work experience term is also scheduled for
the 4th semester. During the work experi-
ence term, the student should expect to
work 40hr/wk or more.
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: 10-20 hrs
per week is required for assignments, labs
and study.
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Jan or early Feb in 4th Semester
Length: 2 weeks - 80 hours minimum
Type of experience: Students are placed with
typical employers in feld/plant (operations),
laboratory or offce employment situations.
Relocation: The Chemical Engineering Tech-
nology Program considers indivual student
needs when assigning work term place-
ments. No relocation expenses are covered
by the program.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to attend
classes and laboratory sessions, to ask ques-
tions and experience NAIT frst hand.
108 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
The NAIT Buddy System allows prospective
students to spend a morning/afternoon or
entire day teamed with a Chemical Engineer-
ing Technology student. The Buddy Student
attends classes and laboratory sessions to
ask questions and experience the Chemical
Engineering Technology program.
To partcipate in the Buddy Student Pro-
gram, contact Maria Martinez (mariam@
nait.ca) at 471-8999.
inFo sessions
Chemical Engineering Technology has no
daytime information sessions scheduled.
However, in February 2008 an evening in-
formation session will be held for anyone
interested in finding out more about the
program. Check the NAIT website for spe-
cific times and locations of the February
2008 Information session: http://www.nait.
ca/infosessions.htm
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Chemical Engineering Technology
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a Technologist by the constitu-
ent associations of the Canadian Council of
Technicians and Technologists.
Second year students are able to apply for
free student memberships in the Associa-
tion of Science and Engineering Technology
Professionals of Alberta (ASET).
After two years of suitable work experience
in industry, the graduate may seek certi-
fication with the Association of Science
and Engineering Technology Professionals
of Alberta (ASET) to receive the designa-
tion of Certifed Engineering Technologist
(C.E.T.).
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
In additional to strong technical skills in
the areas of process design and operations
graduates of Chemical Engineering Tech-
nology must possess sound interpersonal
skills and team skills, effective listening and
written communication skills and attention
to detail. In addition to these these skills,
graduates must have a critical thinking
skills aptitude to assist in problem solving
and trouble shooting.
To complement the technical aspect of the
profession, the graduate will have also have
skills and confdence in presentations, tech-
nical writing and researching.
advanced credit possiBilities
Students completing Chemical Engineer-
ing Technology at NAIT qualify for advance
credit towards a Chemical or Petroleum
Engineering Degree at universities includ-
ing the University of Alberta, MontanaTech,
Lakehead University, Camosun College and
many others. The amount of advance credit
is determined by each institution.
additional post certiFication
diploMa courses
Alberta Society of Engineering Technolo-
gists (ASET) and Society of Petroleum
Engineers(SPE)offer courses and lectures
in a variety of areas of interest to graduates.
Inaddition, many companies have in-house
training programs to facilate post gradua-
tion career development.
post Graduation
The program is continually working to de-
velop transfer credit relationships with uni-
versities and colleges to allow students to
further their education following graduation
from NAIT.
Major skills acQuired
The Chemical Engineering Technologist ac-
quires knowledge and skills in the areas of
process design and operations.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Oil companies (refning, upgrading and •
gas processing)
Chemical companies •
Petrochemical processing companies •
Pulp and paper companies •
Oilfeld Service companies (well •
servicing and drilling)
Equipment design and fabrication •
companies
career opportunities
Graduates fnd careers working in process
operations and process design. Initial job
placements for graduates are as follows:
Process Operators in oilsands •
upgraders, refneries, petrochemical
plants, gas plants, etc.
Operators and Technologists in the •
pipeline industry
Process equipment design and •
fabrication
Technologists in the upstream oil and •
gas industry (oil companies and oilfeld
service companies)
The expanding oil sands development sector
also provides tremendous opportunities for
Chemical Engineering Technology graduates.
Senior technologists may proceed to posi-
tions that involve supervising other tech-
nologists and engineers.
cHemicAL
tecHnOLOGY
The intent of the Chemical Technology
Program is to prepare skilled laboratory
technologists for industrial, government
and commercial laboratories. Graduates
are employed in the felds of forensics, bio-
chemistry, food and agricultural analysis,
mining, metallurgical, environmental, or-
ganic synthesis, petroleum and petrochemi-
cal analysis.
First year courses include chemical safety,
organic and inorganic chemistry, quantita-
tive analysis and physical chemistry. Sup-
port courses include courses in computers,
math, statistics, physics and business com-
munication. Second year courses include
industrial chemistry, hydrocarbon and coal
chemistry, instrumental analysis, biochem-
istry, food and agricultural analysis, environ-
mental chemistry, microbiology, molecular
biology, immunology and project manage-
ment. Co-operative work experience oppor-
tunities are available.
Application of standard and specialized
laboratory technqiues across scientifc dis-
ciplines are emphasized. Training is lab-fo-
cused, providing students with practical, job
ready experience using a variety of modern
laboratory instruments and computer ap-
plications in NAIT’s advanced Centre for
Chemical Studies.
In the first year of the program students
spend approximately 16 hours per week in
theory courses and 14 hours per week in the
laboratory. In second year students spend
an average 12 hours per week in theory and
18 hours per week in the laboratory.
The Chemical Technology program prepares
students to work in a lab environment. NAIT
also has a program called Chemical Engi-
neering Technology that prepares students
to work as an operator in a chemical plant.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences, Environ-
ment & Land Management
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
109 www.nait.ca
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
First day of class
coNtActs
dr. Forrest tittle
Chair
(780) 471-7758
Fax: (780) 471-7757
forrestt@nait.ca
ted ondrus
Associate Chair
(780) 471-7770
Fax: (780) 471-7757
tedo@nait.ca
darlene Barnard
Administrative Assistant
(780) 471-8933
Fax: (780) 471-7757
darleneb@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years (four semesters of 17 weeks
each).
certiFication
Diploma in Chemical Technology
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a technologist by the constitu-
ent associations of the Canadian Council of
Technicians and Technologists.
Graduates are eligible for certifcation and
membership in The Alberta Society of En-
gineering Technologists and the Canadian
Society for Chemical Technology, a constit-
uent of the Chemical Institute of Canada.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
AsM145
technical Mathematics
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
ASM145 introduces the student to measure-
ment and approximate numbers, equations
and formulas, systems of linear equations,
factoring, algebraic fractions, exponents,
logarithms, and logarithmic graphs.
AsM146
Quality Assurance & control
Hours: 55 Credits: 3.0
Topics include mean, median, variance and
standard deviation, frequency distributions,
normal distribution, sampling distributions,
hypothesis tests, confidence intervals,
sample size, linear regression, and quality
control charts.
AsM148
Introductory computing
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This is an introductory course in the use of
software in a Windows environment. Stu-
dents will be introduced to the fundamen-
tals of Excel and Access. On the completion
of this course students should be able to
create and edit spreadsheets using many of
the Excel commands. Using Excel and Ac-
cess, students should be able to create, edit
and manipulate databases.
ch121t
Industrial hygiene I
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Covers the major topics of precautionary
labelling, fres and fre extinguishers; WH-
MIS with special emphasis on characteristic
hazards connected with and safe handling
practices for fammable chemicals, corro-
sive materials, toxic chemicals, compressed
gases, insidious hazards and personal pro-
tective equipment. The emphasis is on the
safe handling of laboratory chemicals.
ch131l
general Inorganic chemistry lab
Hours: 136 Credits: 8.0
The laboratory experiments are designed
to teach basic laboratory techniques and to
reinforce the theoretical concepts covered
in CH131T and CH132T. The frst part of the
course covers experiments in laboratory
techniques and in general chemistry, while
the latter part includes qualitative analysis
and the principles of ionic equilibrium in ho-
mogeneous solutions.
ch131t
general chemistry I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Covers topics in general chemistry includ-
ing matter and atomic structure, matter and
energy changes, chemical bonding, the peri-
odic chart, reactions, chemical equilibrium,
acids and bases, solubilities and solubility
equilibrium.
ch132t
general chemistry II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course provides the student with the
basic knowledge and skills required to mas-
ter inorganic nomenclature, describe the
components and applications of electro-
chemical cells and to do calculations involv-
ing chemical formulas, chemical equations,
solution concentrations, binary mixtures,
acid base and redox titrations and electro-
chemical cells.
ch151l
organic chemistry I lab
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Organic Chemistry I lab introduces the
techniques of fltration, crystallization, thin
layer chromatography, extraction and dis-
tillation (simple, fractional, steam). The
physical properties of melting points, boil-
ing points, refractive indices and infra-red
spectra are measured for selected organic
compounds. Synthetic reactions are per-
formed which illustrate those covered in
Organic Chemistry I theory.
ch151t
organic chemistry I theory
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Organic Chemistry I theory begins with the
structure and bonding of elements found
in organic compounds, followed by an in-
troduction to the main functional groups.
Nomenclature, stereochemistry, physical
properties including infrared spectral prop-
erties, chemical reactions and uses are then
investigated for alkanes, alkenes, alkynes,
alkyl halides, aromatics, alcohols, phenols,
ethers, sulphur compounds and amines.
seMester 2
Ase219
effective communications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will briefy review English skills
and their application to the writing of ab-
stracts, reports, and proposals. Students
will do basic research, gather information,
and analyze and edit the information for use
in oral presentations and in a formal techni-
cal report that includes documentation and
graphic aids. Students will study meeting
concepts, including minutes. Letters of ap-
plication and resumes will also be covered
and appropriate assignments given.
110 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Asp210
light
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will provide the student an op-
portunity to learn and use the physical prin-
ciples, laws and mathematical relationships
relating to electromagnetic radiation with
particular emphasis in the visible region.
Asp211
electrical Measurement
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will provide the student an op-
portunity to know and use the physical prin-
ciples, laws and mathematical relationships
relating to DC electricity, AC electricity,
magnetism, elecromagnetic induction, volt-
meters, ammeters, ohmmeters, digital test
instruments including digital multimeters,
capacitance meters, function generators,
impedence meters, oscilloscopes and elec-
tronic component testers.
ch232l
Quantitative Analysis lab
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
Laboratory exercises deal with quantitative
analysis. Methods used are gravimetric,
including precipitation and electrogravi-
metric; titrimetric including neutralization,
complexation, potentiometric and oxida-
tion-reduction and photometric analysis.
ch232t
Quantitative Analysis theory
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Quantitative analysis encompasses chemi-
cal equilibria (including buffers), precipi-
tation phenomena (including solubility
products) and redox reactions (including
the Nernst Equation). Statistics and chemi-
cal calculations related to the above con-
cepts will be emphasized. The theoretical
principles in this course are related to
gravimetric, titrimetric and electroanalyti-
cal methods. Introduction to quality control
and quality assurance.
ch252l
organic chemistry II lab
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Organic Chemistry II lab introduces vacuum
distillation techniques while continuing with
selected synthetic reactions which illustrate
those covered in Organic Chemistry II the-
ory. The techniques of TLC, GC and HPLC are
used to perform both qualitative and quanti-
tative analyses of organic components.
ch252t
organic chemistry II theory
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Organic Chemistry II theory begins with
an introduction to the basic principles and
instrumentation for gas chromatography
and high pressure liquid chromatography
as well as the interpretation of chromato-
graphic data. It is followed by a review and
expansion of the topics covered in Organic
Chemistry I. This includes the nomencla-
ture, structure, physical properties, chemi-
cal properties and uses of alkanes, alkenes,
alkynes, aromatics, organic halides, organo-
metallics, alcohols, ethers, phenols, thiols,
sulfdes and amines. The course then con-
tinues with an investigation of compounds
containing aldehyde, ketone, carboxylic
acid, amide, ester, acid halide and anhydride
functional groups.
ch280l
physical chemistry lab
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Laboratory work includes experiments
based on the topics described in CH280T.
ch280t
physical chemistry theory
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course covers the theory and calcula-
tions pertaining to ideal and real gases, the
liquid state, phase diagrams, immiscible
and partially miscible mixtures, distillation
of both azeotropic and non azeotropic so-
lutions, colligative properties, adsorption,
reaction kinetics and the frst, second and
third laws of thermodynamics.
seMester 3
ch332t
sample and laboratory
Management theory
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course covers the application of labo-
ratory management and sampling practices
used by industry. The following topics are
covered: Introduction to Quality Assurance,
TQM, ISO 9000, GMP and GLP, Introduc-
tion to Sampling, Sampling Statistics, Size
Reductions - Solids, Screening Equipment,
Mass Reduction, Moisture in Solids, Sam-
pling of Metals, Dust Sampling, Liquid Sam-
pling and Gas Sampling.
ch333l
Industrial Inorganic chemistry lab
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Laboratory work provides exposure to prac-
tical bench scale experiments dealing with a
number of unit operations and simulations
of manufacturing processes. Wet chemical
analyses and stoichiometric calculations are
used to evaluate the purity of the student’s
products.
ch333t
Industrial Inorganic chemistry
theory
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
The theory covers the application of sample
preparation, material balances, fow charts,
some of the most common unit operations
and the manufacturing process of selected
inorganic compounds.
ch341l
oil, gas and coal chemistry lab
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Laboratory work includes the standard
ASTM tests on gasolines, diesel fuels, avia-
tion fuels, lubricating oils, bitumens and
greases. Also included are some of the rep-
resentative tests on coal.
ch341t
oil, gas and coal chemistry theory
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course deals with the production and
processing of conventional crudes, natural
gas, heavy oils, bitumen and coal. The pro-
duction, properties and uses of fuels and lu-
bricants from these sources is emphasized.
ch355l
Biochemistry lab
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
The experiments are designed to examine
various properties of the different types of
biomolecules discussed in CH 355T and
how different techniques can be applied
to the study of these molecules. The ex-
periments performed will include protein
purifcation techniques, isolation of cellular
components, various forms of chromatog-
raphy and electrophoresis.
111 www.nait.ca
ch355t
Biochemistry theory
Hours: 18 Credits: 1.0
This course is an introduction to the chem-
istry of life. The course begins with an over-
view of essential life processes. The main
part of the course focuses on the four major
classes of biomolecules found in living sys-
tems. The first three of these classes are
the lipids, the carbohyrates and the nucleic
acids. In these classes, structure, properties
and function will be discussed. The fourth
class, amino acids and proteins, will be
studied more in depth and will also include
a discussion on enzymes and protein purif-
cation. The course will conclude with a unit
on energy and metabolism.
ch361l
Instrumental Analysis I lab
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This laboratory course introduces gas and
liquid chromatographic techniques. The
experiments performed in the laboratory
include chromatographic injections, mea-
surement of column effciencies, tempera-
ture programming, gradient elution as well
as qualitative and quantitative analysis. The
applications of computers in the analytical
laboratory are introduced.
ch361t
Instrumental Analysis I theory
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces the basic theory be-
hind chromatographic separations. The top-
ics emphasized within the felds of gas and
liquid chromatography will be instrumenta-
tion, column theory, methods of qualitative
and quantitative analysis and the application
of these techniques to various separation
problems. Supercritical fuid chromatogra-
phy, capillary electrophoresis and recent de-
velopments in sample preparation unique to
the separation sciences are explained.
ch362l
Instrumental Analysis II lab
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This laboratory course contains experi-
ments designed to interrelate with and sup-
port the theory areas covered: path length
and concentration effects on absorbance;
analytical error determination; unknown
sample analysis; specialized applications
such as turbidimetry and fluorometry; in-
strumentation calibration checks on wave-
length and absorbance; investigation of
absorbance spectra of some visible-absorb-
ing and some UV absorbing compounds.
NMR sample preparation, IR sample prepa-
ration, instrument operation parameters
and sample identifcation are introduced.
ch362t
Instrumental Analysis II theory
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The theory involves the introductory aspects
of photometry and spectro photometry.
Beer’s Law applications and instrumen-
tal techniques as applied in the ultraviolet
and visible light portions of the spectrum.
Energy interaction with electrons in these
regions is studied, with the emphasis on
molecular absorption. Energy absorption
by nuclei under the infuence of a magnetic
feld is also considered. Components of an-
alytical instruments used in UV, visible and
IR are examined with respect to their con-
tribution to instrument performance and
with cross-reference to electronics theory.
Quantitative analytical applications are
stressed and some qualitative techniques
and applications are introduced.
ch370l
food and Agricultural Analysis lab
Hours: 33 Credits: 2.0
The course gives the student practical ex-
perience in doing pH, moisture, ash, fat,
protein, dairy, vitamin, standard canola and
soil analyses.
ch370t
food and Agricultural Analysis
theory
Hours: 22 Credits: 1.5
The course deals with chemical analyses of
food and agricultural products. Topics in-
clude an introduction to food analysis, pH
determinations, proximate analysis of a va-
riety of foods, specifc methods of analyses
of dairy products, vitamins, carbohydrates,
lipids and canola, soil analyses and sensory
evaluation.
electives
ch300
co-operative work experience in
chemical technology
Hours: 500 Credits: 8.0
Several Engineering Technology Programs
at NAIT offer an optional 16 week co-op
work experience term between second and
third semester. The number of positions
available for each Work Experience term
will be determined by the participating em-
ployer prior to commencement of Semester
2. Prerequisites require the successful com-
pletion of second semester with a minimum
grade point average of 65%. Eligibility does
not guarantee participation.
seMester 4
Bss451
food Microbiology
Hours: 25 Credits: 1.5
Introduction to microorganisms and the
role they play in the food environment. Top-
ics include morphology and fne structure of
bacteria, microbial growth and its control,
classifcation and identifcation of bacteria,
food spoilage and preservation, food pro-
duction and food-related diseases. Lab skills
will include use and care of a compound
microscope, preparation of media, culture
techniques for bacteria, staining, standard
plate counts and biochemical tests for iden-
tifcation of bacteria.
Bss452
Molecular Biology
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
Introduction to nucleic acids and recombi-
nant DNA technology. Topics will include
DNA structure and replication, transcription
and translation, recombinant DNA technol-
ogy and its applications. Lab skills include
plasmid extraction, Quantitation of nucleic
acids, agarose gel electrophoresis, transfor-
mation, PCR and hybridization simulations.
Bss453
Immunology
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
Introduction to structure and function of
the immune system. Topics will include
structural differences of classes of antibod-
ies, production of antibodies, immunity and
immunization, immunological methodology
and applications. Lab skills include Western
blots, radial immunodiffusion assay, ELISA
and electrophoretic assays.
ch422t
Industrial hygiene II
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Industrial Hygiene II is a continuation and
extension of Industrial Hygiene I and in-
cludes a review of WHMIS legislation with
emphasis on: flammable, corrosive and
toxic materials; radiation hazards; electrical
hazards; cryogenics; chronic toxins (includ-
ing carcinogens and mutagens); storage
and disposal of chemicals; discussions of
accident investigation, safety audits and
risk analysis; and the Occupational Health
and Safety Act as it applies to the chemical
worker. Students will get practical experi-
ence using a fre extinguisher. The emphasis
of the course is on the work environment of
the Chemical Technologist.
112 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
ch463l
Instrumental Analysis III lab
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This laboratory course includes experimen-
tal examples of qualitative and quantitative
applications of atomic absorption, atomic
emission, potentiometry, polarography, am-
perometry, coulometry and conductimetry.
ch463t
Instrumental Analysis III theory
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This theory course is a continuation of In-
strumental Analysis II and includes material
on atomic emission and atomic absorption
techniques, methodology and evalua-
tion. Analytical techniques such as x-ray
spectroscopy and electron microscopy are
discussed in some detail. Also included is
information on selected electrochemical
techniques such as potentiometry, conduc-
timetry, coulometry and voltammetry.
ch464l
Advanced Analytical chemistry lab
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This laboratory course exposes the student
to advanced analytical methods utilizing
computer controlled instrumentation and
demonstrates aspects of quality control
procedures. Lab work in gas and liquid chro-
matography, utilizing a variety of detectors,
includes capillary GC and integrator appli-
cations in GC and HPLC. The functions of
the integrator are thoroughly examined in
this lab course and include the generation of
custom reports using external spreadsheet
programs. Experiments in fameless atomic
absorption, ICP, GC mass spectrometry and
Fourier Transform infra-red spectrometry
are also covered.
ch464t
Advanced Analytical chemistry
theory
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This theory course emphasizes the role of
the computer in the laboratory. Topics cov-
ered include the function and application
of the computing integrator and data sys-
tem in chromatography and an overview of
computer control of instrumental functions
in various instruments. Major emphasis is
directed toward the role of the computers in
GC mass spectrometry and Fourier Trans-
form infrared spectrometry applications.
The hardware and software considerations
involved in the interfacing of instruments to
a computer, the topologies and operation of
local area networks and the application of
the computer in various Fourier Transform-
based instruments are explained.
ch471l
environmental chemistry lab
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course consists of the application of
analytical methods used in monitoring air
and water quality. Both laboratory and feld
analytical methods will be used.
ch471t
environmental chemistry theory
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course begins with a discussion of the
atmosphere and meteorology followed by
a study of atmospheric pollution. Freshwa-
ter systems and the hydrological cycle are
studied, followed by a discussion of water
pollution. The interaction of the air and wa-
ter systems is emphasized. Other specifc
topics relating to pollution of the environ-
ment will be covered. These topics include
pesticides, groundwater, the pulp and paper
industry, pollution of the Great Lakes and
environmental legislation.
ch490l
project Management
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is designed to develop skills
in project management using literature
searches, budgeting, purchasing, experi-
mental design and reporting of results.
Proposals and contracts, networking and
job search techniques are included. Qual-
ity management and teamwork skills will be
emphasized.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
An Alberta High School Diploma or equiva-
lent, including English 30 or 33, one of: Ap-
plied Math 30, Pure Math 30, Math 30 or
Math 33 and Chemistry 30.
Successful completion of NAIT’s Pre-Tech-
nology Certifcate Program (Stream Two) is
acceptable.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
An interest in physics and normal colour
vision are definite assets for students en-
tering this program. A career investigation
report is required.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
A career investigation should accompany an
application for the program. This report helps
ensure that applicants have completed ade-
quate research on both NAIT’s Program and
the careers that follow graduation. Informa-
tion that can be accumulated for this career
investigation from various areas: someone
working in the occupation that interests you,
NAIT Open House, the Buddy Student Pro-
gram and work experience.
advanced/transFer credit
After admission into the 1st year of the pro-
gram, students wanting advanced credit
should contact Ted Ondrus, Associate
Chair in order to receive up to 50% of the
program through advanced credit. Contact
should be made as early as possible.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
First Year Laboratory facilities include:
General Inorganic, Organic and •
Quantitative Analyses Laboratories
Physical Chemistry Laboratory •
Second Year Laboratory facilities include:
Instrumental Chromatography •
Laboratory
Instrumental Spectroscopy Laboratory •
Environmental Laboratory •
Biochemistry Laboratory •
Oil Chemistry Laboratory •
Food Analysis Laboratory •
Industrial Chemistry Laboratory •
Biochemistry Laboratory •
Microbiology, Molecular Biology and •
Immunology Laboratory
- All laboratories are computer networked
with access to the internet.
BuildinG location(s)
Main Campus
Centre for Chemical Studies - G-wing
NAIT Campus Map
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: In the frst year, a student spends ap-
proximately 16 hours per week in theory
courses and 14 hours per week in the labo-
ratory. Emphasis is on the acquisition of ba-
sic laboratory techniques using standard lab
equipment. The theory introduces students
to the various felds of chemistry including
inorganic, organic, physical and analytical,
with support courses in mathematics, phys-
ics and english.
113 www.nait.ca
In the second year of the program, students
are offered theory and hands-on experience
in the use of modern laboratory instrumen-
tation, computer applications and special-
ized content in oil, food, environmental
and industrial chemistry. The second year
is more laboratory oriented and students
spend approximately 18 hours a week in the
lab and 12 hours a week in the classroom.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 10-20 hours
per week
co-op & Work experience
Salary: The average salary of year 2006
graduates, nine months after graduation,
was $3000/month.
Dates: Effective Date: 07/01/2007
Length: CH300 - Co-Operative Work Expe-
rience in Chemical Technology
Hours: 500
Type of experience: Several Co-operative
work experience opportunities are avail-
able each year for chemical technology
students who have successfully completed
two or three semesters of full time study.
The number of positions available for each
Work Experience term is determined by the
participating employers. Prerequisites re-
quire the successful completion of all frst
year chemical technology program courses.
Eligibility does not guarantee participation.
Relocation: Relocation is not required for
the majority of co-operative students.
Who facilitates the placement:
Denise Wenzel
NAIT Career Services
471-8899
denisew@nait.ab.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a half day teamed with Chemical Techology
students, to attend classes and laboratory
sessions, to ask questions and experience
NAIT frst hand.
