Centre for Urban Education

Space Shapes Learning Copenhagen Study Visit 17th-21st March 2010

Index

About the Centre for Urban Education Introduction to the Space Shapes Learning study visit Part 1 – The Itinerary School Design Assessment Checklist Programme details: Visit 1 - Ordrup School Visit 2 – Designlab, IT University & Tryoutlabs, Copenhagen University Visit 3 - Ørestad Gymnasium Visit 4 - Hellerup School Visit 5 - Danish Architecture Centre Visit 6 - Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Part 2 - Useful Resources 1: Case Studies - UK 2: Case Studies - World 3: Reading List - PDF 4: Web Lists - UK 5: Web Lists - World Part 3 - Findings and Learning Outcomes Action Plan

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About the Centre for Urban Education:
The Centre for Urban Education is a pioneering Centre within the Institute of Education at Manchester Metropolitan University. We are committed to improving the aspirations, educational opportunities and attainments of all children, young people and families. We work with children, young people and their families, and the professionals concerned with their education and care, in urban contexts, in Greater Manchester, the North West of England, the rest of the UK and internationally. We bring together research, policy and practice to have a direct impact on all those working with children and young people in urban settings. Urban environments are rich in historical, cultural, creative and community diversity. The Centre draws upon the value of these assets to make partnerships and connections so that its programmes transform the lives of individuals and release the capital of our communities. Our Vision is to become a leading international centre for learning and development in urban environments. We do this through developing programmes and activity that: o Develop professionals and leaders to support the creativity and success of urban learners o Foster and develop inter-professional working o Support change and innovation in schools and communities o Network and disseminate practice regionally, nationally and internationally o Link research and practice to provide evidence of what works.

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Introduction
About the Space Shapes Learning Study Visit: This study visit is a unique opportunity for Heads, teachers, creative practitioners , and educators to learn together through a guided exploration of schools, public buildings and spaces in Copenhagen. The aim of the study visit is to investigate how innovative design and use of learning environments can impact on the learner, and enable creative delivery of the curriculum. Danish schools, museums and galleries have an established reputation for excellence and innovation in the design of their learning environments. During this 4 day, 3 night guided study visit participants will visit museums, galleries and schools and participate in discussions with artists and architects, to find out what makes a learning space creative, reflective, flexible, personalised and innovative; and what factors need to be considered to teach successfully in these spaces. We hope that participants will be informed and inspired by visits to schools, museums and galleries, other public buildings and innovative spaces. We will be guided by the teachers and architects who have created and work in new schools in Copenhagen, and have a chance to discuss with them the challenges and opportunities of designing new learning spaces for the 21st Century. Throughout the visit, participants will be facilitated to explore their own area of enquiry and will keep a learning journal; a final workshop back in Manchester will consider how participants can apply what they have learnt in school. There will be time for group reflection, discussion, and action planning, so that participants can take new ideas and approaches back to their schools and to apply this to the transformation of their own school learning environments. The visit has been designed and will be facilitated by CUE Creative Director Nancy Barrett, architect Ian Banks, and artist Noah Rose. How to Use this Learning Journal: This Learning Journal has been designed to provide you with some initial briefing before our main visits to schools, galleries and exhibitions; and to assist you to gather your thoughts and note points of interest at each visit, enabling you to reflect on your own learning outcome sand begin to develop an action plan for future work. Its is divided into 3 parts: In Part 1 you will find a briefing for each visit along with pages to make your own notes. In part 2 you will find some u s e f u l resources- including Reading Lists, CABES’ Schools Design Assessment Toolkit, websites and case studies. In part 3 you will find pages to prepare your findings from the visit, which we encourage you to share with colleagues, and pointers towards developing an action plan.

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The Itinerary
Contents:
School Design Assessment Check-List Programme details: Day 1 - 18 March 2010 Visit 1 - Ordrup School (am) Visit 2 – Designlab, IT University & Tryout labs, Copenhagen University Amager (am) Visit 3 - Ørestad Gymnasium (pm) Day 2 - 19 March 2010 Visit 4 - Hellerup School (pm) Visit 5 - Mind Your Behaviour Exhibition (pm) Day 3 - 20th March 2010 Visit 6 - Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (am)

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School Design Assessment Check-List
Successful School Design: Questions to Ask Linking loosely to the UK Commission for Architecture & the Built Environment's (CABE) key Assessment Criteria for schools, it is suggested that this plan can also be used here in helping participants list their responses to their own individual design assessment. The assessment criteria (listed below) are adapted from the CABE document Successful School Design: Questions to Ask: http://www.cabe.org.uk/publications/successful-school-design The 10 suggested criteria headings for our check-list (although please feel free to also add your own) are:

1.0 Identity & Context
o o o o Does the design match with building ethos & identity? Does it have a strong relationship with its neighbourhood? Does it exemplify desired civic character & educational image? Does it provide an enhanced sense of place?

2.0 Site & Buildings
o o o o Does it have a well arranged site & buildings? Are there strong and clear design concepts? Is the building inspiring and seen as good architecture? Do materials and construction add to this quality?

3.0 External Spaces
o Is there a clear relationship between grounds and building? o Are there a range of outdoor social, education and/or play spaces? o Has provision been made for learning and a wide range of physical activity outdoors?

4.0 Internal Planning
o Is the educational philosophy accommodated in internal spaces? o Does it have a clear spatial plan and broad range of spaces being utilised? o Are movement routes fully accessible and with clear hierarchy?

