HHS Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign

Management Plan
2004
November 2003,- May
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INTRODUCTION

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The Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 is being implemented across five federal
agencies, with certification and outreach responsibilities falling under the Department of
Health and Human Services. The Department, and specifically the Office of Refugee
Resettlement, is dedicated to increasing the number of trafficking victims that are
certified and ultimately served. As part of that effort, ORR is embarking on a two-year
public awareness campaign.
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The following management plan outlines specific goals, strategies for accomplishing
those goals, and a month-by-month project plan to reach those goals. The plan focuses
on the first six months of the project -from the development stage through an evaluation
of the pilot cities. The plan will be extended in Spring 2004 to cover the next six- to 12month period, leveraging the findings and accomplishments of the initial period.

GOALS

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The overall campaign'goal is clear:

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Inc[g_a$ethe gumber of trafficking victims identified and assisted.
To reach this overarching goal, all pieces of the campaign must fall into place and
compliment each other to be successful. For example, the establishment of a tbll-free'
hotline is critical to victims coming forward and being immediately directed to services;
and participation from grantees who can provide victim services prior to certification is
also necepary if we are to protect and keep those victims once they are identified.
Feedback from the ORR grantees and former victims themselves also remind us that
this overarching goal calls for a change in behavior, which will take a period of time. To more specifically direct the public awareness efforts, we have established
communications goals. These measurable and achievable goals will help lead to
accomplishment of our campaign goal.

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Increase awareness of the trafficking issue among people most likely to
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immediately encounter victims.
lncrease intermediary understanding of appropriate message and action
steps when encountering a victim of trafficking.
lncrease awareness among trafficking victims of the services available to
them.

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SrRA'rEGIES
The public awareness campaign will focus on two primary audiences - those who are
most likely to come into contact with victims (intermediaries) and the victims themselves.
The intermediaries will be the first target in each city where the campaign is launched.
We believe intermediaries can be utilized to identify victims and encourage them to
come forward. While ultimately the goal is to encourage victims to come forward on their
own, if a victim does come forward and the intermediary does not know how to react
quickly and appropriately, we might lose the opportunity to assist.

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As discussed, we recommend launching the campaign for the intermediaries in three
pilot cities - Phoenix, Ariz., Atlanta, Ga. a'nd Philadelphia, Pa./Camden, N.J. Following
an evaluation of the pilot and an-adjustment of approach and materials as necessary,
additional cities will be launched and, when appropriate, the direct-to-victim components ,
added.
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The following strategies will be used to accomplish the communications goals for the
intermediary outreach:
Saturate local media in target markets, as well as appropriate national and trade
media, to increase overall awareness and create a "buzz."
Produce and disseminate materials tailored to key influencer groups that define
trafficking an$butline action steps for when victims are encountered.
Formulate local coalitions whose members will know how to recognize victims
and cansa33ist_
thqse victims in getting access to services.

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TARGET AUDIENCES
While thegecond wave of outreach will focus on the victims themselves, wave one will
be targeted to the following intermediaries:
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Law Enforcement
o Vice squad
o Select national law enforcement associations
o Local police
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Service Providers
o Health clinics
o Emergency room personnel
o NGOs
o Faith-based orgar~izations

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PROGRAM ELEMENTS
The following recommended elements are aimed at helping to increase understanding of
the trafficking issue as well as to help inform the target audiencesfkey inte-rmediaries
about preferred identification and action steps when encountering a victim.
This section is laid out chronologically, providing a road map of activity between
November 2003 and May 2004. We expect the plan and specific tools to be modified as
necessary and as additional information is uncovered.

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November

- December 2003: Message and Material D e v e l o p t n n
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1. Develop Key Messages ,and Campaign Identification
Using the messages presented in the RFP as a starting point, the Ketchum team will
further refine those ideas and develop overarching campaign messages, as well as
supporting message points specific to each of our target audiences. The general
platform will include messages that cover the following:
Definition of trafficking
Availability of services
Action statement
Victim d,es~ription/information

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In addition, the ~ e t c h u i nteam will develop a logo or graphic identification for the
campaign. This logo will be placed on all media and target audience materials to alert
the user that it & dgyeloped in cooperation with the HHS program and is specifically
related to trafficking. We may also want to allow local organizations and grantees to use
the logo on material approved by HHS.

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2. Develop Earned and Paid Media Materials
The Ketchum team will develop materials for use in conducting outreach to media.
These materials will be developed for use at the national level and will be customized for
use in the three local test markets. k hey will also be developed in a fashion that will-- -make them helpful information tools for dissemination to potential coalition members,
third-party partners or other intermediaries. They will be fashioned in a way that they
can be easily customized for a particular audience.

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Earned Media Materials
The following will be used for press outreach to national, local and trade media:
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Fact SheetsfBackgrounders
Definition of Trafficking and Key Statistics
Commercial Sex Trafficking
Labor Trafficking (Agricultural, Domestic Servitude, Industrial)
Trafficking Victims Protection Act
Global Trafficking vs. Domestic Trafficking
Federal Government Anti-Trafficking Initiatives

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Tools & Resources
List of national, state and local contacts including law enforcement officials,
advocates, government officials (localized for each test market)
List of national anti-trafficking associations, non-profit organizations
List of resources for trafficking victims (for media to include in stories)

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Other Useful Materials
Trafficking Frequently Asked Questions
Tips for Identifying Trafficking Victims
Case Studies
Local Efforts to Combat Trafficking
Personal Stories
Bios af key spokespeople
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Significant articles, white papers or~research
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Paid Media Materials
Print advertising will be the primary vehicle for the initial phase of the campaign, with
the exception being Hispanic media in Phoenix and Philadelphia/Camden, which will
also utilize radio ads, since radio is an important vehicle for reaching Hispanic
audiences.
Target Audience Advertising: These ads will include calls to action and contact
information."xhey will be developed in a manner that they can be pitched as
PSAs should a partner or coalition member be willing to place them free of
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charge in their publication.
Print ad for law enforcement trade publications
Prinf'Xl"fof health care/social service trade publications
Print ad for faith-based publications

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Ethnic Advertising: These ads will be developed to appear inconspicuously in
the back sections of alternative newspapers, ethnic publications and tabloids
where ads for massage parlors and brothels currently exist, and where
customers, victims and law enforcement looking for targets, will most likely see
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Print and radio ad aimed at Hispanic publications
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Print ad for Asian publications
Print ad for Eastern European publications
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3. Prepare Media Lists and Pitch Angles
In an effort to begin media outreach as soon as possible, the team will pull,together
media lists for national media, pilot-city media, trade media for each target audience,
conservative and religious reporters and the like. The team will also identify and develop
multiple story angles. For example, pitch angles may include:
' Personal interest features on those who have been rescued from victim status by
the HHS program.
The priority that the administration is giving to address the problem of the
trafficking of persons.
Efforts that HHS is making to provide services to victims.

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Understanding the complexities of trafficking, who's involved at the federal, state
and local levels, and what people can do to help identify victims in their
communities.
The team will take advantage of any media opportunities that arise prior to the launch of
the pilot cities. For example, we will offer op-ed opportunities such as spotlighting the
presidential statement at the UN address or commenting on the article expected to
appear in The New York Times magazine.

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4. Identify and Train Spokespeople
Recognizing the impact third-party spokesbeople can have and the credibility they can
bring to a qampaign, the Ketchum team will identify representatives to serve as
spokespeople both at the national and local levels. Ketchum recommends identifying
spokespeople to provide perspectives from every angle including-'
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Federal level~epresentatives(e.g., HHS)
NGOs/community-based organizations/ORR grantees
Former victims
Law enforcement officials
Health care, medical and/or social service representatives
Once spokespeople ace identified and secured, Ketchum will work with them at both the
national and local l e h k to ensure they are armed with messages, materials and an
understanding of the goals and objectives of the campaign. In order to ensure the
spokespeople are comfortable serving in this capacity, Ketchum can provide media
training in eacbf%st market and in Washington, D.C. for other potential spokespeople ifnecessary. The training will be a participatory session where the spokespeople are
involved in mock interviews, while also learning basic media interviewing skills.
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5. Develop National and Faith-Based Coalitions
The core of the "on the ground activity, and our ability to keep the issue top of mind
after the initial few months in a city, will depend heavily on local market coalitions,
supported by nationar and faith-based groups.- The activities outlined betowwittensure
coalitions will be ready to activate when the pilot cities are launched:

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Pilot City Local Coalitions
In order to maximize effectiveness when the individual launches commence, the
team, lead by Capital City Partners (CCP), will carry out research on the trafficked
population.inthe three pilot cities and will make initial contact with HHS grantees. In
each city, the law enforcement networks and social service delivery.structure will be
outlined, also helping to inform delivery and distribution of the materials mentioned
above.

Contact will be initiated with regional faith-based organizations/leaders and elected
and appointed federal officials for the pilot cities, advising them and their offices of
the nature and scope of the program, and providing them with information and
background materials for their own constituent service operations. We will seek their
advice, support and intelligence to introduce the project to key municipal figures who

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can provide very substantial efficiencies for the program. The team will also begin to
identify key local leadership for the coalitions in each pilot city.
National Coalition
The team will develop a protocol for participation by national charitablelcivic coalition
partners. It will examine things such as:
What we are asking potential partners to do to encourage their affiliate
participation. _
How they will use their national communication networks to promote public
awareness.

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In refining the protocol and establishing a foundation, the team will approach groups
with whom relationships exist; those who can be expected to play a national
leadership role; and Jhose who can provide direction to local resources. Among tbe .
groups to be approached.are the American Immigration ~awyersAssociation,
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National Council of La Raza, National Council of Nonprofit Associations, and the
Service Employees International Union (SEIU).

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Faith-Based Coalition
The team will initially review and update its own extensive (1000+) faith-based list in
preparation for developing the faith-based coalition. We will also attempt to acquire
additional comprehensive faith-based and community organization lists to ensure
complete coverage. Initial meetings will be scheduled with a number of significant
nationwide faitha:ba3ed leaders and organizations with respect to the trafficking issue.
among them: The Salvation Army, Family Research Council, and the U.S.
Conference of Catholic Bishops. At these meetings, the team will provide a project
brief, solicit input and willingness to participate in a leadership role, and ask for
volunteers tij'hzst megtings with other faith leaders who might be expected to play asignificant role.
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6. Develop Law Enforcement Specific Materials

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Ketchum will develop the materials listed below to reach law enforcement officers,
particularly those assigned to the Vice Squad Division.
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Trafficking Victims Education & Training Tool Kit
Ketchum will utilize the basic media materials, previously produced information from
existing tool kits (if appropriate) and develop new items that will help educate law
enforcement on the trafficking issue and appropriate action. The materials and
information developed specifically to meet the needs of officers who deal directly with
victims of trafficking could include:

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Suggested Strategies and Talking Points for Communicating with'~/ctims
Profiles for Identifying Victims vs. Prostitutes (Check Lists)
Customizable Materials for Soliciting Victims
Customizable Powerpoint Presentations for InternalJExternal Outreach
Opportunities
List of National, State, Local Resources
Case Studies (Examples of StateILocal Law Enforcement Trafficking Efforts and
Former Victim Stories)

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Ideally, the kit will be Web based so it can be easily enhanced and updated. It can
be made available via the HHS Web site, the Web sites of the national law
enforcement association partners (see below), and/or other outlets including
www.policetraininq.net, a Web site dedicated to promoting and publicizing
educational training, seminars and conferences for police officers. In o.rder to make
law enforcement aware of its availability, Ketchum will promote the tool kit and
availability in trade magazines (e.g., Law ,Enforcement News, Crime Control Digest),
national association newsletters andthrough the local/national coalitions.

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Posters
Ketchum will develop a poster for displiy in police stations that will outline how to
identify 3 trafficking victim and what stepsto take once the victim is identified. The =
purpose of the poster will be to constantly reinforce the need to watch for these
victims. The-posterswill highlight the HHS toll-free hotline number. The posters will
be distributed through national law enforcement organizations, through the local
coalition partners in each target city and potentially through direct distribution to local
police stations.

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Call-to-Action Video
To leverage the weekly/daily roll call opportunities in police stations, Ketchum
recommends developing a short (two- to three-minute) video. The video should offer
front line police gfficers a call to action as well as tips for approaching and
communicating wtth potential victims. The videos will be distributed to local law
enforcement in the pilot cities along with a letter explaining the purpose of the video
and how it should be used.
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Partnerships with National & Local Law Enforcement Organizations
Understanding the influence and credibility of national organizations and
associations, as well as the potential resources, Ketchum will identifyand solicit several national law enforcement organizations to serve as partners/infomation
intermediaries. These organizations will be asked to provide space for articles in
their publications, serve as a distribution mechanism for information, allow for
displays at any local or annual conferences, and provide Web site space for
trafficking information. While these-organizations may be targeted for participation in
the national coalition, that participation is not required.

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Ketchum researched and identified the following national organizations as initial
partners based on their membership reach (both nationally and locally) and the
several opportunities they offer for promotion such as annual conferences, events,
professional development seminars, membership publications and exhibit
opportunities:
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International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) - The world's oldest
and largest non-profit membership organization of police executives, with
more than 19,000 members in more than 89 different countries. IACP's
leadership consists of the operating chief executives of international, federal,
state and local agencies of all sizes. The IACP hosts an annual conference
as well as international conferences at which HHS could exhibit and
distribution information and materials about the Anti-Trafficking campaign. A
representative from the IACP attended the 2003 Office of Refugee

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Resettlement annual conference and expressed the association's interest in
taking on the issue of trafficking, suggesting that an officer from its
association who has worked extensively on the trafficking issue serve as a
spokesperson and work with HHS on this initiative.
Police Foundation -Works with police officers and organizations across the
United States and provides them with research, technical assistance and
communications programs regarding various issues. Police Foundation
publications are used worldwide in police training programs and in criminal
justice, law and public policy programs at colleges and universities.

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International Association of undercover Officers - Promotes and
advocates professionalism among undercover law enforcement officers. The =
International -Associationof Undercover Officers provides several trainipg,
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oppoFtunities for its membership in 2004, including a training seminar
focusing on narcotics, vice and street crimes. It also produces a magazine,
The Brotherhood, specifically for undercover officers.

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7 . Develop Health ServiceISocial Service Specific Materials
To reach social service providers, particularly those working in free, community health
clinics and emergency rooms or at NGOs, the Ketchum team recommends developing
the following materials:
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Poster
Similar to the poster developed to reach law enforcement officers, Ketchum will
develop.,pq$er,s fgj display in community shelters, health care clinics and
emergency rooms offering health care workers, case managers, intake
assessment staff, nurses, physicians, etc. tips for identifying victims and what to
do if they encounter victims. The posters will be sensitive due topotential public
display in community health centers and emergency rooms. These posters can
be hung in locations where intake assessments are taking place, waiting rooms,
exgmination rooms and in bathrooms. The posters will highlight the HHS toll-free
hotline number. They will be distributed through national health care/social
service organizations, through the local coalition partners in each pilot city and
potentially through direct distribution.

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Victim Identification Check List
NGOs, health care clinics and emergency rooms will be provided with a check list
that can be referenced when servicing a potential victim of trafficking. The check
list will provide characteristics, both physical and psychological, typical among
victims of both commercial sex and labor trafficking. It will offer suggested
questions to ask a dienupatient t o determine if helshe is a victim. It will also
outline immediate steps to take if a victim is identified. The check list will be
distributed via national association,^ and local coalition partners.

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Phone Stickers/Rolodex Cards
Once health care clinic, emergency room and social service providers interact
with a person whom they might think is a potential victim of trafficking, it will be
important to give that service provider a direct link to local or federal resources to
forward information about the potential victim. Ketchum will produce a sticker

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and/or Rolodex card with trafficking-specific contact information. They will be
distributed directly to NGOs, local emergency rooms and health clinics in the pilot
cities through local coalitions. ~ h stickerlcard
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will be accompanied by a letter
explaining the program and offering additional local contact information.

Helping Victims of Trafficking Brochure
A brochure will be developed for distribution to health care clinics, emergency
rooms and social~erviceproviders. The brochure would provide an overview of
the trafficking issue and what their role should be when interacting with potential
victims of trafficking. The brochure would also offer providers federal, state and
local contacts and resources for assistance in servicing victims of trafficking. The
brochure could be disseminated "is local coalitior~partners, in conjunction with
- cards and through national organizations and
the phone stickerslRolodex
associations.
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Local Social Services Organizations
Similar to the law enforcement audience, Ketchum will identify and solicit the
participation of several health carelsocial service organizations to serve as
partners. These organizations willl also be asked to provide space for articles in
their publications, serve as a distribution mechanism for information distribution,
allow for displays at any local or annual conferences, and provide Web site
space for information dissemination. Some of these organizations may also be
asked to serye on a national coalition, but that will not be required.
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Ketchum reseaEhed and identified the following national organizations to target
for information intermediary disseqnination based on their membership reach
(both nationally
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such as annual cofiferences, events, professional development seminars,
membership publications and exhibit opportunities:

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National Association of yommunity Health Centers (NACHC) - The
national trade association serving and representing the interests of
America's community health centers. For more than 30 years, the
NACHC has been responsible for bringing doctors, basic health services
and facilities into the ndtion's neediest and most isolated communities
Health centers serve the working poor, the uninsured, as well as high-risk
and vulnerable populationi. Its programs in primary and preventive care
serve 11 million people at 3,000 health center delivery sites, including
community, m~grantand homeless health centers across the country. The
NACHC hosts an annual convention, an annual policy & issues forum as
well as several training seminars and workshops.

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National Association of County and City Health Officials (NACCHO)
- The National ~ssociationof County and City Health Offic~alsis the
national non-profit organizat~onrepresenting local public health agencies
(including city, county, metro, district, and tribal agencies). This
organization represents all local governmental public health agencies,
including counties, cities, citylcounties, districts, and townships. Act~ve
membership in NACCHO includes 1,100 local public health agencies,
serving 75 percent of the U,.S. population. NACCHO hosts an annual
conference as well as training workshops. The organization also partners

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with state and local health Idepartments on various public health
initiatives.

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American College of ~mergencyPhysicians (ACEP) - The American
College of Emergency Phyficians exists to support quality emergency
medical care and to promote the interests of emergency physicians. The
ACEP believes that quality emergency care is a fundamental right and
unobstructed access to emergency services should be available to all
patients who perceive the eeed for emergency services. The ACEP has
more than 22,000 members and 53 local chapters and offers several
annual conferences, meetings, seminars and educational opportunities to
its members. It also produkes and distributes a variety of materials to
inform members about issues regarding emergency medicine and
services.
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8. Establish Benchmark ~easurements
To ensure the public awareness campaign is moving toward accomplishment of its
goals, it will be important to define the environment prior to the campaign's start and
examine the environment following the three- to four-month pilot period. The activities
outlined below will allow the team to track progress toward our goal, identify successes
so they can be duplicated in other markets and examine weaknesses in order to
eliminate or improve them prior to launching additional cities. This research will also
allow us to prove subhantial movement on the path to meeting the ultimate campaign
goal.

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Media Analyak - - . ,
Ketchum will review media coverage in national, local (three pilot cities) and trade
magazines to determine the amount of coverage, positioning of HHS in the articles,
coverage of desired messages and the like. The analysis will include'ln algorifhm for
each media mention, which will be based on a scoring system established through a
goal-setting session with the full team to ensure we are measuring against agreed
upon goals and messages. The final droduct will include quantitative and qualitative
measures that will help identify gaps in media coverage, potential story angles for the
program and any riecessary alteration of message.
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Pilot-City Survey
The Ketchum team will conduct research with the target audiences in the three pilot
cities that will serve a dual purpose. The benchmark research will include a phone
survey of 225 members of our target audiences (75 per city), asking them if they
know how to identify a trafficking victim and if they know what to do if they encounter
a victim of trafficking. In addition, we suggest conducting 15 one-on-one in-person
interviews (five per pilot city) as part of the baseline survey. The interviews would
last for 45 minutes and would allow US to test draft materials, as well as answer the
benchmark survey questions. These interviews will alert us to any necessary
changes to the materials by the audience that they are targeted to before the
materials go into final production.
Coalition Check
In the preparation period, current activities or coalitions will be identified in order to
establish what, if any, organization currently exists. This will allow us to measure the

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amount of new or additional support that has been built in each city and on a national
level.
January

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Pilot City Roll Out

1. Media Outreach
An earned media outreach campaign will be conducted at the national, local and
audience-specific level to generate interest and "buzz" about the trafficking issue. This
will not only raise public awareness, buthelp encourage other cities to join in the antitraffickirlg effort.

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To support the media outreach efforts, Ketchum will regularly monitor agreed-upon
media outlets (national and pilot city) and will execute a "rapid response" approach to
conducting both proactive and reactive media outreach.
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National Media Outreach
Using the pitch angles outlined above as a starting point (Number 3, Message
and Material Development), the team will research and craft strategic med~a
pitches for both long-lead and daily mainstream media including print, broadcast
and radio outlets. The Ketchum team will pursue top mainstream media
including: The Washington Post, USA Today and U.S. News and World Report
as well as prime-time newsmagazine television shows such as Dateline, 20/20
and 60 Min.utes 11, and morning news programs such as NBC's Today Show,
ABCs ~ o o d o r n i n gAmerica, The CBS Morning Show and CNN1sAmerican
Zahn. The Ketchum team will also pitch national radio talk
Morning with ~ a u l a
shows including National Public Radio's All Things Considered, Morning Edition,
, the ABC and CBS Radio Networks.
Diane &&TI S h ~ wand
Where and when appropriate, the team will issue national press releases
concerning the launch of the pilot cities, development of coalitiorl3, andsprogress
being made in the campaign. The team will also identify potential op-eds for
signature by appropriate figures (e.g., HHS officials or coalition participants) on
the trafficking problem or the efforts to combat it.

Local Media Outreach
-- . -Ketchum will conduct outreach to the pilot market print media including The
Atlanta Journal & Constitution, Arizona Republic, Phoenix New Times,
Philadelphia Inquirer, Camden Courier-Post and Newark Star Ledger, as well as
local television and radio programs such as Good Morning Arizona, Arizona
News Channel, Georgia Public Radio, Good Day Atlanta, 11-Alive Sunday Today
(Atlanta), Good Day Philadelphia, Radio Pennsylvania Network, NJN Radio
Network, and New Jersey Roundtable. In reaching out to these local media
outlets, Ketchum will customize the previously developed media materials to
reflect trafficking issues and concerns within each pilot market. Ketchum will also
have identified local spokespeople who will be given localized messages related
to their respective communities with regard to trafficking.
Trade Media Outreach & Advertising
In addition to the advertising placed in trade media targeted to law enforcement
and health care/social service organizations, the team will proactively pitch

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stories and tap into editorial calendars to leverage additional coverage. Such
trade publications will include:

American Police Beat (APB) - The nation's biggest newspaper targeted
exclusively to law enforcement. APB has the highest, audited national
circulation and reaches into every agency and rank.
Police Chief Magazine- The official monthly publication of the International
Association of Chiefs of Police provides a forum for sharing expertise of the
law enforcement practitioners who write the magazine articles.

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Police Times Magazine- A quarterly publication focusing on police training, .
news products and services, technological advances which assist law
enforcement, as well as legal decisions affecting law enforcement.
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POLICE Magazine Provides law enforcement of all ranks with information
that will help them do their jobs more efficiently, professionally and safely.
Each issue of POLICE includes columns written by police, firearms and legal
experts, as well as topical issue-oriented features produced by leading law
enforcement journalists.
Health & Social Work- This publication focuses on the latest advances in
areas such a s clinical work, substance abuse, depression, and maternal
health. ~rt%iesalso cover research, policy, specialized services, quality
assurance, in-service training, and other topics that affect the delivery of
health care services.
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Community Health Forum - Published by the National Association of
Community Health Centers, Community Health Forum is a bi-yonthly
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magazine that supports the delivery of high quality health care to medically
underserved people via the dissemination of information, news, and
perspectives related to community-based health care.

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Nurseweek- Nurseweek has committed to serving all registered nurses
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2. Material'Distribution and Advertising Placement
While the majority of the materials will be developed in 2003, the first distribution will
occur when the pilot cities are launched. Materials will primarily be distributed through
{he local and national coalitions as noted below. Ketchum will also engage national
association partners that may not want to actively participate in a coalition, to also
disseminate materials.

Beginning in January, the advertisements developed will begin to run in targeted media.
Since we would prefer the target audiences be surrounded by our message through
information from the coalitions, national associations and the media simultaneously,
appropriate timing and ad buy specs will be outlined in January. Ads will be placed in
both the trade magazines of our target audience such as those listed above (e.g.,

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American Police Beat, Police Times, The 'Brotherhood, Community Health Forum,
Nurse Week, etc.).
As mentioned in the ad development phase, ads will also be placed In the sect~onof the
newspapers where potential customers, law enforcement, and even vlctlms, would be
looking for information on massageparlors or brothels. A full ad buy will be outlined,
however, the publications considered will include: Chrnese Daily News, World Journal
(Chinese), The Korea Central Daily, The Korea Times, Progress Newspapers Inc.
(Russian), Mundo Hispanico, A1 Dia, Prensa Hispana, Phoenrx New Times, etc.
We will also consider radio advertisements1PSAs geared to the Hispanic market in
Phoenix and Camden. Those ads would run on stations like KMOR 106.3lKMRR 100.3
and KVVA-FM 107.1lKDVA-FM 106.9.
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3. Coalition Building and Execution
.,
During the pilot phase of the program, coalitions will be sol~dif~ed
in Phoenix, Atlanta and
Philadelphia/Camden, National and faith-based coalitions will also be solidified.

Local Coalition Building
The ultimate objective is to create ongoing city coalitions through which we can
continually, and efficiently, disseminate information involving federal efforts to
address the trafficking problem. To do this, CCP will establish two distinct
coalitions in each city, one involving law enforcement and judicial system
officials, the ofher involving social service providers, health care workers, HHS
grantees and faith-based organizations.
The l a w , e . N ~ ~ c e m
coalition
~t
will work to develop mechanisms to encourage local government, police and court officials to identify trafficking victims and
cooperate with HHS and local agencies in providing them with appropriate - services. The social service coalitions will be directed to help inteFmediGies
identify victims of trafficking, and work with HHS and law enforcement to provide
for their relief.
The materials developed in the initial months of the campaign will be distributed
to the coalitionS 'to use in raising awareness within their discrete communitiesand educating their stakeholders on the importance of the trafficking problem.
The members of the coalition will be asked to help disseminate information
through their individual Web sites, newsletters, e-mail distr~butions,gatherings,
and other internal and external communications.

.

.

Each coalition, though treated separately, will be under the direction of the lead
person in each city. Each target city will have a team of representatives
responsible for organizing it, with a team leader making one trip to the city each
month to provide on-the-ground support. A larger support team will spend three
,to four additional days in-city per month. All team members will spend significant
preparation and follow up time for each in-city work period. While in the cities,
the team will provide training and training materials to both coalitions on
identifying victims and the proper follow through activity.

0

National Charitable/Civic Coalition Building
Utilizing the protocols mentioned,above,20 national groups representing the
ethnic, charitable, law enforcement, labor, civic, health care and education
sectors will be targeted and approached. Ultimately, approximately five or six of
these groups will be engaged to participate during this phase of the program.
The initial target list includes groups like the YWCA, National Nurses
Associations, The Urban ~eague,National Restaurant Association, United Farm
Workers Union, National Association of Police Chiefs, National Sheriff's
Association, American Bar Association, Public Defenders, District Attorneys,
American Medical Association, American Pediatric Association, etc.

--

.

--

Once on board, the team will provide the materials developed for downstream
dissemination to coalition members. In addition, the team expects to host regular'
monthly meetings to share information and to reinforce action among the groups, adding new participants as they are identified.
.- .

.

A coalition e-mail alert list will be established to maintain regular communication
and contact will be made at least twice per month with updates.

National Faith-Based Coalition Building
The team will re-energize the faith community that significantly helped give rise to
the initial legislation by identifying those faith leaders who show a willingness to
make this animmediate high priority. Working through the National Association
of Evangelicak,'Covenant House, Lutheran Social Services, Catholic Charities,
t
the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day '
the Southern ~ a p t i sConvention,
Saints, and with individual leaders such as Chuck Colson, James Dobson, and
Fr. RichardNeuha~s,we will identify denominations and faith leaders who are willing to play a prominent role and who are willing to participate in the public
awareness campaign.
c-

-

I

-.

_-

Regular monthly meetings will be established to share information and to
reinforce action among the groups, adding new participants as they are
identified. In addition, regular communications will be distributed through CCP's
1,000+database of pastors and local faith leaders in order to raise awareness of
the issue, ask for specific action items, and encourage local ieaders to step - forward and play leadership roles within their communities on behalf of the public
awareness campaign.
May 2004: Pilot City Assessment and Planning for Additional Roll Outs
Beginning in April, the team will start to assess the success of the pilot city.programs.
The team will repeat the benchmark measures including the media analysis, pilot city
survey and coalition check to uncover movement, success and items or actions that
need to be altered or eliminated.

Media Analysis
Ketchum will review media coverage in the same national, local (three pilot cities)
and trade magazines used in the benchmark analysis for the pilot period. This
analysis will also include quantitative and qualitative measures. The results of the
second media analysis will be compared to that of the benchmark in order to provide

-,

-

specific, quantifiable evidence of the increase in media coverage and the change of
message included in those stories (e.g., greater coverage of HHS role, increase in
positive messages about the trafficking issue, etc.). The analysis will also help to
identify those pitch angles that worked and caught media attention and those that did
not and should be reconsidered as the program moves to the next phase.

,
,- .-.

-

.

Pilot City Survey
The Ketchum team will once again coriduct phone surveys of 225 members of our
target audiences (75 per pilot city), asking them the same questions that were posed
in the benchmark survey. We would attempt to contact the same 225 respondents
that participated in the benchmark survey. The results will allow us to prove an
increased awareness among the target ,audiences in the three pilot cities with regard
to identifying and helping
trafficking victims.
. .
.. . ..

.. . -.

.=.

.-

:

J

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Coalition Check-.' .. ---The Ketchum team will do a city-by-city comparison outlining the partners and
resources that exlsted in each pilot city and on a national level prior to the pilot
versus the resources that exist at its conclusion. The results will allow us to prove
the availability of additional resources and estimate additional assistance those
resources may provide to the larger effort.

.

-

..
.--

Based on the results of these measurement tools, the team will answer questions like
the following to help d@sectwhat worked and did not throughout the pilot phase:
-4.

a
a
a
e
a

What organizations generated the most successful partnerships?
Which materials were most used and in demand?
What materials orpieces of information were missing?
How self-sufficient are the local coalitions?
How much and what type of media were generated in each city?,
When will the pilot cities be ready to add a direct-to-victim component?

-_d

--

Based on our assessment, the team will outline lessons learned, recommended changes
to the program and recommend next steps. Specifically, the team will outline how to roll
out the program in additional markets,-how many markets, and which cities would-be
most appropriate. This initial period will conclude with a management plan for the
remainder of year one.

-

-

To:
Kimberly Reiwinski
From: Frank Cannon
Dated: October 22, 2003
Re:
Nov - May CCP Management Plan
INTRODUCTION

--

The overall objective of this project is to provide resources through the Health & Humans Services
Department to qualified victims of severe forms o'f trafficking. HHS has defined success in the
project's firstyear as-increasing the number of victims identified from 200 to 400 and heightenini
community awareness of the problem. 'capital City Partners' responsibilities are to develop w k i n g coalitions in major cities, identify a ~ engage
d
nation coalition partners and reinvijjoratethe -- .
participation of the faith community in combating the trafficking of persons.

.

...
.-

-

The operational portion of the project is divided into five aspects: organization of the city
coalitions; development of national coalition partners; engagement of faith-based organizations;
cultivation of earned media on both a national and regional basis, particularly in the religous and
ideological press; and overall development and management of these aspect of the Ketchum
proposal.
,-' -k-*

-

In order to accomplish these goals, Capital City Partners will deploy four partners, one staff
member, five subcontractors and spot administrative workers.

<--.-.*-The first aspect of these operations will take place in November and December 2003. Dunng this
time, CCP will assist Ketchum in honing its global strategy, deciding its Phase I messages and
preparing its initial materials. CCPVwillalso perform the critical preparations n e ~ s s a r yfor the successful creation of working coalitions both at the national level and in the three test cities:
Ph~ladelphia,Atlanta and Phoenix.
/ @

~
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.-

CCP: NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER 20Q3

.-

-

-

.-

--

-

Cities
CCP will use the November - December period to plan and stage our programs in each target city,
maximizing effectiveness when the individual launches commence. During this time we will:
- .
0'
Cany out research on the trafficked population in our three pilot cities.
--.
Make initial contact with HHS grantees.
Review the social service delivery structure and law enforcement networks in each city (the
two key constituencies we will be organizing).
Compile a list of regonal faith based contacts and initiate e-mail/fax/phone contact.
Make contact with elected and appointed federal officials for the pilot city areas, advising
them and their offices of the nature and scope of the program, and providing them with
information for their own constituent service operations. We will seek their advice, support,
and intelligence to introduce the project to key municipal figures, who can provide very
substantial efficiencies for the program.

-

Begin to identify key local leadership for the coalitions in each pilot city.

National Coalition

--

During November - December, CCP will lay the foundation for building a National Coalition and
develop the protocol for National CharitableICivic Coalition partners.
This will include
examining:
What we are aslung potential partners to do to encourage their affiliate participation.
H& they will use their nation&communication networks to promote public awareness.
Inrefining the protocol andestablishing a foundation, CCP will approackgroups with whom-- .- *
- :.
. .
We already have relationkhips;
Who can be expected to play a national leadership role;
And who can provide direction to local resources.
Among the groups to be approached are the American Immigration Lawyers Association,
National Council of La Raza, National Council of Nonprofit Associations, and the Service
Employees International Union.

.

..-3..

B

Faith Based Coalition

- .
r
.
7

-\

--

During November - December, CCP will begin building a Faith-Based Coalition by:
Reviewing andupdatingits own extensive (1000+) faith based list.
Attempting to acquire additional comprehensive faith-based and community organizations
lists.
.-- Set up meetings with a number of significant nationwide faith-based leaders and
organizations with respect to the trafficking issue, among them: The Salvat~onArmy,
Family Research Council and the US Conference of Catholic Bishops to
(1) Brief them on the project
..(2) Solicit thek input as to their-willingness to participate in a leadership role(3) Ask them to host meeting with other faith leaders who mlght be expected to play a
significant role.

--_.

-

-

Earned Media
..

.. .- .

CCP November - December earned media efforts will focus on laying the-Toundation of an
effective on-going earned media program, nationally and regionally (locally). During this period,
CCP will:
Deqelop its base of conservative and religious reporters and media on this issue.
Offer Op-ed opportunities to HHS officials on the anti-trafficking program prior to the start
of the global campaign.
~
for conservative and religious media.
Prepare a Press K I tailored
Identify and develop the multiple story pegs that will inevitably present themselves.
Spotlight presidential statements, such as the recent message at the UN.

-.

Aid in the preparation of an HHS official to make a pubIic statement, perhaps via an Op-ed.
after December 7~ when the New York Times Magazine is expected to feature a major
piece on the trafficking issue.
Develop a fast track media oppoI;tunity approval process.
Prepare target regionalmedia lists and analysis.

Management
a

-

N

CCP's management responsibilities exist in coordination and cooperation wlth Ketchum and HHS.
. -- - I
as well as within its own internal structure. During November - December, CCP will:
In consultation with ~ e t d h i r ndevelop
,
its project reporting structure.
Develop an evaluation and reporting process for city projects.
Develop an evaluation and reporting process for national coalition partner actlvlty.
Develop an evaluation and reporting process for faith-based coalition partner activity.
Develop an evaluation and reporting process for its earned media program.
Participate in coordination meetings with Ketchum and HHS.
Conduct coordination meetings with its internal team.
Conduct meetingiqb educate its internal team on the issue, the law, the Ketchum plan and
HHS resources and goals as well as the larger federal picture relating to the trafficking of
persons.

--

JANUARY - MAY, 2004
Cities
In this test phase, CCP will build coalitions in each target city, executing the following plan:
There will be two distinct coalitions in each city, one involving law enforcement and
judicial system officials, the other involying social service providers, health care workers,
HHS grantees and faith-based organizations. Each coalition though treated separately will
be under-the direction of the 1 4 person in each city.
-- Each target city will have a team of CCP people responsible for-organizing it. - - - - .- .-- Ralph Benko ~ i l l - ~ aprinciple
ve
responsibility in Atlanta.
- Dan Casey will have the lead in Philadelphia and Frank Cannon will provide
support.
- Bob Heckman will be the lead for Phoenix, with Mary Jo Joyce providing support.
- Pat Truman will be handling formation of the law enforcement coalition in each city.
- Gene Tame will have primary responsibility for developing the regional media for
each city.
Each CCP team kader will make one trip to the city each month, spending approximately
twenty working hb& in-city.
Support team will spend 3-4 additional days in-city per month,
All team members will spend significant preparation and follow up time for each in-city
work period.-:.M--- -.. ...-

-

-.

-

-

...,

. .

.- .

.

-

.

.

-<

-

-

-

Following this approach, ir? each target city, CCP will:
...
Create active local law enforcement and service provider coalitions.
Lead the law enforcement coalition to develop mechanisms to encourage local government,
police and cou* officials to identify trafficking victims and cooperate with HHS and local
agencies in providing them with appropriate services.
Lead the social ser\tice coalitions to-help intermidiaries identify victims-af--traffiekwga d
work with HHS and law enforcement to provide for their relief.
Provide appropriate materials for law enforcement, social service providers and faith
organizations to use in
Raising awareness within their discrete communities
- Educating their stakeholders on the importance of the trafficlung problem
.- .
Disseminating information through their individual websites, newsletters, emails,
......
gatherings, and other internal and external communications
Provide training and training materials to both coalitions on identifying victims and the
proper follow through activity.
T h e five month goal is to create ongoing city coalitions through which we can continually,
efficiently disseminate information involving federal efforts to address the trafficlung
problem.
In April 2003 we intend to bring in the relevant HHS oficials to meet with the working coalitions in
each of the pilot cities.
'

--

..-

National Charitable/Civic Coalition

a

In the January - May phase of the program, CCP will:
Bring the protocols developed in 2003 to 20 national groups.
Target groups that represent the ethnic, charitable, law enforcement, labor, civic, health care
and education sectors.
Engage five or six of these groups during this phase of the program. Our initial target list
includes the YWCA, National Nurses Aqociations, The Urban League, National Restaurant
Association, United Farm Workers Union, National Association of Police Chiefs, National
Sheriff s-Association, American Bar Association, Public Defenders, District ~ t t o r n e ) ~ ,
- .
AMA, American Pediatric Association, etc.
Provide education and mitesals for downstream dissemination for coalition members.
By the end of April, host regular monthly meetings to share information and to reinforce
action among the groups, adding new participants as they are identified.
Set up a coalition e-mail alert list and contact that list at least twice per month with updates.
.

C

r

-

National Faith Based Coalition
CCP has deep inroads in;ogF faith community. During January - May, CCP will:
Reenergize the faith community that significantly helped give rise to the initial legislition
by identifying those faith leaders who show a willingness to make this an immediate high
priority.
.-<-.*.*..
- ..
- .. .

.-

'

..

Work through the National Association of Evangelicals, individual leaders such as Chuck
Colson, James Dobson, Fr, Richard Neuhaus, Covenant House, Lutheran Sr>citll:Serwces,
Catholic Charities, the Southern Baptist Convention, the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter
Day Saints and similar organizations and individuals to identify denominations and faith
leaders +who are willing to play a prominent role and who are willing to participate in the
public awareness campaign.
By the end df ApriT,-host regular monthly meetings to share information and t o x m f o r c t
action among the groups, adding new participants as they are identified.
Begin regular communications through our 1000+ database of pastors and local faith
leaders.
- raising awareness of the issue
aslung for specific action items
- having local leaders step forward to play leadership roles within their communities
. .. .
on behalf of the public awareness campaign.

Earned Media
In January - May, as the projects begin to take form, CCP will:
Systematically issue press releases to all relevant national and regional reporters and media
as to progress being made.

..

F

a

-

--.

-

Make one-on-one contact with approximately 20 key journalists to ensure that they are fully
appraised of the priority that the administration is giving to address the problem of the
trafficking of persons.
Make one-on-one contact with approximately 20 key journalists to ensure that they are fully
appraised of the concrete efforts that HHS is making to provide services to these victims.
Work to highlight personal interest features on those who have been rescued from victim
status by the HHS program.
Generate a monthly Op-ed for signature by appropriate figures -- by HHS officials or
coalition participants -- on the trafficlung problem or the efforts to combat it.
Disseminate-medialuts
to
themost important religious and conservative media outlets.
.
.

Managenient

.. .

. -.

..

. .. .

-.

.....

.

-

-

.

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f

In its key management functions during the January-May test phase CCP will:
Continue its project coordination role.
Continue project implementation.
Coordinate reporting to Ketchum and HHS.
Adjust future plan execution based on outcomes observed and guidance from HHS and
,J .
Ketchum.
\'
Conduct staff assessment and guidance.
Provide written evaluation and recommendations on the progress of city projects to
Ketchum and HHS.
Finally, project man2g2'iii'erit will have a key role in planning and implementing project expansion.

------.
. .

-

-.

CCP: Severe Trafficking Victims
8 Month Budget

OCT

-

a

NOV

NATIONAL
COALITION
Personnel
Mtg Exp/Hospitality

FEB

MAR

APR

MAY

16050 16050 33270 33270 33270 27660 27660
.J \'-,

-4000

-'.- **.+

FAITH-BASED
COALITION
Personnel
Mtg Exp/Hospitality

..

JAN

CITY COALITION
Atlanta
Personnel
Travel
Philadelphia
--Personnel
Travel .
Phoenix
Personnel
Travel
TOTAL

-

DEC

EARNED
MEDIA
Personnel
Blast Fax
Press Kit

*

3650
500

3650
500

3650
500

3650 3650 3650
500 500 500

3000
500

3000
500

3000
500

5350
600

5350 '5350
600
600

I

@

'

.

3000 3000'
500 500

,

.

MANAGEMENT
Personnel
~e~ai/'Acct~
Secretarial
Telephone
Misc

TOTAL

"

3650
500

5150

4800 4800
600 600
2500

-

.

CITY BREAKOUT
CCP HOURS

FEB

MAR APR

MAY

'56

56

56

56

56

3l~

31

31

31

31

24

24

24

8

8

JAN
ATLANTA
Ralph Benko
($

I.<

Pat Truman
PHILADELPHIA
Dan Casey
($

b*

Frank Cannon
($

,?C

Pat ~ G m a n
($

j.:>

PHOENIX
Bob Heckman
($ i 7 <
Mary Jo Joyce

(9.

i f 7 ~

9
*%,

..

w

,

a
~

Pat Truman

(S

Draft - October 1, 2003
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact:
Robyn Massey

Fran Bernhards

Ketchum Wins Two Year Department of Health & Human Services Contract

--

0

Washington, D.C., ~ c t o b e r2003
,
- Ketchum has won a multi-million dol!gr two-year
contract with the U.S. ~ e ~ a r i i eofn Health
t
and Human Services to implement a public

-

>
-

0

--- -

awareness campaign on the growing problem of trafficking in people. The account will be
managed by Ketchum's Government Marketing Communications Practice based in the
Washington, D.C. office and will be supported by Capital City Partners, a D.C. based organization
which specialized in coalition building and outreach to urban and ethnic communities
"The federal government offers important support services for trafficking victims, but very few
victims take advant&&hf these programs, due to lack of knowledge about their avallabllity or for
fear of deportation," note's Monica Marshall, Ketchum senior vice president, who will serve as
program executive on the account. "We are pleased to have the opportunity to help the
Department of HWlttrandf4uman Services implement this communications effort so more v~ctims
can get the help they deserve."
'

.-

.

--

.

-

,

--

In the first year of the campaign, Ketchum will develop messages and materials on the trafficking
problem in the United States and reach out to those who may come in contact with trafficking
victims inchding law enforcement organizations, social service and health organizations,
community and.minority groups, labor and religiousorganizations, and ethnic grocery staresand .-.
other businesses likely to be visited by trafficking victims. In year two of the campaign, the
account team will add a campaign overlay to reach out to trafficking victims themselves.

:

.%

Founded nearly three decades ago, Ketchum Washington is one of the largest agencies in the
nation's capital, with approximately 80 communications professionals. Ketchum's Government
.
Marketing Communications Practice includes many current and past government ~lients.
including multiple task orders for the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, an agency under
the Department of Health and Human Services, as well as the Department of State, Department
of Education, Environmental Protection Agency, Census Bureau, Federal Emergency
Management Agency, Department of Housing and Urban Development, General Services
Administration, and the U.S. Agency for International Development. As a GSA-approved public
relations contractor (GS-23F-0105M), Ketchum brings a global network of experience in health
education, social marketing, multicultural marketing and education, full-service brand and product
marketing, media and public information services, press and public relations services, marketing

..

-.

and education materials, media analysis and related services, graphic and Web design, and
program management.
An innovator in communication since 1923, Ketchum delivers seamless service around the globe
through its 21 offices and 34 affiliates and associates in North America, Europe, Asra Pacific and

dr

-

Latin America. With its six global practice areas, Brand Marketing, Corporate Commun~catrons,
Healthcare, Food and Nutrition, Technology, and Workplace Communication, Ketchum offers
clients a unique breadth and depth of marketing and corporate communications expertise. A top10 global public relations firm and the PRWeek2002 Agency of the Year, Ketchum is a un~tof
Omnicom Group Inc. (NYSE:OMC; www.omnicomgroup.com). Add~tionalinformation on
Ketchum, its award-winning work, and past press releases can be found at www.ketchum.com. --

--

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*

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# # #

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>.

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September 17, 2003

Anita L. Nearhoof
Contract Specialist
Department of Health &.Human Services
Program Support Center I Division of Acquisition Management (AOS)
Room 5-101 I Parklawn Building
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857

.

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~.

Subject: Clarifications forRFQ No. 03Y003530

. .. .

..
. .-.. .

._._
.. =

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,

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z

.

--

--.-.
..

Dear Anita,
Thank you for giving Ketchum the opportunity to submit a final budget for the Trafficking
Public Awareness Campaign. Per your fax today, we areanswering the following
questions:

1

In total, cc&&iering all of the budgets of the proposed subcontractors,
how much money will be available for media placement and media
production?

A1 .

For Wave One, we have budgeted:
$188,000 for media production (2 TV, 4 radio PSAs and 4 print ads);
$260,000 for PSA national and target market disseminationand tracking and
print ads; based on our experience, we do not expect to pay for anyPSA
placement (the stations will air them free of charge);
$559,030 has been reserved in the budget for additional media production,
placement or event participation expens;es.

2
1
.
,
*
.
-

.

-

...-i.

_

For Wave Two, we have budgeted:
$428,000 for production of 8 TV and 14 -1 6 radio PSAs;
$270,500 for distribution of PSAs (some of the ethnic stations require
payment for airing a PSA).
.

.

We anticipate generating an additional $500,000-$1 million in free advertising
time and have allocated a significant portion of the budget to earned media.

Q2.
A2.

Please provide cost breakdowns for the subcontractorsJproposals.
We have attached detailed cost breakdowns for the subcontractors.

s

-.

Below is an overview of the responsibilities of Ketchum and each subcontractor:
I Ketchum

Program management
Earned media campaign
Benchmark and three follow-up media analysis
Communications audit
ORR Grantee session (two)
Press Kit
Two TV PSAs (Wave One) with free air time
Nine Radio PSAs (Wave One) free air time
Four print ads (Wave One)
PostersIFliers (Wav* Qne)
Four Focus Groups
20 individual interviews
... . .
=
.. ~ a t i o n acensus
l
- pre and post survey (Waves One and TWO).~
Three test markets - pre and post survey (Wave One)
Three test markets - pre and post survey (Wave Two)
National survey of general public - pre and post survey
Twenty four months of national and target city partnership and
coalition building activities - including earned media

POS-.-. Research

~

?I

:

Capital City
Partners Coalition Building
Magna - Asian
Outreach

Coalition building within their ethnic target market (Wave One)
Two TV PSAs (Wave Two)
k o u r radio PSAs (Wave Two)
Language specific collateral (Wave Two)
print ads (Wave Two)
C ~ a l i t i o nbuilding within their ethnic target market (Wave One)
Cutting Edge -r;,.,.,.
Hispanic Outreach Four TV and six to eight radio PSAs (Wave Two)
Language specific collateral (Wave TWO)
Coalition building within their ethnic target market w a v e one) =
Global Works Eastern European Two W P S A s and media purchase (Wave Two)
Outreach
Four radio PSAs and media purchase (Wave Two)
Language specific collateral
print ads
.- .
.J

I

I
'

~

*

~

,. .

<
-.

-

- a. .

In addition to these items, we are submitting the following:
1. Revised budget that is divided by Wave One and Wave Two
2. 'Overview of our approach to algorithm-based media analysis

. .

Please call me at 202-835-8855 if you need additional information. Thank you again for
.-this opportunity.

:-

Regards,

Monica Marshall

..

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:..

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Page I of 1

Wagner, Steven (ACF)
From: Nearhoof, Anita (PSC)
Sent:

Sunday, September 2?, 2003 9:55 AM

To:

Wagner, Steven (ACF)

Subject: FW: Ketchum - One more point

re,

--

Just another updated note from Ketchum, Inc.
. . .
\
-----Original Message----From: Marshall, Monica [mailto:Monica.Marshall@ketc~um.com]
Sent: Friday, September 19, 2003 3 5 7 PM
To: Nearhoof, -Anita.. .-.Subject: Ketchum - One more point
. .

.

.

-

..

.

~ .-.
.
..:-- .

*-

.-

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Anita,
I hope you managed your way through the hurricane without a lot of problems.
I wanted to add to our BAFO that we could certainly do coalition building in 20 markets with this budget

Thank you. Monica

.-

---.---..

. .

.
. .

COST ESTIMATE

I

GSA Contract NO. GS-23F-0105M

i

Solicitation No. 03Y003530

"Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign "

Use or disclosure of data contained on this sheet is subject to the restriction on the cover page of this proposal.

'COST ESTIMATE
GSA contr*t No. GS-23F-O105M

i
~olicitatfbnNo. 03Y003S30

B

"Trafficking ~ u b l i kA warengss Campaign "

.

Summary all Task by Line Item
.
Wave I

(

.,

A. ~ a l a r l e ~ a Wages
nd

Rate

Labor Category

Staff
Marshall. Monica

Senior Vice President

$

perwinski. Kimberly

VPlGroup Manager

8

Isola. Meredith

Account Supervisor

Bender, Cecelia
TED
Bernhard. Fran

Sr. Account Executive
Account Executive
Vice President

%

Nichols, Christina

$

Phillips. Rachel

Wce President
~ rDirector
t

Oliveri. Alyssa

Assistant Account Executive

8

Ray. Jackie
Prinlz. Sandy

Account Coordinator
Contract Manager

0

LoPiccolo. Maria

Sr. Research Associate

8

Howard. Julie

Administrative

$

Graham. Mike

Financial Coordinator

$

Subtotal Dlrect Labor

i

Hours

Amount

bb
I

$

5

\li

$

;y\L

1, C:;
4,261

L

Use or d~sclosureof dala conlamed on lhl¶ sheel IS sublect 10 Ihe reslr!ctlon on Ihe cover page of lllls prcposal

749,828.94

I

COST ESTIMATE
I

I

GSA Contract No. GS-23F-0105M
Solicltatlon No. 031003530

"Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign"

,

Summary all Task by Line Item
Wave l
6. TRAVEL

. Cost

Local travel from D. C. to HHS

/mile

Subtotal Travel

:

Unlts

Amount

S

0.36

. 800

$

0.23

14,400

3,312.00

S

1500
0.15

1

,' 360

15.00'
54.00

288.00
288.00

'

t

!

C. OTHER DIRECT COSTS (ODCs)
Phone ( 1-800 number)

/minute

;.

1-800 set up fee
Long distance calls

lrninute

.*

..

.) *.,

$

Faxes

lfax

$

2.50

' 29

FedEx

lpackage

$

25.00

20..

500.00

Reproduction

/COPY

$

1.25

76 "

95.00

72.50

.:

Media Training Equipmer~t
Mailhouse

$20.000.00
$36.000.00

s

, $6,000.00

. Messenger Service
Nine (9) Radio PSAs
j

Production

45,000.00
$

Dissemination

180,000.00

Two (2) Ads
Production

140.000.00
80.000.00

Dissemination
Print Ads
Production

3.000.00

Four (4) Posters/Fllers
Production

'!

20.000.00
559,029.65

Event Participatlonlrnedia buy '
Benchmark Analysis

2,000.00

.j

i

Subtotal ODCs
D. SUBCONTRACTOR
Capital City Parlners

.

b

cutting Edge Communications

i

Global Works
Magna

I

!

Public Opinion Strategies
Subtotal subcontractors

1,095,078.1 5

. ,

\

.

i

75.000.00

'4

1

,,

\

Use or disclosure 01 dela conlalned on lhi, sheel i r 3ubjecl lo Ihe rerlr!cIIon on the cover page of Ihir proppsal
5

8

I

70.000.00
57.1366.00

.

,

180.000.00

1,323,602.00

1

TOTAL PRICE

940.936.00

,

\

'!

\

'

.

4.:

3,168,797

0

69

69

6 9 6 9 6 9 6 9 W

tf!

W

2z
I

IV)'

W

IV)

0
0

m

0

7

m o m
' S
p z

z

P

G

,

N

P

R

N
(D

COST ESTIMATE
GSA contrait No. GS-23F-0105M

.

"Trafficking ~ u b l i Awareness
k
Campaign"

.

Summary all Task by Line Item.

WAVE II

;1

Period of Performance: 12 Months
A. Salaries and Wages
Staff

Labor Category

Rate

Hours

Amount
I

Senior Vice President

$

126 '

VPlGr'oup Manager

$

296

Isola. Mered~th

Account Supervisor

$

Bender. Cecelia

Sr. Account Executive

$

TBD
Bernhard. Fran

Account Executive
Vice President

15

Phillips. Rachel

Art Director

Oliveri, Alyssa

Assistant Account Executive

$
$
$

Marshall, Monica
Derwinski. Kimberly

,

Ray. Jackie

Account Coordinator

Prinlz. Sandy

Contract Manager

LoPiccolo, Maria

Sr. Research Associate
Administrative
Financial Coordinator

$

.

Howard. Julie

i

Graharri. Mike

$
$

[)h

590

,!I (,:;

225
400

I. ;

61

j'.,j[Jt)

33
80

!'

$

)

,

I

Use or disclosure 01 dala conlained on this sheel is subject lo Ihe restricl~onon (he cover page of lh19
I

,

I..

],)( :!.I

14

2,456
. ,

,

\,
,:)b,

130

\

' \

125

;

I

Subtotal Direct Labor

i

376

,

406,105.81

COST ESTIMATE
I

GSA Contract No. GS-23F-0105M
~ollcitatl& No. 03Y003530

:

P?Trafficking ~ u b l i~wareness
i . . Campaign "

'"

Summary alljTask by Line Item

WAVE II
Period of Performance; 12 Months
8. TRAVEL

Cost

Local travel from 0 C. lo HHS
Subtotal Travel

/mile

$

0.36

Unlts

Amount

600

216.00
216.00

C. OTHER DIRECT COSTS (ODCs)
Phone ( 1-800number)
Long distance calls
Faxes
FedEx
Reproduction
Media Training Equipment
Mailhouse
Messenger Service
Subtotal ODCs
D. SUBCONTRACTOR
Capital City Partners
Cutting Edge Communications
Global works
Magna '
Public Opinion Slrategies
Subtotal Subcontractors

lminute
/minute
Ifax

' ,

lpackage

..

.:;'.

.:.

;.

. _ ..

,

$
$
$

5

0.23
0.15
2.50
25.00

14.400
138
60 00
325.00

24

13

i:
:

I

\

j

TOTAL PRICE

1,831,202.90

,

1

I

'I

,
9

Use or disclosure of data conlained on Ihis ,heel 1s subjecl to me reslncuon on the cover page of this proposal
' !;,
,'
, 1,
,
I

8

.)

.

8

.

Capital City Partners Outreach Services re
H H S Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign

BUDGET (per 24 month ~ e r i o d )
Involvement of CCP Senior partners (discnllnred)'
40 senior partner hours per week @ . ;. 'hr.
30 senior partner hours per week @
'hr
-- 10 partner hours per week
kt(,.. ,/nr.

$566,800

c)!
!.

.

.s

6-

---

..

J
:

...

..... -.

Anti-Traffichng Expert p a t Trueman)
16 hours per week @ $90/ hour

.*

. .

.-=-$74,880

..

--

C

.

.

-- - . -

.

Contract Writmg and Research
14 hours per week senior contract writing @ $80/hour
10 hours per week senior research @ $75/hour
a,'

Church and ~aith-EisedOutreach
20 hours per week @ $70/hr.
.i%'#:L.,

.-.

...'>.

Desk officer
30 hours per week @ $30/hr.

$ 46,800

-

.. .-

.

I.

-... .

.. . .

.-.

..-

-_

.

Administrative Support
36, hours per week @ $28/hr.
Travel

-.

-

..$

.

2;o-oo-.

12 site visits per year @ $1,00O/visit
Out of Pocket Expenses
$ 18,000
Pre-approved expenses @ $750/month
(includes meeting expenses, in town travel, presentation materials, other
miscellaneous expenses)

T O T A L , CCP Subcontract

Selllor Partner hours dscounted from normal rate of $200/hour

U.S. Departmei'it of Health'and Human Services
Human Trafficking

Benchmark Analysis of ~ e d i a
Coverage
November 16,2003 - May 15,2004
Outline of Select Findinas
...

rQ,

-

. a - .

Shift in lead topic-General trafficking articles outnumber sex trafficking articles,
and the.' .+- - reflectingthe influence of th.elRescue & Restore campaign. .launch
.
crystallization ,of human. trafficking
..
as a policy issue.
_.__
.

..

.

/

--. .

. .

Emerging messages about victims services-Although law-enforcement
messages still dominate, about a third of coverage mentions that assistance from
various sources is available to trafficking victims, up from 18 percent at baseline.
Generally, there is little detail about the types of assistance (counseling, housing,
Medicaid, etc.), although close to a third of coverage discusses the T-visa.
+,
**':
>-

HHS, Rescue & Restore visibility-References to HHS have increased as a result
of the Rescue & Restore campaign, yet not all campaign coverage mentions HHS
specifically of'-ils%s^bri7ded messages.
.

Hotline information spreading-Approximately 30 percent of articles from National
Crime Victims' Rights Week (April 18-24) and the concurrent Rescue & Restore
campaign launch mention the HHS trafficking hotline, although not all articles
. .
provide the phone number
for the hotline.
,,
.. .- - -- .
,

:

.

.A<

High DOJ visibility-The Justice Department remains the top agency mentioned in
overall coverage and is also prominent in campaign coverage.
Improved tone-There are fewer neutral and negative articles than at baseline. The
majority of articles (56 percent) are very positive, strongly sympathizing with victims
or advocating anti-trafficking initiatives.

.

.

__..

.-.
..--

U.S. Department of Healthand Human Services
Human Trafficking
Benchmark Analysis of Media Coverage
November 16,2003 - May 15,2004

;I'

.-.

a".

Presented by Ketchum
June 2004

I:

Table of Contents

b

Section I:

Scope
-

Scope
Methodology
The Algorithm Illustrated
o Highest-Scoring Articles
o Lowest-Scoring Articles

General Analysis
-

-

-

-

-

Overall Key Findings
Most Prevalent Reporters
Overall Prevalence of Topics
Prevalence of Federal Agencies
Overall Prevalence of Messages
o Positive Messages
o Negative Messages
o Neutral Messages
Overal!,Prevalence of Spokesperson Quotes
o Ndable Spokespeople
Overall Tone
Snapshot of Coverage: National News Outlets
o Key Findings
o
of Topics
o Prevalence of Federal Agencies
o Prevalence of Messages
Positive Messages
Negative Messages
Neutral Messages
o Prevalence of Spokesperson Quotes
- o Tone of National News Coverage
',r

rr+

rev-arence

-

EP
r

Table of Contents, continued

Section Ill: Target Cities
Prevalence of Coverage'
Snapshots of Target Gities
o New York
o ~hiladelphia
o Phoenix
o Atlanta
o San Francisco
o Washington,. ..D.C.
.. .o Orlando
o Dallas
,
o ~os~n~6les
o Seattle
o ~iami
o Chicago
o Tampa

@

Section IV: State Comparisons
''

-

%
,

Key ~ i n & g s
Snapshots of Selected States
o Florida
ddo--PJew. York
o Pennsylvania
o Georgia,
o California
o Arizona

e

U.S. Department of Health and Social Services

@

@
@
b
@
B
P
B

r.

Human Trafficking
Benchmark Analysis of Media Coverage
November 16,2003-May 15,2004
Scope
This benchmark analysis examines U.S. media coverage of human trafficking in the Un~tedStates
from November 16, 2003. to May 15, 2004. The sample consists of 150 art~clescollected through
daily media monitoring over approximately six m ~ n t h sfollowing the baseline report, which examined
coverage from November 15, 2002 to November 15, 2003. Articles refer to the traff~ck~ng
of people
to
.or withln the United States and are drawn from thefollowing categories of news outlets:

- --

-

-

--

-

.-

@

Major U.S. daily newspapers:-New York Times, Washington Post, USA Today, Wall Street
Journal, Los Angeles Times

9

Other national news outlets: Associated Press, CNN, National Public Radio, FOX News, Time,
U.S. News & World Report, Ne wsweek, National Review, Weekly Standard, and others

a

a

.

?

b
?
b
1

I
b

B
1
1

U.S. daily regional newspapers: Houston Chronicle, Chicago Tribune, Chicago Sun-Times,
Minneapolis Star Tribune, New York Newsday, Aberdeen American News, Atlanta JournalConstitution, Albuquerque Journal, Arkansas Democrat Gazette, Augusta Chronicle, Austin
American-Statesman, pa!timore Sun, Baltimore Daily Record, Bangor Daily News, Baton Rouge
Advocate, Biloxi Sun Herald, Bradenton Herald, Charleston Gazette, Christian Science Monitor, -Cincinnati Post, Contra Costa Times, Daily Oklahoman, Deseret News, Detroit News, Duluth
News Tribune, Fod-Wocth..Star-Telegram, Hartford Courant, Indianapolis News, Akron Beacon
Journal, Grand Rapids Press, Greensboro News & Record, Greenwich Time, Hampton Roads
Daily Press, Lexington Herald Leader, Los Angeles Daily News, Memphis Commgrc~alA p e a I,
Miami Herald, Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel, Myrtle Beach Sun News, ~ e orleans
w
~imGsPicayune, New York Daily News, New York Post, New York Journal News, Oklahoma City Journal
Record, Omaha World Herald, Orlando Sentinel, Palm Beach Post, Philadelphia Daily News,
Philadelphia+lnquirer,Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, Portland Press herald, Richmond Times-Dispatch,
~ O
St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Salt Lake Tribune, San Antonio Express-News, San D I ~ UnionTribune, San Francisco~%hronicle,St. Paul Pioneer Press, St. Petersburg Times, TaCaf'ria hFws
Tribune, Washington Times, Albany Times, Capital Times, Harrisburg Patriot-Ne ws, VirginianPilot, Centre Daily Times, Las Vegas Review-Journal, Reno Gazette Journal, Riverside Press
Enterprise; Santa Rosa Press Democrat, Stockton Record, Tallahassee Democrat, White Plains
Journal, Winston Salem Journal, and others
..Localbroadcast news outlets: WPVI-TV Action News in Philadelphia, KYW News Radio in
Philadelphia, KPNX-TV News Today in Phoenix, WAGA-TV Fox 5 News inAtlanta, and others

Law enforcement trades: FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, Police, Police Chief, and others
Health and social services publications: Health & Social Work, Health Alliance Alert, Nursing,
Journal of Healthcare for the Poor & Underserved, and others
Religious publications: U.S. Catholic, Christianity Today, Catholic News Service, and others

- - . ..

.

3
#

Methodology

a
p

CREATING 'THE ALGORITHM

a

The algorithm assigns a point value, in this case from 0 to 155, to each mention in which 0 is a
"missed opportunity" and 155 is the "ideal media mention." In the Human Trafficking algorithm, we
hav,e allowed for the possibility of press with a negative slant; therefore, the scoring system is also
designed to extend into the negative range.

i)

b
b
@

-.

We have assigned points to news articles based on the following criteria:
-.-.--

Type of publicatbn or media outlet: Higher points awarded to national
.... .
dailiemnd Wlre
. -. . . .
. .
services than assigned-rn regional outlets or specialized trades.
Inclusion of positive and negative messages: Bonus points awarded to articles
containing multiple key messages. Key messages determined jointly by the client and
Ketchum. Negative points assigned to articles containing negative messages.
Expert quotes: Articles receive points for supportive quotes from HHS spokespeople,
other federal agency spokespeople, or trafficking experts/NGOs/local officials. Negative
points assigned to articles containing negative quotes.
Tonality of the article: On a scale ranging from very negative to very positive
Specific menfiqns: Points awarded if HHS or the Bush Administration receives a positive
mention; negativelpoints assigned for negative mentions.
We have also tracked, but not assigned points to the following elements:
.!W....*...

.

-..

Q

State

b

Target cities ..
Topic of coverage
Government agencies mentioned
Selected
., neutral messages

!
0
b

$

--

.

--

.

-...

- .

.:.'.A.

.=

= .:

=

.

. .-

-- -.

@
8

6
P
@

b
B
)

3
i9

4
P
h

The Algorithm Illustrated
To understand the scoring of the algorithm, and to get a stronger sense of "good" versus "bad" or
"weak" media coverage, it is helpful to examine the highest- and lowest-scoring articles. In general,
the highest-scoring articles contain positive, campaign-specific messages and quotes from HHS
officials. Most articles with high scores have multiple positive messages and several supportive
quotes from federal agency officials or NGO spokespeople, as well as positive references to the antitrafficking efforts of the Bush Administration or HHS specifically. The lowest-scoring articles contain
negative messages o i unfavorable third-partyquotes. Some articles, although they do not fall in the
negative range, score low because they are squarely neutral in tone or contain few messages overall,
neither positive nor negative. Examples include some police briefs or legal coverage pertaining to
individual trafficking cases. The highest- and lowest-scoring articles are summarized as follows:

-

Highest-ScoringArticles

%

..

-

125 points: Atlanta Journal-Constitution, "Feds to ID, aid victims of traffic
Poole, 4/21/04

..-

.

-

..
-.--.

6hum~ns,"Shelia M..

-

HHS is positioned prominently in this article's lead, setting it apart from other positive coverage:
"Atlanta is among three cities tapped for a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services pilot
project to identify and assist victims of human trafficking." Unlike some other coverage of the
trafficking campaign launch, this article singles out HHS as the originator of the campaign and
highlights the agency's leadership role within a broad alliance: "The Rescue & Restore Victims of
Human Trafficking campaiqmto be rolled out by HHS is designed to strengthen and build coalitions
among nor~profitgroups, chuiches, health care providers and law enforcement." The article also
quotes Dr. Wade Horn, assistant secretary for the HHS Administration for Children and Families, and -.
Steven Wagner, director of the HHS Trafficking in Persons program. Although moderate in length, this
arficle concisely C O ~ V ~ Y ~ I O . positive
O ~ . - ' +messages,
~
including branded, campaign-specific = .
.
messages that garner more points:
:

s

.%

?.

- -

.. .

Rescue & Restore campaign aids trafficking victims
o Contact the -HHS hotline or view the HHS Web site for more information or if you think
someone is a trafficking victim
o Trafficking is a widespread/common problem in the United States
o A person who- is trafficked is a victim who has bee-ncoerced into sexual ,expiitation
. ..
....or.. forced
. -=
.labor
o Victims of sex trafficking differ from prostitutes because they have been forced or coerced into
the sex trade
o HHS offers services for, trafficking victims, including legal assistance, TANF, Medicaid, food
stamps and SSI
o Services are available for trafficking victims (mentions other agencies or NGOs)
o -- Trafficking Victims Protection Act exists to combat trafficking/help trafficking victims
o Contact law enforcement/service providers if you think someone is a trafftcking victim
Federal government, local law enforcement, and non-governmental organizations are
o
partnering in a campaign against trafficking
o

x

J!

b

b
b
1

125 points: Philadelphia Daily News, "Puttinq an end to human traffickinq; Phila. Launches
project to halt exploitation," Ron Goldwvn, 4/21/04

This article assumes a relatively new angle in trafficking coverage by emphasizing the social services
aspect of the Rescue & Restore campaign. According to the article's lead, "Human trafficking for
forced labor or sexual exploitation is a hidden evil that can't be stamped out by law enforcement
alone. So officials are turning to social service providers-and the public-to help fight what they're

1
I

6

-

ab

iQ

calling 'modern-day slavery' in a pilot project unve~ledin Philadelphia yesterday." Along with other
positive messages, this article has picked up on branded kampaign messages: "'Rescue and
Restore' implores service agencies, neighbors and advocacy groups to 'look below the surface' for
clues to victims." In contrast to much of the broadcast coverage of the Philadelphia launch, this artlcle
directly quotes an HHS official. Robert Zimmerman, an HHS regional head, says the agency hopes to
certify more trafficking victims for protection in Pennsylvania. "Although [the current number] is low
there are indications of more victims. It is largely a hidden problem."

@

120 points: Philadel~hialnquker, "Human Traffickinq; Slaves to a horrible crime," Editorial, 4/22/04

1,
1)

B

b

8

Philadelphia's leading daily newspaper expresses support for the Rescue & Restore campaign's
vision and approach. This article scores well because it credits HHS and the Bush Administration and
acknowledges that the campaign breaks new ground:

@

4

-

-

-

4
@

8

In a letter to the editor of the New York Times, Juhu Thukral, director of the Sex Workers Project at
the Urban Justice Center, argues the Bush Administration's legal crackdown on trafficking largely fails
--rO.
to aid victims:
"Under United States law, the government is charged with offering assistance to uictims who are
trafficked into the United States by giving them visas and other benefits that will allow them to
rebuild their lives. But the frequent requirement of cooperating in criminal prosecutions intimidates
most victims from coming forward, and in fact many victims have found themselves aggressively
interrogatecfby law enforcement officials as if they themselves are the criminals, Add to this the
general level of fear an4,distrust that this administration has created in immigrant
.. .. . ... .
communities,
- and the result is a law that allows the administratifon to market itself well but does not deliverall
that much for young people around the world."

a
B

b

.

Although this article garners a few positive points for sympathizing with trafficking victims and briefly
acknowledging the provisions of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act, its pointed criticism of the Bush
administration's anti-trafficking actions and its overall negative tone result in a low score.
,

.

.. .\

b

5 points: Boston Globe, 'Was Storv About Sexual Traffickinq Exauqerated?" Cathv Younq, 2/9/04

t

Columnist Cathy Young suggests New York Times writer Peter Landesman and anti-trafficking
activists have inflated statistics and testimonial of trafficking crimes to further their cause. Although
Young agrees sexual slavery in the United States is a "real and serious problem," her article leaves a
detrimental impression by questioning the credibility of trafficking reports and insinuating that the
problem has been blown out of proportion. Young recounts a quote by State Department advisor
Laura Lederer, whom she describes as "a radical feminist attorney," appearing in Peter Landesman's
trafficking article 'The Girls Next Door." Young writes, "Lederer, for instance, tells Landesman that
'We're not finding victims [of sexual slavery] in the United States because we're not looking for
them1-a statement that has some truth in it, but may also be a convenient way to explain the lack of

I

b

-.

.r

b

i

.

5 points: New York Time~~%Victims
of Sex Traffickinu," Juhu Thukral, 1/16/04

@
D
b
b

,

.

Lo west-Scoring Articles

6

B--

-

..
.
.
.

"Victims who help inve-stigatorstrack down their traffickers willbe offered help~from7ood
stamps to Medicaid:..~heapproach marks a sharp turn for U.S. law enforcement, wnich
has treated trafficking victims as criminals for entering the country illegally. But President
Bush, Attorney ~ e n e r aJohn
l
Ashcroft and Health and Human Services Director Tommy
Thompson promote the enlightened view that trafficked people are crime victims
deserving aid. That change is reflected in the pilot's name: 'Rescue and Restore."'

i)

@

,

--

...
. ..

i)

evidence. The numbers touted by these activists are especially suspect since many of them
deliberately blur the lines between voluntary and forced prostitution, regarding all of it as servitude
and exploitation of women."

e

a
8
ib
P

1

The focus of this article is on journalistic concerns arising from Peter Landesman's controversial
reporting of trafficking activities, rather than a debate over the merits of the anti-trafficking campaign
However, the article scores low because i t seeds doubts about the validity of aspects ,of the antitrafficking movement and the severity of the problem.
10 points: Boston Globe, "Live-in Nanny Sues Brookline Couple, Sayinq 'They Enslaved Her" Ron
DePasquale, 4/25/04

1

a
b
4
4
10
LI
R

\

-

This article is an example of coverage that scores low because it reports on an individual incident of
forced labor and imprisonment witho~jlseizingthe opportunity to relay messages about the wider
problem of trafficking and what communities can do to stop it. The article repogsan
.- . - li?@atYtvomah
.
was forced'to live with'a' Massachusetts family as an unpaid domestic worker in an example of
"modern-day slavery." Although several articles about sirr~ilarincidents nationwide mention aspects of
the Trafficking Victims Prot'ection Act or cite trafficking figures, this article limits itself to the details of
this individual case with few constructive messages.

- .= ==

U.S. Department of Health and Social Services
Human Trafficking
Benchmark Analysis of Media Coverage
November 16,2003-May 15,2004

. .

Overall Key Findings
Topics

-

The greatest shift in topics since the baseline analysis is the increase in articles about traffkking in
-general rather than focusing primarily on a single type of forced labor (e.g. sex work, m e s t i ~
work, etc.). Coverage of the Rescue & Restore Victims of Human Traffickingcampaign largely
falls within the general trafficking category because it discusses the various forms of traffrcking. General trafficking articles account for slightly more than half of coverage (51 percent), up from
about a quarter of baseline coverage.
Coverage also reflects an increase in articles focusing on child trafficking victims in the United
States instead of solely in foreign countries. However, articles concentrating on U.S. trafficking of
children still account for only about six percent of coverage, up from two percent at baseline.
/'

Articles centered on th&.frafficking of factory, domestic, or farmlmigrant workers primarily report on
specific cases under investigation or in court proceedings.

Messaqes

i.+-..rlA.,

.-

..;

- .

.

.

Victimization is still the most pervasive message, with nearly all articles depicting
.trafficked
-- -.persons as crime victims, up frbm 94 percent at baseline.
A

Although law enforcement messages still dominate, the message that social services are available
for trafficking victims has made headway, especially through coverage of the Rescue & Restore
campaign. About a third of coverage from this six-month period mentions services are available to
trafficking victims through the government or NGOs, compared to 18 percent in the baselinranalysis.
While only'about 10 percent of overall coverage specifies that HHS offers trafficking victims
services besides the HHS hotline, the figure jumps to close to 30 percent of articles during
National Crime Victims' Rights Week (April 18-24) and the concurrent launch of the Rescue &
Restore campaign. In the previous baseline analysis, only about one percent of articles mentioned
...
HHS offers victim-related services.
C

.,

Although the Department of Justice is still the federal agency mentioned the most in trafficking
coverage (36 percent of articles), HHS follows the DOJ with references in a quarter of articles, up
from less than five percent of coverage in the baseline analysis. Mentions of HHS climb to 62
percent of trafficking coverage appearing during the Rescue & Restore campaign launch.
The approximately 38 percent of launch coverage that does not directly identify HHS typ~cally
gives more recognition to the Justice Department (mentioned in about 40 percent of launch-week
coverage) or reports more generally that "law enforcement and service providers" are partnering in
a federal anti-trafficking campaign.

. .

.

The "Rescue & Restore" slogan appears in only about 11 percent of trafficking articles from the
six-month period, but reaches 40 percent of coverage from April 18-24. The "Look Beneath the
Surface" tagline is much weaker. The exact phrase or close variations appear in only three
percent of overall coverage and 11 percent of launch coverage. Many articles depict human
trafficking as a "secretiven or "invisible" crime with victims that are difficult to identify, but they do
not articulate "Look Beneath the Surface" or advise the public about potential signs of
victimization.

-

.Visuals play a key role in conveying branded messages in local television coverage of the
tra,Aicking campaign launch. Although most television coverage from the Philadelphia and Phoenix
markets does not mention HHS directly, t h e k is wide exposure of the Rescue & Restore logo and
print materials displaying the HHS logo, the address for the HHS trafficking Web site, and the HHS
. ,.hotline.
Atlanta television coverage=doesa better job in directly. citing
HHS.
.~... .
-.
.

..

-?=

--*

:

%

-. -.

slightly more than 15 6erce;t.Gf overall coverage mentions the HHS hotline or traffickingweb site.
rising to 46 percent during the campaign launch. The HHS hotline is the most-cited trafficking
hotline, while others, including those of the Justice Department and Polaris Project, receive little
mention. There are instances, however, in which an article mentions the HHS trafficking hotline
without providing the phone number. For example, an Associated Press article reporting on the
campaign launch in Phoenix states, "Each [target] city will also get a hotline that can be used to
report suspected cases of trafficking to caseworkers, without going directly to police or immigration
authoritiesn ("Health officials launch campaign to combat human trafficking," Ananda Shorey,
4/22/04). The end of2tt@article provides the Web address for the HHS trafficking site, but not the
hotline number.
Only six percent of articles contain a negative message, down from 14 percent in the baseline
analysis. criticisin"df'th6 g6vernment for not providing adequate and accessible aid to trafficking
victims remains the most common negative message. Although still an infrequent message, some
NGOs continue to voice concern that overemphasis on law enforcement c w l d h i ~ d eoutreach
r
and aid to trafficking victims.
Compared to the baseline analysis, a greater number of articles reporting on individual trafficking
cases (e.g. bolice investigations, legal proceedings) are injecting messages about the broader
nationwide and international trafficking problem by referring to elements of the Traifficking Victims
Protection Act or citing trafficking statistics.
Several articles about police raids on massage parlors and brothels suggest trafficking was
occurring at some of these establishments, even if victims are reluctant to say so. For example, an
article about massage parlor raids in Colorado explains the following: "...The Trafficking Victims
Protection Act of 2000 requires the women to tell authorities that they are unwilling participants,
'and some in the Colorado cases have refused to do so ...The women are told they will be deported
if they talk, and some are threatened with harm to their family members back in South Korea, or
that their families will be told how the women are making a living in the United States" (Rocky
~ o u n t a i nNews, "'Slaves' Detained; Women Used For Sex Being Held Despite Law to the
Contrary," Brian D. Crecente, 12/3/03).
Close to 20 percent of articles report that many trafficking victims fear working with the police.
About 14 percent of articles explain that many trafficking victims who are illegal immigrants fear
deportation if they come forward. Another 10 percent of articles from the six-month period mention
the diversity factors that influenced the selection of Rescue & Restore pilot cities, a figure that
increases to about a third of coverage from April 18-24.