Cindy Rothwell, Instructor
(780) 471-7762
Fax: (780) 471-7757
cindyr@nait.ca
Contact: Ms. Cindy Rothwell directly for
more information.
inFo sessions
Held annually in the frst week of February.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Chemical Technology
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Chemical Technology students and gradu-
ates are eligibe for membership in the fol-
lowing organizations:
Association of Science and Engineering •
Technology Professionals of Alberta -
ASET
Canadian Society for Chemical •
Technology - CSCT
Chemical Institute of Canada - CIC •
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Successful graduates of the program have
good attention to detail and scientifc hon-
esty. They have developed the ability to
record, analyse and report laboratory re-
sults using procedures developed to ensure
quality assurance and quality controls are
maintained.
Major skills acQuired
Graduates have acquired theoretical and
laboratory skills in organic and inorganic
synthesis and quantitative and qualitative
analysis using both instrumental and wet
chemical analysis techniques.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Commercial, industrial and government
laboratories.
Past employers have included: Syncrude
Canada, Dow Chemical, Imperial Oil, Petro-
Canada, Raylo Chemicals, Agrium Inc.,
Transalta Utilities, Shell Chemicals, ALS
Laboratory Group (Envirotest), RCMP, Uni-
versity of Alberta, Alberta Food Safety Divi-
sion, and Guardian Chemicals.
career opportunities
Graduates will fnd that employment oppor-
tunities exist for the Chemical Technologist
in a wide range of areas, including:
The chemical industry (manufacture of •
inorganic and organic chemicals such
as mineral acids, soda ash, caustic
soda, fertilizers, explosives, oils, soaps
and plastics)
The petrochemical industry (oil •
refning; synthetic crude oil, fuel and
lubricant manufacture, agricultural
products development and
manufacture)
The environmental analysis feld •
(including commercial laboratories,
government agencies and industrial
monitoring laboratories)
The metallurgical and electro- •
metallurgical recovery of metals
The mining industry (separating and •
concentrating ore-bearing minerals)
The food industry (government •
monitoring agencies, packing plants,
dairies, beverage frms etc.)
Research institutions (including •
industrial R&D laboratories,
government research agencies,
universities, colleges, atomic energy
plants etc.)
Biotechnology laboratories •
Forensic laboratories •
114 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
ciViL enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY
The objective of this program is to provide
students with an education to the level of
Engineering Technologist. Graduates will be
able to assist and contribute in the various
phases of engineering projects. The two-
year, or two and-a-half year Co-Op program
offers the student a thorough education in
theoretical and practical applications in the
broad field of Civil Engineering. Students
have the opportunity to apply microcom-
puters and CADD systems to Civil Engi-
neering problems in the areas of Applied
Research, Structural Design, Urban Services
Design, Project Management, Highway De-
sign, Pavement Design, Geotechnical De-
sign, and Foundation Design.
The Co-Op program is designed to provide
students who have limited or no work his-
tory with a means of acquiring on the job
experience prior to graduation.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks); Co-Op
2.5 years (67 weeks academic training + 48
weeks work experience)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
randy johnson, r.e.t.
Chair
Ph:(780) 471-7087
E-mail: randyj@nait.ca
todd koWalchuk, c.e.t.
Associate Chair
Ph: (780) 471-7096
E-mail: toddk@nait.ca
allan theriault, als, p.enG
Associate Chair
Ph: (780) 471-7099
E-mail: allant@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two Years (four 17-week semesters)
certiFication
Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology,
or Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology
(Co-Op Educational Stream).
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a Technologist by the constitu-
ent associations of the Canadian Council of
Technicians and Technologists.
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
After the frst semester, students may apply
to the Co-Op stream. Selection of Co-Op
students are based on academic perfor-
mance in semester one, and the need for
work experience. Refer to the Civil Co-Op
Technology Program for details.
seMester 1
Ase116
effective communications I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
ASE116 is a specialized and practical course
in engineering workplace communications.
The student will be introduced to major
types of communication that parallel those
encountered in the engineering industry.
Topics include an introduction to the engi-
neering writing processes, organization of
project coordination records, principles and
mechanics of technical writing, and engi-
neering workplace communications.
AsM127
technical Mathematics & statistics
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Identifes the fundamentals of mathematics
enabling the student to solve technological
problems. Students will acquire knowledge
in topics including trigonometric functions,
vectors, triangle solutions, linear and qua-
dratic equations, exponential and logarithmic
functions, and analytic geometry. This course
also introduces the student to statistics and
statistical methods which are commonly
used in engineering. The topics include data
summarization, linear regression, probability,
normal distribution, sampling distributions
and confdence intervals.
cIv110
Mechanics of Materials
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course demonstrates the use of equilib-
rium concepts and vector analysis to com-
pute the forces and moments on structures
and structural components. Determination
of member forces in trusses is covered and
the calculation of centroids and moments of
inertia is introduced.
cIv120
surveying principles
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course introduces the student to basic
surveying principles related to the measure-
ment of distances, angles and positions on
the ground. Mathematical techniques will
be used to analyze and adjust feld data and
to compare the quality of the work to typi-
cally used standards. Particular emphasis
will be placed on feld note format, content,
and use of survey equipment.
cIv140
graphical communications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course includes drawing conventions
and procedures to draw with and manipu-
late manual drafting equipment. The foun-
dational principles are identified to draw
orthographic, cross-section, and profile
drawings. The ability to draw complete
drawings using accepted linework, lettering,
layout and dimensioning techniques, while
adhering to a drafting standard will signify
the basis upon which higher level courses
will continue.
cIv150
soil Mechanics I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is an introduction to basic
geotechnical testing and soil mechanics.
The course covers the basic index testing
of soils and the use of soil as a construc-
tion material. Students will acquire a basic
knowledge of soil sampling by conducting a
hand auger investigation. Students will also
acquire a basic knowledge of soil classifca-
tion, grain size, Atterberg limits, mass-vol-
ume relationship of soils, relative density
of soils, laboratory compaction testing, and
feld compaction control.
115 www.nait.ca
cIv160
computer Applications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will apply the basic skills nec-
essary to function on a microcomputer in
the Microsoft Windows environment. This
course also involves the application of mi-
crocomputer software to Civil Engineering
Technology. The student will solve practical
Civil Engineering Technology problems us-
ing various computer software programs.
cIv170
technology Management
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course is an introduction to manage-
ment as seen through the eyes of a Tech-
nologist. It deals with topics that investigate
the technologist’s role in the Environment,
Ethics, Society and Occupational Safety.
The Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and
Labour Law will be studied. WHMIS, safety
in the workplace, and management tech-
niques will be introduced.
cIv171
emergency first Aider
Hours: 8 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to qualify students
to receive a certificate as an Emergency
First Aider as described in Alberta’s Occu-
pational Health and Safety Regulations.
cIv172
whMIs
Hours: 2 Credits: 1.0
Covers the legislation of “workplace haz-
ardous materials information system”. It
is a system developed to make it easier for
workers to fnd out about materials in their
workplace that could injure them or be det-
rimental to their health.
seMester 2
Ase223
effective communications II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
In ASE223, students will apply and expand
the skills acquired in ASE116 to work with
information relevant to the field of Civil
Engineering. The course covers job search
communications, meetings, reports, and
oral presentations. Students will also learn
applied research skills that they will need
for a technical project to be done in CIV300
and CIV400 (second year). These skills in-
clude proposal writing, research, documen-
tation, and technical presentation.
cIv210
structural Analysis
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Topics include the calculation of loads on
structural members, shear force and bend-
ing moment diagrams, review of centroids
and moments of inertia, calculation of
stress and strain, beam defections, bending
and shear stresses in beams, long columns,
and combined stresses. Destructive and
non-destructive material testing techniques
are also introduced. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of CIV110.
cIv220
surveying Applications
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course concentrates on surveying
applications related to Civil Engineering
Technology. Total station technology will be
used to capture feld data and to place con-
struction stakes. The student will develop
skills associated with curve and coordinate
geometry calculations; route surveys, topo-
graphic surveys and municipal surveys. An
introduction to GPS, GIS, coordinate sys-
tems and township/range land description
systems will be provided. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of CIV 120.
cIv230
pavement Materials testing
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is an introduction to pave-
ment materials testing. The course covers
aggregates and their uses as construction
materials. Topics include: granular base
course, Portland Cement concretes, asphalt
concrete, and soil cement applications. The
students will acquire a basic knowledge of
testing and sampling materials for compli-
ance with industry specifcations. Prerequi-
site: Successful completion of CIV 150
cIv245
AutocAd
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This is a course in computer assisted draft-
ing using the latest version of AutoCAD
software. Students will be introduced to the
AutoCAD environment, including program
functionality and applications relating to
civil engineering technology. Students will
begin with basic commands and progress
through to advanced drawing and editing
techniques. Topics include, drawing setup,
draw and modify commands, text, dimen-
sioning, modifying object properties, creat-
ing and inserting blocks, paper space, model
space, layout tab setup, printing, and layer
management. The development of funda-
mental skills required in drawing production
will continue throughout the course.
cIv250
soil Mechanics II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course covers the introduction of
Surficial Geology and the identification
of surfcial land formations and their rela-
tionships to Civil Engineering. It also cov-
ers the introduction to site investigations
using a power auger or drill rig to obtain
soil samples at depth. Topics include soil
identifcation, moisture content, standard
penetration testing, Shelby tube sampling,
and the plotting of borehole logs. Strength
testing is introduced using the unconfned
test, pocket penetrometer, and vane shear
testing. Pre-Requisite: Successful comple-
tion of CIV 150.
cIv270
estimating I
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course introduces the student to an un-
derstanding of basic fnancial planning and
decisions of economic choice. The student
will develop knowledge and skills required
to evaluate cash fows, annuities and loans
that are essential for the budgeting of en-
gineering activities. The ability to complete
quantity estimates, price budget schedules,
and project costing is required in many ar-
eas of Civil Engineering. The methods pre-
sented are intended to represent a process
which can be adapted to many types of
construction estimating used across a wide
variety of construction works.
cIv290
fluid Mechanics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course will introduce principles of fuid
mechanics and apply these principles to
practical problems. Content includes the
study of static fuids and pressurized fow.
Content related to static fuids emphasize
the areas of fluid properties, pressure-el-
evations relationships, density, force distri-
butions on plane and curved surfaces, and
buoyancy. Content related to pressurized
fow include Bernoulli’s equation, General
Energy equation, viscosity, laminar and
turbulent fow, energy losses due to friction
and fttings, series and parallel pipeline sys-
tems, and pump selection.
116 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
seMester 3
AsM327
technical Mathematics II (calculus)
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course uses, with technical applica-
tions the fundamental principles of basic
differential and integral calculus.
cIv300
Applied research I
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course will reinforce many topics cov-
ered in the 1st year Effective Communication
courses and give the student experience in
researching, organizing, monitoring, and
documenting a long-term technical proj-
ect. The course objective is to obtain all the
material needed for the Applied Research
II course, where the student will produce,
present and defend a technical report to the
level of the National Standards for Applied
Science an Engineering Technologies.
cIv310
structural steel design
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
The prerequisite is CIV210. This course
covers the properties of structural steel, the
analysis and design of structural steel com-
ponents such as beams, columns, tension
members, connections, base plates and
bearing plates, and the design and com-
parison of foor systems using concrete and
steel decking. Shop drawings are analyzed
and working drawings are prepared using
AutoCAD. The CISC Handbook of Steel
Construction is used as a design reference.
cIv315
structural wood design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The prerequisite for this course is CIV210.
This course covers design and analysis of
wood structural components using sawn
lumber and glulam. Topics include joists,
timber beams, built-up-beams, glulam
beams, tension members, columns and
connections. Lateral pressure on formwork
due to fresh concrete is also covered. The
CWC Wood Design Manual is used as a de-
sign reference.
cIv320
highway design I
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course applies the survey theory and
field procedures covered in CIV120 and
CIV220. General subject areas include
highway capacity and level of service, route
selection, highway design standards, hori-
zontal spiral curve and vertical curve design
procedures, superelevation of horizontal
curves and combinations of horizontal and
vertical alignments. Engineering computer
software will be utilized for various aspects
of the course. Classroom work assignments
include the calculations, drawings and sur-
veying preparation for a highway project.
There may be a limited number of feld as-
signments. Prerequisite: Successful comple-
tion of CIV 220
cIv330
concrete & Asphalt design
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course covers the materials, proper-
ties, construction, and design of mixes for
Portland and Asphalt cement concrete. Trial
mixes are designed, batched, and tested for
compliance with specifcations.
cIv350
geotechnical design
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
The course includes geotechnical investi-
gations and measurement of soil proper-
ties. Topics include subsurface exploration,
logging, soil description, soil sampling, and
in-place measurement of soil properties. Un-
disturbed sampling and soil testing such as
unconfned compression, direct shear, con-
solidation, and permeability are included.
cIv370
estimating II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Students will expand their understanding of
the construction cost estimating process.
Students will work with examples and ex-
planations that will comprise small build-
ing projects of minimal complexity so the
student can concentrate on the techniques
involved rather than unraveling detail. Stu-
dents will also use microcomputer software
in the estimation process by working on a
series of projects. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of CIV 270.
cIv395
surface hydrology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course will introduce topics related to
hydrology and municipal engineering. Con-
tent related to hydrology will include stud-
ies related to the statistical analysis of data
for precipitation and stream fow generated
from storm and food events. Content related
to municipal engineering will include the de-
sign of open channels and culverts for rural
areas and storm sewers for urban areas.
seMester 4
cIv400
Applied research II
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course objective is the preparation,
production, presentation, and defense of a
formal technical report based on the infor-
mation gathered and documented in Ap-
plied Research I. It includes oral progress
reports, consultative sessions with instruc-
tors, final revisions of parts of the report,
and a fnal bound formal report according to
the National Standards for Applied Science
and Engineering Technologies. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of CIV 300
cIv410
structural reinforced concrete
design
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
The prerequisites are CIV310 and CIV315.
This course covers the analysis, design and
detailing of elements in reinforced con-
crete buildings. The elements include slabs,
beams, columns, walls, foundations and
stairs.
cIv420
highway design II
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is a continuation of the High-
way Design I course CIV/CVC320. This
course introduces the student to highway
cross-section elements and earthworks as-
sociated with highway design and construc-
tion. General topics include: cross-section
design and end area determination, earth-
works (volumes), mass haul quantities, and
diagrams, truck haul quantities and highway
engineering drafting. Engineering computer
software will be utilized for various aspects
of the course. Class assignments include
calculations and drafting. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of CIV/CVC320
117 www.nait.ca
cIv430
pavement design
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course encompasses pavement thick-
ness design, condition evaluation, main-
tence, and remedial techniques used in the
pavement industry.
cIv450
foundation design
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
The frst part of the course deals with the
principles of shallow and deep foundation
design, installation, and inspection of foun-
dations. The second part deals with soil
pressure determination and analysis and
design of retaining walls.
cIv470
project Management
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course introduces the student to the
concepts and principles of project man-
agement and engineering law. Within the
project management section of the course,
the student is introduced to topics such as
project planning, tendering, scheduling, and
inspecting. The origins of Canadian Law, the
court system, tort law, and contract law are
topics discussed in the engineering law sec-
tion of the course.
cIv490
urban services design
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course will entail the concepts of urban
planning, preliminary and detailed engi-
neering design, engineering management,
and environmental considerations required
for urban subdivision development. Top-
ics include: specifications, contracts and
administration of subdivision works, street
grades, curb, gutter and sidewalk design, lot
grading, water-works, storm and sanitary
sewer design, municipal infrastructure test-
ing and inspection, and water and wastewa-
ter treatment.
cIv495
urban services design - cAdd
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course involves the application of de-
sign concepts learned in CIV 490 - Urban
Services Design to produce a comprehen-
sive set of municipal subdivision plans in
accordance with City of Edmonton Servic-
ing Standards. Students will expand on their
intermediate level AutoCAD training to
include the latest version of Autodesk Civil
3D software. Topics include: project setup
and management, drawing settings, point,
line and curve creation using coordinate
geometry (cogo), importing and exporting
points, alignment settings and creation, sta-
tioning, line and curve styles, labels, tags,
tables, and inquiry commands.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
English 30 or 33, Pure Mathematics 30 or
successful completion of Transitional Math-
ematics 101 or Algebra 35 (65%), and one
of: Science 30, Physics 30, or Chemistry 30.
An interest in, and an aptitude for applied
sciences, especially those with a physics
base, is a defnite asset to anyone consider-
ing this program.
Priority will be given to students entering
with Pure Math 30. Applicants presenting
Applied Math 30 may be assessed and up-
grading may be required.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Applicants will apply to the regular Civil En-
gineering Technology program. After com-
pletion of semester one, 30 students will
be selected for the Co-Op stream based on
academic achievement and need for work
experience.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a mandatory
report applicants prepare as part of the stu-
dent selection process for many of our over-
subscribed full-time programs at NAIT
advanced/transFer credit
For students already accepted into the pro-
gram and who are interested in applying for
advanced credit please complete the at-
tached form and submit to randyj@nait.ca .
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classroom lecture
Computer labs
Geotechnical labs
Field Surveying exercises
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 30 hours
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: Varies - 15-45
Hours per week
co-op & Work experience
Dates: May through October.
Length: Two - 24 week components
Type of experience: The scope of work
may include the areas of planning, design,
testing, inspection, supervision, etc.
Salary: Varies - $16-33/hr.
Relocation: Placements are generally in and
around the Edmonton area, but have been
as far away as Terrace B.C., or Yellowknife,
N.W.T.
Who facilitates the placement:
Terry Bajer, RET, CIM
Ph: (780) 471-7085
E-mail: tbajer@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
118 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day attending classes and laboratory
sessions, to ask questions, and experience
NAIT frst hand.
For information please contact:
Connie O’Leary
Ph: (780) 471-8910
e-mail: connieo@nait.ca
inFo sessions
Evening information sessions are usually
held during the frst week of February.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology or
Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology
(Co-Op Educational Stream).
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Graduates are eligible for membership with
The Association of Science and Engineering
Technology Professionals of Alberta.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Design, drafting, surveying, testing, inspec-
tion, and supervision for transportation and
land development projects. Project manage-
ment skills including estimating, scheduling
and supervision. Design and drafting of
wood, steel, and reinforced concrete build-
ings and structures. Applied Research and
presentation techniques of technical docu-
ments using computer applications.
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Refer to The Association of Science and
Engineering Technology Professionals of
Alberta website for further information.
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates wishing to continue their studies
may be granted advance credits at selected
Canadian and American universities. A
NAIT Civil Engineering Technology gradu-
ate can earn a Degree in Engineering in two
years and six weeks at Lakehead University
in Thunder Bay, Ontario, or in two and-a-half
years at the University of British Columbia.
industry support
Co-Op students: placement will be with
consulting engineering frms, civil engineer-
ing departments, and building and infra-
structure contracting frms.
Major skills acQuired
Design and drafting of wood, steel •
and reinforced concrete buildings and
structures.
Design, drafting and surveying for •
transportation and land development
projects.
Design and quality control of soils, •
concrete, and asphalt for engineering
projects.
Project management skills including •
estimating, scheduling and supervision.
Applied Research and presentation •
techniques of technical documents
using computer applications.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Construction companies, government,
municipalities, engineering consulting and
testing frms.
career opportunities
Civil Engineering Technology graduates
find employment in rural and urban envi-
ronments. Their expertise is utilized in of-
fces, laboratories, and construction sites.
Graduates find employment with various
government departments, municipalities,
engineering consultants, general contrac-
tors, and as technical representatives with
manufacturers. The scope of their work may
include the areas of planning, design, draft-
ing, testing, surveying, inspection, construc-
tion supervision, or administration. Civil
engineering projects involve streets, roads
and highways, water and sewage services,
industrial, recreational and commercial
structures. Graduates also find positions
as lab technologists in testing of construc-
tion materials such as soil, concrete, and
asphalt. Estimating, project management,
and computer aided design and drafting are
other areas of employment for civil engi-
neering technologists.
Opportunities for advancement include su-
pervisory or administrative positions such
as construction superintendent, project or
town engineering technologist, technical
supervisor, supervisor of testing services,
chief estimator, project inspector, public
works manager, and technical or specifca-
tion writer.
ciViL enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY cO-OP
The Co-Op program is designed to provide
students who have limited or no work his-
tory with a means of acquiring on the job
experience prior to graduation.
After completion of their frst year of tech-
nical training, students accepted into the
Co-Op program will undertake a work
placement tentatively starting at the begin-
ning of May and running to the end of Oc-
tober. This work placement will be followed
by one 12-week semester and one 13-week
semester of academic study, a second six-
month work placement and a final eight-
week academic semester.
In total there will be 2043 hours, or 67
weeks, of academic training and 48 weeks
of work experience. The Co-Op program is
115 weeks in total duration.
Academic content and career opportunities
mirror the regular two year program.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2.5 years (67 weeks academic training + 48
weeks work experience)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
randy johnson, r.e.t.
Chair
Phone: (780) 471-7087
Fax: (780) 471-7088
e-mail: randyj@nait.ca
todd koWalchuk, c.e.t.
Associate Chair
Phone: (780) 471-7096
e-mail: toddk@nait.ca
allan theriault, als, p.enG
Associate Chair
Phone: (780) 471-7099
e-mail: allant@nait.ca
119 www.nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
certiFication
Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology
(Co-Op Educational Stream).
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a Technologist by the constitu-
ent associations of the Canadian Council of
Technicians and Technologists.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Ase116
effective communications I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
ASE116 is a specialized and practical course
in engineering workplace communications.
The student will be introduced to major
types of communication that parallel those
encountered in the engineering industry.
Topics include an introduction to the engi-
neering writing processes, organization of
project coordination records, principles and
mechanics of technical writing, and engi-
neering workplace communications.
AsM127
technical Mathematics & statistics
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Identifes the fundamentals of mathematics
enabling the student to solve technological
problems. Students will acquire knowledge
in topics including trigonometric functions,
vectors, triangle solutions, linear and qua-
dratic equations, exponential and logarithmic
functions, and analytic geometry. This course
also introduces the student to statistics and
statistical methods which are commonly
used in engineering. The topics include data
summarization, linear regression, probability,
normal distribution, sampling distributions
and confdence intervals.
cIv110
Mechanics of Materials
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course demonstrates the use of equilib-
rium concepts and vector analysis to com-
pute the forces and moments on structures
and structural components. Determination
of member forces in trusses is covered and
the calculation of centroids and moments of
inertia is introduced.
cIv120
surveying principles
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course introduces the student to basic
surveying principles related to the measure-
ment of distances, angles and positions on
the ground. Mathematical techniques will
be used to analyze and adjust feld data and
to compare the quality of the work to typi-
cally used standards. Particular emphasis
will be placed on feld note format, content,
and use of survey equipment.
cIv140
graphical communications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course includes drawing conventions
and procedures to draw with and manipu-
late manual drafting equipment. The foun-
dational principles are identified to draw
orthographic, cross-section, and profile
drawings. The ability to draw complete
drawings using accepted linework, lettering,
layout and dimensioning techniques, while
adhering to a drafting standard will signify
the basis upon which higher level courses
will continue.
cIv150
soil Mechanics I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is an introduction to basic
geotechnical testing and soil mechanics.
The course covers the basic index testing
of soils and the use of soil as a construc-
tion material. Students will acquire a basic
knowledge of soil sampling by conducting a
hand auger investigation. Students will also
acquire a basic knowledge of soil classifca-
tion, grain size, Atterberg limits, mass-vol-
ume relationship of soils, relative density
of soils, laboratory compaction testing, and
feld compaction control.
cIv160
computer Applications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will apply the basic skills nec-
essary to function on a microcomputer in
the Microsoft Windows environment. This
course also involves the application of mi-
crocomputer software to Civil Engineering
Technology. The student will solve practical
Civil Engineering Technology problems us-
ing various computer software programs.
cIv170
technology Management
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course is an introduction to manage-
ment as seen through the eyes of a Tech-
nologist. It deals with topics that investigate
the technologist’s role in the Environment,
Ethics, Society and Occupational Safety.
The Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and
Labour Law will be studied. WHMIS, safety
in the workplace, and management tech-
niques will be introduced.
cIv171
emergency first Aider
Hours: 8 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to qualify students
to receive a certificate as an Emergency
First Aider as described in Alberta’s Occu-
pational Health and Safety Regulations.
cIv172
whMIs
Hours: 2 Credits: 1.0
Covers the legislation of “workplace haz-
ardous materials information system”. It
is a system developed to make it easier for
workers to fnd out about materials in their
workplace that could injure them or be det-
rimental to their health.
seMester 2
Ase223
effective communications II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
In ASE223, students will apply and expand
the skills acquired in ASE116 to work with
information relevant to the field of Civil
Engineering. The course covers job search
communications, meetings, reports, and
oral presentations. Students will also learn
applied research skills that they will need
for a technical project to be done in CIV300
and CIV400 (second year). These skills in-
clude proposal writing, research, documen-
tation, and technical presentation.
cIv210
structural Analysis
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Topics include the calculation of loads on
structural members, shear force and bend-
ing moment diagrams, review of centroids
and moments of inertia, calculation of
stress and strain, beam defections, bending
and shear stresses in beams, long columns,
and combined stresses. Destructive and
non-destructive material testing techniques
are also introduced. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of CIV110.