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5.0 Use
o Do the interiors provide variety and 'delight'? o Will learning spaces and furniture inspire educationally? o Will the building and acoustics work well in full use?

6.0 Environment
o Have space sizes and orientation been well considered throughout? o Are spaces well ventilated and well lit naturally? o Are environmental conditions both good and environmentally sustainable?

7.0 Feeling Safe
o Is any security strategy balanced with openness? o Has the building interior being designed to optimise users feeling safe and comfortable?

8.0 Long Life Loose Fit
o o o o Does the design provide day-to-day flexibility? Can the building accommodate different plans or pedagogies over longer term? Can the design accommodate future building adaptations and extensions? Does the furniture and equipment help facilitate a broad range of options?

9.0 Successful Whole
o o o o Is the whole design 'appropriate' and add up to more than a sum of its parts? Will it be a pleasure to work, eat, learn, play, teach and socialise in this building? Is this building a cherished part of its locality? Do you think it meets the aspirations of the client & community, as well as delivering educational transformation?

10.0 Other
o Any other issues to do with inclusive design approach, pedagogy or otherwise, that you feel is not addressed in the above check list

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Visit 1: Ordrup School interior by Bosch & Fjord
Thurs 18 March: 10.30-12.00
Where: Ordrup School Guides: Jakob Kolding, Head of Pedagogy at Ordrup & Bodil Hovaldt Bøjer of Bosch & Fjord. “Already built but disliked by staff and pupils, the school’s remodelling at first seemed an impossible task because of the general dissatisfaction. But success came once staff, who were initially hostile to the idea of yet more interruptions, learned to trust their ideas and to listen to students." “Our design brief was to produce a range of furniture and areas that would change the learning spaces and make everyone happy again,” says Rosan Bosch. “Because staff initially refused to enter into any dialogue with our team we decided to set up an office in a room in the school and worked hard for six weeks to win them over.” "What we did was mend the gap between the architecture and the teaching practice, and we used design and the design process to help the school transform ways of teaching and learning into a more personalised approach. Furthermore, we helped them to use space and design as an active part of their teaching practice". Information Source: Transforming Learning Places BSF and PCP Leadership Online. http://future.ncsl.org.uk/News.aspx?ID= 13

Design Objectives Ordrup School was developed as part of the Gentofte Municipality SKUB programme which is transforming 12 schools with a more child-centred teaching and focus on individuals. Creative Approach Bosch and Fjord, temporarily moved into the school during the design process with the intention of challenging staff and students’ use of the spaces within the school. Further to this, they gave students an insight into staff perception of the school environment, and vice versa, by giving different groups coloured post-it notes to put in their favourites places. Design Outcome The design at Ordrup is based around three concepts linking back to the SKUB model: Peace and absorption - A desire to withdraw through upholstered ‘reading tubes' or concentration booths. Discussion and cooperation - Carpet 'islands' for several children to sit on are hung on the walls and can put on the floor as temporary places for group gathering. Older children use sunken ‘hot pots’ for concentrated work. Security and presence - Individual ‘team areas’ that divide the school are given distinct identity based on comments made by the staff to give a sense of belonging. Ordrup Skole Grønnevænge 16 2920 Charlottenlund Tel: +45 3998 5959 ordrup.skole@gentofte.dk http://www.ordrupskole.dk

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Ordrup Briefing

Ordrup School Images: Photo credit: Anders Sune Berg http://www.bosch-fjord.com & Noah Rose

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Ordrup Check-List
Please now use as reference the suggested assessment check-list set out earlier to prepare your own analysis of Ordrup School, bearing in mind the supplied briefing sheets listed earlier. It is also suggested you may wish to further revise this assessment following the presentation by Rosan Bosch of Ordrup interior artists Bosch & Fjord. The suggested assessment criteria we ask you to respond to briefly are: Identity & Context - building ethos & identity / relationship with neighbourhood / civic character / sense of place

Site & Buildings - well arranged site & buildings / coherent design / inspiring & good architecture / materials & construction add to quality

External Spaces - relationship of grounds to building / outdoor space for learning & activity

Internal Planning - Good educational spaces & spatial plan / good movement routes and hierarchy

Use - variety and 'delight' / good learning spaces & furniture / building & acoustics work well

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Environment - space sizes and orientation good / ventilated and lit naturally / good & sustainable environmental conditions

Feeling Safe - security balanced with openness / passive surveillance / safe and comfortable for users

Long Life Loose Fit - day-to-day flexibility / different plans or pedagogies over time / accommodate future building adaptations / furniture and equipment facilitate range of options

Successful Whole - 'appropriate' and adds up to more than a sum of its parts / pleasure to work, eat, learn, play, teach and socialise in this building / cherished as part of its locality / meets aspirations and delivers educational transformation

Other - Any other issues to do with inclusive design approach, pedagogy or otherwise, that you feel is not addressed in the above check list