-

d
@
6

Several articles identify fear of retaliation as an obstacle blocking trafficking victims from
attempting to escape. Traffickers may threaten to harm victims or their families if they break free.
Hispanic media has shown interest in the domestic trafficking issue. Limited national coverage of
the Rescue & Restore launch includes a segment on Univisior~and an interview with HHS official
Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny on Telemundo. Spanish-language television in Phoenix and Spanishlanguage television, radio, and print outlets in Atlanta have covered the campaign launch.

S

b
$
0

Spokespeople

0

Quotes by anti-trafficking spokespeople appear in more than three quarters of coverage (77
percent), with nearly 76 percent of articles carrying one or more supportive quotes, up from 72
percent-at baseline. Around five percent
of articles contain an unfavorable quote, down from 11
- --percent in the baseline analysis. - . -

i
fl

-

-

/

.

..

L

*

-

~uotes.-from
local'expe-AsO;.NGO representatives continue to outnumber quotesfrom federal - -.
agency officials. About .71 percent of articles include a supportive quote from a local expert or
NGO spokesperson. Fewer than half (41 percent) contain quotes from officials at federal agencies
other than HHS, up from 30 percent in baseline coverage.
About eight percent of overall coverage includes a quote from an HHS official, jumping to 30
percent during the Rescue & Restore launch week. No quotes from HHS officials appeared in
baseline coverage. ,
li

..s

\=.

.

D

D
D
-.

b.
D
b

D
D
b

b
b
b
b
b
b
b
b

U.S. district attorneys have a prominent role as spokespeople in trafficking coverage, padicularly
in coverage of the Rescue & Restore launch and in articles stemming from local and regional
trafficking investigations.
These attorneys are recognized figures in their state and are often . .
..-.*.-. ., .::*
- .
familiar to region87 med~a.
Several stories about the campaign launch in target cities quote regional HHS officials,=iacluding
Constantinos Miskis in Atlanta and Robert Zimmerman in Philadelphia.
Federal agency officials quoted about anti-trafficking efforts seldom acknowledge another agency
directly. ~o;exam~le, Attorney General John Ashcroft describes the anti-trafficking coalition
without naming HHS orsther agencies:"'Effective interagency and intergovernmerit cwperatron is
also a key part of our strategy to combat human trafficking, and we are training federal and local
law enforcement ...We are developing interagency crisis teams for deployment to major trafficking
hubs and ,are also working with other agencies to obtain visas and humanitarian assistance for
trafficking victimsn (New York Times, 'The Girls Next Door: Letters," John D. Ashcroft, 211 5/04).
. Editorials
.

reflecting the newspaper's views against domestic trafficking appear in the New York
Times, Philadelphia Inquirer, Palm Beach Post, Daytona Beach News Jo~!rn,al,and Omaha WorldHeraId.

Tone
The highest-scoring articles and some of the most positive in tone repon on the Rescue & Restore
campaign.
Very positive articles-those that clearly sympathize with trafficking victims or advocate for the
federal anti-trafficking campaign-make up 56 percent of coverage from the past six months,
compared to roughly 20 percent of baseline coverage.

Similar to the baseline analysis, few articles (about two percent) are negative or very negative in
tone.
Neutral articles decreased from about 30 percent of coverage in the baseline analysis to 22
I
percent in the past six months.

C

Most Prevalent Reporters

C
b

b
b
b
b

h
h

a
b
b

b
b
b
h
h

As seen in the baseline analysis, most reporters generating two or more trafficking articles in less than
12 months are covering local trafficking cases. The reporting is largely from a criminal justice
perspective, with some articles providing brief descriptions of the nationw~deanti-trafficking initiative.
I

The most prevalent reporters writing about trafficking in the past six months are as follows, ranked
from those with the highest-scoring coverage to those with the lowest-scoring coverage:
Lois Kaplan, Ocean County Observer- two articles; averaqe article score: 67.5points
*

-

Kaplan's coverage in the Ocean County Obsen/ercontinues to highlight the legislative anti-trafficking
effqcs of U.S. Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJj,including his introduct~onof the Traffick~ngVtctlms ~rotectlori
Reauthorization Act (HR-2620). Smith represents the northern New Jersey district covered* the'
Ocean County Observer.
.. Anthonv DeStefano, Ne'wsday - five articles; averaqe article score: 57 points

DeStefano is the main reporter covering trafficking issues for Newsday. His beat includes criminal
justice and legal affairs. In the past six months, DeStefano has reported on individual trafficking cases
in New York City, as well the city's new Human Trafficking Investigation Unit and a two-day
conference on human trafficking for law enforcement and local service providers hosted by the
Association of the Bar of thgSity of New York.
-.

Bill Wallace, San Francisco Chronicle - two articles; averaqearticle score: 52.5 points
In a January article, WaHrrccleads with the example of federal raids on four alleged San Francisco
brothels to launch a summary of key events nationwide In the crackdown against human trafficking.
The article also contains a reference to HHS, which seldom appears in traffickin-t coveragepdor to
the Rescue & Restore launch: "Just last month, U.S. Secretary of Health and Human Services Tommy
Thompson announced that more than $200 million was being added to the fight against a trade that
smuggles an estimated 18,000 to 20,000 undocumented sex workers into the United States each
year" ("Sex trafficking ruthless, lucrative / Brothels proliferate despite crackdowns," 1/24/04).
Wallace's other trafficking aflicle is an earlier-crime story report~ngon the San Francisco brothel cases
just after charges were filed.

-

Joan Treadway, Times-Picayune -two articles; averaqe article score: 45 points

$

!'
!
?

Treadway has reported on a trafficking case involving industrial workers in New Orleans and has also
covered a March conference on trafficking awareness for New Orleans law enforcement and service
providers sponsored by the Protection Project of Johns Hopkins University. Her article on the
conference provides a Polaris Project hotline number for reporting suspected trafficking (1-866-8784754).
John Lantiqua, Palm Beach Post - two articles; averaqe article score: 15 points
Lantigua was a lead writer for a three-part series in the Palm Beach Post titled "Modern-Day Slavery."
Most of the articles in the series use the term "slavery" loosely to refer to the harsh working conditions
and meager pay of migrant farm workers in Florida's agricultural industry. However, two of Lantigua's
articles describe examples of worker imprisonment and forced labor. They do not score high, despite
descriptions of deplorable abuses, because the articles lack messages about the federal antitrafficking program.

B
P
b

b

Overall Prevalence of Topics
Based on all media coverage, including both national and regional outlets, the most prevalent topics
ranked from most prevalent to least by percentage of media coverage include:

.
Articles about trafficking generally
Sex trafficking
Trafficking of domestic workers
Trafficking of children
Trafficking of industrial laborers
Trafficking of farm laborerslmigrant workers '
- .-

-

.

Percentage of Coverage
.',.'r...,..

.-

..'i.

---

- ,

Overall Prevalence of Federal Agencies
In overall coverage, the most frequently mentioned federal agencies, ranked from most prevalent to
least based on percentage of media coverage, include:
Department of Justice
Department of Health and Human Services
,Department of State; Department of om eland Security (same number of articles)
White Houselgeneral Bush Administration
Department of Labor
Congress
. - .=

.

Ei Justice

HHS
State

0 Homeland
White House
Labor
W Congress
V .

Percentage of Coverage

b

Overall Prevalence of Messages

f3

@

Positive Messaqes

Nearly all articles carry at least one positive message, chiefly the classification of a trafficked person
as a victim of a crime. The vast majority of articles, 93 percent, carry two or more positive messages.
The most prevalent messages are ranked as follows:

@
0
0

a
-

9
A

@
-0'

3
A

@

A person who is trafficked is a victim who has been coerced into sexual exploitation or forced
labor
Victims of sex trafficking differfrom prostitutes because they have been forced or coerced into the
*
sex trade
Trafficking is a widespread/commo~problem in.the United States
-Federal government, local-law enforcement, and non-governmental _organizations..ar.ekzirtnering in
..,.
a campaign against trafficking ,.
. .
- .Services are available for trafficking victims (mentions other agencies or NGOs)
Trafficking Victims Prot.ection Act exists to combat trafficking/help trafficking victims
*

i@
W Traff icking Victim
BVictimsJNot Prostitutes

0Widespread in U.S.
Partnership Campaign

nServices Available

".
Percentage of Coverage

UTraff icking Victims
Protection Act ' '

- .
.--

Positive Messaqes (cont.)
Lesser positive messages are as follows:

-*

T-Visa gives trafficking victims temporary legal residency
Contact law enforcement/service providers if you think someone is a trafficking victim
Contact the HHS hotline or view the HHS Web site for more information or if you think someone is
a trafficking victim
Rescue & Restore campaign aids trafficking victims
HHS offers services for trafficking victims, including legal assistance, TANF, Medicaid, food
stamps and SSI
Federal government/HHS/the Administration is doing a good job to combat trafficking
-Cook Beneaththe Surface campaQn' is spreading awareness of trafficking

T-Visa
Contact Law EnforcementlServke Providers
Contact HHS
R e s c u e & Restore

W HHS Offers Services
Govt. Doing Good Job

Percentage ofmcoverage

I

¤ Look Beneath the Surface

--

I

-_.

3
ab
0
!B

b
I!

Negative Messaqes
Only six percent of all news articles carry a negative message. Less than one percent of articles
contain more than one negative message. The most prevalent negative messages are ranked as
follows:
Services are not available for trafficking victims/government is not doing enough
Confusion among government agencies - efforts are not coordinated to the extent they should be

E l Services Lacking
Govt. Uncoordinated

~erceniageof Coverage

I

Neutral Messaqes
Approximately 27 percent of all news articles contain one or more of the following neutral messages,
ranked according to prevalence:
Victims fear working with law enforcement.
Victims fear deportation if they come forward.
HHS target cities in the anti-trafficking campaign were selected on the basis of their diversity, size
of immigrant population, and their mix of urban and rural settings.

El Victims Fear Law
Enforcement
PI Victims Fear Deportation

Percentage of Coverage

OHHS Target Cities
Selected For Diversity

M
la
AI
lh
lib

R
R
4

Overall Prevalence of Spokesperson Quotes
About 77 percent of all news articles contain a quote from a spokesperson. Of those articles, 76
percent contain at least one positive quote. About five percent of articles have a negative quote. The
categories of spokespeople are ranked as follows according to prevalence:
Article includes supportive quote from expert/NGO/local official
Article includes quote from-other agency spokesperson
Article includes quote from other HHS spokesperson
Article includes negative quote from expert/NGO/local official

4

\

kRl ExperUNGOILocal-Supportive
O t h e r Agency
ExperUNGOILocal-Negative

b

a
F
F
4

Percentage of Coverage
.,
.?,

Notable Quotes
A snapshot of critical and supportive viewpoints:
.-.,.*? -..
Critics

C
C

Non-Governmental Orqanizations:
Juhu Thukral, director of the Sex Workers Proiect at the Urban Justice Center, in a letter to the
New York Times: "As an attorney who represents trafficked sex workers, I havaseen firsthand
how this administration has failed many trafficked young women...The frequent requ!rement-_of
cooperating in criminal prosecutions intimidates most victims from comlng forward, and in fact
many victims have found themselves aggressively interrogated by law enforcement officials as if
they themselves are the criminals" (New York Times, "Victims of Sex Trafficking," Juhu Thukral,
1116/04)
Ann Jordan, director of the Initiative Aqainst Traffickinq in Persons at the International Human
Ribhts Law Group in Washinqton, D.C., reqardinq the qovernment's denial of funds to antitraffickinq qroups that voice support for leqalized prostitution: "What the Biish policies amount to
is a global gag rule on trafficking" (Inter Press Service, "Debate Roars Over Anti-Trafficking
Funds," Jennifer Friedlin, 4/21/04)
LaShawn R. Jefferson, executive director of the Women's Riqhts Division of Human Riqhts Watch,
commentinq on the State Department's 2003 Traffickinq in Persons Report: "For the third
consecutive year, the State Department report fails to give hard figures on the number of people
being trafficked. The report gives undue credit for minimal effort and ignores government
practices-such as summary deportation and incarceration-that effectively punish trafficking
victims" (Inter Press Service, "Activists Want More from Anti-Trafficking Effort," Ginger Adams
Otis, 4/28/04)

a

Cathy Younq, columnist for the Boston Globe and contributinq editor for Reason maqazine,
referring to Peter Landesman's anti-traffickinq article in the New York Times Maqazine: 'The
activists against sexual slavery on whom Landesman relied so heavily in compiling information for
his article are engaged in an admirable cause. But, like many advocates, they can be blinded by
their agenda...The numbers touted by these activists are especially suspect since many of them
deliberately blur the lines between voluntary and forced prostitution, regarding all of it as serv~tude
and exploitation of womenn (Boston Globe, 'Was Story About Sexual Trafficking Exaggerated?"
Cathy Young, 2/9/04)

18,

b
II)

b
b

\

I
)

Supporters
-Federal Aqency Officials:

-

. -

.

-

.-

.. -

-

c
- --

Dr. Wade F. Horn, Assistant Secretaw for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services: "It is unlikely that victims of trafficking will be found and rescued in significant
nurr~bersuntil the American public gains a much greater awareness of the horror of this
inhumanity...By making communities more vigilant and by telling traffickers their atrocities will not
be tolerated, the message is being conveyed that American rights of life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness must be given to victims of human trafficking" (Arizona Republic, "Hidden Victims of
Trafficking Suffer Modern-Day Slavery," Dr. Wade F. Horn, 4/21/04)
2%

Constantinos I. Miskis, Southeast reqional director of the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services, commentinq on the Rescue & Restore campaiqn: 'With this program, we're really trying
to do a better job g f ~ e t t j n gword out there and making it as easy as possible for victims of human
trafficking to extract themsdves or let someone know so we can get them out of the situation"
(Associated Press, "Officials launch campaign reaching out to victims of human trafficking," Louise
Chu, 4/21/04)
=
-- Steven Waqner, director of the HHS Traffickinq in Persons proqram, remarkinq on the low rate of
victim certification for social welfare benefits thus far: "There isn't anyone involved in this program
who would consider this [500 people] a satisfactory rate," (Associated Press, "Crackdown on
.
.._ . . _ . . . _ . .
-.
Sexual Slavery,"-David B. Caruso, 4/20104)

5
b

b
b

C

!B
C
b

r
r

Attorney General John D. Ashcroft: "Stamping out this vile trade has ranked among the Bush
administration's top priorities since its earliest days. In 2001, the Justice Department announced a
new initiative to battle human trafficking, built on the pillars of prosecution, enhanced outreach and
law-enforcement cooperation ...Effective interagency and intergovernment cooperation is also a
key part of oui strategy to combat human trafficking ...We are developing interagency crisls teams
for deployment to major trafficking hubs and are also working with other agepcies to obtain visas
and humanitarian assistance for trafficking victims" (New York Times, 'The Girls Next Door,
Letters: John D. Ashcroft" John D. Ashcroft, 2/15/04)
Alex costa. Assistant U.S. Attorney General for Civil Rights, referrinq to traffickins victims:
"These are victims and they should be treated as victims ...They need to be aware that if they
come forward they will not be deported" (Philadelphia Inquirer, 'Taking aim at human trafficking;
Phila. is the first site in a federal initiative to end forced labor," Joseph A. Slobodzian, 4/21/04)
U.S. Attorney Patrick L. Meehan, Eastern District of Pennsylvania, reqardinq human traffickinq: "It
sounds like something from the 18th century, but it is happening today" (Philadelphia Inquirer,

=

I"

.

. -.

"Taking aim at human trafficking; Phila. is the first site in a federal initiative to end forced labor,"
Joseph A. Slobodzian, 4/21/04)
U.S. Attorney Paul Charlton, District of Arizona: "No [trafficking] case can be successfully
prosecuted without the assistance of the victims themselves," (Associated Press, "Health officials
launch campaign to combat human trafficking," Ananda Shorey, 4/22/04)
Scott Weber, U.S. Department of Homeland Securitv: "Trafficking is a very violent, secretive
crime. It's the strong preying on the weak" (Associated Press, "Health officials launch campaign to
combat human trafficking," Ananda Shorey, 4/22/04)

-

Secretary of State Colin Powell, quoted from'~raffickinq In Persons Report, 2003: "It's
incompfehensible that trafficking in.human beings is taking place in the 21stCenturyIncorrtprehensible but true. Trafficking leaves no land untouched, including our own,: (&w-Ywk
Times, !'U.S. Tries40 Combat Sexual Abuse of Kids," George Gedda, AP, 92/17/03)
John Miller, director of the State Department's Office to Monitor and Combat Trafficking in
.
Persons: "That slavery exists as we enter 2004 may shock many. Nonetheless, slavery in many
forms, particularly sex and forced labor, reaches into almost every country" (Washington Post,
"Slavery in 2004,"John Miller, 1/1/04). "If illegal immigrants who have information about
[trafficking] victims have a chance at legal status in this country, they might feel secure enough to
come forward," (New-York Times Magazine, "The Girls Next Door," Peter Landesman, 1/25/04)

Non-Governmental ~rqanizaiions:
Kevin Bales, executive director of Washinqton, D.C.-based Free the Slaves and author of
Disposable People: New Slavery in a Global Economv: "Today, we have a basic knowledge of the
[human trafficking] problem. But the bad news is that as more and more cases come to light, we
realize that while we now perceive the tip of the iceberg, there is still the rest of th'e icetferg which
we haven't seen," (Dallas Morning News, "Event underscores scope, toll of human trafficking,"
Frank Trejo, 3/4/04)

-.

..

Michele Clark, a co-director of the Protection Project,-a human traff ickinq research institute at
John Hopkins Universitv School of Advanced International Studies: "Coercion doesn't have 40 be a
loaded gun over your head, it can be psychological. rrafficking victims'] condition is one of
dependency, unfamiliarity, a lack of language--coercion in the trafficking industry includes the
exploitation of this type of condition," (Rocky Mountain News, "'Slaves' Detained; Women Used
For Sex Being Held Despite Law to the Contrary,'' Brian D. Crecente, 12/3/03)
.

Sharon 6. Cohn, director of anti-traffickinq operations for the international Justice Mission, based
in Arlinqton, Va.: "Sex trafficking gets thrown into issues of intimacy and vice, but it's a major
crime. it's pure profit and pleasure, and greed and lust, and it's right under homicide," (New York
Times Magazine, 'The Girls Next Door," Peter Landesman, 1/25/04)
Marisa 6. Uqarte, director of the San Dieqo-based Bilateral Safety Corridor Coalition, commenting
on women trafficked into the United States throuqh Mexico: "If a girl tries to run, she's killed and
becomes just one more woman in the desert. But if she keeps going north, she reaches the Gates
of Hell," (New York Times Magazine, "The Girls Next Door," Peter Landesman, 1/25/04)
Maria Jose Fletcher, attorney with the Florida lmmiarant Advocacy Center: "The [trafficking]
victims and survivors want to forget. They are afraid of dealing with the legal system in the United

=

1

d

States," (Orlando Sentinel, 'Trafficking of Humans Hard to See, Experts Say Officials In Polk
Learn How to Recognize, Help Victims," Christopher Sherman, 2/15/04)

I

v
p
b
b
b
b
b

Robin Thompson, researcher at the Center for the Advancement of Human Riqhts at Florida State
Universitv: "All you have to do is look where cheap labor is required and where there IS a potentlal
for labor exploitation, which pretty much can put you anywhere in our state," (South Florida SunSentinel, "Modern-Day Slavery Called 'Alive and Well' in Florida," Jackie Hallifax, AP, 2/25/04)
Mevnda Barnhart, proqram specialist for the Arizona Leaque to End Reqional Traffickina: We've
heard from people who work with the migrant farming community and the undocumented
community that they had seen trafficking cases but didn't know what to call it and didn't know who
to contact for help," (Arizona Republic, "State'ripe for racket in human trafficking," Daniel
Gonzalez, 3130104)
+
-

* - 0

-

Reliqious Leaders:

.

-

?

=*

I

--

-=-

Cardinal Justin Riqali, Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia, speakinq about the Rescue &
Restore campaiqn: "The root of this evil [human trafficking] is the tremendous violation of human
dignity. This splendid collaboration...p oints out how much energy there is in the community to
extirpate this evil" (Philadelphia Daily News, "Putting an end to human trafficking; Phila. Launches
project to halt exploitation," Ron .Goldwyn, 4/21/04)
Rev. Jan Olav Flaaten.of Arizonans to Protect Exploited Children and Adults: ''We hope to provide
[trafficking] victims wiihkblf-respect, healing and the ability to start life again" (Associated Press,
"Health officials launch campaign to combat human trafficking," Ananda Shorey, 4/22/04) ,
Journalists:

.:*,:

..a

-. .

.

Peter Landesman, author of a traff ickinq expose in the New York Times Maqazine, durinq a CNN
interview: "Prostitutes;who certainly operate in a gray zone of coercion, they do make m n e y ,
they do make some sort of living, if you can call it that. The women and toddlers and girls and
teenagers that I was writing about and reported on are literally in chains, figuratively and literally. If
they3ry to escape, they're killed. Their families in their countries or in their villages or origin are
often beaten or killed if they try to escape. These are people with no choice whatsoever and they
don't earn a dime," (CNN: American Morning, "Interview with Peter Landesman," 1/23/Q4)

-

.

s)

Overall Tone

d

d
b

The majority of articles, 76 percent, are either positive or very positive in tone. About 22 percent are
neutral in tone. Fewer than two percent of articles are negative or very negative in tone.

#
$
P
#
4

@

60
50
40

- --

30

Positive
0 Neutral

20

ONGjative

-

\

j

: *

.,

~.

10
0
- .

Percentage of Coverage

Snapshot of Coverage: National News Outlets
Approximately 23 percent of coverage from the six-month period appears in national news outlets,
including nationally read newspapers such as the New York Times and Washington Post, news wires
such as the Associated Press, and national broadcast outlets such as CNN.

Kev Findings
Topics

-

-

Unlike overall coverage, sex trafficking is still"te most prevalent topic in national stories. About 46
percent of articlesfrom
national outlets
focus on sex trafficking and 31 percent discuss trafficking
- ..*
-.
in general.
.
.
.. .-.
.. -- .- ,
..

.

. --

:

.

.

.

I

, ,

'

While some national television news networks aired stories in the past six monthson human
trafficking abroad, such,as an NBC piece on child sex slavery in Cambodia, the networks (CBS,
ABC, NBC, Fox) have not reported on the U.S. trafficking problem during this period.
Messages
Local media attention surrounding the Rescue & Restore launch has not spurred substantial
national coverage of tbe campaign. The campaign's branded messages of "Rescue & Restore"
and "Look Beneath th'e*$utiace" are largely absent from national coverage. A few Associated
Press stories and a WashingtonPost.com sidebar mention the HHS hotline and address for the
HHS trafficking Web site.
>
-,

-

*#

The most common messaggs in national outlets are largely the same as those in general
coverage, although messages about T-visas and the Trafficking Victims Protection Act appear in a
greater portion of national stories. Overall coverage contains a higher percentage of articles
mentioning the availability of victims services.
Approximately 14 percent of national coverage contains a negative message- the:government is
to six percent in overall coverage.
not doing enough/victims services are lacking-ompared
..- ..

.

,<

.

-.

--

*.

-.:
-

.-:

Spokespeople
About 80 percent of articles in national outlets contain either a positive or negative spokesperson
quote, up from 68 percent in the baseline analysis.
b
b

Attorney General John Ashcroft and John Miller, director of the State Department's Office to
oni it or and Combat Trafficking in Persons, both wrote opinion pieces appearing
in top national
.=.
newspapers (New York Times and Washington Post, respectively).

b
b

As in overall coverage, quotes from trafficking experts or NGO spokespeople outnumber quotes
from HHS and other federal agency officials.

1
t

1

b

Tone
Aligning with overall coverage, articles in national outlets are widely positive.

0

r
b

Prevalence of Topics in National News Outlets

b

The most prevalent news topics in national outlets are ranked as follows:

b

b
h

b
h

Sex trafficking
Articles about trafficking in general
Trafficking of children
Trafficking of industrial laborers; Trafficking of domestic workers (same number of articles)
Trafficking of farm laborerslmigrant workers

. ---

ISex Trafficking
E TraffickingG'eneral

'

E Traff ickinglchildren
TraffickingAndustriaI
Traff ickinglDomestic
ETrafficking/Farm Labor

h

Percentage of Coverage

-

4

-

Prevalence of Federal Agenciesin National News Outlets
The most frequently mentioned federal agencies in national outlets are ranked as follows:
Department of Justice
Department of Homeland Security
Department of State; White House/general Bush Administration (same number of articles)
Department of Health and Human Services '
Congress
Department of Labor

H Justice.
Homeland Sec~irity
State
White House
HHS
Congress
Labor

rl

~ e r c 6 ' h of
e Coverage

Prevalence of Messages in National News Outlets
Positive Messaqes
I

The most prevalent messages in national outlets are ranked as follows:

A person who is trafficked is a victimwho has been coerced into sexual exploitation or forced
labor
Victims of sex trafficking differfrom prostitutes because they have been forced or coerced into the
sex trade
Trafficking 1s a widespread/common problem in the United States
T-Visa gives trafficking victims temporary lecjal residency
Trafficking Victlrns Protection Act exists to combat traff ickinglhelp traff ~ckingvict~ms
-Federal government, local law enforcement, and non-governmentalprgan~zationsaye ~ r t n e r i n gIn
a campaign agalnst trafficking ..
ETrafficking Victim

W VictimdNot Prostitutes
Widespread in U.S.
T-Visa

W Trafficking Victims
Protection Act

".
PerceFitBB@6
df National Coverage

W Partnership Campaign

Lesser messages are as follows: .

%=

=,

-- -

Services are available for trafficking victims (mentions other agencies or NGOs)
Federal governmentlHHS1the Administration is doing a good job to combat trafficking
Contact the^^^ hotline or view the HHS Web site for more information or if you think someone is
a trafficking victim
-- - HHS offers services for trafficking victims, including legal assistance, TANF. Medicaid, food
stamps and SSI
Contact law enforcement/service providers if you think someone is a trafficking victim

-

-

Services Available

W Govt. Doing Good Job
W Contact HHS
W HHS Offers Services
Percentage of Coverage

Contact Law
EnforcemenVServices

CI

fh
R

R

@3

Neqative Messaqes
The following message is the only negative message to surface in articles from national outlets,
appearing in about 14 percent of national coverage:
Services are not available for trafficking victims/government is not do~ngenough

F

b

b

I

Percentage of National Coverage

The following negative messages did not appear in national coverage:
Government is doing't&~much - why are we offering services to illegals/cornplaints about costs
Confusion among government agencies - efforts are not coordinated to the extent they should be
Negative comments about trafficking victims
*-6

r.

-

Neutral Messaqes
Approximately 26 percent of national news articles contain one or more of the following neutral
messages, ranked according to prevalence:
Victims fear working with law enforcement.
Victims fear deportation if they come forward.
HHS target cities in the anti-trafficking campaign were selected on the basis of their diversity, size
of immigrant population, and their mix of urban and rural settings.

Ei Victims Fear Law
Enforcement
V i c t i m s Fear Deportation

~erc'eda~
ofeCoverage

HHS Target Cities
Selected For Diversity

1

Prevalence of Spokesperson Quotes in National News Outlets
Approximately 80 percent of national news articles contain a quote from a spokesperson. About 77
percent have one or more positive quotes; only six percent contain a negative quote. The categories
of spokespeople are ranked according to prevalence as follows:
Article includes supportive quote from expert/NGO/local official
Article includes quote from .other agency spokesperson
Article includes quote from HHS spokesperson; Article includes negative quote from
expert/NGO/local official (same number of articles)

Expert/NGO/Local-Supportive
Other Agency

ExperVNGOILocal-Negative

Percentage of Coverage

4

a
b

i
b

b

Tone of Coverage in National News Outlets
Similar to overall coverage, the large majority of national coverage (85 percent) is very posit~veor
positive. One article, accounting for about three percent of national coverage, is very negative In tone
because it sharply criticizes federal law-enforcement efforts against trafficking (New York Times,
"Victims of Sex Trafficking," Juhu Thukrah 1/16/04). The tone of coverage in national news outlets is
as follows:

-

b
h

60
50

Positive

b
b
b

30

Neutral

20

Negative

L

0

C

10

Percentage of Coverage

. -

'.
- =-

#

Prevalence of Coverage in Target Cities
The following are the target cities ranked by volume of trafficking coverage:
New York
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Atlanta
San Francisco
Washington, D.C.; Orlando

4

-

Dallas
Los Angeles; Seattle; Miami
Chicago; -Tampa
..*..

.

..

x

.
~

...
..
-

.
.

...
. -..

.. ..

. . z

$

Apart from a brief mention in t h e - ~ s w a r kStar-Ledger of an incident that is being looked into as a
possible trafficking-related situation, there was no U.S. trafficking coverage in the following cities
during the six-month period:
P
P
B

v
v

San Diego
Detroit
Portland, OR
Las Vegas
Milwaukee

.<

2.
H New York
Philadelphia

q Phoenix
q Atlanta
San ~ G n c i s c d
E Washington
Orlando
Dallas
Los Angeles
Seattle
OMiami -.. = := .
Chicago
.Tampa

"

b

.

Number of Articles in Sample

%

.
. ..

-- --

d

#
d

d

a
?,

d

New York City
The analysis is based on 20 articles from the New York City media market, including the New York Times. New
York Daily News, Newsday, The Record (northern New Jersey), and Ocean ~ o u n t ~ ~ b s e n(northern
/er
New
Jersey).
Topic
The topics reported in New York news outlets are:
. .

s

60

d

40

I)

+ - e
16

?
d

20

-

,
--

0

--

S

Percentage of co;erage

Positive Messages
The most prevalent positive messages in New York news outlets are:
ETrafficking Victim
DVictims/Not Prostitutes
DWidespread in U.S.
DTrafficking Victims Protection
Act
D Partnership Campaign
DGovt. Doing Good Job
T-Visa
Percentage of Coverage

#
0

. :*

-

-.

The only negative message in New York news outlets is:

B l Services
Lacking

Percentage of Coverage

b

., . .-

-

Negative Messages

1
@

s

Services Available

Tone

Percentage of Coverage

:.

iP
D

Philadelphia

D

The analysis is based on 16 articles from the Philadelphia media market, including the Philadelphia Inquirer,
Philadelphia Daily News, WPVI-TV Action News, KYW News Radio. and others.

P

p
p
D

Topic

The topics reported in Philadelphia news outkts are:
100

D

80

B
D

60

+ - -

S e x Trafficking

40
20
0

-Percgntageof C o y e r ~ e

.-&.

=

-

'.

. , * .

-

. .

. .
~.

b

Positive Messages

1)

The most prevalent positive messages in Philadelphia news outlets are:,
Trafficking Victim
VictiidNot Prostitutes
Widespread in U.S.
Services Available
Partnership Campaign
Rescue 8 Restore
"

Percentage of Coverage

..

I
b
k
1
1

.

1

Negative Messages
--

.

Contact HHS

.*

..\
--.

...

None of the four negative meszages appears in Philadelphia news outlets.

Tone

Percentage of Coverage

..

.-

-

.----...

.&

-

4
4
b

Phoenix
The analysis is based on 10 articles from the Phoenix media market, including the Arizona Republic, Arizona
Daily Star, KPHO-TV CBS 5 News, KPNX-TV 12 News, KTAR-AM Local Drive Time News, and others.

e
@
2,

Topic
The topics reported in Phoenix news outlets are:

Percentage of Co-yerage

b
b
@
R

..~

. ..

..

..

Positive Messages
The most prevalent positive messages in Phoenix news outlets are:
Trafficking Victim
VictimsJNot Prostitutes

q Widespread in U.S.
Partnership Campaign
OServices Available
Contact Law EnforcementlService
Providers
Rescue & Restore

=

Contact HHS

-~

b
9
B
B
b

--

--

Percentage of Coverage
OT-Visa

Negative Messages
.

- -

-

.

.

None of the four nega&e messages appears in Phoenix news outlets.

Tone

:.

.
:

_

4

. .

Positive
Neutral
Negative
Very negative
Percentage of Coverage

.?

-

_

\

.--

Atlanta
The analysis is based,on eight articles from the Atlanta media market, including the Atlanta Journal-Constitution,
WAGA-TV Fox 5 News, WGCL-TV CBS Atlanta News, and others.

Topic
The topics reported in Atlanta news outlets are:

..

. ..

Percentage of Coverage

~

-*

..

>

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Atlanta news outlets are:

.

HTrafficking Victim
VictimdNot Prostitutes

Widespread in U.S.
HHS Offers Services

S e r v i c e s Available
-

H Partnership Campaign
Contact HHS

.

--

4

.

--

Contact Law EnforcementlService Providers

Percentage of Coverage

W Rescue & Restore

Negative Messages

None of the four negative messages appears in Atlanta news outlets.

Tone

.

40

Positive

30

O Neutral
O Negative

20
10

0
Percentage of Coverage

a
&
3
ib
b
b

San Francisco
The analysis is based on seven articles from the San Francisco media market, including the San Francisco
Chronicle and the San Jose Mercury News.
Topic

The most prevalent topics in San Francisco ohlets are:

Percentage of Co,ver?ge

1

Traff icking/General

I

Positive Messages

!4

The most prevalent positive messages in San Francisco news outlets are:

b

--I
I

5

88 Trafficking Victim
8 VictirnsMot Prostitutes
Trafficking Vlctims Protection Act

0 T-Visa
8 WMespread In U.S.
8 Partnership Campaign
Contact HHS

b
b
b

Negative Messages
s

- -

None of the four negative messages appears in San Francisco news outlets.

b
.- -- -.

b

Tone

tZi Very posaive

Positive
Neutral
Negative

. L

Percentage of Coverage
I

,

19

r0
r)

Washinqton. D.C.

4

The analysis is based on six articles from the Washington Post.

4

Topic

a

The topics reported in Washington, D.C., news outlets are:

B

TraffickinglDornestic
Workers
Traffiikimgflndustrial
T raffiikinglFarm
Percentage of Coverage
, .*

r)

&
1D
C

Positive Messages
The most prevalent positive messages in Washington, D.C., news outlets are:

W Trafficking Victim
Widespread in U.S.
Vktirns/Not Prostitutes
Services Available
Traff~kingVictims P.[ptectiohAct

.

Govt. Doing Good Job
V .

percentage of C o v e r a g e

B Partnership Campaign
~-

.

b

Negative Messages

b

None of the four negative messages appears in Washington, D.C., news outlets.

.

:-

,

I

.

Tone
-,
-.

Positive
Neutral

O Negative
"

Percentage of Coverage

I

>-

I

L

.

,,

I

-

..-

-

:

4

4

e
@
@

Orlando
The analysis is based on six articles from the Orlando media market, including the Orlando Sentinel,
Tallahassee Democrat, and Daytona Beach News Journal.
Topic

The most prevalent topics in Orlando outlets are:

Percentage of Co~erage

b
0

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Orlando news outlets are:

Percentage of Coverage

b
B
b

II

contact Law Enbrcement/Servke Providers

. .,-

Negative Messages

The only negative message in Orlando news outlets is:

H Services Lacking

"'

Percentage of Coverage
..

-

.,

Tone

Very positive

8 Positive
O Neutral

0 Negative
I

Percentage of Coverage

-

I

. . - -I

n
Dallas

dn

The analysis is based on five articles from the Dallas media market, including the Dallas Morning News and the
Forth Worth Star-Telegram.

I@

ih
ah

Topic

a

The topics reported in Dallas news outlets are:

ih
R
h
L

60
40

Sex Traffkking
20

4 b - b
m

.-

0

-

.

a

-

-.

Percentage of Coverage

Ab
ifl
h

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Dallas news outlets are:
H Trafficking Victim
Widespread tn U.S.
Trafficking Vktims Protection Act
Victlms/Not Prostihrtes
T-Vtsa
Contact Law EnforcernentlService Providers
Govt. Doing Good Job
Percentage of Coverage

P

b
B
b
-

Negative Messages

The most preva16nt negative messages in Dallas news outlets are:
..

.

L
5

*

Partnership campajgr

.

Percentage of Coverage

Tone

Percentage of Coverage

C

.=-

Los Anqeles
The analysis is based on four articles from the Los Angeles media market, including the Los Angeles Times and
Los Angeles Daily News.
Topic

The topics reported in Los Angeles news outTets are:

. ~.

....

.-

Percentage of Coverage
-.

,-&.

.

.

--

=

*
..
==

. .

..

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Los Angeles news outlets are:
W Trafficking Victim
W Widespread in U.S.

0VictirndNot Prostitutes
0Sew k e s Available
W T-Visa
Trafficking Victims Protection Act
Percentage of Coverage

---.

Contact Law EnforcementlSe~iceProviders
d

Negative Messages

The only negative message in Los Angeles news outlets is:
T-

..

Percentage of Coverage

Tone

-

Percentage of Coverage

Seattle
The analysis is based on four articles from the Seattle media market, including the Seattle Times and Seattle
Post-lntelligencer.
Topic
The topics reported in Seattle news outlets are:

percentage of Coverage

Positive Messages
The most prevalent positive messages in Seattle news outlets are:
100

8 Trafficking Victim

80

8 Widespread in U.S.

60

VictimsMot Prostitutes

40

O Services Available

20

8 T-Visa

8 Partnership Campaign
Percentage of Coverage

Negative Messages
None of the four negative messages appears in Seattle news outlets
Tone

.-

&

..

Percentage of Coverage

.

~

b
P
0

Miami

0
B

The analysis is based on four articles from the Miami media market, including the Miami Herald and South
Florida Sun-Sentinel.

B

Topic

The topics reported in Miami news outlets ar6:

W T raffickinglFarm

iJ TraffiikingDomestic Workers
-

.

Percentage of coverage

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Miami news outlets are:

nTrafficking Victim
nWidespread in U.S.
Victims/Not Prostitutes
OTraffiiking Victims Protection Act

nT-Visa
n Partnership Campaign
Percentage of Coverage

Negative Messages

None of the four negative messages appears in Miami news outlets.
<

Tone

El Very positive

n Positive
Neutral
Negative
, v e r y negativ=

- ,

Percentage of Coverage

B

D
b
b

The analysis is based on one article from the Chicago Tribune.

a

Topic

b
B

Chicago trafficking coverage focuses on the following topic:

B
t6
%r

Chicago

Percentage of Covprage

Positive Messages
The most prevalent positive messages in Chicago news outlets are:

0 Victims!Not Prostitutes
T-Visa

0Trafficking Vktirns
Perc,enta$e
. -.*. . . of Coverage
.: *

]bi

Negative Messages

a

None of the four negative messages appears in Chicago news outlets.

b

Tone

Percentage of Coverage

- ..

,

- .'

@
@
@
R!

b
b

Tampa
The analysis is based on one article from the Tampa media market in the Bradenton Herald.
Topic

Tampa trafficking coverage focuses on the following topic:

Sex Trafficking

.. .

.:-

...

Positive Messages

The positive message in ~ a m . b a
trafficking coverage is:

m
I%I Trafficking Victim

Negative Messages
. ,-

- . , - _

None of the four negative messages appears in Tampa news outlets.

-..

Tone

Positive
Neutral
Negative
Percentage of Coverage

Snapshots of Selected States
The following analysis of state coverage is based on states with 10 or more trafficking articles
appearing within the designated six-month timeframe.

l?

B

Key Findinqs

6

~opics

b
b
+

Trafficking in general has overtaken sex trafficking as the most common topic in states with the
highest volume of-trafficking coverage.
- --

P
B

b
B
b

P
I!
lb

b
B
b
B,

h

.-

C

The Rescue & Restore campaign has generated trafficking coverage in states where thzre was
previously little or none, including Georgia and Arizona.

Messages
Positive messages vary by state, although the victim status of trafficked persons is still the top
message.
The assertion that appropriate services for trafficking victims are lacking or government antitrafficking efforts are ihq&quate is the most common negative message in state coverage.
However, in states where.this message appears, it typically surfaces in less than 10 percent of
coverage.
Arizona trafficking"c8Cerage-emphasizes the availability of T-visas more than Georgia and
Pennsylvania coverage, particularly during the Rescue & Restore launch. "Assist the government
or get deported," a reporter at KPNX-TV in Phoenix states. The broadcast piece also suggests the
temporary nature of the T-visa is a drawback for victims, explaining that victims will be deported
once they are no longer needed to prosecute a particular trafficking case unless they successfully
apply for permanent U.S. residency.

Spokespeople

--

--

.

=
-.

Trafficking coverage within a particular state often mentions the same local and regional NGO
groups, such as the Center for the Advancement of Human Rights In Florida or the Arizona
League to End Regional Trafficking.

Tone
. .
. .. ..
Tone varies by state, yet positive stories still vastly outnumber neutral or ne-ghtivearticles.

-.

b

lir
@

P

Florida
The analysis is based on 20 articles from Florida outlets, including the Miami Herald, South Florida SunSentinel, Orlando Sentinel, Tampa Tribune, Palm Beach Post, Daytona Beach News Journal, Tallahassee
Democrat, and Bradenton Herald.

@
Topic

b

The topics reported in Florida news outlets are:

b

h

a

Percentage of Coverage

Positive Messages
The most prevalent positive messages in Florida news outlets are:
Trafficking Victim
Widespread In U.S.

q VictimdNot Prostitutes

'

OTraff'iklng Victims Protection Act

?

Partnership Campaign

Percentage of Coverage

T-Visa

?

Negative Messages
The most prevale5t negative messages in Florida news outlets are:

Services Lacking

I
.

I

Percentage of Coverage

. ...

Tone

"'

Percentage of Coverage

%-

-

=

-

L

b
L

!

New York
The analysis is based on 17 articles from New York media outlets, including the New York Times, New York
Daily News, Newsday, and Albany Times Union.

!

Topic

!

The topics reported in New York news outlets are:

Sex Trafficking
Traff ickinglGeneral
OTraffickinglChildren
Percentage of Co,vergge

L
b

!

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in New York news outlets are:
IllTraff icking Victim
Victims/Not Prostitutes

0Widespread in U.S.
Partnership Campaign
T r a f f i c k i n g Victims Protection Act
T-Visa
WGovt. Doing Good Job

0Services Available

-

WContact HHS
Percentage of Coverage

.

L

I

Negative Messages

!

The only negative message i n New York news outlets is:

-

WContact Law Enforcementlservice Providers

.

!
I

20

i

15

,I

Services Lacking

10

I

5
I

0

Percentage of Coverage

!

Tone

BVery positive
Positive
13 Neutral
13 Negative
V e r y negative
Percentage of Coverage

+

*

-

The analysis is based on 16 articles from Philadelphia media outlets, including the Philadelphia Inquirer,
Philadelphia Daily News, WPVI-TV Action News, KYW News Radio, and others.
Topic

The topics reported in Philadelphia hews outlets are:

.

Percentage of Coverage

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Pennsylvania news outlets are:
8 Trafficking Vktim

VictimdNot Prostitutes
WMespread In U.S.
Servkes Avallabk
Partnershlp Campaign
Rescue 8 Restore
V '

Percentage of Coverage

Negative ~ e s s a ~ e s

Contact HHS

.

None of the four negative messages appears in Pennsylvania news outlets.

Tone

Percentage of Coverage

--

*

.

-

.

The analysis is based on 13 articles from Georgia media outlets, including the Atlanta Journal-Constitution,
WAGA-TV Fox 5 News, WGCL-TV CBS Atlanta News, Macon Telegraph, Gwinett Daily Post, and Columbus
Ledger-Enquirer.
Topic

The topics reported in Georgia news outlets are:

-

Percentage of Coverage

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Georgia news outlets are:
BTrafficking Victim
.Victims/Not

Prostitutes

Widespread in U.S.
Services Available
V

1

Percentage of Coverage

Partnership Campaign

.-

C o n t a c t HHS

Negative Messages
..

None of the four negative mesiages appears in Georgia news outlets.

Tone

U Very positive

Positive

.-.

D Neutral
Negative

Percentage of Coverage

,

"-

*

-

-.

0

Q

California

@

The analysis is based on 12 articles from California media outlets, including the Los Angeles Times, Los
Angeles Daily News, San Francisco Chronicle, San Jose Mercury News, and Monterey County Herald.

0
0

@

Topic

The topics reported in California news outlets are:

@

.

.

Sex TraffickingDomestlc
TraffikingiFarm

I3 Traffiklngnndustrial

.

I3 TraffickingDomestic

w

Percentage o f ~ o v e r ' a ~ e

-

Workers
TratfickinglGeneral

P
B

Positive Messages

s)

The most prevalent positive messages in California news outlets are:

.

sTraffiking Victim
VictlmdNot Prostitutes

I3 Trafficking Victims Protection Act
I3 Widespread In the U.S.
.T-

b
b
B

Vka

Negative Messages

The only negative message in California news outlets is:

Percentage of Coverage

Very positive
Positive
Neutral
Negative
Percentage of Coverage

P
:b

Arizona

b
B

The analysis is based on 11 articles from Arizona media outlets, including the Arizona Republic, Arizona Daily
Star, Tucson Citizen, KPHO-TV CBS 5 News, KPNX-TV 12 News, KTAR-AM Local Drive Time News, and
others.

b

Topic

D
D

The topics reported in Arizona news outlets are:

Percentage of Coverage

b
b
b

. .

Positive Messages

The most prevalent positive messages in Arizona news outlets are:

Percentage of Coverage
OT-Visa

.

,

Negative Messages

,-

None of the four negative messages appears in Arizona news outlets.

Tone
100

.

80
8 Positive

60

ONeutral

40

0 Negative
20

.Very

0
Percentage of Coverage

negative

.

-

-----

-.

U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services

Round One Roll Out
Media Coverage Report
?,

.

.

Prepared by Ketchum

May 2004

Rescue & Restore Victims of Human Trafficking
Round One Roll Out Media Coverage Report
May 2004
In conjunction with National Crime Victims' Rights Week (April 18-24,2004) the U.S. Department of
Health & Human Services (HHS) rolled out its public awareness campaign to Rescue & Restore
Victims of Human Trafficking in the Atlanta, Philadelphia and Phoenix markets. The press
conferences included participation by Federal and local officials as well as Non-Governmental
Organizations (NGO). Provided is the media coverage generated as a result of the strategic media
outreach surrounding these press conferences. The objectives of media outreach were to:
Generate comprehensive reporting of the R e h u e & Restore Victims of Human Trafficking
campaign. *
- -.r

b

,

s

-

Generate coverage of services
. .to trafficking victims provided by HHS'Throughvarious h m s .

4

Generate coverage of the
. . issue of human trafficking in the U.S.
Showcase partnership between HHS, Department of Homeland Security, Department of Justice.
local law enforcement and NGOs to combat human trafficking.
Media Outreach
Media relations support to promote the press conference in each city was provided by Ketchum.
Ketchum developed a medb advisory, which was approved by HHS to promote the events. The
media advisory was distrihied to key reporters at broadcast and print media in the target markets
as well as select national media. In addition, follow up was conducted with media to schedule '
interviews and encourage coverage of the plress conference in each city. Media outreach efforts
resulted in good preq2,tfirno_ut,fp the press conferences in each market.
Media Coverage Summary
Significant print, broadcast and online coverage was received in all three markets for the campaign
roll-out. In each market, the major daily newspaper and a majority of the television affiliates
attended the press conference and provided coverage of the campaign. The coverage received
provided basic key messages about human trafficking and the campaign. In addition to local media
coverage, stories and interviews were conducted with key national media to promote the campaign.
Hispanic media outreach a190 garnered significant coverage from Univision and Telemundo, two of
the leading Spanish-language television networks in the U.S. The chart below ouflines Eo9efage -received in each market as a result of the press conferences. Total audience impressions for all
coverage received as a result of the press conferences and placement of the Public Service
Announcement (PSA) is estimated to be more than 18 million.

Specific details about media coverage garnered as a result of the press conferences follows.

1

-

Philadelphia
The Philadelphia press conference took place on Tuesday, April 20,2004 at 11:00 AM (EST) in the
Wyndham Franklin Plaza Hotel, Horizons Ballroom. Both the Philadelphia lnquirerand the
Philadelphia Daily News attended the press conference and provided coverage both in their print
editions as well as online. In addition, the Associated Press bureau in Philadelphia also attended
the press conference and wrote a story. WPVI-TV (ABC) ran a story about the campaign, which
featured clips from the United Nations Public Service Announcement. The coverage provided of the
campaign by the media was generally positive and included key messages. Below is a complete list
of the media that attended the event:

dr

-

David Caruso, Associated Press (Philadelphia)
Ron Goldwyn, Philadelphia Daily News
Joseph A. Slobodzian, Philadelphia Inquirer
~ g w Vrazo,
n
Philadelphia lnquirer
Caroline Chen, Philadelphia lnqlrirer
Brian Hickey, Philadelphia City Paper
Giovanni Belthezar, WRTIiAM
Jamila Trindle, WHYY-FM (NPR)
Paul Kurtz, KYW-AM
Tom MacDonald, Metro Networks
Dick Stanvish, KYW-TV (CBS)
Michele Greene, WPHL-TV (WB)
WPVI-TV (ABC)
Elaine Fisher. wTXF-TV"~~&)
Steve, WCAU-TV
'The chart below outlines media coverage received as a result of outreach to promote the event.

. ..

.'..l..*.

Outlet
Associated Press
(Philadelphia)
Philadelphia Daily News
Philadelphia Daily News
Philadelphia Daily News
Philadelphia Daily News
Philadelphia ltlquirer
Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia Inquirer

1

-,

..'-.

Article .
Authorities launch outreach effort to fight
illegal immigrant forced labor
City to pilot program on human smuggling
Putting an end to human trafficking; Phila.
la'unches project to halt exploitation
How you can help in the campaign
Letters: A welcome crackdown
Program to combat "Human Traffick~ng"
Taking aim at human trafficking; Phila. is
the first site in a federal initiative to end
forced labor
Human Trafficking: Slaves to a horrible
crime
Letters: Efforts to end human trafficking
applauded

ESTIMATED
PRINTAUDIENCEIMPRESSIONS

-

ReporterDate
David B. Caruso
20 April 2004
Kitty Caparella
12 April 2004
.
Ron Goldwyn
.
21 April 2004'21 April 2004
22 April 2004
Joseph A. Slobodzian
20 April 2004
Joseph A. Slobodzian
21 April 2004

Gireulation
NIA

22 April 2004

386,890

28 April 2004

386.890

.
a

150,734

-

150,734
*

150,734
150,734
386,890
386,890

3,653,545

Web Site
Philly.com

I

I

ReporterIDate
I Details
Program to combat 'Human Trafficking."
1 Joseph A. Slobodzian 1 News from
htt~://www.~hill~.com/mldl~hill~/news/breakina
20 ~ p r i2004;
l
newsl8475974.htm
Philadelphia

I

Article

lthe

*

Philly.com

--

Pkilly.com

Inquirer and
Daily News.
Putting an end to human trafficking; Phila.
Ron Goldwyn
News from
launches project to halt exploitation
the
21 April 2004
Philadelphia
http://www.phillv.com/mId/~hiUvlnews/breakina
Inquirer and
newsl8480582.htm
DailyNews.
1 .
Taking aim at human trafficking; Phila. is the
Joseph A. Slobodz~an N s w s fr?m
first site in afederal initiative to end forced labor 2 1 A r 2
.' tfie Philadelphia
htt~://~.p'hill~.com/m~d/inauirer/news/local/st
Inquirer and
ates/~ennsvlvania/citiesneiqhborhoods/~hilade
Daily News.
lphia/EGl79077.htm
Editorial: Human Trafficking; Slaves to a horrible 22 April 2004
News from
:

Philly.com

1 tion18413120.htm
Mercurynews.com

I Philadelphia to pilot program on human

I

By Kitty Caparella

I Web site for

I

(CBS)
WCAU-TV
(NBC)
WPHL-TV
(WB)
W PVI-TV
(ABC)
WTXF-TV
(Fox)
WTXF-TV
(Fox)

p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign during the 4
20 April 2004
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign during the 10
20 April 2004
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign during the 5
20 April 2004
p.m. newscast.
Aired several segments about the campaign during
20 April 2004
-, 10 p.m.
Aired several segments about the campaign during - 21 April 2004
.- .
the morning newscasts.

146,923
55133

394,664

.

=

175,849

==

-

-

9 10,321

Atlanta
The Atlanta press conference took place on Thursday, April 2~~ at 10 a.m. in the Sam Nunn
Federal Center, Midrise@ilding, 60 Forsyth Street, Room 4M60. The Atlanta JournalConstitution published a story about the campaign prior to the press conference. In addition,
the Associated Press Atlanta bureau provided coverage of the campaign and interviewed Given
Kapecha, a former trafficking victim for their story. The Associated Press story was picked up
and run by severalnewspapers in Georgia. In Atlanta, there was also strong interest in this
story with the Hispanic media. Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny conducted several interviews prior to the
press event with Telemundo and local radio stations. The coverage provided of-the campaign-by the
media was generally positive and included key messages. Below is a complete list of media that
attended the event:
Shelia Poole, Atlanta Journal-Constitution
Ed McCarthy, CNN Radio
Steve Fenney, Creative Ldafing
Melissa Rincon, Atlanta Latino
Linda Perez, La Vision de Georgia
Priscila Rivere, Mundo Hispanico
Yemille Castejon, WAZX-AM - Spanish language radio
Eric and Rick W., WSB-TV (ABC)
Phil Cantor, WGCL-TV (CBS)

- - - ---

-.

The chart below outlines media coverage received as a result of outreach to promote the event.

Outlet .
Associated Press
(Atlanta)
Atlanta JournalConstitution

Article
Officials launch campaign reaching out to
victims of human trafficking
Feds to ID, aid area victims of traffic in
humans Promise of jobs a lure that puts many
in bondage

ReporterIDate
By Louise Chu
21 April 2004
Shelia M. Poole
21 April 2004

Circuiation
NIA
371,853

--

-/ M..,.'

I
I

Lavisiononline.com

htt~:Nwww.awinnettdailvonline.com/GD
PIarchivelarticlel54208C5176E4F6197
5
F
F
F
m
Trafico de humanos: La nueva
1 Bv Linda Carolina
esclavitud
-

Un paso mas contra el trafico humano

Mundohispanico.com

By Melissa Rincon
29 April 2004
Una'luz para 10s cautivos
By Priscila Rivere
htt~://www.mundohispanico.com/current 29 April 2004

1 Gabriel ~anchez-zinnyabout the campaign 1
I for its morningnews show.

WPLO-AM
WAGA- TV
WAGA- TV
WSB-TV (ABC)

WGCL-TV (CBS)

I Web site for La
Vision.
P

Atlantalatino.com

WAZX-AM

Post.

Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny about the campaign
at 11:45a.m. This radio station reaches 5
cities in the Southeast.
WPLO-AM conducted an interview with
Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny about the campaign
at 8 a.m.
Aired interviews with Costas Miskis on the 5
p.mr'a@ 10 p.m. newscasts.
Aired 80,verage of the press conference
during the morning newscast.
Dr. Wade Horn and several Non,Ggyfirqmen_tal Organizations (NGOs) will be
interviewed for a public affairs program
.
focused on human trafficking.
Aired-segmentabout the campaign on their
I Noon newscast.

Phoenix

..:---

1
.--*.

I WAZX-AM conducted an interview with

+,

-

.

Web site for
Atlanta Latino.
Web site for
Mundo

. .

1 21 April 2004

I NIA

22 April 2004

NIA

21 April 2004

363.125

22 April 2004

150,147

11June2004

NIA

22 April 2004--

k59,833-

.

, . .- ..

,- - - - * --

-

The Phoenix press conference took place on Thursday, April 22"dat 11 a.m. in the Arizona State
University Downtown Center, Room C145. The Arizona Republic provided coverage of the
campaign in March. In addition, the Republic also ran Dr. Wade Horn's Op-Ed on Wednesday, April
21'' prior to the launch as well as attended the press conference and provided coverage of the
ann'ouncement . The Associated Press in Phoenix also attended the press conference and provided
coverage. Broadcast coverage in Phoenix was quite extensive with all four affiliates television and
two radio stations attending the press conference and providing coverage. In addition, Spanishlanguage media Univision also provided coverage of the press conference. The coverage provided
of the campaign by the media was generally positive and included key messages. Below is a
complete list of the media that attended the event:
Daniel Gonzalez, Arizona Republic
Tim Koors, Arizona Republic
Amanda Shorey, Associated Press (Phoenix bureau)
Vaceria Fernandoz, La Voz

"

Mirna Pineda, Telemundo
Angel Matos, Univision
Jose Luis Palomino, Univision
Julio Cesar Otiz, Univision
Tuson Milanovich, KTVK-TV (ABC)
KPHX-TV (NBC)
KPHO-TV (CBS)
Sarah Carlstran, KNXV-TV (Independent)
Bart Graves, KYFI-AM
Horatio Chavez, La Noticias - Spanish language news
The chart below outlines media coverage received as a result of outreach to promote the event.

Arizona Republic

Daniel GonzAlez
State ripe for racket in human trafficking
29 March 2004
Feds' campaign focuses on city
Health officials launch campaign to combat
Ananda Shorey
human trafficking
22 April 2004
Hidden victims of trafficking suffer modern day Dr. Wade F. Hom
slavery
21 April 2004
Human trafficking targeted
Daniel GonzAlez
National education effort is launched in
23 April 2004
Phognix
Oveiceihing fear key in drive to combat
Ananda Shorey
human trafficking
22 April 2004
Feds reach out to illegal entrants
23 April 2004

Associated Press
(Phoenix)
Arizona Republic
Arizona Republic

Tucson Citizen
Arizona Daily Star

'

N/A

432,284
432,284
102,741
107,814

I Article
Phoenix among cities selected for anti-human 30 March 2004
trafficking campaign

Web
..- - Site
- .- -

AZFamily.com

1 azfamily.com
.

'~

State ripe for racket in human trafficking
Feds' campaign focuses on city

AZCentral.com

Human trafficking targeted
National education effort is launched in

)

AZCentral.com

Tucsoncitizen.com

I

htt~://www.azcentral.com/phpbin/clicktrac~email.~h~/l326346
Health officials launch campaign to combat
human trafficking
http:Nwww.azcentraI.com/news/articIes/0422
human-traffOvercoming fear key in drive to combat
human trafficking
http://www.tucson

:.

includes
newspapers,
television
stations and
"-c'cabltinemrks

29 March 2004

Republic Web
site.

Daniel Gonzalez
23 April 2004

Arizona
Republic Web
site.

http://www.azcentraI.com/news/articIes/0330

AZCentral.com

432,284

SF
site.

Ananda Shorey
22 April 2004

Web site for the
Tucson Citizen.

Ananda Shorey

Web site for
KPHO-TV.

22 April 2004

human trafficking 1 http://www.azfamily.com/news/locaI/stories/K
TVKLNeWs20040422.14f2d6735.html

Human Trafficking
http://www.azfamilv.com/ontv/oeaz/stories/KT
VKGEAZ20040422.14f788ble.htmI

Feds reach out to illegal entrants
http://www.dailvstar.com/dailvstay/printDS/19
W h p
Authorities launch outreach effort to fight
illegal immigration forced labor

7
KVOA.com

KTAR-AM
-.

.KTAR-AM
KTVK-TV (IND)

-

Ananda ~ h o r e y
22 April 2004 .

22 April 2004

23 April 2004
20 April 2004

and 8 a.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 4 22 April 2004
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 7 23 April 2004
- ..
a.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 5 22 April 2004
p.m. newscast.

KTVK-TV (IND)

Aired a segment about the campaign on the 6 23 April 2004
a.m. newscast.

KPNX-TV (NBC)

Conducted a live interview with Steve
Wagner on April 22& for their moming news.
Aired several segments on their moming
news, 1 1 a.m. news, 5 p.m. and 6 p.m. news
about the campaign.
Aired several segments on their morning
news about the campaign.
Aired a segment on their morning newscast
about the campaign.
Aired a segment on their 5 and 6 p.m.
newscasts about the press conference.

KPNX-TV (NBC)
KPHO-TV (CBS)
KPHO-TV (CBS)

azfamily.com
includes
newspapers,
television
stations and
cable networks
in Arizona.
azfamily.com
includes .
newgapers,
teleGsion
stations and - . .
cable networks
in Arizona.
Web site for the
Arizona Dailv
Star.
Web site for
KVOA-TV

22 April 2004 - ..

27,067

-.
. - -

...

41,367
- ----

-

135,375

'77,364
365,875
.

22 April 2004

26,445

21 April 2004

9,177

22 April 2004

1 16,286

-

t

KNXV-TV (ABC)
KNXV-TV (ABC)
KGLIN-TV (ABC Tucson)
KVOA-TV (NBC Tucson)
KWHY-TV (IND Los Angeles)
KOLD-TV (CBSTucson)

Aired a segment about the campaign on the 6
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 5
a.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 5
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 5
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 5
p.m. newscast.
Aired a segment about the campaign on the 5
a.m. newscast.

22 April 2004

50,207

23 April 2004

7,185

22 April 2004

32,373

22 April 2004

53,276

23 April 2004

11,047

23 April 2004

7,567

1

National
National media outreach resulted in several radio and television interviews with major national
networks. Steve Wagner, director of the HHS trafficking in persons program, conducted several
radio interviews about the campaign. In addition, Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny conducted an interview
with Telemundo for their national morning news about the campaign. Univision provided coverage
of the Phoenix launch event. In addition, Univision is also planning a special on human trafficking
and has agreed to interviv.Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny for the special. Outlined below are the details of
the national media interviews.
Associated Press Radio Network
-..
Conducted a live interview wiksteve Wagner on April 20".
Associated Press Radio Network provides news programming to more than 600 radio stations
across the country.
- - __

.

.

.

. .,

--

Radio America
Dateline: Washington conducted an interview with Steve Wagner on Wednesday, April 21".
Radio America, a division of The American Studies Center, is a radio network that distributes
programming (24-hours a day, seven days a week) to over 400 affiliates nationwide. Dateline:
Washington is a newsmagazine that discusses the top five news stories of the day. Theprogram airs Monday through Friday from 690p.m. to 790p.m. ET.
Telemundo
Telemundo conducted a live interview with Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny on April 21 about the campaign.
The interview aired on their national morning news.
The Telemundo Network is the leading Spanish-language television network in the United States
and Puerto Rico, reaching 90 percent of the Hispanic population.
- ..
Univision
Univision is a Spanish-language broadcast network. They provided coverage of the Phoenix launch
on their national evening newscast. They are also working on a one-hour special on trafficking
scheduled to air May 20th. We are assisting them with identifying a victim of trafficking to interview
for the special.
Univision ranks as the fifth largest broadcast network in the United States and the leading Spanishspeaking network in the nation.

-

'9% &

,
T,v.

t
*'

h....

USA Radio Network
USA Radio Network conducted an interview with Steve Wagner on Monday, April 1ga.
USA Radio Network is a network that provides news updates, sports coverage, business reports,
and talk programming to more than 1,300 affiliate stations nationwide (including stations in 48 of the
top 50 markets).

d

r

-

Los Angeles Times
Dr. Wade Horn has been interviewed for a story focused on human trafficking in Los Angeles. The
reporter is also contacting Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST), the Legal Aid
Foundation of Los Angeles, and San Francisco Against Global Exploitation (SAGE) to discuss
assistance for trafficking victims and to identify a victim to interview for the story. Story will be
published in the next couple of weeks.
The
Los Angeles Times is the largest~metropoliiandaily newspaper in the country.
-

:

-

-.-

- *

J

-

Washington Post '
Washingtonpost.com included the Trafficking Hotline toll-free phone number and Web site address
as a side bar to an article'on human trafficking. Below is a link to the story:
htt~://www.washinqtonpost.com/w~-dvn/articIes/A61457-2004Mav2.html
Washingtonpost.com is the online component of the Washington Post.
#

Famiiy News in Focus
Outreach by Capital City Partners resulted in a story about the campaign, which was featured on
Family.org, a Web site v a t focuses on family issues in policy and culture. Below is the story link:
htt~://~~~.fami1y.ors/cfo~im/fnif/news/a0031641
.cfm
Family.org is a Web site op'erated by Focus on the Family is a nonprofit organization.
I*,

-

. .,

United Nations public ~ e r ' v k e
Announcement

.-

As of Thursday, April 29 the United Nations trafficking Public Service Announcement (PSA) featuring
the HHS hotline has been aired 91 times by 24 stations in 19 markets with a total reach of 2.62
miliion viewers.
Note: Some of these airing were part of news stories related to the campaign roll out in Philadelphia,
Atlanta and Phoenix.

".-

-

-

.-

s

-.

National
National media outreach resulted in several radio and television interviews with major
national networks. Steve Wagner, director of the HHS trafficking in persons program,
conducted several radio interviews about the campaign. In addition, Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny
conducted an interview with Telemundo for their national morning news aboutthe campaign.
Univision provided coverage of the Phoenix launch event. In addition, Univision is also
planning a special on human traffickingand has agreed to interview Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny
for the special. Outlined below are the details of the national media interviews.

- -

Associated Press Radio Network
Conducted a live interview with Steve Wagnel on April 20".
Associated Press Radio Network provides
news programming to more than 600 radio
- -stations acrdss the country.
- .

.

-

.

. ,.

.&

= -

-

~adii~merica
Dateline: Washington conducted an interview with Steve Wagner on Wednesday, April 21''.
Radio America, a divisjon of The American Studies Center, is a radio network that distributes
programming (24-hours a day, seven days a week) to over 400 affiliates nationwide.
Dateline: Washington is a newsmagazine that discusses the top five news stories of the day.
The program airs Monday through Friday from 6:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. ET.
Telemundo
Telemundo conducted qlive interview with Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny on April 21'' about the
campaign. The i n t e r v i h aired on their national morning news.
The Telemundo Network is the leading Spanish-language television network in the United
States and Puerto Rico, reaching 90 percent of the Hispanic population.

...
<*-.

--

d

..*

Univlsion
Univision is a Spanish-language broadcast network. They provided coverage of the Phoenix
launch on their national evening newscast. They are also working on a one-hBur spgcial ontrafficking scheduled to air May 20th. We are assisting them with identifying a victim of
trafficking to interview for the special.
Univision ranks as the fifth largest broadcast network in the United States and the leading
~panish-spkakingnetwork in the nation.

..

.

-

.-

-

-

-.

USA Radio Network
USA Radio Network conducted an interview with Steve Wagner on Monday, April 1gm.
USA Radio Network is a network that provides news updates, sports coverage, business
reports, and talk programming to more than 1,300 affiliate stations nationwide (including
stations in 48 of the top 50 markets).
Los Angeles Times
Dr. Wade Horn has been interviewed for a story focused on human trafficking ih Los
Angeles. The reporter is also contacting Coalition to Abolish Slavery and Trafficking (CAST),
the Legal Aid Foundation of Los Angeles, and San Francisco Against Global Exploitation
(SAGE) to discuss assistance for trafficking victims and to identify a victim to interview for the
story. Story will be published in the next couple of weeks.
The Los Angeles Times is the largest metropolitan daily newspaper in the country.
Washington Post
Washingtonpost.com included the Trafficking Hotline toll-free phone number and Web site
address as a side bar to an article on human trafficking. Below is a link to the story:

http://www.washinqton~ost.com/wp-dvn/articles/A61457-2004Ma~.html
Washingtonpost.com is the online component of the Washington Post.

Family News in Focus
Outreach by Capital City Partners resulted in a story about the campaign, which was
featured on Family.org, a Web site that focuses on family issues in policy and culture. Below
is the story link: http://www.familv.orQ/cforum/fnif/news/aOO31641.cfm
Family.org is a Web site operated by Focus on the Family is a nonprofit organization.

Monitoring Report
CC = Closed Captioning; I=lnterview; GR=Graphic; PC=Press Conference; R=Reader; SI=Studio Interview; T=Teaser;
TZ=Teased Segment; V=Visual

-

RESCUE AND RESTORE CAMPAIGN NATIONAL
04/20 to 04/23
-1.

-

+loy En El Mundo
Telemundo Network Nation4
04/21/2004 8:00 9:00 am

-

-

.

.... .

..
. -.
-

.

.
. -.

:

-

I

S

..

...

Estimated ~udience:N/A

.--. .

00:08:33 Illegal immigration; St; Gabriel Sanchez, informs the public on the dangers of coming into the
UNited States illegally. V; immigrants. 00:12:45 :LR
2.

Noticiero Univision
Univision Network National
04/22/2004 6:30 7:00 pm

-

Estimated Audience: NIA

00:04:35 Human ~ m u ~ ~ l $ &the
) n US, the Department of Health and Human Services launched a campaign
to fight human smuggling. V: Footage of press conference by the Arizona's District Attorney. V; Footage of
federal agents detaining undocumented immigrants. I; Paul Charlton, District Attorney, Phoenix is a nest for
this crime. It is a nest in the sense that the nest grows here, begins here and it must be stopped here.. V;
Footage of Ad campalgfl."V;Toatage of undocumented immigrants. Julio Cesar Ortiz reporting. 00:07:01 :LR
3. Noticias
KWHY-TV (IND) Local TV Los ~ n g e l e s
04/23/2004 5:00 5:30 pm

-

<

-

>=

s

=.

-

- -

Estimated Audience: 11,047

00:24:05 TZ; Sexual abuse; Some employment offers could be tricks. V; Classified ads. I; Workers, discuss
incidents. I; Paul Charton, Arizona Lawyer, says that they urge the victims to report the incident. V; Rescue
'and Restore victimsof human trafficking logo. V; Commercial over sexual abuse. GR; Telephme number
for reports. Reported Mirna Pineda. 00:26:12 :LR

Video Monitoring Services of America, LP
1066 National Press Building, Washington, DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Note: Unless othemise noted. the above VMS news segment s u m n e s are aenved lrorn olf-air recorr3nps. Shaaea segments were prenwsly sent in dosed caphoning lormat.
Repon Q Copyright 2004 Wdeo Mrnitoring Sew~cesof America. LP. N I righls resewed. h y audence dala crntaned in VMS reports are the c o ~ n p h t e dpopeny ol Nidsen Media
Research. lnc. N I R~ghtsResewad. Media Values are based on the value of 30 seconds of time as measured by SOAD.

-

OVERNIGHT RESULT REPORT

rdr,

- --

UN PSA 'S
+

P e r l o d &&red
..

.

..

--.

By Repork Aprll20.2004

- April 27,2004
-

. -.

... .

.

Report Issued: April 28,2004

.....-...
.

-

. .

.'

--

J

.

/

.

-

AlRlNGS

MARKET

NEW

Los Angeles
.J'

Los Angeles

-

RANK

STATION

MARKETS

NET

DATE

DAY

TIME

VIEWERS

K M W UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

TH

1130P

244,481

2

KMEX UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

TH

630P

342,729

KMEX UNIVISIOF 23-Apr-04

.. Los Angeles

KWHY IDEP SPI 23-Apr-04

Los Angeles

KWHY IDEP - SPI 23-Apr-04

Los Angeles

KWHY IDEP - SPI 23-Apr-04

Los Angeles

KWHY IDEP - SPI 23-Apr-04

-

KWHY IDEP - SPI 23-Apr-04

,

Los Angeles

KWHY IDEP - 5 P I 23-Apr-04

Angelis

KWHY IDEP - S P I 23-Apr-04

LOS

VIEWERS 18+

2

Los Angeles

Los Angeles
. -..

%?.

STATIONS

Los Angeles

2

KWHY IDEP - S P I 23-Apr-04

FR

630P

77.299

Los Angeles

2

W H Y IDEP - S P I 23-Apr-04

FR

800P

162.279

Philadelphia

4

WPHL

20-Apr-04

TU

lOOOP

90.032

San Francisco/Oakland/San Jose

5

KDTV UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

TH

1130P

8.805

San Francisco/OaklandlSan Jose

5

KD,W UNlVlSlOF 23-Apr-04

FR

530A

990

San FranciscolOakland/San Jose

5

KDTV UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

TH

630P

58,014

San Francisco/OaklandlSan Jose

5

KDTV UNIVISIOb 23-Apr-04

FR

900A

12,732

Phoenix

15

KFPH

Phoenix

15

KPHO .

HOME FRONT COMMUNICATIONS

WB

TF

25-Apr-04

SU

1OOA

N/A

CBS

22-Apr-04

TH

600P

89.501

...

RANK

STATION

NET

DATE

15

KTVK

INDEP

22-Apr-04

15

KNW UNIVISIOb 27-Apr-04

Phoenix

15

KTL'W

Phoenix

15

KTVW UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

Phoenix

15

KNW UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

15

KT&

15

KNW UNIVISIO~

15

KNW UNIVISIOb 23-Apr-04

Denver

18

KCEC UNIVISIOb 22-Apr-04

Denver

18

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Monitoring Report
CC = Closed Captioning; I = l n t e r v i e w ; GR=Graphic; PC=Press Conference; R=Reader: SI=Studio I n t e r v i e w ; T=Teaser:
TZ=Teased Segment; V=Visual

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120.to 04/21

-

.

--t.

..

.-

.

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..
Eyewitness News
KYW-TV4CBS) Local TV Philadelphia
04120/2004 4:00 - 5:00 p m

.

-

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.

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...

-

.. .-

I

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00:34:12 Human Trafficking; Philadephia has been chosen'by Federal government for human trafficking
campaign. I; Justin Cardinal Rigali, Archdiocese of Philadephia, comments. 00:34:52 :LR
2.

News 10
WCAU-TV (NBC) Local TV Philadelphia
0412012004 4:00 5:00 p m

-

.ld

;<

00:40:01 Human ~raffickin&'tawmakers and religious leaders held forum to discuss increase in human
trafficking. SB; Justin cardinal Rigali. Archbishop of Philadelphia, it subjects them to sexual abuse'and
slavery. Dept. of Health & Human Services is starting campaign called Rescue and Restore Victims of
.+-.*, &. , .
.:LR
.
- ..
Human Trafficking. 00:41:01
3.

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WB17NewsAt10
WPHL-TV (WB) Local TV Philadelphia
0412012004 10:OO - 10:35 pm

.

.--

-

-

~

d

4.

Action News
WPVI-TV (ABC) Local TV Philadelphia
0412012004 5 0 0 6:00 pm

-

00:27:35 Tease; T; Human Trafficking T; Driver Cited T; New Cola 00:27:58 :LR
...

- ..

00:28:01 Tease; T; Remembering T; In Court T; Human Trafficking 00:30:25 :LR

.

. ..

_-.-

..

-- --

[Derived from Captioning] 13.00 A nationwide program aimed at breaking apart the network. The effort
includes public service announcements. Human trafficking is modern day slavery. It is ev~l.It is hideous. It
is disgusting. This is certainly something that we have to continue to work on, the dignity
. . .ofthe
.
individual.-.
..
-- - .
-- .
human person.

--

.

.'"'

Video M o n i t o r i n g Services of America, LP
1066 N a t i o n a l Press Building. W a s h i n g t o n . DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Note Unless o t h e w s e note4 Ihe above VMS news segment sumrnarles are denved from OR-a!r recordings Shaded segments were previously sent In dosed capt~ollnglorrrial
Report O Copyright 2004 Video Monltonng Servlces of Amer~ca.LP All nghts reserved Any aud~encedata m n l a ~ n e dIn VMS repons are the copynghled propeny of Ntelsen Media
Research Inc All Rlghts Resewed Med~aValues are based on the value of 30 seconds of t~m
as measured by SOAD

.
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.....

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 to 04/21
Continued

5.

00:36:54 TZ; Human Trafficking; Philadelphia is now a test city for a national campaign aimed at
addressing the growing trend of human trafficking. The program is called, Rescue and Restore Victims
of Human Trafficking. I; woman testifying about bang a victim of human trafficking. V; house where
woman was kept; press conference with law enforcement officers at the Archdiocese of Philadelphia. V;
Alex -Acosta, Assjstant US Attorney, talks,about trafficking. V; posters. 1; Cardinal Justin Rigall,
PWadelphia Arch Bishop, talks about the~problem.I; Patrick Meehan, US Att~wey,talks abwtfalgng the*
lead in solving the problem. Michelle,McCormack reporting outside the Archdiocese of-Philadelphia.;
00:39:11 :LR
Fox 29 Ten O'clock News
WTXF-TV (FOX) Local TV Philadelphia
04/20/2004 10:OO 1 1 :00 pm

-

[Derived from Captioning] 00.55 A new program aims to stop the practice of human trafficking. Sharon
crowley is here. What why did the feds choose Philadelphia to test this. We have a lot of people l~vingin this
area that are also new to t v s country and that's par of the problem. It puts them at high risk for being
exploited, so called human traifficking and it's as scary what it sounds.
[Derived from Captioning] 08.01 Modern day shrif ree forcing victims to work in brutal conditions
-.
sometimes as sex slaves. Now the government reaches out to philadelphia to help stop human trafficking.
Shar cron rolly is herer'bave, it's'hard to believe that something called modern day shrif ree or humantrafficking is happening in our area but federal officials say certain groups are at high risk that includes
immigrants mainly women and children and run a ways. You'll hear from 1 of those rua awayscomingup in
just a few minutes. A new federal program was launched here in philadelphia and it's aimed at trying to stop
it. I have sold drugs and stuff like that. How come? Money. Money, trying to eat, trying to feed myself. Ken
collins says he ran away for the first time at 15. 1 was out on the street. What was that like?

--

6.

Good Day Philadelphia
WTXF-TV (FOX) Local TV Philadelphia
04/21/2004 5:30 - 6:00 am

. ..

-

00:04:05 ~ u m a trafficking;
n
New outreach program announced yesterday to prevent human trafficking.
V; News conference. 00:04:25 :LR

7.

Good Day Philadelphia
WTXF-TV (FOX) Local TV Philadelphia
04/21/2004 6:30 7:00 am

-

00:04:38'~umanTrafficking; Federal law enforcement and social services agencies are teaming up to help
tackle human trafficking. V; Pat Meehan (sp) at news conference. 00:05:03 :LR

Video Monitoring Services of America. LP
1066 National Press Building, Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Note Unless olherwrse noled, Ihe above VMS news segmnl sunmarles are denved horn OH-alrrecord~ngsShaded segmenls were prenously sen1 ~ndosed capuonlng f o r m ~
R e ~ rO
t Copynghl2004 V ~ d wMon~tmngServ~cesof Amerlca LP All nghls reserved Any audlence dala conlalned In VMS reporls are Ihf' cwyngh'ed wopefly of Ntelsen Med~a
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Page 3

RESCUE & RESTORE VIC'TIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
-Continued
8.