120 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
cIv220
surveying Applications
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.0
This course concentrates on surveying
applications related to Civil Engineering
Technology. Total station technology will be
used to capture feld data and to place con-
struction stakes. The student will develop
skills associated with curve and coordinate
geometry calculations; route surveys, topo-
graphic surveys and municipal surveys. An
introduction to GPS, GIS, coordinate sys-
tems and township/range land description
systems will be provided. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of CIV 120.
cIv230
pavement Materials testing
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is an introduction to pave-
ment materials testing. The course covers
aggregates and their uses as construction
materials. Topics include: granular base
course, Portland Cement concretes, asphalt
concrete, and soil cement applications. The
students will acquire a basic knowledge of
testing and sampling materials for compli-
ance with industry specifcations. Prerequi-
site: Successful completion of CIV 150
cIv245
AutocAd
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This is a course in computer assisted draft-
ing using the latest version of AutoCAD
software. Students will be introduced to the
AutoCAD environment, including program
functionality and applications relating to
civil engineering technology. Students will
begin with basic commands and progress
through to advanced drawing and editing
techniques. Topics include, drawing setup,
draw and modify commands, text, dimen-
sioning, modifying object properties, creat-
ing and inserting blocks, paper space, model
space, layout tab setup, printing, and layer
management. The development of funda-
mental skills required in drawing production
will continue throughout the course.
cIv250
soil Mechanics II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course covers the introduction of
Surficial Geology and the identification
of surfcial land formations and their rela-
tionships to Civil Engineering. It also cov-
ers the introduction to site investigations
using a power auger or drill rig to obtain
soil samples at depth. Topics include soil
identifcation, moisture content, standard
penetration testing, Shelby tube sampling,
and the plotting of borehole logs. Strength
testing is introduced using the unconfned
test, pocket penetrometer, and vane shear
testing. Pre-Requisite: Successful comple-
tion of CIV 150.
cIv270
estimating I
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course introduces the student to an un-
derstanding of basic fnancial planning and
decisions of economic choice. The student
will develop knowledge and skills required
to evaluate cash fows, annuities and loans
that are essential for the budgeting of en-
gineering activities. The ability to complete
quantity estimates, price budget schedules,
and project costing is required in many ar-
eas of Civil Engineering. The methods pre-
sented are intended to represent a process
which can be adapted to many types of
construction estimating used across a wide
variety of construction works.
cIv290
fluid Mechanics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course will introduce principles of fuid
mechanics and apply these principles to
practical problems. Content includes the
study of static fuids and pressurized fow.
Content related to static fuids emphasize
the areas of fluid properties, pressure-el-
evations relationships, density, force distri-
butions on plane and curved surfaces, and
buoyancy. Content related to pressurized
fow include Bernoulli’s equation, General
Energy equation, viscosity, laminar and
turbulent fow, energy losses due to friction
and fttings, series and parallel pipeline sys-
tems, and pump selection.
seMester 3
cvc399
work eXperIeNce
Hours: 960 Credits: 14.0
seMester 4
AsM327
technical Mathematics II (calculus)
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course uses, with technical applica-
tions the fundamental principles of basic
differential and integral calculus.
cvc300
Applied research I
Hours: 12 Credits: 1.0
This course will reinforce many topics cov-
ered in the 1st year Effective Communication
courses and give the student experience in
researching, organizing, monitoring, and
documenting a long-term technical proj-
ect. The course objective is to obtain all the
material needed for the Applied Research
II course, where the student will produce,
present, and defend a technical report to
the level of National Standards for Applied
Science an Engineering Technologies.
cvc310
structural steel design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The prerequisite is CIV210. This course
covers the properties of structural steel, the
analysis and design of structural steel com-
ponents such as beams, columns, tension
members, connections, base plates and
bearing plates, and the design and com-
parison of foor systems using concrete and
steel decking. Shop drawings are analyzed
and working drawings are prepared using
AutoCAD. The CISC Handbook of Steel
Construction is used as a design reference.
cvc320
highway design I
Hours: 60 Credits: 4.0
This course applies the survey theory and
field procedures covered in CIV120 and
CIV220. General subject areas will include
highway capacity and level of service, route
selection, highway design standards, hori-
zontal spiral curve and vertical curve design
procedures, superelevation of horizontal
curves and combinations of horizontal and
vertical alignments. Engineering computer
software will be utilized for various aspects
of the course. Classroom work assignments
include the calculations, drawings and sur-
vey preparation for a highway project. There
may be a limited number of field assign-
ments. Prerequisite: Successful completion
of CIV 220.
121 www.nait.ca
cvc350
geotechnical design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The course includes geotechnical investi-
gations and measurement of soil proper-
ties. Topics include subsurface exploration,
logging, soil description, soil sampling, and
in-place measurement of soil properties. Un-
disturbed sampling and soil testing such as
unconfned compression, direct shear, con-
solidation, and permeability are included.
cvc370
estimating II
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The ability to complete quantity estimates,
price budget schedules and project costs, is
required in many technologist occupations.
This course is for the student who is begin-
ning to learn the process of construction
cost estimating. The method presented is
intended to represent a standard or basic
core, which can be adopted in many types
of construction estimating used across a
wide variety of construction works. Worked
examples and explanations will come from
small building projects of minimal complex-
ity so the student can concentrate on the
technique involved rather than unraveling
detail. Students will also use microcom-
puter software in the estimation process by
working on a series of projects. Prerequisite:
Successful completion of CIV 270
cvc395
surface hydrology
Hours: 84 Credits: 5.0
This course will introduce topics related to
hydrology and municipal engineering. Con-
tent related to hydrology will include stud-
ies related to the statistical analysis of data
for precipitation and stream fow generated
from storm and food events. Content related
to municipal engineering will include the de-
sign of open channels and culverts for rural
areas and storm sewers for urban areas.
seMester 5
cvc300A
Applied research I
Hours: 26 Credits: 1.0
This course will reinforce many topics cov-
ered in the 1st year Effective Communication
courses and give the student experience in
researching, organizing, monitoring, and
documenting a long-term technical proj-
ect. The course objective is to obtain all the
material needed for the Applied Research II
course, where the student will produce and
present a technical report to the National
Standard for Applied Science an Engineer-
ing Technologies.
cvc330
concrete & Asphalt design
Hours: 52 Credits: 3.0
This course covers the materials, properties,
construction, and design of mixes for Port-
land and Asphaltic cement concrete. Trial
mixes are designed, batched, and tested for
compliance with specifcations.
cvc410
structural reinforced concrete
design
Hours: 91 Credits: 5.0
The prerequisites are CIV310 and CIV315.
This course covers the analysis, design and
detailing of elements in reinforced con-
crete buildings. The elements include slabs,
beams, columns, walls, foundations and
stairs.
cvc420
highway design II
Hours: 78 Credits: 4.0
This course is a continuation of the High-
way Design I course CIV/CVC320. This
course introduces the student to highway
cross-section elements and earthworks as-
sociated with highway design and construc-
tion. General topics include cross-section
design and end area determination, earth-
works (volumes), mass haul quantities, and
diagrams, truck haul quantities and highway
engineering drafting. Engineering computer
software will be utilized for various aspects
of the course. Class assignments include
calculations and drafting. Prerequisite: Suc-
cessful completion of CIV/CVC 320
cvc490
urban services design
Hours: 78 Credits: 4.0
This course will entail the concepts of urban
planning, preliminary and detailed engi-
neering design, engineering management,
and environmental considerations required
for urban subdivision development. Top-
ics include: specifications, contracts and
administration of subdivision works, street
grades, curb, gutter and sidewalk design, lot
grading, water-works, storm and sanitary
sewer design, municipal infrastructure test-
ing and inspection, and water and wastewa-
ter treatment.
cvc495
urban services design - cAdd
Hours: 65 Credits: 4.0
This course involves the application of de-
sign concepts learned in CIV 490 - Urban
Services Design to produce a comprehen-
sive set of municipal subdivision plans in
accordance with City of Edmonton Servic-
ing Standards. Students will expand on their
intermediate level AutoCAD training to
include the latest version of Autodesk Civil
3D software. Topics include: project setup
and management, drawing settings, point,
line and curve creation using coordinate
geometry (cogo), importing and exporting
points, alignment settings and creation, sta-
tioning, line and curve styles, labels, tags,
tables, and inquiry commands.
seMester 6
cvc699
work eXperIeNce
Hours: 960 Credits: 14.0
seMester 7
cvc315
structural wood design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
The prerequisite for this course is CIV210.
This course covers design and analysis of
wood structural components using sawn
lumber and glulam. Topics include joists,
timber beams, built-up-beams, glulam
beams, tension members, columns, and
connections. Lateral pressure on formwork
due to fresh concrete is also covered. The
CWC Wood Design Manual is used as a de-
sign reference.
cvc400
Applied research II
Hours: 24 Credits: 2.0
This course objective is the preparation,
production, presentation, and defense of a
formal technical report based on the infor-
mation gathered and documented in Ap-
plied Research I. It includes oral progress
reports, consultative sessions with instruc-
tors, final revisions of parts of the report,
and a fnal bound formal report according to
National Standards for Applied Science and
Engineering Technologies.
cvc430
pavement design
Hours: 48 Credits: 3.0
This course encompasses pavement thick-
ness design, condition evaluation, mainte-
nance, and remedial techniques used in the
pavement industry.
122 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
cvc450
foundation design
Hours: 56 Credits: 4.0
The frst part of the course deals with the
principles of shallow and deep foundation
design, installation, and inspection of foun-
dations. The second part deals with soil
pressure determination and analysis and
design of retaining walls.
cvc470
project Management
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course introduces the student to the
concepts and principles of project man-
agement and engineering law. Within the
project management section of the course,
the student is introduced to topics such as
project planning, tendering, scheduling, and
inspecting. The origins of Canadian Law, the
court system, tort law, and contract law are
topics discussed in the engineering law sec-
tion of the course.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
selection criteria
Students will apply to the normal Civil En-
gineering Technology program and 30 stu-
dents will be selected during their 1st year
for the Co-Op stream based on academic
achievement and need for work experience.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT.
advanced/transFer credit
Contact for advanced/transfer credit:
Randy Johnson, R.E.T
Program Head
Phone: 471-7087
Email: randyj@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classroom lecture
Computer labs
Geotechnical labs
Field Surveying exercises
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 30 hours
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: Varies - 15-45
hours per week
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
CIV110 Mechanics of Materials CIV120 •
Surveying Principles
co-op & Work experience
Dates: May through October.
Length: Two 24-week components
Type of experience: The scope of work may
include the areas of planning, design, test-
ing, inspection, supervision, etc.
Salary: Varies - $16-33/hr
Relocation: Placements are generally in and
around the Edmonton area, but have been
as far away as Terrace, B.C. or Yellowknife,
N.W.T.
Who facilitates the placement:
Terry Bajer, RET, CIM
Ph: (780) 471-7085
Email: tbajer@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day attending classes and laboratory
sessions, to ask questions, and experience
NAIT frst hand.
For information please contact:
Connie O’Leary
Phone: (780) 471-8910
Email: connieo@nait.ca
inFo sessions
Evening information sessions are scheduled
for the frst week of February.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Civil Engineering Technology
(Co-Op Educational Stream).
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Graduates are eligible for membership
with the The Association of Science and
Engineering Technology Professionals of
Alberta
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Design, drafting and surveying for trans-
portation and land development projects.
Project management skills including esti-
mating, scheduling and supervision. Design
and drafting of wood, steel and reinforced
concrete buildings and structures. Applied
Research and presentation techniques of
technical documents using computer ap-
plications.
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Refer to The Association of Science and
Engineering Technology Professionals of
Alberta website for further information.
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates wishing to continue their studies
may be granted advance credits at selected
Canadian and American universities. A
NAIT Civil Engineering Technology graduate
can earn a Degree in Civil Engineering in two
years and six weeks at Lakehead University
in Thunder Bay, Ontario, or in two and-a-half
years at the University of British Columbia.
industry support
Co-Op students: placement will be with
consulting engineering frms, civil engineer-
ing departments, and building and infra-
structure contracting frms.
proFessional association
courses
Refer to The Association of Science and
Engineering Technology Professionals of
Alberta homepage for further information.
Major skills acQuired
Design and drafting of wood, steel •
and reinforced concrete buildings and
structures.
Design, drafting and surveying for •
transportation and land development
projects.
Design and quality control of soils, •
concrete, and asphalt for engineering
projects.
123 www.nait.ca
Project management skills including •
estimating, scheduling and supervision.
Applied Research and presentation •
techniques of technical documents
using computer applications.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Construction companies, government,
municipalities, engineering consulting and
testing frms.
cnc mAcHinist
tecHniciAn
This program is designed to provide instruc-
tion and practical experience for the student
in conventional machinist training (frst and
second apprenticeship periods). In addition,
this program will provide extensive instruc-
tion in Computer Numerical Control (CNC)
programming and machine operation. The
eight-week work experience component
will provide students an opportunity to ap-
ply their skills and knowledge in an indus-
trial setting by working in a machine shop
or manufacturing plant.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Mechanical & Industrial
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
1 year (4 sessions of 8 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
steWart cook, chair
(780) 471-7810
Fax: (780) 491-3084
stewartc@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
One year (four sessions of 8 weeks each,
plus an eight-week work experience)
certiFication
CNC Machinist Technician Certifcate
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
MAt111
practical 1 shopwork
Hours: 112 Credits: 6.5
The shopwork provides the student with
opportunities to develop skills safe and the
efficient use of machine and hand tools,
measuring and layout tools. The course is
exercise orientated requiring students to
repeatedly produce components. The stu-
dent will use techniques and information
acquired from theory to perform operations
and set-up on lathes, drill presses, pedestal
grinders, and power saws. The student will
also perform any necessary heat treatment
with the use of oxyacetylene equipment,
use a traveler/time sheet in a shop area and
fll out inspection sheets.
MAt113
theory I
Hours: 88 Credits: 5.0
The theory provides information and
techniques necessary for the set-up and
operation of typical machine tools and sup-
port tooling. Students will learn to select,
read and properly use imperial and metric
measuring instruments. Theory includes
concepts pertaining to pedestal grinders,
drilling machines, power saws, and engine
lathes. Concepts such as speeds, feeds,
depth of cut, machine operations, safety
and use of a traveler/time sheet and inspec-
tion sheets in the shop are included.
MAt114
Blueprint reading
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
The student will learn to read/interpret en-
gineering drawing used in the machine shop
and related trades. Studies include ortho-
graphic/isometric projection, section and
auxiliary views, dimensioning systems and
terminology, sketching, part layout, assem-
bly drawing. Correct drawing interpretation
and part visualization allows the student to
plan process such as layout, machining, and
assembly.
MAt115
technical Basic Mathematics
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
The course provides the student with the
knowledge needed to perform trade re-
lated mathematical calculation. Topics in-
clude fractions, decimals, imperial/metric
conversions and calculations, percentage
calculation, algebraic equations, ratio and
proportion and shop related charts and
tables. The student will learn to work with
trade formulas.
MAt121
practical 2 shopwork
Hours: 112 Credits: 6.5
Student will build on the knowledge and skills
learned in Practical 1 Shopwork. The students
will continue to practice manufacturing close
tolerance parts in an exercise-based course.
The exercise/projects will require the stu-
dent to select the correct tooling and de-
velop operating skills on milling machines,
surface and cylindrical grinders, lathes and
drill presses. The student will use indexing
heads, collets sets, steady rests, taper turn-
ing attachments, boring heads.
MAt122
Metallurgy And heat treatment
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
The course studies physical and mechani-
cal properties and characteristics of metals
used in the machining trade. Areas of study
are steel production, identifcation systems,
material testing, the effects of alloying ele-
ments, heat treatment and hardness test-
ing. Lab sessions will enable students to
perform safe proper procedures for heat-
treating and hardness testing.
MAt123
theory 2
Hours: 56 Credits: 3.5
The course includes milling machines, op-
erations, tooling, surface and cylindrical
grinders grinding wheel selection and ad-
vanced lathe operations. The course also
includes theory of advanced threading, API,
carbide tooling selection, and interpretation
and application of reference materials.
124 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
MAt124
Interpreting engineering drawing/
drafting
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
The student will build on the knowledge and
skills to read/interpret engineering drawing
used in the machine ship and related trades.
Studies include interpretation and draw-
ing of orthographic/isometric projection,
section and auxiliary views, dimensioning
systems, terminology, sketching, part lay-
out, assembly drawings, surface finishes,
graphic symbols, geometric toleranceing.
Correct drawing interpretation and part
visualization allows the student to plan
processes such as layout, machining, and
assembly. Drafting skills acquired may be
used to further advance the student in re-
lated areas.
MAt125
technical Advance Mathematics
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
The course provides the student with the
knowledge needed to perform trade related
mathematical calculation. Topics include
the use of fractions, decimals, imperial/
metric conversions and calculations, per-
centage calculation, algebraic equations,
ratio and proportion, special triangles, trigo-
nometric calculations and the use of shop
related charts and tables. The student will
work with trade formulas; determine toler-
ances, fts and areas.
MAt126
Metrology
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
The principals of dimensioning and preci-
sion measurements for machining will be
covered. Topics include calibration of mi-
crometers, vernier calipers, height gauges,
protractors, sine bars, gauge blocks, indica-
tors and comparators.
seMester 2
MAt202
Basic cNc practical
Hours: 112 Credits: 6.5
Students will develop the skills and acquire
knowledge for operations of various CNC
machines. Topics include fundamentals of
machine processes, machine types, part/
tooling set-up, tool identifcation and selec-
tion, program troubleshooting and editing,
graphical verifcation and producing a cor-
rect part with the use of offsets and inspec-
tion. Produce from a drawing and complete
accurate acceptable finished parts using
manual and CNC equipment.
MAt203
Basic cNc theory
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
Covering the fundamentals of machine
processes, machine types, part/tooling set-
up, tool identifcation and selection, trigo-
nometry calculations, process planning,
elementary word address programming,
program editing and testing and graphical
verifcation.
MAt204
Inspection
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
The student will demonstrate an ability to
identify and describe the fundamentals of
linear and angular dimensional metrology,
gauging, direct and indirect reading. Perform
precision measurements and inspection pro-
cedures and produce written reports.
MAt205
AutocAd (Basic)
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
The student will use Auto-Cad to produce
two-dimensional engineering drawings of
mechanical components. Using basic com-
mands for geometric construction, editing
techniques, view controls, object selection,
inquiry, basic dimensioning and creation and
insertion of blocks and text. Produce accu-
rate plots of objects or selected drawings.
MAt206
welding
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course will include various welding
terms, methods and procedures, topics will
include welding symbols, types of welded
joints, and welding machine set-ups. The
student will follow safe procedures when
using oxyacetylene, shielded metal arc, MIG
and TIG welding.
MAt212
Advanced cNc practical
Hours: 112 Credits: 6.5
This course is a continuation of Basic CNC
that is designed for a more in depth under-
standing of the machine language and codes
used in word address programming. The
course will contain manual program writ-
ing with linear and circular interpolation,
repetitive cycles and sub-routines involving
multiple part/machine and set-ups. Machine
operation with compensations and tooling
offsets. Complete process planning includ-
ing drawing, documentation, programming,
set-up sheets, part production, inspection
(TQM) and conversational programming.
MAt213
Advanced cNc theory
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
This course is a continuation of Basic CNC
that is designed for a more in depth un-
derstanding of the machine language and
codes in word address programming. Man-
ual program writing with linear and circular
interpolation, repetitive cycles and sub-rou-
tines involving multiple part/machine and
set ups. Complete process planning includ-
ing drawing, documentation, programming,
set-up sheets, part production and inspec-
tion (TQM).
MAt214
Job search
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
The course will help the student under-
stand employer/employee relations and
the government regulations, which pertain
to the workplace. Job search skills, resume
and cover letters preparation, and interview
techniques. Course will cover blue seal in-
formation such as report writing, documen-
tation, ISO 9000 and other people skills.
MAt215
Master cAM (level 1)
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
The course involves the student in the fun-
damental use of MasterCam software for
the production of CNC machine program-
ming. Students will produce a CAD draw-
ing in 2D geometry then using the CAM
software to defne the tooling and cutting
motions that are required to produce ac-
ceptable parts. The course will include
drawing, work holding methods, cutting
tool, data input, CNC program proving, veri-
fcation, and part production.
MAt216
Mechanical Maintenance hydraulic/
pneumatic systems
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
The combination of practical and theory to
give the student the ability to correctly main-
tain machine shop equipment. The student
will be introduced to basic application of hy-
draulic, pneumatic and power transmissions
devices. The student will learn proper rigging
procedures and applications.
125 www.nait.ca
MAt220
work experience
Hours: 320 Credits: 5.0
The work experience component will give
the student machine shop exposure and
the opportunity to test there newly acquire
skills. The student will be required to spend
eight 40-hour work weeks on a co-opera-
tive job placement. NAIT will organize and
arrange the co-operative placements.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A High School Diploma is no longer re-
quired as a prerequisite for entrance into
NAIT programs however, students should
be aware that some employers may require
a High School Diploma as a prerequisite for
employment.
Grade 10, including English and Math
Last year, successful applicants had a Grade
12 standing in English and Math with a 65%
combined average.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Manual dexterity, able to lift up to 20kg. A
mechanical background would be advanta-
geous to individuals seeking entrance into
the program.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
A standard career investigation is required.
For more information please contact: Ca-
reer Services
advanced/transFer credit
Depending on your academic background,
credits may be advanced. For more infor-
mation please contact:
Stewart Cook, Chair
(780) 471-7810
Fax: (780) 491-3084
stewartc@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Labs include both CNC Turning and Machin-
ing Centres, state-of-the-art computer labs
and programming software, manual lathes,
manual milling machines, drill presses, pre-
cision grinders and heat treating facilities.
BuildinG location(s)
Main Campus, Mechanical Trades Building
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: This program offers both theory and
hands-on shop experience. Combined, stu-
dents can expect a 30 hour in-class work
week.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 15 hours per
week on average. During the 8 week practi-
cum, students are expected to work an av-
erage of 40 hours per week.
co-op & Work experience
Dates: April 27, 2009 - June 19, 2009.
Length: 8 week practicum.
Type of experience: Various machine shop
locations are accessed in Edmonton and
area. Students can expect to work a full 40
hour week and gain experiences in both
CNC and/or manual machine shop work.
Salary: Since this is part of an educational
experience salaries are not paid to work ex-
perience participants.
Relocation: Provisions for relocation are not
made for students seeking placements in
other parts of the province.
Who facilitates the placement:
In consultation with students, a mutually
agreed upon work place site is secured. For
more information please contact:
Stewart Cook, Chair
(780) 471-7810
Fax: (780) 491-3084
stewartc@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Stewart Cook, Chair
(780) 471-7810
Fax: (780) 491-3084
stewartc@nait.ca
inFo sessions
By Appointment, please contact:
Linda Thomson, Administrative Assistant
(780) 471-7833
Fax: (780) 491-3084
lindat@nait.ca
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
CNC Machinist Technician Certifcate
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
People who demonstrate the following
characteristics are generally successful in
the machine shop feld:
Have good hand working skills •
Have good problem solving capabilities •
Are mechanically inclined •
Able to work well with others •
Competent in high school level math •
Demonstrate mature attitudes towards •
learning and work
apprenticeship inForMation
Advanced apprenticeship standing is avail-
able to individuals who after fnding work in
the machine shop industry apply into the
apprenticeship program. For more informa-
tion please call your local Apprenticeship
and Industry Training Offce at: toll free 310-
0000 or locally in Edmonton at 427-8517.
Via the internet @ www.tradesecrets.org
126 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Introduction to Basic Machining •
Industrial Skills (MAC 50)
Basic Machining Centre Operation •
(MAC 201)
Intermediate Machining Centre •
Operations (MAC 202)
Advanced Machining Centre •
Operations (MAC 203)
Basic Turning Centre Operation •
(MAC 301)
Intermediate Turning Centre Operation •
(MAC 302)
Advanced Turning Centre Operations •
(MAC 303)
Machine Shop I (MAC 101) •
Machine Shop II (MAC 112) •
Machine Shop III (MAC 113) •
Machine Shop IV (MAC 114) •
Basic Foundry & Pattern Making •
(MAC 115)
Mastercam Level I - Milling (MC 131) •
Mastercam Level II - Lathe (MC 132) •
advanced credit possiBilities
Depending on academic background, cred-
its may be advanced. For more information
please contact:
Stewart Cook, Chair
(780) 471-7810
Fax: (780) 491-3084
stewartc@nait.ca
proFessional association
courses
Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME)
Major skills acQuired
Machine tool operator for conventional and
CNC machines such as lathes, drill presses,
milling machines and other machine shop
related equipment.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Machine shops, manufacturing plants, en-
gine rebuilding shops, tool and equipment
supply companies, production equipment
repair shops, tool and die, and mould mak-
ing shops.
career opportunities
Graduates of this program may fnd direct
employment in machine shops, manufac-
turing plants or other related felds. Gradu-
ates may have opportunities to become
indentured apprentices with support from
their employers.
cOmBined
LABORAtORY &
X-RAY tecHnOLOGY
The purpose of the Combined Laboratory
and X-Ray Technology program is to serve
the rural community hospitals or health
care centres (15 to 60 beds). The program is
unique in that students are trained in both the
Medical Laboratory and X-Ray disciplines.