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Visit 2: Designlab, & Tryoutlabs,
(IT University & Copenhagen University)

of students, and all the while a third group can be building models, while a few individual students are soldering electronics. In the middle of the room, a large, green staircase provides a link to the mezzanine and seating space for lectures. Under the steps there is storage space available to all the students. The mezzanine also houses a revolutionising inspiration library that is light years ahead of standard educational libraries. Specially designed display cases hold literature mixed with magazines, objects and materials, all tagged with codes that link them to one another and to the internet. Students can use a tag reader to access information about the object, literature or material on display and be guided on to related objects, stories and news. The glass window toward the universityʼs large central atrium has a built-in exhibition function with the unique display case system, which opens up the room and highlights the many options available at the IT University to daily users as well as occasional visitors. This is a display window that is both visible and tangible. With the DesignLab the IT University now has a multi-purpose room that creates a unique base for the department, and which also acts as a powerful icon for the IT University as an innovative and modern educational institution. Information Source: www.boschfjord.com

by Bosch & Fjord
Thurs 18 March: 12.00-14.30
Where: DesignLab, IT University & Tryout labs, Copenhagen University Guide: Bodil Hovaldt Bøjer , Communications Manager, Bosch & Fjord With DesignLab Bosch & Fjord has raised the bar for future classroom designs. A wealth of educational possibilities, workshops and inspiration sites has been fitted into a mere 151 square metres. DesignLab is an innovative and modern classroom at the IT University of Copenhagen that provides an optimum setting and excellent facilities for course in digital design. By using the full height of the room Bosch & Fjord has defied the limitations of the 151 sq M floor space and created a highly flexible classroom that can accommodate a wide variety of educational activities. There is room for small and large group sessions, large plenary sessions, workshop activities with paper, models, electronics and IT, and a studio for documenting, staging and presenting the studentsʼ work. And all these activities can take place at the same time. While one group of students is engaged in a discussion at a big table, a teacher can give a presentation with a screen projector to another group

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Designlab & Tryoutlabs Briefing

Designlab images: Photo credit: Anders Sune Berg http://www.bosch-fjord.com

Note: Tryoutlabs are a new (February 2010) project by Bosch & Fjord. A reworking of some of the Designlab principles, this time for the more established Copenhagen University in their Amager campus. As the project is so new we don’t have any photos to include in the learning journal.

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Designlab/ Tryoutlabs Check-List
Please now use as reference the suggested assessment check-list set out earlier to prepare your own analysis of Designlab and Tryoutlabs bearing in mind the supplied briefing sheets listed earlier. It is also suggested you may wish to further revise this assessment following the presentation by Bodil Hovaldt Bøjer of interior architects Bosch & Fjord. The suggested assessment criteria we ask you to respond to briefly are: Identity & Context - building ethos & identity / relationship with neighbourhood / civic character / sense of place

Site & Buildings - well arranged site & buildings / coherent design / inspiring & good architecture / materials & construction add to quality

External Spaces - relationship of grounds to building / outdoor space for learning & activity

Internal Planning - Good educational spaces & spatial plan / good movement routes and hierarchy

Use - variety and 'delight' / good learning spaces & furniture / building & acoustics work well

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Environment - space sizes and orientation good / ventilated and lit naturally / good & sustainable environmental conditions

Feeling Safe - security balanced with openness / passive surveillance / safe and comfortable for users

Long Life Loose Fit - day-to-day flexibility / different plans or pedagogies over time / accommodate future building adaptations / furniture and equipment facilitate range of options

Successful Whole - 'appropriate' and adds up to more than a sum of its parts / pleasure to work, eat, learn, play, teach and socialise in this building / cherished as part of its locality / meets aspirations and delivers educational transformation

Other - Any other issues to do with inclusive design approach, pedagogy or otherwise, that you feel is not addressed in the above check list

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Visit 3: Ørestad Gymnasium by 3XN
Thurs 18 March: 15.00-18.00
Where: 3XN Offices (15.00) & Ørestad (16.30) Guides: Kim H Nielsen, 3XN Architects & Vibeke B Groth, Head of Education at Ørestad “Inspired by the institution’s innovative pedagogy and a creative approach to integrating IT, this design for a school in a new town on the outskirts of Copenhagen provides a range of inviting and flexible learning environments". “The structure of the building uses three huge columns as the primary loadbearing mechanism. This allows for great flexibility in the use of the floor space". “As part of a ‘new town’ development, the school is important as a landmark, and hosts social and cultural activities for the local communities.". “The school operates without traditional classrooms, instead encouraging students to work both individually and in groups in the various informal work and study areas ..... Creative use of media and communications technology is part of the school’s pedagogy, and its focus on local and global connectedness through technology has led to the local nickname of the virtual school." Information Source: Imagine School Design http://www.imagineschooldesign.org

Design Objectives The spatial organisation of the building is dictated by the pedagogy and curriculum of the school. Creative Approach Wedge-shaped voids in the three upper floor plates are positioned at slight rotations to one another, encouraging visual links and better connections between the different floors and creating double and triple height spaces.. Design Outcome Four floors house four study zones, with each containing a mixture of different sizes and types of learning spaces, fully or semi-enclosed from the open-plan circulation spaces. Furniture ranges from desks and chairs or stools to sofas and large beanbags, allowing flexibility.