Good Day Philadelphia
WTXF-TV (FOX) Local TV Philadelphia
0412112004 7:00 8:00 am

-

-

00:10102 Human trafficking ; Human trafficking is b<hg addressed with an outreach program. V; people
at ameeting. SB; Unidentified man, Officials, Comments on human trafficking happening today. @:10:5&
.-.:
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----

:

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* * * a

Program to combat "Human Trafficking."
Joseph A. Slobodzian
20 April 2004
The Philadelphia Inquirer
Philadelphia will become thesite of a new coordinated "outreach" program designed to combat the growing
problem "human traffickinge%$ convincing victims to come forward and help in the prosecution of criminals
involved in what officials described as "modern-day slavery."
"It sounds like something from the 18th Century but it is happening today," said U.S. Attorney Patrick L. _
Meehan in announcing th'e"'%e~cu6& Restore" program this morning at a news conference In Center City.

-_.

Meehan said officials believe about 50,000 people - mostly women and children - are.bmught iRto.thelJnited
States annually by organized criminal groups, lured by the promise of a better life and decent-paying factory
or domestic jobs.
-.

-.

--

Instead, Meehan said, the victims often find themselves in debt and forced to labor in sweat-shop conditions
or imprisoned and forced to be prostitutes.
... .-..
,
:.
.-- -..--.-.
-..
:

~<.

The basis of the new program is to put prosecutors and federal immigration and human services workers into
a partnership with local non-governmental Social services groups to overcome victims' fears of reprisals and
deportation and..encourage them to come forward and help prosecute those who have brought them into the
United States and enslaved them.
A new incentive to victims, said Scott Weber, chief of the human smuggling and trafficking unit at the U.S.
Bureauof Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Washington, is the "T visa" - up to 5,000 annually will be
available -- that will be given to victims who are undocumented foreign nationals and whaagree to cooperate
with prosecutors.
The T-visa, Weber said, would permit the victim to come forward without fear of being taken into custody and
.
deported.
"These are victims and they should be treated as victims," added Alex Acosta, assistant U.S. attorney
general for civil rights. "Not only do they have the right to a T visa but an array of services through . They will
be treated as refugees... . They need to be aware that if they come forward they will not be deported."
LP
1066 N a t i o n a l P r e s s Building. W a s h i n g t o n . DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10

V i d e o Monitoring Services o f A m e r i c a .

Nole Unless olhemse noted. Lhe above VMS news segmenl surnmarles are denved horn off-sf record~ngsShaded segments were prenously =nl In closed CapOOnlng laml
Repon O Copynghl2004 V ~ d wMwllrnng S e ~ c e 01
s Amer~ca.LP All nghls reserved Any aud~encedala unla~nedIn VMS repotts are lhe copynghled propmy of Ntelsen Med~a
Research Inc All Rghls Resewed Med~aValues are based on the value of 30 seconds of hme as measured by SOAD

-

...

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Page 4

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04/21
- Continued

.a,

-

Among the groups supporting the new program is Catholic Social Services and Cardinal Justin Rigali, head
of the Philadelphia Roman Catholic Archdiocese, joined Meehan at :he news conference. Other groups
include The Salvation Army, Friends of Farmworkers, the Nationalities Service Center, Congreso and the
Pennsylvania
and Citizenship Coalition. ..
- Immigration
.
= *=

a

Mehan-saidPhiladelphia was selected as the first of three.sites for the Rescue & Restore p r o g r e w Atlanta
and Phoenix will also get programs.- because of the region's diverse ethnic population;--indudingmore recent
groups from Eastern Europe, Africa and Asian.
Contact Joseph A. ~lobodzia"at 215-854-2658 or jslobodzian@phillynews.com

~.

.--

.

Human Trafficking Investigation
Michele McCormack
20 April 2004
WPVl (ABC)
We have an update on a story we first told you about in an Action News investigation last month. It concerns
the growing crisis of human trafficking, modern day form of slavery.
.'..l

.l*.,

.'

.

. ,

-.

VIDEO: Michele McCormack reports
,

-

.-

.

:--

AS we reported. ~ h i l a d e l ~ hhas
i a now become a test city for a national campaign aimed at addressing this
troubling trend. The archdiocese is taking the lead among service agencies to rescue and restore victims of
human trafficking, one alleged case we profiled in March.

-

-..

Chandra B U ~ ~ ~ ~ W ~ ~ ~ ~ I ~ N T E R P R E T E R :
.- * -. -.
.
,

~

"A little of her native language then the interpreter's voice: I had no happiness, never saw the light."
Forty-five-year-,oldChandra Bulatwatte made the stunning allegation on Action News in March. 'That she was
kept in a house in Washington Township for over a year, denied her passport and never paid for her work as
a maid.
"Every time she says she wanted to go home they said this is not your country this is America we can do
.what we want."

.

Chandra is now in protective custody, no charges have been filed against the homeowner but the federal
government says still has an active investigation into charges of human trafficking. It was the subject of a
joint press conference with all branches of law enforcement and the Philadelphia Archdiocese.
Alex AcostalASST. U.S. ATTORNEY:
"The trade of human beings for any purpose must not be allowed to thrive."
Video M o n i t o r i n g Services of A m e r i c a , LP
1066 National Press B u i l d i n g , W a s h i n g t o n , DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Nole Unless olhermse noted, the above VMS n e m segment surnmrles are denved horn off-alr reccfdtngs Shaded segments were prevlwsly sen1 In dosed c2pt1OnlnglorR'0l
Repon O Copynghl2004 Mdeo Monllalng Servlces ol Amer~ca.LP All ngnls reserved Any audlence aala conlalnea In VMS repons are the copynghled propeny of Nlelsen Medla
Research Inc All Rtghls Reserved Medla Values are based on the value of M seconds of t~meas measured by SOAD

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
- Continued
I t starts with education of the general public through an array of posters and then a reporting hotline. It will

then be volunteers with the Philadelphia Archdiocese which will use grant money and private funds from
Catholiccharities to establish shelter and counseling for victims.

-

r(rr

-

-

- .-

-cardinal Justin RigalilPHiLADELPHlA ARCHBISHOP:

. & .

.

.:.

. .. .

-:

8

-

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0

"After drug dealing.human' trafficking is filled with the illegal arms industry as the-second4argest criminal
industry in the world today."

--..
.

'

The key is prosecution and Philadelphia is just one of three cities whose success or failure will determine
how the nation stops the trade of people.
Patrick Meehan1U.S. ATTORNEY:
"And it's very special for us in Philadelphia to have taken the lead."
2
'

The hotline number is 88&73-7888, the public's help is crucial since often the victim is isolated and it is a
he said she said case. The observations of members of the general public are critical to corroborating~claims ..
of human trafficking.

How you can help i n the campaign ,
21 April 2004
The Philadelphia Daily News

.-

The victims of human trafficking are usually too frightened or isolated to get help on their own - even
though they ma'y be hiding in plain sight.
. .
. . .~ -- - - .
-.
.
So officials who want to crack down on traffickers in "modern-day slavery" are appealing to social service
providers, neighbors, immigration workers, even the cop on the beat for help.
.
.

.

~

The hot line to da11is 1-888-3737-888 "if you think someone is a victim of trafficking." Victims of the
exploitation are also invited to call.
The posters urge people to "look beneath the surface" because "a victim of trafficking may look like many of
..the people you help every day."

.

There's a!so a Web site for more information about human trafficking: www.acf.hhs.govltrafficking

Putting an end to human trafficking; Phila. launches project to halt exploitation
Ron Goldwyn
21 April 2004
The Philadelphia Daily News
Video

M o n ~ t o r t n gServbces

1066 N a t i o n a l

of A m e r i c a . LP

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RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 to 04/21
- Continued

Human trafficking for forced labor or sexual exploitation is a hidden evil that can't be stamped out by law
enforcement alone.
*

-

-

So officialsareturning -to social service prcyiders and the public - to help fight what they're calling "moderndayslavery" in a pilot project unveiled in ~hiladelphiayesterday.
.. - -.
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Community and public agencies across the region will be trained to spot possible victims of trafficking
among their clients. The training began at the same time the program was announced.
The crime of trafficking, said U.S. Attorney Patrick Meehan, "sounds like something out of the 18th Century"
which victimizes mostly women and children.
Officials admitted they don't know the size of the problem. By one estimate, 18,000 people are trafficked into
the U.S. every year.
6'

C

The victims are generally ~lle@iimmigrants who fear deportation by authorities, or physical harm from thew
exploiters, if they come forward: They are held in bondage by death threats, physical abuse and terror; he
said.
some are U.S. citizensJ~fi$ar"et i a i c k e d from one part of the country to another, for example homeless or
destitute people coerced to go to another region for farm labor or prostitution.

..

>.

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a

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- -

But social services, medical ;id, shelter, protection and a special visa are available for those brave enough
to step from the shadows into the "Rescue and Restore" program, according to Meehan and other officials.
Almost 50 agencies and community groups are part of the partnership announced at a news conference at
the Wyndham Franklin Plaza yesterday.
.- .
, I

.

. :..

..- * . - = - .

~-.

Philadelphia is the first of three cities that will implement the collaborative program. The others are Phoenix
and Atlanta, due for launch within days.
"Rescue and Restore" implores service agencies, neighbors and advocacy groups to "look below the
surface" for clues to victims.
"They're scared, they're certainly not going to pick up the phone and call the FBI," said Alex Acosta, assistant
..
..
attorney general for civil rights.

...

He said no victim that agrees to work with law enforcement officials to help prosecute traffickers will be
deported
Prosecuting traffickers is a top civil rights priority at the Department of Justice, Acosta said.
Catholic Social Services of the Archdiocese of Philadelphia is the lead agency to coordinate efforts, handle
hot line calls, conduct training and manage cases.
Video M o n i t o r i n g S e r v i c e s o f America. LP
1066 N a t i o n a l Press B u i l d i n g . W a s h i n g t o n , DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
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Research lnc All Rghls Reserved Medla Values are based on the value ol 30 seconds of t~meas measured by SOAD

a5
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Page 7

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 to 04/21
Continued
Training sessions for local and state law enforcement officials as well as non-governmental agency staff were held
throughout the day at archdiocese headquarters across from the hotel.

- ---

6.

"The root of this evil is the tremendous violation of human dignity," said Cardinal Justin
..=.~
~igali??i~ple;ndi'd
. .
collaboration...p oints out how much'eiiergy there is in the community to extirpate this evil."
- .
."'

--

. -..
-

---

Arthur N. Read, attorney for Friends of Farmworkers Inc., a cooperating group, said the program seems to
"change the attitude of law enforcement. It offers another way back in" to nab traffickers since victims have
been so reluctant to come forward before.
Catholic Social Services is receiving a $41,000 federal grant channeled through the U.S. Conference of
Catholic Bishops, according to Monsignor Timothy Senior, secretary for Catholic Social Services.
U.S. officials cited prosecuf[qr$ begun against 138 traffickers nationwide in the past 3 '/2 years, of which 78
involved allegations of sex trafficking. Twenty-six victims have been certified for protection in Pennsylvania,
said Robert Zimmerrnan, regional head of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
"Although that number.kb.tbereare indications of more victims," he said. "It is largely a hidden problem."

Taking aim at human trafficking; Phila. is the first site in a federal initiative to end forced labor
Joseph A. Slobodzian
21 April 2004
The Philadelphialnquirer
--

.

.

-

. .

Four years ago, when authoriiiks in Philadelphia began looking into the sudden proliferation o f z ~ G a 6 '
"massage parlors." they found more than the world's oldest profession.

-

i
f

It was an equalty ancient evil: slavery. What authorities discovered was that many of the women had paid
tens of thousands of dollars to brokers to get into the United States - only to find they had to work off that
debt as prostitutes.

~ e d e r aauthorities
l
announced yesterday that Philadelphia had been selected as the firs!.site for a program
to combat the growing problem of "human trafficking" by working with social service groups to persuade
victims to come forward and help pros'ecute the criminals who enslaved them.
"It sounds like something from the 18th century, but it is happening today," U.S. Attorney patrick L. Meehan
said in announcing the Rescue and Restore program at a Center City news conference.
Federal officials say up to 50,000 people - mostly women and children - are brought into the United States
annually by criminal groups that lure them with promises of a better life and decent-paying factory or
domestic jobs.
Video Monitoring Services of America. LP
1066 National Press Building. Wash~nglon.DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Nole Unless olhennse noled Ihe above VMS n e m segrnenl surnmarles are denved torn 011-air record~ngsShaded segments were prenously Senl In closed CaPllMlng formal
Report O Copynghl2004 Mdeo M m ~ l r n n gS e ~ c e s
of Amrlca LP All nghls reserved Any aud~encedata conlamed ~nVMS reports are the copynghled popeny of N~dsenMedla
Research Inc All Rghls Reserved Media Values are based on Ihe value of 30 seconds of l~meas measured by SOAO

.'

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Page 8

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04/21
Continued

Instead, Meehan said, the victims often wind up deep in debt and are forced by threats or violence to work in
sweatshops or are imprisoned and forced to work as prostitutes.
Some women are f ~ r c e dto servlce 30 clients a day, said Alex Acosta, assistant U.S. attorney general f o i
-civikights.
In one Texas case, Acosta said, girls were brought to the United States from Central h w c a a n d
forced to work in a factory dur~ngthe day and to have sex at night with thew captors or.'%e banded out as
favors."

6r

=-

Officials say the victims are part of a 900,000-person-a-year international trade in people for forced labor or
sex.
The new program will not require additional federal funding, Meehan said. Rather, it will involve improving
coordination among prosecutors, federal immigration and human services workers, and local
nongovernmental social services groups, whose caseworkers are often the first to meet victims.
P'

Catholic Social services repr&ntatives and Cardinal Justin Rigali, head of Philadelphia's Roman Catholic
Archdiocese, joined Meehan at the news conference. Other support includes the Salvation Army, Friends of
Farmworkers, the Nationalities Service Center. Congreso, and the Pennsylvania lmmigration and Citizenship
Coalition.
--.. .
d*..

.,,,
<

.

.,'*

Meehan s a ~ dPhiladelphia was selected as the firsi of three sites for the Rescue and Restore program Atlanta and Phoenix are next - because of the region's diverse population, including large groups of recent
immigrants from Eastern Europe, Africa and Asia, as well as the large immigrant farm-worker population in
the suburbs.

.

- -

Perhaps the biggest obstacle officials will face is the deep-seated fear among immigrants - especially those
here illegally - that coming forward will lead to reprisals
and deportation.
.
. _ .- - . . - .
A new incentive to counter that fear, said Scott Weber, chief of the human smuggling and trafficking unit
at the U.S. Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement in Washington, is the "T visa" - up to 5,000
annually will be available - that will be given to victims who are undocumented foreign nationals if they
cooperate with prosecutors.

.

,

*i

These visas, Weber said, permit victims to come forward without fear of being held by U.S. immigration and
deported.
.-...

4

Thus far, Weber said, only a few hundred of the new visas have been issued. That was one reason for
yesterday's news conference and the daylong forum ,at which federal officials briefed social service groups
about the program and aid available.
Acosta assured the group that Justice Department officials were serious about the new program: "These are
victims and they should be treated as victims ... . They need to be aware that if they come forward they will
not be deported."
Contact staff writer Joseph A. Slobodzian at 215-854-2658 or jslobodzian@phillynews.com
Video Monitoring Services of America, LP
1066 National Press Building, Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Nole Unless othenwse noted. Ihe above VMS news segment s u m r n e s are denved Ircm off-alr recordings. Snaded segments were pfenously Sent In dosed CapltOnlng lorrrgt
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..

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Page 9

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
-Continued

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Authorities launch outreach effort t o fight illegal immigrant forced labor
David B. Caruso
20 April 2004
= -=
Associated Press Hewswires

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PHILADELPHIA (AP) - Authorities can2 say for sure how many of the illegal immigranb~smuggledinto the
country each year wind up working as prostitutes or indentured servants, but they know that the human
traffickers who profit from their labor often exploit fear of the U.S. government to keep their victims in line.

=.==
.

- -

Talk to the police or try to escape, the undocumented workers are told, and immigration agents will throw you
in jail or deport you.
Federal officials are launching an effort in three cities to try to break down that fear by publicizing a program
that promises victims of human trafficking that they will receive social services and a chance to stay in the
United States if they cooperatqwith law enforcement.
\*

Since 2002, the government has been able to offer up to 5,000 special visas a year to illegal immigrants who
can show they were forced into servitude or sexual exploitation as part of their passage to America.

..

.'*.~.,.,.. . ..'*
But the program has remained largely unknown, among immigrants as well as among police, prosecutors
and social workers who might-stumbleaeFoss forced labor rings.

.-

-

I,

.

_-

Out of the 18,000 to 20,000 people estimated to be trafficked into the United States each year, only 301 have
received one of the special visas, according to the Department of Homeland Security's bureau of Citizenship
and Immigration Services. .

--

The Department of-Health and Human Services has, to date, certified only 500 people as q6alifying for social
. . ~. .welfare benefits available to trafficking victims.
, - ~

"There isn't anyone involved in this program who would consider this a satisfactory rate," said Steven
Wagner, director of the Trafficking in Persons program at the U.S. Department of Health and Human
Services.
This spring, federal officials will try to give the program a boost in Philadelphia, Atlanta and Phoenixwith a
variety'of training and outreach efforts aimed at helping authorities better recognize trafficking and reach
~... out to its victims.
Each city will also be getting a hot line that nurses, Social service agencies or concerned neighbors can be
use to report suspected cases of trafficking to caseworkers, without going directly to police or immigration
authorities.

In Philadelphia, the service will be staffed by Catholic Human Services, a social service agency associated with the
Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Philadelphia.
Video Monitoring S e r v i c e s of A m e r i c a , LP
1066 N a t i o n a l Press Building. W a s h i n g t o n . DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Note Unless olherwse noled, Ine above VMS news segment s v r m r ~ e sare denved horn off-alr recordings Shaded segmnls were prewously sen1 In dosed captlonlng l w m l
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Research Inc All Rlghls Resewed Medta Values are based on Ihe value of30 seconds of b m as measured by SOAD

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Page 10

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121

--Continued
The program will be able to help victims find housing, jobs and medical services, and eventually put them in
charge with law enforcement, but with assurances that they won't be jailed themselves for turning their
exploiters in.
iol.

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-

-- --

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'We are keenly aware that for this to work,there needs to be confidence that.wJen someone-calls, @ey will.
not be depo-fled," said Alex Acosta,..Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights. 'Victims ofhuman ..
trafficking are victims ... They have a right to be treated like refugees."

-

--.-..

Program to combat "Human Trafficking."
Joseph A. Slobodzian
20 April 2004
The Philadelphia Inquirer
d .

Philadelphia will become t h e d e of a new coordinated "outreach" program designed to combat the growing
problem "human trafficking" bji convincing victims to come forward and help in the prosecution of criminals
involved in what officials described as "modern-day slavery."

.:

"lt'sounds like somethinlJW8h-1th6"1.8thCentury but it is happening today," said U.S. Attorney Patrick L.-.'
Meehan in announcing the "Rescue & Restore" program this morning at a news conference in Center City.
-- .. - -- -. .Meehan said officials believe--about50,000 people - mostly women and children - are brought into the United
States annually by organized criminal groups, lured by the promise of a better life and decent-paying factory
or domestic jobs.
n
the victims often find themselves
in debt. and
forced to labor in sweat;shop conditions
Instead. ~ e e h a said,
..
or imprisoned and forced to be-prostitutes.
... .
:
:
---... .--..
The basis of the new program is to put prosecutors and federal immigration and human services workers into
a partnership with local non-governmental social services groups to overcome victims' fears of reprisals and
deportation and encourage them to come forward and help prosecute those who have brought them into the
United States and enslaved them.
A new.tncent~veto victims, said Scott Weber, chief of the human smuggling and trafficking unit at the U.S.
Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement In Washington, is the "T visa" - up to-5,000 annually will be
available -- that will be given to vict~mswho are undocumented foreign nationals and who agree to cooperate
with prosecutors.
The T-visa, Weber said, would permit the victim to come forward without fear of being taken into custody and
deported.
"These are victims and they should be treated as victims," added Alex Acosta, assistant U.S. attorney
general for civil rights. "Not only do they have the right to a T visa but an array of services through . They will
be treated as refugees... . They need to be aware that if they come forward they will not be deported."
V i d e o Monitoring Services

1066 N a t i o n a l

of A m e r i c a . LP

P r e s s Building, W a s h i n g t o n .

10
DC 20045 T 202 393 7110

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Research Inc All Rghts Reserved Med~aValues are based on the value of 30 seconds of Dme as masured by SOAD

.

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Page 11

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
- Continued

Among the groups supporting the new program is Catholic Social Services and Cardinal Justin Rigali, head
of the Philadelphia Roman Catholic Archdiocese, joined Meehan at the news conference. Other groups
include The Salvation Army, Friends of Farmworkers, the Nationalities Service Center, Congreso and the
Pennsylvania-Imm~gration
and Citizenship,Coalition.
rh

-c

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:

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..

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.

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-

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3

Meehan said Philadelph,ia was selected as the first of three sites for the ~ e s c u e& ~estore-program-Atlanta
and Phoenix will also get programs - because of the region's diverse ethnic population, including more recent
groups from Eastern Europe,,Africa and Asian.

~

---

.

-

US Gov't Targets Human Trafficking Crimes
Paul Kurtz
KYW 1060 (Rad~o)
J
23 Apr112004

,--,

The Department of Human Services has launched a community outreach campaign to rescue vlctlms of
human trafficking

-

--

/ +

"Human trafficking is modern-day slavery. It is evil, it is hideous, it is disgusting."

-

-

-

Assistant US attorney general for civil'rights Alex Acosta says when he thinks of human trafficking.<
envlslons a photograph.
-

--.

-

<

-

.

"It's a picture of ajwin bed. It's a small room where one of the victims was forced to live and have sex with up
to 30 men a day. 'The room's the size of a twin bed.
There arenl.t
even four walls."
. .
.-

.

.. .

,

.
,.

...

-

-..
.~

.....

.

-.

US attorney Patrick Meehan says the "Rescue and Restore" program will partner law enforcement with
social service and religious groups to arrest the human flesh traffickers and help the victims:

.

-

"Once they reach out to us or we're able to reach out and identify them, to give them the protection and
support that enables them to retain their human dignity."
-.

Philadelphia is the first of many cities operating the program.
.

t

http:llwww.k\/wlO6O.com/news archives detail.cfm?newsitemid=37009

Video Monitoring Services of America, LP
1066 National Press Building. Wash~ngton.DC 20045

T 202 393 7110

Nole Unless olherwse noled the above VMS news segmenl summaries are denved fromoff-a~rrecwdtngs Shaded segments were prevtously sen1 !n dosed capbon~ngf m l
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Page 12

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
Continued
Editorial ( Human Trafficking; Slaves to a horrible crime
22 April 2004
The Philadelphia Inquirer

...

-

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A sad-silence fell oyer a news conference .b Philadelphia Tuesday as a federal official described the agony
thathuman trafficking causes. ..
.
.~
--.
..
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-

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.--

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_,

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Alex ~ c o s t aassistant
l
attorney get&;
for civil rights at the U.S. Department of Justice, described acase in
which a young teenage girl was held against her will in a curtained room so small it could hold only a twin
bed. There, she was forced to have sex with as many as 30 men a day. She kept just one personal item in
the room - a teddy bear.
An estimated 18,000 and 20,000 trafficking victims are brought illegally into the United States from foreign
countries every year. Most are women and girls lured with fake promises of jobs or husbands who then,
they're sold into sexual slavery. Other victims are forced to work in demeaning, often dangerous jobs under
threat of death or deportation.
,,

Gf-:
Federal and local law enforcers'have a tough time locating traffickers or victims in a trade that is, by its'
nature, invisible. All the more reason to cheer a federal pilot program launched here Tuesday.
.

Philadelphia is one of tttree'tities-cihosen to test a program aimed at capturing traffickers by offering their.
victims incentives to turn them in. While it's unclear whether the problem is significant here, large populations
in Philadelphia from countries in Asia and Africa where trafficking originates makes this a good plaw-for an
experiment.

-

In Philadelphia, Phoenix and Atlanta, workers at social-service agencies such as Catholic Social Services
will be trained to spot and care for victims, who will be encouraged to contact local and federal law
enforcement. Victims who help investigators track down their traffickers will be offered help from food stamps
to' Medicaid. But the big prize will be a special visa allowing them to remain in the,United -Statesindefinitely
They can be eligible for the visas whether or not their cooperation leads to a conviction.
The approach marks a sharp turn for U.S. law enforcement, which has treated trafficking victims as
criminals for entering the country illegally. But President Bush, Attorney General John Ashcroft and Health
and Human Services Director Tommy Thompson promote the enlightened view that trafficked people are
crime victims deserving aid. That change is reflected in the pilot's name: "Rescue and Restore.
l
largely on trust. Vlctims and service agencies mustbe conv~ncedthose
The program's success w ~ ldepend
comlng forward won't be deported.
If it does succeed, the number of special visas available to trafficking victims may need to be expanded.
Now, a cap allows 5,000 of these "T visas" to be issued each year. To date, only 450 have been given since
they were first offered in 2001.
With this pilot program in place, all of the available visas ought to be utilized. The U.S. focus on these ghastly
crimes must rise above rhetoric.
Video M o n i t o r i n g Services o f A m e r i c a . LP
1066 National P r e s s B u i l d ~ n gW
, a s h i n g t o n , DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
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Page 13

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 to 04/21
-Continued
A national, 24-hour hotline has been established for victims or their helpers to get connected with local
service agencies: 1-888-373-7888.

-

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22 April 2004
Philadelphia Daily News

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Letters

~- =

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A welcome crackdown
Re "Putting an end to human trafficking" (April 21):
On behalf of Amnesty International's 6,500 members in the greater Philadelphia area, I applaud federal
efforts to start here in Philadelphia to address this widespread problem.
6'

,',

Human trafficking for sexuaMxploitation is a serious problem worldwide. Women are often recruited on
false pretenses, coerced, transported and sold for a range of exploitative purposes, including sex tourism
and forced marriage.
women who are traficI&ifdfor SeXiral exploitation are often sexually abused and raped to break them
mentally and emotionally, in order to force them into sex work.
.. - . _
.. .-Many are beaten and raped to punish'them for trying to escape or for refusing to have sex for money.
Despite the risks of HIVIAIDS, women are often punished for refusing to have unprotected sex.

*

-

-.

.

Trafficking and fprced prostitution are internationally recognized as a human-rights violation, with the
Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discr~minationAgainst Women specifically requiring states to
"suppress all forms of traffic inwomen and exp16tationof prostitution of ~omen"~(Article-6). - - - - -

-

--

Philadelphia's efforts to aggressively address this problem in a practical manner will set a positive example
for the rest of the world.

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1066 National Press Building. W a s h i n g t o n . DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Nole Unless olhennse noted lhe above VMS news segmenl sumnyrles are denved from on-a~rrecord~ngsShaded segmnls were prewously sent In dosed capltonlng lorml
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Research Inc All R~qhlsResemed Med~aValues are based on \he value of 30 seconds of t~meas measured by SOAO

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RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
-Continued
.-

9.

CBS 5 News This Morning
KPHO-TV (CBS) Local TV Phoenix
04/21/2004 4:30 6:00 am

-

0

-

-.
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...

[Derived from-Captioning] 14.49,Federal officials are launching an effort in philadelphia, atlania
and here in phoenix, totry to break down the fear human traffickers often use to keep-theirstimsiR
line.. They're publicizing a program that promises victims of human trafficking-that they will .ceceive
.
social services and a chance to stay in the united states, if they cooperate with law enforcement.

---.
.-..
.

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2. CBS 5 News This Morning
KPHO-TV (CBS) Local TV Phoenix
4:30 6:00 am
04/21/2004

-

00115:17 Human Trafficking; R; Federal officials are launching an effort to try to help victims of
human trafficking. 00:15:36 :LR
01:15:18 Human i;&cking;

Recap. 01 :15:39 :LR

3. 12 News Today
KPNX-TV (NBC) Local TV Phoenix
04/22/2004
'5m --6:OBam

- .-

[Derived from Captioning] 95.41 The federal government calls it modern dayslavery. IllegaLimmigrants held hostage by coyotes the women often raped the children abused. Today the federal
government is kicking off a campaign to eliminate immigrant smuggling. The program is called
"Rescue and Restore Victims of Human Trafficking". The federal government will provide
special services like housing employment and health care for victims who come forward. In return
they'll be asked to assist in the prosecution of their capt.ors.
. .
.
. .. . .---- -. .
#.
[Derived from Captioning] 16.09 The federal government kicks off a campaign today aimed at
elim~natingimmigrant smuggling. The program is called "rescue and restore victims of human
trafficking." The federal government will provide housing, employment and health-care for victims
who come forward. In exchange, victims must help prosecute their captors.
:

.
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.- :. -

[Derived from Captioning] 27. Human trafficking is one of the top criminal industries in the world
today. 30.51

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[Derived from Captioning] 30.51 Human trafficking is one of the top criminal industries in the
world today. A new campaign is being launched to stop it. We'll have your first look!

Video Monitoring Services of A m e r i c a , LP
1066 N a t i o n a l Press

Bullding, W a s h i n g t o n .

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RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04/21
-Continued
[Derived from Captioning] 38.59 There's a new push to combat the problem of human
trafficking in the valley. Federal authorities will officially unveil the details in a news conference
later today. Today. We have details this mo~ning.Director of the new program, Steven Wagner
with the US Department of Health and Human Services joins us in studio. Good morning Mr.
- -Wagner.
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[Derived from Capt<oing] 39.55 > Today, the federal government is kicking off a campaign aimed
at eliminating immigranl trafficking. The program is called Rescue and Restore Victims of Human
Trafficking. It will provide special services like housing, employment and health care. In return, they
will be asked to assist in the prosecution of their captors.
_.*-..-.*,_ .

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Arizona Midday
KPNX-TV (NBC) Local TV Phoenix
0412212004
11:08 12:OOpm

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Local PM Drive Time News
KFYI-AM (CBS) ~ o c aRadio
i
Phoenix
04/22/2004
4:00 - 4:05 p m

6.

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-

00:01:07 Health; Federal health authorities have begun campaign to fight human trafficking . SB;
U S Atty Paul Charlton, discusses the campaign. 00:01:36 :LR
7.
.'-

Good Evening Arizona
KTVK-TV (IND) Local TV Phoenix
04/22/2004
4:30 - 6:30 p m

-'

..-..

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00:02:18 Immigrant Trafficing; The Federal government with klck off a program called Rescue and
Restore Victims of Human Trafficking . V; pol~ceafter suspects. 00:02:36 :LR
*

.

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00:42:55 TZ; Using People; Agencies are teamingup to help the victims of human trafficking . V;
LookBeneath the Surface campaign posters. PC; Paul Charlton, US Attorney, talks about the effort
Scott McGee reporting. 00:45:03 :LR

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.
.

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2

Page 16

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
- Continued
8..

Local PM Drive Time News
KTAR-AM (ABC) Local Radio Phoenix
0412212004
4 5 5 5 0 5 prn

-

.

00:02:27 Tease; T; Human Trafficking 00:02:33 :LR
, =:
*
00:03:33 TZ; Human Trafficking ; Federal officials have launched a new procpm to prevent human
trafficking . I; with Paul Charlton, U S attorney, stating that people can come forward w~thoutfear
Many are forced Into servitude of sexual exploitation as part of their passage to the U S J~rnCross
reporting. 00.04'09 'LR

I b r - -

- --

CBS 5 News At 5
KPHO-TV (CBS) Local TV Phoenix
5:00 5 3 0 p m
04/22/2004

9.

-

[Derived from Ca@ioping] 23.45 > We see these images of human trafficking all the time. Drop
houses with illegal imh-grants. But another sinister form of immigrant smuggling goes nearly
undetected.
10.

ABC 15 News 6:00 Difference
KNXV-TV (ABCJT'Zical TV Phoenix
6:00 6:30 prn
0412212004

=:

-

?

-

.l

,,

. := =

[Derived from captibning] 64.51 What's worse, smugglers are forcing immigrants into modern day
slavery. It is called human trafficking . This is a new public service announcement to inform you
about human trafficking . Each year in the U.S.As many as 20,000 people are victims of this crime.
Individuals come to this country, either tricked into coming here, come here against their will, and
then they are forced to work at an occupation which they
. . otherwise would not work at. Women
..
.=. -. - = - .
working in massage parlors as prostitutes.

--

,

11.

%

.

= ,

-:

12NewsAtSix
KPNX-TV (NBC) Local TV Phoenix
6:00 6:30 p m
04/22/2004

-

[Derived from Captioning] 04.55 The feds are teaming up with social service organizations to stop
. : -human trafficking . Public service announcements will soon begin running here in the valley. The
campaign is called rescue and restore . Victims who come forward would be given temporary
housing and help finding work. In exchange, the government wants their help prosecuting offenders.
The government says everyone needs to help look for victims. The hot line has been set up for the
victims to call. We want those individuals to know that they can call this number that health and
human services has provided.

Video Monitoring Services of America. LP
1066 National P r e s s Building. Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Nole Unless olnerwrse noted, the above VMS news segment summaries are denved Ifomoff-a~r
record~ngsShaded segments were prewously sent In dosed caplron~ngl o m l
Repon O Copynght 2D04 Vldeo Monllcmng S~MCPS of Amerlca. LP All nghts reserved Any aud~encedata conta~nedIn VMS reporls are the copyrighted property of N~dsenMedla
Research Inc All Rghls Reserved Medla Values are based on the value of 30 seconds of lime as measured by SOAD

.-.

-

Page 17

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
- Continued
12.

News 15 At 4:30 AM
KNXV-TV (ABC) Local TV Phoenix
04/23/2004
4:30 5 0 0 am

-

*

- --.

ie,

[Derived from-Captioning] 03.43-Here in the-valley.... We see a lot of stories about illegal
immigrants being smuggled into the united states.. But now... Federal.and local authoritieswantRhe
public to be aware of another,very serious problem. Trafficking ad here this is-a-n e w public service
announcement about human trafficking . The campaign called "rescue and restore " hopes to
identify people who may be victims of this crime. As many as 20-thousand people in the united
states... Are victims of this crime. In arizona drug smuggling is also a problem. Everyday cutoms and
border patrol agents inspect thousands of cars crossing the border a the nogales port of entry....

.

13.

.- . -

ABC 7 News At Six
WZVN-TV (ABC) Local TV Fort MyerslNaples
04/22/2004
6:00 6:30 p m

-

f'

C*

[Derived from Captibriing] 08.33 Rule is a 17-year veteran of the office who works as the
supervisior of the victim's services bureau. Heserves on the countys first committee for human
trafficking working with agencies across florida to stop himan slavery and smuggling.
14.

KGUN 9 News'XrTivi3
KGUN-TV (ABC) Local TV Tucson
04/22/2004
5:00-- 5 3 0 p m
"+

[Derived from Captioning] 05.07 The government has launched a new campaign to cut down on
human trafficking . The goal to find undocumented workers who have been forced to work against
their will in sweat shops or massage parlors. The government is offering up to five-thousand visas to
undocumented immigrants who can show they were forced to work In the u-s againsi their will.

.

--

*

15.

, ?

--

-.

a

'Eyewitness News 4 At 5:00
KVOA-W (NBC) Local TV Tucson
04/22/2004
5:00 5:30 p m

-

.

[Derived from Captioning] 07.17 And the feds launched a campaign today to fight human
trafficking . It's aimed at people working against their will in sweat shops, massage parlors, and in
; .- fields. The U.S. Government wants them to come forward. It's offering up t it's offering up to fivethousand visas to illegal immigrants who can prove they were forced into servitude or sexual
exploitation as part of their passage to the U.S.

Video Moniloring S e r v i c e s o f America. LP
1066 N a t i o n a l Press B u i l d i n g , Wash~nglon.DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Nole Unless olhemse noled. the above VMS news segrnenl surnmnes are denved horn on-air reccwdlngs Shaded segmenls were prev~ouslysen1 In closed capllonlng form1
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Research Inc All Rtghls Reserved Medla Values are based on Ihe mlue of 30 seconds of lime as rmasured by SQAO

7

-

-

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
-Continued
16. ,Noticias
KWHY-TV (IND) Local TV Los Angeles
04/23/2004 5:00 - 5:30 p m

.

-

1.7. 00:24:05-TZ; S9xual abuse; Some employment offers could be tricks. V; Classified ads. I; Workers, '
- -discuss incidents. I; Paul Charton, ~ r i z o n a
Lawyer, says that they urge the-victims to report theipcident
V; Rescue and Restore v-ictims of human trafficking logo. V; Commercial over sexual abtlse. GR;
Telephone number for reports. Reported Mirna Pineda. 00:26:12 :LR

..-=.
.- .

.

18. Local AM Drive Time ~ e ' k s
KFYI-AM (CBS) Local Radio Phoenix
04/23/2004 7:00 - 7:05 am
19. 00:00:57 Trafficking of Human Beings. ; The Federal Government is doing more to find victims of human
trafficking by sponsoring a television and radio ad campaign in Spanish to help reach those people. SB;
Skye Webber with Homgland Security, the trafficking of human beings poses an urgent moral challenge.
00:01:24 :LR
I*'
20. Local AM Drive Time News
KFYI-AM (CBS) Local Radio Phoenix
04/23/20048:00 8 1 O S W : ' i '

-

21. 00:01:21 Human Trafficking ; The fed is working to help victims of human traffickjng in a p r o g ~
called Look Beneath the Surface. US Atty Paul Charlton says its a form of modern day slavery. PC; Paul
Charlton, US Atty, says whoever is involved in harming these people should be prosecuted to the enth
degree. Bart Graves reporting. 00:01:59 :LR

-

--

22. ABC 15 ~ e w ; Daybreak
KNXV-TV (ABC) Lacal TV. Phoenix
04/23/2004 5:00 - 6:00 am

..

.- - --.

-.

23. 00:56:39 Human trafficking ; Federalllocal authorities are asking the public in PSA to help stop human
trafficking in 'Rescue and Restore ' program. V; Footage of PSA commercial ad. 00:57:08 :LR
24. Local AM Drive Time News
)<TAR-AM (ABC) Local Radio Phoenix
04/23/20047:55 8:05 am

-

25. 00:06,:02 Human Trafficking ; The fed is working to help victims of human trafficking in a program
called Look Beneath the Surface. PC; Paul Charlton, US Atty, says no case can be successfully
prosecuted without the victim itself. Jim Cross reporting. 00:06:43 :LR

Video Monitoring Services of America. LP
1066 N a t i o n a l Press B u i l d i n g , W a s h i n g t o n . DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Note Unless olhenvlse noled. Ihe above VMS news segmenl sumnrarles are Oenved from on-alr reccfdlngs Shaded Segrnenls were prenously sent In dosed caplionlng f o m l
Report OCopyngh~2004 V l d m Monalalng Serv~cesof Ameroca LP All ngnls reserved Any audience oala m l a i n e d in V M S rewrts are Ihe copynghled proDeny of N~elsenMedla
Research. Inc All Rlghls Reserved Media Values are based on the value 01 30 seconds of t~meas measured by SOAO

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Page 19

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 to 04/21
-Continued
26. Good Morning Arizona At 6 AM
KTVK-TV (IND) Local TV Phoenix
0412312004 6:00 7:00 am

-

-

27. 00-:37:55-Mode~n
slaves.; As many as 20,000 people are being held in the US as slaves. A new progiam
- iS being lauched to combat human trafficking . V; Announcement of the-Rescue and Rest.ore__ .- ,
campaign. The Rescue and Restore campaign is sponsered by the department of ~ e a l t h a n d
Human.
Services . V; Ads for program. PC; Paul Charlton, US Attorney, District of Arizona, says victims
escape from poverty and abuse, only to travel in squalid conditions. 00:38:53 :LR

6r

-

..
-..
.
-.

28. News 13 This Morning
KOLD-TV (CBS) Local TV Tucson
04123120045:00 7:00 am

-

,

29. [Derived from Captioning] 1.02.1 8 Health officials are also taking aim at human trafficking. They're
launching a campaign a,imed at combating the growing problem. The federal government is trying to get
people who work in swea?&ops, massage parlors and in the fields against their will to come forward.
.
The government is also offering visas to illegal immigrants who come forward.

Health officials launch campaign to combat human trafficking
--

Ananda Shorey "
Associated Press Wr~!er
22 Aprll 2004

,

--

2

>

-

PHOENIX (AP) - Federal officials are trying to combat the fast-growing criminal industry of human
trafficking by breaking down the fear that holds many victims, officials said Thursday.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched a campaign here Thursday to try to get
. ..: working in sweat shops, some massage parlors and in fields against their will to come forward.
people
. .
"We hope to provide victims with self-respect, healing and the ability to start life again,"-siid the Rev. Jan
Olav Flaaten of Arizonans to Protect Exploited Children and Adults.
The government has been offering up to 5,000 visas to illegal immigrants who can show they were forced
into servitude or sexual exploitation as part of their passage to the United States.
But the program, which was created in 2000, has remained largely unknown.
The victims -- usually women and children -- are often too afraid and ashamed to contact authorities
Video Monitoring Services of America. LP
1066 National P r e s s B u i l d i n g , Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Note Unless othenuse noted, the above VMS news segmenl s u m r l e s are denved horn oll-alr recordrngs Shaded segments w r e prewously Sen1 In dosed CaptlOn~nglOrrn3l
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Research Inc All Rtgh~sReserved Medla Values are based on the value of 30 seconds of t~meas measured by SOAD

..

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Page 20

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
Continued
"Trafficking is a very violent, secretive crime," said Scott Weber, of the U.S. Department of Homeland
Security. "It's the strong preying on the weak."

--

.\

Out of-the 18,000 to 20,000. people estimated to be trafficked into the United States each year, only 30'1 have
received one ofthespecial visas, according to the Department of Homeland Security's bureau of ~ i t i z e n s h ~ p
.
- -.-. ..
.. ~
anrftmmigration Services.
.
--.. ~
.
e
.
.
.
. .
. .
- .. -.
The Health Department has certified only about 500 people as qualifying for social welfare benefits available :-to trafficking victims.
J

. - .
.-=-

Many victims trafficked into the United States don't speak English and can't communicate with service
providers and law enforcement officials who might be able to help them.
Victims must come out of isolation if authorities are going to be able to combat what Weber said is the
second largest criminal industry in the world.
..d

"No case can be successfully"p~osecutedwithout the assistance of the victims themselves," said Paul
Charlton, U.S. Attorney for ~ r i z o n a .
The vast majority of illegal immigrants come here willingly. Those who are held against their will once they
are here but are not forcea'fo Gorkior give a service, like sex, are offered different visas and social services
than human trafficking victims, said Melynda Bamhart of the Arizona League to End Regional Trafficking.
:..B

d

.,.

..

.

.

-.

"In both situations, people might be held against their will, but it is for different purposes," she said.
To get the human trafficking victims to come forward, federal officials here, in Philadelphia and in Atlanta
are launching a variety of training and outreach efforts this spring aimed at helping authorities better
recognize trafficking.
..

-.

--

.

___.

.

..

..

e

-

~ i c city
h will also get shotline'that can be usedio report suspected cases of trafficking-to-casewokers,-without going directly to police or immigration authorities. :
Health department officials chose to launch the program in Phoenix because Arizona's proximity to the
Mexican border makes it a hub for human trafficking.
There are also many agricultural jobs here, and traffickers have access to an international airport and to a
web of highways and train tracks.
...a

.

The campaign will continue to roll out in other cities across the country throughout the year.

------

On the Net:
Health and Human Services: http:/lwww.acf.hhs.qovltraffickinq/
The following media outlets ran the AP Story:
KPHO-TV (CBS): http://www.kpho.comlGloballstory.asp?S=l8O8612
AZ Central: http://www.azcentral.com/news/articleslO422human-traffickin~22-ON.html
Video M o n i t o r i n g S e r v i c e s of A m e r i c a , LP
1066 N a t ~ o n aPl r e s s B u i l d i n g , Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Note Unless olherwse noled the above VMS news segmenl summaries are denved from 011-a~rrecordlogs Shaded segmenls were prenously sen1 In dosed capllonlng f o r m l
Rewrl O Copyrlghl2004 Wdeo Monllorlng SeMces of Amertca. LP All nghls resewed Any audlence dala conlaned In VMS repons are Ihe copynghled popwty of Nletsm Med~a
Research Inc All Rghls Reserved Media Values are based on the value 01 30 seconds of llrre as measured by X M D

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. .

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Page 21

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04/21
--Continued

Human trafficking targeted
National education effort i s launched i n Phoenix

-

Daniel Gonzalez
. - ,

-

--

.
..-

.

23 April 2004

-

..

.

.

.

..

z>

....

. .~

.*:.

- ...

--~
-

.- 3

.

The Arizona Republic
Forcing immigrants to work against their will in slavelike conditions in the sex trade, sweat shops, agriculture
and as domestic servants is one of the fastest-growing crimes in the United States, federal officials said
Thursday.
The vast majority of these crimes go unreported and undetected, however, because the victims are usually
too afraid to come forward, &+main invisible to society, they said.
"It's a very secretive crime," Paul Charlton, U S . attorney for Arizona, said during a news conference at
Arizona State University's downtown Phoenix campus. "There is a group of victims we have not been able to
.
reach because they are.afcaid to came forward."
Charlton was among more than a dozen high-level federal, state and local officials on hand to 2nnounce a
national anti-human trafficking campaign in Phoenix, one of three cities that will speafiead the effoh.?
Dubbed the Rescue and Restore Campaign, the campaign was developed by the U.S. Department of Health
and Human Services.
Phoenix is being targeted because of the border state's large population of undocumented immigrants and its
role as a major corridor.for illeg9l immigration. Atlanta and Philadelphia are the two other-cities,,.
=.
-y

~

Federal officials estimate 18,000 to 20,000 people are trafficked into the United States each year. Finding
them has proved difficult. Since 2001, only 484 human-trafficking victims from 34 countries have been
identified.
The education campaign is primarily aimed at law enforcement agencies, health care workers and others
who may come into contact with human trafficking victims without knowing 11.

_ ...

It seeks to identify victims and prosecute traffickers.

Currently;federal law enforcement officials are investigating several human trafficking cases in other states
involving victims transported through the Phoenix area, said T. March Bell, senior prosecutor in charge of
trafficking issues at the U.S. Department of Justice's Civil Rights Division.

Video Monitoring Services of America. LP
1066 National Press Building. Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Note Unless olhermse noled. Ihe above VMS news segmen! sumnvar~esare denved horn off-or recordings Shaded segmenls were previously sen1 In Oosed capllontng formal
Reporl O Copyr1ghl2004VldeO Mon~lcmngSemces of Amenca. LP All nghls reserved Any aud~encedata conta~nedIn VMS reports are the coppghled properly of N~elsenMedla
Research Inc All R~ghlsReserved Med~aValues are based on Ihe value of 30 seconds of Ilm as measured by SOAD

aS*Ak

Page 22

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
-Continued
Overcoming fear key i n drive to combat human trafficking
Tucson Citizen (AP)
23 April 2004

.

-

PHOENIX - Federal officials are trying t o c ~ m b athe
t fad-growing criminal industry of human trafficking; by
br&kingdown the fear that holds many victims, officials said yesterday. =:
- . , :-*
. =.
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched a campaign here yesterday to try to get
people working in sweat shops, some massage parlors and in fields against their will to come forward.
:

-:-

:

.,

?

.

--.---.

:

'

- -

''We hope to provide victims with self-respect, healing and the ability to start life again," said the Rev. Jan
Olav Flaaten of Arizonans to Protect Exploited Children and Adults.
The government has been offering up to 5,000visas to illegal immigrants who can show they were forced
into servitude or sexual exploitation as part of their passage to the United States. But the program, created in
2000,has remained largely.unknown.
\'

The victims - usually women and children - are often too afraid and ashamed to contact authorities.

"Trafficking is a very violent, secretive crime," said Scott Webber of the U.S. Department of Homeland _
Security. Out of the 18,80b*to~0~060
people estimated to be trafficked into the United States each year, only
301 have received one of the special visas, according to the Department of Homeland Security.
.,

.

.

= _.,

. ..

.= =

The Health Department has certified only about 500 people as qualifying for social welfare benefits available
to trafficking victims.

. * -

.

Many victims trafficked into the United States don't speak English and can't communicate with service
providers and law enforcement..officials who might be able to help them.

.

:

7

.__-.,

- :

Victims must come out of isolation if authorities are going to be able to combat what Webber said is the
second-largest criminal industry in the world.
The vast majority of illegal immigrants come here willingly. Those who are held against their will once they
are here but are not forced to work or give a service, such as sex, are offered different visas and social
services than human trafficking victims, said Melynda Barnhart of the Arizona League to End Regional
Trafficking.

-.- .

To get the human trafficking victims to come forward, federal officials here, in Philadelphia and in Atlanta
are launching a variety of training and outreach effons this sprtng aimed at helping authorities better
recognize trafficking. Each city will also get a hot line that can be used to report suspected cases of
trafficking to caseworkers.
http:llwww.tucsoncitizen.comlindex.php?pa~e=local&storyid=042304al trafftckinq

Video Monitoring Services of A m e r i c a , LP
1066 National P r e s s B u i l d i n g , W a s h i n g t o n , DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10
Nole Unless olhemse noled. Ihe above VMS news segment surrmarles are denved horn off-alr record~ngs Shaded segments were prev8ously sent In dosed Capl~onlngIOrrrYl
Report O Copyr~gnt2004 V~deoMon~tmngServ~cesof America, LP All nghls reserved Any aud~encedata conla~nedIn VMS reports are Ihe copynghted propmy of N~elsenMedla
Research Int All R~ghlsReserved Medla Values are based on the value of 30 seconds of 11meas measured by SOAO

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Page 23

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
- Continued

1

rd,

Fox 5 News At 5:00
WAGA-TV (FOX) Local TV Atlanta
04/2112004 5:00 6:00 p m

-

-

-

-- . ---

0&11:45 Tease; T; Jackie Barrett. . T; ~ ~ m Trafficking.
a n
T; Missing Woman- T; Animals. - -T;.GpeFts.-. .......
........
00:12:31 :L.R
.
.
.
. .

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.--

i
i

00:23:18 Ti!; Human Trafficking; Atlanta officials to announce the creation of a new task force dedicated to
fighting the growing problem of human trafficking. V; suspected immigrants crammed inside a house. I;
Constantinos Miskis, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, talks about wanting to catch and
convict perpetrators of human trafficking. V; Covenant House of Georgia. I;Andre Eaton, Covenant House
Executive Director, talks about the organization providing a help line for victims of human trafficking. Mirtha
Vaca reporting. 00:25:52 :LR
Fox 5 News At 10:OO ,,..
WAGA-TV (FOX) Local ~ \ t n ' ~ t l a n t a
04/21/2004 1O:OO - 11:00 p m

2.

00:22:17 Human Trafficking; Atlanta is one of the cities chosen to lead the fight against human trafficking.
V; immigrants found in$*%
Catifatifbrnia home. I; Constantinos Miskis, U.S. Department of Health and
Human Services, says they want to catch, charge and convict perpetrators of human trafficking. V;
Covenant House sign and building. I;.Andre Eaton, Covenant House, explains how their hot liae.w&.
Mirtha Vaca, reporting. 00:24:13 :LR

.

..,--

.

3. Good Day Atlanta
WAGA-TV (Fog) Local TV Atlanta
04/22/2004 8:00 - 9:00 am
..-

2..

- .

.. , . . ..

.-

- -. - .

-

00:05:02 Human Trafficking; Atlanta is one of the chosen cities to launch a task force to help properly
identify immigrants brought here for the purpose for sex and exploitation. 00:05:33 :LR
4.

CBS ~ t l a n t a ~ e w
AtsNoon
WGCL-TV (CBS) Local TV. Atlanta
04/22/2004 12:00 - 12:30 pm
00:03:58 Rescue and Restore; The U.S. government has started the Rescue and Restare Public
Awareness Campaign to fight human trafficking. I; Constantinos Miskis, HHS regional director, says the
ethnic populations are targeted most. 00:04:45 :LR

Feds to ID. aid area victims of traffic in humans Promise of jobs a lure that puts many in bondage
Shelia M. Poole
M o n i t o r i n g Services o f A m e r i c a , LP
1066 N a t i o n a l P r e s s B u i l d ~ n gW
, a s h i n g t o n . DC 20045 T 202 393 71 10

Video

Note Unless olhermse noled. Ihe above VMS news segment summanes are derived horn off-a~rrecordtngs Shaded segments were prenously sent In dosed Wpllonlng lumat
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Research. Inc All Rlghts Reserved Medla Values are based on the valw of 30 seconds of hme as measured by SQAD

. . . . . .

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04120 to 04121
--Continued
21 April 2004
The Atlanta Journal - Constitution

..

Atlanta is among three cities tapped for a U.S. Department of Health and Human Services pilot project to
d
identify.and-assist !!ictims of human trafficking: The other cities are Philadelphia a ~ Phoenix.

-

--.

.

.

....

-.

--

. --

,

..

-

.

Government officials say human trafficking has become a major concern worldwide. . Bsome
~ accounts, the
'. traffic in people is tied with illegal arms sales as second only to drug trafficking as criminal enterprises.

---.
--.
-

Wade Horn, assistant secretary of the HHS Administration for Children and Families, estimates that 18,000
to 20,000 victims of traffickers are brought into the United States every year.
Most of the victims are women and children and are largely from Mexico, South and Central America, Asia
and Eastern Europe.
Human trafficking is consi,$ered a form of modern slavery. In the United States, victims are often coerced or
s a better life. Once in America, they are forced to work in harsh
enticed with promises of g o o ~ o b and
conditions as laborers, restaurant workers and domestics or in prostitution or pornography.
'We've not been as successful as we'd like to be in identifying victims and to get them help," Horn said.
..
--. .-.-.
".-ic.+%..

.

.

.

...

-- .-.

In 2000, the Trafficking Victims Protection Act made human trafficking a federal crime. But a major
problem is that victims are often terrified to come forward, fearing retaliation against them or their families
back home. They are often isolated from the larger community and their every move may be closely
controlled.
.-

.-.

Kristi Graunke, a staff attorney and Equal Justice Works fellow with the farmworker division of the Georgia
Legal Services Program, considers trafficking to be a big probl_em
. .
in the state.
-* ,

.

.

__..

--

a-

"I think we're just starting to find out what is really going on here," she said. "By nature, I think it's a very
hidden phenomenon with people who have been intimidated or are in situations of debt bondage."
The Rescue & Restore Victims of Human Trafficking Campaign to be rolled out by HHS is designed to
strengthen and build coalitions among nonprofit groups, churches, health care providers and law
enforcement.
.

. .-

.

Tapestri, one of the area organizations assisting victims of trafficking, "is a vital partnert~nanti-trafficking
work, said Steven Wagner, director of the HHS trafficking in persons program. The awareness campaign.
which will.eventually be rolled out to other cities, wilt.also use ethnic media to reach victims who may not
speak English.
The program offers a toll-free trafficking information and referral hotline (1-888-373-7888). A Web site --www.acf.hhh.govltrafficking --- will include information about trafficking and resources for law enforcement,
health care and social service providers.

Video Monitoring Services of America, LP
1066 National press Building, Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 7110
Note. Unless olherunse noted. the above VMS n e m segment s u m r l e s are denvea f r m off-atr recordtngs Shaded segments were prev~ouslysent in dosed capbonlng l m l
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.

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Page 25

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 tb 04/21
Contilnued

--

,

Officials launch campaign reaching out to victims of human trafficking
By LOUISE CHU
Associated Press Writer
-.
21 April 2004 =
.
. -..
AsSociated Press Newswires
.
... -.
-.
....
.
= 5
.-..- .. -. .
.... -- -ATLANTA (AP) - Given Kachepa was promised a bright future when he agreed to join a traveling boys' choir
that recruited his peers in Zambia: a quality educatiori, free clothes and money to send back to their families
He quickly signed on with the ~bxas-basedgroup, b") soon found a very different reality when he arrived.
His sponsors forced the boys through a grueling work schedule and never gave them the promised benefits,
all the time threatening to send them back to Zambiai-- a prospect that likely meant being disowned by their
families and left to the streets.
,+
,

.

1

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'When they sent you home, t G y called home... telling your families and your church that the kids were bad.
so when you got there, everybody was against you," Kachepa said.
Kachepa stayed with the choir for 18 months before ir!nmipration officials finally discovered the abuse and
-. .
helped the boys find ho%g$.idhelJnited States.
1
Since 2000. the federal government has created programs offering social services andlegal assistmw to
victims of human trafficking, but few have taken advantage of these resources.
To reach out to the estimated 18,000 to 20,000 people trafficked into the United States each year, federal
officials are launching a new campaign in Atlanta anditwo other cities to help federal, local and nongovernment agencies better identify victims.

. -.

- -..

he group that exploited Kachepa assured his silence,by sonvincing him that telling authoritiescertainly -=.meant deportation.

1

"I was 12 years. old at the time, and you didn't know w o to trust," said Kachepa, now 17, who now lives with
a family in Colleyville, Texas.
I

Many say misinformation, language barriers and fear of deportation keep most victims from speaking up.
.. ..

,.

'We're talking about a very isolated, hidden group of 4eople." said Kristi Graunke. staffattorney at the
Georgia Legal Services Program's Farmworker Division.
.

I
I

She said an important component of the campaign is '\letting people know that they're not criminals, but
I
they're victims of a crime."
Among the resources available to victims are 5,000 sdecia~visas offered each year to illegal immigrants who
can prove they were forced into servitude or sexual eiploitation as part of their passage to the United States.
But since that program was created in 2002. only 301 have received one. according to the U.S. Department
of Homeland Security's Citizenship and Immigration Services.
I
of A m e r i c a , LP
1066 Nal~onalPress B u i l d i n g . Washington. DC 20045 T 202 393 71110

V i d e o Monitoring Services

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..
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Page 26

RESCUE & RESTORE VICTIMS OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING
04/20 tc) 04/21
- Contiriued

I
he

campaign, to be rolled out in Atlanta. Philadelphia and Phoenix, will target urban areas where people
often are brought in for the sex trade and service indy&tries, as well as rural areas, where migrant farm
workers tend to be exploited.

rbr

,

-

--

1

:

"Udike a lot of citiis, Atlanta offersboth "&an and rur'al areas," said Constantinos
. I. Miskis, Southest
regional director of the U.S. ~ . e ~ a r t r pof
e ~Health
t
and Human Services.
:==: : -.
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.
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Government officials hope towork with private, non-profit groups, which may have a better foothold in
immigrant communities. ~ h e also
f
will set up a hotlineto help the public identify victims in their community
and help victims find housing, health care and employment assistance.
W i t h this program. we're really trying to do a better jot) of getting word out there and making it as easy as
possible for victims of human trafficking to extract themselves or let someone know so we can get them out
of the situation," Miskis said.

------

.,'

\*'

.

On the Net:
U.S. Department of Health & Human Services: http://www.acf.hhs.aov/traffrck~nq

CORRECTIONS
Staff
22 April 2004
The Atlanta Journal - Constitution
I

The Internet address far ~nformatronabout hums" trafficking was rncorrect In a story publrshed lo tbe
Atlanta & the Word section Wednesday. The correct address IS www acf hhs qovltraff~ckrng.

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--

D e l i v e r y Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

P a g e 3 of 14

!

Consideration and Payment
1.

The Contractor shall provide assistance to the Administration for Children, Youth and Families for
the "Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign." In cohsideration of satisfactory performance of the
work described in h e Statement of ~ork.ltheContractor shall be paid in accordance with the
fixed loaded hourly rates shown in the Contractor's Revised Proposal dated September 17,2003,
which is hereby incofporated.

2

The total cost to the Government for full performance of this delivery order will be $4,999,817.00.

'I

The total funds currently available for payment and allotted for this delivery order are $2,430,000.

3.

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~ e l i v e r yOrder 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 4 of 14

Title: Trafficking Public Awareness campaignl

Trafficking in persins is a modem form of slavery./ Traffickers use threats, intimidation and violence to
force victims to engage in commercial sex acts or to labor under slave-like conditions for the traffickers'
financial gain. Each year as many as 700,000 people around the world, primarily women and children,
are bought, sold, transported and held for the purpose of forced commercial sex or labor. This illicit
practice has not eluded the United States, where tvousands of foreigners - legal and illegal - struggle
behind closed doors against their will as prostitutes, factory workers, domestic servants, and migrant
agricultural laborers.
* I

1

d

r

-

-

In response tolhis crisis, Congress passed the Trafficking V~ctimsProtection Act of 200O.(NPA3, P u b l i ~
Law 106-386, in October 2000. The purposes of the law are to combat trafficking ja persons, to ensure
just andeffective puhishment of trsffickers, and to protect trafficking victims. The TVPA gives the
Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) a number of important responsibilities in the fight
against human trafficking; including: (1) Participation on the President's Interagency Task Force to
Monitor and Combat Trafficking; (2) Establishing a7d carrying out programs to increase public awareness;
(3) Certifying victims so that they may receive benefits and services to the same extent as refugees; and
(4) Preparing an annual report. The Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) was delegated the
responsibility of carrying out activities related to th4 certification of victims of severe forms of trafficking.
As called for under Section 106(b) of the TVPA, HHS, acting through ORR, shares responsibility with
selected federal agencidxbr '...increasing public awareness, particularly among potential victims of
trafficking, of the dangers of trafficking and the protkctions that are available for victims of trafficking." To
that end. ORR staff has been actively involved in national outreach efforts aimed at non-govemmental
organizations (NGOs), voluntary agencies, mutual assistance associations, state and local social service
providers, state and.lacal law.enforcement, and other federal and state government officials. In addition,
ORR has awarded approximately $8.1 million in discretionary grant funding to nearly forty organizations
to provide assistance to certified victims of trafficking, to conduct local and community outrgach,
,
and to
offer training and technical assistahce to groups debicated to the fight against traffi'cking.

--

I

Who Are Trafficking Victims?
Women, children and men are trafficked into international sex trade or forced labor situations by
force, coercioh, or fraud. Traffickers in organized cyminal cartels, loosely organized crime groups
and/or individuals tgke advantage of the economic circumstances faced by potential.victims. . .,
luring vulnerable persons into trafficking networks using tactics such as fraudulent employment
offers, opportunities to learn a new skill or trade, or promises of marriage. Traffickers may
mislead skilled or educated adults facing chronic unkmployment or discrimination as they search
for higher pay~ngjobs or a better life. Traffickers may buy or coerce children from families facing
poverty and economlc desperation. In some cases,(victimsmay even be abducted or kidnapped.
Victims are trafficked from their communities to unkbown destinations, where they find
themselves physically and socially isolated in an unfamiliar culture in which they may not speak
the language. Upon arrival in the countries to which, they have been trafficked, victims often do
not have immigration documents or their documents are confiscated by the traffickers. Traffickers
may threaten physical h a m to the victim or to a loved one left behind in their country of origin
Many victims are raped, beaten or otherwise brutalized into terrified submission to their
traffickers. In addition to sexual, physical andlor emotional abuse and exploitation, victims may
be exposed to other health concerns, such as alcoholism, HIVIAIDS, and other sexually
1
transmitted diseases.

-

* =-

-,

D e l i v e r y Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

I

Page 5 of 14

Trafficking is increasingly perpetrated by organized crime, aided and abetted by corrupt officials, and
hidden by insular ethnic or racial communities that may or may not be aware of the violations taking
place. The victims caught in the trawcking network do not know how to escape their servitude or where
to go for assistance. The sophistication of the traffickers combined with the naivete and desperation of
the people targeted by the traffickers significantly limits the ability of governments, NGOs, and advocates
to reach these victims.
The Cunent Situation
1
Despite passage of the TVPA and increased atte"tion to the problem of trafficking, the public as a whole
remains unaware that the phenomenon of trafficking in persons can be found in many local communities.
In addition, although it is widely accepted that thousands of trafficking victims are still being exploited, a
relatively smaH number of victims hasbeen identified or has come forward for assistance. The exact
reasons for this are uncertain. Victims may fear deportation or are beingmoved by the traffickes and go
either can't or won't come forward. HHS believe$ that most trafficking victims remain unaware that they
might be eligible to receive aid and possibly normalized immigration status, allowing them to stay in the
United States.

---

I

Ignorance of victims' rights, the terror victims feel lowards those who have enslaved them, and the fear of
retribution by traffickers make it essential for HHS to institute a campaign designed to help victims of
trafficking to come forward and receive the full protection and benefds offered by the TVPA. Until now,
little data has been systematically gathered from law enforcement sources, NGOs, or the judicial system
about what types and forms of education work best with this population. For this reason it is important
that information is gath&@ from, among others, relevant trafficking experts, researchers, and federal and
NGO program staff familiar.with, or conducting research on, effective public awareness strategiesfor
victims of trafficking.
1
. The Proposed M e ~ r a g g oal .Pyblic Awareness c4rnpaign

--

ORR is looking to broaden the scope of outreach through media venues in an effort to access and
educate the public - with a priority on populations likely to encounter a victim of trafficking - and the
victims of trafficking themselves. -The message tobe disseminated should emphasize the'following: 1)
There continues to be modern-day slavery in the United States, and it may be happening in your
neighborhood; 2) Victims will most likely have limited knowledge of the United States and American
culture; 3) Victims will most likely be distrustful of law enforcement agencies and government officials; 4)
Victims will need to trust that there is an opportunity for safe escape from their situation;-and 5 )
Government assistance is available to certifed victims of tmcking.
. . _ __. _.

_

__

This contract is to provide ORR with the creation. (ublication, and dissemination of materials and
products necessary to conduct a national awareness campaign, to raise the salience among the public of
the issue of trafficking in persons and to increase the number of victims coming foryard to seek
assistance. Wave One messages will target the public - again, with a priority on populations likely to
encounter a victim of trafficking and will info- these audiences what trafficking is, that it occurs in or
near'their communities, and steps they can take if they suspect a trafficking case. Wave Two messages
will target victims of trafficking, and will inform victims that what is happening to them is illegal, that the US
government will help them get out of their current position of slavery, that the govemment will seek to
punish their oppressors, and how they can get help;.

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Delivery Order No.
Attachment A

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03X00353001D
Page 6 of 1 4

The Contractor shall provide ORR with creative, productjon, editing, graphics, and other communications
support services to implement this camppign. The ORR Project Officer and the Contractor will meet to
discuss specific products to be developed and determine requirements for each product outlined in the
Statement of Work. The project will potentially require cooperation and communication with one or more
ORR grantees that will be considered, for the terms of this contract, to be experts with knowledge and
experience about trafficking as well as knowledge of information products and dissemination mechanisms
(e.g.. published reports, video products, media products) currently being used. In addition, a group of
trafficking experts may be called at ORR's discretion to provide specialized expertise as individuals.
Under this contract, and in conjunction with the findings of ORR and the ORR grantee(s), the Contra~tor
shall conduct reviews of existing infomation resources, and prepare plans, -generate products,
, -and
- - r
disseminate informahon in a variety of formats.
-

. '.

There will be two distinct phases or "waves"
the development and dissemination of the public
awareness campaign. Wave One will target thepublic and may include the development, testing
and production (including dissemination) of radio and television Public Service Announcements
(PSAs), printed materials, posters for public transportation, andlor other means of Information
dissemination deemed appropriate by the Contr,actor and the Project Officer. Wave One may also
include a component of local anti-trafficking coalition-building in targeted metropolitan areas
among non-profit and governmental entities, to cooperate in the dissemination of information to
audiences most likely to encounter victims. Recognizing that certain specialized audiences likely
to encounter victims " w c h as police officers, yublic defenders, child protective services staff,
and organizations engaging agricultural workers - may not be best reached through traditional
advertising, the Contractor will propose and coyduct information dissemination through nontraditional media. The Contractor may also propose a website as a resource to which the public
can turn for more informatioa.

--

.
--

-.

ow ever,

Wave Two will be similar to Wave One.
the messages and dissemination strategies will
specifically target trafficking vidims themselves. In order to effectively do thE, the Gritten =
materials, PSAs, or other products developed m,ust be produced in at least four languages,
including English, Spanish, an East-Asian language (to be determined), and a Slavic language (to
be determined).
Offeror is encouraged to .define test markets for both waves to allow for the eyluatiop o f message
efficacy prior to complete roll-out. Dissemination activities for both waves is anticipated to
continue throughout the term of the contract. The definition of two waves should not be taken to
preclude coincident activities. Offeror should define the term of traditional advertising so as to
maximize impact. Offeror may also recommend limitation of advertising to some number of
specific markets so as to achieve effective penetration.

1. Independently, and not as an agent of the ~overnment,the Contractor shall be required to furnish
'
all the necessary services, qualified personnel, material, equipment and facilities not otherwise
provided by the Government, as needed, to perform the requirements specified below.

-

2,

All work shall be monitored by the ORR Project Officer, in accordance with the provisions of the
contract.

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Delivery Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

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Page 7 of 14

3. All products submitted under this project s4all be the sole property of the Federal Government
and may not be published or utilized separately by the Contractor without the express approval, in
writing, and concurrence of the Project Officer.

Proposal Presentation. Each Offeror shall make a presentation of their recommended media strategy to
the selection committee prior to contract award.
= I

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Development of Management Plan. The Contractor shall have a post-award strategy session with the
ORR Project Mfcer at the ORR office i" washingt4n. DC, within 10 working days of the effective datk of
-the contract. During this meeting there'will be discussions on the specific ta_sks of the contract, 8,
schedule of performance for born waves of the campaign, and any aspects of the conkact that need
clarification. The Contractor shall develop a draft management plan that will describe and outline the
tasks to be accomplished and timeframes for accomplishment of the project tasks for the execution of
both Waves One and Two that will be submitted to y e Project Officer within two (2) weeks of the postaward strategy session. The Project Officer shall ryview the draft and provide feedback within one (1)
week of receipt. The Contractor shall submit the final revised management plan within one (1) week of
1
receiving comments.

.

WAVE ONE TASKS

I

Task 1. Background $&arch
and Developmen\ of ~ a r k e t and
h ~ Dissemination Strategies. The
Contractor shall conduct a review of similar public education/outreach publications, videos, and other
media and assess the success of the current mechanisms for dissemination. The Contractor will be
required to work in collaboration with ORR grantee(s) and the advisory group, as described above in the
Scope of Work. The'pUfposk ofthis collaboration is to gather studies, summations, and other materials
concerning previous or current outreach materials and techniques which might inform the dissemination
. . .- .strategy.
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Subtask l(a). The Contractor shall develop a strategy for increasing awareness within targeted
audiences of the phenomenon of trafficking lin persons. Within eight (8) weeks of the effective
date qf the contract, the Contractor shall present a comprehensive plan for the development of
appropriate messages and identify dissemination strategies for messages and products
developed for the campaign. The plan will describe dissemination methods,.associated costs,-and recommendations regarding which metpods may be effectively used with various products
and targeted audiences. The utilization of efhnic-oriented media is anticipated. The plan will
include a dissemination schedule of performance for Wave One, with tirneframes for
i
accomplishment of the project tasks.
Task 2. Development of Video, Audio, and Print ~aterials.With guidance from the Project Officer,
the-contractor shall develop educational media qroducts in multiple formats, which may include,
but are not limited to video (for television broadcast), audio (for radio broadcast), and print
materials. The Contractor shall be responsible for liaison with entities conducting background
research, developing a schedule, establishing review commlttees,market research, developing
scripts, and production of advertising and purchase of advertisement placement. Development
and review of materials for Wave One shall be completed within four (4) months of the effective
date of the contract.
I

Subtask 2(a). The Contractor shall develop:message content and materials to include primary
design elements (e.g., logo), press kit design and content development, and information kit

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Delivery Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A
Page 8 of 14

design and content development. The lo& shall be designed within eight (8) weeks of the
effective date of the contract.
I
Subtask 2(b). The Contractor shall develop advertising and collateral materials for the public,
which may include, but ale not limited to brochures, flyers and posters (e.g., for display on public
transportation), print advertising (e.g.. newFapers, magazines), radio PSAs, television PSAs,
web advertising, direct mail, and outdoor advertising (e.g., billboard advertisements).
I

Subtask 2lc). The Contractor shall seek tb leverage the contract budget by developing
partnershipswith entities able to provide or sponsor free advertising, and Contractor will advise
Project Officer on the implementation of a "free media" strategy.

-~

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5

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Task 3. Editorial Review, Publication and ~issdmination.Final approval of developed and
reviewed materials for Wave One shall be completed within four (4) months of the effective date of
the contract. The Contractor shall use the schjdule of performance (risk l).?nd appr6ve3
messages and materials-(Task 2) to begin dissemination at that time.

- --

Subtask 31a). The Contractor shall
materials in draft for review by the Project Officer.
After incorporating comments from the Project Officer, a second draft will be provided for review.
Comments will then be incorporated and mkterials prepared for Anal review and approval of the
Project Officer. Messages will be pre-tested as appropriate upon the advice of the Contractor.
The Contractor shall ensure that all materials are prepared in accordance with the Government
Printing Office Style Manual, HHS and ORT printing and publication guidelines and practices,
and meet government printing requirements.

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Subtask 31bl. As noted above, publicatiodlformatsmay include, but are not limited to,
brochures, flyers, and posters (Task 2b). The Contractor shall provide the services necessary to
make materials ready for publication. This may include, but is not limited to, editing, writing (e.g.,
executive sllmma* preface, preamble), re)nrriting, translating, adapting for special audiences,
designing layout and artwork, preparing camera-ready copy, and proofreading.

Subtask 31c). If the Contractoh media strbtegy includes PSAs, the Contriktor shi!ili bn5uTe the
distribution and broadcast of the PSAs for y a v e One and Two. The PSAs developed shall be
distributed to television stations and radio stations, with strategic placement on cable, foreign
language, andlor local affiliates (to be d e t e ~ i n e din conjunction with the Project Officer). The
Contractor shall ensure the dissemination of print materials to appropriate venues.

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raini in^.

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Task 4. Media
TO expand the ability 14 reach targeted populations with information o n
trafficking and how to assist trafficking victims, ;the Contractor shall conduct up to two (2) yearly
training sessions for resource experts identified!by the Project Officer, such as senior level
Department of Health and Human Services personnel and ORR grantees, to appear in media
venues such as print, broadcast, and teleconferences. The training shall consist of small group
sessions (approximately five individuals) and one-on-one coaching. The Contractor shall be
responsible for providing all logistics and equipment necessary to conduct the training. The first
training session will take place prior to Wave ode message dissemination.
.,

at abase

Task 5. Maintenance of Mailing Lists on
File. Under the operation of the various tasks
in this contract, there shall be requirements to develop mailing lists to targeted audiences. The
Contractor shall maintain a database file of each!addressee, using software compatible with ORR
software. Addressees shall include, but are not limited to, state and local law enforcement
agencies, juvenile justice and child protective services agencies, and other government agencies;
national, state, and local NGOs; national, state, and local education and learning organizations;
and national, state, specialty, and trade media.

=.

-

-=.

Delivery Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 9 of 14

Task 6. Prepare Special Packaging, ~ a i l i n g s l a n dFaxes. Dissemination of marketing information or
actual materials to targeted audiences (such as )hose listed in Task 5) will requlre collating and
packaging. The Contractor shall perform this task, which includes duplicating, collating, stuffing folders
and envelopes, packaging for mailing, and faxing qaterials as requested by the Project Officer. Mailing
will consist of preparing and mailing an estimate9 300 to 1,000informational packages. The number of
items in each mailing will range from one to ten, depending on audience, exact message being conveyed,
and other factors.

-

d,

I

Task 7. Provide Messenger Service. The contractor shall provide messenger or similar delivery
service (as agreed upon with the Project Officer) to pick up and transport contract-related mail
and materials between the Contractor's facilidy(-ies) and ORR. There will be approximately 100
trips per-year in the metropolitan Washington',
.DC area.
..
.. -- .Task 8. Evaluate ~ffectivenessof Wave One bessages. After foui(4) iiibnths ~f ~ a v < ~ n e @ e s s a ~ e
dissemirYation(assumed here to..constitute an initial -test market(s)" phase), the Contractor shall cbnduct - - activities to evaluate the effectiveness of the messages, devising appropriate evaluation criteria and
methodologies. Within 30:days following the endof Wave One test market dissemination, the Contractor
shall submit written recommendations to the Project Officer summarizing the review of Wave One's
effectiveness and providing recommendations for) any changes in the comprehensive plan (Task I).
-

/

.

...

.--?

WAVE TWO TASKS:
Task 1. Background Research and ~ e v e l o ~ mo~f Marketing
nt
and Dissemination Strategies. The
Contractor shall conducr'apview of similar existiyg public educationloutreach publications, videos, and
other media targeted at victims and assess the success of the current mechanisms for dissemination.
The Contractor will be required to work in collabo~ationwith ORR grantee@)and the advisory group, as
described above in the Scope of Work. The purpose of this collaboration is to gather studies,
summations, and otheclmateriils concerning previous or current outreach materials and techniques Which
might inform the dissemination strategy, and which help define the characteristics of the target audience
of victims of trafficking in persons. The priority markets for Wave Two activities, based on w e r e - trafficking cases have already been identified, arellikely to include Atlanta. Chicago.Houston. LOS
Angeles, Miami. New York. San Francisco, Seattle, and Washington, DC.

I

--

Subtask ltal. The Contractor shall develbp a strategy for increasing awareness among victims
that trdfficking is illegal and how to get assistance. Within eight (8) months of theeffective date of
the contract, the Cmtractor shall present a comprehensive plan for the devel~pmentof =
appropriate messages and identify dissemination strategies for messages and products
developed for the campaign. The plan will describe dissemination methods, associated costs,
and recommendations regarding which methods may be effectively used with the various
products and targeted audiences. The ut~lizationof ethnic-oriented media is anticipated. The
plan will include a dissemination schedule of performance for Wave Two, with timeframes for
accomplishment of the project tasks.
Task 2. Development of Video, Audio, and Print Materials. With guidance from the Project Officer,
the Contractor shall take existing materials (information developed i n Wave One) and develop
educational media products i n multiple formats, which may include, but are not limited to video
(for television broadcast), audio (for radio broadcast), and print materials. The Contractor shall be
responsible for liaison with entities conducting,background research, developing a schedule,
establishing review committees, market research, developing scripts, production of advertising
n t review of materials for Wave Two
and purchase of advertisement placement. ~ e i e l o ~ m eand
shall be completed within twelve (12) months of the effective date of the contract.
Subtask 2(a). The Contractor shall develdp message content and materials to include or modify
primary design elements (e.g., logo), press kit design and content development, and information
kit design and content development.
1

..

--

Delivery Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 1 0 of 14

Subtask 2(b). The Contractor shall develop advertising and collateral materials for victims of
trafficking, which may include, but are not limited to brochures, flyers and posters, (e.g., for
display on public transportation), print advertising (e.g.. newspapers, magazines), radio PSAs,
television PSAs, and outdoor advertising (e-g., billboard advertisements).