On completion of their training, graduates
are able to perform general medical labora-
tory procedures, general diagnostic radio-
graphic procedures and electrocardiograms.
Students also receive training on computers
and information systems in the medical labo-
ratory and diagnostic imaging departments.
The frst year of the Combined Laboratory
and X-Ray Program consists of 38 weeks of
classroom instruction and related practical
laboratory sessions in medical laboratory,
radiography and electrocardiograms
The second year of the program is 36 weeks
in length and is spent at affiliated clinical
training sites in rural Alberta.
NAIT reserves the right of student place-
ment to any of the designated rural training
hospitals affliated with the program. It is im-
portant to note that urban hospitals are not
designated as training hospitals in the Com-
bined Laboratory and X-Ray Program.
A genuine interest in people and their well
being is essential since the technologist is
invariably involved with people who are in
various states of illness or injury. Consider-
ate, tolerant and courteous patient care is as
important a quality as technical profciency.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Health & Safety
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
tiana stuBer
Administrative Assistant
Room F011
NAIT Main Campus
(780) 471-8785
tianas@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years, consisting of 38 weeks at NAIT in
Year 1, followed by a 36-week practicum in a
designated rural training hospital in Year 2.
certiFication
Combined Laboratory and X-Ray Technol-
ogy Diploma
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Asp114
physics
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students learn fundamental principles of
physics that are relevant to radiographic
technology. Includes electricity and mag-
netism, electrical power and circuits, x-ray
beam production, x-ray interactions with
matter, x-ray beam characteristics, and x-
ray emission. Students should be able to
apply basic principles of physics to the op-
eration of radiographic equipment, image
formation and radiation protection.
clX101
specimen collection/handling
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
Information required for the collection, han-
dling and transportation of various labora-
tory specimens to help ensure the quality of
laboratory results will be covered. Emphasis
will be on the collection of blood specimens,
and practice in venous collection on adults
and capillary collection will be provided.
clX102
general laboratory practice
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
The theory and practice required to perform
basic procedures in a laboratory will be
presented. Laboratory glassware, pipettes,
use of balances, centrifuges, thermal equip-
ment, microscopes and solution preparation
with related calculations will be covered.
127 www.nait.ca
clX111
Quality Management
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to provide a complete
overview of methods used to ensure quality
patient care. The emphasis will be on quality
assurance and quality control techniques.
clX115
radiation science & Apparatus I
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course will provide theory and applica-
tion for the function and operation of basic
x-ray generating equipment.
clX130
Image exposure and processing I
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students learn the basis of radiographic im-
age production through analysis of image
recording devices, flm, processors, repeat
analysis programs and artifact production.
clX140
radiographic Anatomy 1
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will enable a student to identify
the skeletal, thoracic, abdominal, and re-
spiratory anatomy in radiographic images.
Topographical anatomy will be discussed to
aid in radiographic positioning.
clX160
radiographic technique I: theory
Hours: 36 Credits: 2.0
Students learn the radiographic positioning
nomenclature and parameters necessary to
perform standard radiographic procedures
of the upper extremities (limb) and shoulder
girdle, lower extremity (limb) and pelvic gir-
dle. Includes image critique methodologies.
clX161
radiographic technique I: practical
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Students will learn to perform standard ra-
diographic procedures of the upper extrem-
ities (limb), including shoulder girdle, and
lower extremities (limb) including pelvic
girdle. The students will become profcient
at critiquing radiographic images and iden-
tifying radiographic anatomy. The course is
designed to develop cognitive, psychomo-
tor and effective skills.
clX170
patient care in radiography I
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course will provide an understanding of
the patient’s physical and emotional needs
and the radiographer’s role in basic patient
care while undergoing medical imaging pro-
cedures. Students learn basic principles of
patient care, assessment, fundamental ele-
ments of ethical practice and medico-legal
issues. This course also includes universal
precautions and protective techniques, body
mechanics and patient movement. Students
will be trained to perform assessments of pa-
tients physical needs including vital signs.
clX211
Analytical principles I
Hours: 54 Credits: 3.0
The principles commonly used for quantita-
tive analysis in clinical laboratories will be
covered. Principles and applications of light
measuring systems, electrochemistry and
instrument processes will be discussed.
hsc103
Anatomy & physiology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course consists of twenty-two mod-
ules that have been designed to develop an
understanding of the structure and function
of organs and systems in the normal human
body. A study of basic chemical principles is
included. Medical terminology is expanded
and pathology is introduced. This course
is intended to extend the learner’s prior
knowledge of high school biology and pro-
vide background awareness of the human
body in health and disease. It is a required
core course for students in the Allied Health
Science Programs at NAIT.
hsc104
Medical terminology (tlM)
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to familiarize the
student with the terminology used in Health
and Medical Sciences.
hsc105
Infection control and safety
Hours: 22 Credits: 1.5
This course deals with transmission of mi-
croorganisms, immunization practices for
healthcare workers, blood-borne pathogens
(Hepatitis and HIV), standard precautions,
isolation procedures, sterilization and disin-
fection, safety and WHMIS.
Mrt125
radiobiology and protection 1
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Students learn radiographic policies, regula-
tions, and procedures for radiation protec-
tion of self, the patient and others based
on the ALARA principle. Includes the ef-
fects of ionizing radiation on body tissues,
protective measures for limiting radiation
exposure to the patient and personnel and
practices of safe application of radiation,
radiation monitoring devices, and radiation
and pregnancy.
seMester 2
clX201
hematology & coagulation I
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course is a study of the production and
function of the normal blood cells (eryth-
rocytes, leukocytes and platelets) and of
some of the procedures performed rou-
tinely in the clinical laboratory, such as the
use of small hematology analyzers and the
evaluation of blood flms. The course also
includes the basic theory and routine tests
for coagulation.
clX202
hemopathology - erythrocytes
Hours: 44 Credits: 2.5
This course is a study of the pathophysiology
of various anemias as related to the labora-
tory involvement in diagnosis and treatment.
Special tests used for differential diagnosis
are included. This information is applied to
the detection of analytical discrepancies and
ensuring timely, valid results.
clX203
hemopathology - leukocytes
Hours: 44 Credits: 2.5
The pathophysiology of blood diseases in-
volving leukocytes as related to the labora-
tory involvement in diagnosis and treatment
will be studied. Special tests used for differ-
ential diagnosis are included. This informa-
tion is applied to the detection of analytical
discrepancies and ensuring timely, valid
results.
clX208
Quality control
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Students learn to perform standard quality
control tests for radiographic equipment
and accessories. Includes analysis and
troubleshooting of common equipment
performance problems. The development
and maintenance of the quality assurance
program in a radiology department is em-
phasized.
128 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
clX213
clinical chemistry
Hours: 94 Credits: 5.5
This course will provide the knowledge and
skills required to perform selected tests for
carbohydrates, electrolytes, enzymes, and
renal and liver functions.
clX215
radiation science and Apparatus II
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
Students learn the principles of operation of
x-ray generators, fuoroscopic equipment,
digital imaging, and PACS.
clX216
electrocardiography
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
The student will review the structure and
function of the heart as related to electro-
cardiography. This will be followed by a
study of the principle and operation of the
electrocardiograph, artifact recognition
and remedies, and arrhythmia recognition.
All this information will enable a student to
perform a 12 lead electrocardiogram using
digital and analog instrumentation.
clX217
urinalysis
Hours: 38 Credits: 2.0
Macroscopic (chemical) and microscopic
evaluation of urine constituents will be
learned.
clX222
professionalism in the workplace
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This introductory course develops the
learners’ understanding of the importance
of effective interpersonal communication
skills and team work in the health care set-
ting. The diverse needs and human relations
posed by the health care clients are also
explored. Students will also analyze their
personal effectiveness related to wellness,
stress management, and nutrition.
clX225
clinical preparation
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course will simulate a core/rural labo-
ratory where the student will be expected
to perform a variety of tests (e.g. Chemistry,
urinalysis, hematology, ECGs, X-rays, etc.)
on a patient. Other topics include the Gram
stain, blood culture collection, pregnancy
test and rheumatoid factor slide test. Stu-
dents will also practice safe patient trans-
fers and modifed radiography procedures.
clX230
Image exposure and processing II
Hours: 26 Credits: 1.5
Students learn to analyze the factors that
control and contribute to the diagnostic qual-
ity of the radiographic image including den-
sity, contrast, recorded detail, and distortion
as well as technical conversions necessary
to maintain image density. Includes radio-
graphic exposure technique chart develop-
ment and sensitometry.
clX240
radiographic Anatomy 2
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Students learn the radiographic anatomy of
the vertebral column, thorax, cranium, and
facial bones. Includes topographical anatomy
as an aid to radiographic positioning.
clX260
radiographic technique II - theory
Hours: 38 Credits: 2.0
Students learn the radiographic positioning
nomenclature and parameters necessary to
perform standard radiographic procedures
of the chest and abdomen, vertebral column,
skull, facial bone. Includes image critique
methodologies, students will also learn the
necessary adaptations required in trauma
radiography.
clX261
radiographic technique II: practical
Hours: 37 Credits: 2.0
Students learn to perform standard radio-
graphic procedures of the chest and abdo-
men, thorax, vertebral column, cranium,
facial bones and necassary adaptions re-
quired in Trauma Radiography. The student
will become proficient at critiquing radio-
graphic images and identifying radiographic
anatomy. This course is designed to develop
cognitive, psychomotor, and affective skills.
clX263
radiographic technique III
Hours: 36 Credits: 2.0
Students learn the radiographic positioning
and methods necessary to perform spe-
cialized radiographic procedures utilized to
demonstrate the respiratory, digestive, bili-
ary and genitourinary systems. Foreign body
localization, arthrography and long bone
measurement will also be studied. Students
learn modified and advanced radiographic
procedures and patient care skills needed
in training situations. The patient care and
procedures used during contrast studies will
be discussed. Emphasis will be placed on
the radiographic appearance of organs and
structures in regards to particular projec-
tions/views.
clX271
patient care in radiography II
Hours: 20 Credits: 1.0
This course will assist the student in provid-
ing the care given to patients undergoing
medical imaging procedures. Students will
be able to describe medications utilized in
the imaging department, and identify signs,
symptoms and responses to different medi-
cal emergencies. The course will also cover
various medical accessory equipment in-
cluding the purpose and precautions with
their use.
seMester 3
clX300
Medical laboratory, practicum
Hours: 602 Credits: 18.0
This course covers the practical component
of the medical laboratory training through
16 weeks of work experience in an assigned
rural hospital. Students will perform proce-
dures in accordance with the competency
based objectives under the supervision of a
registered technologist and CLXT program
faculty.
clX301
Medical laboratory, theory
Hours: 90 Credits: 5.0
Students will review and expand their theo-
retical knowledge of sample collection,
handling, transportation and processing;
urinalysis, clinical chemistry, hematology
and electrocardiography through tutorials,
worksheets, case studies and exams. This
course runs concurrently with CLX 300
Medical Laboratory, Practicum.
seMester 4
clX400
Medical radiography, practicum
Hours: 585 Credits: 17.0
This course covers the practical component
of the medical radiography training through
18 weeks of work experience in an assigned
rural hospital. Students will perform proce-
dures in accordance with the clinical com-
petency outcomes and objectives under the
supervision of a registered technologist and
CLXT program faculty.
clX401
Medical radiography, theory
Hours: 90 Credits: 5.0
Students will review and expand their theo-
retical knowledge of patient care, radio-
graphic anatomy and positioning, quality
control, image processing and film evalu-
ation through tutorials, worksheets, case
studies and exams. This course runs con-
currently with CLX 400 Medical Radiogra-
phy, Practicum.
129 www.nait.ca
clX455
radiographic pathology
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course will enable a student to iden-
tify pathological conditions relative to
radiographic appearance, which projec-
tions/view would best demonstrate them,
and if any adjustments in exposure factors
are necessary. The general process of the
disease will be discussed.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
All applicants must have a minimum aver-
age of 60% or better in each of the follow-
ing courses:
English 30-1 •
Chemistry 30 •
Biology 30 •
Math 30 or Pure Math 30, or Algebra •
35 with 65% or better.
Physics 30 is highly recommended. •
All applicants are encouraged to obtain a
high school diploma as some employers
may still require a high school diploma.
international applicants
As English is the language of instruction in
all programs at the Institute, an adequate
knowledge of written and spoken English
is a prerequisite for admission. Regardless
of country of origin or citizenship status, all
applicants must demonstrate profciency in
the English language prior to acceptance.
This requirement may be demonstrated as
follows: successful completion of the spe-
cifcally named prerequisite English course
or an approved alternative English course
deemed to be equivalent to the specific
English requirement PLUS a minimum
of three years of education in English in
Canada or in a country where English is the
principal language.
Applicants who do not meet this require-
ment will be required to do the following:
a) successfully complete the specifically
named prerequisite English course or an ap-
proved alternative English course deemed
to be equivalent to the specifc English re-
quirement.
b) TOEFL Internet Based Test (TOEFL – iBT)
Applicants must achieve a minimum overall
score of 83 broken down as follows: speaking
component with a minimum of 23; reading
component with a minimum of 20; listening
component with a minimum of 20; and writ-
ing component with a minimum of 20.
If the testing score is based on the older
testing version, Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL), applicants must achieve
a minimum score of 230 and Test of Spoken
English (TSE) must be a minimum of 40.
international Marks
Foreign credentials must be evaluated by
the International Qualifcation Assessment
Services Branch of Alberta Labour (IQAS).
The phone number for IQAS is (780) 427-
2655 or please see IQAS - Information for
International Marks Conversion.
additional reQuireMents
Computer Skills:
In order to be successful in all Diagnostic
Imaging Programs at the Northern Alberta
Institute of Technology basic computer
skills must be acquired by the student prior
to admission to any of the programs. Basic
computer skills are considered to be word
processing, presentation skills (power
point), and e-mail usage. Instructional staff
will expect that students enrolled in these
programs will have these basic skills and
may expect learning, submission of assign-
ments, and some educational interaction to
occur while using the computer.
iMMunizations
A student accepted into the Combined
Laboratory and X-ray Technology program
is required to be immunized for Hepatitis
B. This service will be provided by NAIT
Health Services upon commencement of
the school year. As well, the student must
have documented proof of two red measles
vaccinations or documented proof of immu-
nity. Persons born before 1970 are consid-
ered to have had the disease and therefore
have immunity.
CPR (Level C) and Standard First Aid:
Successful applicants must obtain current
CPR (Level C) and a current Standard First
Aid Certifcate prior to the end of the sec-
ond semester. Please note that any re-certi-
fcation costs to maintain a current First Aid
and Level C CPR certifcate are the respon-
sibility of the student. Please note that CPR
(Level C) must be taken through the Heart
and Stroke Foundation of Canada.
Once an applicant is accepted into the pro-
gram it will be their responsibility to obtain a
criminal record check(security clearance). A
criminal record check (security clearance) is
required three months prior to the student’s
frst practicum rotation. Please note that fail-
ure to clear could prevent the student from
advancing to their practicum experience.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive. The follow-
ing outlines the student selection process:
The pre-requisites will be reviewed •
by the NAIT Registrar’s Offce for
compliance.
Short listing will occur based on •
academic standing (Phase 1).
Final selection (Phase 2) will be based as
follows:
Academics 60% •
Career Investigation Report 40% •
Conditional Acceptance into Program •
Applicants who have been conditionally
accepted into the program with mid-term
marks and/or progress reports will be re-
quired to present fnal marks by mid July in
order to be considered for full program ac-
ceptance.
The average of the fnal marks (in the pro-
gram’s pre-requisite courses) must be equal
to or higher than the average presented in
Phase 1 of the selection process, in order for
the applicant to progress to full acceptance
into the program. Please note that a drop in
the fnal overall average from that presented
on midterm marks, may result in a ranking
change and possible non-acceptance into
the program, as other applicants on the wait
list may present a higher overall ranking.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT.
The applicant must visit a rural hospital
NOT an urban hospital in Edmonton or Cal-
gary as a site visit for the career investiga-
tion report.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Traditional classrooms are used for most
lectures.
Medical Laboratory labs are fully equipped
with glassware, reagents, pipettes, bal-
ances, centrifuges, thermal equipment,
microscopes, automated analyzers, labo-
ratory information system, computers and
electrocardiographs.
The X-Ray lab rooms are fully equipped with
X-Ray units and accessories.
BuildinG location(s)
NAIT Main Campus - F Wing
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 35 hours per week on average.
130 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
During Practicum (Semester 3 and 4,) stu-
dents can expect to work an average of 40
hours per week (hours may include early or
late shifts and some weekends).
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 10-20 hours
per week on average, this increases during
midterm and fnal examinations.
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
continuinG education
HSC103 Anatomy & Physiology •
HSC104 Medical Terminology (TLM) •
HSC105 Infection Control and Safety •
co-op & Work experience
Dates: June 22, 2009 - February 26, 2010
The 36 week practicum consists of 18
weeks in a lab setting and 18 weeks in an
x-ray setting.
Length: Students work 8 hours per day, 5
days per week for 36 weeks during their
clinical component.
Type of experience: The clinical practi-
cum experience for lab encompasses the
theory and the practical components of
Specimen Collection, Hematology, Clinical
Chemistry, Urinalysis and Electrocardiogra-
phy. For x-ray, the theory and the practical
components of Patient Care in Radiology,
Radiobiology, Image Processing and Qual-
ity Management, Radiographic Anatomy,
Radiographic Pathology and Radiographic
Technique.
The practicum includes a comprehensive
review of the student’s theoretical knowl-
edge through quizzes, worksheets, case
studies and exams.
Salary: There is no salary or stipend received
during the clinical placement.
Relocation: The clinical sites are located at
rural hospitals throughout the province of
Alberta.
Who facilitates the placement:
Sharon Veinot (780) 471-8467
sharonv@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
To set up a Buddy Day please call 780-471-
7036.
inFo sessions
Edmonton: Information Sessions will be
held in February 2008.
For further information, see the Prospective
Student section of the NAIT website.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Combined Laboratory and X-Ray Technol-
ogy Diploma
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Successful completion of the CLXT Provin-
cial Examination entitles graduates to reg-
ister with the Alberta College of Combined
Laboratory and X-Ray Technologists (AC-
CLXT). Graduates may only use the name
“Combined Laboratory and X-Ray Tech-
nologists” or the initials “CLXT” if licensed
by the ACCLXT.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Graduates will gain skills in:
The ability to work closely with others •
and demonstration of a sense of
responsibility.
The ability to work well under fast •
paced conditions with accuracy and
good organizational skills. Problem-
solving and critical thinking with an
appreciation for varied and challenging
tasks are also excellent characteristics
for this career.
advanced credit possiBilities
Combined Laboratory and X-Ray Technology
graduates qualify for advanced credit at:
Athabasca University towards Bachelor •
of Administration {(BSc-HS(PD)}and
Bachelor of Science - (Human
Sciences) under review.
Major skills acQuired
General Medical Laboratory •
Procedures
General Diagnostic Radiography •
Electrocardiography •
Clerical and Administrative Practices •
Quality Control •
Interpersonal and Life Skills •
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Rural hospitals, community health care cen-
tres, medical laboratories and diagnostic
imaging departments.
career opportunities
Graduates typically find work in the rural
hospitals, but may also be employed in
other sectors, including health care centres,
medical laboratories and diagnostic imag-
ing departments.
131 www.nait.ca
cOmPuteR
enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY
Welcome,
Computers are playing an ever-increasing
role in every segment of modern society.
The development of miniature, solid-state
microprocessor technology has enabled
the industry to achieve incredible advances
in computer system capabilities.
The growing demand for computers has
sparked tremendous technological devel-
opment that has resulted in the production
of computers that are smaller, cheaper and
more powerful. A high demand for well-
trained personnel has emerged from the
increasing use of computers.
The program is structured on a lecture/lab
format with extensive hands-on experience.
Topics for instruction are broken down into
two categories: core and option subjects.
Core subjects will be taken by all students.
Option subjects allow students a degree of
specialization. In the end, students graduate
with skills in both hardware and software
applications.
For more information visit the Computer
Engineering Website.
Note:
Fall and Winter intake •
The frst year of this program has a •
heavy electronic component.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Engineering & Applied Sciences, Informa-
tion Technology & Electronics
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 Years (Regular Stream) or 2 Years + (1 or
2 Co-op Work Terms)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
August 25, 2008
coNtActs
herB vanseloW
(780) 378-5264
herbv@nait.ca
siMon Walker
(780) 378-5259
simonw@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Fall Intake Regular Stream:
Semester 1 •
Semester 2 •
Break •
Semester 3 •
Semester 4 •
Fall Intake Co-op Stream:
Semester 1 •
Semester 2 •
Work Term* •
Semester 3 •
Semester 4 •
Work Term* •
Winter Intake Regular Stream:
Semester 1 •
Break •
Semester 2 •
Semester 3 •
Break •
Semester 4 •
Winter Intake Co-op Stream
Semester 1 •
Break •
Semester 2 •
Semester 3 •
Work Term* •
Semester 4 •
Work* •
*Note: Students may choose 1 or 2 work
terms for co-op.
Students must successfully complete all
courses as outlined in the Program Calen-
dar to be eligible for a diploma in Computer
Engineering Technology.
certiFication
Diploma in Computer Engineering Technol-
ogy, or Diploma in Computer Engineering
Technology - Co-op Stream
accreditation
This is a nationally accredited program rec-
ognized toward certifcation of the program
graduate as a Technologist by the constitu-
ent association of the Canadian Council of
Technicians & Technologists and the Cana-
dian Technology Accreditation Board.
This program is also recognized by ASET
(The Association of Science and Engineer-
ing Technology Professionals of Alberta).
progrAM outlINe
streaMs and options
Computer Engineering Technology is one of
two training streams within the Computer
Engineering Technologies cluster of pro-
grams, which comprises:
CNT - Computer Engineering •
Technology
NET - Network Engineering Technology •
Both streams share a common frst year.
CNT students must choose two options in
their fourth semester. NAIT reserves the
right to alter or change option courses.
Co-op participation is available to students
who have completed at least two academic
semesters. Acceptance into co-op is based
on successful completion of all coursework
with a 2.3 GPA.
Co-op Work Experience - Prerequisite:
ETC463 Workplace Preparation or equiva-
lent.
The Co-op program provides training in ca-
reer development. Successful completion
indicates advanced job readiness skills.
Consult with the Co-op Coordinator for the
current fee schedule and more information.
LeeAnne Pawluski
Co-op Coordinator
Phone(780) 378-5255
coopinfo@nait.ca
seMester 1
AsM106
Mathematics
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
The aim of this course is to review and extend
those topics in algebra and trigonometry
which are necessary for electronics and tele-
communications technology. Topics include:
scientifc and engineering notation, graphs,
systems of linear equations, matrices, trigo-
nometric functions, complex numbers, ex-
ponential and logarithmic functions, plane
analytic geometry, and differential calculus.
This course also introduces the student to
statistics and statistical methods which are
commonly used in engineering. The topic
include data summarization, probability and
problems including normal distribution.
132 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
cNt112
workshop
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course starts by first introducing the
student to electrical and chemical (WH-
MIS) safety. Following this the student will
develop electronic component soldering
and unsoldering skills through a series of
practical hands-on exercises. Finally, sev-
eral electronic kits will be built, which will
be used in subsequent courses.
cNt132
Basic electricity
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.5
This course will provide the student with
the opportunity to know and use funda-
mental electrical quantities, laws, and
mathematical equations of electric circuits
and to learn the proper use of basic mea-
surement instruments. This knowledge will
then be applied to describe the behavior of
various circuits, perform circuit analysis,
build, troubleshoot, test and measure the
basic circuit properties. Topical coverage in-
cludes: Basic Electric Quantities, Energy and
Power, Series-Parallel DC Circuits, Sources
of EMF, DC Network Theorems, Alternat-
ing Current, Electrostatics, Capacitance,
Inductance, Series-Parallel AC Circuits and
Resonant Circuits.
cNt141
digital fundamentals
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This lab-lecture course introduces the basic
principles, techniques and conventions of
digital electronics. A practical orientation
to analysis, design and troubleshooting
is emphasized. Topics include: introduc-
tion to Boolean algebra, number systems,
codes and arithmetic, logic families and
characteristics, combinational logic analy-
sis and design, combinational MSI devices,
introduction to sequential logic, MSI coun-
ter- and register-based circuits, memory
devices, and programmable logic.
cNt151
c++ programming 1
Hours: 103 Credits: 6.5
This course provides a brief introduction
to algorithm development and problem
solving. This is followed by an extensive
coverage of the fundamentals of high-level
language programming using Microsoft’s
Visual Studio .NET. Course topics include:
introduction to PCs and Windows, intro-
duction to the C++ language, C++ operators
and expressions, conditional statements,
looping statements, top-down program
development, functions, arrays and strings,
and string functions. Lab exercises will be
undertaken throughout the course on IBM
PC compatible computers.
cNt162
career overview
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This course will examine the career op-
portunities afforded to the CNT or NET
graduate. The focus will be on the types
of employment offered by the IT sector,
professional certifcation requirements by
ASET, discussion of past and present em-
ployers, and expectations in the workplace.
cNt170
open system Interconnection
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.5
This course introduces the student to the
basic concepts involved in the technology of
communication. It focuses upon the Open
System Interconnection model, which breaks
down the challenge of communication into
layers. Developers use the model as a guide
in producing communication standards. This
course takes the student through the theo-
retical functions of the frst four layers of the
model while simultaneously developing tech-
nical skills through practical exercises, which
support the theoretical learning, in a sophis-
ticated network environment. As part of the
practical work, the student is introduced to
the administration of Cisco networking de-
vices. The fow of the course is based upon
the Cisco CCNA certifcation.
seMester 2
Ase241
effective communications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
ASE241 begins with a review of the principles
of English structure and usage, providing a
foundation in effective communications. Stu-
dents will build on this foundation by com-
pleting case studies and reports, additional
technical writing assignments, job search
documents and oral presentations.