Ørestad Gymnasium Ørestads Boulevard 75 2300 København S Tel +45 8230 2222 mail@oerestadgym.dk http://www.oerestadgym.dk

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Ørestad Briefing

Ørestad Gymnasium Images: Photo-share credit: http://www.flickr.com & Noah Rose

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Ørestad Check-List
Please now use as reference the suggested assessment check-list set out earlier to prepare your own analysis of Ørestad Gymnasium, bearing in mind the supplied briefing sheets listed earlier. It is also suggested you may wish to complete this assessment whilst also considering the earlier presentation made by Principle Architect Kim H Nielsen of Ørestad architects 3XN The suggested assessment criteria we ask you to respond to briefly are: Identity & Context - building ethos & identity / relationship with neighbourhood / civic character / sense of place

Site & Buildings - well arranged site & buildings / coherent design / inspiring & good architecture / materials & construction add to quality

External Spaces - relationship of grounds to building / outdoor space for learning & activity

Internal Planning - Good educational spaces & spatial plan / good movement routes and hierarchy

Use - variety and 'delight' / good learning spaces & furniture / building & acoustics work well

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Environment - space sizes and orientation good / ventilated and lit naturally / good & sustainable environmental conditions

Feeling Safe - security balanced with openness / passive surveillance / safe and comfortable for users

Long Life Loose Fit - day-to-day flexibility / different plans or pedagogies over time / accommodate future building adaptations / furniture and equipment facilitate range of options

Successful Whole - 'appropriate' and adds up to more than a sum of its parts / pleasure to work, eat, learn, play, teach and socialise in this building / cherished as part of its locality / meets aspirations and delivers educational transformation

Other - Any other issues to do with inclusive design approach, pedagogy or otherwise, that you feel is not addressed in the above check list

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Visit 4: Hellerup School by Arkitema
Fri 19 March: 13.30 to 15.00
Where: Hellerup School Guides: Helle K Petersen, Senior Teacher at Hellerup & Ulrik Dybro, Project Architect at Arkitema "The traditional school structure with permanent home rooms was replaced by so-called ‘home areas’ consisting of a mixture of large and small spaces with hexagonal bases where children are briefed together before finding a place they are comfortable to work in". "The school yard is located along the building’s west and south facades. There are mounds in the landscape in bright colours, a pool with stepping stones, a bicycle and moon car track, basketball court, amphitheatre, sand boxes and aerial ropeway ". Innovative solutions to specific areas " There are several special study areas: the ‘Kuturium’ with room and facilities for creative, practical and musical developments, the ‘Forum’ for sports and large events; the ‘Kulinarium’ for teaching home economics; the ‘Universe’, an information and work place for grown-ups and children, with books and computer equipment; and the ‘Naturium’ housing natural sciences and a maritime centre". Information Source: Imagine School Design http://www.imagineschooldesign.org

Design Objective The school is the largest single project in the extensive modernization of the Gentofte municipal school system. It not only provides new school facilities for up to 750 pupils and 65 teachers & assistants, but has a substantial role in regenerating a post-industrial area. Creative Approach The building programme was developed through a close collaboration between consultants and participants in the school development project, as well as the many other interested parties; pupils, parents, teachers, the school board and the municipal council.. Design Outcomes The resultant school is very spacious and provides in total about nine square metres of space per child.

Hellerup Skole Dessaus Boulevard 10 2900 Hellerup Tel. +45 39154040 hellerup.skole@gentofte.dk http://www.hellerupskole.dk

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Hellerup Briefing

Hellerup School Images: Photo credit http://www.arkitema.com

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Hellerup Check-List
Please now use as reference the suggested assessment check-list set out earlier to prepare your own analysis of Hellerup School, bearing in mind the supplied briefing sheets listed earlier. It is also suggested you may wish to complete this assessment whilst also considering any presentations made on the school tour by Project Architect Ulrik Dybro of Hellerup architects Arkitema. The suggested assessment criteria we ask you to respond to briefly are: Identity & Context - building ethos & identity / relationship with neighbourhood / civic character / sense of place

Site & Buildings - well arranged site & buildings / coherent design / inspiring & good architecture / materials & construction add to quality

External Spaces - relationship of grounds to building / outdoor space for learning & activity

Internal Planning - Good educational spaces & spatial plan / good movement routes and hierarchy

Use - variety and 'delight' / good learning spaces & furniture / building & acoustics work well

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Environment - space sizes and orientation good / ventilated and lit naturally / good & sustainable environmental conditions

Feeling Safe - security balanced with openness / passive surveillance / safe and comfortable for users

Long Life Loose Fit - day-to-day flexibility / different plans or pedagogies over time / accommodate future building adaptations / furniture and equipment facilitate range of options

Successful Whole - 'appropriate' and adds up to more than a sum of its parts / pleasure to work, eat, learn, play, teach and socialise in this building / cherished as part of its locality / meets aspirations and delivers educational transformation

Other - Any other issues to do with inclusive design approach, pedagogy or otherwise, that you feel is not addressed in the above check list

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Visit 5 : DANISH ARCHITECTURE CENTRE (DAC) ‘MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR’
Fri 19 March: 16.00 to 17.00
Exhibition by 3XN Architects at the Danish Architecture Centre (DAC) Where: Danish Architecture Centre (16.00) Guides: Self Exploration MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR focuses on and challenges the concept of behaviour expressed in seven themes directly associated with the design universe of its architectural practice. These themes are: o o o o o o o Cultural Behaviour Learning Behaviour Human Behaviour Social Behaviour Public Behaviour Building Behaviour Responsible Behaviour

such as: Ørestad College, the new Denmark’s Aquarium, 'The Blue Planet', Saxo Bank's award-winning head offices and the Danish Embassy in Berlin."