I
Subtask 2b). The Contractor shall seek t i leverage the contract budget by developing
partnerships with entities able to provide or\ sponsor free advertising, and Contractor will advise
Project Officer on the implementationof a Yfree media" strategy.

h

.

-

-

Task 3. Editorial Review, Publication and ~isie'mination.Final approval of developed and
reviewed materials for Wave Two shall be comdleted within twelve (12) months of the effective
date of the contract. The Contractoi-shall use the schedule of performance (Task 7) and approve9
messages and materials (Task 2) to begin dissemination by that time. '
-

.

.-

---

Subtask 3(a). The Contractor shall prepare mathrials i n draft for review b y the Project Officer.
a second draft shall be provided for
After incorporating comments from the Project
review. Comments shall then be incorporated and materials will be prepared for final review and
approval of the Project Officer. Messages shall be pre-tested as appropriate upon the advice of
the Contractor. The Contractor shall ensure that all materials are prepared in accordance with the
Government Printing Office Style Manual, 'HHS and ORR printing and publication guidelines and
practices, and meet government printing requirements.

veer,

.
J .
L
,

Subtask 3(b). As noted above, publication formats may include, but are not limited to, brochures, flyers,
and posters (Task 2b). The Contractor shall provide the services necessary to make materials ready for
publication. This may include, but is not limited to, editing, writing (e.g., executive summary, preface,
preamble), rewritins.translating, adapting for special audiences. designing layout and artwork, preparing
camera-ready copy, and proofreading.
-- -

ensue

Subtask 31~).If the Contractor's media strategy in4udes PSAs, the Contractor shall
the
distribution and broadcast of the PSAs for Wave One and Two. The PSAs developed shall be d~stributed
to television stations and radio stations, with strategic placement on cable, foreign language, andlor local
affiliates (to be determined in conjunction with the project Officer). The Contractor shall ensure the
disseminationbf print materials to appropriate venues.

-

1

-

7

-r

-f

Task 4. ~aintenanceof Mailing Lists on Databar File. Under the operation of the various tasks
i n this contract, there shall be requirements to develop mailing lists to targeted audiences. The
Contractor shall maintain a database file of each addressee, using software compatible with ORR
software.
Task 5. Prepare Special Packaging, Mailings and Faxes. Dissemination of marketing information
or actual materials to targeted venues for reachiyg trafficking victims (which might include, as an
example, commercial facilities i n particular neighborhoods) will require the assemblage of mail
packages. The Contractor shall perform this task, which includes duplicating, collating, stuffing
folders and envelopes, packaging for mailing, and faxing materials as requested by the Project
Officer. Mailing will consist of preparing and mailing an estimated 300 to 1,000 informational
packages. The number of items in each mailing will range from one to ten, depending on
audience, exact message being conveyed, and other factors.
Task 6. Provide Messenger Service. The contractor shall provide messenger or similar delivery
service (as agreed on with the Project Officer) toipick up and transport contract-related mail and
materials between the Contractor's facility(-ies) and ORR. There will be approximately 100 trips
per year in the metropolitan Washington, DC area (cumulative, for both wave one and wave two
activities).

I

= ..

..

D e l i v e r y O r d e r 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 11 of 14

Task 7. Evaluate Effectiveness of Wave TWO Messages. After four (4) months of Wave Two message
dissemination (assumed here to constitute an initial -test market(s)" phase), the Contractor shall conduct
activities to evaluate the effectiveness of messages, devising appropriate evaluation criteria and
methodologies. Within 30 dsys following the
the Contractor
shall submit written recommendations tc! the
the review of Wave Two's
effectiveness and provide recommendations
plan (Task I ) .

SCHEDULE
OF DEUVERABLES

6.

Satisfactory performance of this contract
Contracting Officer, or the duly authorized
stated delivery schedule.

-

Task

to occur upon delivery and acceptance by the
of the following items in accordance with the

-

Description

Draft management plan
Final management plan
WAVE ONE
i
Task I Description , ,.
1
1 Comprehensive p a n for Wave One message development and
1.
dissemination strategies

I

I

I

2.

1

1 Within 8 weeks of effective

1

,'@

1

Finalize logo
- design

1

II

messages
Dissemination of Wave One messages

I

1 Media training, .firif session

.-

I date of the contract

date.ofAhe cowact -==
Within 4 months of effective
date of the contract

i

I

1

1 Months 4 - 24

Completion of editorial review. final app4oval of Wave One
I

I

. .
. .

I

1
1

I

Compilation of mailing lists on databaseifile

5.

Prior to.Wave OnBfiessa~e
dissemination
Duration of contract

I
I

I

I

Duration of contract

Preparation of special packaging, mailings and faxes

6.

i

I

7. .
.. - .-

I

I Wifhin 4 months of effective.

I

4.

I

Deliverv Date,
Within 8 weeks of effective
date of the contract -

I Development
of Wave One media products in multiple formats
,*-..--*<
.a

3.

' ~ e l i v e r vDate
Within 10 days of effective
date of the contract
Within 2 weeks of initial
strategy meeting
Within 4 weeks of initial
strategy meeting
'

- Initial post award-strategfmeeting with IORR Project Officer

Provision of Messenger Service

I

I

Duration of contract

I

8.

Evaluation of effectiveness of Wave One messages and
recommendation of changes to dissemination plan

After 4 months of message
dissemination

i

1
WAVE TWW
Task Description
Comprehensive plan for Wave Two message development and
1.
dissemination strategies
,
2.

Development of Wave Two media products in multiple formats

,

Delivery Date
Within 8 months of effective
date of the contract
Within 12 months of effective
date of the contract

I
1

1

Delivery Omder 03Y00353001D
Attachr:ent A

3.

Page 12 of 14

Completion of editorial review, final approval of Wave Two
messages
I

Dissemination of Wave Two messages

Within 12 months of effective
date of the contract
Months 13 - 24

1

1

4.

Compilation of mailing lists on database file

Duration of contract

5.

Preparation of special packaging, mailings and faxes

Duration of contract

6.

Provision of Messenger Service

Duration of contract

7.

Evaluation of effectiveness of-Wave Two messages and
recommendation of changes to dissemination plan

1

.-

--~

Afler 4 months of message
dissemination .. -= .

The period of performancefor this contracd shall be September 30,2003 through September 29,
2005..
I
8.

INVOICING PROVISIONS

I

The Contractor shall submit invoices, in an original and three (3) copies to the finance
office listed belowrC-$
PSCIFinancial Management service
Division of Financial Operations I
P a r k t m Building. Room 16A-12
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville. MD 20857
~elephoneNumber 301-443-3020

~

The Contractor agrees to include the follo4ng general information on each voucher:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5

--

6.
-

Contractor's name. invoice numbei and date;
Orderldelivsry order number;
--Payment terms;
TarIdentification Number" (TIN);
The Internal
Revenue
Name (where practicable), title, phone number, and complete mailing address of
responsible official to whom payment is to be send; and
Signature of an authorized official certifying the voucher to be correct and proper for
payment
A

I

:

9. Delivery Order Vehicle and Type

I

-

..

_.
.-

A firm-fixed-price delivery order shall be swbrded.

I
10. 1"spection and Acceptance Criteria

1

Final inspection and acceptance of all ~ork(~erformed,
reports, and other deliverables shall be
performed at the place of delivery by the ~rbjectOfficer.
I

'

03Y00353001D
Attachment B

Page 13 of 14

1

11. Points of Contact

a.

The Project Officer for this pm,ect is:
I

Steven Wagner
Administration for children & iamiies
Office of Refugee Resettlement
370 L'Enfant Promenade, s.w!, 6'h Floor East
Washington, DC 20447
Tel: 202-260-1853

The PSC Contracting Officer

fhe only individual authorized to modify the order.
--

The Contractirtg Officer is:

-

.

..-

.-

C

-

1

Janet Miller
Program Support Tenter
Department of Health and Human Services
Parklawn Building, Room 5-101
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 208,57
Phone: (301) 443-2475
FAX: (301) 443-3849

1

c.

The PSC Contract Specialist rdsponsible for the administration of this order is:

-,.-

d*

-

-

<

12. Technical Monitoring

#

.-

1

Anita Nearhoof
Program Support Center
Department of Health and Human Services
Parklawn Building, Room 5-101
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
Phone: (301) 443-5312
FAX: (30 1) 443-3849

!
I -

-- --

a

2

d

-.

&

1. Performance of the work under this delivery order shall be subject to the technical monitoring

of the Project Officer. The term "Technical Monitoring" is defined to include, without
I
limitation, the following:
a.

Technical directions to the confactor which redirect the delivery order effort, shift
work emphasis between work aireas or tasks, require pursuit of certain lines of
inquiry, fill in details or otherwise serve to accomplish the contract'ual scope of work.

b.

Providing information to the Cobtractor for assistance in the interpretation of
drawings, specifications or technical portions of the work description.

c.

Review and, where required bylthe delivery order, approval of technical reports,
Drawings, specifications and technical information to be delivered by the
Contractor to the Government under the delivery order.

...- r

D e l i v e r y O r d e r 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 14 of 1 4

2. Technical direction must be within the general scope of work stated in the delivery order. The
Project Officer does not have the authority to and may not issue any technical direction which
(i) constitutes an assignment of additional work outside the general scope of the delivery
order; (ii) co9stitutes a change as defined in the delivery order clause entjtled, 'Changes," (iii)
causes, in any manner, an increase or decrease in the total estimated delivery order cost, the
fixed fee or the time required for delivery order performance; or (iv) changes any of the
expressed terms, conditions, or specifications of the delivery order.

3. All technical direction shall be issued in writing by the Project Officer or shall be confirmed by
himlher in writing within 5 working days after issuance.
\

4. The Contractor shall proceed promptly with the performance of technical direction duly issued
by the Project Officer in thmanner prescribed by this clause, and within h~sherauthority
- - *
under the provisions of this clause.
-

- - -

.

. .

\

3

---

5. If, in the opinion of the Contractor, any instruction or direction issued by the Project Officer is
within one of the categories as defined in (i) through (iv) above, the Contractor shall not
proceed but shall notify the Contracting Officer in writing within 5 working days afler the
receipt of any such instruction or direction and shall request the Contracting Officer to modify
the delivery order accordingly. Upon receiving such notification from the Contractor, the
Contracting Officer shall issue an appropriate delivery order modification or advise the
Contractor in writing that, in hislher opinion, the technical direction is within the scope of this
clause and
not constitute a change under the Changes Clause of the delivery order.
The Contractor shall thereupon proceed immediately with the direction given. A failure of the
parties to agree upon the nature of the instruction or direction or upon the delivery order
action to be taken with respect thereto shall be subject to the provisions of the delivery order
clause g~titlgdpisputes."

qe

6.

RightsinData
I

L-

.,...=.

=

The Contractor must obtain the approval of the Project Officer prior to publicizing or
disseminating information regarding this project.
-s.
d

A.

.
\

/.

-

%._

_.-

:

Page 1 of 1

I

Bena, Anna Marie (ACF)
From: Mueller, Jill (ACF)

"

Sent:

Tuesday, February 04,2003 12:15 PM

To:

Bena, Anna Marie (ACF); Aqui, Antoinette

1

Subject: update on Mediascope

4

b

I though I should put this into email in case anyone has questions for us and I am not here.
I

C

John Tuskan appointed Estelle Rondello (301-443-9848) as the liaison on /his potential collaboroation between ORR and CMHS on the Mediascope
project She called me on Friday 1/31 and was very excited about the project... says$ey are getting a good response from writers of big name TV shows.

,

I

,

The current CMHS contract ends March 31st. Estelle's thoughts are that d e can extend their contract as a cojlaborative effort beheen ORRICMHS,
which would require that we use the Trafficking CAN to add money to the contract. This would require a relati~elyquick turn around on our end, since the
contract ends in March. The current contract they have with Mediascope is for $96,200, plus a separate contract (7) to cover costs of travel and lodging
for panel participants (she will get that info to me early next week). She has mailed a copy of the complete contra~hto me (which I have not yet received).
I

As a side note, she mentioned that the Assistant Secretary sat in on one of these roundtables and was very interested by the project.

Jill Mueller
Program Analyst, Traflicking
Oflice of Refugee Resettlement
370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW, 6th FI. East
Washington, DC 20447
phone: 202-40 1 1196
fax: 202-40 1-0981

-

McGroarty, Emmett (ACF)
From:

Myada, Elaine [elaine.myada@ketchum.com]

Sent:

Monday, August 30,2004 4:27 PM

To:

McGroarty, Emmett (ACF)

Cc:

Murphy, Michael

Subject: Source for Child Exploitation Stat '
Emmett.
Below is a link to the source for the child exploitation stat. It was in the 2004 TIP report from the State
*
Department.

How Prostitution Fuels Trafficking
Considerable academic, NGO, and scientific research confirms a direct link between prostitution and trafficking.
In fact, prostitution and its related activities, including pimping, pandering, and patronizing or maintaining
brothels, contributes to trafficking in persons by serving as a front beh~ndwhich traffickers for sexual exploitation
operate. A Swedish govemmpnt study revealed that much of the vast profits generated by the global prostitution
industry go d~rectlyinto the po&ts of human traffickers. The International Organization for Migration estimates
that each year 500.000 women are sold (trafficked) to local prostitution markets in Europe.
Of the 600,000 - 800,000 people trafficked across international borders every year, 70 percent are female and
50 percent are children. Pheh7ajontyof those women and girls fall prey to the commercial sex trade.

Elbine My&
Senior Account Executive
202.835.94-78
"
. -- .

Ketchum. Passion and-Precision in Communication.

..

Fax cover Sheet
US Department of Health and Human Services
Adminkfrationfor Children and Families
qffice of Refugee Resettlement

To: Elaine Myada

From: Emmett McGroart y
Date: 1 October 15,2004
Subject:

1

Elaine,

I'll call you re the attached.

Fax Number: 2021835-8879
Phone Number:

Fax Number:
Phone Number:

..

Time: 1 2:47 PM

Human Trafficking is
Identifying Child Victims of
t - 9 Human Trafficking
Modern-Day Slavery ,(,LG+'.~
H ~ l n ~ atrsffick~ng
n
1s a ~~~oderii-clay
form of
slaver . Victims of human trafficking arc
<~~l,,icctctl
to force, fraud, or coercion for the
L purl30sc of s ~ x u a l
Victims arc young

r'

4

t

, ~ A C ~eL.'(d
T

klr4

4.)

e r ,)ad. 4~

+r.4irC;I.

r
r (9 6 "i
04
Children who are victi~r~s
of human traffickit; may be
~nistaken~forprostitutes, runaway youth, migrant farm
workers clr domestic servants. By looking beneath the
surf?ce, picking up on the rjght clues and asking the
right questions, you may udcover children who are
i
being exploited.

I

Communicating with
child Victims
Trafficking

*e;&'ked$

c k,,

When

children who have been\
remember child victims
assume what has
fault. Often. child
victims of traffick~ngmay not establish trust easily,
They may have been

f

Al~l>roxi~nately
bOO.OOO to 800.000 victims are
lraffickctl across in~ernationalborders annually.
ant1 I,etwccn 14.500 ancl 17.500 of those victims
arc trnffickcd into the United States each year.
accord~ngto U.S. governnient estimates. More
tliar~half of these victin~sworldwide arc
cliildrcri. ~lccor-d~nlo the L! 5 Del~art~nentof State.

-

c.4LtPCc;"0

~ l i ! l t l v~c[irnsof

)PF

traffick~ngare often exploited t h
.including prostitution.
pornography and sex tourism. They are also
cxploited for forced labor, including domestic
servitude and migrant farming.

r.*r

Children explaited for 1aba.r are often hungry or
~nalnourishedto [he extenithey may never reach
the~rfull lie~glitor they niay have poorly formed or
rotting teeth.

qugsrions may hclp you tletcrmine if you nre

Children cxploired for sexual purposes may show
evidence of untreated sexually transmitted diseases.
including HIV/AIDS, urinary tract infections, and
kidney problems.

cx~>cctwhen VOLI came? Werc vclu scared?

Children who are victims of trafficking can also be
idintified by environmental factors, including whether
the child is living at the workplace or with an
employer, living with multiple people in a tramped
school sporadically or
space, or not in school.
the US. \ ~ 4 d ' i ?
has a significant gap of Ssn
Forced labor may expose children to physical abuse
or leave signs such as scars, headaches, hearing loss,
cardiovascular/respiratoryproblems and limb
amputation. They lnay also develop chronic back.
visual and respiratyry problems from working in
agficulture, construction or ~nanufacturing.

tie psychological effects of exploitation include
helplessness, shameland humiliation, shock, denial
and disbelief, disorientation and confusion, and
ankiety disorders i&luding post traumatic stress
disorder, phobias, {anic attacks and depression.

Do you have any papers? Who has rliem?
Are yoii in school? Are you' working? Can yclu
leave if you want?
Where do you live? Who else lives tliere? Are
you scared to leave?
I-las anyl3ody ever thrcatencd you to keep yclu
rrorn running away?
Did;anyone ever tnuch you or hurt yor~?
!

Ilurhrl
er C
&''

r~.,f
pctC

FACSIMILE

-

To:

Emmett McGroarty

Fax Number:

From:

Michael Murphy

No. of pages
lncludlng this one:

,Date:

August P,2004

Company:

Ketchum

.-Subject:

- NJ-statlsticswrce report'
.

2

=-

-

Message:
F YOU DO KO1 RECOVE ALL
THE PAGES PLWE C A U

Emmett,

TEL: 202 835

As requested, attached please find the page of inlormation referenced in our m e d ~ advimry
a
for Newark
It comes from the report, 'Intemationai Traff~cklngof Chlldren to New York City for Sexual Purposes,"
from ECPAT-USA In 2002, written by Mla Spmgenberg.

Kmtchum

m~sma
NW
~ 3 0 0
WE?hilgtln

Please let me know if you

DC zm
T: 2a?&35m
F: 2 0 2 E 3 5 m

questions cr need addional assistance.

Many thanks.

Michael Murphy

,,. r

O f k w In:
a*.

.,

, ,.

Nalh Amsb

K e t c h u m D.C.
202-835-9467

:-a

-. .
-.

.

NOTE: The intorm!h
conkhad in lhb h h i i e is
conAdenlhl and ls blended only
lor the use d the n d u i cf
enllty lo whoin d Is eddmsed. I1
you are no1Ule h$ndedrscpimt
or he pttnon responsW, lor
delivering il lo me himM
redpen do not use or d W e
Rl9 facsh,lla U ycu b e
recetted lhk tacslmk h emr,
pleale now us irnednlely by
lelepnne el ME 835 8a00, and

return the oainalvh U.Spostal
service lo Kddrum. 2OM L S l .
NW, Sde 300.Washkglon. DC
m3a.

Passion and Precision in Communication

-

..

-

_
:

the u.s." But there is no national intelligence infrastructure that tracks
trafficking patterns according .to each victim's age, gender, nationality,
purpose for trafficking and route used on a local, regional and national level.
Much moremust be-done to find these children and provlde them with the
range of services they need.
Traffickina t o New York City

.

-

NEW York City has already been identified as a major point of entry
and a transit area for traffickers either depositing victims i n l h e New York .. ,metropolitan area and/or circulating them t o other clties across the-country.
The INS has documented 250 brothels In 26 cities, including New York, with
trafficking victims in them." The sex industry and prostitution is well
established in New York City, and prostltutlon can take place In the back
rooms of strip clubs and peep show theatre^.^' Newsday, i n a year-long
investigation of trafficking of women to New York, found trafficked women
from the Czech Republic In strip clubs at Times Square and evidence of
Korean, Thai, Filipino and Malaysian trafficked women i n Queens and
Chlnese trafficked women in ~ h i n a t o w n . ~ ~
I n New Jeqey, part of the New York metropolitan area, there is a high
density of sex establishments located in Newark, Jersey City, East
Brunswick, Red Bank and Rockaway Township. New Jersey reportedly has
the highest number of strip clubs of any state, total~ngover 200, some of
which operateas-fronts for p r o ~ t i t u t l o n .Accordlng
~~
to Walter Zallsko, a
Jersey City police supervisor and expert on traff~ckingand Russian arganized
crime, over thirty five hundred women and girls are working as sex-slave3 or _-as indentured servants in the metropolitan area. Having interviewed as
many as 300 victims, Zalisko found that almost three quarters claim they
came here t o work other fobs, but were forced t o become strippers and
~ ~ York City is also an epicenter for the fraud and
prostitutes ~ n s t e a d .New
organized crime that accompanies human trafficking and is among the tbp
three cities in the-country with the greatest amount of visa fraud. In the -- -- -U.S., Russian organized crime is concentrated in New York C ~ t yand New
~ e r s e .25
y

I.

-

II

Raymond and Iiughes. Sex 7knficking of IVonter~!n rhe Uniled Slules; lrrlrrnational arid Domestic T r e k .
0' Neil1 Richard. 3.
See Mia Spangenberg, Prostiluted Youlh in New York Ciy: A n Overview (New York: ECPAT-USA,2001j.
" "Smuggled forSex" Newvdny FivaPart Series. 11-15 March 2001.
.
11
Walter Znlisko, personal interview, 6 June, 2001.
2' Wal:a Zalisko, "Russian Organized Gimc, Trafficking in Women, and Government's Rcspnnsc." Aues*blc at:
'O

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"

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<http:/lwww.nionroulh.comI-wpldlndexl.htm>.
..
25
Gillian Caldwell, Steven Galster and Nadia Steinzor, Crimearrd Servitude: AII Erpoze ojrhe Trzf/icin IVomenjbr
Pros~ihrtiolljiomIlre Newb Independent Stater. Wash~nglon,DC: Global Surv~valNetwork, 1997). 37.

H

PROMOTION OF ANTI-TRAFFICKING MESSAGE IN SPANISH LANGUAGE
ENTERTAINMENT MEDIA
Mitroff and Associates
June 2005

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A. Objective
The Task Order is to conduct two educational meetings, or workshops, with supporting
materials directed at those individuals who are in a position to influence the content of
Spanish language television entertainmentprograms. The purpose of these educational
activities is to inform program content creators about the phenomenon of human
traffickingand the reality of harpan trafficking victims, and to encourage the inclusion of
anti-trafficlung storylines into programming.
- -.. ..

-

S

- ---

B. Background and Technical Understandinp,
Trafficking in persons is a modem form of slavery. Traffickers use threats, intimidation
and violence to force victims to engage in commercial sex acts or to labor under slavelike conditions for the traffickers' financial gain. Approximately 800,000 to 900,000
victims annually are trafficked across international borders worldwide, and between
14,500 and 17,500 of those victims are trafficked into the U.S., according to the U.S.
Department of Staie. Victims of human trafficlung are subjected to force, fiaud or
coercion for the purp3!e of sexual exploitation or forced labor.
Traffickers primarily target women and girls, who are disproportionately affected by
poverty, the 1aek.d-aecwto education, chronic unemployment, discrimination, and the '
lack of economic opportunities in countries of origin. Traffickers lure women and girls
into their networks through false promises of decent working conditions d relatively = =
good pay as nannies, maids, dancers, factory workers, restaurant workers, sales clerks, or
models. Traffickers also buy children from poor families and sell them into prostitution
o r into various types of forced or bonded labor.
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Individuals vuherable.to trafficking o; other forms of sexual victimization are typicafly
not aware of the phenomenon of human trafficking, or the tactics used by traffickers to
lure victims into situations of exploitation. Consequently, HHS has undertaken a public
awareness campaign both to prevent persons from becoming victimized, and to assist
victims in achieving rescue and restoration.
C. Scope of Work

Communication Strategies and Technical Expertise: As part of the mess&;
dissemination strategy of the trafficking public awareness campaign, HHS recognizes the
use of Spanish language entertainment programming as an important vehicle for reaching
critical target audiences in the United States. The systematic use of entertainment
programming as a vehicle to reach target audiences is a field of practice known as
Entertainment-education (E-E). E-E is the process of "purposely designing and
implementing a media message to both entertain and educate, in order to increase

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"

audience members' knowledge about an issue, create favorable attitudes, shift social
norms, and change overt behavior."'(l)
Mitroff & Associates, having expertise and experience in the arena of E-E and outreach
to the entertainment industry (see Personnel Briefs), will develop and implement an
educational outreach effort designed to reach television entertainment executives,
producers and writers, e.g. Content Creators, of Spanish language television programs
principally in Mexico City. The goals of the effort are to: 1) increase knowledge and
awareness of human trafficking issues by television content creators; and 2) encourage
the incorporation of accurate portrayals of human trafficking storylines in programming.

- - -

To meet these goals, Mitroff & Associates (M&A) will design, plan and conduct two,
onsite workshops in Mexico City for an audience of television content creators. Mitraff
& Associates will determine fhe length and time for workshops during the preplanning
stage. The goal is to create workshops that best accommodate the schedule and needs of
the community we are attempting to serve. The workshop serves as a bridge between the
nonprofit and creative communities. These events, which explore vital and often
controversial issues related to health and the media, provide an opportunity to bring
together leaders in public health, education, the social sciences and the entertainment
industry. Workshops feature invited guests fkom the creative community, who are treated
to a lively panel dis,cussion with a Q&A, followed by a reception where guests and
panelists have a chan5e. to meet face-to-face.

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The principle components of the workshop(s) are:
A,-.*..&,

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>'A

1) Prep Meeting: The day before our workshop or just before our workshop in Mexico
we will conduct a prep meeting for speakers and panelists, M&A staff, .Ketchurn project
staff, and any technical crew that is necessary. M&A's Directors will conduct the prep
meeting, with the purpose of ensuring an organized, time-conscious, and on-message
workshop..

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2) Speakers and Panelists: M&A will work with ~ e t c h u mto develop appropriatepanels - for workshops. Each program and panel will include:
- We will select an appropriate Moderator among the dignitaries who will be on hand
from the American Embassy or an individual working with suitable NGOs in Mexico
City. By inviting a prominent individual fiom the Mexican Community to participate we
will enlist their support and leverage their contacts within Mexico We will also have
established a partnership in Mexico that can return to for follow up meeting; on topic of
Trafficking or other HHS projects should they arise.: In addition, we will identify and
invite another individual working to end trafficking to introduce panelists at the event,
possibly an HHS high-ranking individual.

'

Singhal, A,, & Rogers E.M. (1 999). Entertainment-education:A communication strategy for social change
Mahwah. NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

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- Speaker Presentation: General background on the subject of human trafficking with
supportive power point presentations, video clips, statistics, etc. - Presented by staff
member from HHS Human Trafficking unit, Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny.
-Two (2) Expert Presentations: One expert will represent the professional community
that deals with the realiiies of human trafficking, e.g. someone from legal, medical, or
social service (specific decisions to be made based on research during Planning Phase).
The second expert will be an individual who represents the "first person" point of view,
e.g. an individual who has experienced trafficking.

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(This person will be identified during the planning research. (The priority is to i d e n t ~
someone in or near Mexico C i ~ . - g alocal Mexico Cztyperson cannot be identzjied, an
individual from the west coast area will be sought.)] It will be our utmost goal to Pnsare that our event is culturally mlevant and sensitive to our target audience.'-Wirecognize
that we will representing the United States in this venue and will be conscious of creating
a partnership with our neighbors across the border.

-+
.

3) Resource MaterialsPackets: An educational materials package containing
supplemental, support materials including information regarding sources for additional
information. The contents of the education materials package will be drawn from
materials already pgqared for the HHS human trafficking public awareness campaign,
augmented as necess* with information discovered during the Planning Phase.
4) Evaluation and Reporting: Workshop evaluation and follow-up with participants for
the purpose of prepiring-a-final report including outcomes in terms of programming
affected or to be affected.
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The overall effort will last approximately five (5) months, to be completed by December
31,2005, and will proceed through four (4) phases:

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Phase 1: From start thru August 30,2005
Pre-planning
Workshop desigdplan .- - -Phase 2: September 1 thru October 31,2005 Phase 3: Dates TBD between November 1- 18,2005 Workshop in Mexico City
Follow up/Evaluation/Reporting
Phase 4: November 2 1 - December 3 1,2005
Detailed task list for each phase are identified in Section E: Timeline, below
-D. Professional Background of Mitroff & Associates

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Mitroff & Associates is an unincorporated association of three experienced practitioners,
Donna Mitroff, Lisa Cho Allen and Adele B. Wilson. The three principals worked
togetker under the umbrella of Mediascope, a non-profit corporation. The corporate bio
of Mediascope read as follows:
Mediascope is a national, nonprofit research and policy organization working to promote
issues of social relevance within the entertainment industry. Founded in 1992, a principal
objective is to encourage responsible portrayals in film, television, the Internet, video
games, music and advertising. The organization addresses a variety of topics, including:

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Substance Use
School Violence Prevention and
Bullying
Childhood Obesity
Media Ratings
Teen Sexuality

Children's Television
Diversity
Media Violence
Effects of Video Games
Artists' Rights and Responsibilities

Mediascope provides todls and information to assist the creative community to be more
socially responsible without relinquishing creative freedoms. Screenwriters, producers
and media executives; journalists and critics; and researchers, educators, government
officials, advocacy groups, parents and students, use resources and services.

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"

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Mediascope's work has resulted in innovative research and improvements in media = - *
practices on various issues'affecting children and society at large. For eximple, the
organization initiated some of the first studies on media ratings and their influence on
children's media selections, and administered a major contextual content analysis of
violence in television and film, which resulted in broadcast and cable leaders' agreeing to
rate television programs. The organization is known internationally as a resource for
scientifically-based insights and perspectives on media issues. Advisors include
distinguished individuals from the fields of media research, child development, advocacy
and the entertainmqt industry.

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As of July 3 1,2004, ~ k d i a s c o made
~ e a decision to go on hiatus while taking stock and
determine whether a new model exists that could allow for the relaunch of the
organization at- re date.

Personnel Briefs and Role in Traffickinp Media Outreach:

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Donna Mitroff, Ph.D.

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Donna Mitroff is an Adjunct Professor in the Annenberg School of Communication at the
University of Southern California where she teaches about children and media issues, and
is currently a consultant to production companies, networks and studios in the areasof
children and families and media use, media policy for young people and the development
and production of media for children. Dr. Mitroff s career has also included commercial
and public television and education. She was President of Mediascope from September
2002 through August 2004. Utilizing her expertise and consultations in the area of
children's media, she continues to consult and undertake projects that seek to incorporate
-messages of positive social and health portrayals in popular entertainment. Prior to
s
joining Mediascope, Dr. Mitroff spent five years as Senior Vice President o f ~ o l i c i e and
Practices in Programming, Education & Community Issues at Fox Family Channel.
Before that she spent 12 years at WQED Pittsburgh, first as Director of Educational
Services and then as Vice President of west coast production in Los Angeles working on
both documentary and drama productions. For three years, Dr. Mitroff ran her own
business providing educational consulting services to broadcast, cable, production
companies and studios. Dr. Mitroff has been an elementary and special education teacher,
a teacher trainer, and a cumculum designer. She holds a Ph.D. in Education and a
Master's Degree in Special Education from the University of Pittsburgh. Her teaching

=

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experience encompasses elementary, special and higher education, with formal training in
child development, remedial reading, program evaluation and research.

Donna's Role in Trafficking Media Outreach: Project Executive
Oversee the planning and development of one or two educational "workshops" to be held
in November 2005, for creative and media executives in Mexico City. Duties include:
Assemble team in U.S., including M&A staff7consultants
Work with Ketchum in developing press release(s)
Assist content director in identifying experts, speakers
Liaison between--Ketchurn,M&A, and other project staffers
Oversight and final approval expenditures and in hmng support staff,
including administrative assistants, vendors, translators, writers, or other
project consultants.
Create evaluation and follow up process
Work with M&A staff7consultants in final reporting

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C

Lisa Cho Allen

Lisa Cho Allen is president of Lisa Cho Allen & Associates, a Los Angeles-based social
marketing firm spe~ializingin bringing social and health issues to the entertainment
industry. For the p a s ) b o administrations, Lisa has served as Senior Consultant to the
Office of National Drug Control Policy, where she has conceptualized and implemented
strategic plans for a national campaign to educate members of the television, film and
news industriesdxmt depictions of substance abuse and its effect on audiences. Lisa was
Director of Programs and Project Director at Mediascope, and has also served in similar
capacities for organizations based in Hollywood whose mission is to educate an&infom
the entertainment community about the consequences of their work. Lisa has worked in
Hollywood as a producer, writer and distribution executive. She is a graduate of UCLA
and lives in Studio City with her wonderful son James and their golden retriever Luna.
-

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Lisa's Role in Traffifking Media outreach: Content Director

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Work with Ketchum project staff and M&A staff through planning process, assisting with
hiring, scheduling, etc., with primary focus on program content and creation:
Program Creation
Identify, recommend and secure expert speakers
Identify, recommend and secure first-person speaker@)
Tip Sheets and Issue Briefs (secure and direct writerleditor-for English
language version and secure and direct translator))
Work with Ketchum in development of one sheets, tip sheets,
brochures andlor other materials
Identify, secure a writer to tailor content for media writers and
creative executives
Identify opportunities for outreach, follow up '
Create Program Agenda
Oversee and direct prep meetingrehearsal
Mexico City Liaison contact

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Identify, secure translatorslguides for Mexico City
Develop contactlinvitation list(s)
Direct supportive staff
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Adele B. Wilson
Adele B. Wilson served as Project'Director for Mediascope for over six years, where she
designed and managed innovative media outreach programs that brought entertainment,
academia and government together through special events, roundtables, meetings, media
events, and panel discussions. Organizations include The Ad Council, The Center for
Mental Health Services, The Soros Foundation, The W.T. Grant Fbundation, The
California Wellness Foundation and the UCLA Health and Media Research Group,
among others. She also coordinated several Mediascope research projects and
publications, working with distinguished researchers fiom Stanford University %-idLEwis '
& Clark College. These incliided three studies for the National Youth Anti-Drug Media
Campaign, Substance Use in Popular Music & Movies, Popular Music Videos, and
Popular prime-~imeTelevision, as well as their most recent publication, Prime-Time
Teens: Perspectives on the New Youth Media. Her entertainment background includes 10
years at Rhino Records, where she helped develop and implement many of the
community involvement programs that today make Rhino one of the most respected
companies in corporate America, and serves as Vice President and Managing Director for
Nobody Productions, independent production company creating live events, theater,
television and movie).',
Adele's Role in Trafficking Media Outreach: Project Director
.,,-,*,*, . " ,,'+

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Work with Ketchum project staff and M&A staff through planning process, assisting with
hiring, scheduling, etc., withiprimary on physical production and event planning ' =
Oversee location and site logistics:
On-site coordination of staffing and crew
Catering
Technical Equipment and Staffing (Audio-Visual) , - .- --.
'PresentationPowerPoint and/or Flash
Oversee development of outreach materialslpackets
Invitations (Layout and Design)
Mailing (Printing, mail lists)
Tent Cards
Tip Sheets
Issue Briefs
Handouts
Budget Maintenance
.
Event and meeting production schedules
Work with Ketchum on travel
Air
Ground Transportation
Hotels
Per Diems/Expenses

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E. Program Elements and Timeline:
Program Elements
Assurn~tionsand pre-agreements regarding program elements and timeline: The delivery
of program elements according to the timeline and within the budget outlined in
Section F requires mutual understanding and acceptance between Ketchum and M&A of
key aspects of the effort.

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1. M&A are responsible for the design, development and execution techniques for the
Mexico City workshop including the identification of the universe of relevant
.television entertainment executives, producers, and writers in and around Mexico
City w h will be invited to participate in the workshop and including the . . . = identification and "vetting" of the two content experts to participate in h e - workshop
and including the preparation of "master copies" of materials to be included in
workshop materials packets.

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2. M&A will have the support of Ketchum Los Angeles for certain administrative
services such as air and hotel reservations and other assistance to be defined during
Phase 1 & 2 of the project
3. Spanish/English translation services will, to the extent possible, be supplied by
Gabriel SancheLginny of HHS, Human Trafficking unit staff. However, M&A have
allocated a portionaf the budget to cover translation services in Los Angeles.
Additionally, Sanchez-Zinny is identified as a possible presenter for the workshop.
Expenses for
,<
,..- his travel
-.. -- will be incurred by HHS, not by the M&A budget. There is _ _
no honorarium budgeted for ~ I participation.
S

Timeline

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Phase 1 : Pre-planning - Outline and development of tasks and deadlines
Includes a series of meetings andlor teleconferences to determine:
Event components and General Goals
a
Target Audience and Invitation Lists
Program Messages
Optimal Timeframes and Potential Schedules
Staffing and Translations
Mexico City Logistical Needs

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-..
Phase 2: Planning and Development - Implement Phase 1
Encompasses complete production and design of workshops, including:
Determine number of events (one or two events)
Vetting and securing of expert panel and first-person speaker(s)
Develop and finalize list of invitees
8
Print, invitations and mailing lists, send invitations
Make follow up invitation pitch calls
"Teaser" emails
Develop and finalize design and content of materials, with translations
Tip Sheets
Issue Briefs

--

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Resource Information
Brochures
Agenda(s)
Bios of SpeakersIGuests
Travel between Los Angeles and Mexico City for location scouting,
translatorslguides, etc., and, finding and securing said location(s)
.

-

igr

Phase 3: Workshop(s) - The workshops will be designed to educate creative and media
content creators through a panel
and an open question and answer session.
Workshops include:
M&A, Ketchum Project staffs, Speakers, Panelists travel to Mexico City
-Prepmeeting(s)pior to workshop(s)
-.. .....
On-site -production
....

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Phase 4: Reporting - Summarizing workshop evaluations
A final report will be written and submitted to Ketchum before the final due date
of December 3 1,2005, unless otherwise specified. Report will be developed through:
Review of written evaluations: Questionnaires will be given to all invitees
Call and poll a selection of participants to determine their desire to include
messages in upcoming storylines or media coverage
S u m a r y of results will be written
%.?.

F. Budget:

-

Staff/Consultants"
D. Mitroff, Project Executive
L. Allen, Content Director
A. Wilson, Project Director
TBD, WriterEditor
TBD, TranslInterpreter(LA)
-'

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TBD, ~ d i i n i s t r a t i v eSupport
TBD, Trans/Interpretet(MC)
TBD, Phone callers (LA, MC)

Total StaffIConsultants

$1 16,700

Travel
1') October 2005:
2 Roundtrip Airfare @
2 Accommodations, 4 nights @
;
X)
Ground Transportatior '"---' h*r-.l cars, public)
Per Diem 2 people @
'S
2

_-

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I

n

,

,

'74
i/

2) November 2005 :
2 Roundtrip Airfare @
2 Accommodations, 4 nights @
1x1
Ground Transportatio? (Taxi. hired cars, public)
Per Diem 2 people @

-

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3

3) November 2005:
3 Roundtrip Airfare @ $500
3 Accommodations, 5 nights @ $180/night (w tax)
Ground Transportation (Taxi, hired cars, public)
Per Diem 3 people @ $75 for 5 days

(

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I

r
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S
M&A Staff Travel

. b , - -

November 2005:
U.S. Expert
1 Roundtrip Airfare 6
, 47
1 Accommodatidn, 4 nightz "
t (W tax)
Ground Transportation (Taxi, hired cars, public)
Per Diem 1 person @
!
Local expert, First Person
Fl.1
2 Accommodation, 2 nights @
Ground Transportation (Taxi. hired
Per Diem 2 person @ !
bY

Total Travel
.cr
.
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WORKSHOP(S)
Pre-workshop Prep Meeting:
(Room rental in hotel, dinner) 12 people
Worksho~Event
(Room, catering, AN, tech staff)
Materials (Design, Priht, ~ o l d e r ~ a c k eMail)
t,
Workshop Total

Direct Expenses
Includes:
Long distance, local calls
Mileage reimbursement
..
SuppliesIEquipment
Licenses and video duplication
Fed ExPostage
~ i r e c Expense
t
Total
PROPOSED ESTIMATED TOTAL

--

)'

k'
public)

L'

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@

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MEMO
Steve Wagner, HHS Emmett McGjoarty, HHS

TO:

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s,

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PROM:

Ketchum Team

DATE:

December 8,2004

*

-HHS Trafficking weekly Meeting Notes

RE:

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The following is a summary of the HHS Trafficking weekly meeting, which took place on Tuesday,
December 7, 2004, 2:00 PM The following people participated in the meeting:
Steve Wagner, HHS
Emmett McGroarty, HHS
Gabriel Sanchez-Zinny, HHS
Frank Cannon, Capital City Partners

Andy Blom, Capital City Partners
Kimberly Dewinski, Ketchum
Elaine Myada, Ketchum

Management Plv.
Ketchum provided year two management plan to HHS.
Budget for year two is over by approximately $1 15,000.
CCP noted that each city costs approximately $80,000 and that if HHS was to cut a city
-or the a g r i ~ & w e m r k e t the budget shortfall would reduce.
HHS will review management plan and provide feedback on whether to cut a city,
agriculture market or other component of plan in order to close $1 15,000 bu_dget- shortfall.
Ketchum will prepare HHS a breakdown of labor and out of pocket costs for each of the
broad management plan categories (i.e. materials development, media outreach) in
order to assist with decision-making on budget.

1.

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.- - - - Hotline
HHS and CCP met with Covenant House last week.
Covenant House has agreed to go back and flag any calls that they connected directly to
non-governmental organizations, wh~chinvolve potential victims.
HHS also requested that Covenant House provide better phone coverage during daytime
hours since an analysis of past hotline reports show that 80 percent of calls are received
between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Ketchum will do regular call mon~toringof the hotline
HHS will provide tracking for calls referred t o law enforcement and NGOs.

II.

111.

IV.

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Coalition Building
CCP would like to finalize training and launch event schedule so they may work with
HHS grantees to coordinate.
CCP will check on outreach to Wescare Nevada.
Media Outreach
.
HHS would like an outline of the presentation and media trainings.
Ketchum will provide overview of trainings.

..
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HHS will check several dates in ~ a n u a for
r ~ possible presentation or media training.
V.

Material Development
Ketchum provided photos from domestic and labor photo shoots. Next week Ketchum
will present layouts for migrant and sex trafficking posters.
Material Reprint: Ketchum reviewed proofs and sent back to printer. First set of posters
will be ready December 10th
Faith-Based Mailing: Awaiting approved letter from HHS.
CCP will provide victim identification e-mail information bulletin to HHS on Monday for
review.
HHS will provide Ketchum with revised human trafficking fact sheet.

VI.

National Organization OutreachlConferences
CCP requested a letter from HHS for the Ricky Martin Foundation.
Ketchum will coordinate a follow-up meeting with the American Med~calAssoc~at~on.
HHS will provide American Red Cross contact information.

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VII.

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Ketchum is following up-with American College of Emergency
Physicians to
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coordinate a meeting.
Emergency Nurses Association has decided not to pursue teleconference regarding
campaign partnership. Ketchum will identify other nurses associations to follow-up
with regarding partnership.
HHS is scheduled to speak at a NCMEC brown bag on February 23rc.
University of Maryland students will be presenting their ideas for the campaign on
Friday, December 1othat Ketchum.

Next Steps
HHS will revi wmanagement plan and provide feedback on whether to cut a city,
agriculture ma
%.e t or other component of plan in order to close $1 15,000 budget
shortfall.
Ketchum will prepare HHS a breakdown of labor and out of pocket costs for each of the
broad management plan categories (i.e. materials development, media outreach) in .
order to assist with decision-making on budget.
Ketchum will do regular call monitoring of the hotline.
-- _HHS will provide tracking for calls referred to law enforcement and f f i O s .
CCP will check on outreach to Wescare Nevada.
Ketchum will provide overview of presentation and media trainings.
HHS will check several dates in January for possible presentation or media training.
~ e t c h u mwill present layouts for migrant and sex trafficking posters next week.
HHS wM provide approved Faith-Based letter.
-. - -CCP will provide victim identification e-mail information bulletin to HHS on Monday for
review.
HHS will provide Ketchum with revised human trafficking fact sheet.
CCP requested a letter from HHS for the Ricky Martin Foundation.
Ketchum will coordinate a follow-up meeting with the American Medical Association.
HHS will provide American Red Cross contact information.
Ketchum will identify other nurses associations to follow-up with regarding
- ..
partnership.

.

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*

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VIII.

Administrative Issues
- The next weekly meeting will be held on Tuesday, December 141hat 2 p.m.

.-.

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4

6930 Carroll Avenue Sui~e1000 Takoma Park. Maryland 20912 301-270-0841 Fax 301-270-4166

Pleasc submit invoices to:
AFYA, Inc., Aitn: l'ami McCLtchey, 6930 Carroll Avenue, Suitc 1000, Takoma Park, MD 2091 2

INVOICE FOR HONORARTUM

Maaaie Gallanher

Name of Provider:
Address orprovider:

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Telephone o f Provider:
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Contract No. 105-98-8403

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Task Oraer No. 36
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Total iionorariuln Fee Nor to ~xceed: 5 1.000:0~...

Honorari~ln~
~ a t e i$5d0:00Id2~

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FIonorarium Scrvices: AFYA, lnc., undu contrdcl with the Administration for Children arid T;'unilies,
agrees lo pay you, an hvnorarjurn not to exceed S 1,000 at the rnte of $500 per day. This co~npensatirm
shall be for preparing and dclivering a presentation entirled, 3'ronzotingStrong Familia!oand h'eullly
Mum'uges: A Viewfrom rlie Stutcs, at.the ACF Welfare Keform National Conference rm
September 5 . 2001. All work covercd by your Honorarium Agreement mt he completed by
Deccmber 3 1,2001. $11 invoices for your scmces musl hesubmitted to AFYA, Inc., on or heforc
Decemb~r3 1. 200 1. \\.

Date of hivoicc:
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Number oC days o r sc~vicebeing bi1,lcd on this invoice:
-<.-.-..A,.

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Total dollar aunount billcd

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this invoice:

01;

Description of services rendered under this invoice:

(Cuplec of uny rtlater-fuhdoleloped murr he

tuhnr,~redh h thb r~rvnlcc.)

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Providcr'i Signature:

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AF\I'iq
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6930 Carroll Avenue Suite 1000 Takorne Park, Maryland 20012 301 -270-0841 Fax 361 -27W165

October 2,2001

--

Ms. Maggie Gallagher
53 Cedar Lane
Ossining, NY 10562

- Subject: Honorarium
Agreement for Presenting at the Administratisn Tor Children an&<

-

-

---

Families Welfare Reform National Conference

Denr Ms. Onllagher:

Please carefully read the following agreement. Sign and return both originals to Tarni
McClatchey, Deputy Project Director, AFYA, Inc., 6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 1000, Takoma
Park, MD 20912.
AFYA, Inc., under c k b a c t with the Adminirtrdtion for Children md Fn~nilies(ACF), agrees to
pay you, an honorarium-'not to exceed % 1.000 at a rats of I6500 per day, for preparing and -haking
a presentation cnlilled, Promotirg Strong Fumilies and Healthy Marriages: A View,frornthe
Srara, during the_&_F_.W.@fare
National Co,nfqm~ce,onSeptember 5,4\)0.1,,
_,
. . Reform
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Datcs:

September 5-6,2001

~ ' ~ n f t aPlaza
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Washii~gton,DC

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Contract No.:
Task Order No:

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36

This u,greement is subjcct ro the following terms:
1. This agreement and your invoice for services inust be submitled to AFYA
.- ,.
Deccillber 3 I , 200 1.

011,or b e h e ,

2. -You are not a regular employee of AEYA and therefore are not entitled to workmnn's
compensation b~nefits,uncmployment insurance, or any other type of insurance or benefits
normally provided to mployces of AFYA. In addition, AFYA is not responsible for
withholding Federal or State income curs
. , or ,roclid security taxes from
, . , she fee quid.
..

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Honorarium Agrement
Page 2 012
October 2, 2001

3. It is your responsibility to ensure thal you do not receive duplicate payment for u m e and
services rendered under Ulis conwnct.
- -4. Any products developed specifically for, or as a result of, the above named activiry wiJ
,
bedome t l ~ cdomain of tht Administration for Children and Families ancf-thus bccome
available for public use. Copies of any nlaerids developed lllusl be submitted with ~ h ~ s
agreement.

-

5. Eitl~crparty may terminate this agreement at m y timt: upon two wccks wtitl.cn notice to the
othcr party.

6. This agcement expires December 3 1,2001. All work covered by this ageanent must begin
no carlier than ~dyd0,2001,and must hc completed by December 3 1,2001.
The following partics acoept and agree to the specificd terms and conditions of this contract:

M 4 . 4 -cfie/nz-

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Your ~i~naturd'
2)

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Tami L. McClatchcy
Deputy Project Director, AFYA, inc.
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Date

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INVOICE DATE

I N ~ I CAMOUNT
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500 l00

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NET CHECK AMOUNT

6930 CARROLL AVENUE. SUITE 7000
TAKOMA PARK, MD 20012
(301) 270-0841

F~LM
BANK

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MARYL~D

BELTSVILLE. MARYLAND 20705
66-223-550 "

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DATE
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AMOUNT

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PAY

500 DOLLARS AND 00 CENTS"

TO THC
ORDER OF

AUDREY CHAPMAN

02/15/82

008693

500.00

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6930 Cerroll Avenue

Suite 1000 Takoma Perk. Maryland 20912 301-270-0841

Ms.Audrey Chapman

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A.B. Chapman Association, Inc.
1800 Diagonal Road
Suile 606
-,'Mexmdria,VA22314;
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Subject: Honorarium Agreemen1 for Resenting a1 the Administration Tor Children and
Familics Welfare Refonn National Con felmcc
Dcar Ms. Chapman:

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Fax 301 -270-4196

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Plcasc carefully read the Following agreemen[. Sign and return both originals to Harry R. Day,
Ph.D., Projecl DirectbvAFYA, Inc., 6930 Carroll Avenue, Suite 1000, Takoma Parlc, MD
203 12.

-

AIYA, Inc., under
... contract with the Administration for Childrcn and Fanlilies (ACF), agrees to
honorarium
of $500 lor making a presentation cntitleti, Fumilv Forrnnrlnr~:Farnrly
pay you,
Support S~rule&ies,during Ihc ACI; Welfare Rcform National Conrcrcnce on Seplcmber 5,200 1.

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Location:

1-oews L'Elifant Plaza 1lotel
Washi~iglon,DC

Contract Nu. :

105-98-8403

Task Order No:

36

.Thisageemcnt is subject to the following tcrms:

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1. This agreement, which will also serve as a rcqucst for paymen1 01thl;. honorarium, must be
submiied lo AFYA on, or before, Dcckrnber 31,2001

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pelc&+.
'0cd to workman's
2. You are not a regular employee 01AFYA and thererorc are not entr
compensation ba~cfits,uneillploymcnt insurance, or any other 1ypc of insurance or beneiits
normally provided lo m~ployeesof AFYA. In addilion, AFYA is not rcsponsible for
withholding Fedcral or State income taxcs or social security taxes from thc fee paid.

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Honorarium Agreement
Page 2 of 2
Dcccmber 18,2001

3. It i s your responsibility to ensure h a t ydu do not receive duplicate payrncnt fur ume and
servicesjendercd under this contract.
. - 4. h y pmductsdeve~opedspccificdly for. or as a result of, the abovc named acriviti-will
become the domain of thc Administration for Children and Families and thus become
available for public usc. Copies of any materials dcvcloped must be submitted with this
agrecmcnt.

- - -

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5. Eithcr party may tcrrninate this agreement at any time upon two weeks written notice to the
other party.
,'

6. This agreement ex$rcs December 3 1,2001. All work covered by this ag-eemcnt must bcgin
no earlier than July 30, 2001, and must be complctcd by Uecembcr 3 l ,2001.

Thc lollowing parlics accept and a p c to the specified terms and conditions of Lhis conlrdct:
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--Prqject Director, AFYA, Lnc.

Date

Social Security Number

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tS23F0105H,

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TRAFFICKTNG PUBLIC AWAR

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DATA

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FECENED .
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ACCEPTED. AND C O N ~ O R
TO~THE_CONT&~T. EXCEPT AS
NOTED: '

32b SIGNATURE OF ALlTHORlZED GOVERNMEHT REPRESENTATIVE

32c DATE

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32d. PRINTED NAME AND T I U OF AUTHORIZED GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATNE

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32e MAILING ADDRESS OF AVTHORKED GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE

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35.SHIP NUMBER

34 VOUCHER NUMBER

35 A M W N T VERIFIED;
CORRECTFOR
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PARTLAL

321. TELEPHONE NUMBER OF AUTHORKED GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE

I32g. E-MAIL OF AllTHORlZED GOVERNMENT REPRESENTATIVE

.-

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COMPLETE

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37. CHECK NUMBER

FINAL

FINAL

38.S R ACCOUNT NUMBER

139. SO3 VOUCHER NUMBER

140. PAID BY

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42a. RECEIVED BY ( P M ~ )

4la. I CERTIFY THIS ACCOUNT IS CORRECT AND PROPER FOR PAYMENT
41b SIGNATURE A N D T m E OF C E R T I M N G OFFICER

4 l c DATE

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42b. RECEIVED AT (Laahon)

1

4 2 c DATE REC'D (YYIMMIDD)

42d TOTAL CONTNNERS

.-

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Delivery Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Consideration and Payment

I

I

1.

The Contractor shall provide assistance 'to the Administration for Children, Youth and Families for
the 'Trafficking Public Awareness Campaign." In cohsideration of satisfactory performance of the
work described in the Statement of work. the Contractor shall be paid in accordance with the
fixed loaded hourly rates shown in the Contractor's Revised Proposal dated September 17. 2003.
which is hereby incorporated.

2

The total cost to the Government for full performance of this delivery order will be $4,999.817.00.

3.

The total funds currently available for payment and allotted for this delivery order are $2,430,000.

.

~ e l i v e r yO r d e r 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 4 of 1 2

Title: Trafficking Public Awareness ~ a m p a ' i g n

Trafficking in ~ershnsis a modern form of slavpry. Traffickers use threats, intimidation and violence to
force victims to engage in commercial sex acts or to labor under slave-like conditions for the traffickers'
financial gain. Each year as many as 700,0001 people around the world, primarily women and children,
are bought, sold, transporied and held for the purpose of forced commercial sex or labor. This illicit
'practice has not eluded the United States, where thousands of foreigners - legal and illegal - struggle
behind closed doors against their will as prostitutes, factory workers, domestic servants, and migrant
agricultural laborers.
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response tothiscrisis, Congress p i k e d th$ ~rafickingVictims Protection Act of 2000 (TVPA). ~ " b l i c
Law 106-386, in October 2000. The purposes:of the law are to combat trafficking in persons: totnsure*
just and effective pu'nishment 01 traffickers, an'd to protect trafficking victims. ~ h e ' n P Agites the .
. .Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) a number of important responsibilities in the fight
against human trafficking; including: (1) Participation on the President's Interagency Task Force to
Monitor and Combat Trafficking; (2) ~stablishingand carrying out programs to increase public awareness;
(3) Certifying victims so that they may receive ,benefitsand services to the same extent as refugees; and
(4) Preparing an annual report. The Office of ~ e f u g e e
Resettlement (ORR) was delegated the
responsibility of carrying out activities related to the certification of victims of severe forms of trafficking.
As called for under Section 106(b) of the TVPA, HHS, acting through ORR, shares responsibility with
selected federal agencik%or"...increasing public awareness, parficularly among potential victims of
trafficking, of the dangers of trafficking and the protections that are available for victims of trafficking." To
that end, ORR staff has been actively involved in national outreach efforts aimed at non-governmental
organizations (NGOs), voluntary agencies, mutual assistance associations, state and local social service
providers, state and.locallawgnforcement, and other federal and state government officials. In addition,
ORR has awarded approximately $8.1 million 'in discretionary grant funding to nearly forty organizations
to provide assistance to certified victims of trakicking, to conduct local and community outreach, and to
= =
offer training and technical assistance to groups dedicated to the fight against trafficking."
:

I
I

Who Are Trafficking Victims?
Women, children and-men are trafficked into international sex trade or forced labor situations by
force, coercion, or fraud. Traffickers in organized criminal cartels, loosely organized cri=megroups
andlor individuals take aclvantage of the economic circumstances faced by potential victims,
luring vulnerable persons into trafficking networks using tactics such as fralidulent'employ7nenf'~offers, opportunities to learn a new skill or trade, or promises of marriage. Traffickers may
mislead skilled or educated adults facing chronic unemployment or discrimination as they search
for higher.payingjobs or a better life. ~raffickersmay buy or coerce children from families facing
poverty and economic desperation. In some cases, victims may even be abducted or kidnapped.
I

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!
. .Victims are trafficked from their communities io unknown destinations, where they f~nd
t'hemselves physically and socially isolated in :an unfamiliar culture.in which they may nof speak
the language. Upon arrival in the countries to which they have been trafficked, victlms often do
not have immigration documents or their documents are confiscated by the traffickers. Traffickers
may threaten physical harm to the victim or to a loved one left behind in their country of origin.
Many victims are raped, beaten or otherwise brutalized into terrified submission to their
traffickers. In addition to sexual, physical andlor emotional abuse and exploitation, victims may
be exposed to other health concerns, such as alcoholism, HIVIAIDS, and other sexually'
,
transmitted diseases.
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D e l i v e r y O r d e r 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

I

P a g e 5 of 1;

Trafficking is increasingly perpetrated by organized crime, aided and abetted by corrupt officials, and
hidden by insular ethnic or racial communities that may or may not be aware of the violations taking
place. The victims caught in the traqcking network do not know how to escape their servitude or where
to go for assistance. The sophistication of the traffickers combined with the naivete.and desperation of
the people targeted by the traffickers significant19 limits the ability of governments, N G O ~and
, advocates
to reach these victims.
''

I

The Current Situation
Despite passage of the N P A and increased attention to the problem of trafficking, the public as a whole
remains unaware that the phenomenon of trafficRing in persons can be found in many local communities.
In addition., although it is widely accepted that thousands of trafficking victims are still being exploited. a
,
relativelysmall number clf.victims hasdeen identified or has come forward for assistance. The exact
reasons for this are uncertain. -victims may fearldeportationor are beingmoved by the tr3ffickefs and So
either can't or won'tcome forwarLT. HHS believes that most trafficking victims remain unaware that they. . .
might be eligible to receive aid and possibly normalized immigration status, allowing them to stay in the
United States.

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Ignorance of victims' rights, the terror victims feel towards those who have enslaved them, and the fear of
retribution by traffickers make it essential for HHS to institute a campaign designed to help victims of
trafficking to come forward and receive the full protection and benefits offered by the N P A . Until now,
little data has been systematically gathered from law enforcement sources, NGOs, or the judicial system
about what types and forms of education work bes: with this population. For this reason it is important
that information is gattip%.$ from, among others,. relevant trafficking experts, researchers, and federal and
NGO program staff familiar with, or conducting research on. effective public awareness strategies for
victims of trafficking.

The Proposed Message af q.public Awareness: Campaign
. . ..
ORR is looking to broaden the scope of outreagh through media venues in an effort to access and
educate the public - with a priority on populations likely to encounter a victim of trafficking - and the
victims of trafficking themselves: The message to be disseminated should emphasize the followiay: 1)
There continues to be modern-day slavery in the United States, and it may be happening in your
neighborhood; 2) Victims will most likety have limited knowledge of the United States and American
culture; 3) Victims will most likely be distrustful !of law enforcement agencies and government officials; 4)
Victims will need to trust that there is an oppoAunity for safe escape from their situation; and 5)
Government assi,stance !s available to certified,victims of4rafficking.

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7

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This contract is to provide ORR with the creatipn, publication. and dissemination of materials and
products necessary to conduct a national awareness campaign, to raise the salience among the public of
the issue of trafficking in persons and to increase the number of victims coming forward to seek
assistance. Wave One messages will target the public - again, with a priority orrpbpulations likely to
encounter a victim of trafficking - and will inform these audiences what trafficking is, that it occurs in or
near their communities, and steps they can take if they suspect a trafficking case. Wave Two messages
will target victims of trafficking, and will inform victims that what is happening to them is illegal, that the US
government will help them get out of their current position of slavery, that the government will seek to
punish their oppressors, and how they can get help.

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Delivery Order
Attachment A

NO.

03800353001~

i
Page 6 of i;

I

The Contractor shall provide ORR with creativk, productjon, editing, graphics, and other communications
support services to implement this campaign. j ~ h e
ORR Project Officer and the Contractor will meet to
discuss specific products to be developed and determine requirements for each product outlined in the
Statement of Work.. The project will potentialli require 'cooperationand communication with one or more
ORR grantees that will be considered, for the terms of this contract, to be experts with knowledge and
experience about trafficking as well as knowleldge of information products and dissemination mechanisms
(e.g., published reports, video products, media products) currently being used. In addition, a group of
trafficking experts may be called at ORR's discretion to provide specialized expertise as individuals.
Under this contract, and in conjunction with the findings of ORR and the ORR grantee(s), the Contractor
shall conduct reviews of existing information rysources, and prepare plans, generate products, and
- . .
disseminate information in a-variety of formats;
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There will be two distinct phases or "wave&' for the development and dissemination of the public
awareness campaign. Wave One will target the public and may include the development, testing
and production (including dissemination) of radio and television Public Service Announcements
(PSAs), printed materials, posters for public transportation, andlor other means of information
dissemination deemed appropriate by the contractor and the Project Officer. Wave One may also
include a component of local anti-trafficking coalition-building i n targeted metropolitan areas
among non-profit and governmental entities, to cooperate i n the dissemination of information to
audiences most likely to encounter victims:. Recognizing that certain specialized audiences likely
h police officers, public defenders, child protective services staff,
to encounter victims q ~ c as
%
and organizations engaging agricultural workers -may not be best reached through traditional
advertising, the Contractor will propose and conduct information dissemination through non- .
traditional media. The Contractor may also propose a website as a resource to which the public
can turn for more.,-infprmat-icn.
.-... ..
I
Wave Two will b e similar to Wave One. ~ o k e v e r the
, messages and dissemination strategies will
specifically target trafficking victims themselves. In order to effectively d o this, thewrittern
materials, PSAs, or other products developed must be produced i n at least four languages,
including English, Spanish, an East-Asian language (to be determined), and a Slavic language (to
be determined).
4

I

Offeror i s encouraged to define test markets for both waves to allow for the evaluation of message
=
efficacy prior to complcke roll-out. Disseminatiorractivities for both waves I s anticipated to
continue throughout the term of the contract. The definition of two waves should not be taken to
preclude coincident activities. Offeror should define the term of traditional advertising so as to
maximize impact. Offeror may also recommend limitation of advertising to some number of
specific markets so as t o achieve effective penetration.

..

1. Independently, and not as an agent of the Government, the Contractor shall be required to furnish
all the necessary services, qualified personnel, material, equipment and facilities not otherwise
- provided by the Government, as needed, to perform the requirements specified below.

2. All work shall be monitored by the ORR Project Offcer, in accordance with the provisions of the
contract.

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D e l i v e r y Order 03Y00353001~
Attachment A
,

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I

3. All products submitted under this project shall be the sole property of the Federal Government
and may not be published or utilized sepaiately by the Contractor without the express approval, in
writing, and concurrence of the Project Officer.

Proposal Presentation. Each Offeror shall make a presentation of their recommended media strategy to
the selection committee prior to contract award. j

..

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Development of Management Plan. The Contractor shall have a post-award strategy session with the
ORR Project Officer at the ORR office ia Washing'ton, DC, within :0 working days of the effective date of
-the contract. During this meeting there-will be discussions on the specific..ta_~~s
of the contract, a=
,
schedule of performance for.both waves of the campaign, and any aspects of the conlract.that need
- clarification. The Contractor shall develop a draft management plan that will describe and outlinethe
tasks to be accompli~hed~and
timeframes for accomplishment of the project tasks for the execution of
both Waves One and Two that will be submitted to the Project Officer within two (2) weeks of the postaward strategy session. The Project Officer shall'review the draft and provide feedback within one (1)
week of receipt. The Contractor shall submit the hna~revised management plan within one (1) week of
:
receiving comments.
WAVE ONE TASKS

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Z

Task 1. Background ~ d ' e a r c hand ~ e v e l o ~ m kof
n tMarketing and Dissemination Strategies. The
Contractor shall conduct a ieview of similar public education/outreach publications, videos, and other
media and assess the success of the current mechanisms for dissemination. The Contractor will be
required to work in collaboration with ORR grantee(s) and the advisory group, as described above in the
Scope of Work. Tti'&'piftpd'se" this collaboration is to gather studies, summations, and other materials..
concerning previous or current outreach materials and techniques which might inform the dissemination
strategy.
. :a
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Subtask l(a). The Contractor shall develop a strategy for increasing awareness within targeted
audiences of the phenomenon of trafficking in persons. Within eight (8) weeks o i the effective
date.of the contract, the Contractor shall:present a comprehensive plan for the development of
appropriate messages and identify dissemination strategies for messages and products
developed for the campaign. The plan will de-sccritie dissemination methods, asso,~ia.Ie.~.cost~~
and recommendations regarding which methods may be effectively used with various products
and targeted audiences. The utilization ;of ethnic-oriented media is anticipated. Th,e plan will
include a dissemination schedule of performance for Wave One, with timeframes for
accomplishment of the project tasks. I
Task 2. Development of Video, Audio, and Print Materials. With guidance from the Project Officer,
.Ahe Contractor shall develop educational media products i n multiple formats, which may include,
but are not limited to video (for television broadcast), audio (for radio broadcast), and print
materials. 'The Contractor shall be responsitjle for liaison with entities conducting background
research, developing a schedul,e, establishirig review committees,'market research, developing
scripts, and production of advertising and purchase of advertisement placement. Development
and r e i i e w of materials for Wave One shall be completed within four (4) months of the effective
date of the contract.
Subtask 2(a). The Contractor shall delelop message content and materials to include primary
design elements (e.g., logo), press kit design and content development, and information kit

-

D e l i v e r y O r d e r 03Y00353001D

I

~ t t a c h m e n tA

I
I

design and content development.
effective date of the contract.

Page 6 cf 14

he logo shall be designed within eight (8) weeks of the
I

Subtask 2(b). The Contractor shall develop advertising and collateral materials for the public,
which may include, but ale not limited to brochures, flyers and posters (e.g., for display on public
transportation), print advertising {e.g., newspapers, magazines), radio PSAS; television PSAs,
web advertising, direct mail, and outdoor advertising (e.g., billboard advertisements).
!
Subtask 2(cL The Contractor shall seek to leverage the contract budget by developing
partnerships with entities able to provile or sponsor free advertising, and Contractor will advise
Project Officer on the implementation of a 'free media" strategy.
5

.h.

-

.

Task 3. -Editorial Review, Publication and dissemination. Final approval of developed and =
-reviewed materials for Wave One s h l l be clompleted within four (4) months of the effective date of
the contract. The Contractor shall use the schedule of performance-(Task 1).:: and
apprbvd ' '
. messages and materials'(~a& 2) to begin dissemination at that time.
.

.

Subtask 3(aL The Contractor shall prepare materials in draft for review by the Project Officer.
After incorporating comments from the Project Officer, a second draft will be provided for review.
Comments will then be incorporated a'nd materials prepared for final review and approval of the
Project Officer. Messages will be preitested as appropriate upon the advice of the Contractor.
The Contractor shall ensure that all materials are prepared in accordance with the Government
Printing Office Style Manual, HHS and ORR printing and publication guidelines and practices,
and meet government printing requirements.
z'

\=

:

Subtask 3(bL As noted above, publitation formats may include. but are not limited to.
brochures, flyers, and posters (Task 2b). 'The Contractor shall provide the services necessary to
make materials ready for publication. /This may include, but is not limited to, editing, writing (e.g.,
executive-summary,-preface, preamble), rewriting, translating, adapting for special audiences.
designing layout and artwork, preparing camera-ready copy, and proofreading.

,

.

Subtask 3(cL M the Contractor's media strategy includes PSAs, the Contractor *all ensure the
distribution and broadcast of the PSAs for Wave One and Two. The PSAs developed shall be
distributed'to television stations and r'adio stations, with strategic placement on cable, foreign
language, andlor local affiliates (to be determined in conjunction with the Project Officer). The
Codractor shall ensure the dissemination of print materials to appropriate venues.

,
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,

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Task 4. Media Training. To expand the ability to ieach targeted p o p u l i t i o n s w i t h i"loimhtion3n
trafficking and how to assist trafficking victims, the Contractor shall conduct u p to two (2) yearly
training sessions for resource experts identified b y the Project Officer, such as senior level
~ e p a r t m e n of
t Health and Human Services personnel and ORR grantees, to appear i n media
venues such as print, broadcast, and teleconferences. The training shall consist of small group.
sessions (approximately five individuals) and one-on-one coaching. 'The Contractor shall be
. esponsible for providing all logistics and: equipment necessary to conduct the training. The first
training session will take place prior to Wave One message dissemination. ., ..

.

Task 5. Maintenance of Mailing Lists on database File. Under the operation of the various tasks
i n this contract, there shall be requirements to develop mailing lists to targeted audiences. The
Contractor shall maintain a database file of each addressee, using software compatible with ORR
software. Addressees shall include, but are not limited to, state and local law enforcement
agencies, juvenile justice and child protective services agencies, and other government agencies;
national, state, and local NGOs; national, !state, and local education and learning organizations;
and national, state, specialty, and trade media.

.

.

D e l i v e r y O r d e r 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 9 o

14

Task 6. Prepare Special Packaging, Mailings and Faxes. Dissemination of marketing information or
actual materials to targeted audiences (such as those listed in Task 5) will require collating and
packaging. The Contractor shall perform this task, which includes duplicating, collating, stuffing folders
and envelopes, packaging for mail~ng,and faxing;wterials as requested by the Project Officer. Mailing
will consist of preparing and mailing an estimated 300 to 1.000 informational packages. The number of
items in each mailing will range from one to ten, depending on audience, exact message being conveyed,
and other factors.
'Task 7. Provide Messenger Service. The contractor shall provide messenger or similar delivery
service (as agreed u p o n w i t h the Project 0ffic:er) t o pick u p and transport contract-related mail
and materials between the Contractor's facilitq(-ies) and ORR. There will be approximately 100
trips per-year in the metropolitan washington: DC area.

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--.
. --

!

~ a s k 8 .Evaluate ~ f f e c t i v e n e s sof Wave One Messages. After four (4)rrii1nths.~fw a v e 0ne-%e&agk
dissemination (assumed here 16 constitute an initial 'test market(s)" phase), the contractor shall conduct
activities to evaluate the effectiveness of the messages, devising appropriate evaluation criteria and
methodologies. Within 30days following the end of Wave One test market dissemination, the Contractor
shall submit written recommendations to the Project Officer summarizing the review of Wave One's
effectiveness and providing recommendations for any changes in the comprehensive plan (Task 1).

-.

,

WAVE TWO TASKS:

Task 1. Background Research and Development o f Marketing and Dissemination Strategies. The
Contractor shall condud qxeview of similar existing public educationloutreach publications, videos, and
other media targeted at victims and assess the success of the current mechanisms for dissemination.
The Contractor will be required to work in collaboration with ORR grantee(s) and the advisory group, as
described above in the Scope of Work. The purpose of this collaboration is to gather studies.
summations, and o ~ ~ , m a ! e rconcerning
~~s
previous or current outreach materials and techniqueswhich
might inform the dissemination strategy, and which help define the characteristics of the target audience
of victims of trafficking in persons. The priority markets for Wave Two activities, based on where
trafficking cases have already been identified, ace likely to include Atlanta. Chicago: ~ o u s t ~ n ; " L o 5 Angeles, Miami, New York, San Francisco, ~ e a t ' t l eand
, Washington, DC.

.

Subtask 1(a).-The Contractor shall dev'elop a strategy for increasing awareness among victims
that trafficking is illegal and how to get assistance. Within eight (8) months of the effective date of
the contract, the Contractor shall present a comprehensive plan for the development
.. .. ... ..- _o!-., .
-..
appropriat& messiges and identify disskminafion strategies for messages and products
developed for the campaign. The plan will describe dissemination methods, associated costs.
and recommendations regarding which 'methods may be effectively used with the various
products and targeted audiences. The utilization of ethnic-oriented media is anticipated: The
plan will include a dissemination schedule of performance for Wave Two, with timeframes for
accomplishment of the project tasks. I
I

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' ~ = s 2.
k Development of Video, Audio, and erint Materials. With guidance f r q q the Project Officer,
the Contractor shall take existing materials (information developed i n Wave One) and develop
educational media products in multiple form,ats, which may include, b u t are not limited t o video
(for television broadcast), audio (for radio broadcast), and print materials. The Contractor shall be
responsible for liaison w i t h entities conduct'ing background research, developing a schedule,
establishing review committees, market research, developing scripts, production of advertising
and purchase of advertisement placement. Development and review of materials for Wave Two
shall be completed withintwelve (12) months of t h e effective date of the contract.
Subtask 2(a). The Contractor shall de!velop message content and materials to include or modify
primary design elements (e.g., logo), press kit design and content development, and information
kit design and content development. ,

1
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D e l i v e r y o r d e r 03Y00353001~
Attachment A

I

I

Faoe 10 c f 1;

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Subtask 2(bL The Contractor shall develop advertising and collateral materials for victims of
trafficking. which may include, but are riot limited to brochures, flyers and posters, (e.g., for
display on public transportation), print a'dvertising (e.g., newspapers, magazines), rad~oPSAs,
television PSAs, and outdoor advertising (e.g., billboard advedisements).

Subtask 2(c). The Contractor shall seek to leverage the contract budget by developing
partnerships with entities able to provide or sponsor free advertising, and Contractor will advise
Project Officer on the implementation of a 'free media" strategy.

rQI

Task 3. Editorial Review, Publication and iss semi nation. Final approval of developed and
reviewed materials for Wave Two shall be completed within twelve (12) months of the effective.
the contract. The Contractmshall use the schedule of performance (Task I ) and approved
- .date
- - of
messages and materials (Task 2) to begin dissemination by that time,--.-.
. ..
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Subtask 3(al. The Contractor shall prepare materials i n draft for review by the Project Officer.
After incorporating comments from the project Officer, a second draft shall be provided for
review. Comments shall then be incorporated and materials will be prepared for final review and
approval of the Project Officer. Messages shall be pre-tested as appropriate upon the advice of
the Contractor. The Contractor shall ensure that all materials are prepared i n accordance with the
Government Printing Office Style Manual, HHS and ORR printing and publication guidelines and
practices, and meet government printing requirements.
;t'

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.:.

Subtask 3(b). As noted %we, publication f o r ~ a t smay include. but are not limited to. brochures, flyers.
and posters (Task 2b). The Contractor shall provide the services necessary to make materials ready for
publication. This may include, but is not limited to, editing, writing (e.g., executive summary, preface,
preamble), rewritinatans!ati%, adapting for special audiences, designing layout and artwork, preparing
-. .
I
camera-ready copy, and proofreading.

..

.

..

..

Subtask 3(ch If the Contractor's.media strateiy includes PSAs, the Contractor shall enswe-thedistribution and broadcast of the PSAs for wave One and Two. The PSAs developed shall be distributed
to television stations and radio stations, with strategic placement on cable, foreign language, andlor local
affiliates (to be determined in conjunction with the Project Officer). The Contractor shall ensure the
dissemination of print materials to appropriate venues.
- . --

'

I

.

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Task 4. Maintenince ofmailing Lists on b a t a b a s e ~ i l e .u n d e r the operation of the v a r i o m t a s k
i n this contract, there shall be requirementsito develop mailing lists t o targeted audiences. The
Contractor shall maintain a database file of each addressee, using software compatible with ORR
software. ..
Task 5. Prepare Special Packaging, hflailing& and Faxes. Dissemination of marketing information
or actual materials to targeted venues for re,aching trafficking victims (which might include, as an
. ..
'.&xample,commercial facilities i n particular neighborhoods) will require the assemblage of mail
packages. The Contractor shall perform this task, which includes duplicating; collating, stuffing
folders and envelopes, packaging for mailing, and faxing materials as requested by the Project
Officer. Mailing will consist of preparing an'd mailing an estimated 300 to 1,000 informational
packages. The number of items i n each mailing will range from one to ten, depending on
audience, exact message being conveyed, and other factors.
Task 6. Provide Messenger Service. The contractor shall provide messenger or similar delivery
service (as agreed o n with the Project Officer) to pick up and transport contract-related mail and
materials between the Contractor's facility(-ies) and ORR. There will be approximately 100 trips
per year i n the metropolitan Washington, DC area (cumulative, for both wave one and wave two
activities).

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Delivery Order 0 3 ~ 0 0 3 5 3 0 0 1 ~
Attachment A

Page 1 1 of 1;

Task 7. Evaluate Effectiveness of Wave Two ~ e s s a g e s .After four (4) months of Wave Two message
dissemination (assumed here to constitute an initial 'test market(s)" phase), the Contractor shall conduct
activities to evaluate the effectiveness of messages, devising appropriate evaluation criteria and
methodologies. Within 30 days following the end, of Wave Two test market dissemination, the Contractor
shall submit written recommendations to the Project Officer summarizing the review of Wave Two's
effectiveness and provide recommendatibns for any changes in the comprehensive plan (Task 1).

Satisfactory performance of this contract shall be deemed to occur upon delivery and acceptance by the
Contracting Officer, or the duly authorized repreentative, of the following items in accordance with the
stated delivery schedule.
. .

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a

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Task

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1 Description
1- Initial post award-strategy-meetingwith ORR Project Officer
.

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Draft management plan

I

Final management plan

( Within 4 weeks of initial

Development of Wave One media products in multiple formats

.'.-. -. .. -.

1

messages
Dissemination of Wave One messages

I

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4.

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I

8.

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. .. .

Media training,
- first session

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Provision of Messenger Service
I

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Months 4 - 24

I

I Prior to.WaveDnemessage
dissemination
Duration of contract

I

Duration of contract
Duration of contract

i

After 4 months of message
dissemination

Evaluation of effectiveness of Wave One messages and
recommendation of changes to dissemination plan

WAVE, TWO

I

date of the contract

dissemination strategies

I

2.

I Development of Wave Two media products in multiple formats

.

,

date of the co-ntract Within 4 months of effective
date of the contract
I

1 Preparation of special packaging, mailings and faxes

1 6.
.

1 Within 4 months of effective
I date of the contract
I Within 8 weeks of effective

Compilation of mailing lists on database file

5.

7.

1

Ccmp!etion of editorial review, final approval of Wave One

I

!

Delivery Date
Within 8 weeks of effective
date of the contract .

=

Final~zeloqo
- design
-

3.

.

1

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I

-H..

--

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I strategy meeting

I

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;

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.

=-

/ date of the contract
I Within 2 weeks of initial

WAVE ONE
I
Task ( Description -,
I Comprehensiveplan for Wave One message development and
1.
dissemination strategies
2.

-I. Delivery Date'
I Within70 days of effective

I

1

Within 12 months of effective
date of the contract

s

..

D e l i v e r y O m d e r 03Y00353001D
Attachlrent A

3.

Completion of editorial review, final approval of Wave Two
messages

Within 12 months of effective j
date of the contract

Dissemination of Wave Two messages

Months 13 - 24

4.