AsM200
calculus
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course reviews the study of differen-
tial calculus started in ASM104/ASM106,
and develops the concepts of integral cal-
culus, continues with a study of differential
equations and concludes with the study of
infinite series. The approach is geared to
applications in electronics. Topics include:
differentiation, partial differentiation, inte-
gration of polynomials and transcendental
functions, applications of the derivative and
integral, solution of differential equations
using the Laplace transform, responses of
linear systems, MacLaurin series, and Fou-
rier series. Prerequisite: ASM104/ASM106
or equivalent.
cNt234
electronics
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.5
This course covers basic solid-state phys-
ics, diodes, basic transistor operation and
switching, simple discrete transistor am-
plifiers and develops the theory required
to analyze and design various op-amp ap-
plication circuits. Additional topics covered
in this course include: op-amp frequency
response, Butterworth active flters, linear
power supplies, linear voltage regulators
and A/D and D/A conversion. Laboratory
exercises are undertaken throughout the
course to verify the theoretical concepts
and to provide experience with various
measurement techniques. Prerequisite:
CNT132 Basic Electricity or equivalent.
133 www.nait.ca
cNt252
c++ programming 2
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.5
This course is a continuation from the basic
C++ course. The platform used for program
development is Microsoft Visual Studio
.NET. The student will create console-based
programs within the Windows environment.
Topics include review of C++ iostream,
reference variables, function overloading
and default parameters, bitwise operators,
advanced pointers, dynamic memory allo-
cation and heap management, structures
and unions, text and binary files, sorting
and searching, linked lists, recursion, bi-
nary trees and an introduction to Object
Oriented Programming (OOP). Advanced
debugging techniques and development
strategies will be examined. Programming
exercises will make up a large component
of the course. Emphasis will be placed on
good programming style and professional
documentation. Prerequisite: CNT151 C++
Programming 1 or equivalent.
cNt270
operating systems
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.5
This is a lecture and laboratory course on
Operating Systems theory, configuration
and administration. Students will be intro-
duced to the general characteristics and
functions of Operating Systems as well as
specifc instruction in the confguration and
administration of current versions of Mi-
crosoft Windows and Linux. Prerequisite:
CNT170 Open System Interconnection or
equivalencies.
cNt294
pc hardware
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.5
The object of this course is to introduce the
student to the architecture of the PC and
various PC hardware devices. This course
is a lab/lecture course, which gives the stu-
dent hands-on experience on a PC. Prereq-
uisites: CNT112 Workshop, CNT132 Basic
Electricity, CNT141 Digital Fundamentals or
equivalencies.
options
etc463
workplace preparation
(coop students only)
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This seminar based course prepares stu-
dents for the work placement. Topics include
the following: co-op procedures and policies,
resume and cover letter writing, interview-
ing strategies and other career development
subjects. Prerequisite: Successful completion
of coursework with a 2.3 GPA.
etc584
coop work experience
Hours: 680 Credits: 10.0
Students work 16 weeks in a program-re-
lated, industry position. Components of this
course include two workplace evaluations,
a site visit by a NAIT staff member and a
daily work journal. The work experience
enhances student employability and allows
students to apply academic training in a
work environment. Prerequisite: ETC463
Workplace Preparation or equivalent.
seMester 3
cNt341
Micro design 1
Hours: 119 Credits: 7.5
After completing this course, the student
will be able to design, build and program
dedicated microprocessor systems for a
variety of applications. MD1 hardware top-
ics focus on the design and construction
of an embedded system using a Motorola
microcontroller. Software topics include
Motorola Assembly language, applying
structured programming techniques and
the use of a wide variety of software devel-
opment tools. Prerequisites: CNT132 Basic
Electricity, CNT141 Digital Fundamentals,
CNT234 Electronics, CNT294 PC Hardware
or equivalencies.
cNt353
object oriented programming
with c++
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This course is intended to provide each
student with the theoretical and practical
experience required to design, develop and
maintain object oriented programs written
in C++. The course covers a wide variety of
C++ topics including: reference variables,
default function arguments, dynamic mem-
ory allocation, classes, function overloading,
inheritance and polymorphism, templates,
exception handling, namespaces, run-time
type information, and stream-based i/o
(fle and console). Programming in C++ is
accomplished with Microsoft Visual C++.
This is a lecture/lab format course with sig-
nifcant emphasis on program development.
Prerequisite: CNT252 C++ Programming 2
or equivalent.
cNt355
sQl
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Databases provide a way to store infor-
mation electronically in a very organized
fashion. In some cases, the amount of in-
formation is extremely large and managing
the storage, retrieval, and modification of
the data normally requires extensive use
of “Structured Query Language (SQL)”, the
language designed for use on “Database
Management Systems” such as Microsoft
SQL Server and Oracle. The focus of this
course will include coverage in the following
areas: an overview of SQL and how it “fts”
into today’s computing environment; the
design and creation of relational databases,
normalization concepts (which form the
basis of database design); use of SQL for
tasks such as retrieving, storing, changing,
and deleting data; constraining the values
that can be stored; important functions
available within a DBMS (such as those for
mathematical operations); use of stored
procedures, views and triggers; selection,
creation, and use of indexes for quickly lo-
cating data.” Prerequisite: CNT151 C++ Pro-
gramming 1 or equivalent.
cNt372
Networking
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This course builds upon the fundamental
knowledge of communications and net-
working gained in CNT170. The course con-
tinues the format of teaching theoretical
concepts supported by practical exercises.
The course provides the student with in-
depth explanations of networking funda-
mentals such as protocols, network design
and implementation, and troubleshooting
and support. Prerequisites: CNT141 Digi-
tal Fundamentals, CNT234 Electronics,
CNT270 Operating Systems, CNT294 PC
Hardware or equivalencies.
134 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
cNt382
digital Measurement and
control systems
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
The primary goal of DMAC is to develop
in the student an ability to solve real world
measurement problems using a desktop
computer. To this end, the student will gain
knowledge and experience with the inner
workings of transducers, signal condition-
ers, computer interfaces and the software
that combine these into a coherent system.
The software used in this course is Lab-
VIEW and is operated with Windows as the
operating system. The labs involve interfac-
ing industry standard sensors to the PC with
LabVIEW performing the data acquisition
and display. Prerequisites: CNT151 C++ Pro-
gramming 1, ASM200 Calculus, CNT234
Electronics or equivalencies.
seMester 4
Ase414
technical report writing
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
A practical post-secondary course in oral
and written technical communication. The
student will be required to demonstrate
the ability to manage a technical project
successfully from the proposal stage to the
fnal full-length formal report and presenta-
tion. Prerequisite is ASE239 Effective Com-
munications or equivalent.
cNt461
web development
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This course introduces the student to web
site development. Web pages will be de-
veloped (using a variety of technologies)
and published. Graphic file formats, site
structure, navigation methods and site
management will be covered, as well as
cross platform issues. Additional topics will
include data base integration. Prerequisites:
CNT353 Object Oriented Programming
with C++, CNT355 SQL or equivalencies.
cNt483
Industrial programming
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.5
This is a course that provides the student
with the theoretical and practical experi-
ence required to create and operate indus-
trial control systems. The course is divided
into two logical sections with new topics
building on the knowledge acquired from
previous topics. An associated project for
each section must be completed. The frst
section deals with designing and imple-
menting solutions to state based control
problems using ladder logic, the second
with creating user interfaces for PLC based
control application using standard MMI
creation software. Prerequisites: CNT141
Digital Fundamentals, CNT252 C++ Pro-
gramming 2 or equivalencies.
cNt491
It Management
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This is an introductory course on manage-
ment and information technology man-
agement. Special attention will be given
to the following topics: management of IT
projects, theories of motivation, commu-
nication, management of new technology,
customer relations, business economics
and time management. Lectures are supple-
mented with flms and case studies. Soft-
ware tools are used to create spreadsheets,
databases and word-processed documents.
PERT diagramming is introduced as a tool
in management planning. Some course time
is devoted to presentations by representa-
tives of local industry regarding the nature
of the industry, the role of the technologist,
opportunities, placement, ethical codes and
other matters. Prerequisite: ASE239 Effec-
tive Communications.
options
cNt442
Micro design 2
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This is the second of two courses on embed-
ded microprocessor systems using Motorola
microcontrollers. Software topics include
writing ROMable code and interrupt driven
real-time programming. MD2 hardware top-
ics include bus interfacing, analog-to-digi-
tal and digital-to-analog conversion, liquid
crystal displays and programmable timers.
This course includes a microcontroller hard-
ware/software design project. Prerequisite:
CNT341 Micro Design 1 or equivalent.
cNt453
Introduction to windows
programming with c++/clI
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This lecture/lab/research course intro-
duces program development for Windows
using Visual C++/CLI. Topics include .NET
memory management, managed objects,
.NET collection classes, forms, controls,
GDI+, file i/o, asynchronous sockets, and
threading. Primary focus will be solving
complex problems, algorithm development,
and managing complex state information.
Students will be expected to work individu-
ally and in groups. The last six weeks of this
course is dedicated to a complex group
project. Prerequisite: CNT353 Object Ori-
ented Programming with C++ (65%+), or
equivalent C++ course that covers (in de-
tail) inheritance, polymorphism, operator
overloading, RTTI, and the STL.
cNt456
Introduction to Asp/vB .Net
Hours: 102 Credits: 6.5
This course will focus on design and con-
struction of data-driven web applications
using a multi-tiered architecture on Micro-
soft .NET platforms. Coverage will include:
Introduction to ASP.NET •
Introduction to Visual Studio .NET •
Using Server Controls •
Using ASP.NET Rich Controls •
Using VB .NET within an ASP.NET Page •
Managing Data Sources •
Building Data-Driven ASP.NET •
Applications
Confguring an ASP.NET Application •
Troubleshooting and Deploying an ASP. •
NET Application
Creating and Using XML Web Services •
The course will have a heavy practical em-
phasis and evaluation will be based entirely
upon a series of exams given at regular inter-
vals in class (at least 10 in total). Preparation
for exams can be done either at NAIT dur-
ing scheduled classes or at home if the stu-
dent has the ability to do so. Prerequisites:
CNT353 Object Oriented Programming with
C++, CNT355 SQL or equivalences.
135 www.nait.ca
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
All applicants require the following or
equivalent courses:
English 30-1 or 30-2 •
One of Physics 30, Chemistry 30 or •
Science 30
An interest in and an aptitude for •
applied sciences, especially those with
a physics base, are defnite assets to
anyone considering this program
Pure Math 30 or successful completion •
of Transitional Mathematics 101 or
Algebra 35 (65%)
Applicants presenting other math •
courses, for example, the previous
Alberta Learning designations of Math
30 and Math 33, will be considered
on an individual basis by the Registrar.
Math updating or upgrading may be
required.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Additional Requirements:
Students must have access to a •
computer that has the capability of
running Visual Studio .NET.
Computer keyboard entry comprises •
a signifcant portion of training time;
therefore, touch typing or basic
keyboarding skills are a defnite asset.
selection criteria
In some cases, student selection may be
competitive; based upon criteria that may
include academic achievement beyond
the minimum prerequisite identifed in the
NAIT calendar or application form; a career
investigation report may be required. Con-
tact the Registrar for current information
about selection criteria for this program.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
advanced/transFer credit
In order to qualify for Advance Credit, the
course hours and content of the completed
course must be the equivalent to or more
extensive than the course the student is
seeking exemption for.
Students must submit a course outline and
transcript for courses to be considered for
credit.
Students, who are granted course exemp-
tions may jeopardize their opportunities for
scholarships or an honours diploma. Some
scholarships require 100% loading for eli-
gibility.
Please contact our Student Advisor for eli-
gibility of advance credit at charehbr@nait.
ca or 780-471-8578.
international Marks
Students applying to NAIT from outside
Canada must have their marks converted
to an Alberta standard. For more informa-
tion on international mark conversions see
International Qualifications Assessment
Service (IQAS).
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms are either lecture or computer
lab styles. Note, several courses are struc-
tured for a lab room setting.
BuildinG location(s)
Main Campus and NAIT HP Centre
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 30 hours
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 30 hours
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
continuinG education
CNT151 C++ Programming 1 •
CNT170 Open System Interconnection •
CNT252 C++ Programming 2 •
CNT353 Object Oriented Programming •
with C++
CNT495 PC Repair and Upgrading •
ETC131A Basic Electricity I •
ETC131B Basic Electricity II •
ETC141 Digital Fundamentals •
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Most work placements occur from
May to August. However, some special posi-
tions become available during other terms.
Length: 16 weeks. 32 weeks available with
program approval
Salary: Wages are determined by the par-
ticipating companies. $8 - $18/hour
Who facilitates the placement:
LeeAnne Pawluski
Co-op Coordinator
Phone: (780) 378-5255
coopinfo@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to attend
classes and laboratory sessions, to ask ques-
tions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Phone (780) 378-5259 for detailed informa-
tion or to participated in the Buddy System.
inFo sessions
Tues, Feb 5, 2008 - Evening sessions, visit
www.nait.ca for details.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Computer Engineering Technol-
ogy, or Diploma in Computer Engineering
Technology - Co-op Stream
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Students are eligible for student member-
ship in the Institute of Electrical and Elec-
tronic Engineering (IEEE).
Student memberships in The Association of
Science and Engineering Technology Profes-
sionals of Alberta; (ASET) are available.
After two years of suitable work experience
in industry, the graduate may seek certi-
fication with the ASET to receive the CET
(Certifed Engineering Technologist) desig-
nation and upon further qualifcations, the
RET (Registered Engineering Technologist)
designation.
136 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Student membership is also available in the
Canada’s Association of Information Tech-
nology Professionals.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
Analytical thinking/Problem solving •
skills
Oral and written communication skills •
Interpersonal skills •
Ability to work in teams •
Desire for continual learning •
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Bachelor of Applied Information •
Systems Technology
Bridging courses maybe required. •
Please contact Terry Goudreault at
780-378-5322 or terryg@nait.ca
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates who further their studies may be
granted advanced credit at Canadian and
American Universities. However to ensure
that credit is granted, you need to check
with the Canadian or American University
that you are applying at.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Employers are companies involved in the
development of software, installation, main-
tenance and design of computers and data
communications equipment.
career opportunities
Graduates are prepared for employment
opportunities in:
Supporting Data Communication •
Systems and Local Area Networks
Software Development and Support •
Instrumentation and Data Acquisition •
Process Control Hardware and •
Software
CAED (Computer Aided Engineering •
and Design)
Technical Management •
Sales and Support •
Systems Administrator •
Embedded System Design •
Programmable Logic Design •
Database Programmer •
Web Developer •
cOmPuteR
netwORk
AdministRAtOR
A Computer Network Administrator Makes
“IT” Happen.
Have you ever wondered what makes MSN
Instant Messenger “Instant”?
How are you able to play that on-line game
with someone halfway around the world?
What is your computer running: Windows,
Linux? What is the difference and what are
the advantages and limitations of each Op-
erating System?
The primary objective of the CNA program
is to provide students with a solid foundation
to begin a career in Information Technology.
The program provides an opportunity for
students to gain skills in computer network-
ing and administration. The CNA program
is a theoretical and practical examination of
computer network systems, and the major
feature of the program is the scope of the
training provided.
The program covers many of the training ob-
jectives for various vendor certifcations. The
knowledge gained will assist those students
who wish to challenge vendor examinations
such as CompTIA’s A+, Network+, Linux+,
Microsoft’s MCSA, and Cisco’s CCNA.
The CNA program is delivered in a modu-
lar format. In addition to network admin-
istration topics, the CNA students cover a
number of network communication topics
to broaden their skills. This additional in-
formation has proven to be valuable in the
present networking industry.
Students will have a network design project
course to enhance and complement the
skills they have obtained in the classroom.
An advisory committee from industry pro-
vides input on the direction and focus of the
program content.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Information Technology & Electronics
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
1 year (2 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
General inQuiries
(780) 378-5201
Warren dickie, cna coordinator
(780) 378-5212
warrend@nait.ca
len roGers, associate chair
(780) 378-5206
lenr@nait.ab.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
This is a one year certifcate program with a
total program length of 32 weeks. Semester
one is 16 weeks in length. The second se-
mester is also 16 weeks long.
Application deadline is March 31, 2008 for
September classes.
Application deadline is Oct 31, 2008 for
January classes.
certiFication
Successful candidates receive a NAIT cer-
tifcate.
Students who wish to ensure rapid integra-
tion into the work force should challenge
vendor specific examinations during the
CNA course. NAIT does not necessarily
cover all of any vendor’s specifc training ob-
jectives. Therefore, it is the CNA student’s
responsibility to obtain the latest vendor
exam objectives.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
cNA111
pc fundamentals
Hours: 90 Credits: 5.5
This course provides the student with the
ability to confgure and troubleshoot PCs.
The emphasis of the course is on becoming
familiar with components and theory of per-
sonal computers. Hands on exercises will
enhance learner understanding of material
presented through lectures. With additional
study students will be able to challenge the
Comptia A+ PC hardware exam.
137 www.nait.ca
cNA125
Microsoft windows client
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This integrated theory/lab course will pro-
vide the student with knowledge to install,
implement, and administer the Windows
client operating system in a workgroup or
domain.
cNA126
Microsoft windows 2003 server
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This integrated theory/lab course will pro-
vide the student the knowledge to install,
confgure, administer, and support the pri-
mary services in the Windows 2003 Server
operating system.
cNA136
linux +
Hours: 90 Credits: 6.0
This course will provide the student with a
comprehensive introduction to the Linux
operating system. The student will become
familiar with the Linux command-line en-
vironment, utilities, applications, and the
graphical X Window environment.
cNA145
wireless Networking I
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
This course provides the student with an
overview of the various wireless technolo-
gies available in today’s workplace. The
student will explore when and where to use
the various technologies, and will confgure
wireless devices to form an network.
cNA146
Network fundamentals
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This course maps to many of the Comptia
Network+ certification exam objectives.
After completing this course the student
will be able to describe the functions and
features of network components, as well as
confgure and troubleshoot network devices
and protocols.
cNA177
client Applications
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
An introductory survey of MS Word, Excel,
Powerpoint, Outlook, Visio, and Access.
Also, installing and distribution of the ap-
plications on the network and saving tem-
plates and data related to these applications
on the network. The Program will require the
use of these applications in later courses.
For example, the Outlook client will be stud-
ied in light of the MS Exchange mail server
component of the program (Server Applica-
tions), and Visio will be regularly used for
physical and logical network diagramming
throughout the program (Advanced Net-
working, Network Infrastructure and Active
Directory at the very least). Access (da-
tabase) fundamentals will come into play
during the MYSQL part of Advanced Linux,
while Word and Powerpoint will be needed
for the Professional Development course.
cNA191
system Image Management
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course provides the student with an
understanding of the concepts of large scale
OS deployment, and the tools used to per-
form them. Patch and service pack manage-
ment and proper technical documentation
are also introduced.
seMester 2
cNA227
Microsoft windows 2003 server
- Network Infrastructure
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This integrated theory/lab course will pro-
vide the student the knowledge to install,
implement, and maintain a Windows Server
2003 network infrastructure.
cNA228
Microsoft windows 2003 server
- Active directory
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This integrated theory /lab course intro-
duces the student to the Windows Active
Directory. The student will learn to plan,
implement, and maintain AD forests, sites,
domains and organizational units, in accor-
dance with the accessibility, performance
and security goals of a business plan. The
student will also use group policy to deploy
software and confgure a computer or user
environment.
cNA236
Advanced linux
Hours: 60 Credits: 4.0
This course will expand upon the concepts
introduced in Linux+ and will provide a
deeper understanding of client, file and
network services. The security issues sur-
rounding this operating system will also be
examined in detail. This course maps to the
second exam of the LPI/LCA certifcation.
cNA245
wireless Networking II
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces the student to the
security concerns of the 802.11 wireless
protocol. Students will be able identify and
explain the vulnerabilities of a wireless LAN,
and what security options are available to
protect the network. The student will be
able to develop and implement a functional
security policy and apply security solutions
in a WLAN environment.
cNA246
Advanced Networking
Hours: 90 Credits: 6.0
This course provides the student with a
foundation in network routing, switching,
and troubleshooting in a multi-protocol
environment. The student will be able to
explain the function and operation of rout-
ers and switches and confgure the devices
for use on a network. The OSI model will be
used as a guide in the development of a sys-
tematic approach to troubleshooting.
cNA267
Network design project
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
The objective of this course is to introduce
the student to the fundamentals of network
design and to provide a fnal project encom-
passing the knowledge gained throughout
the entire program.
cNA281
professional development
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
This course provides the students with the
skills to produce effective resumes and pre-
sentations. The student will be expected to
generate a technical document, and present
a project to the class, increasing both docu-
mentation and public speaking skills.
138 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
cNA291
Applications servers
Hours: 60 Credits: 3.5
This course introduces the student to the
installation and support of backend server
applications. The student will be introduced
to web, mail, and authentication server
software.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Grade XII English 30-1 or 30-2, Science level
20 and Math level 20.
additional reQuireMents
Résumés outlining computer work experi-
ence, education, and a career investigation
report must accompany all applications.
Students with exposure to computers in
maintenance and servicing role, and/or
appropriate post-secondary qualifcations
(degree/diploma from a Telecommunica-
tions or computer-oriented program) will
be given preference. The class size is limited
to 20 students.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Keyboarding skills of at least 30wpm at
95% accuracy.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and based
on criteria that may include academic
achievement beyond the minimum prereq-
uisites identified in the NAIT calendar or
application form.
The CNA program is a multiple semester
intake program (September and January).
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
A resume and a standard career investiga-
tion are required. Students with past experi-
ence in computers will be given preference.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
All courses are taught in a Lab/Lecture for-
mat in a lab with computers and Projector.
BuildinG location(s)
NAIT hp Centre
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Classes run 6 hours per day starting at
9:15am. 30 Hours of class time per Week.
Average number of hours a student can
expect to study outside of class: Students
are expected to spend at least 20 hours per
week in study time.
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Warren Dickie, CNA Coordinator
(780) 378-5212
mailto:warrend@nait.ca
inFo sessions
NAIT Open House, October 10-11, 2008
Information and Communications Tech-
nology Programs Info Sessions, will be an-
nounced at a later date.
Orientation for Fall intake is Tuesday, Sep-
tember 2nd, 2008 at 9:15 a.m. in room
WA102.
Orientation for Winter intake is Tuesday,
January 5th, 2009 at 9:15 a.m. in room
WA118.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Successful candidates receive a NAIT cer-
tifcate.
Students who wish to ensure rapid integra-
tion into the work force should challenge
vendor specific examinations during the
CNA course. NAIT does not necessarily
cover all of any vendor’s specifc training ob-
jectives. Therefore, it is the CNA student’s
responsibility to obtain the latest vendor
exam objectives.
advanced credit possiBilities
Vendor certifcates may provide advanced
course credit. Transfer credit is only as-
sessed and granted for students currently
enrolled in the CNA program, and students
may be required to demonstrate appti-
tude and understanding of the material for
which credit is sought. All requests for ad-
vanced credit are to be directed to the CNA
coordinator.
industry support
CNA works closely with industry profes-
sionals to ensure that the course concepts
are valid and up to date.