“Architecture can get people talking together. Architecture can calm children in the classroom. Architecture can make p a s s i v e p eo pl e more ac tive. Architecture can shape corporate culture. Architecture can encourage people to find new paths, discover new aspects of their city – and of themselves. In short, architecture can shape your behaviour. MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR invites you to step in behind the scenes at one of the largest and most successful architectural companies in Denmark, 3XN, known for prestigious projects

“The exhibition is based on 3XNs most recent and remarkable projects, and provides an insight into the thoughts, visions and processes that lie behind 3XNs architecture. 3XN has carved out a unique position for itself within Danish architecture and is a strong presence internationally – thanks to the studio’s spectacular buildings, a firm focus on innovation and not least the important position given to human behaviour." Information Source: Danish Architecture Centre http://www.dac.dk/myb/mybweb.html Danish Architecture Centre Strandgade 27B DK 1401 Copenhagen K T: + 45 3257 1930 http://english.dac.dk

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DAC Briefing

DACImages: Photo-share credit: http://www.flickr.com & Noah Rose

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DAC: ‘Mind Your Behaviour’
In his DAC exhibition MIND YOUR BEHAVIOUR, Kim H Nielsen, Principal Architect at 3XN invites us to step behind the scenes at 3XN. As we will already know, the practice is known for its prestigious projects like Ørestad Gymnasium. The exhibition focuses on and challenges the concept of human behaviour as expressed in seven themes that 3XN directly associate with the "design universe" of its architectural practice and philosophy. These themes are ‘Cultural Behaviour’, ‘Learning Behaviour’, ‘Human Behaviour’, ‘Social Behaviour’, ‘Public Behaviour’, ‘Building Behaviour’, and ‘Responsible Behaviour’. They place focus on that which happens "when architecture shapes behaviour and when architecture through its own behaviour shapes our lives and relationships". Therefore, as further food for thought in advance of the concluding plenary session please think about this philosophical approach, and respond with your thoughts and impressions: Building Behaviour - We all want to be original and authentic. We turn up our noses at copied goods and hope one day to invent a new wheel. What’s innovative is good, what’s familiar is boring - Raises the question: How can we be original, yet simultaneously adapt to the familiar?

Cultural Behaviour - The world is shrinking. Globalization means that we no longer have one TV channel but 50; the internet gives us access to vast volumes of knowledge and low price travel has made the whole world familiar - Raises the question: How can we use each other’s differences to expand our world again?

Human Behaviour - Everybody remembers a first; the first day at school, the first trip to New York, their first love. We thirst after new experiences, yet time after time we still seem to choose the same old paths - Raises the question: What makes people choose new paths?

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Learning Behaviour - Most of us attended a school where we were taught to put up our hand and to sit quietly in our seats. Today, the same classrooms need to accommodate very different teaching methods - Raises the question: Can a building in itself aid the education process?

Public Behaviour - Many people no longer see themselves as ‘urban dwellers’, but instead see themselves as belonging to a particular neighborhood. Despite so many examples in the past, many new urban developments still seem empty and soulless Raises the question: How do you lay out an urban environment for people?

Responsible Behaviour - The materials of the future are already available to us. They can help us find the answers for many of the challenges that the world faces in the future - Raises the question: Should the materials we know limit architecture, or should we develop materials that meet our needs?

Social Behaviour - Man is born a social creature. We seem to be inspired with good ideas and learn better in the company of others. We spend our school years studying and absorbing knowledge with our peers - Raises the question: Should interaction cease when working life begins

Other - Let us have any other thoughts on this theoretical philosophy?

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Visit 6 - Louisiana Museum of Modern Art
Sat 20 March: 11.00 to 13.30
Louisiana Museum of Modern Art by architects Jørgen Bo, Wilhelm Wohlert and Claus Wohlert Where: Louisiana Museum Guides: Self Exploration

with different materials, technics or themes - changing with the different exhibitions".

"Every museum naturally has its own history and develops in its own special way. Louisiana opened in 1958 with a collection of modern Danish art. The original idea was to establish an interplay between visual art, architecture and landscape and in so doing create an unmistakably Danish setting and a haven for people with a serious interest in contemporary art". "The park serves as an ideal setting for displaying the museum’s collection of modern sculptures. Similarly the prominent museum buildings, constructed between 1958 and 1998, offer a fascinating background for the permanent collection of twentieth century art". "The activities in the Childrens Wing are designed for children age 3 till 6 years old, 7 till 11 years old, and 12 till 16 years old. All activities in the Childrens Wing takes their starting point in the Louisiana museums exhibitions and collection of modern art. Beside a Computer room and a Storytelling-room the Childrens Wing also houses rooms with open workshops, where children and their adults can work independently

"The Childrens Wing offers different art mediating activities designed for families, childrens institutions and their staff". "The museum Louisiana opened the Childrens Wing in September 1994. From the Childrens Wing there is direct access to the Lake Garden with an impressive collection of allottmenthouses created by world famous architects, landart by Alfio Bonanno and slides from the 1978-exhibition Children is a people". Information Source: Saatchi Gallery http://www.saatchi-gallery.co.uk Louisiana Museum of Modern Art Gl. Strandvej 13 3050 Humlebæk Tel: +45 49190719 mail@louisiana.dk http://www/louisiana.dk

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Louisiana Briefing

Louisiana Museum Images: Photo-share credit: http://www.flickr.com & Noah Rose

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Louisiana
You are encouraged to explore Louisiana, and in particular to consider the architecture, visual art, and landscape jointlly, in terms of scale, context, design, detail, use and meaning. In particular, we would encourage you to consider the following: Colour in Art Louisiana's current COLOUR in ART exhibition comprises 150 works by 72 different artists, and explores the close relationship between art and colour. work viewed against the landscape, as well as a play sculpture. The latter may not have been the original intention, given parameters set in written instructions, but certainly that is how young children interpret it!