Compilation of mailing lists on database file

Durationof contract

5.

Preparation of special packaging, mailings and faxes

6.

Provision of Messenger Service

1
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7.

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Evaluafion of effectiveness o f Wave Two messages and
recommendation of changes to dissemination plan

Duration of contract

1

Duration of contract
After 4 months of message
dissemination
.
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The period of performance for this contract shall be September 30, 2003 through September 29,
2005..

8.

INVOICING PROVISIONS
The Contractor,,,$hall submit invoices, in an original and three (3) copies to the finance
office listed below'.
PSClFinancial Management Service
Division of Financial Operations
Parkiuwn-BuMing, Room 16A-12
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
Telepho~neNumber 301-443-3020
The Contractor agrees to include the following general information on each voucher:

.:

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1.
2.
3.
4.
5.

,

6.

9.

"

Contractor's name, invoice number and date;
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Orderldelivery order number;
_. : .
Payment terms;
The Internal Revenue Service T a x Identification Number" (TIN);
I
Name (where practicable), title, phone number, and complete mailing address of
responsible official to whom payment is to be send; and
Signature of an authorized official certifying the voucher to be correct and proper for
payment

Delivery Order Vehicle and Type

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A firm-fixed-price delivery order shall be awarded
10:-Inspection and Acceptance Criteria
Final inspection and acceptance of all work performed, reports, and other deliverables shall be
performed at the place of delivery by tfie Project Officer.

03Y00353001D
Attachment
i.1.

11. Points of Contact
a.

The Project Officer for this project is:

Steven Wagner
Administration for Children & Families
Office of Refugee Resettlement
370 L'Enfant Promenade, s.w., 6" Floor East
Washington, DC 20447
Tel: 202-260-1853

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b. -

-The PSC Contracting Officer is ihe only individual authorized to modify
the order.
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The PSC Contract Specialist responsible for the administration of this order is:.
-,.-,n.c.

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Janet Miller
Program Support Center
Department of Health and Human Services
Parklawn Building, Room 5-101
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857
Phone: (301) 443-2475
FAX: (301) 443-3849

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The Contracting Officer is:

C.

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Anita Nearhoof
Program S ~ p p o rCenter
t
Department of Health and Human Services
Parklawn Building, Room 5-101
5600 F~shersLane
Rockville, MD 20857
Phone: (301) 443-5312
FAX: (301) 443-3849
.

12. Technical Monitotlng

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1. Performance of the work under this delivery order shall be subject to the technical monitoring
.of the Project Officer. The term Technical Monitoring" is defined to include, without
limitation, the following:
a.

Technical directions to the Contractor which redirect the delivery order effort, shift
work emphasis between work areas or tasks, require pursuit of certain lines of
inquiry, fill in details or otherwise serve to accomplish Ule contiadtual scope of work.

b.

Providing information to the' Contractor for assistance in the interpretation of
drawings, specifications or technical portions of the work description.

c.

Review and, where required by the delivery order, approval of technical reports,
Drawings, specifications and technical information to be delivered by the
Contractor to the Government under the delivery order.

Delivery Order 03Y00353001D
Attachment A

Page 14 o f

1;

2. Technical direction must be within the general scope of work stated in the delivery order. The
Project Officer does not have the authority to and may not issue any technical direction which
(i) constitutes an assignment of additional work outside the general scope of the delivery
order; (ii) co9stitutes a change as defined in the delivery order clause entjtled, 'Changes," (iii)
causes, in any manner, an increase or decrease in the total estimated delivery order cost. the
fixed fee or the time required for delivery order performance; or (iv) changes any of the
expressed terms, conditions, or specifications of the delivery order.
3. All technical direction shall be issued in writing by the Project Officer or shall be confirmed by
himlher in writing within 5 working days after issuance.

4. The Contractor shall proceed promptly with the performance of technical direction duly issued
by the Project Officer in the-manner prescribed by this clause, and within hislher authority
- . . -- . - *
.. .under the provisions of this clause.

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5.

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If, in the opinion of the Contractor, any instruction or direction issued by the Project Officer is
within one of the categories as defined in (i) through (iv) above, the Contractor shall not
proceed but shall notify the Contracting Officer in writing within 5 working days after the
receipt of any such instruction or direction and shall request the Contracting Officer to modify
the delivery order accordingly. Upon receiving such notification from the Contractor, the
Contracting Officer shall issue an appropriate delivery order modification or advise the
Contractor in writing that, in hislher opinion, the technical direction is within the scope of this
clause a n d . d g 9 not constitute a change under the Changes Clause of the delivery order.
The ~ontract&shallthereupon proceed immediately with the direction given. A failure of the
parties to agree upon the nature of the instruction or direction or upon the delivery order
action to be taken with respect thereto shall be subject to the provisions of the delivery order
clause ,e_n$$ed-."Djsputes."
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6.

Rights i n Data
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The Contractor must obtain the approval of the Project Officer prior to publicizing or
disseminating information regarding this project.

.)

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DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

R E Q ~ ! s ; T :;g;..:-~;'
: ~ ~

PURCHASEISERVICEISTOCK REQUISITION

-

A F A 0001 882
-

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DHHS/PSCID.~

PURCHASE

-

I CUSTODIAL ARE4

REOUESTING ORGANIZATION

DHHSIACFIOFFICE O F PUBLIC AFFAIRS (OPA)

.

E E ~ T c :,EiS:

STCCK ISSL'E

SER'JICE

I QSJELT

I D&TE

1

I 1!0ii2001

OPA

FOR REFERENCE CALL

EXTENSION

APPROPRIATION

John Allen

(202) 40 1-92 1 5

752 1536

CLLSS

2

,

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.

DELIVER TO

DHHSIACFIOPA
Aerospace Building, 7th Floor West
370 L'Enfant Promenade, S. W .
Washington, DC 20447
- -

--ITEM N O

DATE REOUIRED

- --

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DESCR!PTI_ON
(INCLUDE S ~ D C K
!U%BER. MODEDPARTNO.. E T C )

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ISSUE

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Suggested Source: Sullivan and Associates
-.
.. 5 15 Ehan Allen Avenue
-Takoma Park, MD 2084 1
POC: Mr. Timothy Sullivan
(301) 891-3194
..

TOST

UNIT
..OF.

QUANTITV
REQUIRED

Publisher (See attached SOW.)

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UNIT

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5

75.000 00

5

75.0000i,

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FUNDS AVAILABLE (S~gnaturefl~tle)
I cerlify that the propenylsewices requested are r e q u ~ r e dfor

Government busmess, and are no1 available from excess or
current assets:

.

DATE

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TOTAL

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$

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. . . . . . .

'ROPERTY

VOUCHER DATE

MANAGE^^ OFFICER (Signalure).
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HHS-393 (Rev 6/90]

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.

BACKGROUND
Please include a background statement

STATEMENT OF WORK
Contract assistance to be-providedshall consist of the following work objectives:

Publications and Newsletters. Work will include the print, graphic design and content
of general and specific topics for a number of publications and newsletters for the
~dministrationfor Children and Families.

-

* .=

TASK 1 .

-.-.

Meet with Federal Project Officer (FPO) to discuss all aspects of the publications
and newsletters including but no limited to subjects, length, layout, graphics and
design.
Meeting will take place within the first week after award
. . . . .

TASK II

--

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.

.

.

Provide conterllt&r publications based upon topics selected by the FPO. Design
graphics and layout of articles. Read articles, research related documents and
review publications for pertinent information. Advise on current issues related to
selected topics.
....-.,,.. ....
Submit
-.
draft articles for review by FPO. The FPO shall review
and submit comments to the contractor within 14 days of receipt. Draft to be
submitted within ten (10) days of receipt of topic.
, <..=
. . . . . - -.... - ..... -.
.....
..--.- .. - ~..........
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TASK Ill
Edit articleto incorporate-manges.Changes shall be madewithin ten 10 days ...
After-receipt-of
-the-.Project
- --Officers
comments.
. . . .
......
. . ..
.......
....

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. -.

.

Level of Effort:
One (1) Publisher

Period of Performance.
. - a

From date of award not to exceed six (6)

'

:--:.

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...

AMENDMENT OF SOUClTATIOWODIRCAT10N OF CONTRACT
r -me

~BR&NDA~L

AMENDMENT#
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a~~~lgn~~.nucan

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ILtY001BB202D

419102

7. - O v p r w r n - ~

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SuIJiwnand Arsodrmr

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I~.TH\S~APPUEBOE~~YTDI~OD~RCAMNSOF~.
IT -FIB
THE m
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R NO. AS -BED
HIIEM I&*,

The conmaafs mma nnd ID ahwrld road as follows Sullivan and ~~
Aun!
jj Tm Sullivan
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TIkoma Park, Mb 209 12
Tax ID:522339291

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AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATIONfMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT
2 PIUENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO.

' 3 EFFECTTVE DATE

,

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4

03/13/2002
G*

COO001
6.ISSUED BY

CONTRACT 10 COCE

I ;AGE

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REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REONO.

7. ADYINISTERED BY (If DVIW me.7 lmm 6 )

CODE

( TiiS/TSC/AOS/DAM

CHES/PSC/AOS/DAM
PARiCLAWN BUILDING, ROOM 5-101
5600 FISHERS LANE
ROCKVILLE MD 20857

PARi(lAhlJ S U I LSING , ROOK 5 - 10 1

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56CC FIShZRS LANE
ROCKVILLE M 3 20857

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8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (rrr. @nu,
W W . Slam w Z P C C W

BA. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITAT IOU NO

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SULLIVAN AND ASSOCIATES
A t tn : TIM .SULLIVAN

512 ETHAN ALLEN AVENUE
TAKOMA PARK MD 2 0912

BB. DATED (SEE T E M 11)

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WA. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO.

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12. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA ( l f r e g l h e d . ) - ---- -.
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13. THIS ITEM APPUEJ ONLY TO MDDIFlCAllDMS OF CONTRACTYORDERS. IT MODIFIES THE WNTRACTIORDER NO. AS DESCRIBED IN K E Y 14.

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A THIS CHANGE ORDER IS ISSUED P U R S U A Y ~ : (SHh

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16A NAME AND TITLE OF CONTRACnNG OFFICER (Type wpm!)

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sullivan and Aesociates,
515 Ethan Allen Avenue
Takoma Park, M d . 20841
Tax ID:

158. CONTRACTORIOFFEROR

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DEP,SR'~IENTOF HEALTH & HUMAN S E R ~ ~ C ~

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Proparn S u p ? C x ! n
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\17-,yr-nr.-.

Room 5-10]. ParMaun Buiickn;
5600 Fshers Lax
Rockville. hlD :OF57

TO:

Joseph Grubbs
Task Order Officer

FROM:

Contracting Officer
General Acquisitions Branch, DAM/AOS

RE :

Appointment of Contracting Officer's Technical
Representative as Task Order Officer
Contract No.'282-98-0016, Task Order N u m b e r - 30

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Effective this d'ate you are hereby appointed the Contracting
Officer's Technical Representative as Task Order Officer for
monitoring the work required by the subject task order.

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You-areauthorized,-when necessary, to correspond akdLh51d
conferences with the Contractor on matters of a technical
nature; conduct ihgpections and perform evaluations permitted by
the task order; approve technical data required by the task
--orderrandmaintain the official technical file.

--

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All signific'Emt*actions taken by you as the Task Order Officer -will be documented and a copy of the documentation shall be
fu~rnishedto.._the,
Contracting Officer. This documentation s h o u u
include: t-r-i-preports;
memoranda for -the file and correspondence
with the Contractor.

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This appbintment ..doesnot empower you to issue -or approve
changes, entec--into,any-agreement, modi'fication, or any..o~th,gtr_
matter affecting the cost or terms and conditions of this task
order.
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Your assistance thus far has been greatly appreciated and we
look forward to the successful completion of this requirement.
.I£ this office can be of further assistance, please , - +contact
Dean Guidi, Contract Specialist on ( 3 0 1 )443-2475.

"hCT3.

5%

Marga et M. Kel y

Contracting Officer

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TASK ORDER
Effective Date: August 28, 2002
Contractor:

The Lewin Group

Address:

3130 Fairview Park Drive, suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Subject:

A.

B.
C.
,D.
a

s

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Title: "Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Community Initiative"
Task Order-Dfficer: Joseph Grubbs

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This Task Order is hereby issued, pursuant to the terms and conditions of-theblaster Contract,
especially SECTION C, SCOPE OF WORK, and SECTION H, TASK ORDER PROCEDURES.
The Contractor's initial proposal andall revised proposals are incorporated herein, except in the
event of a conflict bet wee^ the Contractor's proposal and the terms and conditions of the Master
l
ovefthe Contractor's proposal. The
Contract whereas the Masler C o n t ~ j ltakeprecedence
attached Statement of Work contained herein is considered to be within the scope of the Master
-. - -Contract.
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E.

Cost: i. ..
Fee,
?(prime Contractor)
= (Subaontractor):
Fee
c
Cost plus Fixed Fee:
4 App@pFiatim/CAN-Numbers-8 - ..
Associated Costs: - .................

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.$600.QO(jOo.
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DUNNS:
F.
Statement of Work - (See Attachea)
G.
Delivery Schedule - (See Attached)
H.
Period of Performance: August 28, 2002 through August 27,2004
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The attached Statement of Work contained herein IS considered to be within the scope of the
Master Contract. The Contractor's Rev~sedProposal d$ed fiugust 1 , 2002, which was subm~tted
In response to d~scussionsheld adryeen Eontractor and;h&rask'order
0if;cer on July 25. 2002
that required a reduction in both the,si!%6e of *ark and total cost plus fixed fee, shall take
precedence over the Scope of work as deflned hereln. '

See Page-2, for approval signatures

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Continued, from Paqe-1
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30

The Lewin Group

Date
The Lewin Group

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Date
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(THE NEXT PAGE BLOCK WILL CONTAIN PAGE(S) 1-20 OF THE

DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/WORKSTATEMENT)

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
STATEhlENT
SECTION C-DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONM'ORK
TITLE: "HEALTHY hWRRlAGE AND RESPONSIBLE FATHERHOOD C O h f h K ~ I T I '
INITIATIVE"
C.1.

Purpose of Task Order:

To provide technical assistance to approximately 15 community-level demonstration coalitions and their
state government partners to promote and maintain healthy marriages, family formation and responsible
fatherhood. Tasks shall include (1) providing technical assistance to targeted state governments (title
IV-D agencies or their umbrella agencies) in complehng requests for section 1 1 1 5 waivers, which will
be for thepurpose of funding demonstration projects under the Administration for Children and Famly's
s&onJllS(a)(2) authoGty; (2) collabordi'ig with state and local government, and community-based
and faith-based organizations, tq d e v e l ~ pcommunity-level coalitions to develop th~de.monsirat?oni;(3)
identifying and c.omm"nicating t o local partners best practices relating to marriage promot'ion. family . - formation and responsible fatherhood; (4) providing ongoing dapacity-building activitjes to support the
demonstrations;
and
(5) developing evaluation designs,!~
measure
implementation and community
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Since 1960, the number of chfldwn living without their father present in the home has increased from 10
million to 24 ~ l i l l i o n T. w o factors have contributed to this change in family structure: first, divorce,
which leaves about 1 million children without their father each year; second, non-marital pregnancies,
which..make up approximatelj
-,-. *. ....one-third
. .... *. of all births in America, or approximately 1.3 million children
each year. Research has shown that children who live without their father present in the home have a '
more difficult pathln life. They are more likely to live in poverty; drop out or fail out of school; engage
in at-risk behavior; and suffer emotional or psychological problems necessitating treatmeft:~ In-contrast.
children who grow up with their father present are less likely to experience poverty, engage in high-risk
behavior, or suffer from emotional or d k v e ~ o ~ m e n tproblems,
al
and over time have h ~ g h e rlevels of
educ-ati-onal attainment, employment opportunity and earning potential.

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Research also confirms an inverse relationship between "on-marital pregnancies arid the potentla1 fG
healthy marriages and positive socioeconomc development. Women who have a c h ~ l dout of wedlock,
particularly as teens, are less likely to b e married later in life and have significantly lower levels of
education, employment and income. In contrast, women who wait to have children until they are
married, have completed their education and are established in a job create a more solid foundation for
t h e m s e l ~ e sand their children. They are more likely to enjoy a healthy marriage that remains viable over
time. Therefore, for the purpose
o f [his task order, the concept of promoting healthy marriages, family
formation and responsible fatherhood will include efforts to reduce the number of non-rnariral
pregnancies.
The goal of the community-level demonsrrations supported by [his task order will be lo develop and
sustain projecrs [hat promore healrhy marriages, family formation and responsible farherhood. First, the

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
demonstrations will integrate marriage, family formation and fatherhood into ACF ProFams, such as
Child Support Enforcement, Head Start, Community SenriceSBlock Grant, Child Care. Runrlutav and
Homeless Youth services, and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, and by facilitating the
development of new projects at the community level. This will enable partners to leverage the broad
base of services at the federal. state and local level. as well as to build upon existing relationships
between service providers and families. Second, the demonstrations will offer senficesin a supportive.
accessible environment, reaching out to individuals and families within their communities. The
demonstration partnerships will inc-lude governmental, non-governmental, community- and faith-based
organizations, with local coalitions driving interventions at the grassroots level.

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C.3.

Government Furnished Information:

..

For pecormance on the task order, appropriate agency officials from the Administration for Ch~ldren
a z ~ a r n i l i e will
s make available the la!est information that is released from~gency~,prograrns.
as
deemed appropriate arid nndcessary by h c h officials for task order performance.
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Government Furnished Property:
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Riphts to Data:
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The Contractor shall not publicize or disseminate information within the time period of this specific task
order without the prior written approval
of the Task Order Officer.
-..............

C-6- Statement of Wo;E""

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The demonstrations supported under this task order will feature a saturation approah, with each3ite
having the opportunity to craft the most appropriate
mechanisms for intervention. This task order will
.
reinforce these strategies through technical assistance, performance measurement
and assessments
of .
_
.
implementation and.impactr-.The.work completed und& the ta~k.gi;derkill support
the mission cif each
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. A ~ ~ , ~ a r tagency
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Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE): The OCSE mission is to assure that assistance in
obtaining support is available to children by locating parents, establishing paternity and support
obligations, and modifying and enforcing those obligations. The demonstrations will support this
mission and the objectives under title IV-D by enabling fathers to play a more positive, substantive
r o 1 e . itheir
~ child's development. OCSE plays a key role in promoting marriage, family formation
and responsible fatherhood and will expand these activities under this task order-

*

Head start: The mission of Head Stan is to pr&ide comprehensive child development services to
eligible low-income children from birth to five years of age and their families, as well as 10pregnanl
women; to help enrolled children achieve their full potential, Early Head Start and Head Start
grantees provide comprehensive health, nu~ritional,educational, social and other services; and to
provide parents with [raining and educa~lonto fosrer their understanding of and involvemenl in [he

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
development of their children. The demonstrations will support this mission by improl-ing the
social, economic and health condition of families by promoting healthy mamages and by giving
fathers the skills they need to be active participants in the development of their child and family.
And, for the current year, Head Start is developing modules for marriage, family formation and
responsible fatherhood to incorporate into its existing programs.
Office of Community Services (OCS): The OCS mission is to strengthen local communities through
community partnerships and improving civic participation; and increasing community development
investments so that families can-lead healthy, safe and productive lives. This rnission is achieved
through the work of the Community Action Agencies (CAAs) and their community-based partners.
The demonstrations will support the OCS mission by building stronger communities through the
formation of healthy marriages and by reinforcing.current community-level service delivery
networks and strengthening partnerships between CAAs, state and local government, and
-community-based 3nd faith-based. organizations. ocs is developing. modules
... -.
for mamage, farm1 y,
formation and responsible fatherhpod to incorporate into its existing programs. - - - ... - - ~.

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Child Care Bureau: The mission-of the Child Care Bureau is to enhance the quality, affordability,
and availability of child care for all families. This includes adedication to ensuring the safe, healthy
development of children. The demonstrations wi-11support this Nssion by enhancing the
environment for child development through the promotion of healthy mamages, family formation
and responsible fatherhood. In collaboration with other ACF agencies, the Child Care Bureau has
begun developing marriage, family formation
and responsible fatherhood modules to integrate into
.
.
,
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its existing programs.
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Runaway and Homeless Youth: The mission of the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) is to
Primary activities in this mission are the Runaway
. ..
support young people and
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str~ngthrning
- ... - e . -. . ..-.families:
.
.
and Homeless Youth services and pitive-youth-development initiatives. The demonstrations wil I
support this mission by creating-opportunities for fathers to become positive contributors...to. .-youth
.
development and creating-alealthy, supportive-fami3yenvironment by.promoti~gmarriage.- - - - - - -- ..-- . .
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provisions that reinforce'the~d~nlstratlon
s cornmitmm&t:tb'mamage,responsible-fatherhood and
the formation of two-parent families. The demonstratjonswill support this mission.bypwmoting.
marriage, family formation and responsible fatherhood.
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The purpose of the Healthy Mamage and Responsible Fatherhood Community ~emonstraAonInitiative
will be to invest in broad-based, community-level coalitions that engage in comprehensive lintervention
strategies promoting and maintaining healthy marriages, family formalion and responsible fatherhood.
The w0r.k-.completedunder this task order will involve providing technical assistance to the
demonstration coalitions and their state-level partners. The ACF Regional Officeswill coordinate with
the Contrac:or for the completion of the work. First, technical assislance will be offered to targeted state
governments' (title IV-D agencies or their umbrella agencies) in completing requests for section 11 15
waivers, whlch will be for the purpose of funding [he demonslration iniriatives under ACF'-s-section---- I 1 15(a)(2) authority. Second, lechnical assistance will support each*of Ihe demonsrralion sites in
assembling commun~ty-basedcoalilions to serve as drivers of the demonslration inillalives. Finally, and
on an ongoing basis during \he period of (his ask order. ~echnicalsuppon will be provided to help the

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
coalitions and their state partners in the following areas: preparing resource development strateg~esfor
susta~ningthe initiatives, identifying best practices in marriage, family formation and respons~hle
fatherhood, building the capacity of the coalitions, and designing evaluations to measure the
effectiveness of the demonstration initiatives.
The work under this task order will be completed in conjunction with ACF Regional Office staff.
Regional Office staff will be responsible for assisting in the initiation of relationships between the
Contractor, targeted states and demonstration sites, as well as project support functions. ACF will select
sites based on negotiations-with the states and the sites. The Contractor shall not be required to
participate in the selection process.
The Contractor shall be responsible for the followingtechnical assistance activities:
( W e c t i o n 1-1! 5 ~ a i c e r s The
; ~ontracto;;hall provide technical assistance to state govemmenLs
- (titlq
.
N - D agencies or their umbrella agencies) in completing requests for O ~ seeionE
1 1 . ~waivers.
5
. . ..
The OCSE waiveis will be for theburpose of funding demonstration initiatives under the ACF's
section 1115(a)(2) authority and must meet al+repFiateprovisiom-u~ds seetkn-4i 15 (see - - - - -.
Appendix
. . . .A,:
Child Support Enforcement Demonstration and. . Waiver Authority).
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(2) Coalition-Building: The Contractor shall help participants in-thedemonstrationsites and their statelevel partners to'develop coalitions df local and state government-organizations,and faith-based and
community-based groups. This coalition will constitute the decision-makingbody-for.the-project;-.-and will be responsible fof q5ng
.
federal funds to leverage substantial funds from other sources.
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--'(3) R.-e..s-o .~-.~ ~ c ~ c .D .e ~. -e l The.
o p mContractor
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shall provide technical assistance during the period of Ihe . - - - - - - - i ~ o ~ r ~ o o ' the
h e -,.-.-,Acoalitions:de~elop
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plans to sustain the-demonstrations in the-IcinglFmi---:::-:~..
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(4) Best Practices: The Contractor shallcollaborate with experts to provide insight into the latest
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research and strategies
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f o r p r ~ m o t i nmarriage,
~
family formation and respnnsibfe-farherhooa:- -

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(5) Capacity43uilding: The.Contractor:sliall piov1'de~~~1stance:1n-S~ategZ~1a~nni~g,financial
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management, and interagene.y-eoltabopation:.Th&will help to:.ensure the operational elfeciiveness--.. :.-:.
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-of the coalitions over._time. ,
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(6) Evaluation Design: The Contractor shall work in cooperation with experts in the field of evaluation
research to develop an appropriate evaluation strategy to assess the implementation process and
measure the impact of the demonstrations at a community level.

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016

Scope of Work

C.7.
*

Tasks to be included in this project are described below.

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TASK 1.0. - FINALIZE DETAILED STUDY PLAN
Subtask 1.1. Orientation Meeting

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Within two weeks of task order award the Contractor shall meet with the Task Order Officer
(TOO) and other federal agency representatives, including the federal project workgroup for this
initiative, to clarify technical assistance objectives, approaches, requirements and parameters.
Issues-to-be discussed at the meetinginclude but are not limited to: (1) a discussion of ACF '
goalsand objectives for the task order; (2) roles and responsibilitiesqf technical assistawe gaff
and other personnel involved.wiCh the task order; (3) use of experts for accomplishing the
...
objectives of the task order; (4Jrefinement of methods and processes for providing technical
assistance; and (5) prodbctionof a~finalrepoflmd related documents.
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The Contractor shall submit a memorandum outlining the major issues and de~cribin~decisionsmade
at
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the meetingby the 6th week afteraward
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The Contractor shall, as approved by the TOO, identify experts who can contribute to the project ..
of Contractor-staff -andg.r_oposed~con~ul~ffa~fs.~
to supplemenL the-knewledge,
......................
skills, and-.expertise
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Such experts shallin~luder ~ e a r c h e r s policyrnakers,
,
and program operators working on issues
directly related to promoting marriage, family formation and responsible fatherhood and
designing community-level
evaluation
-_ . - . . . .
. . . .
'. . strategies. ACF expects that experts from ag ~ay!y_of
programmatic backgrounds
a i d experience shall be included
familycou~seling,
Eh-ildiiid-- .
family developmen~,~respp~le.jatherhood,
marriagepromotion, public health) as well as. .
experts with:experieri'ce.e~aIuitiiig~,j(~giamsof
...........
the.nature,planned. By,ihe,5th week afterllaSk . . . . . .-. .--:
order
he C o n t r d ~ . i l - ~-ii m-eh6randu;
i6 ihkTOO:
to be: . . - ~- -.. ... .. . --.

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award,$

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p~~p~;inggxperts
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invjted-to .pa-rtl-cw-!einthe work under the task order+and indicating their areasof expertise. .,
The experts should be utilized early in the process so that they can provide information on.
existing programs and work in their specific areas of expertise to adequately inform the work
plan. The Contractor shall convene some or all of the experts identified, as agreed to by the
TOO, for an initial meeting to provide suggestions and guidance to ACF and the Contractor
. regarding areas of technical assistance, specific methods to be used to provide technical
assistance, and programmatic and evaluation questions to be addressed dun'nk the course of
activity under this task order. The Contractor shall convene the initial meeting by the 12th week
afrer'award of task order.
The Contractor shall communicate with various experts periodically throughout the project to
sol~citguidance and feedback on the work of the project and shall submit drafts of major projecl
del~vcrableslo the group of experts for their review. The expens, as a group or individually, may

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I asr: Yroer lvumber 3U
Contract Number 282-98-0016

assist and inform ACF and Contractor staffin various aspects of work under this task order.
This may include, but not be lirriled to: providing expertise and knowledge about current or
prior research examining issues relating to mamage promotion, family formation responsible
fatherhood. and
evaluation; providing information about existing servlces or programs
or components of programs developed to promote marriage, family formation and responsible
fatherhood; participating in site visits to obtain more in-depth information; wnling and analyses
related to project work as requested by the Contractor, providing input into the technical
assistance; responding to information gathered and developed by the Contractor including- the
compila~ionand analyses ofjnfonnation and recommendations for alternative program models to
be tested; participating in briefings and presentations; developing evaluation designs; and
reviewing other major project deliverables. Upon approval by the TOO, the Contractor may
arrange to have some experts present for finaldiscussions and briefings during which the
proposed technical assistance and specific intervention approaches to be implemented in the.
demonstration sites are reccrnrnendd.
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ACF anticipates thal the total gfdup of experts that may be actively involved-may consist of
approx~mately 8- 10 indi~iduals.~How~ver,-a.larger number of experts may be contacted and
consulted regarding existing research, programs, or other specific areas of expertise needed to
accomplish work under this task order. For budgting purposes, the Contractor shall consider
---thatsix experts will .require
travel expenses to participate in up to three meetings.
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Subtask 1.3.. . . -~. .~. . i a i l study
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Based on the inforrnatioBobtained during the orientation meeting, discussions with the T O P and
with the experts. the ~ont;actor shall s u. . 4~- ~ ~~- 2 ,dc z . ,~, 2 ~ f t &-.d- e.. t. astudy
i l e dand york,plan.that
.......... defines . : ....
specific !asks and.approaches ~ a n d ~ d a l f ~ ~ ~ ~ n a & e r n e n t - r e s p o 1 1 ~ i b i 1 i ton
~ ~-~athorough-----~.-~Based
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<understandingof the-%r)ak a..d objectives
this w r k , the Contractor sha!l include in the work
---- -. . . for
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plan: a detailed plan for utilizing the experts throughout the period of performance; methods and
to dsigg~-an.emluatim

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detailed study.plan shall..identify:.po~n~a1~prob1.ee~_th~t
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maybe-enc-red.incarry+g:wt
the project a& provide recommended
approaches foraddressing them. The......
Contractorshall
.
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submit a draft work plan Wr review by th; TOO and othei-federal s i i f f b y i h e l o t h s e e k a f t e r
award of task order. The Contractor shall revise the plan and produce a final plan that addresses
any comments raised by the TOO or other HHS staff by the 15th week after award of task order.

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TASK 2.0. -TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
TlieContractor shall provide technical assistance to support the demonstratio" coalitions at the
state, local and community level. The technical assistance activities shall be approved by the
TOO and informed by discussions with the panel of experts. Technical assistance shall be
provided only to sites approved by ACF and their state partners. Areas of technical assistance
shall incfude: ( I ) section 1 115 waivers, (2) coalition building. (3) resource development, (4) best
practices, (5) capacity-building, and (6) evalua~iondesign.

F
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T a s k Oirder Numbci- 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Subtask 2.1. Section 1115 Waivers
The Contractor shall assist the targeted stategovernment partners (title IV-D agencies or their
umbrella agencies) in developing requests for Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE)
section 11 15 waivers; which will be for the purpose of funding the demonstration initiatives
under ACF's section 11 15(a)(2) authority (see Appendix A - Child Support Enforcement
Demonstration and Waiver Authority). The Contractor shall communicate with the TOO and
representatives from OCSE about the completion of the waiver requests. The Contractor shall
review all pertinent documentation from OCSE and communicate with OCSE staff as
appropriate to determine which waivers will be required to facilitatti funding of the
demonstrations. Waiver requests must follow all applicable requirements under section 11 15
and OCSE guidance. The waiver requests sh'all be submitted to OCSE beginning the 16th week
after the-task order award and may continue dudng.the period of the task o r d e r k - h e Contractor
.shall.provide assistance toapproxjgately 15 state government partners, as approved by,&e 700.
in developing waiver requests. -.
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Subtask 2.2. Coalition Building
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The Contractor, as approved by the T O 0 and with the support of the ACF Regional staff, shall
- - ---work~tk-federaI, state and local government officials and representatives from communitybased and faith-based organizations in approximately 15 demonstration sites targeted by ACF to
....
develop community-level coalitions. The coalitions should be based on relationships between
fonnal institutions (g6u6mrnental, nongovernmental, faith-based, community-based, and private
organizations), informal institutions (civic groups, neighborhood associations, faith-based
..........
associations),-andthe-public.&-large:
.
These
coalitions
will
constitute
. . . .:... .....the.............
decision--making:body
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.for the projecil-aii~,~i!l,~be,~r~~sponsible
for leveraging funding from other
sources.
. By
. . the
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16th . . . . . . .. ... .. .
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week after task order award, the Contractor shall s i b h t t o the TOO^ memorandum that
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identifies the prospective participants in each of the coalitions.
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The Contractor shall support the coalition-building process by facilitating a series of two
meetings for approximately l.$.select_ed,emons~ration
sires.:
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. . . . . .. . . . .. . .. . .. . .. . . . . . parlnerswill.
. . . . . . . . . . . _ . .:
. . . .. ....._.-.. . . .-discussionamong t h e -:: - . - .- -1
provide logfstical support:fm:the.:meedngs;
withthe~Contractdr-kading1he
. . . .
,
participants. These meetings should foc~.onstrategi~-~lanni~
andgoal-setting, . : ~ o p i c - s f o ~ t h e.
meetings: (Meeting 1) ( 1 ) Vision, mission, and values to guide the demonstration initiative; (2)
community-level partners that should be included in the planning, implementation, and
evaluation; (3) potential sources of non-federal financial and in-hnd support; and (4) operational
and governance structures to provide community-based leadership. (Meeting 2) (1) Goals and
objectives for the demonstration; (2) best practices relating to rnamage promoti on, family
.formation and responsible fatherhood; (3) current and potential programs that may be
incorporated as action strategies; (4) the use of media and other communication strategies; (5)
inlernal and external constraints; (6) resource development and fund-raising acrivities; and (7) an
action plan with operational next steps.
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The Contractor shall work with federal, state and local parrners?~converle the firsr meeting of
targeled demonstration coalitions by the 16th week following the task order award and the
second meeting by the 32nd week. By [ h e 201h week after [he [ask order award, the Contractor

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'Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
shall brief the TOO and other ACF staff on the status and results of the meetings and, bv the 48th
week, provide a copy of the action plans for each coalition. For travel and budgeting purposes.
the Contractor shall plan for two meetings in each of the approximately 15 sites.
Subtask 2.3. Resource Development

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The Contractor shall provide technicabass~stanceto help the selected coalitions develop a
resource development strategy to secure non-federal sources of financial and in-lond support
This wlll not include the actual fund ralsing, but will be a strategic plan for future resource
development. As required by statute, the state share of the section 11 15(a)(2) fundlng must be in
the form of financial support, but resources over and above the mandated state share can be
financial and in-kind support. These resource's may include contributions from foundations,
private individyals, grants, volunteer support and other sources. The coalitions should deveiop
tesource development strategies that would be appropriate for their respective demonstra+iorr
, ,.
plans.

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The
.. contractor shall submit to the TOO a Giy
ti;eurc.e.&-v~mentstrategies
coalitions by the 52nd week following the
task order award.
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Subtask-2;4. Best Practices-

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The Contractorshallwprk w i t ~ ~ m ~ m f f ~ a ~ & c o - u h i to
~ the
c ~ coalitioni'~~
a t e
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"promising practices" fo;'promoting marriage, family formation and responsible fatherhood. In
-:.conjunction with the expeits, the Contractor shall review pertinent best practices IiteratureI -,.: .---. -...--. ... .
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ernpineal-%dings;-and descriptive
-..-- ~ e p ~ ~ o c i a ~ ; e c o n ~. m .health
i. ~ c ~re1aated
n. d. benefn:~.
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as.&.eff&Fvf*n=Ifamifig, c&uns~lr~ga"a-suppoti~tb-~b~~te-hea]thy
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mamages, family forrnationaiid r k s- -p ~ s i b l e ~ f a t h e r h o ~ d ? ~ h ~ p o f p - o sbest
e ~ ~practice
f t h e review
is to provide information on a broad array of approaches being taken to encojrage and ~ r a i n
-healthy marriages; and to support and promote responsible fatherhood. The Contractor, In
conjunction with the experts, shall.use the information from the .best practice rev-iew to make
tohelp-the
coa]itmns-plan--- - -'.---'-------<:
decisions about haw to focCs-tEe'*;rbtk7un&rr~his-a.mdeand
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- . . . . . - . . . effective stritegie5forthe d e m 6 ~ ~ ~ t i m s . - 1 ~ f o m
from-1-hckst
ati~~
practice revl'&-.also..--.*.
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.sh.ouldbeused in the evaluation design considerations-and reco&nendatiokc--.

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To inform the best practice review, the Contractor shall explore existing mamage, family
formation and fatherhood promotion initiatives. The following programs/sites are
recommended: the Greater Grand Rapids Community Marriage Policy in Grand Rapids,
Michigan; the State of 0klah6rna's Department of Human Services mamage promotions
... ,
Tennessee;
policies; the First Things First rnaki'age and fatherhood ne~worksin Chattanooga,
and other appropriate programs/sites as approved by the TOO.
The con~ractorshall develop strategies for integrating best practice information into the
planning: implementation and evaluation of the demonstrations.-In addition to the initial
planning of rhe demonstrations, best praciice information st~ouldbe provided to the coalitions by
the Contractor on an ongoing baskdurin-gthe-penod of the task order. The Contraclor shall;in - coordina~lonwith ~ h TOO,
e
convene up ro ~hreemee~ingsof the experts and key operational staff

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Twik Order Number 30.
Contract Number 282-98-0016
from the coalitions to facilitate an ongoing discussion of the latest research. findings from
evaluations, innovative approaches and related information. The meetings shall be held at ACF
in Washington. DC. For budgeting purposes. the Contractor shall plan for up to sir expens and
one representative from each of the approximately 15 sites to attend the best practice meetinps.
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The Contractor shall submit to the TOO a memorandum summarizing the findings from the best
practices review and identifyjng ways In which the best practices will be incorporated Into the
demonstrations. The memorandum shall be submitted by the 28th week after the task order
award.

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Subtask 2.5. Capacity-Building

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The Contractor shall provide ongoing-technical assistance to build the operational capacity of-the
mlitiort,s. In t 6 s capacity, tl~eCont;~ctorshall facilitate up to two mgctings with the.coal.itionileadership. to address..needs of thecoalitions, and be available for informal discussioniby -..telephone and e-mail to provide'support on an issue-by-issue basis. The coalitions will provide
-. .Jogistical support-for-the m&ngs;-Fer-budgeting
.
.- - - purposes,
- -the- Contractor ~haIl-pla_n~f~orfwo
meetings at each of the approximately 15 sites.
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Strategic planning and maaqmerit.-TheCobtractorshallrpr*
supportfor establishi+a-.mission, vision a n d ' k u e s to guide the coalition; identifying goals and objectives; and
translating these goals and objectives into activities.
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Financial planningpnd.magement - The contractor shall provide support for developing standards.for budgeting, finane,al p-I-anni-ngand management l o assist the coalitions in
maximizing resources and ensuring fiscal accountability.
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--..3..,
7

Interagency collaboration - The Contractor-shall provide support for creating effec-t-ive-inter- - - - - partnerships m 6 i - ~ k m n t a t i ' o n . ~ m.. ~k .~acommunity-level;-at
andamong - - - organizational
.
.
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. In the standard monthly report submitted to ACF as-part of the normal contract administration
process, the Contractor shall include the frequency and purpose of contacts for capacity building.
The reports should identify the number of contacts for each demonstration site during the report
period, the purpose of the contact,.the staff person or expert providing the technical assistance
and other relevant infonnation. The timing and format of the monthly reports shall adhere to
AC.Fsprocurement guidelines.
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Sublask 2.6. Evaluation Design
The Contractor shall provide technical assisiance to the coalitions in developing options for
evaluation design. The purpose of the evaluation design activilies will be to help the coalilions - .
develop frameworks for sustaining operational effectiveness and measuringlh-e-impact o T i h e
demonsrrations at a community level. The Contractor shall gather descriptive information about

- T i

Task Order Number 30
Contract ~ u r n b e r282-98-0016
programs through telephone discussions and site visits. The Contractor shall intemie~vofficials
or staff within the programs, or researchers familiar with the programs, to discuss program
mission, organization, operations, participant characteristics, outcomes, and other relevan!
topics. To the extent possible, any written information available about the program shall he
obtained prior to scheduling interviews and site visits. When feasible, site visits shall include
discussions with program parficipants and collaborating organizations. The TOO shall be given
as much advance notice as possible about site visit scheduling in order to alloiv time for planning
for federal staff to participate in some site visits. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall
plan for one site visit to each of the approximately 15 sites.
The Contractor also shall assess the availability and verifiability of administrative data and other
sources of information at the local level. i he ton tractor shall assist the demonstration sites in
identifying.sou_rcesof data relatingfa
~.
demographics, marriage, non-marital pregnancies, divorce,
and other key indicators.
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The Contractor's activities shall be limited to technical assistance for the purpose of evaluation
design. Actual evaluation research
.- - . .............. wjtl~nofbe
completed under this task order. - - --

Evaluation Desien
Activity 2.6.1
Measurement
. . Performance
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The Contractor shall assist the leadership and staff of each coalition
. - . . . . . .in
. . . . the
.
development-of
a
.....................
logic model for the dem0n~t~ii6~i:-$i'iii~ve!:'fikkkldgic
model shd"ld'ide"tify the inputs,
activities, outputs, i n t i d d i a t e outcomes, and end outcomes for the demonstration.
. . . . ........

.......
The
of a -logic model for eachcoal~~oon/demmo.n~trra~ii~n
- Contractor shall submit to-the TOO a&copy
. . . .
slteby thF48ih iveekafter ihii'ii&%;hkr
i
d
.
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Evaluation'Beskn~Activity
2.6.2
Community
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The Contractor shall assist thecoalitions in developing options for measuring the impact of.the
inte.vention~strale& at a cornmunity.leve1... Theevaluatio" designs-should-refleet-reeent
. . .
-research relating to ~ 0 ~ ~ ~ i t ~ - 1 e ~ i ~ e &ethcdi:&d
t d ~ i r t i 'include
6 n ardiscussibn and strategies
for-usingsmall-area.da1-time-series-anaiysis and statrstical modeling of counterfactual:.-The;
Contractor shall submit to the TOO evaluation plans for each of the demonstrations by the 60th
week after the task order award.
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By the 72nd week after the task order award, the Contractor shall submit to the TOO a
memorandum that provides. recommendations
. . .
concerning evaluation strategies and the
cbhonstratio~sto be-considered for more in-depth evaluation. The memorandum =hall identify
the demonstration sites recommended for further study. the rationale for the'i&omm&ridations,
and alternative program recommendations and rationale to be considered if i t is not possible to
condkt site visits with one or more of the primary programs identified.
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....

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
TASK 3 - DISCUSSIONS/BFUEFINGS AND. FINAL REPORTS
Subtask 3.1. Discussions and B r i e f i n ~ s
Because this is developmental work for ACF, the agency wants to be closely involved with the
project as new information becomes available. Therefore, in addition to regular communication
with the TOO, the Project Director and key project staff shall periodically brief federal staff
informally on developments-and findings prior to formal submissions (e.g., information
generated during coalition building, discussions with experts, telephone discussions with state
government and program officials, and technical assistance). The Contractor shall assume that
such informal discussions will be conducted 6y telephone approximately every 3 weeks and that
each discussio~will require 1-2 haus. The exact schedule will be approved by the TOO after
-Task order award and may be adjusted over time as project work-anddevelopments-sugggst..-Any
written information.relevant to -the discussions will be submitted to the TOO-bymail, fax or e- mail for distritiution to other fe'deral staff prior to the scheduled telephone conversation. It is
expected that during s u c h ~ i n f o m ~ ~ n e f itheTrqec7
ngs
Director or other staff will report on the
range of programs for which informationhas-been
obtained to date or since the last briefing,
.
unique or innovative approaches identified,
..- . sign~ficant
-- . . .- .. ...
developments or problems in the conduct . ~ .
--ofthe work -asplanned, new research findings, extent of consisten~e~o~di-v%~~enatrlndin~s
across studies, major knowledge gaps for which information is being-sought;-i-npu{-from expea. .... .
-- - - - - .
- - .-- - members, and o, g... , e r . i s s n ~ d - m
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The Project.Director and key project staff shall conduct two formal briefings for ACFPHHS staff, -invited experts, and other
invited
participants as agreed to by the TOO.
The first
briefing shall ..-.-. ..
.
.
- ..
..
.. --- - - . - be a mid-project slaw-repoa.and shall be completed by the.48t_h,,we_elj
a f t c j h g t x k ~ r d G ~...:_ _
~ .
,
. .. . award. The Contractor and
.
key staff shall
.
present background . .information,
.describe the
and cqn-strain@relajing to
development of the demonstra!ion coalitions, identify. opportunities
..
implementation, discuss next steps, and provide an opportunity for open discussion and
comments on the activities comp1eted.t.o-date..~Ihe..~nt~actorsha11.consider~rhe~comments
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The secondbriefing
- sha+libe scheduled after. subrnissib" 01-the d r a f t . d . t h e f i n a l r e ~ d ~
this briefing the Contractor and key staff shall provide an overview of the project; present
summary information/descriptionsof various demonstrations, including common and unique
componenis or characteristics; and discuss evaluation design issues and.r.ecommend~tioOnsS..The
.
briefing shall include a discussion of recommendations and implications for further study in the
area
by ACF or others.
Evaluation related issues to be discussed may include: the ability to
-- . ..
-+&reask scope o r scale of existing programs; challenges to replication of selected
p ~ o ~ i a k s / m o d einl sother sites; program uptake and completion rates; avail~ibilityand validity of
small area data; potential for using intermpled rime-series analysis and relared techniques, as
appropriate; stabiliry of funding for program operarions; and other issues idenrifled by
Conrracior staff.
' -

.. . - .. .. . .
.

. .

Tzsk O r d e r Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
The Contractor shall submit to the TOO for approval a draft outline for the briefings 31 least t \ s , ~
weeks prior to the scheduled briefing date. The first briefing shall be conducted by the 4Sth
week after task order award and thesecond by the 94th week.

Subtask 3.2. Draft and Final Report
The Contractor shall prepare an outline! and a draft and final report on the project. The
Contractor shall submit to the TOO for approval a report outline with suggestions or options for
information presentation. The Contractor shall submit the outline no later than the 90th week
after task order award.

.

The draft final report should summarize the work performed, present summary information/:
descriptions otvarious demonstrations, including common andunique comporlents 01
,
Characteristics; and discuss~evaluationdesign issues and recommendations. :Thedraft final report
should include a discussion of rk'comrnendations and implications for further study in the area by ACF or others.' Evaluation rel&ed issues to be dis_cus.sed.in the-draft final reqort_may include:
the ability to increase s c 6 p or scaleof existing programs; challenges t ~ % ~ l i c a t i o of
n selected
programs/models in other sites;program uptake and completion rates; availability and validity of
e ~ arelated
n a l y techniques,
~is
as
.
small area d a t a ; w h l f o r u s i n g ~ i n t e ~ ~ ~ t ~. d - ~ i.m ~ ~ and
appropriate; stability of f u n d i n g - f ~ f $ ~ g r aoperatidns;
m
and oihif issues identified by
.
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The Contractor shall s u b x t thZ draft of the final repon to the TOO and members of the expert
panel by the 90th week after task order award. The Contractor shall revise thereport and
. . . .
. . . produce a final report that addresses cornments.on the-draft raisedby the T O O and.other.....l.':..... . . . .
..~~
reviewers. T h e ~ f t n d m p o r tshall be submitted by the 104th-weekafter task order-award.The.
Contractor shall not make any -p&&tke report public without. prior written approval of the
TOO or until the report has been~releasedby ACF. Ln addition to printed cofies re&ired:
digital copy of the report shall be delivered based on the guidelines in Appendix Bspecifications
-- . . .
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for the Delivery of Digital Copies of ~ e ~- o- ~r t- s- . - .-. . . .
. .
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Pi

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016

SECTION F - DELIVERABLES OR PERFORhlANCE

F.1.- Period of Performance
The penod of performance under this Task Order shall be August 28,2002 through August 27, 2003,23
months from effective date of contract, unless changed by modification.

F.2.- Ilems to be Delivered and Delivery Schedule
The contractor shall subrmt the following items during the referenced time periods to the Task Order
Officer (TOO), Joseph Grubbs, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for
Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW, Washington, DC 20447

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The items specified for delivery are subject to the review and approval of tFiETOO b f o r e fiial'
acceptance. The contrktorshall.be r&ired t o make revisions deemed necessary by the TOO.
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The Government reserves the right to approve or disapprove deliver%lei~eems~e~T0OowiI1
be
14
working days to . r e v i e ~ , . c ~ r n m eandlor
nt
approve items requ*
prior approvals. -- -. allowed
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F.3.- Deliverable Schedule
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Progress Reports

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No. of Copies
*2 copies

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Subtask 1.2
Memorandum of Proposed Experts f o r
Consultation and--Project Lnvolvement
.
.Subtask 1.3
- Study and Work Plans

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5-Copies

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5 weeks

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Deadline
I* of Ea Month

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Subtask 1.1
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Drajl 10-weeks: -Final 15 weeks

Subtask 2.1
Requests for Section 1 1 15 Wa~verst
Demonstrar~onFunding to
.- OCSE
..
1st Requests

~ e m o r a n d u mof Coalition Participants
',~ction'Plansfrom Demonstration Coalitions

'

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5,.copies
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16 weeks

As required by OCSE

16 weeks
48 weeks

5 copies
5 copies

52 weeks

5 copies

-.

Sublask 2.3
Resource Development Strategies of Coalitions

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?

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Task Order Number 30
Contracl Number 282-98-0016
Deadline

-

Subtask 2.4
Memorandum for Best Practices
Review

28 weeks

Subtask 2.5
Monthly Reports

I" R e p o n
Subsequent

5 copies

12 weeks
Every4 weeks

5 copies
5 copies

Activity 2.6.1
Logic Models

48 weeks

5 copies

. .
Evaluation Plans
Memorandum with ~6commendations"

60 weeks
72 weeks

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Subtask 3.1
- .&fma]-Bnefmgs--~---.
- Mid-project S latus Briefing . .
- -- -..
- ~ Final
Briefing -- .
- -.

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94 -weeks
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Subtask 3.2
-Final Report
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- - 75.copies .....-........
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plus electronic file
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'One ( I ) copy of repon shalLbe submitted to the Contracting Officer, Program Support Center,
AOS. Division of Acquisition Management, Parklawn Building. Room 5-101, 5600 Fishers Lane.
.Rockville, h l 20857.
~
Subqut 2ndcop)r.of repon-to the TOO. referenced address.
.. - - -

~

-.

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
APPENDIX B - SPECIFICATIONS FOR T H E DELlVECRY OF DIGITAL COPIES OF
REPORTS
Where contracts require the submission of repons, digltal copies are required In order to fac~lltatethe
retention of electronic copies of these reports for future use, allow for Web slte posting. and meet
requirements of Section 508 to provide accessibility to people with disabilities.

In addition to the printed copies required under the contract, two digital copies of the report shall be
delivered on media readable by Windows 9x programs. One copy shall be formatted in word processing
programs marketed by Core1 and Microsoft corporations (i-e., Wordperfect or Microsoft Office) and one
in hypertext markup language (HTML) that is codedqor Section 508 accessibility. Where compatibility
with earlier versions of the software is in doubt, files shall be delivered in the version of the software
r e m m n d e d by the ~ e d e r aProject
l
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The text. tables; and any c h m s or oth&'graphics shall be organized and formatted as described here. ' - =
Lengthyd-oc.uments(greaterthan.500 Kb) should be divided into several parts and a separate file should
be provided f ~ r e r r c h . ~ ahngttTyfiQgrc2ter
rt.
than 200 Kb) should be avoided if possible. The title
-. . page, table of c o n t e n t s . n d n d o t h e r f r o n t . ~ L b e - l a a s g p a r a t e f i l e E i l e n a m e should
s
contain
Q
J
. --.-.---s used in the printed version. For example,
consecutive numbers that c m s p a n d .
shall be those used by the software
-Chapter 4, Figure 2 can be rendered:&-C4~2.~if..Suffixes
manufacturer or follow the usual industry conventions, e.g., doc, xls, gif, jpg, etc.
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Tables and tabular material shall not be converted into graphical.images, but be included with thewrd-process~rigfilEordelivered as-spreadsheet files. Tables and........
tabular
data
shall
also be converted to
--.
-.
HTML format and coded .,.-,-,*.
for Section
508
accessibility.
In
order
to
comply
with
Section 508
,,,a
--requirements,such data shall not be submitted in Ponable Document Format (PDF)'.
- ..
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Graphic figures such as bar and line ch'arts, diagrams, and other drawings shall be-@cljr&dLkU&~ilfi
(Graphics Interchange ~ o r m s or
) the JPEG (Joint photographic Experts Group) format. Even though-., -a single file for printing purposes;--- '
the graphical elements mayhave bken~riiergedwith the text form
. . . . . . . . . . . ................
each graphical image shall be delivered as a separate file on thedisk and must no; be embeaded in a .
. -word .processing, spreadsheet, slide show or other composite~file.In order to meet Section
. . . .
508
_ ____..
accessibility requirements, graphic images must be accompanied by summary text and coded tabular;
data for larger files and shall not be submitted in PDF.
" ' . ' . .

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' A c r o b a ~Reader 5.0 allows screen readers 10 access PDF documents. However. nor all P D F documents are I ~ X I - b a s esome
d.
are scanned In a s graphics. Scanned g r ~ p h i c srenders hem uscless lo many Jsslsllve iechnologies. Accessible H T m
v e r s ~ o n sare ~ h approprlate.al~crna~ive.
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. . . .

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Additional information about accessibility standards related to Section 508 may be found at
http://www.webaim.org/standards/508/checkJist. The documenr provides an'interpretation of Section
508 Web-standards but is not an official document.

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
SECTION G-CONTRACT ADMINISTR4TION DATA
The basic contract contains Sectlon G in its entirety.
G.1. In addi~ionto the information required by SECTION I, FAR Clause 52.232-25, Prompt Payment,
the following information is also required for-submission of a proper invoice.
(a) Signature of an authorized official certifying theinvoice to be correct and proper for
payment;

..

(b) Period of performance for which costs are claimed; and

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(c) Tax identification number.-(employer's identification number) ormcial s e c u. r i t y ~ n u ~ r-*: ~

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(d) The contractor shall subm:t an original and threg3) copiespf it's invoice to:
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One (1) original voucher complete with all required back-up documentation shall be submitted to the
....
contract Specialist and addressed 19;.
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Division of Acquisition
Management.,
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~ a m ~ ~ ~ GRoom
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5600 Fishers Laze.
Rockville, Maryland 20857
_ -.
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Contract Number 282-98-001 6
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
...-Task Ordei'Nii'm6eri:3O

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Parklawn Building, Room 16A-12 - : - . -. .. .. .. - --- .- --.
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Three (3) copies of the voucher with copies of all required
back-up documentation shall be submitted to:
.

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Rockvllle, Maryland 20857
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30

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.(.:e):Vouchers must show the Goveriiment Pri>jCct Office& name and phone number' on the face

page. All calls concerning contract payment shall be directed to the general help line for
contract payments on (30 1)443-6766.

In accordance with the requirements of the Debt Collection Improvement Act of 1996, all payments
under t h i s contract will be made by electronic funds transfer (EFT). The Contractor shall submit
financial institurion information to the Financial Management Services Office in accordance with
Section 1, F A R Clause 52.232-33, Mandatory lnformation for Electronic Funds Transfer Payment.

--

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
G.2. The Contractor shall furnish the following minimum information i n support of costs submjrred. i f
applicable:
( 1 ) Direct Labor- includes all persons, listing the person's name, title, number of hours or da\,s

worked, the total cost per person and a total amount for this category;

(2) Fringe Costs-show rate, base and total amount;
(3) Overhead or Indirect Costs-show rate, base and total amount;

--

(4) Consultants-include the name, number ofdays or hours worked, a total amount per
consultan(and a total amount fathis category;
.. .
.
-~

=.-

-

..

--

.-

*
.----- -

-

(5) Travel-include for each airplane o r train trip taken the name of traveler, date of travel-,
destination,'the transportatidn costs, including ground transportation shown separately and the
per diem costs. Other travel costs shall also be listed. A total amount for this
category shall be provided; .

.

--7

. . . . . . .

-

....

--

.

--

......

(6) Subcontractors-include, for each subcontractor, the same data as is being provided for the
- - - p i m e Contractor. A total amount
for this category shall be provided;. .
- - ..
..
-f
(7) Data processing-inchhe all non-labor costs, i.e., computer time, equipment purchase, lease
or rental, data tapes. A total-amount for this category shall be provided;

-..

Other Direct Cs&iw-lude-alisting of all other direct charges to the contract, i.e., office-.
supplies. telephone, equipment rental, duplication;
.
- . .
-----.-..
-- .........
.=..--.:--~.
:. - -- -. ..-..*

.

.- (8)

-.

...

(lo) Fee-show g[~-,-b~~-and:tota]
.-..- -.

- G . 3 . Travel and Other Costs

. . . .

-

(9) G & Ashow-rate4ase and total; and

-

...

.=
....-.=
.

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a

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- .-.

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-

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-.-

-

.

A. The Contractor will be reimbursed, not to exceed $175,544 for all domestic travel
described .below, incurred directly and specifically in the performance of this contract, claimed
by the Contractor and accepted by the PSC Contracting Officer, i n accordance with the Federal
Travel Regulations:
. .. .~
. .

.

... A

-

(1) Costs of air travel by most direct route. "Air Coach" or "Air Tourist" accommodations on
prop or jet aircraft constitutes the normal class of air travel which shall be utilized.
.. is n ~
. .t. ~
. . .a ~ v a
.. i l a ~ b l e
First-class accommodations may be used i f ( 1 ) less than first-class
provjding reservation was requested within 24 hours after the-traveler had knowledge of
the trip; (2) less than first-class requires circuitous routlng; (3) less than first-class
requires travel to begin or end at unreasonable hours (i.e., i f scheduled flight time I S
before 8:00 a.m. and scheduled amval is after 9:00 p.m.); (4) less than frrst-class would
-

-

...

.

.

-

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
result i n additional direct costs which would offset the transportation savings: or ( 5 ) less
than first-class will not make connections with other flights or means of transportation for
continuation of the journey.

(2) Costs of rail travel by most direct route, first-class with lower berth or nearest
equivalent.
(3) Travel by motor vehicle includingrented automobile shall be reimbursed on a reasonable
actual expense basis, or-at the Contracior's option, on a mileage basis at a rate of .365
cents per mile, plus any toll or ferry charges.

e

-

(4) Reasonable subsistence not in excess of a ~ t u aitemized
l
expenses not to exceed the ceilings
.in the Federal Travel Regulations in effect at the time of incurred cost. Contractor will .
. voucher at actual cost.
- 9

9

......
. . . .

G.4.

=-s:.

. .

.-v---

Advance Under~tan'din~
Other provisions-of thiscxmtract notwithstanding; the-Contractor is hereby authorized to incur
r t h u r i t h o u t - f ur t hauthorization:
e r... -the following costs, .within
the........l i ~ s ~ f o......................
.........
.- .

Total
-

.....
-

.

.-

-

..-

Task Order Number 30
Con1 r a r t N u p '
93-08-0016

-

-

-

T b b o u e listed consuitants, cannot exceed the referenced rate indicated wilhsut prior written approrap
...
of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officer.

.-r-

v

G.5.

Key Personnel

- -

-

-

,
.
,

The individuals
cited below a.- -r.e. . k e y p e r s ~ n n e l ~ S m 3 5 2 . 2 7 0 -KEY
5 , PERSONNEL,
.. - .- ...... - ..
.
.- . -.. . .
incorporated-6yrefeience).
-....... ..
.
.- . . .
. ............
. . . . .........
.
....= ..... . . . . . .
.
. . . .
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.............................
--- .
.
NAME
. . . .

.

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1.

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TITLE

..

. ~..
.

-

-

-

.

. -

Project Director

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.

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I

-,.-,-.+,,,*
,-

.

-

..

f rojectMarrage~-

.....

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.
..........

--

-

..

352.232-74 Estimated Cost and Fixed Fee-Incrementally
Funded Contract (April 1984).
'

....

-

(a) It ~-~~~;m~iP~'fhat'i~.total.coa-rn-the
-- . . . . . . . . . . . . on~~rnment-for.fuI1
performance of this task order will
be'
which the sum of
7
represents the estimated reimbursable
......... _.
costs and
7
.presents the two (L)IIXCO-I"&S.

i~

-.

.

H
i

,

(b) Total funds rllrrpnflv ailabl able for payment and allotted to this task order is $600,000.00,

of which
I n , .

represents the estimated reimbursable costs and
i rebresents the fixed-fee. For further provisions on funding, see the Lirmtat~ons
,;i-?.

. . .- ...

(c) It is estimated that the amount currently allotted will cover performance thibugh
August 01,2003.
. _ _ L _ . _ _ _

. . . . . - . . .

-

.

. . . . . . . . . . . .

(d) The Contracting Officer may allot addltlonal funds to the contract without-the concurrence of
the Contractor.

..

:.

.+.
<

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
SECTION H-SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS
Restriction on Publication and Dissemination of Material Derived from Work Performed Under
This Task Order

H.1.

A. In accordance with FAR 52.227-14-Rights in DataGeneral paragraphs (b)(2)(i)and(d)(l), the contractor shall not release, reproduce,
distribute or publish any data first produced or specifically used by the Contractor in
performance of this task order without the prior written approval of the Contracting Officer.

---

\

B. The Contractor shall not establish claim to copyright subsisting in scientific or techn~cal
articles based on or containing data first produced in the performance of this task order arid
published in academic technical or professional journals, symposia proceedings OF similar
.works, without the prior writfen approval of the Contracting Officer.

-==

T

-

C. Upon request from thk C o a t r a c b ~ t omake a report, presentation, or other disclosure of such
material, the Contracting Officer, in conjunction with the Project Officer will rev~ewand
FeporC, p r e s e n t h n , - o r u t h e i disclosure of such - - - -- -approve or disapproire-ilie-piopijsed
..........
~ n f d f m a t i oor~riaiih~~-ne.that(m)me
i n f o ~ a t i o nis b e i i i g E d f 6 r the-purpose f o T
- which i t was
supplied
and
(2)the
privacy
of
entities
supplying the information p_r described in
.........
it is not violated. ,.
.

..

.

--- -. .
---

. . .

.

<.

.

.

D. Whenever any data is to be developed by-a subcontractor-underthis task order; the Coritractor
. shall include the terms of paragraphs A.,B., and C., in the subcontract, without substantive
a l t e r a t i o n , . and.~cdher~kiuse-will
beincluded to diminishthe-Government's rights in that
data. -- - . . . - - - - . .
...........
.... * - - :

H.2.

.-.

-.

.

Printing and Duplicating

-

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>--

-

. . - .

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.

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FAR Part 8.801 defines printing as f'printing,bin&~g,--Mmk~~-work,-(in~hding-my~items-requiring.--.-::-.L.:.: :..
-*
. the precesses of composition; platemaking; presswork, binding;-and-l'njdiographicb)
for ihe-useof an
executive department ,-independent agency, or estab1ish.d-theGovemmertt:"The contracterrnay duplicate or copy less than 5,000 units of only one page, or less than 25,000 units in aggregate of
.
multiple pages for use of a department or agency. This page limit is per requirement and not per
contract. These pages may not exceed a mafi.rnum-image size of .103/4 by 14 114inches.

---.-

.

.
If contractors have-a print~ngzquirement, not copyingar duplicating, it must be under $1,000 and a
waivermus~be obtained from the Joint Committee on Printing through the HHS Printing Officer.
A.P. Barnes, who can be reached at (202)690-5521. The waiver must be obtained be'fore any material is
printed. ..

Page 1 of 2
WlODlFlCATlON TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: October 3, 2002
C~~ntractor.The Lewin Group
Address:

31 30 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Subject:

A.

- -

. .

B.

-C.
D.

E.
F.

Contract Nurrrber 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
ModificationNumber 1 Title: "Healthy Marriage & Responsible Fatherhood Demmtratic:ln ,
Community Initiative"
Task Order Officer: Joseph Grubbs
Period of Performance: August 28,2002through August 2 7 , 2 W ..........

.:

.........

This modification is hereby issuedpursuant to the terms and conditions of the subject-----.
--

Section G - Contract Administration Data:
a'

\5

I

-

-

,

G..4. Advance ~nderstandinq:,: - - - - - - Other provisions of this contract notwithstanding, the Contractor is hereby
authorized~~in.~,urtheffollowing~~costs,
within
the limits
set
.. . .-- - - ... - - --.
- -- forth
-- without further
__ . ,
authorization:
-

.. -

.......

--

--

-.

S~ubcontractorslConsultants,--.
-

Total
- -

.

-- -

--

-

-

. .

._

..

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._
;

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/

Page 2 of 2

--

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...
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.--

. ...
.~.
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.. .

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-

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- .
-

The listed' sub~ontractors/cOnsU~~s;
cannot exceed.the referenced rate indicated
without prior written approval of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officcr!r.
i

......................................

-

The
ol (

Be ~ a r n e d ) % x ~ eConsultants
rt
must not exceed the referenced rate(s)
iadicated without prior written approval of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officer. The Contractor, The Lewin Group must identiwan-aprncable
consultant in cBHr8baration with the Administration for Children and ~am'iies (ACF) Task Order Officer, (TOO). Upon receipt of approval, the contractor shall
farward a confirmation le#er, identifying the selected consultant,,daily rate, and
number of days considered for work, to the TOO, and Contracting Officer.

--

-.-

-- -

. . . .
-.
. . . -.-

-

~

<

-

..- - .
........by reason of this modification.
2 The total amount.oi
co~&&&is:unchanged.
..
. . . . - . - .. - ....
. . .. . --. - -... -. . . . . . . . . . . . -- .-- --. - - -- - - -...........-.--- -- --- - .- .- . .
.. - .... -. .
3 All other terns-and conditions remain-unchangedby reason of this rnodifi~ation.~
-

-

-

-

-,.

The Lewin Group
F~rmName

. .

OCT - 4 '2@l2

Date

-.

.
-.

.

.

....

-

. . .
-.
.
. . . . . . . . ....
.

-

--

..-

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 2

Page 1 of 2

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: July 11, 2003
Contractor: The Lewin Group

-

d
,

Address:

3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

-subject:-

A.

-

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
. -.
. . -- = ,
.. ... .. ..
'
Modification Number 2
~.
..
C.
Title:
"Healthy
Marriage
and
Responsible
Fatherhood
Demonstration
.
.
.
Community Initiative"
D.
Task Order Officer: Brendan Kelly
- - -. . . . - .- --3-App~o.p~riatiOn~~3~~CAN':N~1m~ers,
....
Assoc'laTe3 Object
8
A p p l i c a m-.M
s :- -. --.. . . . . . .
--.
..
- .. .-.- . . . .
----App# 7534536-36998035,OG#
2 5 13,-Arnt:-$368,639---7
A ~ J #7531512, CAN# 3G996472, OC#.25.13, Amt: $200,000
kpp# 75x1553. CAN# 3G992016.OC#25.13. Amt: $100.000
EIN: 561970224
. .- . -.
-- .--. . .
.~
..
.
-.
--DUNNS-TS732!Z7TA-. . . .
F.-?-':-~Periodof Perforrnance:.AugustZ8,20a2-througL-------------~.
.
. . . . . . . .
August 27, 2004 - - -

6.

....
.
--.

'

.-

.

.- - -

-.

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~.

-

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-

-

....

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.-

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.

.

.

--

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-

.- :
.
r

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f

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This s~~pplemental
-agreement is entered into, pursuant to the authority: of
FAR 52.243-2, Changes - Cost R-eimbursement(AUG 1987)-Alternate I (APR 1984). .
.
.
. . .
....
.....
..... --..--.-,...----..
----. -.--- - .-..
. . -. . . .. .. .. . ... .-. . . .
. . . .
.-. .- .
.
,
~heabm&eference&~askOrder is .-hereby modified to change Section
. . . . F
. . and
.
Section
G.
. . . . . . . . .
.............................
.......-...-......-...
-... . :
.
asfollows: - - - ..=~~
i--.i-.r:ry..*.Yci..-r-i-..--..i.-;-i
~

.

7 - - .

C...

* a

(See attached Page)
-

The Lewin Group.

*~uthorizedSignature

~ a r b r &Kelly
~ o n t r a c y nOfficer
~

Date

/I

Date

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 2

Page 2 of 2

1. On the face page of the task order, Subject D., the Task Order Officer's name is
changed to read Brendan Kelly.
2. On Page-13, Line F.2, Deliver items during the referenced time periods to the Task
Order Officer (TOO), Brendan Kelly, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation,
ACF, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., Washington, DC 20447.
3. On Page-17, Line A (3), Change mileage basis at a rate of .360 cents per mile, in
lieu o f .365 per mile.
=

d

r

-

-=

-

,

s

4. On the face page of the task order, Current Obligation, and page-19, Line G.6.. furly
fund the task order by adding incremental funding in the amount of $668,639.00.
The funded amount is increased from $600,000.00 by $668,639.00 to
$1,268,639.00.
.-.

-

-

-

-

..-

-

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-

-

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Allotherterms iiiidonditions remain unchanged and in full force and effect.

--

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 1 of 13

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: July 21, 2003
Contractor:

The Lewin Group

Address:

3130 air view Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Subject:

A.
-B.

-.-

C.

--

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Ordf?~Number 30
- . =
Modification Number 3
-.Title: 'H&lthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Community Initiative"
-Task Order
- - - Officer:-Brendan Kelly
~ppro~riation:.7~31536
CAN Number: G991539 -.
. - _ ...
- .- .- -- .
Object Class: 2-5.1.3". - ---Total-Contract-Modific-ati~riobl~gaion
$49,613
EIN:
PVNNS:
F%;iod of Performance: August 28,2002 through
~ u g u s27,2004
t
- .

'

&

Y4

-.

-

T h i s supplementdagree~nentis entered into, pursuant to the authority: of
FAR 52.243-2, Changes - Cost Reimbursement (AUG 1987)-Alternate I (APR 1984).
-- -3

-The above referenced Task Order is hereby modified to change Section C, and
Section G , as follows:
.. .

-

.

,

.

-

The Lewin Group.

(See.attached Pages)

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-

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::

.

_

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-~
_

-._

c.

.--:

. .

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
1. In Section C- DESCRlPTlONlSPEClFlCATlONSNVORK STATEMENT, the level of
effort is hereby changedlredirected as outlined in the following pages, to prov~de
continued Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration Community
Initiative. This modification shaH be incorporated into the above numbered
Task Order.
Statement of Work, (the changes in text are highlighted in Bold):
Z

Tasks tobe included in this project are described below.

- -Subtask
1.2 Experts for Consultation
---

-.
. ..

*

~

. -..

.. --.
.

.

.. .

.

.. --

/

z

..

The Contractor s h a k a s approved by the TOO, identify experts who can contribute to the
-project to supplement the knowledge, skiHs, andexpertise of Contractor staff and proposedconsultants. Such experts shall include researchers,policymakers, and program operators
working on issues directly related to promoting marriage, family formation andresponsible----fatherhood and designing community-level evaluation strategies. ACF expects that experts
from an array of programmatic backgroundsand experience shall be included (e.g., family
counseling, child andtamily development, responsible fatherhood, marriage promotion,
public health) as well as experts with experience evaluating programs of the nature
planned. By the 5th week after task order
- - - - award,
- .the
. Contractor shall submit
a -- .
memorandum to the TOO
proposing
experts
to
be
invited
to
in
the
work
under
"
the task order a d ~ndicatihgtheir areas of expertise. *.A'.

The experts
should be
utilizedearly in-.the
process so that
they-can provide ififormalion o_n
. .- .
.-------=---=.
... -.- --. . - -- - . ..
existing programs and work in their specific areas of expe%se to adequately inform the
work plan. The Contractor' shall convene someor all of the experts identified, as agreed
. . - .suggestions
. . . . . . - - -. -. - . an.d guidance to7ACFand-the
to by the TOO, for an initial meeting to provide
contractor regarding areas of technical assistance, specific methods to be used to provide
technical assistance, .and programmatic and evaluation question's to be addkssgd duing
the course of activity under this task order. The Contractor shall convene the initial meeting
by the 12th week after award of task order.

. ... --.

<

:

-

The Contractor shall communicate with various experts periodically throujhout the project
to solicit guidance and feedback o n the work of the project and shall submit drafls of major-project deliverables to the group of experts for their review. The experts, as a group or
individually, may assist and inform ACF and Contractor staff in various aspects of work
under this task order. This may include.,. but not be limited to: providing expertise and
knowledge about current or prior research examining issues relating to marriage promotion,
family formation responsible fatherhood, and program evaluation; providing information
about existing services or programs or components of programs developed to promote
marriage, family format'ion and responsible fatherhood; participating in site visits to obtain
more in-depth information; writing and analyses related to project work as requested by the
Contractor; providing input into the technical assistance; responding to inlormation

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
gathered and developed by the-Contractor including the compilation and analyses of
information and recorr~mendations for alternative program models to be tested;
participating in briefings and presentations; developing evaluation designs; and reviewing
other major project deliverables. Upon approval by the TOO, the Contractor may arrange
to have some experts present for final discussions and briefings during which the proposed
technical assistance and .specific intervention approaches to be irr~plementedin the
demonstration sites are recommended.

&

ACF anticipates that the total group of e x ~ e r t sthat may be actively involved may consist
of approximately 8-10 individuals. However, a larger number of experts may be contacted
and consulted regarding existing ~esearch,programs, or other specific areas of expedise
needed to accomplish work under this task order. For budgetingpurposes, the &ntractbr
shall consider that six experts will require travel expenses to participate in up to three
meetings.

-

-

-

-.

A

-

---

.

-

The contractor shall assess the level of need-for technical assistance within-the -- - . .
sites by takinOBdyanGgeof ~ ~ u ~ ~ e x p e r . i e . n c e . o f . ~ . e ~ f.....
.o
.. ~ o..w -i n g
demonstration
.. -.
...~
..
.-.
.
-.
consultants-in
n
gin
g
%
+
E
-k
g
n
i6
je
isjc
marriage -agrams..
..
_.Theconfractnr will arrzarrrrn inr - n L~. . A - ~ * fnr.
--- provide up to
T

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nrnvlflo - I l n tn Ih

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to provide up to 9 days of adviiie i n

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-

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-9-

-~

-.

-.

.. .

-

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-

The contractor-shall identify and engage the services of additional experts to
support ACF's African American Healthy Marriage Initiative. The contractor shall
coordinate with experts from a variety of fields who could provide support i n various
ways including, but not limited to, being national spokespersons for the initiative,
assessing cultural appropriateness
ofcaterials, providing culturally appropriate
- -. materials, or identifying-progranvmodels that have been effective in African
. -,

. -- .

to-----.-.-..'- --.- -.-

days i n support t'his task
and the ACF
African American
.
.
. .
d*itiative
(mHT$/Tt).;:.:7;--;.:-::>:
:--.
;..;
....
.
. .- .-~

.-.

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suppon or rnls tasn;
.-

port of this taskm
9

'a,.

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..

American communities. The contractor shall submit recommerrdation~for sucb
experts and obtain approval from the Federal Project Officer priodo.r7B&iivTg
. .- . formal
.. ....
offers to proposed experts.
.

-

...-

-.
~-

- -

-.

-. -.- -. ~...-.

Subtask 1.2.1 Develop Marriage Education Curriculum
The contractor shall support
the efforts of experts in the marriage education field on
. .
the development of a marriage education curriculum. The curriculum shall be

...

~-

.
-

-

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

- designed to build the skills and knowledge of individuals t o form and sustain healthy
marriages and to be consistent with best practices

inthe marriage education field.

Subtask 2.1 Section 1115 Waivers

a

The Contractor shall assist the targeted state government partners (title IV-D agencies or
their umbrella agencies) in developing requests for Office of Child Support Enforcement
(OCSE) section 1115 waivers, which will be for the purpose of funding the demonstration
initiatives under ACF's section 1115(a)(2) authority (see Appendix A - Child Support
Enforcement Demonstration and Waiver huthority). The Contractor shall communicate
with theTOOand representatives-fromOCSE about the completion of the waiver requests.
The Contractor shall review all pertinent documentation from OCSE and communi~atewith
OCSE staff as appropriate to determine which waivers will be required fo facilitate funding
of the demonstrations. Waiver requests must follow all applicable requirements under
section 1115 and OCSE guidance. The waiver requests shall be submitted to OCSE
beginning the 16th week afterBe tcsk order awa~dand may continue during the period of
the task order. The C o n t r a c t o r ~ ~ ~ s t a n c e - t o - a p p r -o x i m a t e l y - 1state
5
government paitners, as a
- p *-G i i E T b y s - f b ~ , - i n developing waiver requests.

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he contractor shqjl provide intensive,-on-site technical assistance t o u p to fwe-of

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the sites irnplementik section 1115demonstrations under CHMI, as approved by the
Federal Project officer. This shallincludei but not be limited to, coalition building,
financial management,-programdevel~pment~a~d
&atamanagement-(Snbtask 2.6).
For budgeting purpose% the contractor shall expect t o make o n average u p to two
site visits t o each of the five section 1115 sites.
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Subtask 2.2 Coalition Building
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The Contra-=tor, a s ~ a p p r ~ ~ e d b y t h e ~ ~ ~ ~ . . a ~ d \ ? r i t hoft h
the
~ sACF
u p pRegional
ort
staff.
;shall work with'federal, iiate'and .local government officials and representatives from
community-basd andfaith--based organizations in approximately 15-~3emonstrration
. . . . . . . . .
Sites .
targeted by ACF to develop community-levelcoalitions. The-coaliiions should be based
on relationships between formal institutions (governmental, nongovernmental, faith-based,
community-based, and private organizations), informal institutions (civic groups;neighborhood associations, faith-based associations), and the public at-large. These
coalitions will constitute the decision-making body for the project, and will be responsible
'for leveraging funding from other sources. By the 16th week after tas.k order award, the
Contractor shall subrrlit to the TOO a memorandum that identifies the prospective
participants in each of the coalitions.
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The contractor shall support the coalition-building process by facilitating 5 series of two
meetings for approximately 15 selected demonstration sites. The demonslralion parlners
will provide logislical support for the meetings, with the Contractor leading the discussion
among the participants. These meetings should focus on strategic planning and goalselling. Toplcs for the meetings: (Meeting 1) (1) Vision, mission. and values to guide the

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 5 o f 13

demonstration ~nitiative;(2) community-level partners that should be included in the
plannihg, implementation, and evaluation; (3) potential sources of non-federal finaRcial and
in-kind support; and (4) operational and governance structures to provide communitybased leadership. (Meeting 2) (1) Goals and objectives for the demonstration; (2) best
practices relating to marriage promotion, family formation and responsible fatherhood; (3)
current and potential programs that may be incorporated as action strategies; (4) the use
of media and other communication strategies; (5) internal and external constraints; (6)
resource development and fund-raising activities; and (7) an action plan with operational
next steps.