Major skills acQuired
Upon successful completion of the program,
the graduate will be able to commission and
administrate networks for enterprise-wide
computing. They will be familiar with both
voice and data facilities. If desired they will
be prepared to start their own small busi-
nesses.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Past employers offering work experience:
Alberta Energy •
Alberta Justice Department •
Alberta Transportation •
Caritas Health Group •
Coopers & Lybrand Ltd. •
CTV •
Data Com Management Ltd. •
Denshel Associates •
Edmonton Northlands •
Edmonton Public School Board •
EDS Canada •
Michetti & Associates •
Micromedics •
NAIT I.S.D. •
139 www.nait.ca
Shell •
Sherritt Inc. •
Sperry-Sun Drilling Service •
St. Albert Protestant School Board •
St. Johns Ambulance •
Transport Canada •
University of Alberta •
Xerox Canada Ltd. •
career opportunities
Opportunities for employment in computer
networking exist under various titles and job
descriptions. Graduates in many cases may
work as independent contractors or consul-
tants. Typical employment involves system
support under the following job titles:
Manager: Information Technology, Client
Services or Information Systems
LAN Administrator, Network Services,
Desktop Support, Technical Support, Oper-
ations or Information System Department
Systems Analyst, Telecom Analyst, Com-
puter Application Coordinator or Help Desk
cOmPuteR sYstems
tecHnOLOGY
The Computer Systems Technology Pro-
gram provides the student with a solid
foundation in business data processing, da-
tabase concepts, and data communication
systems. These concepts are all oriented
toward the business feld and are supported
by courses in programming languages, op-
erating systems, accounting, business com-
munication and organization.
Here are the upcoming offerings of the CST
program:
January 2008 (Application deadline •
Oct 30)
September 2008 (Application deadline •
Mar 31)
January 2009 (Application deadline •
Oct 30)
Students work within a networked client-
server environment, learning programming
languages which include Java, and Visual
Basic .Net. Database programming tools
include SQL-Server, and Oracle.
CST students can apply for a Co-op expe-
rience. A 16-week Co-op semester allows
students to apply the skills and knowledge
learned in the classroom to a full-time work
situation.
To maintain a current curriculum, our
courses are always under review and are
subject to change.
Visit the Computer Systems Technology
Program website at http://www.cst.nait.ca.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Information Technology & Electronics
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Continuing Education, Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 16 weeks) + 16 week
employment experience for co-op students
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 2, 2008
application deadline
July 01, 2008
coNtActs
chair
Sia Samimi
Telephone: (780) 378-5350
Fax: (780) 471-8375
Email: ssamimi@nait.ca
adMinistrative assistant
Yvonne Felske
Telephone: (780) 378-5314
Fax: (780) 471-8375
Email: yvonnef@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
This program is two years in length. Each
academic year is divided into three 16-week
semesters and students may start the pro-
gram in January or September, depending
on available space. All intakes are not the
same size, and space may be limited for
some offerings.
Students may apply for a 16-week Co-op-
erative Employment (Co-op) Semester that
provides work experience following the
successful completion of second or third
semester courses.
certiFication
Diploma in Computer Systems Technology,
or Diploma in Computer Systems Technol-
ogy – Co-op Stream
accreditation
The Computer Systems Technology curric-
ulum has been accredited by the Canadian
Information Processing Society (CIPS). A
graduate may receive an I.S.P. (Information
Systems Professional) designation after six
years of relevant work experience.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
Ist110
logic & problem solving
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course provides a foundation for devel-
oping logical problem solving skills. Analyti-
cal and critical thinking skills are emphasized
throughout this course. This is a creative
process, and emphasis is placed on solv-
ing a wide variety of problems through the
creation of valid, effcient and maintainable
algorithms. A variety of tools and techniques
are introduced to facilitate the development
and proof of proposed solutions.
Ist115
financial Accounting
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course provides a foundation for fi-
nancial accounting concepts and skills.
Students will learn basic bookkeeping
techniques in both a manual and electronic
format, and complete one accounting cycle.
Accounting for service and merchandising
businesses will be covered, as well as other
topics such as inventory systems, account-
ing information systems, internal controls,
and payroll.
Ist135
programming fundamentals
Hours: 128 Credits: 8.0
This course provides an introduction to
program development and programming
standards using the Java language. Empha-
sis is placed on the creation of maintainable
solutions in an object oriented environment
using design documentation UML and
structured fowcharts. Co-requisite: IST110
Ist140
foundations of success
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course provides a foundation of funda-
mental skills inherent to successful comple-
tion of the CST program and to learning in
the workplace. Students will learn or review
basic computer skills (Word, Visio, Excel
and PowerPoint), and will have opportunity
to apply these to in-class assignments. The
students will explore their learning styles
and different techniques to make the most
of their learning experience. Students will
learn guidelines for creating effective tech-
nical documents and will have the opportu-
nity to demonstrate their communication
skills in a variety of media (written and oral),
and receive feedback. They will learn basic
researching skills to show them a variety of
references beyond the classroom.
140 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
Ist185
fundamental computer concepts
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course introduces fundamental com-
puting concepts that provide the student
with foundation level understanding of the
personal computer computing environment.
The student will study numbering systems
theory and formal logic. Computer hard-
ware skills are also developed for a small
home Operating System environment, along
with an understanding of Operating System
patches, utilities and security issues.
seMester 2
Ist215
systems Analysis & design I
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course will discuss how Informa-
tion Technology is used and managed in a
business environment. The Work System
Framework will be introduced to provide the
student with the tools necessary to analyze
business problems from many perspectives.
The student will learn data gathering tech-
niques. The System Development Life Cycle
and Unifed Process methodologies will be
introduced with an emphasis on proper
analysis and design concepts. Using the
following visual tools: DFD, ERD, and UML,
the student will be exposed to in-class ex-
ercises to improve their understanding of
the concepts. Students will be introduced to
design and formatting of input screens and
output reports. Pre-requisite: IST140
Ist235
client-server programming
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course provides an introduction to
intermediate Client-Server concepts and
popular tools for creating Client-Server ap-
plications. This course focuses on imple-
mentation with an emphasis on creation of
maintainable solutions using analysis and
design documentation. All programs will be
suitable for use in a Client-Server environ-
ment. Evaluation of the fnal programmed
solution is accomplished by walkthroughs of
program statements and the use of debug-
ging tools to prove the validity and appro-
priateness of the fnal product.The course
introduces Visual Basic .Net and the .Net
Framework as a means for creating object-
oriented applications. Visual Basic .Net and
ASP.Net are used as tools to design a form-
based presentation layer for client-server
systems. Pre-requisites: IST110, IST135
Ist245
database Management
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course will provide the student with the
technical skills necessary to design, build and
work with current SQL database systems.
The course will examine theoretical database
concepts as well as provide experience with
Transact – SQL in the SQL Server environ-
ment. Pre-requisites: IST110, IST135
Ist260
Networking I
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course will provide the student with
fundamental concepts of logical and physi-
cal network structures. Emphasis will be
placed upon the understanding of the TCP/
IP protocol suite and its functionalities on
local networks as well as on the internet.
The student will learn to identify and ad-
minister physical network components,
such as switches, home based routers, and
wireless devices. A portion of the course
will cover the development of web pages
utilizing HTML, including the use of tags to
display lists, tables, and images. Pre-requi-
sites: IST185
Ist271
Business communications
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course presents communication con-
cepts and provides opportunities for their
application in an IT environment. This course
will ensure that students enhance written
and oral communication skills typically ap-
plied in client relations, technical report
preparation, and user documentation. Team
process will be an important element in the
delivery of this course. Pre-requisite: IST140
co-op Work experience
Ist305
co-op work experience
Hours: 640 Credits: 10.0
The students perform 16 weeks of full-time
related work experience with an employer.
The students will be paid for their work
and their progress will be monitored. Upon
completion of this experience, students
submit a report describing and evaluating
their experience. Pre-requisite: Successful
completion of all 1st year courses.
seMester 3
Ist315
systems Analysis & design II
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course is intended to give students a
solid foundation in systems analysis and
design using an object-oriented approach.
Students will learn “best practices”, which
are highlighted throughout the course to
give students concrete examples of what
concepts to apply in a business environ-
ment. Concepts taught will include business
modeling, project management, unified
process, use case modeling, advanced de-
sign principles, user and system interface
design, and security. Prerequisite: IST215
Ist334
J2ee development
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course will focus on system develop-
ment using Java in a J2EE environment.
Students will learn to build robust n-tiered
solutions to business problems. The em-
phasis of the course will be web-based
delivery of the solution. Major topics will
include: How and when to use distributed
architecture; How to use effcient and main-
tainable data access; How to use clean and
maintainable web interfaces; How to create
valid, efficient and maintainable business
solutions. The students will primarily use
open-source software and develop appli-
cations using a robust Integrated Devel-
opment Environment (IDE). Prerequisites:
IST235, IST245
Ist336
enterprise systems using .Net
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
This course introduces the student to multi-
user and multi-tier (layer) analysis, design
and implementation concepts with a focus
on On Line Transaction Processing (OLTP).
An emphasis will be placed on Internet-
based application using distributed ob-
jects and database services. Prerequisites:
IST235, IST245
Ist360
Networking II
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course will provide the student with
advanced concepts in network structure,
and functionality. Topics will focus on server
and enterprise level devices, techniques and
best practices in a multi vendor environ-
ment. This will include skills related to web
server setup. Emphasis will also be placed
upon the understanding of network security
concepts for local area networks. Prerequi-
site: IST260
141 www.nait.ca
Ist370
organizational Behaviour
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
Organizational Behaviour provides students
with an opportunity to understand practical
aspects of what people think, feel, and do
in a business environment. Exercises, case
studies, and team projects will provide stu-
dents with a chance to develop practical
skills. Pre-requisite: IST 140
seMester 4
Ist471
project Management, leadership,
and career development
Hours: 96 Credits: 6.0
Students will become familiar with project
management processes, discuss and refect
on leadership/ followership, and assemble
a career portfolio. Material covered in this
course can enhance team effectiveness in
the capstone project IST410 course. The
essential skills gained in this course can en-
hance competitiveness in the IT job market.
Prerequisites: IST140, IST271
Ist410
project
Hours: 160 Credits: 10.0
This course will bring together the knowl-
edge and skills acquired through the frst-,
second-, and third-semester courses in
NAIT’s Computer Systems Technology pro-
gram. Knowledge of business, communica-
tions, programming, systems analysis and
team work are especially useful for the proj-
ect course. In industry, analysis/program-
mers/designers develop computer systems
with project teams. In this course, teams
of students will develop a project from
analysis, through design, to development.
To further simulate the business environ-
ment, the teams will present their fndings
through both oral presentation and written
documentation. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of the frst three semesters.
electives
Ist490
flash
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course will introduce the students to
the concepts of multimedia programming
using Macromedia Flash. They will have
the opportunity to create relevant, com-
pelling user experiences through an open,
integrated web development platform.
Conceptual overviews, demonstrations,
practice exercises, quizzes, and interactive
labs will enable the student to build and
develop dynamic web content and appli-
cations that can be delivered to multiple
platforms and devices. Students will draw
on their previous knowledge of communi-
cations, business, programming, network-
ing, and analysis to complete this course.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 1st
year courses.
Ist435
Advanced web Application
development using c#
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course will focus on business applica-
tion development using the C# platform of
the Microsoft .Net framework. Students will
be introduced to C# through a progressive
cycle that will include basic code and syntax,
distributed development, data storage, XML,
user and custom controls, and security and
deployment. Prerequisite: Successful com-
pletion of 1st year courses and IST336
Ist434
Microsoft Business solutions
Integration
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course will introduce the student to
the world of Microsoft Business Solutions
and how to integrate with them and the Mi-
crosoft Offce Suite. The student will learn
about simple business analytics through
XML and Excel pivot table reports; how to
create interactive intelligent applications
using Smart Document technology and
XML in Word; about Enterprise Resource
Planning (ERP) with Great Plains; and how
to integrate their own Visual Basic applica-
tions with Great Plains through eConnect.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of 1st
year courses and IST336
Ist432
Quality Assurance & software
testing
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
Software systems are increasingly more
complex, requiring implementation of key
quality processes and effective testing. This
course introduces the concepts of quality
assurance and software testing in informa-
tion systems. The course will cover topics
such as web testing, white box testing, busi-
ness process testing and user acceptance
criteria. As well, the importance of develop-
ing good test data and proper test report-
ing will be covered. Prerequisite: Successful
completion of 1st year courses.
Ist431
oracle
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This course will introduce students to pro-
gramming for Oracle on both the server
and client sides. PL/SQL will be covered in
depth. The students will also construct 2-
tier client/server business applications us-
ing Oracle Forms with an Oracle database
back end. Prerequisite: Successful comple-
tion of 1st year courses.
Ist404
cst curriculum equivalent
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This elective is a means of obtaining credit
for CST courses completed prior to imple-
mentation of the new curriculum. Students
cannot pre-register for this course, but may
apply for credit through an Assistant Pro-
gram Chair any time during the second year.
Ist403
Business elective
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This elective is a means of obtaining credit
for related business course work completed
outside the Institute. Students cannot pre-
register for this course, but may apply for
credit through an Assistant Program Chair
any time during the second year.
Ist402
general elective
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
This elective is a means of obtaining credit
for related general course work completed
outside the Institute. Students cannot pre-
register for this course, but may apply for
credit through an Assistant Program Chair
any time during the second year. Depart-
ment Consent Required.
142 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
co-op Work experience
Ist405
co-op work experience
Hours: 640 Credits: 10.0
The students perform 16 weeks of full-time
related work experience with a co-operat-
ing employer. The students will be paid for
their work and their progress will be moni-
tored. Upon completion of this experience,
students submit a report describing and
evaluating their experience. Prerequisites:
Successfull completion of all semester 1, 2
and 3 courses.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
Applicants require English 30 or 33 and
Pure Mathematics 20 (New), OR Transi-
tional Mathematics 101, OR 65% or greater
in Applied Math 30 (New).
Applicants should be aware that fuency in
English writing and oral communication will
be necessary to succeed in this program.
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include aca-
demic achievement and skills beyond the
minimum prerequisite identified in the
NAIT calendar or application form. Mini-
mum academic achievement for competi-
tive selection is typically 65%.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
As this program trains students for a career
in an industry that is dynamic and demand-
ing, applicants should have an analytical
ability and enjoy problem-solving. Appli-
cants should also be able to touch type or
possess some keyboarding skills.
selection criteria
Selection is competitive, and is based on
grades achieved in both English and Math.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation report is part of
the student selection process for many of
full-time programs at NAIT. It is valuable
for learning about possible career options
available in the IT feld. For information on
how to write a career investigation, refer to
NAIT’s Program Calendar, or on-line Career
Investigation.
advanced/transFer credit
If your prior studies or work experience
qualifes you for advanced credits for any of
CST courses, please contact the program to
inquire.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Most classes are held in classrooms and
computer labs, depending on the subject.
Some courses are available on-line and
some topics may be delivered using dis-
tance education tools such as video confer-
encing. Tools necessary for on-line learning
will be made available, if needed.
averaGe nuMBer oF hours in
classrooM per Week:
Full time students can expect to spend from
20 to 30 hours per week on average in the
classroom.
averaGe nuMBer oF hours a
student can expect to study
outside oF class:
As a rule of thumb, students should expect
to spend 1 to 2 hours outside of class for
each hour spent in class for homework and
studies.
continuinG education courses
You can receive some credit in the full-time
program by completing the following Con-
tinuing Education courses:
seMester 1
IST110 Logic & Problem Solving •
IST115 Financial Accounting •
IST135 Programming Fundamentals •
IST140 Foundations of Success •
IST185 Fundamental Computer •
Concepts
seMester 2
IST215 Systems Analysis & Design I •
IST235 Client-Server Programming •
IST245 Database Management •
IST260 Networking I •
IST271 Business Communications •
seMester 3
IST315 Systems Analysis & Design II •
IST334 J2EE Development •
IST336 Enterprise Systems Using .NET •
IST360 Networking II •
IST370 Organizational Behaviour •
seMester 4
IST410 Project •
IST471 Project Management, •
Leadership, and Career Development
seMester 4 electives
CNT495 PC Repair and Upgrading •
IST431 Oracle •
IST435 Advanced Web Application •
Development Using C#
IST490 Flash •
co-op & Work experience
Co-op is offered each term. It is an optional
course, and students are selected based on
marks, attitude, and instructor feedback.
Students may choose to take one or both
Co-ops.
possiBle proGress path:
YEAR ONE
Semester 1, Semester 2, Co-op 305
YEAR TWO
Semester 3, Co-op 405, Semester 4
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, attend
classes and laboratory sessions, and ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Contact 378-5353 for information.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Computer Systems Technology,
or Diploma in Computer Systems Technol-
ogy – Co-op Stream or Computer Systems
Technology Certificate or CST Upgrade
Certifcate
143 www.nait.ca
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Since the CST curriculum has been accred-
ited by the Canadian Information Process-
ing Society (CIPS), CST graduates become
eligible for the I.S.P. (Information Systems
Professional) designation after six years of
relevant work experience.
university oF lethBridGe
CST graduates can also apply to the Uni-
versity of Lethbridge which recognizes and
grants credits for CST courses toward the
Bachelor of Science degree. For more infor-
mation, click the following link: read more...
nait
At NAIT, CST graduates can pursue a
3-year applied degree through the Bach-
elor of Applied Information and Systems
Technology (BAIST) program, or enter
the 4-year Bachelor of Technoloy (BTech)
degree. Both programs offer full credits to
CST graduates toward the completion of
their degree. BAIST is a two-year program
offered through day time and evening stud-
ies, comprising 8 months of in-class stud-
ies and 8 months of credit work experience.
For more information, click the following
link: read more... NAIT BTech is only offered
full time at this time. For more information,
please contact NAIT Registrar.
university oF athaBasca
The University of Athabasca grants credits
for several of CST courses toward the Bach-
elor of Science in Computing and Informa-
tion Systems degree. For more information,
click the following link: read more...
Major skills acQuired
CST prepares the student for immediate
employment in the business sector in a
software solutions capacity, typically as a
programmer/analyst. Our graduates find
employment in consulting, user education
and training, technical writing, software
development, technical support, network
administration, and network support.
Upon graduation, the student will be pre-
pared to: communicate with colleagues,
clients, and systems analysts in a clear and
effective manner; identify and analyze data
processing problems; solve data processing
and programming problems using proven
techniques; write programs within perfor-
mance standards and time constraints in
programming languages commonly used
in business; and plan, schedule and control
systems projects.
cAreer opportuNItIes
career opportunities
Working in client services, programming,
or systems analysis and design, graduates
of the CST program have become valuable
employees in a wide range of industry sec-
tors throughout Alberta, across Canada,
and around the globe.
current eMployers
5th Dimension •
A T Plastic Inc. •
Alberta Education •
Acrodex •
Alberta Blue Cross •
Altagas Utilities Inc. •
Andiamo Systems Inc. •
Aspen Regional Health •
Automated Benefts Inc. •
Banks Hill •
Barber Engineering & Controls Ltd. •
Cancer International Research Group •
Capital Health •
Catholic School Board (Leduc) •
CGI Group •
City of Edmonton •
Computer Upgrading Specialist •
Convergys Customer Management •
Canada Inc.
Cricket Works Design Group Inc. •
Darkside Consulting •
Dell Canada •
DS Home Computer Ltd. •
Dynacare Kasper Medical Laboratories •
ECS Electrical Cable Supply •
Enbridge Pipelines Inc. •
Eworkfow Bus Inc. •
Finning (Canada) •
Ford Credit Canada •
Fujitsu Consulting •
Government of Alberta •
Government of Canada •
IBM Canada Ltd. •
Institute of Chartered Accountants of •
Alberta
Matrikon Consulting Inc. •
Matrikon Management Inc. •
Microserve Business Computer •
Solutions
MB Services •
NorQuest College •
Northern Alberta Institute of •
Technology
NAEJA Pharmaceuticals •
Ormed Information Systems Ltd. •
PC Place •
PCL Construction Resources Inc. •
Professional Systems •
Promise Group Inc. •
Queen’s Printer •
Sequiter Software Inc. •
Shaw •
SimarTech •
Telus •
Time Industrial •
TransAlta Corporation •
University of Alberta •
Upside Software Inc. •
Vantix Systems Inc. •
Weldco-Beales Manufacturing •
Alberta Ltd.
Other: Contract Work •
cOnstRuctiOn
enGineeRinG
tecHnOLOGY
The program is designed to provide stu-
dents with opportunities to acquire a broad
knowledge of management, estimating,
and technical aspects of construction with
prime focus on commercial and residential
buildings with related support industries.
Basic skills taught include construction
management, cost estimating, structures,
supervision, building science, contract
law, construction equipment, construction
safety, project planning and scheduling,
building regulations, reports and presenta-
tions, and cost control.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Building Construction & Design
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 17 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
First day of class
144 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
coNtActs
cora nicholson, adMin. support
Tel: (780) 471-8701
Fax: (780) 491-3054
E-mail: coran@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years (four 17-week semesters), com-
mencing in August of each year.
Students must successfully complete 2 years
of course study to be eligible for the Con-
struction Engineering Technology diploma.
certiFication
A diploma in Construction Engineering
Technology.
Students will also obtain a St. John First Aid
certificate, and an Alberta Construction
Safety Association certifcate.
accreditation
On September 11, 2006 the Construction
Engineering Technology program received
national program accreditation by the Ca-
nadian Construction Association Gold Seal
Program.
The following Construction Engineering
Technology individual courses have been
accredited by the Gold Seal Accreditation
Board: Safety, Effective Communications
I & II, Contract Law, Estimating I, II & III,
Supervision, Project Planning & Schedul-
ing, Construction Economics, Construction
Delivery Systems, Construction Project
Management.
The Construction Engineering Technology
program is currently pursuing accredita-
tion with the Alberta Society of Engineering
Technologists (ASET).
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
AsM117
technical Mathematics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
The student will become familiar with the
use of a scientific calculator and will be
able to solve problems and manipulate
equations involving algebra, trigonometry,
logarithms, base e exponents, and plane
analytical geometry.
coN100
standard first Aid with level A
Adult cpr
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to teach you to
recognize and provide intervention for life
threatening emergencies until medical aid
arrives. It includes such topics as artifcial
respiration, how to help someone who is
choking, how to deal with shock and un-
consciousness, severe bleeding, CPR for the
adult casualty, secondary survey, fractures
for upper and lower limbs, head and spinal
injuries, wounds, multiple casualties, eye
injuries, burns, poisons, medical conditions
and environmental injuries and illnesses.
This course meets the requirements of Al-
berta First Aid regulations and gives three-
year certifcation.
coN111
Mechanics I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course studies the use of equilibrium
concepts and vector analysis to compute
the forces and moments on structures and
structural components. Computation of
forces in truss members is also covered. It
is the intention of this course to familiarize
the student with how loads affect support-
ing elements in a structure.
coN116
effective communications I
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This is a specialized and practical course
focusing on professional communications
vital within the construction industry. Topics
include an introduction to technical writing
processes, organization of project coordina-
tion records, report organization and writing,
and business workplace communications.
coN128
computer Applications
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course provides the entry-level user
with the basic skills necessary to use a
microcomputer in the Microsoft Windows
environment using word processing and
spreadsheet applications.
coN131
small Buildings
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
An introductory course covering the basic
principles of wood frame construction from
start to fnishing stages. The course includes
presentation of construction details and
systems used within wood frame construc-
tion. Drawing wood frame details is also
included within the course. Portions of the
Alberta Building Code and basic structural
span tables for wood and their application
are incorporated into the course.
coN132
Building products & Materials
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course introduces and examines the ma-
terials, products, and building systems that
are used in the construction of buildings. The
course will relate materials sources, manu-
facturing processes, product standards, and
product development. Included are structural
components, building elements, and internal
finishing components. The course follows
the divisional Master Specification format
that emulates the order in which a structure
is built. Divisions 2 through 14 are discussed
in various detail to supplement the remain-
ing program structure.
coN140
technical drawing
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course provides students with the abil-
ity to examine and interpret the information
contained within a typical set of construc-
tion drawings. This course examines the
information found on architectural, struc-
tural, mechanical and electrical drawings.
The use of scales and basic dimensioning
techniques are also examined. Students will
investigate orthographic views, sectioned
views, and pictorial views as they relate to
a full set of construction drawings. Basic
three-dimensional drawing and detail inter-
pretation using basic drawing techniques
is also incorporated within the course. Em-
phasis will be placed on the student achiev-
ing skill in drawing interpretation and the
application of various drawings to the com-
munication of the design.