Louisiana: Childrens Wing The Children’s Wing is a three-storey annex and ideal place to find imaginative ways of introducing children and young people to modern art and encouraging them to think about it. Spaces are varied in size and outlook, and receive direct and indirect natural daylight and overlook the outdoor spaces. Staff management and facilitation has a light touch.

Gleaming Lights of the Souls: Yayoi Kusama In this exhibit visitors are invited to enter a small mirrored chamber, with a pool of water on the floor. An aray of small LED lights hung from the ceiling produce endless reflections. A series of recurring visions first came to artist Kusama in childhood, after which she started seeing a psychiatrist at the age of 10. She became gripped by these visions of dots, nets and violet flowers covering everything she saw. Louisiana Pavilion: 3XN Louisiana Pavilion by 3XN architects was designed to demonstrate cutting edge possibilities with sustainable and intelligent micro materials. The vibrant green pavilion acts as both sculptural

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Design Analysis- Louisiana
Design Analysis: Understanding Scale, Context, Detail & Meaning
The important aspects of design are considered at different scales, gradually focusing in from the overall environment and surrounding area to micro attention to design detail and then ultimately the user experience - out of this comes a holistic whole. Whilst we appreciate this is a very quick visit, please consider your immediate thoughts on the following 4 questions.

1. How does Louisiana address the macro scale of the site and its wider environment - for example:
• • • • • • • Links to its distant context of Copenhagen city Addresses the surrounding physical, social/community and economic context Acts as a visual focus or complements open spaces around it Provides well designed public spaces both internally and externally Helps give the site an identity Exploits views and orientation Relationship to Øresund and views to Sweden.

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Design Analysis- Louisiana
2. How does Louisiana address the context of the museum's actual building and grounds - for example:
• • • • • • • • • • • Provides for all required functions - cultural and practical Encloses space and activity Links its odd cluster of buildings via circulation Uses the natural ground levels and contours Brings an 'art' into its buildings to become 'architecture' Sets off the relationship between architecture, exhibit and visitor Offers options for both use and perspective Considers future flexibility and adaptability of spaces Provides an contemplative, inspiring, healthy and safe environment for the user Addresses sustainability during operational use and subsequent uses – for example, through sustainable use of energy and materials, and adaptive use of space and materials Is accessible to all - regardless of age or ability

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Design Analysis- Louisiana
3. How does Louisiana address the micro detail of the museum - for example:
• • • • • • • • Sets off its works of art and landscaping Manages the quality of light and ventilation – natural and artificial Uses colour - either bold, natural or subtle Deals with finishes and materials – natural, man-made, looks, texture, durability Uses its fixtures & fittings, furniture and equipment – including looks and ease of use Utilises technology, IT and new media Provides otherwise for its visitors needs by way of refreshments, consumer goods and support facilities Ensures access for all

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Design Analysis- Louisiana
4. How does Louisiana address its active use and educational / cultural opportunity - for example:
• • • • • • • Subconsciously or consciously influences the user cultural experience and learning opportunity Caters for families and young people Deals with user wayfinding and interpretation matters Uses its staffing and management to compliment the enjoyment of the building Deals with the issues of trust and security of exhibits Uses different spaces, relationships and perspective to engage with visitors and nurture contemplation Uses other devices to support education and learning

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Useful Resources
Contents:
1: Case Studies - UK 2: Case Studies - World 3: Reading List - PDF 4: Web Lists - UK 5: Web Lists - World

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Case Studies: UK
Westborough School: Westcliff, Essex by Cottrell and Vermuelen "The Cardboard Building, at Westborough Primary School in Westcliff, took four years to build and is Europe's first building made from exclusively recycled cardboard materials".

learning, and how it inspires the pupils to follow careers in design and architecture". Source: Teachernet Inspiration Series http://www.teachers.tv/video/2884 http://www.cv-arch.co.uk The 'Big Rug School': DfES Exemplar School concept by Sarah Wigglesworth Architects "This project was part of a research project funded by the DfES looking at the design of new school buildings. The brief was to design a new 2-form entry Exemplar Primary School. The building was to be sited on the edge of a conurbation and suffered from noise problems due to its proximity to an urban trunk road".

"The walls, roof and supporting beams are all made from recycled cardboard which was developed from materials the school had collected. All the furniture within the building is made from old materials, which have either been recycled or re-used. Even the garden has been designed from sustainable resources: old chimney pots, railway sleepers and cockle shells from the nearby beach". "This programme takes a look inside Westborough School and the revolutionary design of the Cardboard Building, and follows the continuing sustainable development work in the construction of the playground". "The experience shows how the development of an acclaimed work of architecture has been used as a teaching aid to support the children’s

"Sarah Wigglesworth Architects proposed a design which was based on the concept of the warp and weft of a big rug. ‘The Big Rug School’ was developed to be a richly woven textile that integrates the pupils, staff and community with the landscape, local conditions and collective aspirations. It found novel solutions to the brief, offering flexible spaces throughout the school for both children and adults to engage in individually-directed learning". Information Source: Architects4Education http://www.architects4education.co.uk/

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Case Studies: World
Ingunnarskoli School: Reykjavik, Iceland by Bruce Jilk Ingunnarskoli in Reykjavik is a new school model for Iceland. This learning environment design integrates educational planning, programming, and design during the decision making. It is designed for 400 students in grades one through ten.

http://c2a.co.uk/downloads/resources/D esignDownIceland.pdf http://www.designshare.com Discovery 1 School: Christchurch, New Zealand by Wynyard Design Studio "Discovery 1 provides a great example of a school that is truly integrated into to its social and physical context, inhabiting the top floor of a department store in Christchurch’s central business district". "The school offers an innovative approach to teaching and learning that puts students' individual learning needs at the centre and then uses locations and facilities around the city to provide the setting for each child’s learning experience".