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The Contractor shall work with federal, state and local partners to convene the first megting
g f targeted dkmonstration coalitions by the 16th week following-the task order-award-a~d
the second meeting by the..32nd week. By the 20th week after the task order award, the
Contractor shall brief the TOO and other ACF staff on the status and results of the
meetings and, by the 48th week, provide a copy of the action plans for each coalition. For
travel and budgeting pwposes~the-Cmtractorshall
~-.planfor
~
two-meetings in each of the ..:-.- . . . . . . . - approximately 15-sites. ---- ... . . . . .
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__-_. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . -- The contractor shall provide and coordinate with expert con-sultants and ACF staff
t o provide lower-intensity-filephone-based technical assistance t o up to 30 CHMl
demonstration s i t e k ~ h i s
shall include, but not be limited to, technical assistance
..
o n issues relating to coalition building,
program development,
data
management
..
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Through subcontracting or consulting ;tgreementsr.:-i-y--.;z=.-:;--

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The contractor shall cover the travel costs for site visits by contractor staff and
expert consultants to u p to 25 non-1115 demonstration sites. For budgeting
purposes, the contractor shall expect that one oneday site visit will be made by
contractor staff and by the expert consultants t o each of the sites. ACF expects that
technical assistance t o the remaining CHMl sites will be provided by ACF Central
Office and Regional Office Staff.
subtask 2.3 Resource Development
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The Contractor shall provide technical assistance to help the selected coalitions develop
a resource development strategy to secure non-federal sources of financial and in-kind
supper\. This will not include the actual fund raising. but will be a strategic plan for future
resource development. A s required by statute, the slate share of the section 11 15(a)(2)

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
funding must be in the form of financial support, but resources over and above the
mandated state share can be financial and in-kind support. These resources may include
contributions from foundations, private individuals, grants, volunteer support and other
sources. The coalitions should develop resource development strategies that would be
appropriate for their respective demonstration plans.
The contractor shall provide f o r travel costs for experts and other key personnel
associated with the African American Healthy Marriage Initiative t o support u p t o
49 one day site visits (or a n additional 39 trips from the original contract) and
facilitate the attendance by 20
t o the Smart Marriages Conference i n
Reno, NV.
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Subtask 2.4 Best Practices-

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The Contractor shall work with the experts to identify
.andcommunicate to the coalitions
"promising practicesnforpromoting marriage,-familyformation and responsible fatherhood.
In co~junction
-with the experts, the -Contractor
.
~sh
. d
..l ~ r e i i e wpe-rtinent
best practices
literature, empirical findings,~~~descr~ptiv.e..reports
on th_e..s~cial,economic andhealth .. . ... . -. -;:related benefits of marriage, as well as the effects of.pray.id.ing-training, coun~selingand
-. .
support tb promote healthy marriages;-fami~~matio~antj~re~ponsib1e~fathe~ood:~
... purpose of the best kf&ctice review is to provide information on a broad array of
..--.
. - -.. approaches beingtakento encourage and maintain healthy marriages, and to support and
..-. - ..-..
promote reSUp6- a ~ T h - r - % t o ~ ; . i n
conjunction with-theexperts;shan use
..the information f ~ m . t h ebest practice review to make decisions about how to.focus-the work u n d e r ~ t ~ ~ s ' s ~ ~ e r : ~ a n d ~ ~ t o ~ h e l p ~ f f i ~effective
' c ~ l i t istrategies
o n s p l a for
n the
us&n
the
demonstrations. lnfo.rmation from the best practice review also shwld ...be
.. .. ..
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evaluation design considerations and recommendations.
To inform the best practice review, the Contractor-shallexplore existing-marriage, family- . - - - --.
.
formation and fatherhood promotion initiatives.: - --The--following--programslsites
are
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:
.
-=-----recommended:-the G r e a t e r - G r a n 6 R a p i ~ s ~ ~ m i i h ~ t y y M aPolicy
r r ~ a gIn
e -Grand Rapids,
.-'
Michigan; the State of ~ k l a h o m a ' s - D e p a r t m e n t - d - ~ r n a ~marriage
~ m e s promotions
policies; the First Things First marriage and fatherhood networks in Chattanooga,
.Tennessee; and other appropriate programslsites as approved by the TOO.
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best practice information into the
The Contractor shall develop strategies for
. .-integrating
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planning, i m p ~ e m e n t a t i e n - - a n d e v a I u a i b n - o f - t h e - d e m o n s t r a t i o n s . ~ n . . a d d i t i ~ ~ ~ _ t o _ t h e-1.-i n.. i t
pla-nning of the demonstrations, best practice information should be provided to the
coalitions by the Contractor o n an ongoing basis during the period of i h e task order. The
Contractor shall, in coordination with the.TO0, convene up to three meetings of the experts .
and key operational staff from the coalitions to facilitate an ongoing discussio6of the latest
research,-findings from evalu3170ns~innovative approaches and related information. The
meetings shall be held at ACF in Washington, DC. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor
shall plan for up to six experts and one representative from each of Ihe approximately 15
sites to atiend \he best practice meetings.
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Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 7 o f 13

The Contractor shall subrqit to the TOO a memorandum summarizing the findings from the
best practices review and identifying ways in which the best practices will be incorporated
into the demonstrations. The memorandum shall be submitted by the 28th week after the
task order award.
The contractor shall develop and provide best-practice information to the
demonstration sites, based on the following activities:
Subtask 2.4.1 Conferences
cont~ractorshall coordinate.with appropriate experts to host up to three twoday
- The
dbrife'rences in Chattanooga, TN. These conferences will provide participhnfs frorh
the sites with various sthtkgies for developing and implemenhg a"succkssfu~~
marriagedemonstration. In addition, the conferences will feature group and peer
.
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technical assistance~sessionswith experts and contractor staff. For budgeting
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----I----purposes,the
contract.or sh~a!!lle%pec_t
to cover-traveland
.. . ... . - travelmlafed expensesfor--".
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up to135 p a ~ i c i p r m t s ~ r ~ ~ ~ - c ~. ..-.. ~
O
-conf&r;-n~es-.:$,;&-:p;ovide
~
e
~
e
e
n
~
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r
h
h
~
an. . . - .. .
.
.opportunity for teams of people from'local communities to come together to learn
about and beginplanning their communi~yhealthy marriageigitiatives.. The Lewin - - . . .
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Group, staff from FTF<stafffio~m~ublic'~trate$tkiandother
consultants, along with
...
- ACF Central and Regional Office staff . will
. . . -.deliver the ~ontent;~and.facili_tate_.th.e-.
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the
lead
-on
agendadevelopment
and
work
with-'-----'.-.
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s the conferences.
.- . FTF'S
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budget will provide forfacility..
.
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costs, rnaterialg~*~$d
. .. . .. ~~~
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~ r n. o
.. .n . ~ a b o r ' c o s ~ s ~ a s ~ s s
tl-&:conferences.
ocia~ed~with

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The contractor shallpro.viddforthe travel andtravel-related expenzes (not including
conference registration fees) for-sending25 participants and contractor staff to the
. . . .
Smart Marriages conference in Reno,
_
NV.
_ _ _The
.._.._....
_ . _contractor
_ -....-... shall
. . not-billfor
. _ . _ . . . _ labor
_ . . _ cost...
_ . _..-. - - .-.- . = ,-this ~ ~ . t i u ~ t y ~ d u ~ i n g . . t h e . - ~ S ~ ~ M a ~ ~ i a ~ e s ~ f e r e n c e ~ - u n l e..s. s. ~ m t r a
-....under
. ..
.will be pr~senting,p~~?riding~t.echnic.al
assistancefo.tb~sites.-or-engagedin-other. - - - .-:.-.
-.
. . . ~ .
project work.
- .- .
. Subtask 2.4.2 Marriage Toolkit
The contractor shall develop and refine the technical assistance toolkit. The toolkit
shall consist of those elements agreed to in the original task order agreement. The
contractor shall submit to the Federal Project Officer a draft of eadh module of the
toolkit and a final version, which shall reflect comments from ACF and from experts
on the first drafts. - - - -- - - Subtask 2.5 Capacity-Building
The Contractor shall provide ongoing technical assistance to build \he operational capacity
of the coalit~ons.In t h ~ scapacity. the Contractor shall facilitate up to two meetings w ~ t hthe

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modi.fication Number 3
coalitions' leadership to address needs of the coalitions, and be available for informal
discussions by telephone and e-mail to provide support on an issue-by-issue basis. The
coalitions will provide logistical support for the meetings. For budgeting purposes, the
Contractor shall plan for two meetings at each of the approximately 15 sites.
Primary Capacity-Building Areas:

1. Strategic planning and management - The Contractor shall provide support
for establishing a mission, vision and values to guide the coalition; identifying
goals and objectives; and iranslating these goals and objectives into
activities.
- -. a w . - - -

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2. Financial planning and management -

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hec contractor stisli provide support

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for developing standards-forbudgeting, financial planning and management
to assist the coalitions .in maximizing resources and ensuring fiscal
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-3. lnteragencycoilaboration -The Contractor s t i a l ~ ~ 6 v i d e ~ - ~ i c r e a t i...T:'!.ZTL+
ng
.--eft
implementation ;e.&orks at
.....
- ... --ective
-. . .lMer--organizational_part_nerships-and
. . . . . .
. .-. .......
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a comqunity level:^-anm-@ocal- &-stabkvel-organizations. - - - - \.-.
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- - ---In the standad+jor4My yre~ort:submitteckto A C b s p a r l o f t h e ~mhS73o'ntract ...........
-.
.- . -- --- - - - - - a m s t r a t i o--n pr&&;*@i3raiS'shiiif
&
t t r e q. .~ .e - n ~ ~ a n d u rof
~ Eont
o s eact s . . . . . .
.
- . . . .
for capacity. - b ~ j l d ~ ~ ~ h e ,.~hmlhid-entif_y.~the.
. ~ e ~ d r t ~
.number. o f contacts for each - .: - , ..demonstration site during the report period, the purpose
of the contact, the staff person or
.
.
expert providing the tecti"ica[assistance and other relevant informalion. The . .~- and
format of the monthly reports shall adhere to ACF's procurement
guidelines.
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This subt.a-sUsdeM&and the
. . - -level
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. it has
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Subtask 2.6 Evaluation Design

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The Contractor shall provide technical assistance to the coalitions in developing options
for evaluation design. The purpose of the evaluation design activities will be to help the
coalitions develop frameworks for sustaining operational effe_ct.enessand-measurn&impact of the demonstrations at a community level. 'The Contractor shall gather descriptive
information about programs through telephone discussions and site visits. The Contractor
shall interview officials or staff within the programs, or researchers fam~liarwiih the
prog;ams, to discuss program mission, organization, operations, parlicipant characteristics,
outcomes, and other relevant topics. To the extent possible, any written information
available about the program shall be obtained prior to scheduling interviews and site visits.
When feasible, site visits shall include discussions with program parlicipants and
collaborating organizations. The TOO shall be given as much advance notice as possible
about site visit scheduling in order to allow time for planning for federal staff to participate

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
in some site visits. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall-plan for one site visit to
each of the approximately 15 sites.

:

The Contractor also shall assess the availability and verifiability of administrative data and
other sources of information at the local level. The Contractor shall assist the
demonstration sites in identifying sources of data relating to demographics, marriage, nonmarital pregnancies, divorce, and other key indicators.
The Contractor's activities shall be limited to technical assistance for the purpose of
evaluation design. Actual evaluation resea?ch will not be completed under this task order.

- The

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contractor shall provide tec-hnical assistance to targeted demonstratiorrsitesi n the development o f a management information system (MIS) to collect
administrative data at a community level
for the site.
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The contractor shall engage in t h e f ~ l l o w i n ~ a ~ t i v i t i(1)
e s identify
:
sites for further
.- work after-consultation with the Federal Project Officer;
(2) obtain-aggregate
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:=:.statistics
.at
the
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a
c
-site
h
(~e.,-marriage-;l~d-di\rorce-r~tes;
.. .. - - . .- .- .
. . .
demographics; employmentlincome inforniation);:(3) c~ndu[~tbaroIdaysite
visits-to
.
each of the sites to a,sF.ess availability of adrn-inistrativ-edata-atthe individual level; -.. . .
-(4) contact
. .. - .
..
vital
.
statisfks, child welfare, child support,TANF, and labordepartrnents..
. . ... . .
. .
-. -at the state level to-discuss.,types o f information a d e - f r e m - a d m i n i s t r a t i v e < - - - .
.---...
systems -an-d%vCument3ny-&iues_in
obtaining this once evaluation sitesand. . . . . . -.
evaluatorhave---~+)
e
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o
c u m e o t t ~ t e - e r r v i m n m e ~ - t . - a ~ d ~ ~ ~ a n. ~
. foi-

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- implementing thcCdeemoiStrali-orifnTtiative;(6)di'sciiss sites' data collection 'needs
and how software program .might be useful to them; (7) developrdesi~nlfoF3ata--------collection program; (8) develop list of information to be collected; (9) meet-withACF
and revise based.onsuggestions;.(l.0).designforms and outline the capability ofthe
. . ~
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pro9ram6. . .- - - s - - y c.z , .- - - - - . - .
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Evaluation Design Activity
2.6.1 Performance..Measurement
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The Contractor shall assist the leadership and staff of each coalition in the development
of a logic model for the demonstration initiative. The logic model shouldidentify the inputs,
activities, outputs, intermediate outcomes, and end outcomes for the demonstration.
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The Contractor shall submit to the TOO a copy of a logic -model for each
coalition/demonstration site by the 48th week after the task order award.
--

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Evaluation Design Activity 2.6.2 Community Impact Evaluation
The Contractor shall assist the coalitions in developing options for measuring the impact
of the internention strategies at a community level. The evaluation designs should reflect
recent research relating to community-level evaluation methods and include a discussion
and strategies for using small-area data. time-series analysis and statistical modeling of

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 10 of 13

counterfactuals. The Contractor shall submit to the T ~ evaluation
O
plans for each of the
demonstrations by h e 60th week after the task order award.
By the 72nd week after the task order award, the Contractor shall submit to the TOO a
memorandum that provides recommendations concerning evaluation strategies and the
demonstrations to be considered for more indepth evaluation. The memorandum shall
identify the demonstration sites recommended for further study, the rationale for the
recommendations, and alternative program recommendations and rationale to be
considered if it is not possible to conduct
. site visits with one or more of the primary
programs identified.

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TASK 3 - DlSCUSSlONSlBRlEFlNGS AND FINAL REPORTSSubtask 3.1 Discussions and Briefings

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Because this is developmental w
o r.-k f 6. . r-~. -~ ~ , ' f i e - ~ ~ 6 n ~ l to-be
y - w aclosely
h t s involved with - - - - . - ...
the project-*
- .- - . - n
. e w information becomes .available. Therefore, in addition to regular '----'-... - -.'
;
-- =6commu
nic-at-io-n~-~m~~.e~~TB~~'th~~~Pi:t>jecTT
fiiecfoi-a-"-d- k+y-piojeCt
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brief federal staff informaHy on developments and findings prior to formal submissions-----(e.g., information generated.during coalition building,-discusski-ns-with-experts. telephone

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discussions with statebovernment andprogram officials, andtechnical aSsisfance).. The
Contractorshall assumethat-such informal discussions will-be-conductedby telephone
approxim.alelyevery 13 weeks and that e , r h m - h o m k e
exact.- - - .-:
- .
schedule-will-be~appVov~.yfhe
10-Orafter task-orde~award
and.-may-badjusted'wer---y-=-'--i---.q''"
time as projectwork-~anddevelopmmeerits
sugge-st. -Any written information relevant to the
discussions will be submitted to the TOO by mail, fax or e-mail for Qlstribution-to-other
-federal staff prior to the scheduled telephone conversation. It is expected that during such
r oth'er:staff willreport on.the range of programs.for-- - - - - informal briefings the Project ~ i r e c t oor
..
- . - . ..-.-.--. .
- . which-infqatisnhas betmoBtaked-tudateor sincethe last briefing, unique orinnovative..- . .- - .
approaches identified, significant developments or.problems in the conduct of the work as
---planned, -mresearch'3ritfings;-extent of cmsistence or divergence'of'fitiUiii~~~rdss,::-. .. . -.
studies, major knowledge gaps for-which information is being sought, input from expert
panel members, and other issues identified by the Contractor or ACF.

.- - . . -. ----

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.
.

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,

~

The Project Director and key-'piGj&ctstaff shail-conduct two formal briefings f6r ACFIHHS
staff,
. . invited
.
.
experts,
.- andpther-fnvited participants as -agreed to by the TOO. The first
briefing shall be amid-project status report and shall be completed by-the481h week after
the task order award. T h e Co"tractq and key staff shall present background information.
describe thewdevelopment of th6'demonstration coalitions, identify opportunities and
constrajnts relating to implementation, discuss next steps, and provide an opportunity for
open discussion and comments on the activities completed to date. The Contraclor shall
consider the comments received in planning the next steps of the project.
,

-

The second briefing shall be scheduled after submission of the draft of the final report.
During this briefing the Contractor and key staff shall provide an overview 01 the project;

-

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 11 of 13

present summary informationldescriptions of various demonstrafions, including common
and unique components or characteristics: and discuss evaluation design issues and
recommendations. The briefing shall include a discussion of recommendations and
irnplicat~onsfor further study in the area by ACF or others. Evaluation related issues to be
discussed may include: the ability to increase scope or scale of exist~ngprograms;
challenges to replication of selected programs/models in other sites; program ~lptakeand
corrlpletion rates; availability and validity of small area data; potential for using interrupted
time-series analysis and related techniques, as appropriate; stability of funding for program
operations; and other issues identified by Contractor staff.

.\

P
,.-

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The Contract~rshall submit-to the-TOO for approval a draft outline for the briefings at least
two weeks prior to the scheduled briefing date. The first briefing shall be conducted-by-the
. 48th week after task order award and the second by the 94th week.
..

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-.. -....-..

.-=.

- .. -

. . . .

The contractor shall provideperiodicproject briefings and-technical statub reports.
The contractor
shall expect t o s&a-si-de
u p t o six.hours..per-month
for this subtask.
.. -....
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-.......
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...................--.
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A

.

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The Contractor shall..prepare-an--0Vttine-and
a-draft-and-final report on the projectrT-he
Contractor shall s u b k ~ the
o TOO for approval a report outline with suggestions or options
.
for information presentahon. T h e ~ o n t r a c t o ~ s h a l l ~ s u b ~
outline
i ~ t h eno later than the 90th . .
.
.
-.
__..............
week a f t e r t m r . a. . .w. . . .a. . .r. .d... .. ,.. .. ... .. .:. ...... -. :. . -- - . .- .~
-.
~
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~
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..*.-.*,*..- .,. ...'-.
-_
_ .______
_
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- - ..
.
The drafl findr+shotlldsumarize-the-work-performed;
present summary information1 . . . . . . . . . . . .
descriptions of various demonstrations, including common and unique-components or-- . . .
characteristics; and discuss evaluation design issues and recommendations. The drafffifal
.
. . .
report should -includea-~kussionof-recornmendaY101~s~and
impli-cations for further study
-.
.
.
in the area_by ACF o r ~ o t h e r s I I ~ ~ ~ t e d j ~ u e ~ t ~ - b e d i u s drafi-final-----------.-.,r;
s e d n t h e. . .
.
. ~report may-include: the a b i l i t y ' t o ~ n c.........
r e a s ~ c q por.sca~e.ofexi_sting.~?rograms;
e
challenges . . . .
. . . . . . . . .
- 1 to replication of selected programslmddelsin~tkhe~tes;
program uptake-and-mmpleWri- - , rates; availability and validity of small area data: pote--iStialfor using-interruptedtime-series
..
analysis and related techniques, as appropriate; stability of funding for program operations;
and other .Issues identified by Contractor staff.
.
.

. . . . . .

_p---.pp_.

'

0 i

-__

,

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The Contractor shall submit the draft of the final report to the TOO and members of the
experl panel by the 90th week after task order award. The Contractor shall revise the
reporl and produce a final report that addresses comments on the drafi 'iaised by the TOO
and other reviewers. The final report shall be submitted by the 104th week afler task order
award. The Contractor shall not make any part of the-re~puMicwrthoutprior-writte.n
approval of the TOO or until the report has beenreleased by ACF. In addition to printed
copies required, a digital copy of the reporl shall be delivered based on the guidelines in
Appendix B - Specifications for the Delivery of Digital Copies of Reporls.

-.

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.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 12of 13

This subtask is deleted and the level of effort originally dedicated to support it has
been reallocated elsewhere. The contractor shall shift the level of effort from this
subtask to other subtasks by removing the deliverables for this subtask.

2. In Section G- Contract Administration Data, Change to the following rates, and
Associated ~ubcontractorl~onsultants:
G.1. Advance Understandinq:

-

Other provisions of this contract notwithstanding, the Contractor is hereby authoriza to
incur the following revised costs, (as listed on modification propcsal dated 5/29) within the
limits set forth without further-authorization:

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'Represents
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-------

New S~tbcontractor/&mst~ltant,not listed oninitial Task Order Contract.
- .- ---- -

-

- .

-

--

---A

- -

---

-The listed subcontrac~orsl~n.sultants:cannot
exceed the referenced rate indicated without
prior writte-rnapproval of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officer.
i
J5

\-,

-

--

T h e (To Be Named) Expert Consultants must not exceed the referenced rates indicated
without p r i o r w ~ - r u p p m ~ a Lthe
o f ProgdlrppocEenter_(PSC)-ContractingOfficer.
.The Contractor rr)usj,jdentLtyan applicable consultant in collaboration with the
Administratio_n_f=Children and Families (ACF) Task Order Officer, (TOO). Upon--- - --- receipt of approval, the contractor shall forward a confirmation letter, identifying the
selected consultant, daily rate, and number of days considered for wo%, to the TOO, and

3.ThetotaTaa-n7-ofthe-bask~~e~In~i~offeeisincreasedby
from $1.268.639.00 to.$1.318,252.00. The total fee is -decreased by

1- :I
-

=

-.from_

4 . Please,coordinate revised changes to applicable tasks and sub-task due dates and
times with the assigned Task Order Officer.

5. All other terms and conditions remain unchanged and in full force and effect.
:,

-- .-

-

-r
-

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 4

Page 1 of 2

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: August 29, 2003

OMB No. 0990-0115

Contractor: The Lewin Group
3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Address:

.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
6.
ask-order umber 030
. s
C. - Modification Number 4
Title: "Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
D.
Community Initiativen------Task 0rdTr Officer: Brendan Kelly
E.
F. ----Cost:
--$
.?.' j'
---Fee:

Subject: a

-

A.

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Cost plm-fi~ed-fee31:3t8;252:00- A*ropriation: 7531 536
CAN Number: G991539 - _ _ _
--. . . . -.- . ... . . .Object-Class: 2513-----------.........
. . . . . . . . . .
.,.-.-.£IN: ...-.
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. DU-NNS:.
G.Statement-of Work: Unchanged
..........
.............
..........................
. . . .- ~ e l i v e r ~ ' ~ c h e d uUnchanged
le:
- H.
- I..-.,Periad of Performance: August 28,2002 through
August 27,2004
..... --. .--......--- ---.-.
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This modification is hereby issued pursuant to-the terms and conditions-of>~ersubjgct
------- - -- contract. The subject Task Order is.hereby modified asfollows:
1. Change G.?., Advance Understanding, Page 13, of Task Order Modification Number
3 to read:

Expert Consultant 3.

i

1
i - I

1

J

--

The listed consultant can not exceed the referenced rate indicated without prior written
approval of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officer.

--- - .

...
- <

.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 4

Page 2 of 2

This change is issued at no additional cost to the government. The Total Amount of Task
Order Remains at $1,318,252.00, period of performance, and all other t e n s and
conditions remain unchanged.

- The
~ewinGr6up:
Firm Name
......

......
.

Contracting Officer

y:-y707
Date
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. - -- .

--

- - ------ -

-

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: February 12, 2004
Contractor: The Lewin Group

a

Address:

3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

SLIbject:

A.
B.

-

C.
.

.=-.

.
.

D.

E.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 030
Modi,ficationNumber 5.,
Title: 'Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Corr~munityInitiative"
.-~
.. .C - Task-Order Officer: Mark Fucello
. ...-... Period of Performance: August 28, 2002 through
-August 27,2004

C

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---- --- -. .-

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Modification
.
-. ..
.- - - . .
is.hereby.issu.ed pursuant to the terms and conditions
This Administrative
..
of the subject contract,at
nOO~ZiTti~nal~~st.to~the~~GoVemmnt.~
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The above referenced Task-Order..'ys_hgreby-modified
to change Section F , as follows:
,,"

.:.

1. On the face page oAbe task order, Subject D., the Task Order Officeis name is
changed to read Mark Fucello, in lieu of Brendan Kelly.

.

2. On Page-13, LSne"F.2.. Deliver Items during the referenced time periods to the Task
Order Officer (TOO), Mark Fucello, Social Science Research Analyst, Office
of Planning, Research and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families,
- -LELDepartrnentof Health and Human Services, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW..
Washington, DC 20447.
Phone Number: (202)401-5750
Fax: (202)205-3598
-E-mail: mfucello@atf.
hhs.gov
. - - - a

3. The total Task Order amount, period of performance, and all other terms and conditions
remain unchanged and in full force and effect.

FL.k
~ a / ~ aKelly
&

Date

.

1

-.

.-..
.- ---

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: May 04, 2004

Contcactor :
Address :

The Lewin Group
3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Subject :

A.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 030
. Modification Number 6
Tit1e:"Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood
Demonstration Community Initiative"
E.
Task Order Officer: Mark Fucello
F.
Period of Performance: August 28, 2002
through September 30, 2004

B.
C.
D.

*

-,-

.

-

This supplemental agreement is entered into, pursuant to the .
authority of FAR 52.293-2, Changes-Cost Reimbursement (AUG 1387)Alternate I APR 1984).

.

,
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by $727,734.00. The accounting data
1. The Task Order amount is--increased
.
.--....
.-. . . . . .
is as follows:
..
--..
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- ..-.

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-...........

Total Estimated C o & ' f i Mod . #s :
_-_FixedFee, LewL?, . Mod_ #6:..._-___.
.
....
~

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.

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-

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Totab Estimated Cost Plus Fixed Fee,
Mod # & .
Three (3) Appropriation, CAN,

Appropria

&

......

$727,734.00

Object Classes:

-......

=. :-:. : ~ .,Obj-edtClas-g-';'-r
.........
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. . . . .2
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41.i;q.96;i21.
5.-.1.3....
a. 7541553
'-.$225,
000 . 00 . . .- .-G996
4
72----25.,13-.d0-;--=--1-5
1-2
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O
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,0'00.06
- . -.-- . . .
-4;G992016
25.13
c - 75x1553 - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
........
$~00,000.~~

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The Lewin Group
Firm Name

/

- --- =.

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2. Section C- DESCRTPTION/SPECIFICATTONS/WORK STATEMENT, the level of
effort.is increased as outlined in the following pages, to provide
continued Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Community Initiative. This modification shall be incorporated into the
above numbered Task Order. (See Attachment A, Pages 1-51.

4---

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;

. . . . .

-.
.nBMMT.ION: .. . .$ .5.2.5 . , m O i ' O E + :

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................

/

Autfiorized Signature

Date

Page 2-Contract Number 282-98-0016,Task Order Number 30, Modificatior
Number '6

3. On the face page of the task order, subject H, the Period of
Performance is changed to read August 28, 2002 through 'September 30,
2004.
4. Section F.1 "Period of Performance," is changed as follows: The period
of performance is changed from August 28, 2002 through August 27, 2004
to August 28, 2002 through September 30, 2004.

-

rbr

-

5.-Sect-ion
Data
-G-Contract Administration
.=
=

- .

.

:

G.1. 352.232-74 Estimated Cost and Fixed Fee-Incre6kntaL:ly.
~G~de8
Contract (APRl984)'.

- -- - -

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*
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(a) It is est'imated that the total cost to the Government for full
performance of this task order wi3-lFbe $2,045,986.00of
- .- which the sum-of
I
I represents the e s t i m a t i reimbursable
. costs
.-- .
-and
-. . .
I
represents
the fixed-fee.
.
.
. . . . . . . . .
-. . . . .

,1

. --

(b) Total funds-curr.entlvavailable for payment and allocated to
this task order contract are $1,843,252.00,of which
represents-theestimated reimbursable costs and
represents the fixed-fee. For further provisi-ons
on fundhg, see the Limitation of m n d s clause.

- .

-

(c) It is48r6t.inx+tedthat the amount currently..allotted w i l k w e r
performance through August 16, 2004.
-

.....
.

--.

(dl The Cont-ractirlgGfficer may allot additional finds
t d -012
..
-. -.-- .- -. -... --.
contrac=wi
th-~~f'
'con-cCu-f~renc~'
of -the--Contractor
.

G - 2 . Advance
Understanding-.
:- - . . . - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
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-- . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Total :

=.

.

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:

=

,

. . . . .

Other provisions ?f this c o n t - r a c t n o t w i t h s t a n d i n g , the Contractor is
hereby authorized to incur the following estimated revised 'cdsfs, las
listed on modification proposal dated April 7, 2004) within the limits
set forth without further authorization:
Subcontr; -:tors/Consul
tants :

--

--

Page 3-Contract Number 282-98-0016,Task Order Number 30, Modification
Number 6

Total :

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The listed-subcontractors/consu1tants cannot exceed the referenced rate
indicated without . prior mitt en a p p r o - 3 of-+he Program Support Center
..
.. . . . ..
.
.
.
.
. . . . . .
.
. .....
.
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(PSC) Contracting Officer.

-- - - -.

6. T h e total task order amount, inclusive of fgcis.-increased.by

$727,734.00 from $1.318.252.00 to $2,-045,386.80.-The total fee is
'

...

\.=

?-a

7. Coordinate-revised changes to applicable task and sub-task due dates
and times with the assigned Task Order Of'ficer.
------.----L.-.;--.+---.'.
--..-.....-.....-....
..-----.
;....&..--..-._................I-...~....-.....-...--...-.-...
8. All other terms and conditions remain unchanged and in full force
and effect .
.- .
+,A-

:

- __
I

Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

Page 1 of 5

ATTACHMENT A
Statement of Work (the text changes requested by this modification are highlighted
in bold).
Tasks to be included in this project are described below.

-

1.Change Subtask 2.1 Section-1.115Waivers as follows:
..

..

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.

-- . - 3
The contractor shall provide intensive, on-site technical assistance to up totwelve of the
..
sites implementing section 1115 demonstrations under CHMI, as approved by the Federal
..
-Project -0fficerTheA C F -Office
of
Child Support Enforcement with the assistance of
. . . .
. - -..
. ACF Regional office staff shall monitor~theuse of federal program funds, assess the
- - -progress of program development
and implementation,
and actively identify
. - ....... .
..
-.... ..technical assistance neecis-in.individua1sites. The Conifactor shall Frovide intensive
- - technical assistance to-theextent that each-siteis willing tvwork with the
-- - . .- .~... - - .-- . . -. . . .
. . .- . . . - .
...
Contractor and its subcontractor.or consultmts.tobelp develop healthy marriage.
.....
s are likely to assist in promoting child support
demonstration p r i ~ m that
objectives, such as establishing paternity, obtaining child support, and assuring .'
-..-----.
-.
.- --. . .
- assistance i n obtaining support for all chimren for whom such-assistance is''..
....-:requested. This1t9ohnical.assistanceshall include, but not be limited to, coalition
. ..
.. .
.
building, financial management, program development, and data management (Subtask
2.6). For budgeting purposes; the Contractor shall expect to make on avernge u p ~ o t -w--o
siteu-isits-beachof the twelve section 1115 sites.
I-..

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The intensive technical assistance shall include working with each site to create a
developm'ent plan that can lead the site to implementation of a strong healthy
marriage community saturation program model that meets child support - - .- -enforcement program objectives. These plans may include strategies for reaching
out to additional target populations, expanding the base of service partners and
providers, and/or expanding the range of programs and services provided. The
development plan shall list specific steps the site will take to launch their CHMl
program. The contractor shall work with each site to develop specific benchmarks
- that will be used to assess site progress against their plan. The plan shall be designed
to build on a site's specific strengths and needs. The contractor should'assume that
each site will need at least one visit and up to an average of two visits during the
remaining period of performance. The contractor shall hold regular conference
calls with each site, and other phone and email contact will be ongoing to maintain
momentum and follo~v-upon action items agreed to during the visits. Technical
assistance to tbe 11 15 demonstration sites shall aim to address program site needs
and may include:

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

Page 2 of 5

o development of plans that can assist sites to structure healthy marriage
services and messages in ways that meet child support enforcement
program objectives, as outlined in the section 1115 waiverterms and
conditions, including: improved compliance with support obligations by
non-custodial parents when needed; increased paternity establishment
for low-income children born to unwed mothers; collaboration with
court agencies to assure support for children for whom child support is
requested; and direct intervention witb two-parent intact and single but
co-parenting households to emphasize the importance of financial and
-- .
emotional support for children.
.-

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o strategic planning, as needed, such as assisting with community needs
assessments, md-ggduet-hp-lq$c - model e x e r c i s r t e 4 l e s f i - o u- t ~.
.
. .~ populatio~~interyent
ions, outcomes,
..
-etc. ..
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---.-- - -.-.

. -.
.- ...

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coaljii.-o~a:evej.p-mentnt
- ,- - actfvrtlehTinr;drrn-an'dxngage
community
su p port er s, providers . a ~ n d ~ T r t F r i S , I a n t S 3 S w e mcsisl
~ . ~ c aance-on
~
7
---:
1- -7manageqent-structures;-coalitionleadership, guidance for federally
.

fundedQrajth-basedservice providers, and decision-making processes.

..
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o program-wide provision of information regarding allowable activities of
"
idaocFio..F.aith-Based
faiW.b'aaCedService p r o v k k ~ outti~~s
and Com~ni~'OfgaTuatibnsron-Pafinerkg
.......................................
yith tpe Federal .-.
Government,'?~~issued
by .the
.
White House Office of FaitlrBased and- Community Initiatives.
-Q

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.-....---.-

-..--

.

.

--.-.

.

.

/

sites'-efforts
on----y;--:-development
- ...... - -of
- -s
-....e r v i c e - c a p a-.c. ~ ~ cdemmstratim
us
-.
.
-- -.- -- .
-....
.
selecting-target populations-for+-initiative; development of - -pbrtitipant outreach and reCruitmenf pSi~is;seJ&ifi?if b e - - - delivered (e.g., PREP, Pairs, RE, etc.);-identification of program
providers and settings; plans for training service deliverers; and, as
. - --. -. -- ..
. .
..
public-.-..e ~ e n t s . -.
needed, assistance with media_cam_p_a.ignsand
.
.- . . -.
?

~

~

-

-

_

o development of family violence client screening capacity in each site to - - help programs ensure that healthy marriage program staff are properly
trained to recognize and respond to family violence concerns and that
participants are appropriately referred to service providers equipped to
assist them with past, ongoing or potential domestic and family violence
problems or questions. The Contractor shall engage family violence
expert consultants wbo are familiar with the sortsof healthy marriage
intervention strategies and programs provided in CHMI sites and shall

-

Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

Page 3 of 5

ensure that other project staff have the capacity to provide technical
assistance related to family violence as well.
o development of a Management Information System (MIS) in each site
that would'allow the program's managers to collect information
necessary to help them monitor and refine their programs and to allow
the state child support enforcement agency to meet its reporting
responsibilities to the A C F \Office of Child Support Enforcement. The
Contractor shall hglp each site identify the elements to be included in *
their MIS, provide assistance with programming l h e MIS, recommend
appropriatedata security measures, and train site staff'ih use of the
MIS.
-

-

--- - - -

-

-

.
-

-

.

.
=+

..

2. Add Subtask 2.1.1 as follows:

Technical Assistance to Other ACF-funded Healthy Marriage Grantees
-

-

-.
-.

The Contractor shall respond to requests for techical assistance from Healthy
Marriage grantees~u.ndedby A C F programs other than by 1115 waiver awards.
The appropriate program office within ACF with the assistance of ACF Regional'
OffEce staff3liall -monitor the-use-of-fedemlprogram-funds,
assess the progress of

- -. - -.....
.-.
- .
.- .- .....-. ..- ...

program develqmeot.and-implementation,.andactively identify technical assistance needs in individual sites.

-

-

. ~ . . -.- ......
. .

.

.-

-

. .. -

. ....
~

.... ..

...

- ...- . . . .

_

,. . : _ _

These grantees shall inc1"de entities funded by the following program oflices of
ACF: Children's Bureau, Office of Community Services, Office of Refugee
Resettlement, ~ d m i n ---.i s t r a t i o nfor Nativ.e
the -Office
. . . - --..--.-- - -.,.
-.-.,-,,
, -... . .Americans,
- - - -..--.. ..-and
-.-...
... - - . . of
- - -Child
-.---.--.
--.--.
S u p p o ~ E n f o r c e m e nand
t may include.other.progpmoflicea.duri.ng.
the-period. eT
performance-The.primary focus-01-tktechnicalassistance provided b y tbe----. .. Contractor to these sites shall be on the healthy marriage component of their
projects (e-g., creation of healthy marriage program development plans; outreach
and marketing strategies focused on bealthy marriage; selecting healtby marriage
curricula appropriate for the target populations; development of healthy marriage
service delivery capacity) although other assistance may also be provided if
requested, including for example-dewleprnent of d e t d e d work plans for meeting
the goals of the federal funding program; complying with general rules governing
federal grantees including those applicable to federally funded faith-based service
providers; identification of program providers and settings; and plans for training
seriice deliverers.
.. . ..

, ,

.. . . - -

.

,(

- - <

-.

-.

.

-

The Contractor shall ensure that all ACF-funded Healthy Marriage grantees are-----provided expert technical assistance in tbe development of family violence client
screening capacity to assist participants with past, ongoing or potential domestic

.

. .. ..

.

.

Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

Page 4 of 5

and family violence problems or questions. The Contractor shall engage family
violence expert consultants who are familiar with the sorts of healthy marriage
intervention strategies and programs provided by the Healthy Marriage grantees
and shall ensure that other project staff have the capacity to provide technical
assistance related to family violence as well.

-

For budgeting purposes, the Contractor,shall expect to work with up to 20 healthy
marriage grantees under this subtask and will plan to make at least one visit to up
t o 12 bf these grantees. The cuotractor shall hold conference calls as needed with
.
healthy marriage grantees that request technical assistance, and the Contractor =
shall'engage in bthefongoing phone and email contact to follow-up on action'itenis
agreed to by the grantee and the Contractor.

-

.

-.

.-

3. Add Subtask
2.1.2 as follows:
. .

- ...
--

-

. . .

.-.

-

~

.- ...
- .

. . . .
. . .

.

.

. . . .

... . .. - ... . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

.

-.

-

.

.

-.

. . .

.

.
..

--

..

Monitoring of S u b c o n t i i t t o r ' - % r i = st A
.

...
.--

...

...

-- -

.....

p~

.

--..

--

.
....

..

The Contractor shall engage-and c o o r d i G t e t ~ ~ ~ f e x - p e r t - c m s n l t a n t assist
s t o - = .. - - - - them with subtasks>a::l and 2.1.1 as necessary. The Contractor shall negotiate anddirect work of subcontractors
and
-.. consultants.
.- -- .-Theegotiationsmay
include an
.
......
...-. - .- - .
.
-- . - ---d*-d-7isseay'.
. . .. . . .
.
..
.
.
.
.
.
.
outliniof thetype and scope of t e c h n i i z..- .--a -e i-~
T.R- S E
. &
. .@
= ~~TWI
on1115
- . .
.- 3~m12-~;.1:-v$fj-e><r.it,
::.::.-.,: ..:. {-:.. - =
CHMI sites o r ' W l t h y a M a r r i.-a--geetnearg
. . .
......
Contractor shall allocate ~ ~ b ~ ~ ~ t ~ a c t o r f ~ ~ ~ throughoutthe------'-"
~ ~ l f ~ ~ ~ t ~ ~ k -~ ~- . u- r c e s
remaining period of perfo~mance. The Contractor shall get feedback from
-=-=
.... - .
. - .subcontractors' arid e x p e r t c o n s ~ l t ~ n t ~ - i n t ~ ~ ~ t ~ i ~ o n s ~ . w i ~ ~ s ~ a n ~ t e e s
.
contribute to a resource file of materials
and information that can be shared with
. .......
. . -.
..s.........
he-€*%tract.& ;.L~:..;. ... .:.:-LC-. TL!,
~pecific~sjtes
as neededand a
... - ........
--.- - .
shall make this r e s o u r c e ' ~ e ~ ~ ~ lo.-~ ~ a ~ wf,eS.-w,
~ ~ p - h.o.a
~ ,
-.
trying to build c o m r h n i t y healthy marriage ioika(ireswithwbem-neither t b e
..........
- Contractor nor A C F is currently working intensively. - - - - -. .
2

-

...

:-:

:,.

.

:

. . . .
-.

-.

'

.-

.

--

.

;-

4. Add'subtask 2.1.3 as follows:
-

. - .

-

.......

. . . . . .

Technical Assistance to Healthy
. . . . . . . .Marriage
..
Initiatives
- ..- unfunded
.
by ACF
- -

.

.

. .-

.

,

The Contractor shall support the provision of technical assistance by subcontractors
apd consultants for healthy marriageinitiatives that are not currently receiving
funding from ACF and, thus, shall not receive assistancemder subtask 2.1 or 2.1.1;
As rksources allow, the Contractor may respond directly to requests for technical
assistance from such healthy marriage initiatives if this work can help inform the
knowledge base of healthy marriage program development.

-

.........

-.

.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

5. Change Subtask 3.1 Discussion and Briefings, as follows:

-

dr

-

The Project Director and key project staff shall conduct two formal briefings for
ACFIHHS staff, invited experts, and other invited participants as agreed to by the TOO.
The first briefing shall b&a mid-project status report and shall be completed by the 48"'
week after the task order award. The Contractor and key staff shall present background
information, describe the development of the demonstration coalitions, identify
opportunities and constraints relating to implementation, discuss next steps, and provide
an opportunity for open discussim and comments on the activities completed to date.
The Contractor shall consider the comments received in planning the next steps of the+
-,
. ,project.

The Contractor shan conduct five to six monthly briefings for the Assistant
Secretary for Children and Families and ACF senior staff whose programs are
involved in funding Healthy Marriage activities. The agenda for these briefings
-shall be developed in COD~U-~~TOQ
and shall serve to update ACF
senior staff on the technical assistance- provided
- - -- - under this contract as well as the
progress of Healthy Marriage projects funded by ACF and, in particular, the
- - progress of the sectit& 1115 waiver sites as they build toward their community
saturation objectives.
-

-

.

- . --

.

-

-- - - - .

The second b r i ~ r l ~ -- s h a l l ~ ~ ~--m- B -m -i-of-the
- s-- -s draft
i e nof the
--- finatrepoit.- =
During the briefing- the Contractor and key staff shall provide an overview of the project;
present summary infbrmation/descriptions of various demonstrations, including-cornman
and unique components or characteristics; and d k ~ ~ ~ ~ . v a 1 u a t ~ n _issues
d e ~ iandg n _recommendations. The briefing shall include adiscussion of recommendations and - - .implications for further study i-d&e-ebyACF and others- Evaluation_r&tedissllesh
be discusied may include: ~hF%bifi&t_o~&xezse scopcand-scaie of exisling programs; -challenges to replication of selected piograrns/models in other sites; program u p t a k e a d -completion rates; availability and validity of small area data; potential for using
interrupted time-series analysis and related techniques, as appropriate; stability of
fundlng for program operations; and other issues identified by Contractor staff.
-.

.

-

- -

- --

--

-.

.

. .
.

-

.-... .

.-

-

The Contractor shall submit to-the TOO for approval~adraffou_tlinefor
thgbnkfings at
'least two weeks prior to the scheduled briefing date. The first bnefing shall be conducted
by the 48Ihweek afler task order award and the Second onlor before September 28,2004.
The contractor shall provide periodic p r o j e c t - b ~ e f i n g s a a & s t a t u srep&-addhion to the monthly briefings for ACF senior staff. The contractor shall expect to
set aside up to ten hours per inonth for Subtask 3.1.

-

.
..

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER

-

Contractor:
Address :
Subject :.

The Lewin Group
3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA
22042
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task .Order-'Number 30
...-.
..
Modification
..
Number 7
.:.-.
..
----'~it-le: "Healthy Marriage and ~esponsible
Fatherhood Demonstration Community
-Inititative"
Task Order Officer: Mark Fucello
:Period of P e r f o r m a n c e ~ : ~ A X . i i g u s t 2 8 ~ , L 2 U 0 2- ~ ' t ~ ~
. . .
- -December----3-1;,2004- -

A.

- --

p.

Effective Date: August 23, 2004

B-.

.

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.

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F.

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-....

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Object
Class:
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. . . . . . . . . . . .. . .. . . . . . . . . . . . .

.

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. - -.
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- ..

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The purpose-.
of-.t-his
modification -ir-s-to -extendthe -period---of-- - - performance through December 31, 2004 at no additional cdstto
t-heGovernment.
.

.

.

.

.

.

.

..

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$ -3,920.00 APPR: 7541553
-.

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--- .

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CW:. 4G995514 -$--$-8,814-jrb
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All other terms and conditions remain-unckaX?JFd-by reason of this
modification.

.De t-'.-.o..f--H
ea-ltl-

& Hiiw2ii.

Program Support Center

-.

ng Offlcer/Date

.

..

-

.'

yT%l
Tq 7 " ' ~
Cont a

.

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDEF
Effective Date: December 9,2004

---

-

. . .

Contractor:
Address:

The Lewin Group
3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls C h ~ c hVA
, 22042

A. Contract Number 282-98-0016
B . Task Order Number 30
..
C. Modification Number 8
--D,---Title-: "HeaIthy Maniage and I tesponsible Fatherhood. - - .- -. - - .- . .
Demciiistration Cornmur ity Initiative"
E- Task Order Omcer: Mark Fucd.o. ... ;:F. Period of Performance: August :.8,2002 through
'J
February 28,2005 . . . . .
. .

Subject:
-.

. . .

.

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.............

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The purpose of this modificatiop is to extend the period of perform;tnce thou& ~ e b i 28,h
2005...m-ne.yeriod of perfor~nnje-shdlbe August 28,2002 thr )ugh February 28,2005. The .
extension is at no additional cost to the Government.
-

.

--

--

.

-

........

-

The Lewin Grouv
. . . . - - .-...-

.--- -..

..
. .

. .
....
. .

.

Dmt. of Health & HurnanSexv~ces
;,.
. Prograr 1 .Support Center

.

.
. .

1 DATE OF ORDER

1 2. CONTRACT NO

cl/oL/2c32

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2.

HAME OF Z O G I W E E

/ A C F / C ) ? ? 01 ?-LJL\-?:IXG,

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OFFICE 1Adn.e:~ conrzaan?0nC8 131

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REOUISITONREFERENCE NO.

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3. OQCER NO.

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ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES
IMPORTANT; Mark all ucickagcs and paperz w t h c o n m e t andlor orwr numbers

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NAME 0; CONTRACTOR

tGRGEJL'T GALLACZER
b. COMPANY NAME

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DELIVER TO F.o.5. POINT
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:3. PLACE OF
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10/31/2002

ACCEPTANCE

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- .........

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ITEM NO.

SUPPLIES OR !SERVICES

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120. INVOICE NO.

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! 23 NAME

BY ( S f g n ~ r ~ ~ :

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TOTAL

7.2 v N l T E 3 STATES 01: AMEQ'CA

PVEVIOUS EO'T1CY Y O 7 U S l O L E

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TITLE: C O N ~ C ' I I N G I O ~ D E R I N G
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If desired. rhls order (or a =opy there00 may be used by the Cmlractor as the Ccnmdcrs invoie, tndeed cf a scoarare invn* ~-- e ,:.-cv:~c:
the following statement. (sianed and dated) is cn (or altathed to) me order: 'Paymmt Is requested in me amount of S
Nz
Otner lnvolcc will be zvbmillud.~However, if thc C c n t n c t o r wiehee to submit an 1nvo:ke. Lne following informatier must ce onvlcee:
conlrzu number (if
8r.y). order number, ilern number(:). dcsaiption cf su?olics or service, sizes. quantLcs. unll prices. a - c exls-CE
Latal:. Prepald shipping casts will be indicated zs 8 sewrate item on fie invcice. Where shl??ng ~ 9 extgGC!
5
510 (ex~e:! f3r ~ a : t e :
oost). Ihc billing must k suplortee by a bill of lading Or recei91. Whcn severs1orders are invoiced to an o:d&ng acrlvity cu%5 !?e a m c
Sirling period, consolldateO periodit 3 i l l i ~ g sare enzouraaed.

-

RECEMNG RE PORT
Quantity in the "Quantily Accepted' column on the face o f e k order has beon:
inspected,
by me and conforms to this conuaa Items listed below have been rejected for Vie reasons indicated.
SHIPMENT
NUMBER
TOTAL

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CONTAINERS

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SICKANRE OF AUTHORGZD U S . GOV7 LV

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OPTIONAL FORM 347 (Rcv W51 fBAC)O

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ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES
SCHEDULE CONTlNUATION

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COh'FUCr NO

02YOCIB79CIE

srder, p l e a s e contac:

Sora V . "ysn

at

[301)443-5229.
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S??IC?

COMT2kCT

FROZECT O S F I C E X :

K.A. CAG-XNNATHLY
O F F I E OF PLANXIEG, XESE3RCE

..

P N i ) FVALUATION

; Z D M I N I S ~ T I O N FOR
.
CHI IS^^
ELQ FmSLIES
370 ENIFANT ? R O M E P ; ~ ~ D E : S W
~JZEINGTOI,
DC : ' 2 0 4 4 7
: = *
TELE?HONE: 202-205-4829 . FAX: 202-205-3598 +
-

--

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.
.
.

..- .-

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?ERPOSP :
--.
THZ PUP.POSE OF THlS CDNTRACT IS TO PRCVIDF
EXPERT ADVISZ AND SUPPOXTT-TD THE

FOR W.1LDE-S A N 3 FLYILIES (ACF).

.

-

-

- -

B A C K G R O m : .k. ,
, ., ,
T-XREE OF FOUP. GOALS OF TEE P Z R S O N C
R E S P O N S I B I L I T Y AND WORK OPPORTUSITY
ZCONCILIATION ACT= or 1936 ARE RELATR
T O MARRIAGE, IKCLUDfNG GOALS TWO, TkXSS

Dnrl

.

CUR :

2.

E2lD THE DETEXDENCE CP NEEDY PARENTS
ON
BENEFTTS-EY ~~mii:i;c-JOB ?RE?AW.'TIDL WORK AND MARR-IAGE:

G~VERWENT

I

3.

PiTFJmT' AND XEDUCE M E XNCIDENCZ OF
OUT-OF-WEDLOCK PRXGNANCIES AND
ESTABLISH ANNEAL, NUMERICAL GOALS
FOR PRZVSLTTING W D REDUCIXG Ma
INCIDENCE O F THSSE PREGNANCIES: AxD

4 .

ENCO'TnAGE THE FORMATION AND
MAINTENANCE OF lWO-PARENT F A K I L I E S .

Conzlnued . . .

- u c

7*CC,S

F

w.!h mr!rac1 pnaw w o c r numkrs

C1/04/2C02

-.-- 3;

. . . .

ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES
SCHEDULE CON~NUATION

C C ci;ES

r,

I

IMPORTANT: btsrk all lactiqcr, a r h x r n m!P cnnaa ;ndlnrac!cr r u m r s .

3

,

j ORCW N L

D A ~ E O F C R D E R ZONTP.&tTSO.

G:/04/2302
IT%

J,x;t

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)02YO018T9Ci2

I

SC?PL.SSISLRVICES

KC.

ORCEQE1
i (CI ID!

la)

(A)

ACP I5 ?-J?.SVZNG

C U A N T ~UN~T
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>RICE

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11

KNOWLEDGS ABb'JT T:E
'
AMONG LOtJ - iNcDEiE FCi?;-L,AiIcr:S,
azJO?IlU'TIAL STFSTZGXES ST>-TTZS MI5I-Z P W U E
TO STRENGmZN MARRIAGE. - A t F XEZDS
ADDZT1OKA.L E X P E R I I S G TO ACCOKPLISH l Y I S
WORK.

;!

i

1

TO tRZ3C.E
3lsNW;ICS C? 14APRiAGE

RESEAD.Ei

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S T A E Z G h T 07 WORK:

-

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TEE - C~IVLCL'O?.
S F L U L . CONSrSLT K E X A
F
T
ACF IN ONGOIKG WORK XLATED TO

'

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w,

-STRENGTAENING Mi?&TIP.qE,
.PROVIDE
x s x s T m c r ADVICE ON DEVELOPMXNT OF NEX
-X?ZSEX?C% A C T I V I Y I E S IK T H I S Ai?EA.-- -..
T ~ Z CONTRACTOR SHALL P ~ F O R MA VARIETY
OF F . C T I V I T I E S INCLUDING (BLT NOT L I M I T E D
TO). PROVIDING INFORYATION--O?J THE PROGRAMS
ON 'XUE
TO S T R E N G T i i N S MARRIAGE, --SING
D I S S E M I N A T I O N O F MATERIALS, .m
P A R T I C I P R I N G I N t C 5 b 1 ~ G . SAND--WQWliOPSS----

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NJD A C C E P ~ A N C ~OF T:+E
DELIYE-RABLES BY TAE F R O J E C T O F F I C E R
PAZTIAL PAYMEATS SF?L; BE AVTUORIZED.
ALL I N V O I C E S MUST-BE SEZjMITTED TO- THE
PROJECT O F F I C E R FOR AlEROVAL ?RIOR T O
.
PAYMENT.

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UPON P.SCEI?T

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PAYb?FXi SC-ULE:

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S P E C I F I C EZQUIXEM;MGUT&:
COPIES OF QUARTERLV~EPORTS DETAILING
WDXK U<D ACCOFPLIS&S
W Z L L R E . . ..............
SUBMITTED T O T
XZ P R O Z C T , O F F I C Z R 1 5 DAYS
--EE3?+-aff,-BX?-Q&-EACE
QUARTER.
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TOTAL A M O U r r r O F AWARD S W L NOT M C E C D
$24,750.00.

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TOTAL C.WR153 FOz:vn?D ' 0 ?STDAGE!ITEI,!
NSN 7%;-0 1.152-0062

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O ~ I O N * CrORM 348 ~

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ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVlCES

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PAGE

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SCHEDULE CONTINUATION
..

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f the Coxcractoz; (b) C
onzrac: wse competitive
c m ~ l c t e'office identizi
:he

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PARTIAL P A Y M ~ S

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recart

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01-

~ c c i a l~ k c u r i t yNumber.

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a clause ma

YOTiL CARRIED F ~ R W A R D T O
1ST 'AGE lI*EM 171N)\
ca.,..,.

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OPllOllbL FWIW a d 1 l k v n l
%C4 "Ci.
TAb *"CVt,S-*>('

ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES
SCHEDULE CONTlNUATlON
IMPORTANT: Me(k

all p x K n c c an? paw15 with C m m s ? 9 a OCew rum--

DATE OF O m E R

f OSTRACT NO.

!

1

6

5

1 ORDER N3.
132Y001G790LE

C1/04/2OC2
SU2hlESISEWICES

ITEM hiO.

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,

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(MAY 2001)

ITEMS!

ZAR 5 2 . 2 2 3 - 1
(AUG 1987)

-

C?-GES

F I E 2 PRICE

NDTICS.. .

-

.

- - D ~ R E ~ ~ T ET3
~)

ORDER.

.-

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.

.
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COXTACTS &IS AS . FOLLOXS :

.'

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DAVTD G..TNE

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CDC

NSTDNFR SEFXtCS

NIX

MICHELLE SEORTER.

{303+-496-6OBB

FDA

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( 3 0 1 ) 44-028( 3 0 1y-827--5040----(4_441 6 8 7 - 6 6 6 6 - - - -

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TOTAL CARRIED FU?WXRC T
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TL9 DI CW 1.13 0 1 :

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i

AMENDMENT OF SOLICTTATIONIMOOLF~CATIONOF CONTRACT
2. iSulESDMZ-NTIMODIFltnTI3N SO

3 EfFEZTVE D A T

B NAME AN3 A3DZESC OF COPi?PACTOR

1,

i ?AGE
/ I

t@UTFUr !D C59E

a, REOCIS;TION!PJRCH~~E REO.NC.

F DAC-ES

-

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15 PROJECT ND. 1: s:::rxe:

/No. W w L car*ly. Sm:a or4 Z D W a )

M?&G?G.ET . G U L A G X E R
5 3 C E C F R LANE
3SSINING NY 1 0 5 5 2
XL

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.

.

542665600-

,

.

100. DATED lSEE ITEM 73)

.

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11. THIS

ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENT6 OF SOUCIlAnONS

FAClLllY CODE

.

10L MODBlUTION OF CONXACTIORDER NO.

02Y001E7901D

.

C1/04/2002

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!JTN
y l n n W~mBergdsohdhG(xr IB omcndcd as sel f w ~n11em14. - t h c h a r r ~O-C.PIC
Z D C O Tfor
~ Or i v l l a f O R w
Dts c a e r d e ~ . j ~ i ru:
s ealen6P!
oncr; mufl Bwnowicdgc
of h t snsnornent p n a ID me t w r anddste 8 ~ e C i b 2
k me ~ o ~ u m t or
c aan smutecd.+rns o f k k
W ~ 8 1 Bm *j n r q
~ k m Ba ma.:1 ~d rawrnlng
'
6of ma arrr~dment(bl -prigmelp~
of m b arnmarnm~ w ~ . % yd tha o n e wbmiard; or (c! 8 y
SOPJTJ~Cbuer or tclcgm, which kd&:
s re1BrBncom the f06cJmtiOn-a~d sinmomon1 mmb-ff f-*LURETLO_UR ACKNOWEOGEEW 10 BE RECENEO A:
M E PLACE DESIGMTED FOR ME RECEIPT OF OFFERS ~ H E H O U R W ME
D
SPECIFIED MAY RESULTIN REJECTONOF YOL*.OFFER. a uy
vhuo of Ihk ~ r n m d myou
l dczis la Wngc ap olkr 8lrebOy chillad. nu- Chrmgs may Dc
by I @ e wa bUw. D ~ O ~ M C ~l o W m cr ldngm k
r r l ~ e n l~o aibc r d ~ t i l anna
l ~ thk W r n 4 n t . and is e b s O rwbr (.we m m c *ow SF^ drur:- d a d .
3 2 . ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRlATlON DATA fllmau1rw.l
,
-.-.~
. ..- . - - -

..

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.

s e e Schedule

13. THIB nEM APPLES ONLY TO MTlFlCAnONS OF-OERS.

.

.... -. .,

-.

rl MODmESTwE CONfRAtlmRDE4

, ,.-

--

A. THIS CWPNGE ORDER 13 ISSUED P U R S ~ T (Specify
~ .
#whomy) -THE CHANGES SEr FORTH Ih; TEM
ORDER NO. IN ?EM 10A

FAR 4 9 . 1 0 3

1.

(b) Unlitera1 Change

..

in

NO. AS DE3CRIBEDINrlEM

ARE MADE IN THE C O W C T

.

0. THE ABOVE NUMBERU) CONTRACTORDER IS MODIFIED T O REFLECT THE ADMINISTRATWE CHANGES ( a m as JIsngsS h p ~ p or-.
q
~ppro~r~aUoo
d,7rn, o t l SE-JORTW IN ITEh4 cc..iC_l.fis.UAN- TO THE A m O R m OF FAR 63.103(b!.
.
.
.
.
.. .. . - .
.
. .
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-

.

.

.

C. THIS SUPPLEMENTAL AGREEMENT IS ENTERED IN70 PURSUANTT O THE AUMO!3TT OF:
D. OTHER (Spm'ly type dmodiEnlrOn m b ~ u l h d y ~

E IMPORTANT:
1 4 . DESCRIPTION

;

i i i ;a not

CDNR~IDI

I.

Iir rcnireo to

slgn thu d a v m m r a d rliun

OF A~~ENDMENT~MODIFICA~ON
(Oqmired Oy UGF jcaim

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Tax ID Number: .
(
.
-- .
D~JNS. Nunbe::
This modifies purchase Ordef*r\'mber 0 2 ~ 0 0 1 8 7 9 0 1 ~ .
due do governmental delays I n t h e project.

D

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List of changes.is as follows:
P e r i c d Of s e r f o m a n c n End D a r e changed f r o m 1 0 / 3 1 / 2 0 0 2 t o 1 0 / 3 1 / 2 0 0 3
- A l n o u n t f o r this Modificat:on:
l o z a ~
$0.00

A.

,

.., ,,.

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All other t e r m ~and conditions r e n b - s the same
;oncir~ed . . .
Cxeo! a$ jrovldcd.hcrcin, 311 lermj and cond~tiDnso!:rc
: j A NAME A X 0 TITLE OF SIGNER~lTpcor o r i n ! ] - -

c~~urnm
retercrccd
l
in !!em On rr 10.4. ar Ine~elolacchncso. rcmdn: uncnerqcd md i n lub lwcc 2nd snec.
- - .
,OhNAME A.%O.TT;LE~O~~CONTRAC~NG
OFFICER V y ~ ornnnl)
n

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JNCEW V.
159, CONTRACTCWOFFCRGR

.

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?:Cv?cu: 1CC
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1766. UN:TED STATES OF AVERlCa

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.

!

.

i 16C. DATE SIGNED
I

-

!I 0 9 / 2 6 / 2 0 0 2

.

~SIO?DIV. 01 Cm1rn~n.11~
O6krsrJ

. .. ..

--

------ -

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.

STMIOASD FCRM 30 (REV '0.83)
ResvtDOd by G M
- -- '

._.FAR
..

(qC5).53.243

.
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LE9-!

600/600 a

816-1

9ELO-P6S- LOE

tsy

AIO-UOJ~

u e g ~ [: 1

so-~i-uer

~~

Marcre@ GelAdksrr. 5 3 O I d n ~ -Wnirtg
,
NYlOSIP
Invoica, Dab: m$t30, Z
m
Govt. Canbad R m c r r NO:.O2WK31m o 1 3
Invoice No 1

.

-

.+ ,2

I.

Work completed

,
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Partial Payment in the mramc of $2l,!500 is muested

.. .-.

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... .-Margarst &a*

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Per your request:

CONSULTANTS: EXPERTS-WriterIEditors

EMPLOYEE

EOD

Stephen Bates
-. .-

- --- - --

-

William h4attox--

.t.

-

-

RESIGNATIOK

ApriLS, 2093

November, 2002

4 u ~ u s t19,2004
-

February, 2005

. ~.
..

..

.

Robert Patterson

;

. .. .

.

~ i l l i a ?McPhefsbn S e p t e m b e r 14; 2002

Laurie Vuoto

.~

..
:

May 14,2004
July 6, 2004

~

-

November, 2002

...

=

-

1

(Submit w i t h request for Personnel Action, SF-52)
1.lAt.lE OF PERSOtJ (Lasl, first, middie rnitial)

1.

. --

2 . TOTAL FERIOD FOR Vr'HICH APPOlPiTr.!E:IT i S
REQUESTED ren:~reyear (3651 o a s G: J s k c , ~ , - ,

~

penod

Bates. Stephen
MA11- It4G
- ADDP.ESS
-

3

.

.

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,

4

I

365
- --

APPROXIMATE NUrJE3ER OF D A Y S PERSON IS
EXPECTED TO PiRFORht SER','ICES DURING THIS
PERIOD

26 1

-

5

SERVICES TO BE PERFORMED

A

EXPLAIN IN FULL THE SERVICES TO BE PERFORMED

The consultant will write and edit speech material, articles or other information for Lhe Assistant Secretary In order to
provide the public with a fuller understanding of ACF's objectices. He will write documents for the Assistant Secretary for
federal use, such as issue papers and position papers. H e will acquire the necessary facts, data and opin~onsnecessary
tovalidate statements i n ACF publications. The cofisultant will provide writing and editing assistance to senlor ACF
oftefalsl-gs deemed necessary by the Assistant Secretary; The consultant will prepareidking points a n d ~ s t i ~ r t ~ e ~ o ~ s ~ ~
~.
aimed at highlighting specific problems andrecommend short-term and long range solutions. ~h'e~consullant
will ensure . that the philosophy, goals, and priorities of the Assislant Secretary for Children and Families are conveyed in the most
concise manner. The consultant will.,.contribute to other ACF initiatives, as deemed appropriate by the Assistant Secretary.

.--

B SPECIFY WHAT DUTIES WlLL BE ASSJGNED THAT WlLL INVOLVE THE PERSON IN THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS ON BEHALF OF THE
GOVERNMENTWITH ANY PROFIT OR wk-PROFIT
ORGANIZATION

The consultant will contact private or non-profit organizations that have researched matters or conducted studies'on
issues that are within the purview of ACF, in order to learn of better ways to serve ACF's various constituencies.

c

SPECIFY WHAT DUTIES WILL BEASSIGNED THAT WILL INVOLVE THE PERSON IN THE RENDERING OF ADVICE T O T H E GOVERNMENT
WHICH WlLL HAVE DIRECT AND PREDICTABLE EFFECT ON THE INTERESTS OF ANY PROFIT OR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION

The consultant will provide appropriate information to profit or non prfit organizations to help themprovide better-services to constituents who are mutually served by ACF and the private organizations.
6 SPECIAL QUALlFlCATlONS OF THE PERSON RECOhlh1ENT)ED FOR APPOINTMENT (LIs! those whtch relate spec~ficallyto lhe servrces lo be
performed )

3

. -The consultant has extensive-high lev)el experience as awriter and editor on public policy issues.~.He~.ha~authg~ed
-..
co-authored and edited several books; served a s Literary Editor of> major national publication ( ~ i l s o nQuarterly), and
written numerous articles for major magazines and newspapers.
,
H e graduated rnagna.cum laude from Harvard College, with a degree in Government, and graduated cum laude from
Harvard Law School. His vasl experience wil enable him lo address a wide range o f human services Issues.

t4OTE: Complele requ~redcert~ficalionon olher side of form

CERTIFICATION
In approving the appointment of this consultantlexpert, I have considered the requirements of law.
. Personnel
.relevant decisions of the Comptroller General and Office of
Management
..
and Department
.~
policies and instructions. More specifically, I have sat~sfiedmyself that:
. -..- .-- ---~

--

-

~

~

-.

-.

1. the services of the individual are essential for effective program management

~-

..

2. the dut~esto be perfo~medare those of.(check one)
-.-

-.

-

.

a consultant (that is, they are purely advisory in nature and will not include
the performance or supervision of operating functions)

r6,

-

-

--.

-

-

.

an expert (that is, they require a.high:level of experlise not available in the
regular work 6 S e )

--

.
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.

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3. the proposed appointee is qualified to (check one)

. .

provide advisory services as a consultant
.

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~

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.

~

.~

.
. ..- ..

..

serve as an expert as that term is used in FPM Chapter 304-1

4. the appointment is appropriately designated as (check one)
-

.

interdtl@t (the individual will work occasionally and irregularly)
temporary (the individual will work on a regular basis for temporary perlod)

5. the appropfiate,appei~trnentauthority is being used

. ..
-.

6 the pay level IS appropriate for the duttes to be performed and the qual~ficatlonsof th_e
.#
appointee

. ..

-- F

7. the record ofappointment has been clearly documented to show the services to be performed and the special qualifications of the appointee which relate specifically to those
services
..

.:

.. ..

.

.

:.

." . ? - .

.-.

8. a statement of employment and financial interests has been obtained and it has been
determined that no conflict of interert exists.
~

Dale

Y/P/OL
Date

~

~

.

-

.

,/J~&

S~gnalureof Prvgram Manager Aul
Sewlces)
hls ce

r u e d lo Oblaln the onsullant'sIExpert's
r l l c u l a e~m ; If.? 3, 6 ,I , and 8

made F. Horn. P ~ . DAssistant
.
Secretary1 ACF
S~gnalureof Appolntlng r n l c l a l (This cerl~hcalion
relates particularly to Items 2
lhrough 8)

GPO 935 217

~

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PERSONNEL ACTION .APPRO\'-AL REQLTEST

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New ~lre---consultant/officeof the Ass~stantSecretary
Recruiting--Stephen Bates

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Salary Rate------$52.93 per hour--GS- 1517 $1 10.471 per year
Proposed Effective Date-----APRIL-8, 2002
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Reviewing Official

1'1
Martin ~ a n n e n f e l s e r l
Deputy ~sii.sl%hf
~etyetaryfor
Policy and External Affairs

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SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION EXPERT OR CONSULTANT
(Submit w i t h request for Personnel Action, SF-52)
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NAME OF PERSON (Las: first, m~ddle~ n ~ t i a l )

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William R. Mattox. Jr.

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TOTAL PERIOD FOR iVH!CH ;PPOltJit.!it:i
!S
REQUESTED {enrlre ;,car 5 6 5 , d r i s cr ?. s:i;rr!
period )

--365

3. MAILING ADDRESS
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APPROXlhtATE NUblBEE G; D A \ ' S PERSON IS
EXPECTED TO PERFORI.1 SEil:,tCES Ej'i;lP:3 i K l S

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SERVICES TO BE PERFORMED

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EXPLAIN IN FULL THE SERVICES TO BE PERFORMED

The consultant will write and edit speech material, articles or other information for the Assistant Secretary in order to
provide the public with a faller understanding of A€Fs.objectives.: He willwrite documents for the Assistant SecretaG for
f e a a l u&, such as issue papers and pdsitibn papers. He will acquire the necessary facts, data and opinioos nscessaB
to validate statements in ACF publications. ..The consultant will provide writing and editing assistance to senior ACF
officials, as deemed necessary by the Assistant Secretary. The consultant will prepare talking p o ~ n t sand short reports
aimed at highlighting specific problems and recommend short-term and long range solutions. The consultant will ensure
that the philosophy, goals and priorities of the Assistant Secretary for Children and Familie are conveyed in the most
concise manner. The consultant will contribute t o other ACF initiatives;as deemed appropriate by the Assistant
Secretary.

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B. SPECIFY WHAT DUTIES WlLL BE ASSIGNED THAT WlLL INVOLVE THE PERSON IN THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS ON BEHALF.OF THE
GOVERNMENT WITH ANY PROFIT OR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION.

The consultant will contact private or non-proft organization that have researched matters or conducted studies on issues
that are within the purview of k€?marder to learn of better ways to serve ACF's various constituencies.
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C . SPECIFY WHAT DUTIES WlLL BE ASSIGNED THAT WlLL INVOLVE THE PERSON IN THE RENDERING OF ADVICE TO THE GOVEFiNMENT
WHICH WlLL HAVE DIRECT AND PREDICTABLE EFFECT ON THE INTERESTS OF ANY PROFIT OR N O N - P R O F f f ORGAN72ATIOW-

The consultant will provide appropriate information to profit or non-profit organizations to help them provide better services
to constituents who are mutually served by ACF and the pr~vateorganrzations

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SPECIAL QUALIFICATIONS OF THE PERSON RECOMMENDED €OR APPOINTMENT ( L ~ slhose
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whlch relate speofically lo the servrces to be
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performed )

The consultant has extensive high level experience as a writer with USA TODAY, Washington Post, and The Wall Street
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Journal. He has serve on the Board of Contributors for USA TODAY.
He graduated summa cum laude from the University of Georgia's College with a degree i n Journalism in 1984. He alsdo
received the Henry W. Grady Distinguished Alumni Award from his alma mater In 1997.

NOTE Complete requ~redcen~ficationon other s ~ d eof form
HHS41O (Rev 12/77]

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CERTIFICATION
In approving the appointment of this consultant/expert, I have considered the requirements of law,
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relevant decisionsof the Compt~ollerGeneraland Office of Personnel Management and- Department
-- policie~and~i~sifuctions.
More specifically, I have satisfied myselfthat7
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1. the services of the individual are essential for effective program management

2. the duties to
be performed are
those of (check one)
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consultant (that is, they are purely advisory in nature and will not include
the performance or supervision of operating functions)
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an expert (that. is,
they require a high level of expertise not available in the
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regular work' force)
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3. the proposed appoiniee is qualified to (check one)
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provide advisory services as a consultant
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as an expert as that term is used in FPM Chapter 304-1

4. the appointment is.aepropriately designated as (check one)

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intermittent (thk individual will w o ~ koccasionally and irregularly)

/ tempg!ay,lthg

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i",$vidual will work on a regular basis for temporary period)

5. the appropriate appointment authority is being used

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6. the pay level is appropriate for the duties to be performed and the qualifications of the
appointee

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7. the record of appointment has been clearly documented to show the services to be performed and the specie4 qualifications of the appointee h i c h relate specifically to those
services

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8. a statement of employment and financial interests has been obtained and it has been
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determined that no conflict of interest exists.-~.

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S~onatureof Proqram ~ a n a q e Authorbzed
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to O b t a ~ nthe Consultant'slExpert's
~ & l c e s ) Thls Eertlficationie~atespapcularly to ,terns 1. 2. 3. 6.7. and 8

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Signature of Appolntlng &!clal
through 8)

(This certification relates particularly to items 2

GPO 935-217

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DEPARTMENT OF

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

REaUiSiTlOIJf4'J!b1SEK

PURCHASEISERVICEISTOCK REQUISITION

KAcm54
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OFFICE

BPA and Call !lo
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REOUEST FOR

DHHSlPSClAOSlDAMlGAB

D

SER~ICE

PURCHASE

REOUESTING ORGANlZATlOrl

KA

STOCK~SSUE

FENTAL'IEA~E

1 OATE

CUSTODIAL A R M

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CO@E'SYt.16,1.:

I OBJECT CLASS

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ACFlImmediate ORce of the Assisl;~nt Secretary

10
1 EXTENSION

FOR REFERENCE CALL

WJahrsrn
DELIVER TO

Administration for Children and Families, IOAS
Aerospace Building 6 Floor-W
370 L'Enfanl Promenade. SW a W&mgto~. D.c. 20447

CAN

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29995504
DATE R E G U I ~ E D

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DESCRIP'~IO~

rrEM NO.

Consullant Serv~ces
The consultant will write and edit materials. articles and other

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UNIT
OF
ISSUE

QUANTITY
REQUIRED

(INCLUDE STOCK NUAfBER. MODEUPART N O . E T C )
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08/26/02

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COST
TOTAL

UNIT

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information for the Assistant Secretary in order to provide the
public wilh a better understanding of ACF's objectives.
He will acquire the necessary facts. data and opinions necessary
to validate statements in A'&%

publications. The consultant will

provide writing and ediling assistance to senior ACF officials, as
deemed necessary by the Assistant Secretary. The consultant
..will prepare talking pahtsand.shQrt-term and long range
solutions The consultants will ensure that the philosophy, goals
and priorities of the Assistant Secretary for Children and Families
are conveyed in the most concise manner. The consultant
will contribute to other ACF initiatives, as deemed appropriate
by the Asslslan!, Secretary

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Sounm:
willianrskr3m

80.00
$0.00
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$0.00

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DATE
I cartify t h a 6. p r ~ p e ~ l r e n i c rs ~sq u e l t e dare

requ~red

2
5
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TOTAL

Im Gorernmnl business. and are not a r a J a M s l r o m exce.:r

08113/02

a mn.nl . r u t s '

n,?, ma1 w
ecc,ved

8,)

p ~ a n b b e r\ n a # u t e otn

tne -ou;lnllty

lolal a a s anrw>!alcci

F E C E l ~ l r 4 GO F F I C I A L (Siyn.~:ure/rrlIe]

DATE

OPOEP I43 (PO. DO. FEDSTRIP. ETC I

O R D E R DATE

V O L j C H t R IJO

VOIJCHER DATC

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APPROVED B Y (S,gnarureiT~lie]'

11

11
PROPERTY MANAGEMENT O F F I C E R (5,pnarurt',i'

DATE

SUPPLEMENTAL INFORMATION

- EXPERT OR CONSULTANT

(Submlt wlth request for Personnel Action. SF-52)
1. NAME OF PERSON (Last. firs, rn~ddlemrtralj

Patterson, W. Robert

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2. TOTAL PEW33 F 0 9 WHICH APWIN-hdfh(T 15
REQUESTED (entrre year (365)aays or a snorre;
pen& ;

- 365

3. MAILING ADDRESS
4.

610 Diskin Place, SW

Leesburg. VA 20175-5052

APWOX!MATE NLIMBER SF DAYS DERSDh IS
EXPECTED TO PERFORM SERVICES DURING 'FIS
DERlOD

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SERVICES TO BE PERFORMED
A EXPLAIN IN FULL THE SERVICES TO BE PERFORMED
The consultant will write and edrt speech material, anlcles or otherwritten information for the Assistant Secretary in oroer
to provide the public with a fulier understanding of ACF's objectives. He will write do cum en!^ for tne Ass~stantSecretary
for Federal use. such as issue papers and position papers. He will acquire the necessary facts, aata and opinions
necessary to validate statements in ACF publicatl_ops. The consultant will provide writing andeditlng assistance to kenlor
AC~offici.gls.,as deemed iiecessary by the Assistant Secretary. The consultant will prepare talking points and_shofl
repons aimed at highlighting specific problems and recommend short-term and long range solutions. ,The consultant will
ensure that the phibsophy, goats andpnoritieKof the Assistant Secretary for Children and Fami:ies are conveyed in the - most concise manner. The consultant will contribute to other ACF initlatives as deemed appropriate by the Assistant
Secretary.
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DUTIES WlLL BE ASSIGNED THAT WlLL INVOLVE THE PERSON IN THE TRANSACTION OF BUSINESS ON BEHALF OF THE
GOVERNMENT WlTH ANY PROFIT OR YOYPROFIT ORGANIZATION
The consultant will contact private anhiion-profit organizatrons that have researched matters or conducted studies on
issues that are with~nthe purview of ACF, in order to learn of better ways to serve ACF's vanous constituencies.

B. SPECIFY WHAT

C. SPECIFY WHAT DUTIES WlLL BE ASSIGNED THAT WILL INVOLVE THE PERSON IN THE RENDERING OF ADVICE TO THE GOVERNM-NT
WHICH WILL HAVE DIRECT AND PRW~CTABC~S-FFECT
ON THE INTERESTS OF ANY PROFIT OR NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION.

The consultant will provide appropnate information to profit or non-profit organizations to help them prov~debetter services
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to constituents who are mutually served by ACF and the pnvate organlzatlons
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SPECIAL QUALIFICATIONS OF THE

PERSON RECOMMENDED FOR APPOINTMENT (Llst those m l c h relate specrf~callyto the servses to be

performed.)