145 www.nait.ca
coN180
surveying
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course introduces the student to basic
measurements of elevation, distance and
angles on the ground. Fundamental con-
cepts and theory covered for all types of
direct differential levelling, chaining and tra-
verse surveys, including typical construction
layout, plotting of profiles, cross-sections
and contour plans. Extensive feld exercises
will be conducted for development of basic
skills in all the above surveys using the lev-
els, chains, transits and/or theodolites. Land
division with respect to the Third System of
Township Surveys will be presented.
seMester 2
coN210
Applied Mechanics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course provides a continuation of the
Mechanics course with emphasis on the
basic concepts of statics and stress analy-
sis required in the Structures courses in the
program. Topics include loads on structures,
simple stresses, shear force, bending mo-
ment, fexural stress, shear stress, defections
and column theory. Prerequisite: CON111
coN217
statistics
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course presents basic statistics includ-
ing terminology, sampling methods, data
analysis and correlation, graphing and re-
porting. Problems and assignments will in-
clude construction applications for building
materials quality control testing, including
control charts, and project scheduling. Pre-
requisite: ASM117
coN218
Building environments
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will instruct the student through
lecture, assignments, and feld work on the
evaluation, design and control of building in-
terior environments. The course will evaluate
environments and recommend preventive
remedial action. The course will teach the
use of thermal gradients and psychometric
charts. The course will show how to solve
problems related to heat transfer through
building envelope, how to design, select, and
specify joints and sealants for buildings. The
course will discuss mold remediation as an
emerging issue as a result of tighter building
envelopes. Co-requisite: CON219.
coN219
Building envelope systems
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course examines the specifc materi-
als and systems of assembly that enclose a
building to provide and maintain the desired
interior exterior separation. Included in this
course are a review of the elements of wall,
door and window systems, floor systems,
and roof systems as used in commercial
and residential construction. The analysis,
documentation, and presentation of a roof
membrane report comprise a major compo-
nent of the course. Included in this course
is an introduction of Leadership in Energy
and Environmental Design system (LEED)
and like systems used in the design and
construction industry. Prerequisite: CON131
and CON132. Co-requisite: CON218.
coN233
concrete & soils technology
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course studies the fundamentals of
concrete and soils as they pertain to the
construction industry. In the frst half of the
semester, students will be introduced to the
fundamentals of concrete, including portland
cements, mixing water, aggregates and con-
crete admixtures. Students will perform stan-
dard tests for slump, air-entrainment, unit
weight and compressive strength. Concrete
construction practices for mixing, transport-
ing, placing, fnishing and curing of concrete
are studied. The students will then study
soils as an engineering material, including
properties of soil, exploration methods, clas-
sifcation of soil, load bearing capacities, and
soil lateral pressure. The course includes
tests associated with the identification of
soils, soil compaction, density control and
soil strength. Prerequisite: CON132
coN250
project planning & scheduling
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
Project Planning and Scheduling introduces
the student to the process of analyzing pro-
posed construction work, and preparing logi-
cal project execution plans. From the project
execution plan, the student will then prepare
realistic time based project schedules. Both
manual methods and computer project plan-
ning software (MS Project) will be used.
coN260
effective communication II
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Effective Communications II is a practical
post secondary course in business com-
munication. The student will practice major
types of oral and written communication
normally encountered in industry. Prerequi-
sites: CON 116 or equivalent course, or con-
sent of the Construction Department.
coN270
estimating I - Quantity surveying
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Estimating I provides for skill development
in quantity surveying as used by the con-
struction estimator. Studies and practice
will involve drawing interpretation and
quantity surveying to the various Master-
format divisions. Prerequisites: CON131,
CON 132 and CON 140.
coN292
Building services
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course introduces the student to the
three areas of Building Services. The topic
areas are electrical, heating ventilation and
air conditioning, and plumbing. The areas
of focus will be familiarity with products,
codes and co-ordination with the building
operations.
seMester 3
coN311
soil Mechanics and foundations
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course studies soil as an engineering
material, including soil exploration methods,
classification and engineering properties.
Students will learn how to interpret soil re-
ports, and then apply the basic knowledge of
the engineering properties of soil to design
shallow foundations, recommend pile type
for deep foundations, assess slope stability
and design retaining walls and their drainage
systems. Trenching and foundation exca-
vation will be discussed, including recom-
mended shoring and dewatering techniques.
Prerequisites: CON 210 and CON 233.
coN315
wood and steel structures
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course examines the structural aspects
of wood and steel framed buildings. Topics
covered include elementary structural analy-
sis, Limit States Design, selection of suitable
structural members according to current Ca-
nadian Codes, and discussion of actual con-
struction planning and execution methods
commonly used. Prerequisites: CON210
146 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
coN317
construction Mathematics
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course presents basic algebra and
geometry, differential and integral calcu-
lus, and statistics. Emphasis will be given
to the practical use of analytic calculation
and graphic methods to demonstrate the
concepts and define and solve construc-
tion related problems in physics, quantity
measurement and technical statistics data
analysis. Prerequisite: ASM117, CON217.
coN351
safety
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
The Safety course is a study of the required
Occupational Health and Safety Legislation,
recommended programs and procedures
that form an essential part of safe operation
and control of a successful construction or-
ganization and its projects.
coN370
estimating II - direct costs
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
Estimating II will cover the preparation of
detailed estimates of typical residential and
commercial projects. This course will intro-
duce the student to pricing direct labour and
material costs of various elements. Students
will then utilize skills from Estimating I to cal-
culate project costs. Prerequisite: CON270
coN392
contract law and documents
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course will introduce students to the
nature of law in respect to contract. Statute
and tort law will be examined in addition
to rights and responsibilities of the various
participants to typical construction con-
tracts. Various forms of construction con-
tracts will be examined in this course along
with tendering, contract execution, the gen-
eral conditions of contracts and the law of
contracts. Dispute resolution including me-
diation and arbitration will also be reviewed.
Typical project manuals and specifcations
will be examined as they relate to Contract
Law and contractual compliance.
coN393
supervision
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course focuses on the development of
the supervision skills students will be re-
quired to possess within the construction
industry. Subject areas include supervisory
roles and responsibilities, personnel prob-
lems, effective listening skills, supervisory
leadership, management of conflict, and
disciplining employees. This course em-
phasizes student presentation skills and
class management.
coN395
construction project Management
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course examines the process of con-
struction from a management viewpoint
working towards an understanding of the
administrative processes of construction.
Roles, professional responsibilities, and con-
tract administration for the traditional deliv-
ery system of construction will be examined.
Topics include bidding requirements, bid
submittal, contract signing, submittals,
samples and shop drawings, construction
documentation and record keeping, changes
and claims, progress payments, lien act,
substantial and fnal completions, warranty
period and project calculations.
seMester 4
coN415
concrete structures and formwork
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course examines the structural aspects
of reinforced concrete buildings. Topics cov-
ered include elementary structural analysis,
Limit States Design, sizing of suitable struc-
tural members according to current Cana-
dian Codes, coordinating reinforcing steel
drawings, selection of appropriate form-
work systems, and planning and execu-
tion methods commonly used for concrete
structures. Prerequisite: CON315
coN429
construction and Architectural
design
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course reflects current design-build
requirements of the typical contracting
frm. Emphasis within this course will be to
develop and write the owner’s statement of
requirements, create functional relation-
ship diagrams, preliminary and fnal design
of a small to medium size building based
on the Alberta Building Code, the owner’s
statement of requirements, applicable land
use, building typology and the urban fabric.
Basic presentation techniques will also be
examined. Applicable building envelope,
structural, mechanical and electrical sys-
tems integration will also be incorporated.
Prerequisites: CON140, CON292, CON311,
CON315, CON392, and CON395. Co-requi-
site: CON481
coN462
reports and presentations
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course requires the student to re-
search and write a technical paper relevant
to the Construction Engineering Technol-
ogy (construction management, supervi-
sion, materials and assemblies, economics
etc.). The mechanics, theory, presentation,
and research techniques for the report are
examined in class seminars, however, the
majority of the report production occurs
outside of the allocated class time. The
course will require the student to make
several presentations to an audience of
peers and Faculty. The student will be re-
quired to procure the services of industry
representatives who are conversant in their
chosen topic subject matter. The instructor
will guide students within their respective
individual research reports to help aid in
meeting established technical criteria. Pre-
requisite: CON260
coN470
estimating III - Indirect and
conceptual costs
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is a continuation of Estimating I
and Estimating II with a focus on preparing a
complete estimate. This course studies indi-
rect costs, estimate types, tender packages,
and related issues involved in completing a
tender submission. Prerequisites: CON370
147 www.nait.ca
coN471
construction equipment
Hours: 68 Credits: 4.0
This course is focused on heavy construc-
tion equipment use and management. The
technical aspects of equipment selection
that forms an integral part of a construction
project will be developed. Aspects relating
to the planning, scheduling, supervision and
cost estimating of construction equipment
will be discovered by gaining a knowledge
of and applying various pieces of equipment
to achieve project effciency and economy.
coN480
construction economics
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is an introduction to basic busi-
ness practices and related economics of a
typical construction frm within the Province
of Alberta. Students will be required to cre-
ate a small company based on a business
plan proposal and follow the process of set-
ting up the fnancial requirements of a typical
company. Record keeping, invoicing, fnancial
statements, expenses and other related busi-
ness accounting functions will be examined.
Current trends within the construction cli-
mate of Alberta will also be explored.
coN481
Applied Building regulations
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
Introduces the student to the Alberta Build-
ing Code and Zoning requirements for
typical buildings. Building classifcation, oc-
cupancy requirements, building fre safety,
and exiting will be examined as they relate
to the latest edition of the Alberta Building
Code. The course introduces the function of
a safety codes offcer and building inspec-
tors. The Alberta Planning Act, Land Use
Bylaws and the Alberta Building Code will
be examined.
coN490
finance and cost control
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course is an introduction to fnancing
and cost control of construction projects in-
cluding residential and commercial real es-
tate transactions and mortgages, funding of
public projects, planning and management
of cash fow during construction, holdbacks,
change orders and construction claims. The
process and application of cost control will
be studied and practiced in detail including
methods of progress measurement, earned
value calculations and cost forecast reports
used in industry. Prerequisites: CON370
coN495
construction delivery systems
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
This course examines the matrix of con-
struction delivery systems currently in use
within the construction industry. Unit price,
secured-cost contracts, cost plus, and man-
agement contracts will be identified and
reviewed. Students will also be required to
write and complete written expressions of
interest and request for proposals. Con-
tractual obligations and contract review will
be incorporated into this course. Various
CCDC documents will also be examined.
Prerequisites: CON392 and CON395.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
High School English 30-1 or 30-2; Pure
Math 30, or a minimum of 60% in Applied
Math 30, or a minimum of 65% in Algebra
35; and one of: Physics 30, Chemistry 30,
Science 30.
Applicants presenting other Math and
English courses, for example the previous
Alberta Learning designations of Math and
English 30 or 33, will be considered on an
individual basis by the Registrar. Upgrading
may be required.
An interest and an aptitude for applied sci-
ences is a defnite asset to anyone consider-
ing this program.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
selection criteria
Applicants will be accepted based on aca-
demics and submission of a career inves-
tigation report. In addition, prior related
experience may be considered.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process. This report helps the
applicant ensure that they have made the
correct career choice.
advanced/transFer credit
Contact:
Terry Fulcher, Program Head
Tel: (780) 471-7071
Fax: (780) 491-3054
E-mail: tfulcher@nait.ca
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
The program consists of both classroom
setting and teaching labs. Classroom lec-
ture courses are usually 2 hours in length.
Laboratory demonstrations are given to
compliment the lecture material and are
hands on – expect to get a little dirty and
have fun doing so. Both lecture and labs are
supplemented by in-the-feld learning.
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Students can expect 31 to 32 hours in
the classroom per week. This is scheduled
class and lab time. Students are expected
to attend classes to permit evaluation by
instructors and to facilitate learning within
lab environments.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: The average
number of hours will vary but a student can
expect to spend 20 to 30 hours a week on
assignments and study.
co-op & Work experience
Year 1: During the month of October, the
frst year class participates in a 3 day work
experience with Habitat for Humanity. This
work experience gives new students expo-
sure to a construction site.
Year 2: During the third week of October,
the second year class participates in a one
week work placement where the student
observes the workings of a construction
company. The student can expect to par-
ticipate in the delivery of various buildings
and structures and expect to assist their
contractor mentor in the design and con-
struction process.
Most positions are in Edmonton and sur-
rounding communities. Some positions are
offered in Calgary and Red Deer if needed,
and if the student aids in obtaining the posi-
tion, out of province positions may also be
considered by staff.
Salary: No monetary compensation is of-
fered for either work experience.
Who facilitates the placement:
Terry Fulcher, Program Head
Tel: (780) 471-7071
Fax: (780) 491-3054
E-mail: tfulcher@nait.ca
148 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
Students in this program are required to
own a laptop computer. Recommended
specifications can be obtained from the
Construction Engineering Technology pro-
gram offce.
Students are also required to own the fol-
lowing safety gear:
Safety steel toe workboot or shoes •
(CSA approved, must cover the ankles)
Safety glasses •
Hardhat •
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day attending classes and laboratory
sessions, to ask questions, and experience
NAIT frst hand.
Please contact:
Cora Nicholson, Admin. Support
Tel: (780) 471-8701
Fax: (780) 491-3054
E-mail: coran@nait.ca
inFo sessions
Daytime Information Sessions:
No daytime sessions have been scheduled.
Evening Information Sessions:
Wednesday, February 6, 2008
Location and time to be announced at a
later date
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Diploma in Construction Engineering Tech-
nology.
Students will also obtain a St. John First Aid
certificate, and an Alberta Construction
Safety Association certifcate.
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
The need for qualified construction tech-
nologists who have a good understanding
of all facets of construction and general
contracting continues to provide opportuni-
ties for Construction Engineering Technol-
ogy graduates.
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Students may wish to obtain supplemen-
tary diplomas in Civil Engineering Technol-
ogy or Architectural Technology through
NAIT. Credit may be given for courses with
similar content.
advanced credit possiBilities
Graduates wishing to continue their stud-
ies may be granted advanced credit at Ca-
nadian and American universities. Factors
include individual university entrance re-
quirements and student academic achieve-
ment. Engineering, Architecture, and
Bachelor of Technology are professional
degrees that the Construction Engineering
Technology graduate may wish to pursue.
proFessional association
courses
Association of Science & Engineering Tech-
nology Professionals of Alberta (ASET)
Construction Specifcations Canada
Major skills acQuired
In this two-year program, you will gain skills
in:
Construction project planning, •
scheduling, and management
Quantity take off, estimating, and •
tendering
Contract administration, contract •
law, cost control, and sub-trade
coordination
Computer applications in construction •
Knowledge of materials, products, •
building systems and codes in the
construction industry
Blueprint reading, sketching of details, •
site surveying, and specifcation
interpretation
Supervision and productivity •
improvement
Quality control •
Building assessments •
Safety and First Aid •
Skills are taught within an environment that
allows the student to develop communica-
tion skills and compatible attitudes that
contribute to success as a Construction En-
gineering Technologist.
For further information, please contact:
Career Services - (780) 471-8874
E-Mail careers@nait.ab.ca
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Typical employers include construction
frms, government agencies, construction
material manufacturers and suppliers, prop-
erty developers, and consulting frms.
These are some of the many employers that
traditionally hire graduates of this program:
Government of Alberta - Infrastructure •
& Transportation
Alberta New Home Warranty Program •
Alldritt Homes •
All Weather Windows •
Alpha Construction Inc. •
Aman Building Corporation •
Bird Construction Ltd. •
Blanchett Neon Ltd. •
Brenex Building Corporation •
Burke Perry Homes Inc. •
Cameron Development Corporation •
Carrington Properties Ltd. •
Clark Builders •
Cormode & Dickson Construction •
Cuthbert Smith Consulting Partnership •
Inc.
Dwight’s Roofng Ltd. •
EBA Engineering Consultants •
Ellis Don Construction Services Inc. •
Flint Energy Services Ltd. •
Grant Jorgenson Construction Ltd. •
Jayman Master Builder •
Johnston Builders Ltd. •
Kiewit Group •
Ledcor Industries Ltd. •
Lincolnberg Homes Ltd. •
Noble Structures •
Pacesetter Homes Ltd. •
Parkwood Homes Inc. •
PCL Construction Management Inc. •
Permasteel Construction Ltd. •
Reid Built Homes •
Scott Builders Inc. •
Stantec Consulting Ltd. •
Sureway Construction Management •
Ltd.
Stuart Olson Construction Ltd. •
Voice Construction Ltd. •
149 www.nait.ca
career opportunities
Graduates without prior construction expe-
rience are being hired as entry level project
managers, estimators, and superintendents
within the construction and manufacturing
industries.
Graduates with prior construction expe-
rience, such as trades people, are being
employed at supervisory and intermediate
project management levels, site superinten-
dents, and technical sales representatives.
Some graduates start their own construc-
tion company in residential or commercial
construction.
Typical career positions include estimators,
project managers, subtrade coordinators,
technical sales representatives, project
planners and schedulers, cost control tech-
nologists, superintendents, construction
managers, building inspectors, and occupa-
tional health and safety coordinators.
Visit www.nait.ca for more information.
cO-OPeRAtiVe
tRAdes
ORientAtiOn
Considering a career in trades but not sure
what to choose? Whether you’re new to the
job market or considering a career change,
this is your opportunity to gain an overview
of all 51 Alberta trades before making your
decision. Industry has high expectations of
entry-level employees. You’ll gain a variety
of skills in Co-operative Trades Orientation
to assist you in meeting those expectations.
Training is provided in basic shop practices,
Fire Safety, Level 1 First Aid/CPR, WHMIS,
H2S Alive and Safe Rigging Practices.
Direct work placements in industry will
give you technical training in this program.
It will also give you an opportunity to show
a potential employer that you have both a
willingness to learn and a positive attitude
that will make you a valuable employee.
Successful students in this 19-week pro-
gram may become paid employees within
15 weeks, with the opportunity soon follow-
ing for apprenticeship in their chosen trade.
Co-operative Trades Orientation covers
all 51 Alberta trades including: Carpenter;
Electrician; Millwright; Auto Body; Plumber;
Parts Technician; Automotive Service Tech-
nician; Welder; Heavy Equipment Techni-
cian; Motorcycle Mechanic; etc.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Trades
certiFication
Certifcate
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
19 weeks (including 12 week practicum)
Two intakes offered
location
Fairview
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
September 15, 2008
application deadline
First day of class
coNtActs
BoB shMyruk
Assistant Program Head, Welding
NAIT Fairview Campus, Fairview
(780) 835-6742
bshmyruk@nait.ca
Fred Walkley, instructor
NAIT Fairview Campus, Fairview
(780) 835-6719
NAIT Fairview Campus Toll Free 1-888-
999-7882
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Students must pass all six courses.
certiFication
NAIT will issue a Certifcate of Achievement
in Co-operative Trades Orientation upon
successful completion of the program.
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
to105
trades related studies
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course is deisgned to provide a review
of basic math and english as it relates to the
trades.
to110
trades orientation
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.0
This course is designed to help students
develop attitudes, skills and knowledge
consistent with employers’ expectations
for entry level employees within their trade,
the development of appropriate communi-
cations and interpersonal skills and basic
trade practices.
to111
trades safety
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course provides basic training in fire
safety and safe rigging practices. Certifca-
tion is provided in WHMIS, CSTS and First
Aid Level A. CPR and H2S Alive may be pro-
vided depending on career choices.
to120
theory
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course is designed to provide students
with information and to develop skills in the
terminology and procedures of the occupa-
tion. This course will be delivered concur-
rently with TO110.
to121
Industry shop placement
Hours: 480 Credits: 7.0
This course will provide the student with
employment related experience in an in-
dustry work site placement. The course will
help develop foundation skills in a specifc
occupation.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
A High School Diploma is no longer re-
quired as a prerequisite for entrance into
NAIT programs however, students should
be aware that some employers may require
a High School Diploma as a prerequisite for
employment.
Students must have English 10 or a Grade 11
English, and Math 10 (old curriculum) or a
Grade 11 Math. Include offcial transcripts of
secondary and any post-secondary educa-
tion with your application.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
Adult Status is available if you’ve been out
of school for at least one year, but admis-
sion is not automatic. If you are seeking to
apply under Adult Status, you must submit
a letter outlining your education, experi-
ence, and reasons for seeking admission to
the program.
150 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
delIvery optIoNs
A low student-teacher ratio ensures you’ll
receive the personal attention you need
as you consider the advantages of several
trade options. Strong instructor support is
offered to assist you in choosing a career
path that will lead to personal satisfaction.
classrooM or laB settinG
Approximately 40% shop setting
60% classroom setting
classrooM and study hours
30 Hours
co-op & Work experience
Length: 12 weeks
Type of experience: 1st year apprenticeship
work in the student’s chosen trade
Salary: None
Relocation: Responsibility of the student
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
Contact Fred Walkley, Instructor
(780) 835-6719 or email: fredw@nait.ca
inFo sessions
Daytime Information Sessions:
By appointment Fred Walkley, Instructor,
(780) 835-6719
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
NAIT will issue a Certifcate of Achievement
in Co-operative Trades Orientation upon
successful completion of the program.
Trade skills and knowledge consistent with
employers’ expectations.
Training in WHMIS, Fire Safety, Level I First
Aid/CPR, H2S Alive, Safe Rigging Practices.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Graduates of this program have gone on
to apprenticeships in their chosen trade.
The present shortage of skilled workers
is expected to continue as journeyman
tradespeople retire over the next few years.
Demand for tradespeople is high and job
prospects are excellent in almost all trades,
not only in Alberta but across Canada.
cuLinARY ARts
The programs offered by the NAIT School
of Hospitality and Culinary Arts, including
the Hokanson Centre for Culinary Arts, are
showcased online at: www.nait.ca/scho-
olofhospitality
NAIT’s School of Hospitality and Culinary
Arts has been providing skilled graduates to
the Hospitality industry for close to 40 years.
The school trains over 500 students per year
in various hospitality-related programs.
The Culinary Arts program is recognized
as the corner stone of NAIT’s School of
Hospitality and Culinary Arts, providing
outstanding training to aspiring culinar-
ians. Comprehensive up to date curriculum,
well-equipped labs and superior learning
experiences enhance NAIT’s Internationally
recognized reputation for Culinary Excel-
lence. Ongoing industry partnerships and
strong community support ensure curricu-
lum content remains current and relevant.
Exceptional teaching faculty provide indus-
try-based experience in a student centered
learning environment.
The recent creation of Hokanson Centre for
Culinary Arts positions students to access
hands-on learning experience and exposure
to cutting edge technology in unparalleled
“state of the art” kitchen labs.
NAIT’s Culinary Arts Program attributes:
small classes (15-1 student instructor •
ratio)
two intakes- September January •
competitive tuition rates •
online learning •
diverse career opportunities •
emphasis on team based learning •
experiences
participation in special event dinners •
opportunity to compete in Culinary •
competitions
affliations with Professional •
Associations
a generous allotment of student •
scholarships and awards
diverse extra curricular and intramural •
activities
central location •
affordable accommodation within •
walking distance of NAIT
QuIck INfo
suBject
Hospitality & Culinary Arts
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (4 semesters of 16 weeks)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
January 7, 2008
application deadline
January 04, 2008
coNtActs
vinod varshney, chair
(780)471-8681
Email: vinodv@nait.ca
stanley toWnsend, chair
(780)471-8694
Email: stant@nait.ca
sheila ouellet, adMin. assistant
(780)471-7655
Email: sheilao@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years (four 16 week semesters)
151 www.nait.ca
certiFication
Cooking Certifcate (Year One)
Culinary Arts Diploma (Two Years)
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
coc101
professional cook theory I
Hours: 40 Credits: 2.5
Through lectures and demonstrations,
students will formulate basic cooking and
industry knowledge. Topics include trade
calculations, job marketing skills, basic cost
control and the introduction of industry
trends and styles.
coc131
soup, vegetables and starch
cookery
Hours: 115 Credits: 7.0
Students apply the fundamentals of stock
making and vegetable preparation to pro-
duce a variety of soups, sauces, vegetables
and starch items.
coc132
range
Hours: 115 Credits: 7.0
Students will acquire the fundamental
concepts, skills and techniques involved in
roasting, boiling, stewing, braising, poach-
ing, sauteeing, and panfrying of meats,
poultry and seafood.
coc133
short order
Hours: 115 Credits: 7.0
This course emphasizes the skills necessary
in preparing breakfast and luncheon menus
through the introduction of hot and cold
sandwich combinations and light entree
selections
coc137
cooking fundamentals I
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
The student learns fundamental skills in
quantity food production, including knife
skills and vegetable identifcation/prepara-
tion. Kitchen safety will also be covered.
fNM102
sanitation
Hours: 32 Credits: 2.0
This course will identify standards and pro-
cedures for the maintenance of clean and
sanitary conditions throughout the food
service facility. Students may be eligible to
write the Government of Alberta Certifcate
Exam in Food Sanitation and Hygiene.
seMester 2
coc102
organizational Behaviour I
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
This course is designed to meet the needs
of the students who must face challenges of
tomorrows workplace. Organizational Be-
haviour focuses on personal management
and how that relates to a larger group. Top-
ics of study include basics of organizational
behaviour, diversity, motivation, personality
and behavioural styles.
coc134
desserts
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
This course is designed to introduce stu-
dents to basic theory, practices, and pro-
duction techniques required to produce
yeast goods, fruit and custard pastries and
cakes, plain and fancy cookies, cream puffs
and eclairs.
coc135
garde Manger
Hours: 80 Credits: 5.0
Students demonstrate classical and modern
cold food preparation techniques. Students
progress to more elaborate preparation
such as those used in designing catering
menus and platter displays.
coc139
customer service skills
Hours: 50 Credits: 3.0
The student learns customer driven service
skills that result in consistent quality food
service. Theory, demonstration and hands-
on experience is provided.
coc140
Meat fabrication
Hours: 30 Credits: 2.0
This course provides the student with the
necessary skills in meat grading and portion-
ing. Identifcation of quality factors of meat,
fsh and poultry are emphasized. Hands on
butchering and portioning skills are facili-
tated through a wide variety of products.
coc199
culinary field lab
Hours: 150 Credits: 9.5
In this course students gain skills from a
new experience in an approved culinary arts
related position. Together with the instruc-
tor and the employer, students set up work
assignments to connect classroom learning
with career-related work experience.
fNM101
Nutrition
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
Students will study the role of nutrients in
providing energy and reducing health risks.