The process for making decisions about this new school was called 'Design Down.' It started with the biggest issues, such as the overall context, and moved toward more detailed aspects. The Design Down Committee, a multistakeholder group of parents, teachers, administrators, students, employers, neighbours, and other concerned citizens, delivers this. Early in the design process the Learning Signature is developed. The learning signature focuses on what is special and unique; it becomes the identity of the school. Source: Design Down Process: Designing a School in Iceland with its Users for PEB Exchange by Bruce Jilk

Integrated social / physical context "One key element about the school is using its ‘inner city’ status – making use of city centre facilities - swimming pool, businesses and art galleries on a day to day basis. Source: Information Source: Imagine School Design http://www.imagineschooldesign.org http://www.discovery1.school.nz

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Reading List - PDF
Web-Downloadable PDF Documents UK - Schools Policy Partnerships for Schools (PfS): Building Schools For the Future (BsF) Standard Documents: http://www.partnershipsforschools.org.u k/library/bsf_standard_docs.jsp Department of Children, Schools & Families (DcfS):21st Century Schools White Paper : http://publications.dcsf.gov.uk/eOrdering Download/21st_Century_Schools_Sum mary.pdf DfES Better Buildings, Better Desgin, Better Education: http://publications.teachernet.gov.uk/eOr deringDownload/10yrs%20investment.p df UK - School Design Quality DfES: Schools for the Future: Exemplar Design Compendium: http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/_doc/61 13/Exemplar%20Designs%20compen dium.pdf Office for Government Commerce: Design Quality: Achieving Excellence in Public Procurement Guide: http://www.ogc.gov.uk/documents/CP00 69AEGuide9.pdf UNISON: The Governors Essential Guide to PFI: http://www.unison.org.uk/acrobat/12174. pdf UNISON: Reclaiming the Initiative: Putting the Public Back into PFI: http://www.unison.org.uk/acrobat/18461. pdf

Construction Industry Council: Design Quality Indicators Online Guide: http://www.dqi.org.uk/dqi/Common/DQI Online.pdf CABE: Picturing School Design using DQI: http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/picturingschool-design.pdf CABE: How CABE's School Design Panel Works: http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/successfulschool-design.pdf CABE: Successful School Design Questions to Ask: http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/successfulschool-design-questions.pdf CABE: Schools for the Future Client Design Advisor: http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/buildingschools-for-the-future-the-client-designadvisor.pdf CABE: Achieving Well Designed Schools Through PFI: http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/achievingwell-designed-schools-through-pfi.pdf CABE: Assessing Secondary School Design Quality: http://www.cabe.org.uk/files/assessingsecondary-school-design-qualitysummary.pdf Architecture Centre Network (Kent Architecture Centre): Design Quality Indicators for Schools Question Cards: http://www.architecturecentre.org/docum ents/publications/DESC_24Q_V3.pdf Building Schools Exhibition & Conference 2010: http://www.itmps.co.uk/digitaleditions/bs cecjournal2010.html

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School Works: Creating New Schools Guide: http://www.schoolworks.org/pdf/schoolBuildings.pdf UK - Design Models Big Rug School - Exemplar Primary School Design Model: http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/_doc/6102 /sarah%20wigglesworth%20compendiu m.pdf Design Share: Design Patterns for 21st Century Schools: http://www.designshare.com/images/Th eLanguageofSchoolDesigneBooksumm aryweb.pdf Innovation Unit: Classrooms for the Future: http://www.innovationunit.co.uk/images/stories/classrooms_of _the_future.pdf UK - Learning Environments / Pedagogy Learning Environments of the Future (Final Report for CABE / Building Futures)

http://rubble.heppell.net/places/media/fin al_report.pdf Denmark - General SKUB: The School of the Future (Denmark) http://create2009.europa.eu/fileadmin/C ontent/Downloads/PDF/Projects/Nationa l_projects/DK_SKUB_The_school_of_th e_future.pdf International - General International Union of Architects: Copenhagen Declaration; Sustainable By Design: http://www.uiaarchitectes.org/image/PDF/COP15/COP 15_Declaration_EN.pdf Design Down Process: Designing a School in Iceland with its Users for PEB Exchange http://c2a.co.uk/downloads/resources/D esignDownIceland.pdf