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The consultant achieved extensive high level experience by serving as a consultant with the Heritage Foundahon in
developing, strategizing and applying trouble shooting slolls to a domestic.policy project. He trained and mon!to!ed
.aiesearch editors and co-hoste6focus p b u p presentat~onsthat introduced the Family & Society Da'tabase to Bush
Administration officials, Capitol Hill staff, coalition groups, Heritage Foundation deparlments and select groups. The
consultant has also acquired extensive experience as a 'Senior Publications Director and Execut~veEditor of the Family
Policy Journal for the Family Research Council.
He graduated from Philadelphia Biblical University with a Bachelots In Religlon major and an English minor. He received
a Master's in Communicat~onsfrom Wheaton College in Illinois. The consultant also has a Master's in Theology, which he
received from
. . .Westminster Theolog~calSeminary in Philadelphia.
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NOTE- Complete required certiication on other side of fcrm.
HHS410 (Rev. 12/77;

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In
re'evant

the appointment of this C ~ ~ ~ I t a n U e ~Iphare
e d , considered the requirements of law
of the Comptrolier General and Office of Personnel Management and
P O ~ ~ C Iand
~ S i n ~ t r u c t i ~ nMore
r.
specifically, Ihave --sahsfied myself that;

Deranmin

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1. the sehi~s-dfftheindividual are essential for effective pragram management

2. the duties LO be performed are those of (check onel_
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--a--the
consultant (that they are purely adv~soty~nsature
and w ~ lnot
l tnclude
performance or supervlslon of operat~ngfunct~ons)

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an'expe' ('hat is, they require a high level of expertise noLavailable inthe
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provide advisory services as a consultant
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a% expea-as-that term js used in FPM Chapter
-serve-as
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3. the proposed appoirrtee-i~Q"ij;ilifi~dt~
(check-&e).---L:.'i.
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304-1

4. the appointmews appropriately designated as (check one)

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intermitten1(the individual will work occasionally and irregularly)
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temporary (the'ind~vidual
will work on a regular oasls for temporary per~od)

5. the appropriate appointment authority is being used
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6. the pay level is appropriate for the duties to be performed and the qualifications of the
. .aappointee

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7. the record of appointment has been clearly documented to show the services to be performed and the special qualifications of the appointee which relate specifically to those_._-.______ _ . _.servlces:.
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8! a statement f
i employment and financial interests t i i s b ~ obtained
n
and it'has been
determ~nedthat no conflict of interest exists.

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througn 8 )

GPO 935-217

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CONTRACT MODIFICATION FOR-TASICORDER 35556r27 August 2004

The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is seeking to
modify ENCORE Management Corporation Contract, Task Order
35556 to include the functions of a n Illustrator 11, Engineering
Technician V and VI.
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The contractor shall provide support service in the following task
areas:

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Illustrator 11
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Projects require the ability to use multlple media to convey ideas
and messages. These projects require proficiency in the use of
multiple media and in executing acceptable work.
Themes illustrated may be either concrete in nature or they may
represent ideas and abstract concepts.
- -Acquires information about the subject matter assigned and
develops q.background of subject matter knowledge through
carrying oub'these assignments.

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Engineering; Technician V
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Performs non-routine and complex assignments involving
responsibility for planning and conducting a complete project d .. -= =
relatively limited scope or a portion of a larger and more diverse
project; selects and adapts plans, techniques, designs, or layouts.
Contacts personnel in related activities to resolve problems and1
coordinate the work; reviews, analyzes, and integrates the
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technical work of others.-Completedw6rk-isreviewed
for techni&a------.-:
adequacy a n d satisfaction of requirements. May train and be
assisted by lower level technicians.
Analyzes technical data to determine applicability to design
problems; selects from several possible design layouts; calculates
design data; and prepares layouts, detailed specifications,
estimates, procedures, etc.
Plans or assists in planning test to evaluate performance: *
Determines test requirements, modifications, and test procedures;
conducts tests using all types of instruments; analyzes and
evaluates test results, and prepares reports on findings and
recommendations.

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HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
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PURCHASElSERVlCElSTOCK REL)UISITION

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A FA 0001 882
CFFICE ZC)EE.SY:.:30.

BPA and Call N o

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DHHSIPSCIDM
REQUESTING ORGANIZATION

1
PURCHASE
FE@UEST
F@F

- SE?\IICE

S7CC4

DHHSIACFIOFFICE O F PUBLIC AFFAIRS (OPA)

- RF'.T&-

SSLE

OPA

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FOR REFERENCE CALL

EXTENSION

John Allen

(202) 401 -92 15

1 APPROPRIATION
7521536

:f<S:

I @ E J E C T C-;t$
1 2 J-. / 3

%Ti

CUSTODIAL ARE3

11:OT/200I

( CAN

DELIVER TO

DHHSIACFIOPA
Aerospace Building, 7th Floor West
370 L'Enfant Promenade. S . W.

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798GJ~-

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DATE REQUIRED

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FUNDS AVAILABLE (S~gnalurefl~lle)
i cerllfy that the properlylserwces requested are r e q u ~ r e dfor
Government b u s ~ n e s s ,and are nor available f r o m excess or
zurrent assels '

DATE
TOTAL

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$

25,000 00

RECElViNG OFFICIAL -

I c e n ~ f yma! !he quanljtles lndlcaled in Ihe ,.Ouanl~ly
Recutred column above have been recetved on Iota1 or as annolaled

DATE

k
~ O P E R T YM A N A
OFFICER
GE
( ~ i~
g n aM
lure)'

i H S - 3 9 3 [Rev 6/90)

/d/

DATE

RECEIVING OFFICIAL (S~gnamrefl~lie)

DATE

ORDER NO (PO D O FEDSTRIP, ETC I

ORDER DATE

VOUCHER NO

VOUCHER DATE

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BACKGROUND
Please include a background statement
STATEMENT O F WORK
Contract assistance to be-provided shall consist of the following work objectives:
Publications and Newsletters. Work will include the print, graphic design and conten!
of general and specific topics for a number of publications and newsletters for the
Administr-ation for Children and Farnilies.
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- TASK
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Meet with Fede~alProject Officer (FPO) to discuss all aspects of the publications
and newsletters including but no limited to subjects, length, layout, graphics and
design.
Meeting will take place within the first week after award
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TASK II

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Provide content&r publications based upon topics selected by the FPO. Design
graphics and layout of articles. Read articles, research related documents and
review.
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. publications
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for pertinent information. Advise on current issues related to
selected top-its( submit draft articles for review by FPO. The FPO shall review
and sub.mit cornme'nk to the contractor within 14 days of receipt. Draft to be
submitted within ten (10) days of receipt of topic.
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Edit article to i n c o r p ~ . t e x h a n ~ e s , - ~ h a n ~ e s - s h amade
l l - b e within ten 10 days . .
After -receiptafthe--Project Officers cornme-rits.
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Level of Effort:
One (1) Publisher
Period of Performance:
From date of award
notto exceed six
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AMENDMENT OF SOLICrrATlON/MODlFlCAllONOF CONTRACT
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?ho EontrnWs mum ~d

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ID ahould fwd as follows: SuIlivan and Arsodntes

m.Tin Sullivan

512Elhvl Allso Ave
Tabma PPk. Md-20912
Tax ID:522339291

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AMENDMENT OF

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SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

2. AUENOMiNTlYODlilCATlON NO.

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COOOOl

03/13/2002
I GA9

CODE

6, ISSUED BY

EFFECn"E

1

DATE

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R C O V I S I T I O N I P U R C ~ EREONO

4.

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522339291

'ODE

lm3

&Y.S/;SC/AOS/DAM
PAR'KlAkT ~ U I L S I K G , ROOK 5 - 101
562C P I S E R S LANE
ROCKVILLE Y I 23857

IBA. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO
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BB. OATED (SEE ITEM 111

lUA. MODIFICATION OF CONTWCTIORDER NO.

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;5. P?CJECT h? (11 epy:caosi

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SULLIVAN AND ASSOCIATES
Attn : TIM ''SULLIVAii
512 ETHAN ALLEN AVENUE
TAKOVA PARK MD 20912

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I . M M E AND ADDRESS OF CONTWCTOR /no. nnet, nnnw. S l m end ZIP Cmml

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I 7. ADMINISTERED BY (11LWH man lmm 6)

EH.!S/PSC/AOS/DAM
PARKLAWN SUILDING, ROOF? 5-101
5600 FISHERS LANE
ROCKViLLE KD 20857

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CONTRACT ID CODE

02Y00188201D

-- -.108. DATE1 (SEE /?EM 13)
FACILITY CODE
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01/10/2002

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11. TWS ITEY ONLY APPLIES TO AMCUDMENTS OF SOLIUTAlWNS

OH

O T h e eDDvs n u r n o e w solrlrawn Is e m d m ar 601 fwVI In liar 1 4 . The h r s n l Oale 6psflLd Iurecslpl d o f f e n
U b mx~ondw.
not s.~.r)cea
Olfers must sr!~~ovleoge
reclrlpl D
mlr
I smenarnenl p n u mVle n w r anbeale epemlrc In me robcam or 0. a m M n a . by on0 O( me foPoulnp menu%: Is) By wmptwnp
lleme B snd 15. aod rowmng
ot ma o l l n submmscl: u (c) B y
rn~lsd
s b e ommarnent p)By er%nh.leog!np recaipt d Ullr smenomml m each

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Bepanle lemr w laspram wHEIIInCluOe5 0 relsreno I0 Vie SOUcletlm an0 emenamen1number. FALURE OF YOUR ACWOWLEDGEMENT TO BE RECENED AT
THE PLACE DESIGNATED FOR THE RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO M E HOUR AND DATE SPECIFIED .MY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER. R DY
vkaa of h ~ esm s n m e n l w ddesa UI c h p n p an offer drsaag rubmlllsd. such mmgm m q bs mabe ay telegram or toter. j r w m e a oscn lalsgrsm u muot mokos
mfemnes 10 Ins mlldts~lonan0 ws sm.ndmenL s M Is recslwee WI to me omnlna hwr r n a dam speClned.
12. ACCOUNTING AND APPROPRIATION DATA ( i f q r h b d )
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1S.THlS ITEY APPLIES ONLY TO MODIFICAllORS OF COWTRACTSIORDERS. R MODIFIES THE WNTRACTiORDER NO. A 9 DESCRIBED IN ITEM 14.

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A THIS CHANGE ORDER IS ISSUED P U R S U A ~ ? ~(SpscrpscrW
:
B u f k M y j M E CHANGES SET FORTH IN ITEM 14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT
ORDER NO. IN ITEM 1OA.

FAR 43.103(A)
8. THE ABOVE NUMBERED CONTRACTlORDER IS MODIFIED TO REFiECT THE ADMINISTRLITIVECHANGES (ruth as manges tn peylng Mrs.

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L IMPORTANT:

Conlrafla

@I& not.

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74. DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION ( O r g e 1 ~ ~bv
6 dUCF

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THIS SUPPLEMENTAL AGREEMENT IS ENTERED INTO PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY OF

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appmwelkm Unle. e t c j SET FORTH IN iTEM 14. PURSUANT TO THE AUTHORITY OF FAR 43.10Xa).

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The Contractor name in Box 7 of the orlginal order is Incorrect along wlth the tax ID. It
should be changed. to read:
Sullivan and Associates.
I
515 Ethan Allen Avenue
Takoma Park, Md. 20841
Tax ID:
(3011 891-3194
,

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This is a no-cost extensior.
Continued . . .

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Except 8s pmvlaal neraln. all rerms an0 fona~uons01 Vlb d m r n o n l m l a m c n o m llam 9 A u IOA as nerelolnrs cnanpsd rmnelnl unmsnpsd m a In lull f u m a n d eflbcl

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15A NAME AND TITLE OF SIGNER (Type wpnnl)

15C DATE SIGNi5

158 CONTWCTORlG~FESOR

( S r p n a l ~ r errlmrlon a d n w r . 0

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Prenovs e O l l # ~unuseDls
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76A NAME AND TITLE OF CONTRACTING OFFICER (Typo wpfb71]

168 UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

1EC DATE SIGNED

1SfgnsluoU C ~ y s c l r nOmW
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STANDARD FORM 30 (REV 10-831
Ptsscfibea by GSA
FAR ( 4 8 CFR) 53 243

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Invoice
Deprlmcnt of Eeahh d Hrmurn Savices
..
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&immadm for CbiHm andPamiliw

To:

Aarospace Buildiag
901DStrcot,SW =
Wadhgbn, DC 20447

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512 Ethan Allen A m
TakomaPd, MD 20912
Tux ID No: 522339291

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April 24,2002:

Telcphoos confe&o

April 2428,2002:

Research snd writing media c o m m ~ c m plan
s

April 30.2002:

Meeting with AC.Hill to prtxnt plan and b'scuss its d&lr

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Fcb~ary25,2002: Final h f t ecript treatmest for paternity vibw d c l i v d

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Febnrary 5,2002: Meating with C b Gereton, PDAS, d al, review of and input on, draft #I

Pabnrary21.2002: Mtcting with Chris chstm, PDM, et al, review and input tuaipt treatmtnt

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HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

FECLIISIT:?~;: ; s : . : z ~ z

PURCHASEISERVICEISTOCK REQUISITION

AFA0001883
OFFICE CCDE,SU:.'EC,

. 6PA and Call No
I REQUEST

TO

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DHHSIPSCIDAM
REOUESTING ORGANIZATION
D H H S / A C F / O F F I C E OF PUBLIC A F F A I R S ( O P A )

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EXTENSION

John Allen

( 2 0 2 ) 40 1-9215

CL;S~
I CGJECT
. APPROPRLATI9N

7571536

1 CAN

DELIVER TO

DHHS/ACF/OPA
A e r o s p a c e Building. 7 t h Floor W e s t
3 7 0 L ' E n f a n t P r o m e n a d e , S . W.
Washington. D C -2 0 4 4 7 ~ ~

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CUSTODIAL AREA
OPA

FOR REFERENCE CALL

ITEM NO

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NUMBER M O C K W A R T NO ETC J

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for

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UNIT

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Government business, and are not available from excess or
current assels:

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RECE!VING OFFICIAL - I centfy inal tne qu;ntt;~es r r d ~ c a e dIn !tie '.Ouantlty
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DATE

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1HS-393 (Rev 6/90)

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Please include a backgound statement.
STATEMENT OF WORK
Contract assistance to be provided shall consist of the following work objectives:

--

Speech Writing. Work will include the writing of speeches. both general and spec~fictopics for
various senior level individuals within the Adrqinistration for Children and Families inciud~ns
but not limited to, certain research related items.
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After award, meet with pro~ectFedera~llProject
OffiFerG revienr--tasks and discuss-----various topics and'lndividuals for which the speeches will be written within the 6-month
time frame. ... -..--

..

TASK II
Provide content (orspeeches based upon topics selected by the FPO. Read articles and
review publicationi*includingrecently released research items for pertinent information.
Advise on current issues related to selected topics. Submit draft speeches for review by
FPO. Provide draft speech within 5 days of receipt of topic. The Project Officer shall
review and subatit m m e n t s to the contractor within 3 days of receipt. The contracror's
draft speech shall be submitted within five (5) days of receipt of topic.
-.TASK 1.11
a

Edit speeches to-incorporate changes. Changes shall be made within ten (10) days after
receipt o'f the Project Officer's comments.
.
.. .-~
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Level of Effort:

-

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One (1) Speech Writer
Period of Performance:
.

.

From date of award not to exceed six (6) days.

---

-

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~. .-.

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,

ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICE'S
IMPORTANT Mark s l l p.ckaget and paDers with c o n b a d andlor oroer numbers

12

1 DATE OF ORDER

1

C O N T a C T NO f l f m ~ l

1(

01/10/2002

-

6 SH!D TO

a M A M E OF CONSIGNEE

3. ORDES NO.

14 SEQU1SITIONIRECE3ENCE NO.

C2Y00188301R

lO2Y0018Ej

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STREET AD0SES-C

BLDG., 7 3 FLCOR

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D%Z-:S/?SC/AOS/3RM
P-KLAWN
SUIL3ING. ROOM 5 - 1 0 1

D STREET SSW, X 0 0 Y

1901

7 2 5

5 6 0 0 PISHERS

ROCKVILLP MD 2 0 8 5 7

/ d. STATE

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7.70-

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3 5 .ROSPNSERG

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a NAME OF CONTWCTOR

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10. REaUlSmONlNG OFFICE

7521536

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11. BUSlNES5 CLnSSlFlCATlON (Cneck ~ p p m p I a I eboa(es j

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Destination

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PURCHASE

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Net 3 0

07/08/2002

D. ACCEPTANCE

1 Destination

Destination

17. S C ~ E D U L E(See r e v e n s tw Rs/ecrnms)
--..

UNIT
PRICE
18)

OUANTlN

lTEM NO

SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

OUANTrPl
ACCEPTED
(91

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ID Number.
DUNS Number.
Tax

CAN:

G998035

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class:

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T h i s Professional S e r v i c e C o n t r a c t 1 s
A d m l n l e t r a t l o n f o r C h i l d r e n and F a m i l i e s .

Continued . . .

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19 GROSS SHIPPING WEIGHT

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(cam.
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21. W L INVOICE TO:

s. NAME

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rnsrnucrrohs

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ON REVERSE

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23.NAME ( r l p a a )

-LAWRENCE B . POPE
TITLE. CONlRACTlNGlORDERlNG OFFICER
OPIIOWAL F D n I Y I ~ m -

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2513 PY:-2002

This PLDIeeeimml Sarvlce Coatract La tor t b rri! iLy of apecchas
Mminiruatioa for Qrildran md P.nili~~.

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Prnavr o ~ u m
a1

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11.

AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONiMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT
3. EFFECTIVE DATE

Z AMENDNENTlNODlFlCATlO~NO

0001

14.

IGAB

D-XHS/ P S C / A O S / DAM
PAR-WN
B U I L D I N G , ROOM 5 - 1 0 1
5 6 0 0 FIS'XERS JAKE
ROCKVILLE MD 2 0 8 5 7

'.

~ E C U I S I T ~ O N P U ~ C H AREONO
SE

?A255

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7. M M l N : S E R E 3 BY (11o t f w c a n nom C)

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3HHS/PSC/AOS/DAM
?ARKLAWN S L ' I L D I N G , R33M 5 - 1C i
L 6 C O P I S E E S LAKE
ROCKVILLE ND 2 0 8 17

-

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15 PQCJSCT VO ('1 e ~ z c s s e :

I

108/~5/2002

.

.:e

6. ISSUED BY

! D4iE O C

CONTRACT ID CODE

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a. N M E AN0 ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR

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ROSENBERG COMMVh1ICATIONS
A t c n : JEFF ROSENBERG
1 2 5 1 2 W . OLD B A L T I K O R Z ROAD
BOYDS MD 2 0 8 4 1

¶A AMENDMENT OF SOLICITAT~OHNO

'

BB. OARD
(SEE ITEM 77)

-

-

. . .

rBr

. . .

1 0 8 DATED (SEE ITEM 73)

-.

FACILITY CODE

521903385

'ODE

-

-.

01/10/2002

...

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13. WB ~

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~ APPLIES
L
Y TO AMENDMENTS OF SOUUTATIONS

M

.

D T n e wbavs n u m ~ s r e as o m n o n

IS emenan3 as WI l o r n ~nl ~ s m
14. Tns hour and sale sman.d for rscedplof Onen
0 1 s~IIBM~C
0 1 sno1 n s ~ s n o m
acvlrrwleags r a u p t of me emendrnml prmr IO mb nour m a aals sped6s0 In ma wlldtaflm w am amenom. br OM 01 me IoUDlrtngrnanms. (a) By comzdsurg
l~erneB ana 16, a m r e w m l n ~
c o p ~ s ; b C m m ~ ~( bn )~. ~m
peowmsog~ng
) ~ ~
rgslpt ?I v l ~ smsnomsnt on es& copy CJ uls onsr subrnllma: or (c) B Y

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ssperam leltw or U Y p g m M l C h LIYIimes s mletmcu 10 me rDHcItaUOn an. srnommenl number. FAILURE OF YOUR ACKEM)WLEDGEUENT TO BE RECEIVED AT
THE P U C E DESIGNATED FOR TME RECEIPT OF OFFERS PRIOR TO THE nOVR AND OATE SPECIFIED MAY RESULT IN REJECTION OF YOUR OFFER, i3 b,
vlrlusol Ihlb smmarnmrd y w mb.IO c n s n p an oRer sirseQv wbmUlsd. such mange may m made by Islegram Or lelmr, prmldW s a m luagrnm or b u a makes
rslemnce lo me mncksaon end vlls amndmenl. and Is recsrved Brla ID me ODerrlnq nour end abm swclRed.
IZ. ACCOUNflNO AND APPROPRIATION DATA (Nmqoksd.J
-. . . . . .

See S c h e d u l e

12. THIS

.

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tq M

, FAR
- ~ - -4.3 . I 0 3 fbl
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ONLY TO HomFIcAnoWs OF CONTRACTSIORDERS.

A T n l s CnANGE ORDER IS ISSUEDeURStr
ORDER NO \N ITEM 1OA

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mu APPLIES

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THE COI(TRACTIORDER

NO. AS DESCRIBED IN m

- --

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m auvrontyf M E C M E S SET FORTH IN ITEM-14 ARE MADE IN THE CONTRACT

-

8. THE ABOvE NUMBERED CONTRACTX)ROER IS MODIFIED TO REFLECT THE ADMINISTRATIVE CHANGES (YIch as cnnngas h w y t q eke.
appmpnsfm oas*. e k ) S€I FORTU IN ITEM 14.PURSUANT TO THE A g H O R I T t OF FAR43:lOXb)
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~ return

14. DESCRIPTION OF AMENDMENTMDDIFICATION ( o q n o l l a d By Uff

Tax

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recflm neaalngs. a-p

COPIDS 10me

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DUNS N u m b e r :
- Thls'ls a no cost extension. _ ,
Change B l o c k 1 5 to:

I

09/30/02

1

T h e p e r i o d o f p e r f o r m a n c e i s c h a n g e d f r o m J a n u a r y 9. 2 0 0 2 t n r u J u l y 8 , 2 0 0 2 t o J a n u a r y 9 ,
2002 t h r u Sepizernber 3 0 ,
Price

and

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2002.

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a l l o t h e r L e m e a n d c o n d i t i o n 8 remain unchanged.

E l ~ e p85
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15A NAME AND TnCEOF SIGNER (Type Wpficl).__ - _

OF CONTRACTING OFFICER ( 7 y p or p m l )

.,

J O S E P H PIRRONE
158 CONTRACTORIOFFEROR

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70C DATE SIGNED

168 VNrTEO STATES OF AMERICA

15C DATE SIGNED

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STANDARD FORM 30 (REV 10-831
PrarolDsO By G S A
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DATE OF ORDER

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ORDER FOR SUPPLlf S OR SERVICES
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01/10/2002
ITEM NO.

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ORDERED

SUPPLIESISERVICES

[A)

(8)

(C)

(C)

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PRICE
(F:

Conzracc was competitively awarded;

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PARTIAL PAYMENTS

Project Officer. Invoicee/Requeet for Payments sh 11 be subsitted directly to t i
Project Officer for approvalof payment.
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INVOICE INFORMATION/CLAUSES INCORPORAT.ZD BY REI'ERENCE

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In addition to the information.required by 52.232-?5 Prompt Payment),,+!ocr ~cvoice
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Number (Employer's Cdentlfication
must contain the following:
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CLAUSES INCORPORATED BY REFERENCE (FAR 52.252-2)(!'EB 1998)
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This contract incorporates the following cla~eesb.1 rt!ference with the same force
and effect as if they were givenln full text. U p m equest, the Zontracting
Officer will make =heir full-textaYailable;-Al-ao-;t h f f ul3 m t -o ?-a~lause-may
te
accessed electronically
- . . . . .
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FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION ( 4 B CFR CHAPTZR. 1) Z A ~ I S E S :
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FAR 52.213 -4 TERMS AND CONDITIONS
ITEMS) (MAY 20011..,-,*,. ,,,_

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CONTACTS ARE AS FOLLOWS:
PSC JEANETTE PAXG
(301) 443-3020

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Total amounc of award: $25,000.~ ' The
.
cbligacion b r tllie award i 3 shorn
17(i).
3

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FAR 52.243-1 CHANGES - FIXED PRICE
(AUG 1987)
I
. ...=.NOTICE.. .
DSBT
COLLE(YI0N
IMPROVE
ENT
ACT
07
1996
IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE REQUIREMZNTS OF THE
THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND MR*IAN SERVICES XILL M W PAYMENT BY E ECl'RONIC F%NDS
TRANSFER (EFT) . ~dUiiii%iiiIjli~~
: T ~ - P R ~ ~ v-FULL.
~ D E AND 'OM 'LETE -1NFORMA':ION T O THE
APPROPRIATE FINANCE OFFICE WILL DELAY PAYMEXI'. QUZST::ONS CONCERNI'JG EFT S W L BE
DIRECTED TO THE-CONTACT. PERSON FOR THE FINANCE OFF:CE S E O ~IN BLOIX 21 OF THIS
. . . .
- . - - . - .
ORDER.

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SIMPLIFIED A :QU::SITIONS (OTH.?RTHAN COMMERCIAL

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TOTA!. C A R r l l E D F O R W A R 3 TO 151 PAGE rlTEM l7W))
N S N 754C-Oi.I51.BDB?

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OPTIONAL FORM

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SCHEDULE CONTINUATION
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DATEOFORDER

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w r l t t e n w i t h i n t h e eix month t i m e frame.

( 2 0 2 1 205-9688

9CO

PROJECT OFFICER, AUTHORJTY

a.

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Continued . . .

--

TOTAL CARRIED FORWARDTO 137 PAGE l n E M I 7 l n l )
H Y I lMDOl.!Kl.11OBI

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SUPPLEMENTAL INVOlClNG INFORMATION

If desired. t h ~ somer (or a copy thereol) may be used by the C o f l V a a ~ ras Ihe C 0 f l M f l 0 l ' ~InVOtCe 1PStead d 8 separale lnvo ce prov ow
the follow~ngstatement. (signed and dated) IS on (or anached to)me order. "Paymenl is requesled In the amount of S
ND
other ~nvolcewill be submitted." However, if the Contractor wlsh@s_tosubmll an lnvolce, the f~llowlnginforrnauon musl De providec.
.conVacl number (if any), order number, llem number(s), descri$(hj" of.uppl!es
or service. sizes, quanbl~es,~ n iprices,
l
and exrendec
tolals. Prepaid shipp~ngcosrs wlll be indlcaled as a separate item orrthe ~nvoice.where shipplng costs exceed 510 (excepl lo: parcel
post), the billing musl be supponed by a Dill of lading Or receipt. When several orders are invoiced to an 0:oenng aclivny O ~ r i r gme same
billing period. consolioated period~cblllings are encouraged.
RECEIVING REPORT.

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Quantity In me "Quantity Accepted' wlumn on lhe faceof Vlls order has been:

Inspecled.

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accepreb,

receivec

by me and confwms to this conhact. hems listed below have been rejected lor the masons indicated.
SHIPMENT
NUMBER

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FINAL

DATE

SIGNATURE OF AumoRIED u.s. t
O
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RECENED

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ITEM NO

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Page 1 of 2

TASK ORDER
Effective Date: August 28, 2002

-

-

.

Contractor:

The Lewin Group

Address:

3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Subject:

A.
B.
C.

-

D.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Title: "Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Communtty Initiativen
Task Order Ofticer: Joseph Grubbs
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cost:
fl %
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Fee, 7%: (>rime Contractor)
I
Fee, 3% (Subcontractor)
$1,268,639.00
Cost plus Fixed Fee:
...
4 AppropriationfCAN -Numbers-& . ; - . . -r:r
Associated Costs: - .........................
26998035-7521536,$360,000.00 i. .
2699201 6-75x1553, $100;800.0& .., - - ...
. . . . . . .
2~999007-7521
550, $100,000.00 1
. .. . . . . ...- ..
-26995120-7521536, $100.000.00
Object
. . . - ......
Class:
25.13
i
.Current Oblw.mn-:. ..:.. :.. - .r I--.
$_600iQm.~I:T
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This Task Order is hereby issued; pursuant to the terms and conditions of thce Master Contract.
especially SECTION C, SCOPEOF WORK, and SECTION H, TASK ORDER PROCEDURESThe Contractor's initial proposal and-allrevised proposals are incorporatedherein; except in-the
sa~nd
of the Master
event of a conflict b e t w e e n ~ ~ o n h a c t ~ F ' s ~the-termsandconditions
take
overheContract whereas the Master C o n f c ~ ~ 4 r i ~ ~precedence
/,--The
attached Statement of Work contained hereinisiconsidered to be within the scope of the Master
.....
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DUNNS:
Statement of Work - (See Attached)
Delivery Schedule - (See Attached)
Period of Performance: August 28.2002 through August 27. 2004

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The attached Statement of Work contained herein is considered to be within the scope of the
Master-Contract. The Contractor's Revised Proposal dgled @gust 1, 2002. ~wbichwas submitted
Eontractor and~hB7as-k-OrderOfficer on July 25. 2002
in response to discussions held t t e t ~ e k n
and tstal cost plus fixed fee, shall take
that required a reduction in both the.s~6@iof.work
precedence over the Scope of work as defined herejn. '

See Page-2, for approval signatures

..--

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Page 2 of 2
Continued, from Paqe-1

umber

Contract
282-98-0016 .
Task Order Number 30

The Lewin C

u /&/
'

Authorized agnature
The Lewin- Group
.
*

Date

.,

(I_

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SEP - 3 2002
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THIS PAGE INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK
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(THE NEXT PAGE BLOCK WILL CONTAIN PAGE(S) 1-20 OF THE
DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/WORK STATEMENT)

-

Task O r d e r Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
SECTION C-DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/WORK
STATEhWNT
T I T L E : "HEALTHY h W R R l A G E AND RESPONSIBLE F A T H E R H O O D C O h ~ f U N I T Y
INITIATIVE"
Purpose of T a s k O r d e r :

C.1.

-

T o provide technical assistance to approximately 1 5 community-level demonstration coalitions and their
state government partners to
and maintain healthy marriages. family formation and responsible
fatherhood. Tasks shall include (1) providing technical assistance to targeted state governments (title
W - D agencies or their umbrella agencies) in completiag requests for section 11 15 waivers, which will
be for the purpose of funding demonstration projects under the Administration for Children and Family's
115(a)(2) auth-ority; (2) collaboratirig with state~andlocal government, and community-based
*
section 1
6c
. .~.
-and faith-based organizations, to d & e l ~ ~ ~ ~ c o m m u n i t ~ -coalitions
level
to devkl'op thcdemonstrations; (3)
identifyng and c ~ m m ~ n i c a t i ntog local partners best practices relating to marriage promotion, family
formation and responsiblefatherhood; (4) providing'ongoing capacity-building activities to support the
demonstrations;
and- ( 5 ) developing~eval_uation desi-gnst o measure implementation and community
.
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Since 1960,the number of chikdp living without their father present in the home has increased from 10
million to 24 million. T w o factori.have contributed to this change in family structure: first, divorce,
which leaves about 1 million children without their father each year; second, non-marital pregnancies,
which make up approximately one-third
of all biflhs in America, or approximately 1.3 million children,
-..
each year. Research has shown that%&ildrenwho live without their father present in the home have-a
more difficult path in life. They are more likely to live in poverty; drop out or fail out of school; engage
in at-risk behavior; and suffer ernotional or psychological problems necessitating treztment? In c?oiitrast.
children who grow up with their father present are less likely to experience poveny, engage In high-risk
behavior, or suffer from emotional or developmental problems, and over time have higher levels of
I
educational attainment, employment opportunity and earning potential.
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Research also confirms an inverse relationship between no"-marital pregnancies and the polential for
healthy marriages and positive socioeconomic development. Women who have a child out of wedlock,
particularly as teens, are less likely to be married later in life and have significantly lower levels of
education, employment and income. In contrast, women who wait to have children until they are
married, have completed their education and are established in a job create a more solid foundation for
themselves.and
.
their children. They are more likely to enjoy a healthy marriage that remains viable over
time. heref fore, for the purpose o f this task order, the concept of promoting healthy-manages, family
formation and responsible fatherhood will include efforts to reduce the number of non-marital
pregnancies
The goal of the commun~ty-leveldemonstrations supported by this task order will be to develop and
susta~nprojects that promote healthy marriages, famlly iorma~ionand respons~blefatherhood. First, the

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
demonstrations will integrate marriage, family formation and fatherhood into ACF p r o s a m s , such as
Child Support Enforcement, Head Stan, Community Services Block Grant. Child Care, Runaway and
Homeless Youth services, and Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, and by facilitating the
development of new projects at the community level. This will enable partners to leverage the broad
base of services at the federal. state and local level, as well as to build upon existing relationships
between service providers and families. Second, the demonstrations will offer services in a supponive,
accessible environment, reaching out to individuals and families within their communities. The
demonstration partnerships will include governmental, non-governmental, community- and faith-based
organizations, with local coalitions driving interventions at the grassroots level.

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C.3.

Government Furnished Information:

For performance o n t h c task order, appropri-de agency officials from the Administration for ChilcJren.
a n n m q i e s will make available the latest information that is released from c e n c y programs.
a;
deemed appropriate afid necessary by h i h officials for task order performance.

C.4.

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Government Furnished Property:
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Rights to Data:

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T h e Contractor shall not publicize o r disseminate information within the time period of this specific task
order without the prior written approval of the Task Order Officer.
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C.6. Statement of Work':"'"'. I .': -1 . .. - . .
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T h e demonstrations supported under this task order will feature a saturation approacFi, with>ach i i i e
having the opportunity to craft the most appropriate mechanisms for intervention. .This taskjorder will
reinforce these strategies through technical assistance, performance measurement
and assess'ments of
.
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i m ~ l e m e n t a t i ~and-impact;.The
n
work completed undeilttie-iajE5aer. will support the fission df each
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..C F partner agency as follows: ..
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Office of Child Suppon Enforcement (OCSE): The OCSE mission is to assure that assislance in
obtaining suppofl is available to children by locating parents, establishing paternity and support
obligations, and modifying and enforcing those obligations. The demonstrations will support this
mission and the objectives under title IV-D by enabling fathers to play a more positive, substantive
role in their child's development. OCSE plays a key role in promoting marriage, family formation
..
a n d re's'ponsible fatherhood and will expand these activities under this task order:.-- *
Head Startr The mission of Head Start is to provide comprehensive child development services to
eligible low-income children from birrh to five years of age and their families, as well as to pregnant
women; to help enrolled children achieve their full potential, Early Head Start and Head Star1
grantees provide comprehensive heal~h,nutritional, educational, social and orher services; and to
provide parents with training and education to foster their understanding of and involvement in the

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016

development of their children. The demonstrations will support this mission by improv~ngthe
social, economic and health condition of families by promoting healthy marriages and by giving
fathers the skills they need to be active participants in the development of their child and family.
And, for the current year, Head Start is developing modules for marriage, family formation and
responsible fatherhood to incorporate into its existing programs.
Office of Community Services (OCS): The OCS mission is to strengthen local communities through
community partnerships and improving civic participation; and increasing community development
investments so that families can lead healthy, safe and productive lives. This mission is achieved
through the work of the Community Action Agencies (CAAs) and their community-based partners.
The demonstrations will support the OCS mission by building stronger communities through the
formation of healthy marriages and by reinforcing ci~lmentcornmunity-level service delivery
networks and strengthening partnerships between CAAs, state and local government, and
community-based and faith-based organiz$tions. OCS is developing modules for marriage, family
- *
formailon and responsible fatherhood to incorporate into its existing progrims. .

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Child Care Bureau: The mission of the Child Care Bureau is to enhance the quality, affordability,
and availability of child care for all families. This includes a dedication to ensuring the safe, healthy
development of children. The demonstrations will support t h ~ mission
s
by enhancing the
environment for child development through the promotion of healthy mamages, family formation
and responsible fatherhood. In collaboration with othki ACF agencies, the Child Care Bureau has
begun developing mamage, family formation and responsible fatherhood modules to integrate into
its existing programs.
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Runaway and Homeless Youth: The mission of the Family and Youth Services Bureau (FYSB) is to
strengthening
families. Primary activities in this mission are the Runayay
'support young people and
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-and ~ o m e l e s Youth
s
services and pili-ve-ysuhdevelopment.iniriatives
The demonstr$tions wjll
support this mission by creatingspportunities for fathers to become positive contributor~,toyouth
.
development and creating al-ealthy, ~upportive-familyenvironment by-promotinfrrrarria'.ge'.
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Temporary Assistance toNeeedy
~ a i n__i l _i e_ ._(TANF):
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TANF
legislation
inc1~ded:sevkral
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. - ..provisions that reieforce-the Adniinistration's commitment to marriage, responsible-fatherhood and .the formation of two-parent fapilies. The demonstrations will support this rmssion by p i o m o ~ ~ n-.g
rImarriage, family formation and responsible fatherhood.
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The purpose of the Healthy Marriage and Responsible ath her hood Community emo on strati on Initiative
will be to invest in broad-based, community-level coalitions that engage in comprehensive intervention
strategies promoting and maintaining healihy marriages, family formation and responsible fatherhood.
The work completed under this task order will involve providing technical assistance 10 the
demonstr&on coalitions and their state-level partners. The ACF Regional Offices wilk coordinate with
the Contractor for the completion of the work. First, technical assistance will be offered to targeted state
governments (title IV-D agencies or their umbrella agencies) in completing requests for section 1 1 15
waivers, which will be for the purpose of funding the demonstration initiatives under ACF's section
1 115(a)(2) authority. Second, technical assistance will support each'of the demonstration sites in
assembling cornmunity-based coalitions to serve as drivers of the demonstration initiatives. Finally, and
--on*%-mgemg basis during the-prri-od of this task order, ~echnicalsuppor~will be provided lo help the .

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
coalitions and their state partners in the following areas: preparing resource development strategies for
sustaining the initiatives, identifying best practices in marriage, family formation and responsible
fatherhood, building the capacity of the coalitions, and designing evaluations to measure the
effectiveness of the demonstration initiatives.
The work under this task order will be completed in conjunction with ACF Regional Office staff.
Regional Office staff will be responsible for assisting in the initiation of relationships between the
Contractor, targeted states and demonstration sites, as well as project support functions. ACF will select
sites based on negotiations -with the states and the sites. The Contractor shall not be required to
participate in the selection process.
The Contractor shall be responsible for the following technical assistance activities:
iP,

(I) Section 111 5 - ~ a i v mThe
: Contractor shali provide technical assistance to state governments
. (title ,
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-'TV-~;~encies or their umbrella igkncies) in completing requests for OCSE section 1.1 15 wai-?en.
The OCSE waivers will be forthe *'purpose of funding demonstration initiatives under the ACF's
section 1115(a)(2) authority and must meet all appropriate' provisions under section 11 15 (see
-.
Appendix A - Child Support Enforcement Demonstration and Waiver Authority).

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(2) Coalition-Building: The Contractor shall help participants in the demonstration sites and their state-level partners-todevelop coalitions~oflocal and state government organizations, and faith-based and
community-based groups. This coalition will constitute the decision-making body for the project.
and will be responsible for u s i ~ gfederal funds to leverage substantial funds from other sources.
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OR~~ggc.eI)euel.opmen~~be,
Contractor shall provide technical assistance during the period of the

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i ~ o i G i T 6 ~ h eihe
l p coalitions deLelop plans to sustain t h e demonstrations in the long term.
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(4) Besl Practices: The Contractor shall collaborate with experts to provide insight into the latest
.family fomatjan.andre~ponsible~3aiher-6@d.~~=---~
-1 research and strategies for pr~moting'rnama~e,

..

(5) Capacity-Building: The.Contractor.shall provide.assisiance~in-strategic
planning, financial
I -_
_------management, and interagency c ; o l l a h ~ i t i g.'Th-~:w3lEe7p
.
- t ~ c n s u r e t h operational
e
effect.iveness=
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(6) Evaluation Design: The Contractor shall work in coopeiation with experts in the field of evaluation
research to develop an appropriate evaluation strategy to assess the implementation procdss and
measure the impact of the demonstrations at a community level.
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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016

C.7. Scope of Work
Tasks to be included in this project are described below.

TASK 1.0. - FINALIZE DETAILED STUDY PLAN
Subtask 1.1. Orientation Meeting

.......

Within two weeks of task order award the Contractor shall meet with the Task Order Officer
(TOO) and other federal agency representatives, including the federal project workgroup for this
initiative, to clarify technical assistance objextites, approaches, requirements and parameters.
but are not limited to: (1) a discussion of ACF
Issues to be discussed at the meeting include
gcrals and objeches for the task order, (2) roles and responsibilities of~echnicalassistan& staff s
and other personnel involved with the task order; (3) use of experts for acconiplishirrg~the
object~vesof the task order; (47 refinement of methods and processes for providing technical
assistance; and (5) production of a final report and related documents.
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The Contractor shall subniii a memorandum outlining the major issues, and describing decisionsmade at
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the meetingby the 6th week after award ~ffh-e;-Ksk-order.-~-:'=
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The Contractor shall, as approved by the TOO, identify experts who can contribute to the project
to suppleme-nLthe--knwledge,skills, and-.expertiseof Contractor staff-and proposed consulfanfs:. .
Such experts shall iy.~l*qde,ye$e_archers,
policymakers, and program operators working on issues ..
directly relatkd to promoting marriage, family formation and responsible fatherhood and
designing cornmunity-level evaluation strategies. ACF expects that experts from an ~ a y , g f-- = programmatic
.
biikgrounds
. .
and kperience shall be included (e'.-g:, family c6"hseling, ch.ild 2ndfamily development, responsible.fatherhood, marriage promotion, public health) as well as
experts with
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order award,: the Contractor shall submit ,a.memorandum to the.TO0pfoposing expeks to' be'
,inviJeeo pa.rtt.c~pate in the ,work under the-task order and indicating their areasof ex'pmise. -='

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The experts should be utilized early in the process so that they can provide informatibn on
existing- -programs
and work in their specific areas of expertise to adequately inform the work
plan. The Contractor shall convene some or all of the experts identified, as agreed to by the
TOO, for an initial meeting to provide suggestions and guidance to ACF and the Contraclor
regwding areas of technical assistance, specific methods to be used to provide technical
assistance, and programmatic and evaluation questions to be addressed duririg'the course of
activity under this task order. The Contractor~shallconvene rhe initial meeting by the 121hweek
after award of task order.
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The Contracror shall communicate with various experts periodically Inroughout the project lo
solicit guidance and feedback on [he work of the project and shall submit drafts of major project
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delivernbles ro the group of experts for their review. The expens, as a group or individually, may

1 asr. v r a e r number 3U
Contract Number 282-98-0016

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-assist and inform ACF and Contractor staff in various aspects of work under this task order.
This may include, but not be limjted to: providing expertise and knowledge about current or
prior research examining issues relating to mamage promotion, family formation responsible
fa~herhood,and
evaluation; providing information about existing senficesor progr3mc
orcomponents of programs developed to promote marriage, family formation and responsible
fatherhood; pmicipating in site visits to obtain more in-depth information; writing and analyses
related to project work as requested by the Contractor; providing input into the technical
assistance; responding to information gathered and developed by the ~ontracto'rincluding the
compilation and analyses of information and recommendations for alternative program models to
be tested; participating in bri;fings and presentalions; developing evaluation designs; and
reviewing other major project deliverables. Upon approval by the TOO, the Contractor may
arrange to have some experts present for final isc cuss ions and briefings during which the
proposed technical assistance and specific intervention approaches to be implemented in the .
demonstration sites-are recommendd,

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ACF allticipate~that.the total gfoop of experts that may be actively involved may consist i f
approximately 8-10 individuals. However,
-a larger number
of expertsrpay beLo~nt&t~edand.
--- consulted regirdingexistlng reseiic-hTproFms, or other specific areas of expertise needed to
accomplish work under this task order. For budgeting
purposes, the Contractor shall consider
-- -that six experts will require=~rave4.expenses
to..participate-in up- to-three.rneetin.gs1
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Subtask 1.3. D~etailedStudy
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Based on the information$btained during the orientation meeting, discussions with the TOO and
with the experts. the contractor shall s u .b. -m~ - A
~ & d ~ ~ t ~ d e t astudy
i l e dand yo!k,plan that
. . . . .difines -.
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specific tasks and approaches and staffing-lidaanagement responsibilities.Based on a thoroughunderstanding of t h e ~ l s a n..do bj ec ti v .e. . s. . ... f o this
r .work,
. . . . . . . . the Conrractor shall incl-ude in the work
plan: a detailed plan for utiliiing the experts throughout the period of performance; methods and

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Thtde@ihht-H
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iden
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p&oblems that maybe-=mereddin
k-rniiig
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the project andprovide r e c o ~ i i d e approaches
d
for $dressingthem. The ContrBctor
....
. . shall
submit a draft workplan for review by t h e ~ 0 0and other-federal siiiff byihe 10th wbek after
award of task order. The Conrractor shall revise the plan and produce a final plan that addresses
any comments raised by the TOO or other HHS staff by the 15th week after award 06 task order.

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TASK 2.0. -TECHNICAL ASSISTANCE
The Contractor shall provide rechnical assistance to support the demonstrarion qoalitions ar the
state, local and communiry level. The techn~calassistance activities shall be approved by the
TOO and informed by discussions wirh the panel of experts. Technical assistance shall be
provided only to sites approved by ACF and rheir slate partners. Areas of technical assistance
shall include: ( 1 ) section I I 15 waivers, (2) coalirion building, (3) resource developmenr. ( 4 ) best
practices, ( 5 ) capacir y-building, and (6) evaluat~ondesign.

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T a s k O r d e r Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Subtask 2.1. Section 1 1 15 Waivers

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The Contractor shall assist the targeted stategovernment partners (title TV-D agencies or their
umbrella agencies) in developing requests f i r Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE)
section 11 15 waivers, which will be for the purpose of funding the demonstration initiatives
under ACF's section 11 15(a)(2) authority (see Appendix A - Child Support Enforcement
Demonstration and Waiver Authority). ..The Contractor shall communicate with the TOO and
representatives from OCSE about the completion of the waiver requests. The Contractor shall
review all pertinent documentation from OCSE and communicate with OCSE staff as
appropriate to determine which waivers will be required to facilitate funding of the
demonstrations. Waiver requests must follow all applicable requirements under section 11 15
and OCSE guidance. The waiver requests shan be submitted to OCSE beginni$ the 16th week
after the task order award and may continue
.
. ..~during the period of the task o r d e r g ~ h Contracmr
e
shall provide a&lstance to approximaiely 15 state government partner.s..as approvedby thsTOO;
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in developing waiver requests. .. :..
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Subtask 2.2. Coalition Building
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.and y i ~ hi h. e : ~ u ~ . ~ oof~he.
r t ACE Regional.staff,
The Contractor, as approved,.bythe.TQ
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-work-with-federal, state and local government officials and representatives from comrnunitybased and faith-based organlzatians-in-approx-imately-l5 demonstration sites. targeted by ACF to
develop community-level coalitions. The coalitions should be based on relationships between
formal institutions ( g o v ~ d n e n t a lnongovernmental,
,
faith-based,community-based, and private
organizations), informal institutions (civic groups, neighborhood a&&iations, faith-based -.............
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associations),
and
the
public..atllarge.
These
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will
constitute
the
decision-makingbody,.
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sources.
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. . . the 16th
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week after task order awardj4he-Contrac-toi shill submit-tothe TOO a memorandum.that
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identifies the prospective participants in each of the coalitions.
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The Contractor shall support the coalition-building process by facilitating a series ofltwo
meetings
for approximately
15 selected
d e .m. . Q
R S L l ~ ~ ~ e d e. m
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provide logistical support for the meetings,with the ~ o n t r a c t 6 c l ~ a ~ n ~ . ~ d i s c u s s i ~ n - .:-a ~- ~- - .t- h e : ..- . . .
participants. These meetings should f~cus:onstrat~~i~~~lannin~.and.~oal-setti-n
g... - ~ o ~ i c s . fthe
or
meetings: (Meeting I) (1) Vision, mission, and values to guide the demonstration iniiiative; (2)
.. .
community-level partners that should be included in the planning, implementation, (nd
evaluation; (3) potential sources of non-federal financial and in-lund support; and (4) operational
and governance structures to provide community-based leadership. (Meeting 2) ( 1 ) &oak and
objectives for the demonstration; (2) best practices relating to marriage promotion, family
-formation and responsible fatherhood; (3) current and potential programs that may be
incorporated as action strategies; (4) the use of media and other communicatibfi strategies; (5)
internal and external constraints; (6) resource,development and fund-raising activities; and (7) an
action'plan with operational next steps.
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The Contractor shall work with federal, state and local partners70 convene the first meeting of
...
and the
targeted demonstration coalitions by the 16th week following the task order. award
second meeting by the 32nd week. By the 20th week after the [ask order award, the Conlractor

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-001 6
shall brief the TOO and other ACF staff on the status and results of the meetings and. by the 4Sth
week, provide a copy of the action plans for each coalition. For travel and budgeting purposes,
the Contractor shall plan for two meetings in each of the approximately 15 sites.
Subtask 2.3. Resource Development

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The Contractor shall provide technical assistance-tohelp the selected coalitions develop a
resource development strategy to secure non-federal sources of financial and in-hnd support.
- This will not include the actual fund raising, but will be a strategic plan for future resource
development. As required by statute, the state share of the section 11 15(a)(2) funding must be in
the form of financial support, but resources over and above the mandated state share can be
financial and in-kind support. These resources'may include contributions from foundations,
private individuals, grants, volunteeq~sspponand other sources. The coalitions should deve1o.p
resource development strategies that would be appropriate for their respective demonsti-atkn =
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The Contractor shall subrnim-the TOO^ copy of the resource development strategies for the
coalitions by the. .52nd
week following the task order award.
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Subtask.2;4. Best Practices----

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The Contractor shall work with the-experts-toidentify and communicate to the coalitions
fatherhood. In
"promising practices" for&0moti~~~~3gk~armlyyfo-~~airon
and
.responsible
.. conjunctionwith the experts, the Contractor shall review pertinent best practices literature, - - : - . - G -.- .--. .-. .
empirical findings, and descriptive reports onthe--social,.economic and..health
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related
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mamage, as well as..,&ieffects.of providing:training, counseling and support to promote healthy- .
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marriages, family f o m a t i o n ~ - ~~.~.~ f a t h ~ r t r & d ~ - ~ h ~ ~ s e - ' ~ przctice
f - t h ereview
~ ~ b .-. . .e s-t
is to provide information on a broad array of approaches being taken to encoujage aod rnaimain
--healthy-marriages;and to'supponand promote responsible fatherhood. The Contractor. in
conjunction with the experts, shall use the information from the-best practice-review to make
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dec~siansabout h-ow tofpcu';-th'e.\ijbik7undererihi$
hsk
ordifiin'
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effective strat6gies for the d e m n s m - t i o R H n f o .m. a t i O ~ n f i O ; h t ~ r e v &
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in the evaluatim design corisl.derations.&idrecommendatiow,------ -f'

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To inform the best practice review, the Contractor shall explore existing mamage, family
formation and fatherhood promotion initiatives. The following programslsites are
recommended: the Greater Grand Rapids Community Marriage Policy in Grand Rapids,
Michigan; the State of Oklahoma's Department of Human Services mamage promotions
Tennessee;
policies; the First Things First mamage and fatherhood ne~worksin Chattanooga,
...
and other appropriate programs/sites as approved by the TOO.

.

.

4

:. . . .

The Contractor shall develop strategies for integrating best practice information inlo the
planning, implemenlation and evaluation of the demonstrations. In addilion to the initial
planning- of the demonstrations, best practice information should be provided to the coalitions by
the Conlractor on a n ongoing
baskdunng-the-period
..
--of the .-task order. The Contr'acror shall;iri - ..-.- -- -coordinalion with ~ h eTOO, convene up to three meetings of the experts and k e y operalional staff

Tz.;k Order Number 30
Conlract Number 282-98-0016
from the coalitions to facilitate an ongoing discussion of the latest research, findings from
evaluations, innovative approaches and related information. The meetings shall be hcld ar .4CF
in Washington, DC. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall plan for up to ?in experts and -.
one representative from each of the approximately 15 sites to attend the best practice meetings.
The Contractor shall submit to the TOO a memorandum summarizing the findings from the best
practices review and identifying ways in which the best practices will be incorporated into the
demonstrations. The memorandum shall be submitted by the 28th week after the task order
award.
Subtask 2.5. Capacity-Building

-

-c

........

The Contractor shall provide ongoing technical assistance to build the operational capacity of lhe
-ccgli.tio.ris. this capacity, the Contiktor shall facilitate up to two megtings with the coaktioss',.
leadership to address needs of tbe,coalitions, and be available for infoAal discussions.by - .
telephone and e-mail to provide'suppon on an issue-by-issue basis. The coalitions will provide
logistical support for t h e m - i n g d e r budgeting purposes, the Contractor- shall-plan for two
meetings at each of the approximately
15 sites.
..........
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...
..
. . . . . . -. . . . . . . .

.

~ r i r n a G ~ ~ a pt a~c ~i 'idin=
" i Areas:
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...
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~-

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~.

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-~

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Strategic planning and management -The Contractor shallprovidisup@ortfor establishing a
mission, vision and d&ks to guide the coalition; identifying-goals and-objectives; and
translating these-goals and objectives into activities.
. .
.
.
.. . . . . .
---*
....., .- .--- .-.- . . .. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Financial planning --+and-management -The Contractor shall provide support for developing
standards for budgeting,.financial planning and management t o assist the coalitions in
maximizing resources and ensuring fiscal accountability.
.#
=
-- -:

r

.-

- - .. .

..

:-.

-- -

a.r

Interagency collaboration - The Contractor.shall.pr.o.vide support for creating-effec+ive-inter- - - - .
organizational
. . . partnerships
. .
&iiT;i-Eijdementatfon ne.tworksatacammunlty-1~4,and-~am0~g--~
.....
. . . . . .
.-- .
.
.. . . .
loca]- and. state-leve] o r g a n--j z ~ l j m . : r - ~ ; - - - ~ L.-..--L. .-- - - . - -- .-=
_
-... ..-.
.
..
.? _.
.
.
....-.
.
--.In thestandard monthly report submitted to ACF as part of the normal contractadmin~stration
. . . .
process, the Contractor shall include the frequency and purpose of contacts for capacity building.
The reports should identify the number of contacts for each demonstration site during the report
period, rhe purpose of the contact, the staff person or expert providing the technical~assistance
and other relevant information. The timing and format of the monthly reports shall adhere to
ACF:-s procurement -guidelines.
.--

-

-

2
'

...

Sublask 2.6. Evaluation Desixn
.......

The...
Contractor~s~all.provide
t&.calassistance
to the coali~ionsin developing options for
evaluation des~gn.The purpose of the evaluation design activities will be to help the coalitions
.develop frameworks for sustaining operational effectiveness and measuring7h~impaCiof ihe
~demons1ra1ions.ar.a
communiry.level. T h e C o ~ ~ r a f t o r - s t r a l l ~ e s c n p tinformation
ive
aboul

..

-- - - --

-

-- . -

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
programs through telephone discussions and site visits. The Contractor shall interview officials
or staff within the programs, or researchers familiar with the proFams, to discuss program
rtission, organization, operations. participant characteristics, outcomes, and other relevant
topics. To the extent possible, any written information available about the program shall be
obtained prior to scheduling interviews and site visits. When feasible, sitevisits shall include
discussions with program participants and collaborating organizations. The TOO shall be gi\'en
as much advance notice as possible about site visit scheduling in order to allo~vtime for planning
for federal staff to participate in some site visits. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall
plan for one site visit to each of the approximately 15 sites.
The Contractor also shall assess the availability and verifiability of administrative data and other
sources of information at the local level. The Contractor shall assist the demonstration sites in
identifying-sources of data relating to.. ~.
..
demographics,
marriage, non-marital pregnancies, divorce,
.....
a d other key indicators.
.
. . . -.
I

--

,

. . . . .

-

~

,

2 _ ~

- -

.
-

-.

-..
--

i.

...

The Contractoi's activities shall be limited to technical assistance for the purpose of evaluation
design. Actual evaluation::research
. . . . . . . .
. . . . . . .will
..
not
-.- . be
- . completed under this task order.

.

. . .

Evaluation Desien Activity
.
.
. _ ...__.
2.6.1.. Performance
.__
Measurement
. .-...

....
-

.

-

. . . . .
-

.

The Contractor shall assist the leadership and staff of each coalition
.-- . - .- . . .in
. the development of a ..
. . .
logic model for the demonstration initiative.. Thelogic model should-identifythe. .inputs,
.
activiiies,oulputs;inte&&ate
outcomes;;lnd end outcomes for-thedemonstration.
--

~

-.

.

.

..

.

.

.

--

The Contractor shall submit to-the TOO a copy of a logic model for each coalition/demonstration
- . ..
.
.
site by the 48th weeh.af,fer ~ _h .e ~. t. .a. .sorder
k .award.
.
.
.
. .
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...
. . . . . . . . . .. .
. . . . . . . . . .. . . .. . . . - . . . . .

-.

....

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........

.

-.

-.-..

Evaluation-DesGn-~ctivity
2.6~2-CommunityImpact Evaluation

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,.

s

:a

.

.. . . . . . . . . .

. . . .. .. .
. . . . . . . .

-=. =

. . . . .

--

--The Contractor shall assist the coalitions in developing options for measuriigthe impact o f t h c
design&o&rda~t-~--;;-:-~;----~~~
, .
.~
. -.
-- intervention ,$rate.gi_esat a communityJevel-.Theevalllation
.
research relating to cornrnun~ty~l~vefl~~valuationmethods
and include~a~discussion
and strategies
. . . . - -. . .
for-"singsmall-.area.da~time-series-ilnalyii
and statistiial modeling of counterfactbat T h e -.-

Contractor shall submit to the TOO evaluation
plans for each of the demonstrations
.
.
week after the task order award.
.

..

--

.. .-

qy the 60th

-~..!

~

-

,

. .

...

By the 72nd week after the task order award, the Contractor shall submit to the TOO a
:.
memorandum that provides recommendations concerning evaluation strategies and the - - - -..
demonstrations to be considered for more in-depth evaluation. The r n e r n ~ -.**.''
a n d u r s ~ s h ~ ~ ~ . , i.d e. n t ~ ~-.~ ' .
the demonstra~ionsites recommended for further study, the rationale for the recomh~en'dations'; and alternative program recommendations and rationale to be considered i f i ! is not possible to
. . .. . .
conduci site visits with one or more of the primary programs identified.

.

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
TASK 3 - DISCUSSIONSIBFUEFINGS Ah?) FINAL REPORTS
Subtask 3.1. Discussions and Briefincs

........

-.

-

...

..-..

-

Because this is developmental work for ACF, the agency wants to be closely involved with the
project as new information becomes av-ailable. Therefore, in addition to regular communication
with the TOO, the Project Director and key project staff shall periodically brief federal staff
informally on developments and findings prior to formal submissions (e.g.,
- information
generated during coalition building, discussions with experts, telephone discussions with state
government and program officials, and technical assistance). The Contractor shall assume that
such informal discussions will be conducted by telephone approximately every 3 weeks and that
each discussion_willrequire 1-2 hours. The exact schedule will be approved by the TOO a f t e ~
task order award and may be adjusteh over time as project work and..dg.veloprnentssugg~.Any
written information relevant to-thediscussions will be submitted to the TOOTbymai.l,'fax or email for distritiution to other fe'deral staff prior to the scheduled relephone conversation. It is
- expectedtfrat-durirlg sucmrm3-riefings
the PrbjectDirectEr other staff will report on the
range of programs for which information has been obtained to date or since the last briefing,
unique or innovative approaches identified, significant developments or problems in the conduct
of the work as planned, new research findings, extent of consistence or divergence of findings
across studies, major knowledge gaps for which information is being s o u g h t r i ~ p t f r o mexpert
.
.
panel members, and otheiissues
ideiiified by the Contractor or ACF.
...
,d'

2 .

B.'

.....

.

.

-

The Project Director and key project staff shall cbnduct~twoformal IYriefin~forACF/HHS staff,
invited experts, and other invited participants as agreed to by the TOO. The first bnefing shall
be a mid-project s t q J y ~ j e p o d ~ nshall
d be completed by the.48th weekafter
.thetask order.,:,- - .....
award. The Contractor and
key
staff
shall
present
background
information,
describe
the
.
.
.......
development of the demonstration coalitions, identify opportunities and constraints.re!a~~ng
.
.
*
to
implementation, discussnexr steps, and provide an opportunity for open discussion and
comments on the activities completed to-date._Ihe.Csntractorshallconsider-he-cornment~.. .....
.
. .received in.pl.m.ning the next steps-of [he pMj.ect. - . . -. . . . .
.-------.
.-. . - -. ~

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The second briefing- shall.be scheduled affer.sub~ssi&"~nf.lhe
draft.ofihefinalrepoh~ui&
[his briefing [he Contractoi- and key staff shall provide an overview of the project; present
summary information/descriptions of various demonstrations, including common and unique
components or characteristics; and discuss evaluation design issues and.recommenda!ion_s_.The . . . .
briefing shall include a discussion of recommendations and implications for further study in the
area by ACF or others. o valuation related issues to be discussed may include: the ability to
i-nereasescope or scale of existing programs; challenges to replication of selected
programs/models in other sites; program uptake and cornplerion rates; availab'lliry and validity of
small area data; potential for using interrupted time-series analysis and related techniques, as
appropriate; stability of funding for program operations; and other issues identified by
Contrac~orstaff.

.- .-

Task O r d e r Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
The Contractor shall submit to the T O O for approval a draft outline for the briefings at least
weeks prior to the scheduled briefing date. The first briefing shall be conducted by the l s t h
week after task order award and the second by the 94th week.

tup

Subtask 3.2. Draft and Final Report
The Contractor shall prepare an outline and a draft and final report on the project. The
Contractor shall submit to the T O O for approval a report outline with suggestions or options for
information presentation. The'Contractor shall submit the outline n o later than the 90th week
after task order award.
The draft final report should summarize the work performed, present summary information1 :
descriptions of various demonstrations,-including common and unique components or . ,
-- characterktics; and discuss evaluation design issues and recomme~datidfis.Th.e draft,.fi~al~~eport
. should include a discussion-of recommendations and implications for further study in the area by
ACF or others.' Evaluation relGed issues to be discussed in the draft final report may include:
- - - - d h e a b i l r t y t c ~ i n c r e a s e ~ or
~ ~scale
p e of existing programs; challenges to replication of selected
programs/models in other sites; program. ..uptake .and
-.....completion
rates; availability-and validity of ..--:
.
small area data; potential .for
.. .. usingintenupted..time-series
. .. . analysis and related techniques, a s
appropriate; stability of funding for program operations; and other issues identified by
- .
-..
.
Contractor staff.
--.-_ _ . . .. .
.
..
.
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..---.
:

-

. -. .

~-

~.

.

The Contractor shall s"br;;(.i%e
d r a t o f t h i final report to the T O O and members of t h e expert
panel by the 90th week after t'askorder award. The Contractor shall revise the report and- produce a final report that addresses comments on thedraft raised by.lhe T.00 and-other I
1~.
~ e v i e w e r s The-fma1-~-~pml
.
sfid.t€1eXti6iited by the 104th week after task order award.~The
Contractor shall not make a n y - m t h z reportpu~bl~cwithout
.
piior written approval of [he
.
TOO or until the repon has been released by ACF. In addition to printed copie'SrequiFed, < =
digital copy of the report shall be delivered based on the guidelines In Appendix B Specifications
..- -~
. . . .. .
for the Delivery of Digital Copies of Reports.-- . . ..
. .

_

.

.

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~

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b

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.. .-.._

--

._

_

_

. ..

.-

. .-

C

-

-

.?.

-

---

.

-

.

Task Order Number 30

Contract Number 282-98-0016
SECTION F - DELIVERABLES OR PERFORMANCE
F.1.- period of Performance
The period of performance under this Task Order shall be August 28,2002 through Augus! 27. 2 0 0 1 , 2 3
months from effective date of contract, unless changed by modification.

F.2.- Items to be Delivered and Delivery Schedule
The contractor shall submit the following items during the referenced time periods to the Task Order
Officer (TOO), Joseph Grubbs, Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administrarion for
Children and Families, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW, Washington, D C 20447
-rOl

-

-

.

J

T h z t e m s specified for delivery are subject to the review and approval of the TOO k f o r e f i n d
acceptance. The contractor shall be req'uiied to make revisions deemed necessary by the TOO.

-

-

.......

The Government reserves~the right to approve or disapprove deliverable items. The TOO will be
allowed 14 working days to review,.comment.ando~apprav&msr,eq~iring.priorapprovals. . - -

-

.

......-

. . .

.

.

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--- ..

-....

Progress Reports
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.-

=
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\?-.

.......

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....
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---... . . . . . . . .

.

~

-.

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~...--..

.......

--

- ... . . . .6
. . . . weeks..

...

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. . . .

.

. .

,-.;--

-

.$

...................

. . .-~. . .
1:-

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-

~

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-

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-.

-

-

-

-

-

Drafi I0 weeks- -.
Final 15 weeks

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.

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5 weeks

. . . .

= ~ :

~.

~

.....

-

-

...

.....

~

.Study.-and work Plans -

No. of Copies
* 2 copies

-

.-

Memorandum of Proposed Experts for
Consultation and Project Involvement

-

...

. .

..-.. -.

-~

~

. .

~

.

. . . . . .

-

-- - - - - .. - -

--

--

-

.............
.-

.-

...

-.
. . . . . .-

Deadline
Is of Ea Month

Subtask.l.l
M.emor
-an um on Cnentatiqn,
Meeelng
.*..:-*.
-:.
-

-

........
. . .......
.
.

..

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- .

F.3.-Deliverable Sched*
.

.

-

.

.--.

-

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5To.pies

5 copies
......
.*

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.-.--.

-

-.

.-.

.. --

-.
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Subtask 2.1
Requests for Section 1 1 1 5 Waivers1
Demonstration Funding to OCSE
Isr Requesrs

16 weeks

As required by OCSE

subtask 2.i
Memorandum of Coalition Participants
Action Plans from Demonstration Coalitions

16 weeks
'48 weeks

.....
5 copies
5 copies

Su btask 2.3
Resource Development Strategies of Coalitions

52 weeks

5 copies

-

-

.

-.

- -

-

...

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Deadline
Subtask 2.4
i
Memorandum for ~ e s Practices
Review

28 weeks

Monthly Reports

I" Report
'Subsequent

Activity 2.6.1
Logic Models

-

-Actiyity
16.2
Evaluation Plans .
. ..
Memorandum with ~icommendation;
.
.
.
.
.

-

Subtask 3.1
Briefmgs - --..=-Mid-project Status Briefing .
Final Briefing

...
...

--

..---. - . - - -

-

.

- ...
~

5 copies
--

-

~~

. ~.9

60 weeks
72 weeks-

&pi ks

=

-

*
--?
.
-.

-

..

. .

5 copies

-

..
.

-- -:.g8 W M ~ S

.-

--

.......

-

--

.

..

.

-

-...

.--....-

. . . . . .

94 weeks
.

.

....

-

Drafr--90

.- . . . . . .

...

--

.

..---.
- . . . .. .
.~..
...........
F i n. -~
~ .d
. a . & z ~ e _.
&
-

...
~

4 8 weeks

.-

. -. - ........

.

. .
.~
~-

5 copies
5 copies

E+ee31Feeekr

-.
. . - . -~

...

5 copies

12 weeks
Every 4 weeks

. . -

..\y
~

-.-..-

-

-

Subtask 3.2
.-Final Repon

No. of Copies

-

..

--

-

.-- -

-- .

.

- . -.

.-L

..

-

---..

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5 copies .
75 ~ o p i.............
e s- - - - ---. ~.
1 camera-ready - .
plus electronic file

..
...

.

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-~

.

.-

-

" . i s -

*One (1) copy of repon shalLbe iubmitte'd to the Contracting Officer,-Program Support Center,
AOS, Division of Acquisition Management. Parklawn Building. Room 5-101, 5600 Fishers b n e ,
Rockville, ~ 2 0 8 ~ , . S u b r N..............
i2"_c~py.
to the TOO, referenced address.
--

-

Y

.
.
. I-. . . . . . . -.
.

-. . : . ..

-.

.-..

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
APPENDIX B - SPECIFICATIONS FOR THE DELIVERY OF DIGITAL COPIES OF
REPORTS

- .

Where contracts require the submission of reports, digital copies are required in order to facilitate the
retention of electronic copies of these reports for future use, allow for Web site posting, and meet
requirements of Section 508 to provide accessibility to people with disabilities.
In addition to the printed copies required under the contract, two digital copies of the report shall be
delivered on media readable by Windows 9x programs. One copy shall be formatted in word processing
programs marketed by Core1 and Microsoft corporations (i-e., Wordperfect or Microsoft Office) and one
in hypertext markup language (HTML) that is coded for Section 508 accessibility. Where compatibility
with earlier versionsof the software is in doubt, files shall be delivered in the version of the software..
recornrnecded by the Federal Project Officer;':
... ..
..- ,

rb.

-

-

..--.

. .

7'

--

*

The text, tables, and any chahs or other graphics shall be organized and formatted as described here
Lengthy documents (greater than 500 Kb) should be divided into several parts and a separate file should
o e provided for each part. Engthy files (greater than 200 Kb) should be avoided ~f possible. The tltle
page table of contents, and o h ~ f r a n t m a ~ ~ &
In aWseparate
~
file. File names should contain
consecutive numbers that correspond to lhe numerical
- .labels used in the printed version. For-example,
Chapter 4, Figure 2 can'be rendered as C4F2.gif. Suffixes shall be those used by the software
manufacturer or follow the usual industry conventions, e.g., doc, xls, gif, jpg, etc.
/'

-.

2.

-*?.

Tables and tabular material shall not be converted into graphical-images,. ..but-be
.
.inclu&dwith the--word-p r o ~ @ " f i ~ delivered
~ ~ b r as-spreadsh.eet~~filei.Tatrles
and.......
tabular data shall a1sb:be converted to
~.
- - HTML-format and coded forSection 508accessibility. In order to comply with Section 508
-. .. . .
requirements, such data shaTl"i'6t 6e .$fibfitted in Portable Document Format (PDF)'.
. .
..

~

.

Graphic figures such as bar
. . .and
.
line charts, diagrams,
. . . . .and
. . . other
-drawings ~ha!! be.-d~eK~e~ed%i1h~.~ti1I(Graphics Interchange Format) orthe JPEG (~bintPhotographic Experts Group) format. Even-though--,
.
_the graphical elements mayhave b k n merged
with
the text
. . . to
. . fonn
. . . a single file for printing purposes;--- - . .
. . . . . .
...
'
.. --- -. ..
.. .------.... -. .. each graphicalimage shall be delivered a i a i e p Z e tile on t h e m and must not be eGbeiIded in a
..word processing, spreadsheet, slide show or other.composite file; In order to meet Section
.
508_ . -. ..
accessibility requirements.graphi;'images must beaccompanied by summary text and~coded~tabular
data for larger files and shall not be submjtted in PDF.
~

.

.

-:

.

....

--.-

. . . . .

.-

-

... <

--

_-I

I

..

I

Additional information about accessibility standards related to Section 508 may be found a1
http://www.webaim.org/standards/508/checklist. The document provides an interpretation of Section
508 Web. srandards
but is not an official document.
.,-.

' A c r o b a ~Reader 5.0 allows screen readers to access PDF d o c u m e n ~ s Hou,e\,cr. not all PDF documents are text-based. some
are scanned In as graphics. Scanned pr3phlcs renders them uscless lo many asslstlve technologies. Accessible HTML
versions are t hc appropriate al~crnatcvc.

--.

Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016

SECTION G-CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA
The basic conrract contains Section G in its entirety.
G.1. In addition to the information required by SECTION I, FAR Clause 52.232-25, Prornpr Payment,

the following information is also required for submission of a proper invoice.
(a) Signature of an authorized.officia1 certifying the invoice to bc correct and proper for
'payment;
(b) Period of performance for which costs are cjairned; and
.

--

+-

-

-

. . .

= *=
..

.

'

(cf Tax-identification number (employer's identification number) or social security
number .
.......
. .

=.

-

-..--.

.-.

(d) The contractor shall subm:t an original and three (3) copiguf

it's invoice to:

One ( I ) original voucher complete with all required back-up documentation shall be submitred to the
Contract Specialist and addressed
. .
to:
.. ...
. .
..
-..---.

-

~d

-

. - -

-

. .-..

Division
of Acquisition
Management, .AOSPSC-.-- - ................
PaiGwT
....
u~ld~gg,.
Room 5-101
5600 Fishers L a n 8 :
Rockville, ~ a r ~ l a 20857
nd
......
.- ..
Contract Number 282-98-0016
.
. . .
...-..........
Task Order Number 30.: .
..
-. . . . . . . .
. -

_.
......

.-....

-

--

-

--

.

. . . . ....
. . . .

- . . . . . . .

.

.

.

.

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~

-

~.

Three (3) copies of the voucher with copies of all required
back-up docurnentation shall be submitted to:
~.
.-

--

--

...

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~arkIaGnBuilding, Room I6A-I2
5600 Fishers Lane .'
Rockville, Maryland 20857
Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task 'Order Number-30 ..

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(e) Vouchers must show the Government Project Officer's name and phone number on the face
page. All calls concerning contract payment shall be directed to the genera1,help l~nefor
contract payments on (301)443-6766.

I n accordance w i t h the requirements of the Debt Collection lrnprovernent Act of 1996, all payrnenrs
under this contrac't will be made by electronic funds transfer (EFT). The Contractor shall submit
financial insliturion inforrnar~onto the Financial Management Services Office i n accordance with
Section I, FAR Clause 52.232:33, Mandatory Information for Electronic Funds Transfer Payment.

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Task Order Number 30

Contract Number 282-98-0016

G.2. The Contractor shall furnish the following minimum information in support of costs submirted. i f
applicable:
( 1 ) Direct Labor- includes all persons, listing the person's name, title, number of hours or days

worked, the total cost per person and a total amount for this category;

(2) F r i n ~ eCosts-show rate, base and total amount;

(3) Overhead or Indirect Costs-show rate, base and total amount;
(4) Consultants-include the name. number of d'ays or hours worked. a total amount per
consultant a_nda total amount for this category;
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(5) Travel-include for each airplane or train trip taken the name of traveler, date of travel.

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destination,'the transportati8n costs, including ground transportation shown separately and the
per diem costs. Other travel costs shall also be listed. A total amount for this
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category shall -be-provided;.- - - - .
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(6) Subcontractors-include, for each subcontractor, the same data as is being provided for the
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(7) Data processing-inclu&.all non-labor costs, i.e., computer time. equipment purchase, lease
or rental, data tapes. A totalamount for this category shall be provided;
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(8)Other Direct Costs-i.nch~h-listingof all other direct charges to the contract, i.e., office
supplies, telephone, equipment rental, duplication;
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(9) G & A-sho=rate+ase
(10)--show

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A. The Contractor will be reimbursed, not to exceed $175,544 for all domestic travel
described below, incurred directly and specifically in the performance of this contract, claimed
by the Contractor and accepted by the PSC Contracting Officer, in accordance with the Federal
Travel Regulations:
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(1) Costs of air travel by most direct roule. "Air Coach" or "Air Tourist" accommodations on
prop or jet aircraft constitutes the normal class of air travel which shall be utilized.
First-class accommodations may be used if (I) less than first-class is not available
providing reservation was requested within 24 hours after the traveler had knowledge of
the trip; (2) less than first-class requires circuitous routing; (3) less than first-class
requires lravel to begin or end at unreasonable hours (i.e., if scheduled flight time is
before 8100 a.m. and scheduled a-mval is after 9:00 p.m.); (4) less than first-class would

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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
result in additional direct costs which would offset the transportation savings; or ( 5 ) less
than first-class will not make connections with other flights or means of transportation for
continuation of the journey.

(2) Costs of rail travel by most direct route, first-class with lower berth or nearest
equivalent.

(3) Travel by motor vehicle including rented automobile shall be reimbursed on a reasonable
actual expense basis, or at the Contractor's option, on a mileage basis at a rate of .365
cents per mile, plus any toll or ferry charges.

(4) Reasonable subsistence not in excess of actual itemized expenses not to exceed the ceilings
in the Federal Travel Regulations in effect at the time of incurred cost. Contractor will
voucher at actual cost.
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Advance ~ n d e ' r s t a n d-i n ~
Other provisions of this contract notwithstanding, the Contractor is hereby authorized to incur
the following costs, within the limits set forth without further authorization:

Subcontracts/Consultant
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Task Order Number 30
Contract Number -52-98-0016

e f h e - & o v d i s t e d con~ultants,cannot exceed the referenced rate indicated without prior written app~oval'
of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officer.

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Th~~ndividuals.cited.below
are,key. personnel (See HHSAR.352.270-5, KEY PERSONNEL,
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352.232-74 Estimated Cost and Fixed Fee-Incrementallv
Funded Contract (April 1984).
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. . . . . .- . totalrost.to
the. eovernm~.ntfnr full performance of this task order will
(a) It is. . estimatedIh~.the
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the estimated reimbursable
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costs and
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(b) Total funds currentlv available for payment and allotted to thls task order is $600,000.00,
of which
esents the esrimated re~mbursablecosts and
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For further provls~onson fundlng, see [he Llrmlat~ons
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(c) 11 1s est~matedthat the amount currently allotted wlll cover performance through
August 01,2003.

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(d) The Contracting Officer may allot additional funds to the contracr without the concurrence of
the Con~ractor.

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T a s k Order Number 30
Contract Number 282-98-0016
SECTION H-SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS

H.1.

Restriction on Publication and Dissemination of Material Derived from Work Performed Under
This Task Order
A. In accordance with FAR 52.227-14 Rights in DataGeneral paragraphs (b)(2)(i)and(d)(l), the contractor shall not release, reproduce,
distribute or publish any data first produced or specifically used by the Contractor in
performance of this task order without the prior written approval of the Contracting Officer

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B. The Contractor shall not establish claim to c'opyright subsisting in scientific or technical
articles-based on-or containing dat-a-firstproduced in the performance of this task order and
-published in academic technical or professional journals, symposia proceedings or sirrdar -.
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works;-without the prior written approval of the Contracting Officer.

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C. Upon request from thccontractor to make a report, presentation, or. .other
disclosure of such
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material, the Contracting O f f i ~ ~ E i F o n f u n c i ~ o n ~ w
thei t Project
h
Officer will review and
approve or disapprove the
proposed
report,
presentation,
or
other
disclosure of such - - -. --.
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i n f 6 ~ a t i o "or malerial to determii&ihet-(~-)the-*nfomationis beiiiguSea for the-purpose f o r
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which it was
supplied and (2)the privacy of entities suppljring the information or described in
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D. Whenever any data is to be developed by-a subcontractor-under this task order, the Contractor
shall include the terms of paragraphs A.,B., and C., in the subcontract, without substantive
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beincluded 40 dimil_nl_nish-t~-G~ment's
rights in thatdata. - . . . . . . . . . . -. . . . . . . . . . . - . . . . . . . . . -.... - .