Current nutrition guidelines and interpreta-
tion of food labels will be used to determine
healthy food choices. Students will identify
ways to modify recipes and menus to pro-
vide healthy menu choices, and to meet the
needs of customers with nutrition related
health concerns.
seMester 3
coc233
International cuisine and culture
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.5
Emphasis is placed on learning to use vari-
ous condiments and seasonings that are
indigenous to different parts of the world
in food preparation. Topics may include Far
East, Middle Eastern, Mediterranean, and
Continental cuisines. Students identify the
culture and lifestyles of the countries visited
to help understand the connection between
food and culture.
coc234
cold Buffet/culinary design
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.5
This course introduces two main focuses of
the cold kitchen: a la carte appetizers and
grand-buffet arrangements. Students learn
to prepare canapes, hors d’oeuvres, appe-
tizers, pates, galantines, terrines, and sal-
ads. Modern food decorating and arranging
techniques for practical and show purposes
are emphasized sculpting and ice carving
techniques are discussed.
coc237
dining room cuisine
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.5
The student learns to utilize concepts of
classical cuisine to meet today’s lighter eve-
ning dining requirements. Food preparation
focuses on restaurant cooked to order pro-
duction using a traditional brigade system.
Emphasis is placed on creativity, timing,
organization, and teamwork.
coc241
Menu Management
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This course will establish a link between
the importance of proper menu design and
restaurant proftability. Topics such as res-
taurant demographics, cross-utilization,
mark-up methods, menu analysis and menu
layout will be introduced in the form of lec-
tures, assignments and group discussions.
152 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
coc243
culinary Innovation
Hours: 12 Credits: 1.0
This course is a culmination of everything the
student has learned over the two semesters.
The student is able to showcase their skills
and culinary knowledge by preparing an ap-
petizer, entree and dessert, using product
supplied in a “Black Box”. Emphasis will be
placed on creativity, palatability of fnished
product, scheduled completion time, and
high sanitation standards. The course is de-
signed to encourage product utilization with
an emphasis on menu placement.
seMester 4
coc203
Introduction to gastronomy
Hours: 64 Credits: 4.0
In pursuit of culinary excellence, this course
is designed to introduce students to the
fascinating world of food and wine pairing.
Through informative sessions, tasting, and
feld trips; students will learn which criteria
to apply when choosing a wine to accom-
pany a dish (or vice versa). In addition, stu-
dents will be able to apply this knowledge in
their trade, allowing them to fnd the ideal
gastronomic combination when creating
their own recipes.
coc231
contemporary cuisine
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.5
The course is designed to give students
the opportunity to advance and refne their
skills in quantity cooking in a realistic res-
taurant setting. Food preparation focuses
on restaurant cooked to order production.
Emphasis is placed on timing, organization,
cost control and team work.
coc232
patisserie
Hours: 120 Credits: 7.5
The student continues to learn concepts,
skills and techniques for preparing classical
and contemporary desserts and pastries.
Emphasis is placed on plated desserts, show
pieces, and fancy gateau and pastries.
coc240
Applied computer Applications
Hours: 20 Credits: 1.5
This course introduces computerized soft-
ware application pertaining to a food and
beverage cost control system. Utilizing the
skills and knowledge gained in Purchasing
Management COC250, the student will
further their understanding of cost controls
through a series of computerized exercises
utilizing electronic spreadsheets and dedi-
cated software.
coc245
Journeyman exam preparation
Hours: 12 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed for the student to
prepare themselves to write the Provin-
cial Journeyman Examination. All areas of
cooking are revisited and reviewed in order
to direct the student into productive study
techniques. Student success is paramount,
and preparation for certifcate examination
is a critical step in the completion of the
student’s journey.
coc250
purchasing Management
Hours: 100 Credits: 6.0
This course provides the student with a
hands-on approach to the fundamentals
of food and beverage cost controls. The
course, supplemented with reading assign-
ments and projects, will be held in a fully
functional lab setting. Procedural duties will
include effective food and beverage con-
trols, purchasing, receiving, storing, issuing
and point of sales. High sanitation and team
skills will be emphasized.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
This program does not have these require-
ments.
selection criteria
Student selection is competitive and is
based on criteria that may include academic
achievement beyond the minimum prereq-
uisites identifed.
All students are required to meet the aca-
demic prerequisites and provide a written
Career Investigation.
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Classrooms provide seating to accom-
modate lectures and group discussions.
Labs are first class training facilities, fully
equipped with food production equipment
and products.
BuildinG location(s)
Main Campus
11762 106 Street
Edmonton, AB T5G 2R1
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: 30 hours per week.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 8 – 10 hours
per week.
classrooM settinGs/laBs:
Classrooms provide seating to accom-
modate lectures and group discussions.
Labs are first class training facilities, fully
equipped with food production equipment
and products.
co-op & Work experience
Dates:
November - December, March – April
Length: 5 week period to complete 150
hour feld lab requirement.
Type of experience: The feld lab is designed
to allow students to obtain hands on work
experience in a hospitality establishment.
Upon successful completion of this course,
the student will have an increased aware-
ness of day-to-day operations within a food
establishment.
Salary: Since this is part of the educational
experience, students work on a voluntary
capacity.
Relocation: Relocation is possible. Avail-
ability of work site placements depends on
industry participation and an interview se-
lection process.
Who facilitates the placement:
Vinod Varshney, Chair
Telephone: 780-471-8681
Fax: 780-471-8914
E-mail: vinodv@nait.ca
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
153 www.nait.ca
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
The NAIT Buddy System provides an op-
portunity for prospective students to spend
a day teamed with a NAIT student, to at-
tend classes and laboratory sessions, to ask
questions and experience NAIT frst hand.
For further information please go to http://
www.nait.ca/ProspectiveStudents.htm
inFo sessions
Please go to http://www.nait.ca/Prospec-
tiveStudents.htm for inquiries on sessions
offered.
grAduAte INforMAtIoN
nait certiFication
Cooking Certifcate (Year One)
Culinary Arts Diploma (Two Years)
pre/post Graduation aFFiliation
Graduates of the Cooking Certifcate or the
Culinary Arts Diploma may become mem-
bers of the Canadian Federation of Chefs
and Cooks (CFCC). Following five years
of progressive work experience, members
may pursue a national certifcation exami-
nation to become a Certifed Chef de Cui-
sine (CCC).
attriButes oF successFul
Graduates
NAIT Culinary Arts grads are much in
demand and are sought out for a variety
of career opportunities in leading hotels,
restaurants and catering facilities. Other
career opportunities have been realized as
food stylists, culinary publishing, product
research and development and entrepre-
neurial ventures. Not only do NAIT grads
get the jobs- they get the job done.
apprenticeship inForMation
See www.tradesecrets.gov.ab.ca for further
information.
Further career enhanceMent
courses
Hospitality Management Program:
Students can challenge the journeyman
exam. Graduates may elect to indenture
as apprentices in restaurants, or other es-
tablishments where cooking is a major pro-
duction factor. Once indentured and after
successful completion of their journeyman
exam, the students can challenge the Inter-
provincial Red Seal exam.
advanced credit possiBilities
Applicants must arrange an appointment
with a Chair to discuss any transfers or
credits. NAIT will accept graduates of sev-
eral one year certificate programs from
other colleges directly into second year.
Contact:
Vinod Varshney, Chair
Telephone: 780-471-8681
Fax: 780-471-8914
email: vinodv@nait.ca
OR
Stanley Townsend, Chair
Telephone: 780-471-8694
Fax: 780-471-8914
email: stant@nait.ca
proFessional association
courses
Graduates of the Cooking Certifcate or the
Culinary Arts diploma may become mem-
bers of the Canadian Federation of Chefs
and Cooks (CFCC). Following fve years of
progressive work experience, members may
pursue national certification to become a
Certifed Chef de Cuisine (CCC).
Major skills acQuired
The Cooking Certificate program offers a
one-year course of study, leading to a two-
year diploma in culinary arts. The focus
of the certificate program is developing a
comprehensive fundamental cooking skills
complimented with trade math, sanitation,
nutrition, personal and professional man-
agement.
The Culinary Arts Diploma provides an ad-
vanced set of culinary skills enhanced with
principles of gastronomy and culinary man-
agement. A strong focus on presentation
skills and creativity are emphasized in the
diploma program. Student talents are pro-
fled in Ernest’s, NAIT’s critically acclaimed
dining room.
cAreer opportuNItIes
typical eMployers
Hotels, restaurants, food service chains,
catering frms, institutions, grocery stores,
travel service operations, food processors,
resort chains.
career opportunities
NAIT Culinary Arts grads are much in
demand and are sought out for a variety
of career opportunities in leading hotels,
restaurants and catering facilities. Other
career opportunities have been realized as
food stylists, culinary publishing, product
research and development and entrepre-
neurial ventures. Not only do NAIT grads
get the jobs- they get the job done.
cYtOtecHnOLOGY
The Cytotechnologist works in a specialized
feld of laboratory medicine, which involves
the use of a microscope to evaluate cells
for evidence of cancer and other diseases,
through the recognition of alterations in cell
morphology.
The first year of the Cytotechnology Pro-
gram consists of 39 weeks of classroom
instruction and related practical laboratory
experience at the Northern Alberta Institute
of Technology. All courses in Year One must
be successfully completed before proceed-
ing into Year Two.
The second year of the Program is 49 weeks
in length and is spent at an affliated clinical
training site. The affliated clinical sites are
in Edmonton (AB) and Calgary (AB). This
second year includes exposure to essential
clinical experience augmented by appropri-
ate theoretical lectures.
This Program would appeal to those with an
interest in cell biology and tumor pathology.
QuIck INfo
suBject
Health & Safety
certiFication
Diploma
delivery Method
Full-time
lenGth
2 years (39 weeks at NAIT; 49 weeks lab
training)
location
Edmonton and Area
ApplIcAtIoN deAdlINes
next start date
August 25, 2008
application deadline
March 31, 2008
coNtActs
Melody steWart
Diagnostic Laboratory Administrative
Support
(780)471-7662
Email: melodys@nait.ca
progrAM detAIls
proGraM Model/coMpletion
reQuireMents
Two years (39 weeks at NAIT followed by
49 weeks of laboratory training.)
154 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
A NAIT Diploma in Cytotechnology is
granted after successful completion of the
frst and second year.
certiFication
Diploma in Cytotechnology
accreditation
This program is fully accredited by the Ca-
nadian Medical Association (CMA)
progrAM outlINe
seMester 1
cyt103
cytologic procedures and urinalysis
Hours: 51 Credits: 3.0
Cytologic specimen preparation and stain-
ing will be emphasized. Macroscopic
(chemical) and microscopic evaluation of
urine samples will be learned.
cyt224
Introductory cytopathology
Hours: 153 Credits: 9.0
This course is intended to provide the
student with basic knowledge of disease
processes as a foundation for the study of
cytology. The course deals with the nature
and cause of disease with emphasis on cell
injury and adaptation. There are extensive
sections on inflammation, neoplasia and
organisms found in cytologic specimens.
In addition, the basic principles of quality
management will be introduced.
cyt236
fundamental hematology
Hours: 45 Credits: 3.0
The composition and function of blood and
the blood-forming organs in both normal
and abnormal patients is studied.
hsc104
Medical terminology (tlM)
Hours: 17 Credits: 1.0
This course is designed to familiarize the
student with the terminology used in Health
and Medical Sciences.
hsc105
Infection control and safety
Hours: 22 Credits: 1.5
This course deals with transmission of mi-
croorganisms, immunization practices for
healthcare workers, blood-borne pathogens
(Hepatitis and HIV), standard precautions,
isolation procedures, sterilization and disin-
fection, safety and WHMIS.
Mlt102
general laboratory practice
Hours: 42 Credits: 2.5
The theory and practice required to perform
basic procedures in a laboratory will be
presented. Laboratory glassware, pipettes,
use of balances, centrifuges, thermal equip-
ment, microscopes and solution preparation
with related calculations will be covered.
Mlt103
Anatomy & physiology
Hours: 85 Credits: 5.0
This course consists of twenty-two mod-
ules that have been designed to develop an
understanding of the structure and function
of organs and systems in the normal human
body. A study of basic chemical principles is
included. Medical terminology is expanded
and pathology is introduced. This course
is intended to extend the learner’s prior
knowledge of high school biology and pro-
vide background awareness of the human
body in health and disease.
Mlt220
histotechnology I
Hours: 59 Credits: 3.5
An introduction to the principles and prac-
tices of preparing clinical specimens for
histological examination, including fxation,
decalcifcation processing, embedding and
microtomy will be presented.
Mlt221
histology
Hours: 36 Credits: 2.0
This course will provide an introduction to
the functional classifcation of cells and tis-
sue arrangements, followed by the micro-
anatomical structure of the major organs of
the body.
Mlt222
histotechnology II
Hours: 63 Credits: 4.0
This course will provide an overview of the
techniques used to determine cellular and
non-cellular components for microscopic
examination.
seMester 2
cyt234
gynecologic cytology - theory
Hours: 100 Credits: 6.0
This course is a sequel to CYT224. Diag-
nostic cytology of the female genital tract
in the absence of disease and in pathologic
states: infammatory conditions, cancerous
lesions and reactions to therapy is covered.
Endocrinology is also studied.
cyt235
gynecologic cytology - laboratory
Hours: 154 Credits: 9.0
This course is a co-requisite for CYT234.
Laboratory sessions complement Gyneco-
logic Cytology Theory and focus on recogni-
tion of normal states and on identifcation
of pathologic states with emphasis in the
early detection of asymptomatic cancer.
Detection skills are introduced.
cyt247
respiratory cytology
Hours: 126 Credits: 7.5
Embryology, anatomy, histology and normal
cytology of the lung is covered. Respiratory
pathology is related to histologic and cy-
tologic findings in respiratory specimens.
Laboratory sessions focus on identifcation
of pathologic states and recognition of nor-
mal and inadequate specimens. Detection
skills are also developed.
cyt248
Aspiration cytology
Hours: 163 Credits: 9.5
Embryology, anatomy, histology and cytol-
ogy of salivary glands, lymph nodes, liver,
pancreas, thyroid, breast, etc. are studied.
Pathology of each site is related to histo-
logic and cytologic features. Principles of
immunocytochemistry are covered in rela-
tion to differential diagnosis. Laboratory
sessions complement theory and focus on
identifcation of pathologic states.
cyt249
Body fluid Analysis
Hours: 90 Credits: 5.0
Embryology, anatomy, histology and cytol-
ogy of the kidney, adrenals, lower urinary
tract, prostate, body cavities and central
nervous system are covered. Pathologic
states are related to histologic and cytologic
features in fuid and aspirated specimens.
Laboratory sessions complement theory
and focus on recognition of normal states
and on identifcation of pathologic states.
Detection skills are also developed.
Mlt100
professional practices
Hours: 34 Credits: 2.0
This course uses a “blended learning style”
of educational instruction. It uses both
WebCT and classroom instruction while
introducing the learner to the importance
of effective interpersonal communication
skills and team work. The diverse needs
and human relations posed by health care
clients are also explored. Students will also
analyze their personal effectiveness related
to wellness and stress management.
155 www.nait.ca
Mlt104
Immunology
Hours: 24 Credits: 1.5
This course is a study of the body’s defense
mechanisms, both innate and acquired. The
involvement of the immune system in vari-
ous disease states and clinical conditions
are also discussed. The student is intro-
duced to the principles of antigen-antibody
reactions and their application in many
laboratory tests.
Mlt216
Molecular Biology
Hours: 23 Credits: 1.5
This course provides the student with the
principles of molecular biology techniques
and demonstrates the practical applications
of this technology in a diagnostic laboratory.
Topics include, but are not limited to, DNA/
RNA isolation, hybridization, Polymerase
Chain Reaction, and restriction enzyme
analysis.
seMester 3
cyt324
cytology practicum (theory)
Hours: 220 Credits: 13.0
This course reviews and expands the stu-
dent’s theoretical knowledge of cytotech-
nology through tutorials, case studies, and
written exams. CYT 324 runs concurrent
with CYT326. (CYT325 runs concurrent
with CYT327)
cyt326
cytology practicum (clinical)
Hours: 690 Credits: 20.0
This course covers the clinical component
of cytotechnology training through work
experience in a Cytotechnology Laboratory.
The student will gain competency in detec-
tion and identifcation of cytologic entities
through evaluation of routine and archived
cytologic specimens. The student will also
learn and gain experience in cytoprepara-
tory techniques.
Mlt200
Management practices
Hours: 16 Credits: 1.0
This WebCT course provides the study of
health care organizational behaviour. It will
expose the student to the skills required for
supervisory/management positions within
laboratory medicine.
seMester 4
cyt325
cytology practicum (theory)
Hours: 220 Credits: 13.0
This course reviews and expands the stu-
dent’s theoretical knowledge of cytotech-
nology through tutorials, case studies, and
written exams. CYT 324 runs concurrent
with CYT326. (CYT325 runs concurrent
with CYT327)
cyt327
cytology practicum (clinical)
Hours: 690 Credits: 20.0
This course covers the clinical component
of cytotechnology training through work
experience in a Cytotechnology Laboratory.
The student will gain competency in detec-
tion and identifcation of cytologic entities
through evaluation of routine and archived
cytologic specimens. The student will also
learn and gain experience in cytoprepara-
tory techniques.
eNtrANce reQuIreMeNts
60% or higher in Biology 30, Chemistry 30,
English Language Arts 30-1, and Pure Math
30.
Applied Math 30 combined with one of the
following courses will be accepted in lieu of
Pure Math 30; Transitional Mathematics
101, or Algebra 35 with a competency level
of 65%.
international students
As English is the language of instruction in
all programs at the Institute, an adequate
knowledge of written and spoken English
is a prerequisite for admission. Regardless
of country of origin or citizenship status, all
applicants must demonstrate profciency in
the English language prior to acceptance.
This requirement may be demonstrated as
follows: successful completion of the spe-
cifcally named prerequisite English course
or an approved alternative English course
deemed to be equivalent to the specific
English requirement PLUS a minimum
of three years of education in English in
Canada or in a country where English is the
principal language.
Applicants who do not meet this require-
ment will be required to do the following:
a) successfully complete the specifically
named prerequisite English course or an ap-
proved alternative English course deemed
to be equivalent to the specifc English re-
quirement.
b) TOEFL Internet Based Test (TOEFL – iBT)
Applicants must achieve a minimum overall
score of 83 broken down as follows: speaking
component with a minimum of 23; reading
component with a minimum of 20; listening
component with a minimum of 20; and writ-
ing component with a minimum of 20.
If the testing score is based on the older
testing version, Test of English as a Foreign
Language (TOEFL), applicants must achieve
a minimum score of 230 and Test of Spoken
English (TSE) must be a minimum of 40.
Foreign credentials must be evaluated by the
International Qualifcation Assessment Ser-
vices Branch of Alberta Labour (IQAS). The
phone number for IQAS is (780) 427-2655.
acadeMic upGradinG
Not meeting the requirements to enter the
program of your choice? Consider Aca-
demic Upgrading options offered at NAIT.
non-acadeMic reQuireMents
A student accepted into the Cytotechnol-
ogy Program is required to be immunized
for Hepatitis B. This will be provided by
NAIT Health Services upon commence-
ment of the program. An administrative fee
may be charged for this service. This will be
confrmed at program commencement.
In addition, the Cytotechnology Program
requires that students have documented
proof of 2 red measles vaccinations or doc-
umented proof of immunity. Persons born
before 1970 are considered to have had the
disease and therefore have immunity.
A “2 Step” baseline TB skin test will be ad-
ministered by Health Services following the
commencement of the program at NAIT.
Two skin tests are given 1 to 3 weeks apart
and must be “read” 48-72 hours later. NAIT
Health Services will reveiw history of previ-
ous exposure, previous skin tests, chest X-
ray, or BCG vaccination. Students who have
already completed the “2 Step” test, will
be given a single TB test prior to practicum
placement.
All vaccinations must be completed prior to
entering into Year II of the program.
For further immunization information,
please contact NAIT Health Services at
(780) 471-8733.
Prior to completion of the frst year of the
program, the student may be required to
have a current First Aid and CPR (Level C)
certificate. A criminal record check clear-
ance may be required at some clinical train-
ing sites.
Completion of the Cytotechnology Career
Investigation report form is a requirement.
Basic computer literacy is required.
156 NAIt full time calendar 2008-2009
selection criteria
Student selection is highly competitive and
is based on criteria that may include aca-
demic achievement beyond the minimum
prerequisites identifed in the NAIT calen-
dar or application form. Last year, success-
ful applicants had a competitive average
range of approximately 75% to 80% in the
prerequisite courses. The competitive av-
erage range fuctuates yearly based on the
number of applications received.
New applicants are always encouraged to
apply and will be notifed if further upgrad-
ing is necessary in order to be competitive.
It is recommended that applicants who re-
quire upgrading write departmental exami-
nations upon completion of upgrading.
All applicants are encouraged to obtain a
high school diploma as some employers
may still require a high school diploma. Ap-
plicants with a credential in another NAIT
Health Science Program may be given some
preference in the selection process.
The following outlines the student selection
process:
The pre-requisites will be reviewed •
by the NAIT Registrar’s Offce for
compliance.
Short listing will occur based on •
academic standing. (Average of the
course prerequisites.)
Final Selection will be based as follows:
Academics 30% •
Career Investigation Report 30% •
Interview 40% •
career investiGation
The Career Investigation is a report ap-
plicants prepare as part of the student
selection process for many of our over-sub-
scribed full-time programs at NAIT
Completion of a Career Investigation Re-
port Form, specific to Cytotechnology is
required. The form can be obtained from
the Diagnostic Laboratory Administrative
Support (780) 471-7662, or download the
form in Adobe PDF.
advanced/transFer credit
The course instructor evaluates the applica-
tion for advanced credit then requests ap-
proval from the Chair.
delIvery optIoNs
classrooM or laB settinG
Traditional classrooms are used for most
lectures.
Labs are fully equipped with glassware,
reagents, balances, centrifuges, thermal
equipment, microscopes, automated ana-
lyzers, laboratory information system and
computers.
classrooM and study hours
Average number of hours in classroom per
week: Semester 1: 33 hours/week. Semester
2: 34 hours/week
During Practicum (Semester 3 and 4) stu-
dents can expect to work an average of 40
hours per week.
Average number of hours a student can ex-
pect to study outside of class: 15-20 hours/
week
co-op & Work experience
Dates: Semester III: June 25, 2009 - De-
cember 21, 2009. Semester IV: December
31, 2009 - May 30, 2010
Length: Students work 7.75 hours per day,
5 days per week, for 49 weeks during their
clinical placement.
Type of experience: This clinical practicum
provides practical experience in Gyneco-
logical and non-Gynecological Cytology,
and Cytopreparatory technique in a variety
of clinical sites. It includes a comprehensive
review of the student’s theoretical knowl-
edge through workshops, worksheets, case
studies and exams. This may vary with each
clinical site.
Salary: There is no salary or stipend received
during the clinical placement.
Relocation: All clinical training sites are lo-
cated in Edmonton (AB) and Calgary (AB).
Who facilitates the placement:
Evelyn Carroll (780)491-1384
Trudy Hamilton (780)471-7654
fees ANd eXpeNses
tuition and Fees
For estimated tuition and related costs refer
to the Program Costs Estimates chart in the
back of this book. Please note:
chart shows costs for the 2007/08 •
academic year – fgures for 2008/09
were not fnalized at the time of
printing. Please refer to the website for
the most up-to-date data (www.nait.
ca/webcalendar/fulltimefees.htm)
expenses listed on the chart are for •
Canadian and Landed Immigrant
students studying full-time (192 hours
or more per semester). International
students and those not studying full-
time should consult the Registrar’s
Offce for details of fees and expenses.
scholarships
For more information visit:
www.nait.ca/scholarships.
Financial aid
For more information, visit:
www.nait.ca/fnancialaid.
AddItIoNAl INforMAtIoN
Buddy systeM
There is no buddy system available for this
program.
inFo sessions
OPEN HOUSE Joint Information Sessions:
Medical Laboratory Technology
Cytotechnology <