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Web Lists: UK
List of Key Websites UK - Schools Policy: Department of Children, Schools & Families Timetable for Action: Every Child Matters: http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/everychildmatter s Department of Children, Schools & Families Timetable for Action: http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/21stcenturyscho olssystem Partnerships for Schools (PfS): is responsible for management and delivery of the government's capital programmes for schools: http://www.partnershipsforschools.org.u k Teachernet: School Building Design, Management & Development: http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/managem ent/resourcesfinanceandbuilding/school buildings/?section=681&CFID=5200149 &CFTOKEN=e02d2f-7c8b87fd-acb1457d-8364-b4af9308a784 UK - Schools Best Practice Advocacy & Advice MMU Institute of Education: Centre for Urban Education (CUE): http://www.ioe.mmu.ac.uk/cue Centre for Urban Education (CUE): Space Shapes Learning (Copenhagen Study Tour 2010): http://www.cuecopenhagen.blogspot.com Engaging Places : A resource to support teaching and learning through buildings and places: http://www.engagingplaces.org.uk/home UNISON: PFI Guidance: http://www.unison.org.uk/pfi Construction Industry Council: Design Quality Indicators for Schools Online: http://www.dqi.org.uk/website/dqiforscho ols/default.aspa Building Futures: Debates the future of the built environment and socioeconomic & environmental impact over twenty-years: http://www.buildingfutures.org.uk British Council for School Environments (BCSE): UK's leading charity in education, design and construction: http://www.bcse.uk.net Sorrell Foundation / Joined Up Design for Schools: Gives pupils the role of clients for a design project at their school: http://www.thesorrellfoundation.com/join edupdesignforschools.php Transformation Trust: Independent charity set up to give young people the opportunities and experiences to fulfil their potential: http://www.transformationtrust.org.uk Learning Through Landscapes: Helps schools and early years settings make the most of outdoor spaces for play and learning: http://www.ltl.org.uk London Open House: Open House is an independent organisation committed to raising the standard of the built environment: http://www.londonopenhouse.org/school design/index.html Transforming Learning Spaces: http://future.ncsl.org.uk

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Web Lists: World
School Design Studio: Private sector best practice portal linked to Fielding Nair International: http://schoolstudio.typepad.com Design Share: School design best practice portal: http://www.designshare.com Imagine School Design: Sheffield University's an independent design-led research and consultancy unit: Bureau: Design + Research [BDR]: http://www.imagineschooldesign.org UK - Learning Environments / Pedagogy Futurelab: Not-for-profit organisation that is dedicated to transforming teaching and learning: http://www.futurelab.org.uk We Are the People: David Putnam's Education Inspired Film: http://www.wearethepeoplemovie.com Teachers TV: http://www.teachers.tv Professor Stephen Heppell/ Ultralab: http://rubble.heppell.net http://www.naec.org.uk/ultralab/ww3 Denmark - General Danish Architecture Centre: http://english.dac.dk 3XN: Mind Your Behaviour: http://english.dac.dk/visArtikel.uk.asp?ar tikelID=6173 Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Denmark: Learning from Denmark 2010: http://www.amblondon.um.dk/en/menu/L earningFromDenmark/LearningFromDe nmark2010 International - General European Year of Creativity and Innovation 2009: http://create2009.europa.eu Innovative Designs: School Design Exemplars: http://www.innovativedesign.net/awards. htm Innovative School Design Parameters for Hong Kong in 21st Century: http://www.cuhk.edu.hk/proj/innovativeschool/home.htm

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Findings and Learning Outcomes
Contents:
Day 3 - 20th March Plenary Session (pm) Action Plan

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Findings and Learning Outcomes
Plenary Sat 20 March: 16.00 to 18.00 Part 3
Findings and Learning Outcomes: How can the learning environment be developed to support new and innovative forms of teaching and learning? You might want to think about: • • • • • • • How ICT Interested is integrated into the school design Furniture and fittings New ways of using additional / rearranged physical space within the school Flexible spaces Immersive Learning Space, Outdoor space Specialist spaces- for example, Art or Science How functional space- for example, walls, corridors, storage- is designed AND used. Where: Hotel Maritime Meeting Room Facilitators: Nancy Barrett / Noah Rose / Ian Banks

What factors need to be considered to teach and facilitate learning successfully in these spaces? You might want to think about: • • • What different types of teaching are used? Where students are located when they are learning- researching- working in groups? How does the curriculum support the development of skills and competencies as well as knowledge?

What are the characteristics of spaces that encourage: • • • • • • • reflection & contemplation discussion creativity and imagination project or team working and collaboration

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What learning can I take back into my own context? What are the 3 most striking things, relevant to my own context, I can share with colleagues: 1. 2. 3.

What ideas or innovations can I adapt or adopt into design and planning for my school?

What are the key challenges in the next: 3 months: 6 months: 12 months:

What are the key opportunities in the next: 3 months: 6 months: 12 months:

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Next Steps: Actions for transforming the learning environment. In setting out your next steps it may be useful to think about some of the following things: Action Sharing the learning Outcomes – presenting to and briefing colleagues/head/ governors/ community Setting up a steering group ‘Visioning’ how our new learning spaces could be Mapping out the school re-build/ design process Identifying design challenges and opportunities Involving learners in identifying opportunities and solutions Identifying opportunities to influence and engage in design Developing briefs for facilitators/ creative practitioners to work with staff and students Identifying and allocating resources form within capital budgets Anything else? Who needs to be involved? What resources do we have/ need?

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For more information contact: Centre for Urban Education Institute of Education Manchester Metropolitan University 799 Wilmslow Road Didsbury M20 2RR T: +44 (0) 161 247 2406 E: cue@mmu.ac.uk www.ioe.mmu.ac.uk/cue

Copyright 2010, Centre for Urban Education, Manchester Metropolitan University.

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