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FAR Part 8.801 defines
as ~ L p ~ R t i . l l ~ g ; - b ~ w t k - ~ ~ k - ~ ~ k - ~ ( i ~ h d i n g ~ ~ a n ) c i ~ e m f r - f q t ) ~ ..~ ~- : of
com{osition,
platemaking;presswork,
bin8ing,:andhcCr6graphids)
foT
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of
An-'
the. precesses
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executive department ,-independent agency, or establish-of .the Government:"-The contractormay duplicate or copy less than 5,000 units of only one page, or.less than 25,000 units in aggregate of
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multiple pages for use of a department or agency. This page limit is per requirement and not per
contract. These pages may not exceed a maxi-mum-imagesize of-10314.by.-14114inches.
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If contractors have a printing requirement , not copying or duplicating, i t must be under $1,000 and a
waiver mdst be obtained from the Joint Committee on Printing through the HHS Printing Officer,
A.P. Barnes, who can be reached at (202)690-5521. The waiver must be obtained bef&e any material is
printed.
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Page 1 of 2

WlODlFlCATlON TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: October 3, 2002
Contractor. The Lewin Group
Address:

3130-Fairview.Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

Sb~bject:

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F:

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Mmber I
Title: "Healthy Marriage & Responsible Fatherhood Dernonstratkln
Community Initiative"
Task Order Officer: Joseph Gwbbs
Per%idX3Performance: August 28,2002 through August 27,200f--

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This modification.is.hereby .issued-pursuant!o.!he.!erms.an_d-con.dfii90s.o!.!he subject
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Section G - Contract Administration Data: - _ \*
G.4. Advance Understandina: - - Other provisions of this contract notwithstanding, the Contractor is hereby
- -authorized!p_,ipcyr tQefollowing costs, within the limits set forth without further
-authorization:
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The listed subcontractors/consu~tants,cannot exceed the referenced rate indicated
v~4thoutprior written approval of the Program
Support Center (PSC) Contracting Offic~:sr.
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The (To Be Named) Expert Consultants m u s t - n a t e e dthe referenced rate(s)
indicated without prior written approval of the program Support Center (PSC) - Contracting Officer.v.*The Contractor, The Lewin Group must identiw-an applicable
consultant i n collabor&ioh with the Administration for Children and Families
(ACF) Task Order Officer, (TOO). Upon receipt of approval, the contractor shall
farward a confirmation letter, identifying the selected consultant, daily rate, and,
number of days considered for work, to the TOO, and Contracting Officer.

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Ihe Lewin Group
Firm Name

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Date

OCT - 4 '2092
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Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 2

Page 2 of 2

1. On the face page of the task order, Subject D., the Task Order Officer's name is
changed to read Brendan Kelly.
2. On Page-13, Line F.2, Deliver hems during the referenced time periods to the Task
Order Officer (TOO), Br-endan Kelly, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation,
ACF, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., Washington, DC 20447.

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3. On Page-17, Line A (3), Change mileage basis at a rate of .360 cents per mile, in
lieu of .365
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4. On the face page of the task order, Current Obligation, and Page-19. Line G.<, fully
fund the task order by adding incremental funding in the amount of $668,639.00.
The funded amount, is increased from $600,000.00 by $668,639.00 to
$1,268,639.00.
All other terms and conditions remain unchanged and in ful\ force and effect.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 1 of 13

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: July 21, 2003
Contractor:

The Lewin Group

Address:

3130 air view Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

A.

Contract Number 282z98-0016
Task Order Mwnber 30
. - -Modification Number 3
C.
Title: "Heatthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Community Initiativew
D.
Task Order Officer:. . .Brendan
Kelly
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Appro~jiaXGn~T!!31536
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CAN Number:.:G99j.539., . T o ~ l . ~ o n t r a c ~ - ~
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DUNNS: !.' ---.
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~ e & d of Performance: August 28, 2002 through
~ u ~ u27.2004
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This ~ u p p l e m e n t a l ~ a c y e e m
istentered into, pursuant to the authority: of
FAR 52.243-2, Changes - Cost Reimbursement (AUG 1987)-Alternate I (APR 1984).

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-The above referenced Task Order is hereby modified to change Section,G, and
Section G, as follows:

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The Lewin Grouo.

Date
~ a M Kelly
3
contrac%ng Officer

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

1. In Section C- DESCRlPTlONlSPEClFlCATlONSlWORK STATEMENT, the level of
effort is hereby changedlredirected as outlined in the following pages, to provide
continued Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood Demonstration Community
Initiative. This modification shall-be incorporated into the above numbered
Task Order.
Statement of Work, (the changes i n text are highlighted i n Bold):
Tasks to be
. included in this project are described below.

-- Subtask
- - 1.2 Experts
for consultation
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The Contractor shall, as approved by the TOO, identify experts who can contribute to the
project to supplementthe knowledge, skills, and expertiseofContractor staff and proposed
consultants. Such experts shall include researchers, policymakers, and progr=\mators
working on issues directly related to promoting marriage, family formation and responsible
fatherhood and designing community-level evaluation strategies. ACF expects that experts
from an array of programmatic backgrounds and experience shall be included (e.g., family
counseling, child anddecpily development, responsible fatherhood, marriage promotion,
public health) as well as expeds with experience evaluating programs of the nature
planned. By the 5th week after task order award, the Contractor shall subrr~ita
memorandum to the T O 0 proposing experts to beinvikd to participate in the work under
the task order and'lrTi9Tcating their areas of expertise.
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The experts should be.utili.z.ed:early
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existing programs and work in their specific areas of expertise to adequately inform the
work plan. The Contractor shall convene some or allof the experts identified, as agreed
to by the TOO, foran initial meeting to provide suggestisns and guidanceto-ACF and-the ..
Contractor regarding areas of technicaLassistance~specificmethods to be used to provide
technical assistance, a d programmatic and evaluation questions'to be'addressed'dunig
the course of activity under this taskorder. The Contractor shall convene the initial meeting
by the 12th,week after award of task order.
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The Contractor shall communicate with various experts periodically throughout the project
to solicit guidance and feedback on the work of the project and shall submit drafts of major
'pi6ject deliverables to the group of experts for their review. The experls, as a group or
individually, may assist and inform ACF and Contractor staff in various aspects of work'
under, this task order. This may include, but not be limited to: providing expertise and
knowledge about current or prior research examining issues relating to marriage promotion,
family formation responsible fatherhood. and program evaluation; providing information
about existing services or programs or components of programs developed to promote
marriage, family formation and responsible fatherhood; participating in site visits to obtain
more in-depthinformation; writing and analyses related lo project work as requested by the
Contraclor; providing input into the technical assistance; responding to informaiion

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Nurr~ber3

Page 3 o f 13

gathered and developed by the Contractor including the compilation and analyses of
information and recommendations for alternative program models to be tested;
participating in briefings and presentations; developing evaluation designs; and review~ng
other major project deliverables. Upon approval by the TOO, the Contractor may arrange
to have some experts present for finaldiscussions and briefings during which the proposed
technical assistance and specific intervention approaches to be implemented In the
demonstration sites are recommended.
ACF anticipates that the total group of experts that may be actively involved may consist
of approximately 8-1 0 individuals. ~owever,'alarger number of experts may be contacted
and consulted regarding existing research, programs, or other specific areas of expertise
-neEded to accomplish work under this task order. For budgeting pwposes, the Contractor'
shall consider that six experts'will require travel expenses to participate in up to three
meetings.
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The contractor shall assess-the
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-need-for
- technical assistance within the
demonstration
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advantage o f the direct experience of-the-following - .
consultants in designing and operating-marriage promotion programs..
--Thop n n t r ~ pt at, i~l l ~--en-- g-- ---II----'.#
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. t o provide u p t o
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3 aavs ot advtcn in cmmnnnrt nf t h ; ~
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da$s-in support this task a n d the ACF African American
--itSmtive (.AAHM~):.:. 'I- .. :. :.:. .:: .. .: : . . . .: :. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . - .
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The contractor &hall identify and engage the services of additional experts
support ACF's African American Healthy Marriage Initiative. The contractor shall
coordinate with experts f r o m a variety o f fields who could provide support in various
ways including, b u t not limited to, being national spokespersons for the initiative,
assessing cultural appropriateness o f materials, providing culturally appropriate
materials, o r identifying program models that have been effective i n African
American communities. The contractor shall submit recommendations for s u c o
experts and obtain approval f r o m the Federal Project Officer prior*o.rfk&i~g
.. . formal
offers t o proposed experts.

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Subtask 1.2.1 Develop Marriage Education Curriculum
The contractor shall support the efforts of experts in the marriage education field o n
the development of a marriage education curriculum. The curriculum shall be

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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
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designed to build the skills and knowledge of individuals t o form and sustain healthy
marriages and t o be consistent with best practices i n the marriage education field.
Subtask 2.1 Section 1115 Waivers

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The Contractor shall assist the targeted state government partners (title IV-D agencies or
their umbrella agencies) in developing requests for Ofice of Child Support Enforcement
(OCSE) section 1115 waivers, which will be for the purpose of funding the demonstration
initiatives under ACF's section 1115(a)(2) authority (see Appendix A - Child Support
Enforcement Demonstration and Waiver Authority). The Contractor shall communicate
with theTOO and representatives from OCSE about the completion of the waiver requesis.
-rbe ~ontracto;shall review all pertinent documentation from OCSE and communicate with
OCSE staff as appropriate to-determine which waivers will be required tb-facilitate funding
of the demonstrations. Waiver requests must follow all applicable requirements under
section 11153nd-OCSE guidance. The waiver requests shall be submitted to OCSE
beginning the 16th week after the task order award and may continue durrng the period of
the task o ~ d e rThe Contractor shall provide assistance to approximately 15 state
- -, developing-waiver requests.
government partners, as a p p r o ~ m b e - T O O in

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-The contractor shall provide intensive,-on-site technical -assistance t o u p to five-of - - - - - the sites irnplementing&ection 1115 demonstrations under CHMI, as approved by the
Federal Project Officer. This shall include, but not be limited to, coalition building,
financial management,-prog~arndevelopment,and d a t a m m a g e m n t t S n b t a s k 2.6).
For budgeting pu~poses,.fhecontractor shall expect to make o n average u p t o two
site visits to each of the five section 1115 sites.
.-- -- -Subtask 2.2 Coalition Building
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_ T - h e C o n t r a c t o r , as approved hy-the-TOO and with the support of t h r A € F Regional staff; shall work whh federal, state-and -local government officials and representatives from
.
. community-basedand faith-based organizations inabproximately 15 demonst.ratiijh s.hi3
targeted by ACF to develop community-level coalitions. The coalitions should be based
on relationships between formal institutions (governmental, nongovernmental, faith-based,
community-based, and private organizations), informal institutions (civic groups..
neighborhood associations, faith-based associations), and the public at-large. These
coalitions will constitute the decision-making body for the project, and will be responsible
f~r~leveraging
funding from other sources. By the 16th week after task.order award, the
Contractor shall submit to the TOO a memorandum that identifies'the prospective
..
participants in each of the coalitions.

-

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,

...

-

.

.

.

.

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.

.

.

.

.

.

- .

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. - .

The Contractor shall support the coalition-building process by facilitating a series of two
meetings for approximately 15 selected demonstration sites. The demonstration partners
will provide logistical support for the meetings, with the Contractor leading the discussion
among the-participants. These meetings should focus on strategic plann~ngand goals e t ~ i n ~ r T o ~for
i c the
s meetings: (Meeting 1) (1) Vision, mission, and values l o guide the

..

-. -

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
demonstration initiative; (2) community-level partners that should b e included in the
planning,l.mplementation, and evaluation; (3) potential sources of non-federal financial and
in-kind support; and (4) operational and governance structures to provide communitybased leadership. (Meeting 2) (1) Goals and objectives for the demonstration; (2) best
practices relating to marriage promotion, family formation and responsible fatherhood; (3)
current and potential programs thatmay be incorporated as action strategies: (4) the use
of media and other communication strategies; (5) internal and external constraints; (6)
resource development and fund-raising activities; and (7) an action plan with operational
next steps.

--

.-.

The Contractor shall work with federal, state and local partners to convene the first meeting
d targeted dgmonstration c o a l i t ~ by
~ sthe 76th week following !he task order a w a d a M
the second meeting by-the 32nd week. By the 20th week after the task order award, the
Contractor shall brief the TOO and other ACF staff on the status and results of the
meetings and, by the 48th week, provide a copy of the action plans for each coalition. For
travel and budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall plan for two meetings in each of the
-- - - - -approximatdy-45-sites;-- -------- -7
- - - --- - -- - --.----- The contractor shall provide and coordinate with expert consultants and ACF staff
t o provide lower-intenSSty-felephone-based technical assistance-to u p to30-CHMt - - demonstration sitedabis shan include, but not be limited to, technical assistance
. - . . -. .
data management ..
o n issues relating t o coalition b;uilding, program development,
(Subtask 2-61. and othe-rs: -p~f~fitle~t&deraC~PFojectOfficer.
- .
- - -~.
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- - . . . . - . . . . . -- ..... - .
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The contractor shall cover the travel costs for site visits b y contractor staff and
expert consultants t o u p t o 25 non-1115 demonstration sites. For budgeting
purposes, the contractor shall expect that one one-day site visit will be made b y
contractor staff and b y the expert consultants t o each of the sites. ACF expects that
technical assistance to the remaining CHMl sites will be provided. by ACF Central
Office and Regional Office Staff.
Subtask 2.3 Resource Development

. .

.

.

.-

The Contractor shall provide technical assistance to help the selected coalitions develop
a resource development strategy to secure non-federal sources of financial and in-kind
support. This w~llnot include the actual fund raising, but will be a strategic plan for future
resource development A s required by statute, the state share of the section 11 15(a)(2)

.. . ..

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-'

..

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
funding must be in the form of fjnancial support, but resources over and above the
mandated state share can b e financial and in-kind support. These resources may include
contributions from foundations, private individuals, grants, volunteer support and other
sources. The coalitions should develop resource development strategies that would be
appropiate for their respective demonstration plans.

m

The contractor shall provide f o r travel costs for experts and other key personnel
associated with the African American Healthy Marriage Initiative to support u p t o
49 one day site visits (or a n additional 39 trips from the original contract) and
facilitate the attendance by 20 participants t o the Smart Marriages Conference i n
.-Reno, NV.
. --Subtask 2.4 Best Practices --

-

--The Contractor shall work withthe-experts to identifyaid comm~tnicate
. ..~
.
tothe.coaliti0.n~
marriage,.family
. ~.
. - . -f o h a t i o n and responsible fatherhood.
"promising practicesnfor promding
._______
In conjunction with the experts, the ContractorShdI--reiiew pe-rtinent best practices
. . - --..
literature, empirical findings, and descriptive.reports on. the social, economic and health
.
.
training,
.
counseling
and
6f.pra.di.ng
.
related
benefits
of
marriage,
a
s
well
as
the-effects
.
-~
.
.
.
support to promote h9,althy marriages, family formatiorrandresponsible fatherhood. The
.purpose of the best pr&tice review is to provide information on a broad array of
-.
-.
. - -. approaches being taken to encourage andmaintain healthymarriages, and to support and
. ..
.- . . ..- ..
.-*
promote
.
respe-atBe~. nk&o~:,
in conjunction-with-theexperts;shall
..
use -- - - - . .
~- t h e - i n f o ~ i i o n t m ~ practice
t
review to make decisions about how to
..
focus-the
work u n d e r ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ s ~ ~ ~ ~ plan
s effectk&strategies
~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . for
~ the
~ ~ [ p
demonstrations. lnformation.from the best practice review also sho.dd~.
be-usedin
the
evaluation design considerations and recommendations.
To inform the best practice review; the Contractor-shall explore existing-marriage, familyforrnation-and-fatherhood promotion initiat-:--%e--,fottewing-prograrnslsite3'-are
-..
.
.
recommended: the Greater-GraniTRapidsC6m-m_llriiiyMarriage-Policy
in Grand Rapids,
-. . . a - .
, Michigan; the State of ~ k l a h o r n d s - ~ r t r n e n t - o f - ~ H r n a ~ ~
ma~riage:promotim-s
S-e~es
policies; the First Things First marriage and fatherhood networks in Chattanooga,
Tennessee; and other appropriate programslsites as approved by the TOO.
-

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The Contractor shall develop strategies for integrating best practice information into the
planning, implementation and evaluation of the demonstrations. In addition to the initial
planning of the demonstrations, best practice information should be.provided to the
coalitions by the Contractor o n an ongoing basis during the period of the task order. The
Contractor shall, in coordination with the T.00, convene up to three meetings of theexperts
and key operational staff from the coalitions t.0 facilitate~anongoing discussion of the latest
research; iindingsfrom evaluations, innovative approaches and related information. The
meetings shall be held at ACF in Washington. DC. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor
shall plan for up to six experts and one representative from each of lhe approximately 15
sites to attend the best practice meet~ngs.

-

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 7 of 13

The Contractor shall submit to the TOO a memorandum summarizing the findings from the
best practices review and identifying ways in which the best practices will be incorporated
into the demonstrations. The memorandum shall be submitted by the 28th week after the
task order award.
The contractor shall develop and provide best-practice information to the
demonstration sites, based on the following activities:
Subtask 2.4.1 Conferences

The contractor shall coordinatewith appropriate experts to host u p to three two-day
cdnferences i n Chattanooga, TN. These conferences will proiride participanti=froni*
the sites with various strategies for developing and implementing a successful
marriage demonstration. In addition, the conferences-will feature group and peer
.......
sessions-with
- -- ........
.
experts and contractor staff. For budgeting
technical assistance
.
traue!.~reiated
expenses for.
.-.- purposes, the contractqr shall exp.e.ctt.0cover_t~raueland
.~
.-...... ............
u p to 35 participants for each conference. The conferences w i l l - p r o ~ n n
opportunity for teams of peapte
......
-from
- ......
t o c. . a. . l. :. c. . o
. mmuriiti~
t o come together
lo'iearh ---- - ........ - ........
about and begin planning their community healthy marriage initiatives. The Lewin
Group, staff from FTF; staff f r o m Public strategies,-andother consultanti, along with
ACF
Central a n d ~ e & & a l Office staff will deliver the content--and
facilitate-.the . . .
. . . .
.- . . ~
sessions.:7he
Lewin ~ ~ i o.. u ~ ; i f i i l i f a k ~ai lg~ed n. od~a d e v ~ ~ work
p ~ with~ d -- .
. . . . . . . . . . . .
FTF-to prepare materialsforfhe c o n f e r & c & ~ ~ ~ ~ s ' b u d g e t - G
p'widefor
iil
facility,: . "
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costs-, r n +
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d.. ~. .~. e. r. ~. .n. ~. l. a. b o r c o s i s ~ ~ ~ ~ c ~th&:conferences.
iafeddwith . .
- -The contractor shall provide for the travel and travel-related expenses (not including
conference registration fees) for sending 25 participants and contractor staff to the
Marriages conference in Reno,
. . __.
....._.
The
contractor
n o t - b. j. j. l. f. m
hb~tcost
__ NV.
.-.......
.-.---~---shall
... .--.
........... -. .- .....-Smart
- - .. -. .undei
..
t h i s . ~ c ~ i ~ ~ ~ y ~ d ~ i n g . ~ t h e e S m w f - M a i r i a g e s - ~ f e r e n ~ e i - u ~ ~ e--ss~o~ract
-.
--- .
.... - - .
will be presenting,-pcoviding. t.e.chnical assistaniielo-the-sites,.or-engagdin-otb
project work.

-

~

~

~

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-.<.

Subtask 2.4.2 Marriage Toolkit
The contractor shall develop and refine the technical assistance toolkit. The toolkit
shall consist of those elements agreed to in the original task order agreement. The
contractor shall submit to the Federal Project Oficer a draft of each module of the
toolkit and a final version, which shall reflect comments from ACF and from experts
on the first drafts. -- - -- - - - - Subtask 2.5 Capacity-Building
The Contractor shall provide ongolng technical assistance to build the operational capacity
of the coalitions. In this capacity, the Contractor shall facilitate up to two meet~ngsw~ththe

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
coalitions' leadership to address needs of the coalitions, and be available for info~mal
discussions by telephone and e-mail to provide support on an issue-by-issue basis. The
coalitions will provide logistical support for the meetings. For budgeting purposes, the
Contractor shall plan for two meetings at each of the approximately 15 sites.
Primary Capacity-Building Areas:

1. Strategic planning and management - The Contractor shall provide support
for establishing a mission, vision and values to guide the coalition; identifying
goals and objectives; and translating these goals and objectives into
adivities.
.
-.
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-

a - -

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-2. Financial pianningand management - The Contractor shallprovia;! support .
for developing
standards-for budgeting, financial planning and management
.. ..
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. . - t o a s s i s U h- e
. a & b R s i n maximizing
resources
and ensuring fiscal
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3ccountability.
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3.. Interagency coJlabe~at~TheGontFactor
sha[I.-fivide--&Eatinglr:
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imp!ementationne&orks at

....

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community
organizations.
.- kvel~damongtecat-and-state-level
-..
. - --- ...-. ....
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. -- .....
- ... . . . .....
-.
.
-...
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--t h e starida&rsofl?hifreport submitted-to A C L a s pa-f
. the~:normZE66t~act .
~

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and purpose of contacts . .~-.administration
.. p.---.
r ~ ~ e ~ , - b : ~ o n t r a ~ tinclude
p ~ . sthe
h afrequency
~. ~. . .
.
. for capacity ~bujlding++~h&-reporls ~shaldid_ent@.~ihe.number.
o f contacts for eachdemonstration site during the report-per5od;the purpose of the contact, the staff person or':. . . . .
expert providing the technid3lassistance and other relevant information, ~ h e j i h-i n ~ a n d
format of the monthly reports shall adhere to ACF's procurement
guidelines.
-- - - --- -- ~

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.

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- - - . . . . ....................

This subtask is deletedand the level of-effodoriginaily. &&i&ated
_-___ .t o. s u p p o- r t-i_t has
.
.been realbi-;t-ed
hhgre-lG=LA- .

.

~~

.

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:

Subtask 2.6 Evaluation Design
The Contractor shall provide technical assistance to the coalitions in developi~goptions
for evaluation design. The purpose of the evaluation design activities will be to help the
coalitions develop frameworks for sustaining operational effectiveness and measuring the
impact of the demonstrati6t-k at a community level. The Contractor shall ga!her descriptive
information about programs through telephone discussions and site visits: i he Contractor
shall interview officials or staff within the programs, or researchers familiar with the
todiscuss program mission, organization, operations, participant characteristics.
outcomes; and other relevant topics. To the extent possible, any written information
available about the program shall be obtained prior to scheduling interviews and site visits.
When feasible, site visits shall include discussions with progra-m participants and...........
collaborating organizations The TOO shall be given as much advance notice as possible
about site visit scheduling in order to allow time for planning for federal staff to parlic~pate
.

.-

. .... .

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3
in some site visits. For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall-plan for one site visit to
each of the approximately 15 sites.
The Cor~tractoralso shall assess the availability and verifiability of administrative data and
other sources of information at !he local level. The Contractor shall assist the
demonstration sites in identifying sources of data relating to demographics, marriage, nonmarital pregnancies, divorce, and other key indicators.

--

The Contractor's activities shall be limited to technical assistance for the purpose of
evaluation design. Actual evaluation reseaich will not be completed under this task order.
-The contractor shall pr.ovide technical assistance to targeted demonstratio~~rsites'
i n the development -of a management information system .(MIS) 'to collect. administrativedata at* communitylevel for the-site.
~

.
.

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.

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::The
contractor shall engage in t h e f ~ l l o w j n ~ c t b i i i e (1)
s : identify sites for further
-. .
- - work ~-after-consultation with the Federal Project Officer; (2) obtain aggregate
.. -. . - - .
-..
. - ..
.=t-atistics
a
t
the
c
.
W
f
i
~
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M
t
y
;
f
w
e
l
=
f
o
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c
h
s
(xei,-marriage~-andi
t
e
-divorce-:rates;
...............
- -. . .
demographics; employmentlincorne information);:(3)-cenduct.twodaysitevisits to - - each of the sites to assess availability of administrative data a t the individual level;
- ( 4 ) contact
. . . . . . . .vital
. . . . .
s t a t i ~ ~child
s , welfare; child support, TANF, and labordepartments~- ....
- at the state level to-discuss.types-of information awilabl*frem-administrativeL: -systems a. . . n
.
- ~ ~ ~ ~ m
a ney -ni sts .u e . s T j n _ . w i n gthis-'o-n.ce- e ~ a l ~ i o " ~ ~ - ~ i t e s ~ - ~ n d
. . - - ...
-. ~ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
-.
. . . . .
evaluator h a v e . - b e e ~ i d e M k d ; - ( 5-docamen+tksite-envimnmeni
)
andpl+iEfor - '
'
. . .
implementing th@demo*-trali-onh'tnS1iative; (6)~di'stusssites'data collection needs ........
.. and how software program ..might be useful to them; (7) devel0.p-desiijnf0'5Ziata--------collection program; (8) develop list of information to be collected; (9) meet~with
ACF
and revise based.on .suggestions.; (AD)design forms and outline the capability of the
..
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Evaluation DesigrifActivify 2.6.1 Performance M e a s u r e m a
.

.

.

-

-A

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.

The Contractor shall assist the leadership and staff of each coalition in the development
of a logic model for the demonstration initiative. The logic model should identify the inputs,
activities, outputs, intermediate outcomes, and end outcomes for the demonstration.
The0Contractor shall submit to the TOO a copy of a logic .model for each
coalitionldemonstration site by the 48th week after the task order award.
Evaluation Design Activity 2.6.2 Community Impact Evaluation
The Contractor shall assist the coalitions in developing options for measuring the impact
of the intervention strategies at a community level. The evaluation designs should rellect
recent research relating to community-level evaluation methods and include a discussion
and strategies for using small-area data, time-series analysis and statistical modeling of

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 10 of 13

counterfactuals. The Contractor shall submit to the ~d.0
evaluation plans for each of the
demonstrations by the 60th week after the task order award.
By the 72nd week after the task order award, the Contractor shall submit to the TOO a
memorandum that provides recommendations concerning evaluation strategies and the
demonstrations to be considered for more indepth evaluation. The memorandum shall
identify the demonstration sites recommended for further study, the rationale for the
recommendations, and alternative program recommendations and rationale to be
considered if it is not possible to conduct site visits with one or more of the primary
programs identified.

- TASK3 - DlSCUSSlONSlBRlEFlNGS
AND FINAL REPORTS-;:
. ..

iCr

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Subtask 3.1 D i s c u s s i o n s a n d ~ r i ~ f i n g ~ '

- .--

- ---

:=. -

-

--

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--

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--

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Because this is developmental
.---work--for
-- ACF, the--agencytyants to be clp_s~ely.involved
with .
.
the
project
a<
new
informati~ecom.sqvailable,-Therefo~e,
in
a
d
d
i
t
i
e
n
t
m
g
~br----~-'-"". ..
.
.. .
- .-.- . . . --- cornmu .--at.io-E-vmmh.'
Tm-tfi':H-i;cimCCf
brraT1.dddd
kkeemk j-ecf-msAatfp-e-fil~ C
i Cal
. - - - brief federal staff informally on developments-and-findingsprim t o formal submission^ :
(e.g., information generated.during coalition building, discussions with experts, telephone

.. .

~

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.

..

tYzLL:=.=-G:.

diszussions with state g&ernment and program officials, and technical assisfance). The
Contractor-shall assumethat-such informal
discussions will be conducted by telephone
- .
approxim~alely~every:3~weeks
and that each discussion will require 1-2 .hours. -The exact.. - . - . - . . -.- - . -.
schedule-will-be -appn3vd-.tTythe TOO -after-task.orderaward a ~ dmay
- k-adjusted-&er. ---- '--- --.
time as projeet ~ w o r k ~ a n ; d d e v ~ l o p ~ e n t s s u g- g~en~written
sy~ . ~ information relevant to the
discussions will be submitted 40 the TOO by mail. fax or e-mail for distribution to ether
federal staff prior to the scheduled telephone conversation. It is expected that during such
informal briefings.the.P.roject ~ u e c t oor
r 0ther:staff willlreport on the range of programs for--- - - - - - - - .. .-. . .--Mfkieh -infcum@en.has
bm-&takred:M&-.orsincethetast briefing;-unique-or innovative
.:
....
..
.- - . .- - .
in the conduct of the
. approaches identified, significant developments or,roblems
-work as
- planned,-new reskarch -finhdings;-extent of consistence or divergenceof 'find?ngs'acroSs
..
studies, major knowledge gaps for-which information is being sought. input from expert
panel members, and other issues identified by the Contractor or ACF.

-

--

. . < - .

-

The Project Director and key project staff shall conduct two formal briefings for ACFIHHS
staff, invited experts, and other invited participants as agreed to by the TOO. The first
briefing shall be amid-project status report and shall be completed by the 48t.h week after
the task order award. ..TheContracts! and key staff shall present background information.
describe therdevelopment of the'-demonstration coalitions, identify opportunities and
constraints relating to implementation, discuss next steps. and provide an opportunity for
open discussion and comments on the activities completed to date. The Contractor shall
consider the comments received in planning the next steps of the project.
The second briefing shall be scheduled after submission of the draft of the flnal report.
During this briefing the Contractor and key staff shall provide an overview of the project;

-.

Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 11 of 13

present summary inforrnation/descriptions of various demonstraijons, including common
and urllque components or characteristics; and discuss evaluation design issues and
recommendations. The briefing shall include a discussion of recommendations and
implications for further study in the area by ACF or others. Evaluation related issues to be
discussed may include: the ability- to increase scope or scale of existing programs;
challenges to replication of selected programs/models in other sites; program uptake and
completion rates; availability and validity of small area data; potential for using interrupted
time-series analysis and related techniques, as appropriate; stability of funding for program
operations; and other issues identified by Contractor staff.

- two

The Contractoc shall submit-to the TOO for approval a draft outline for the briefings at least
weeks prior to the scheduled briefing date. The first briefing shall be- -conducted-by th6
48th week after task order award and the second by the 94th week.
.-

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.
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The Contractor shall prepare-an*.
and a-draft and final report on the project. The
Contractor shall submit6 the TOO for approval a report outline with suggestions or options
forintormation presentation. The C o n k a ~ l s u b m ithe
t outline no later than the 90th
.
.
.
.
week
. . .after taskwEferaward,.
.
. . ..
.
.
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
..

......

...

--

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-

. ,:,I.----

- -

.

.--- . -.
. . . - ..Subtask 3.2
. . Drafi.:aiid Final-Repod--------. - .-. .
-.
.. - ..
. . . .
..........
--.-- ........

- ..

..

The contractor shall provide periodic project briefings and technical status reports.
The contractor shall e x p ~ c t t o s
e. .+- a. .s-i z t e ~ p - ~
t oi x ~ o uper
r s monthfor this subtask..
.
. .

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The draft finalr~shotlldsumma~ize-Hre
work-performed; present summary information/ . . . . . . . . . .
descriptions of various demonstrations, including common and unique-components or
characteristics; and discuss evaluation design issues and recommendations. The drSffT~ni--report should -includeadiscussionof-fecornmendations.and implications for further study
In fie a-of
o . t h ~ ~ ; d t , b a t i e n ~ j s s t o - b e d i ~ ~ ~ s edraft-finald i n . t h .-e- - -. . . .........
-reportmay inklude: the ability-to increase scope orscale of existing programs: challenges
-- - - ,to replication of selected p r o g r a m s l m ~ & l s i n ~ t h e ~ t e
programuptake
s;
and-zompletiwirates; availability and validity of small area data; potential for using interrupted time-series
analysis and related techniques. as appropriate; stability of funding for program operations;
and other issues identified by Contractor staff.
The Contractor shall submit the draft of the final report to the TOO and members of the
expert panel by the 90th week afler task order award. The Contractor shall revise the
report and produce a final report that addresses comments on the draftra'ised by the TOO
and other reviewers. The final report shall be submitted by the 104th week afler task order
award'. The Contractor shall not make any part of the report public without prior written
approval'of the TOO or until the report has been released by ACF. in addition to printed
copies required, a digital copy of the report shall be delivered based on the guidelines in
Appendix B - Specifications for the Delivery of Digital Copies of Reports.
.
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Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 12 of 13

- This subtask is deleted and the level of effort originally dedicated t o support it has
been reallocated elsewhere. The contractor shall shift the level of effort from this
subtask t o other subtasks by removing the deliverables for this subtask.

2. In Section G- Contract Administration Data, Change to the following rates, and
Associated Su bcontractor/Consultants:
G.1. Advance Understandina:

-

Other provisions of this contract-notwithstanding,the Contractor is hereby authorized to
incur the folloiing revised costs, (as listed on rnodification~proposaldated 5/29),w&inlhe
.-limits set forth without furtherauthorization:

----

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 3

Page 13 of 13

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'Representsa -New- S u b c o n k a e t w 4 ~ ~ & t a nnotlisted
t,
on initial Task Order Contract,'- .... - -.
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The listed subcontractorslconsultants cannot exceedlie referenced rate indicatedwithout
prior written approval of the Program support-center (PSC) Contracting Officer.
. _ _ 7

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w i t h .o ~ t ~ .~.. ~..r- .i o r w ~ ' ~ ..the
t t e Program
~ ~ m ~ Support-€enter.(PSC)
a~of
contrading Officer.
.The Con~actpr~must
.,..--..+.
identity
. .. -. an applicable consultant in collaboration with the
.
..
. . -.-..
..= :.
Administration for C.hildren and Families (ACF) Task Order Officer, (TOO). Upon _ - . . .
receipt o f approval,-the contractor shall forward a confirmation letter, identifying the
selected consultant, daily rate,'and number of days considered for worK to th6 TOOT and
.
-.
Contracting.Off:lcey,--. - --.
- :_ ..
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-- - --. -.-.* -. - -.- -.- -,
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3.The~tot:a~aa~-fif_.~f~fh~ta's;k~~~~--md~i~~~fffe&'isincre~s&d
.

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T k ( T . o . B e ~ a m s d. )~ x ~ e r t ~ . o n ~ ~ ~ t ~ a _ n t s ~ m ~ u . s t ~ g o t ~ _ ~.c e . e d - t h e - r e f e--I
r e '-T-.n~~~ate~

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--from$1,268,639.Q0 to-$,1,,318,252.00.--Thetotal-fee is decreased t
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4 . Please coordinate revised changes to applicable tasks and sub-task due dates and
times with the assigned Task Order Officer.

5,.,A!1other terms and conditions remain unchanged and in full force and effect.

....

6

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--

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 4

Page 1 of 2

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: August 29, 2003
Contractor:

The Lewin Group

Address:

3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 22042

OMB No. 0990-0115

. .

-

a

Subject:
.-.-

-

: - A.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order bkimber.030
-.. Modscation Number 4
......
Title: "Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood
.-. Community Initiative"
Task Order Officer: Brendan Kelly

.

B.
C.
D.

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CAN.~fdttfeberS991539G-,-Objert

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emo on strati on

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Cost plus fixed-fee:'-$1~,318,252.00
A p p r i a t i o n : 7531 536

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H.
I.

f?lacc- -7-3

:.....

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Statement-of Work: Unchanged
- .....................
...........................
-- - -Delivery Schedule: Unchanged
..Period of Performance: August 28,2002 through
August
-- _- ---- -27,2004
_ __ -.-.-. . . _ . .
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-- . . - .- - . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
1' ...
--.
-This modification-is hereby issued pursuant to the terms and conditions of -the
subject
-- - - --- - - -- contract. The subject Task Order is hereby modified as follows:

. .. . . . . . .

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1. Change G.l., Advance Understanding, Page 13, of Task Order Modification Number
3 to read:

_ - 1 .

Expert Consultant 3.

I
I - >

The listed consultant can not exceed the referenced rate indicated without prior written
approval of the Program Support Center (PSC) Contracting Officer.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 4

Page 2 of 2

This change is issued at no additional cost to the government. The Total Amount of Task
Order Remains at $1,318,252.00, period of performance, and all other terms and
conditions remain unchanged.

--

The Lewin Grdup.
Firm Name
Date
.

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~ a & & t Kelly Contracting Officer

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MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: February 12, 2004
Contractor: The Lewin Group
Address:

3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church. VA 22042

Subject:

A.

~ontrad
Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 030
Modification Number 5
Title: 'Healthy ~ a r r i a g e s n dResponsible Fatherhood Demonstration
Community Initiative"
Task Order ~ f i i c e r Mark
:
Fucello
. =
-Period of Performance: August 28, 2002 through
August 27,2004

B.

-

$

' -

This Adrr~inistrativeModification
is hereby
issued pursuant to the terms and conditions
- - - - -- - - of the s u b j e c f ~ ~ n -t- ~ c ~ n-o-~ ~ d ?-_ Z_i-f__
i o ~__
~ ~ c o s t- totheGoYemment.
1
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The above referenced Task Order is hereby modified to change Section F , as follows:

1. On the face page $?he task order, Subject D., the Task Order Officer's name is
changed to read ~ a r k ' ~ u c e l l in
o , lieu of Brendan Kelly.
-

--

--

---

2. On Page-13, Line+--2, Deliver Item-duringthe referenced time periods to-the Task
Order Officer (TOO), Mark Fucello, Social Science Research Analyst, Office
of Planning, Resear-chand Evaluation, Administration for Children a-nd Fapilies,
-US-Department-of Health and Human Services, 370 CEnfant promenade, S W ,
Washington, DC 20447.
- -Phone Number: (202)401-5750--Fax: (202j205-3598
,
- - -- -- - - .
E-mail: mfucetto@acf:hhs.gov
-J

%

3. The total Task Order amount, period of performance, and all other terms and conditions
remain unchanged and in full force and effect.

Tit
Date

-

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-.

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER
Effective Date: May 0 4 , 2004
Contractor:
Address :

The Lewin Group
3 1 3 0 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 8 0 0
Falls Church, VA 2 2 0 4 2

Subject :

A.
B.
C.
D.

Contract Number 2 8 2 - 9 8 - 0 0 1 6
Task Order Number 0 3 0
.Modification Number 6
Tit1e:"Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood
Demonstration Community Initiative"
Task Order Officer: Mark Fucello
Period of Performance: August 2 8 , 2 0 0 2
through September 3 0 , 2 0 0 4

E.
F.

-

.IR.

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+

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-

-.-:

This supplemental agreement is entered into, pursuant to the.-. .
,-.
authority of FAR 5-2:24-3--2, Changes-Cost Reimbursement (AUG -19.8'1) .
Alternate I APR 1 9 8 4 ) .
.

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1. The Task Order amount is increased by $ 7 2 7 , 7 3 4 . 0 0 . The accounting data
. - .-.

is as follows:.
--

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Total Estimated Cost, Mod-#6:
Fixed Fee,- ~.. . e
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Total.:,E3timatedCost Plus Fixed Fee,
Mod #6'b::.
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Object
Classes:
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$727,734.00

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effort is increased as outlined in the following pages, to p~ovide
continued Healthy Marriage and Responsible Fatherhood De~onstration
Community Initiative. This modification shall be incorporated into the
above numbered Task Order. (See Attachment A , Pages 1 - 5 1 .
.The Lewin Group
. .
Name
-Firm
. ./
. . . . . . . . . . .

---.-.

Authorized Signature

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Date

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2 . Section C- DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONS/WORK STATEMENT, the:level of

/

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- $ 2 2 5 , 0 0 0 . 0 0 - ...
- .
$ 2 0 0 , 066. 0 0
$ 1 0 0 , orro . o.. o
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CURRENT' QBG3GAT;ION
: -$52S3,000;
- .
00
....-- - .- -..-.- ..
-EIN: 5 6 1 9 7 0 2 2 4
,-DUMJS: 1 9 7 3 2 5 2 7 7 -"
...

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Page 2-Contract Number 282-98-0016, Task Order Number 30, r4odiF icat lon
Number 6

3. On the face page of the task order, Subject H, the Period of
Performance is changed to read August 28, 2002 through .September 30,
2004.
-

,

4. Section F.1 "Period of Perfomance," is changed as follows: The period
of performance is changed from August 28, 2002 through August 27, 2004
to August 28, 2002 through September 30, 2004.

5. -Section
G-Contract
Administration
. Data
.
.
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G.1. 352.232-74 ~stimatedCost and ~ i x e dFee-Incrementally
...-. . - Funaed
Contract (APR ;I984)-:

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(a) It is est5mated that the total cost to the Government for full
performance-of---t-h--*---L---a--~i~l-l
be $2,045,9136.OO of
-- ...
. . . . .
- .which the--sum--.& LG,/ cd
ce~resents-the.estimated
reimbursable
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.
s-,.,-.- - . . .
ep_res.ents
..
the-.fixed-fee..

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(b) Total funds-currently available for payment and allocated to
this task order contract are $1,843,252.OD,.ofwhich
,.'
,.. represents the estimated reimbursable costs and
I'
i
. epresents the fixed-fee. For further provisipns
on funding, see the Limitation of Funds clause.
.-

(c) It ia..as.timatedthat the amount currently allotted will
cover
performance through August 16, 2004.
p
p

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(cl) The Contracting Officer may;..allot
additional funds
t o -tfit.-.-..
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contracT-with=uli'f c o n ~ c u ~ r e n c ~--the--Contractor.
~~of
~p

_

.- G . 2-- ~.
Advance
.~ . ~ .
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- - . . . . . . ._Understanding::
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Other provisions of this contract notw-ithstanding, the contractor is
her~eby authorized t o incur the..Iollowing estimated revlsed 70-srs , tas
listed on modification proposal dated April 7, 2004) within !he limits
set forth without further authorization:

1

Total :

- _-

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Page 3-Contract Number
Number 6

282-98-0016,

Task Order Number

30,

Modification

Total :

.

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The listed subcontractorsjcorrsultants cannot exce-e&Theeereferenced
rate
indicated without prior written approvd of-+he Program-Support Center---- - .
.........
- . . .- -. . .- . - .
. . -.
- . -- - . (PSC) Contracting -Officer.

-~-- -

----;

6 . The total task order amount, -inclusiveof fee-i-s-x.inc.ie$ged--by
- $ 7 2 7 , 7 3 4 - 0 0 from $ 1 , 3 1 8 , 2 5 2 - 0 0 to S2.045.986.00. The t o t 2 1 f o p 4

increased by

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from
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7 . Coordinate revised changes to applicable task and sub-task due dates
and times with the assigned Task Order Officer.
8 . All other terms and conditions remain unchanged and-in full force
and effect .

.-

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Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6
ATTACHMENT A
Statement of Work (the text changes requested by this modification are highlighted
..
in bold).

.

Tasks to be included in this project are described below.

1. Change -Subtask 2.1 Section 1115 Waivers as follows:
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The contractor shall provide intensive, on-site technical assistance ;o up to twelve of the
sites implementing section 11 15 demonstrations under CHMI, as approved by the Federal
Project Officer. The A C F Office of Child Support Enforcement witb the assistance of
ACF Regional Office staff sball monitor tbe use of federal program funds, assess the
- progress of progranrzfevelopmtmrd-implementation, and actively identify
tecbnical assistance neeasbini d i v i d u a l sites.. The Contractor sball provide intensive
tecbnical assistance to tbe-extent tbat each:siteisyilling to work with,tbe
..
Contractor and its subcontractor or consultants.to belp.develop healtby marriage
demonstration pr&$ams
tbat are likely to askist in promoting cbild support
objectives,
.. ..
such as establishing paternity, obtaining child support, and assuring ..
-.
..-assistsnce in-bbfaining support for all cbildren for whom suchassistance is --requested.Thi.s.tghnicalassistance shall include, but not be limited to, coalition
building, financial management, program development, and.data management (Subtask 2.6). For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall expect to make on average
.up_to two
. - .sitevisits-to -each of the twelve section 1 1 15 sites.

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Tbe intensive technical assistance sb.allinrlude working witb eacb site to create a
development plan fbat can lead the site to implementation of a strong bealtby
marriage communiq saturation program mod'el tbat meets child support -. enforcement program objectives. These plans may include strategies for reaching
out to additional target populations, expanding the base of service partnersland
providers, and/or expanding tbe range of programs and services provided. 'The
development plan shall list specific steps the site will take to launch their CHMI
program. Tbe contractor sball work with each site to develop specific benchmarks
-that will be used to assess site progress against their plan. The plan shall be designed
to build on a site's specific strengths and needs. The contractor should assume tbat
each site will need at least one visit and up to gn average of two visits during the
remaining period of performance. The c'bntractor shall bold regular conierence
calls witb eacb site, and otber phone and email contact will be ongoing to maintain
momentum and follow-up on action items agreed to durinz the visits. Technical
assistance to the 1 1 15 demonstration sites shall aim to address program site needs
and may include:

-

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

o development of plans that can assist sites to structure healthy marriage
services and messages in ways that meet child support enforcement
program objectives, as outlined in the section 1115 waiverterms and
conditions, including: improved compliance with support obligations by
non-custodial parents when needed; increased paternity establishment
for low-income children born to unwed mothers; collaboration with
court agencies to assure support for children for whom child support is
requested; and direct intervention with two-parent intact and single but
co-parenting housebolds to emphasize the importance of financial and
emotional support for children.
- . - -..
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o strategic planning, as needed, such as assisting with community needs
-. - -~
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--assessments, and condw&ng-a-logkmodel exercise t o fleshout target
population, interventions, o.utcomes, .etc.
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o coal~tio~~eve~opmentact~vities
to inform and engage community -. supporters, providers and participants as well as technicalassistance on
management structures, coalition leadership, guidance for federally
funded'taith-based
service providers, and decision-making processes.
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o program-wide provision of information regarding allowable activities of
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fattw-bas'ed'service providers as outlined in "Guidance~to~Paith-Basid-............
.-.... . .
and Commnn?fSf~~~g~~uatioins~onn-Partperin.g
............
- ................
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with t-h.'eFederal . . - . . .
Government,"..issued by the White House Office of Faitb-Base& an&--Community Initiatives.
. .
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-9 development
..-..
.- -.- --of
- - rervicenparity-to-foco&emoamation-sites7
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effortron..
selecting target populations~fortheinitiative; development of
pirfici$nt outreach add i e c r " ~ - ~ e n f ' p l a n s ; s e ~ e c f i o ~ o f y c c u ---r-r-i -c- ~ b e
. .
delivered (e.g., PREP,-Pairs, RE, etc.); identification of program
providers and settings; plans for training service deliverers; and, as
needed, assistance with media campaigns and public events.
,
l
I

o

development of family violence client screening capacity in each site to
help programs ensure that healthy marriage program stalf are properly
trained to recognize and respond to family violence concerns and that
participants are appropriately referred to service providers equipped to
assist them with past, ongoing o r potential domestic and family violence
problems or questions. The Contractor shall engage family violence
expert consultants who are familiar with the sorts of healthy marriage
iotervention strategies and programs provided io CHMl sites and shall

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

Page 3 of i

ensure that other project staff have the capacity t o prok-ide technical
assistance related to family violence as well.

o development of a Management Information System (MIS) in each site
that would allow the program's managers to collect information
necessary to help them monitor and refine their programs and to allow
the state child support enforcement agency to meet its reporting
responsibilities t o the A C F Office of Child Support Enforcement. The
Contractor shall help each site identify the elements to be included in
their MIS, provide assistance with programming the MIS, recornpled
appropriate dala security measures, and train site staff in use of the
MIS.

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2. Add Subtask 2.1.1 as follows:~
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Technical Assistance to Other ACF-funded H e a l t h y ~ r r i a g e ~ t e e s.-- _
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The Contractor shall respond to requests for technical assistance from Healthy
Marriage
Ivhded by ACF programs other than by 1115 waiver awards.
The appropriate program office within A C F with the assistance of ACF Regional
OfKce staff3liall monitor the use of federal program funds, assess the progress of
program devehpmerrt a~d-implementation,and actively identify technical
..... ~ . ~
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assistance needs in individual sites.

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-of- -

These grantees shall include entities funded by the following p r o g r a k offifes
ACF: Children's Bureau, Office of Community Services, Office of Refugee
the. __Oficenf-ChildResettlement, Administration
for Natixe.
. . _____
. _
.Americanqand
__ _ _ _ _.... .. _ _ _ _ _._.
... _ _ . _
__. _
- _
- - - - . -- ~ " ~ ~Enforcement
o r t
and may include other program offices during theperiod of
performan-~~Thepimary focus-oilttretecl;micCaIassistance
provided b y t h e --- - =.-:
.
Contractor to these sites shall be on the healthy marriage component of thei:r
projects (e.g., creation of healthy marriage program development plans; ou:treach
and marketing strategies focused on healthy marriage; selecting healthy mdrriage
curricula appropriate for the target populations; development of healthy marriage
service delivery capacity) although other assistance may also be provided if
--'requested, including for example development of detailed work plans for meeting
tbe goals of the federal funding program; complying with general ru'le's governing
federal grantees including those applicable to federally funded faith-based service
providers; identification of program providers and settings; and plans for training
service deliverers.

- --

-..--

The Contractor shall ensure that all ACF-funded Healthy .Marriage
grantees
.- -. - - .
-- ---- are-- provided expert technical assistance in the development of fa-mily ~ i o l e n c ~ ~ c l i e n t screening capacity to assist participants with past, ongoing o r potential domestic
-

.

-

-

-

. . -.;-

-. .- .

Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

and family violence problems o r questions. The Contractor shall engage family
violence expert consultants who are familiar with the sorts of healthy marriage
intervention strategies and programs provided by the Healthy Marriage grantees
and shall ensure that other project staff have the capacity to provide technical
assistance related to family violence as well.

Z

'

For budgeting purposes, the Contractor shall expect to work with u p to 20 healthy
marriage grantees under this subtask and will plan to make a t least one visit to up
to 12 of these grantees. T h e contractor shall hold conference calls as needed with
healthy marriage grantees that request technical assistance, and the Contractar =
shall engage in other ongoing phone and email contact to follow-up on action items
agreed to by the grantee and the Contractor.

=

3. Add. Subtask
2.1.2 as follows:
- . . -- --.- . . .

...

-..

-

~

. . . . . .

--.-..

-.

....

.----

:."-----

The Contractor shall ,engage a n d . ~ o m d i n a ~ G ~ - ~ f : ~ ~ & t a n t s tassisto
-;.
them with subtasks kj and 2.1.1 as necessary. The Contractor shall negotiate and
Thenegotiations
may include an '
- .
direct work of subcontractors and coosultants.
.
.
- - -. - .- - .
-.
..- . .- -. ~.
. . .
.
..
outlini of the type and scope of techni
E'dFia-se;&F6. f1.,
.
-. . . ~.
r-L ;1-5de-~3~~:-~-s~
CHMI sites--orad*=-M~~arriagegraritees3iimnmtaSK
. * . . .!:<.~:- *- :-. :-. ;-:; -- . =
........
Contractor shall allocate ~ u b c 0 n t r a d m / ~ 0 r i s ~ t t ~ ~ i ~ throughoutthe---.---:--k~6~rces
remaining period of performance. T h e Contractor shall get feedback from= -. .=-=
. .- .
subcontractors' and ~ x p e i t c o ~ ~ ~ l t ~ ~ t ~ ~ i ~ t e ~ c t i ~ o n ~ ~ W i t h s i t e ~ ~ ~ ~- i--~. e ~
contribute to a resource-. file..........
of materials and information that can be shared with. . . . . . . . . . .. .. .. . ..
.--- s p e c i f i ~ i j e s - - a
needed
s
a n d akonfiNjiii...+k&&-asilpprepriate;
.
-The-C:-euttact(er . . . .. - . . . .
make this resourc~e'me?5-\ia3
e; ~a~s~-PPPPrOPffSate,
to--other-comm~iiifi~es-wh-o-arC
(lying to b ~ i l ~ c o m n i i m ihealthy
ty
;arriageioitintive.withwbrn-nei(hcr t h e - ; =:
I
Contractor nor A C F is currently workingintedsively~
~

.

.

.

.

-

:

~-;

..........

-.

.

.

,

L

;-'--

4. Add Subtask 2.1.3 as follows:

Technical Assistance to Healthy Marriage Initiatives unfunded by ACF

- . -

The Contractor shall support the provision of techniCal assistance by dubcontractors
and consultants for healthy marriage initiatives that are not currently receiving
funding from A C F and, thus, shall not receive assistance under subtask 2.1 or 2.1.1.
As risources allo,~,the Contractor may respond directly to requests for technical
assistance from such healthy marriage initiatives if this work can help inform the
knowledge base of healthy marriage program development.

;.

Contract Number 282-98-001 6
Task Order Number 30
Modification Number 6

Page 5 of 5

5. Change Subtask 3.1 Discussion and Briefings, as follow-s:

-

-

The Project Director and key project staff shall conduct two formal briefings for
ACFIHHS staff, invited experts, and other invited participants as agreed to by the TOO.
The first briefing shall b e a mid-project status report and shall be completed by the 48'
week after the task order award. The Contractor and key staff shall present background
information, describe the development of the demonstration coalitions, identify
opportunities and constraints relating to implementation, discuss next steps, and provide
itn cpportunjty for open discussion and comments on the activities completed to date.
The contractor shall consider thecomments received in planning-the next steps-of.the+
...:.:-. . .
.
projeet.

.m

.-

**

. .

-

The Contractor shall conduct five to six monthly briefings for the Assistant
Secretary for Children and-Familiesand ACFs_e_nic~st.affwhose programs are
involved in funding Healthy Marriage activities. The agenda for these briefings
-. ~ ~ ' - ~ s h a l l ~ ~ d w ein
l ocp~e nd s u l t a t i b a . ~ i t h . & ~ e T Q O ~ a ~ h n e t o - u p d a. t. e. ~ . ~ ~
senior staff on the technical assistance provided under this contract as well as the
- - ..
--- .
. . . .Marriage projects fu&d.by-AGF-a~d~in-particular,
the - progress of Healthy
of the sectgn 11 1 5 waiver sites as they build toward their community
. . . .
. . .
~.
.........
saturation objectives.
.
.- . ..
-- -- .. --. .

- --

--

~-

..

..-....
i,----."--

.

--

-

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. . . . . . . . . - . . . .

The second b r i P f i n g s h a ~ ~ ~ ~ bof-thedrafl
~ i s sof ithe ..fina?repo it.- ;.- - - - : - . +.. .:: ::
During the briefing the Contractor-and key staff-shallprovide an.overview o f t h e project; . . . . . . . . . . .
present summary infoxmatio.ddescriptions of various demonstrations, inc;ludingsowan
_and unique components o ~ ~ h ~ e n ~ i c ~ ~ ~ d ~ d i ~ c ~ t t s s ~ f : . ssue.sSand
f t a 1 u ~-t I 0 n ~.- d._:.e s...~- ~ ~
recommendations. The briefing shall-include adiscussion-of recommendations and - --- - - - - .
-- .
.- . . . .
--implicationsfer -furthersfudy !h5L&e+by-ACF- d o t h a s , - .Evaluation-related. .-issues&- ..
be discussed may i n c l u d ~ t h ~ ~ l r t y t o i n ~ ~ e a ~ e - ~ oopf existing
e a n ~ &programs;
le
challenges to replication of selected piograrnsimo&.& inother sites; p r o g r a m u p t ' a k e a n d ~ ~ . . . . . . . . . . . .
~ompletionrates; availability and validity of small area data; potential-for using .
I
interrupted time-series analysis and related techniques, as appropriate; stability of
funding for program operations; and other issues identified by Contractor staff.
:

-

-.--

.

.

,

'
'

_.
.-... .

-

The Contractor shall submit to the TOO for approval a draft outline for the briefings at
'"least two weeks prior to the scheduled briefing date. The first briefing shall be conducted
by the 48Ih week after task order award and the Second onlor before September 28, 2004.
The contractor shall provide periodic project briefings and technical status reports in
addiiion to the monthly briefings for ACF senior staff. The contractor shall expect to
set aside up to ten hours per month for Subtask 3.1.

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDER

Effective Date: August 23, 2004

Contractor:
Address :
Subject:

The Lewin Group.
3130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA
22042
.

A.
B.
C.
D.

Contract Number 282-98-0016
Task Order- number
30
.. - .~odification
Number 7
. -*
-Title:
"Healthy Marriage and ~ e s ~ o n s i b l e
Fatherhood Demonstration Community
a_i**&v+I-.
-__E.
Task Order Officer: MarkFucello
F. .. Period of.P e - r f ~ o r m a n c . e - : - - : ~-;., q ~200.26 ~ 2 --.through---8
=_:- -.
- -.December.2.1L2_W.4
.

. . . . -

---

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. . . . .

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. . . . . . . .

. .. ..

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.

1. The purp.os-e-..of
-this.modification- i . S ~to.
t-he..pe-riod.-.of.performance through December 31, 2004 at no additional
;rn
-t-heGovernment..
.

-

--

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..

- - -- -

-

.

.

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s L.~a.sk.
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is ..increased:-'f-i-m.;
$.I-8-4.3.2..5 2 -- . by .-$2P2..
....
, 734-to--$2- 045- -6 -..MT-'

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:
. . .

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. . . . . .

. . . .

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CAE.:.
4G99.5514..$- 98.,.3.14
- 0.0..APPR:.
.7541536 . .
ir
<'. 4G992016_$1001000.00 APPR: 75x1553,
-..:.--4G99.6121
$ 3 ,920.00 APPR: 7541553
-

..

-

-.

. .

-

_ - _ -----I
.

.

.- -.

.
.
z

.

........

.

-Total Mod Obligation: $202,734.00..

. .

~

. . . .

. . . . . .

.

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- . ...

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.

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. . . . .-

. . . . . . . . ...
..

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.

-.

-

All other terms and conditions remain unch-aTjZJCd-by reason-of --thismodification.

...
Dept..of Health & Human Services
Program Support Center

'>recJ;ir ~6 C m V c i ~ t j

.....
. .
..

MODIFICATION TO TASK ORDEF .
Effective Date: ~ecernber9, 2004

Contractor:
Address:

The Lewin Groug
3 130 Fairview Park Drive, Suite 800
Falls Church, VA 2-2042

*
.

:

-

:*

Contract Number 282-98-0016 T-k-Order Number 30
C. Modification Number 8
-D.-- -Title: "HealthyMarriage and-]tesponsible Fatherhood. --Z- - - - - .Deriionstration Cmuritylnitiative"
-- --.
E. Task Order Officer: Mark Fucel o
, ,
F. Period of Performance: August :8,2002 through
kS
February 28,2005

Subject:
--

.

... --.
.

.

A.

D

- -

- --

The purpose of this modificatiop is to extend the period of perform;tnce throu&~Febqaq 28,2005. n e - n = y ~ y o do f p e r f o ~ ~ r : e - sbe
h ~August
l
28,2002 thr ,ugh February 28,2005: The
extension is at no additional cost to the Government.
--

..<-

-

... - . . . . . . . . .

,

-

The Lewin Group
......................

-

.

..--

.

,

...
.

.

Dmt. o F Health & Humm Serv~ces
~. , .
Prograr 1 Support Center

.

..

Authorized SignatureDate

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* .

EC 1 5u-XXH .
*.*

--

IMPORTANT

1

D D l E OF 0RD.D

1

=-. - - -

ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

Mark a l l packages a n d papmrs w l l h c o n t r a c t a n d l o r omer

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17. SCHEDULE fSae revem br Rajecliw3)

K E M SO.

TERMS

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9.4CCOUNTING AND ADPRODRIATIONS DATA

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07/25/2003

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TITLE C O N T W C T ~ M W O ~ D E R ~OFFCER
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D P l I M A L I D R N 147

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WEVlOUS EDnlON NO7 U S B L E

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- ..-..SUPPLEMENTAL

-

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-- ..-

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INVOIC'NG INFORMATION

If desired. lhis oroer (or a copy thereof) may b e used by Ihe Convaclcr as Ihe Conlractor's invo~ce.Inslead of a seoarale

Invoice,

o:c:..oec

Ihe following stalemenl. (signed and dated) is on (or allached to) the order -Paymecl is reouested in me amount o! S
, \olher invotce will bs sucmined ' However. i f the Contractor ~ ~ ~ s lho esubmil
s
an Invoice, *e lci!sw~pq~nformationrnus: be aroi,i:e?
conlract number (11any!. order number. Item nurnber(s1. desuiotion of s u ~ ~ l i or
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unit prices, ana erieF,cer
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lo acq!aer.ng acliviffou!loc :ne 52,-.e
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-

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-- -

RECEIVING REPORT
-

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Ouantlly ~nIhe "Ouanlily Accepled" columq on the face of this order has been.
inspected.
by m e a n l conforms to lhis conlracl 1lerr.s llsled bklow have been rejected for the reasons ~ndicaled
SHIPMENT
NUMBER
TOTAL

~PJI'I*'

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( RECEIVEDAT

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CONTAINERS

DATE RECENED

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REP.

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REPORT OF REJECTKIHS
REASON FOR R E I E C I I D h

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ORDER FOR

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SUPPLIES OR SERVICES

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SJ"PLIESrS_EPSES
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P r o ~ e c tCf ficer
KA Jaaaznathan
Administra:lo- ior Ckildren and Pamilies
37C L'Enfact Tronenade. SW
Washinqton. DC 25447
Telephone Nu*er
2Ei-205-4829
Fax N u d e r 2C2-205-1596

--

.

-

~

-

Purpose :
Provide expert advice
research ir.:tiatives
-

~~.
. ..

.

Statement of Work:
.ation for Ch.ldrer. and
I and project 3 that are
rent's agenda. Consultatlo
LtiOn throughout FY 2003
luring short lime periods.
Examplee of the tasks are as follows:
_..--__

t

xngthezing h althy marrlag
i i c a l approac , ~rr.pacton

I'

'unaed or ro e funded by A
!11 struc:ure
approach,
s mission an1 goale
3 . Provide guidance a n d technical
request by the project officer to
4
Serve as a panellst to revlew proposals
aselst ACF In the ldentlflcatlon of outstan
of fundin5 rnerlt

research/concepts papers.
selected by ACP project officer. These pap
senior staff for making policles in the ar

.5 .... Develop brief

707KL CARRIE@ F O R W A q D TO
NSN r % w r - t s 2 d o ~ z

YLYC

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'ST P A G E ( n E M

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ORDER FOR SUPPLIES OR SERVICES
SCHEDULE CONTINUATION

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IMPORTANT: M a h aP DBCVPBS
arc paper6
DATE O F OR3ER

r n l m L C ~ I ~ B Camdlw
:

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.

-. - - -

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CONT9LC' NO

I O Q D E 9 NC

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The C o n t r a c t o r ci-e c a r e s o f d e l l v e r a b l e s a n
lroject

&. : : ,

Officer.

deliverables by the
subrr,l:ted d i r e c t l y
$25,000.

4

I

f p _ r , p r o g r a m desi3.l. a n d
55,000.

.

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55,000.

I . t

3 . P r o v i d e g u i d a n c e a n d technics-1-aseiotanc
request b y t h e p r o j e c t o f f i c e r t o enhance tb
Serve a s a p a n e l i 6 y c o review p r o p o s a l s
a s s i s t ACE i n :he i d e n t l f i c a t i o r . o f o u t s t a r .
of f u n d i n g m e r i t .
$1,000.
4.

t o m rr:.age-related

rojects cpor
54,000.

u t i i t y of p r o j e c t r s u l t s .

D e v e l c p brie",rr$earch/concepts papers. bn
s e l e c t e d by ACF p r o j e c t o f ' f i c e r .
These papers

-5.

.

$10,003.

918

-.

-

DESIGNATION QF PROJECT OFFICER

RESEARCH

,

,

PLANNING,
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I N F O ~ M A T I O ~ / C L J I I I J ~ EINCORPORATED
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I N V O i C Z INFORMATION

I N M D I T I O N T Z T H E INFORMATION R E Q U I R E C BY 5
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CDC CUSTOMER S E R V I C E
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S I H , MICHELLE SWORTER
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PURCHASEISERVICEISTOCK REQUISITION

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EE3UESTING OF?G4NIZATIOPI

ACFXXflce of Planning. Research and Evaluat~on

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K .4 Jagannathan

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Adrmnistration for Children and Farmlies
Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
3 70 L'Enfant promenade, SW, Wasi-ungton, D. C. 20447

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DESCRIPTION

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(INCLUDE STOCK NUMBER. MODEUPART N O , ETC 1

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Provide expert advice and support the development of
several marriage-related research initiatives of the
Administration for M d r e n and Farmlies.
.. .

Vendor:

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hlary Myrick
-g--,
Public Strategies, h c .
301 Northwest 63rd, Suite 215
Oklahoma City, OK 731 16
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CONTINUATION PAGE
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..Julia Sa\.oy; C'ontractim-Officer
Department of Health 8i Human Resources
Progani Support Center
Division of Acquisition Management
Room 5- 1 O 1. Parkla~vnBuilding
501, Fishers Lane
Rockville, hlD 20857

Dear-Ms. Savoy:

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I am pleased on behalf of Mary Mynck and Public Stratesies to respond to Request for
Quote 03Y002345. We have modified our proposal after Ms. M y i c k ' s discussion u ~ t h
you earlier- today.
We have studied the Descnption/Statement of Work and based on Ms. M\rick's
discussion with yo^, we offer the following proposal:
'.

Mary Mynck's time to provide expert advice and supnor* of the development of
several marriage-related initiatives as directed by ACF: up to :,(
hours at a cost of

P

,, :

George Young, senior staff, time under the direction of Ms. h.ly.rrck: a r n costef
hour up to a total of

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Related travel as directed by ACF and miscellaneous direct costs to support the
~..
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activities above: S5,000.
.. . .. .-.-.
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This proposal includes a.December 3 1, 2003 time frame for the duration of this
contract as discussed.
The total of $25,000 and the specific breakdown of the costs u~illbe in large part
dependent on the directions received by ACF.
... -- ...
..--

Public Strategies. through the efforts of Ms. hl~yrick.looks fonvard to the oppo~zunityto
assist ACF ~viththe development of marriage-related initiatives. Ms. M ~ r i c khas been at
the forefront of niarriage initiative developnient. besinning with the Oklahonia hclamage
Initiative, the first state related effort of its kind. I have included \krith this correspondence
Ms. MJrick's biographical information.
Please contact Karen Johnston at (105) 848-2 17 1 i f you have any queslions

.....

Julia S a 1 . o ~
J u l y 23, 2003
Page T n ~ o

..

Thai* you for this opportunity

Ronald E. Bussert
Chief Financial Officer

cc: Mary Mynck 2.
Karen Johnston

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07-22-03

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Offioe of Phmmg, Rrsearch and Evaluanon
370 LEnfanr Prommade,SW,Waslunpn, D.C.20447

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(INCLUDE STOCK NVMMR, M O D M A R 7 NO.. ETC.)

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Suppon t t i e . d c v e l o p af
x v a a l marriage-related research initiavcs af rbe
Anmlnlmatioa for Children had Families.
pmv;&

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M a n >I\-rick
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Ms. Mary Myrick will consult with and assist ACF on several marriage-related initiativrs
and projects that are currently the fpci of the Administration's and Department's agenda
Consnhation will cover scvcral tasks that will require implementation throughout FY 2003.
The tasks m a y be discrete and may require intense effort during short time periods.
Examples of the t a s k a r e as follows: Review specific A C F initiatives in rbe area of strengthening hedthy marriages for
program design and content, soundness of the technical approach, impact on
stakehold*rs, and potential r e a l & from their implementarion.
- . --

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~ v A u a t the
e implementation of specific projects funded or to be ~ I I I # ~ & I ~ ~i. ~the
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area of strengthcni,ng healthy marrisges for their structure, approach, ovcrall design,
and their potential'for promoting ACF's mission and goals.
I
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Provide guidance and technical assistance to marriage-related projects upon request
by the project officer to enhance the utility of project results.

Serve as a panebst to review proposals on strengthening healthy marriages and assist
ACF in the i d m t i d a t i o n of outstanding concepts, ideas. and projects worthy of
funding merit
Develop brief.cesearchlronccpt papers, on short notice, on specific themes selected by
ACF project officer- These papers are expected to provide support to senior staff for
making policies in the area of strengthening healthy marriagts. . .C
-- Justification for the Services of Ms. Mary Mvrick:

Ms. Mary Myrick is a nationally recognized expert on marriages and has played a major
role in developigg Oklahoma Marriage Initiative. S h e heads Public Strategies, hc-,which
bsr provided coonsultatihu to several states, public organizations, and natiotial iciotiati6is
on several aspof marriage initiative. Ms. Myrick's expertise and knowledge ~this
II
specific area have been keeaty sought by legislators, public service organizations, advocacy
groups, and state admhistrators. For these reasons, M s . Myrick is uniquely qualified to
serve as a consultant for ACF.

,

. .

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TRANSMITTAL
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fax:

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03Y00244S " Provide expert advice an support the developmmt .of several marriage.related-researchinitiativwf the ACF'.
. . . .
. . . .. . --.
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. .
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FROM :

Contract Special-ist, PSC

...

Julia

C.

Savoy

Please r e v i e w and approve this proposal for $25,000. Wili need
additional funds if approved. I f I can be of f u r t h e r assistance,
please give me a,; call.

<.

Attachment
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.
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,
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.

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From the desk 01 ...
Julia C . Savoy
. Contract Specialist

....

DHHS. PSC. DAM
5500 FISHERS LANE

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Parklawn Bldg. 5-101
Rcxkv~lle.M D 20857

Tele 301.443-1386
Fax: 301 443-3849

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From-

July 2 1,2003
-.

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Julia Savq,-Cmtmting CBicer
Dqartment ofHealth & Human Riiources
P r o m Support Center
Division of Acquisition Management
R w m 5-1 01, Parklawn Buildmg
-500 Fishers Lane
RoskviIle, MD 20857

*

---

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Facsimile Transrmssim to 301-443-3849
- '

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Dear Ms. S a m

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I am p l d on behalf of Mary Myrick and Public Strategies to q o n d to Request for
Quote 03YQ02445. ,

W e have studied the DescriptiodStatemeat ofW d and offer the following proposal:
Mary Myrick's time to provide expert advice and ...lpport of the d e v t l n m ~ r lof
t
several maniagetelated jritiatives as dutcted by ACE:
hours at a cost of j-,G; our
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foratotalof '

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Staim stafi's time under the dhection of Ms.Myrick:,I3O hours at a cast of
i, " b u r fix a total o ~ ~ - -..- ~- L'
Related travel as dusted by ACF and miscelheous drrat costs to support the-. -activities above: S5.000.

-

~ d o w of
n the costs will be in 1-6 part
dependent on the directions received by ACF and the time availability of Ms.Myrick

!
-

?he total o f 525,000 and tbe specific b

.-

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Public Strategies, through
effort8 of Ma.Myrick look?fimvard to thc oppcxt~nityM - - assist A f f with the development of mmiage-related initiatives. Ms.Myrick has bear q
the forefront ofmarnage initiative development, beginnkg wrth the Oklahoma M&a@
Matin,the firststate related cffon of its kind. I have includud with this camspond&
Ms.Myrick's biomhtcal mfocnmation.
.

..

PI=&= contact

lohnston at (405) 848-2171 if you have any questions.
.

..

-

-- -

I

-- -

Julia Savoy
July21,2003
Page Two

Ir,

-

Ronald E. Bussat
Chief Financial office^
.

- - .

-

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cc: Mary MyirckKaren Johnston

.

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hls. hlar! h,l!*rick will consult with and assist A C F on se\.eral marriage-ril:lted initiatib-es
and projects that a r e currentl!? the foci'of the Xdministration's and Departnlent's agenda.
Consultation will cover several tasks that \<ill-require implementation throughout F\.2003.
The tasks may be discrete and may requir-e intense effort during short time pcriods.
Examples of the tasks a r e as follow.^:
..

-

~ e v i e \ < s ~ e c i f ACF
ic
initiati\res4n the area of strengthening i~ealth!m a r r i a p s for
.--.
.
program design and content, soundness of the technical approsrh. impact on': . ---,.
.
stakeh.olders, a n d poten.tial fesults from their implementation.

.

-- .

- .

-.--

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.

.
.. ...

Evaluate the implementation of specific projects funded o r to be funded b\ liCF in the
area of strengthening healthy marriages for their structure, approach, overall design,
and tbeir potential for promoting ACF's mission and goals.
Provide guidance and technical assistance to marriage-related projects upon request
by the project officer !p enbance tbe utility of project results.
-2%

Serve as a panelist to r e ~ i e wproposals on strengthening healthy marriages and assist
A C F in the identification of outstanding concepts, ideas, and projects worthy of
f u n d i n g merit.
--'
4
"
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Develop brief researeb/concept papers, on short notice, on specific themes st?lect&by
ACF project officer. These papers a r e expected to provide support to senior staff for
making policies in the area of strengthening healthy marriages.
....

-

.

.

Justificationfor the.- Services
of Rls. h l a r y h l v r i c k :
-..

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-.

--.-- .- . -. .*. .

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Ms. Rplar!r blyrick is a nationally recognized expert on marriages and has played a major
role in developing Oklahoma Marriage Initiative. She heads Public Strategies, Inc., which
has provided'consultation to several states, puhlir organizations, and national associations
on several aspects of marriage initiative. Rls. hlyrick's expertise and knowledge in this
specific
area have been keenly sought by Ieo,islators, public service organizations, advocacy
., .; ;
groups, and state administrators. For these reasons. hls. hlyrick is unique!) qualified to
serve 2 s a consultant f ~ .ACF.
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Fiealthv hlarriaoe" P r o ~ e c t
HHS C c n l r a c t t: 2-333-33-0234
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I nis je!ter c ~ ~ l ! i r , n:?at
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ing
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s~:,;~ces cf ?*IS ?&ri F L . y : ' ~ k T h ~ swork wril be in con;unc:rcn wrth
L'iro:r~aYncr.. Senior Hesearzb. Ass;c:ate a! IdDRC or her designee

aareed lha! Setvdeen Jenlrary 1 , 2004 :br?ugh December 31, 2004 Ihe
Ir,s:~!ute-w:illend the knowledce T r d expertis? of Ms. Myrick to fuRher the goals of
It-e p r q C.,1, T P e extent l o wnich her expemse IS required r a y vary over trse
course o f ttq.%fqect and ~ z cepen3
y
up33 !he s3ecific interveri~iorrstha: enc up
being tested 2r popula:lon; rc.rc;eted In parrrcular sltes. Subject to Ms. Myrick's
.nterest anc availaSilily, tasks may rncidde: ore3arlng background dccuments:
c3rlductins analyzes: co-23lbcrlrc prc)ect p~5lications:vrsiting polentiai s!!es:
re~le;~;~~~:~rJe~,"alerlals.
i e n d ~ r ge r p e i l ~ s eand gu~dance;attendlag ar,c!
parllcloa:~ngtn :earn -neet;.igs a r d 50n!ererc,n Cz!ts. All wcrk condccted for !ne
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of ten (10) days during trl? perloc
! n ~ sai;r.eerrer.l. a\ a rate of 9140.00 oer Pour, fcr an eighl ( 0 ) hour day. for a
marrmlrm C! s11.2r)0.1)c. In
Paymen: will DP made lo Pu9l1c Stralegies. n'.;<dpot M3RC's reca~p:GI
sign?* in.~rj;cesvthlch-gre identified by MDRC code
21 74: 3.1 !C)~..p3.37.~terniz:nccdnsul!ing s c r v l S s rendered and expenses.. .. .- .=- - 1ncl~:red. Pa2b!irl:s!ratqies sne!l :eialn ai; original back-1i3docun'en:a:'on In 11s :
r e r n r c s fur ar!y n:ld I pursoses :la1 m?y bz rsqulred by M3.?C or any
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~ r ~ d e r s l c oI2a:
d !he 1erTs o f this agreemerl: are subject to the a3provsl of
bHS. 3nd :ha! any rPcutremenls c,f tp- !ederal goverrrnen: w h ~ c hlmpact the
i ? r . T S of I5is fet;er, s-all reqcir? a p g r ~ 3 r i 2 !~oTli'ica:i~r:
~
or ~ P S C I S S I OB~S
apprcz::aie Ir; :he e;?nl !ha! a n ? c f 1"s wcr%fc- h,:Di?C shall rnv3lve c!eparrng
2-,3?rc-:!:in~ da:a !:'es the? Pub'lc S:ra!egles sha!l enssre that tne culfet~io'nan?
r ~ a i r i l e ~ t r C'
z eda:a ~ ~ t - l cc3rl2
b
n 3 f : s ~ n a l 13en:tier;. 1s In compltance w ~ : h
;- . c : S:;!U:P~
2 s tc DTlvE':,
a r c zcr.f~.lanl.ai':;., rncluginj; the Frl*:acv Act. Socia:
s?:,.l':y
LC:. 3 ° C :>I ~!~Z:.,~SC~~.IZD
P C a C i f i i>r;d Arccuntabil[,, A",. T ~ l 1s6
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',!>?C .c; ~ b l l g 2 i o d13 pass !nrz~;:y :c
5 ; i d ; y y 1 e s . i;rCe: :?e cri'.iS'ST.5 0 : ;5 Prime Cift:ac[ *A::-;
t1k5
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Fri32
Ssr:'iic!, i 5 lE? ex;:?[ Iy1211,:?2?? 1 5 ab!e :Q !ac!ji:a!e ~&llca[ior, ::.?r;!~j : ~
a:'.riSi,:!un :n Fublic 3tra!e~,:esfcr w?rk i t :s air:hnring. MDRC sha!; clo sc.
7:1r:b~trrTc:0. :b.? ~O'!?E;C,:~Gfedora regulaticr; a!so r e a n s that Pg9I.c S:ra[e,;!.=s
i?-,d 52s hrl.lyr;ck)s?all rict Se cer-ni!bd tc release or c:+:lcse. vprkal:.i 3: I;
t;r3, an:, da:a G r 6r,s infc,rma: #>? pzrIz.n;?pJ.: work. p c 3 ~ r r n e~j c r i p rI?:C
z;:eerer.!. c * ; c c ~3: ~;?~,.C-PS~JIS
Cr !1ndin3 of if's v:cr% (inS:3ding 3aia c s i ' e r , ! . ~ ~ ,
Eralysrs. 6::'i.;!.f1nal
xaper;
,$ccr;sj Izr :?e period 01 !his cc?;rac:
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c?tair:ir,g
apcrcvsl c f YDRc.
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......

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!' 2~bl.:: S : r i j i q i n s a ~ r e e sW I ; ~! r ! s let!er and Ihe ~nzorporaiedrvlORL" General
T5:r~)sz r i ~ ~ C ~ : 3 1 1 1
Ricer.
~ n s ( ~ x c e cto
l tne oxten: same IS nodifled Dy
c c o l i a r , c c V J ; ! ~ : -,roprlet3rj rrgnls 3:?,iJlS!0q of [he Kt-(S Prime Conrract as
e:<3:essed 2 5 o ~ e ) ~. i e a s esign ard reiu:n one of the two entlosed zoples cf l h ~ s
lelter, a1or.o \.rilh :-te MDRC Conf~den!lal~lv
Pledge to the a:tenticn of W e ~ c yE
Wei:s. Esq., on behalf of ?JIDRC

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C,CYNO?:'LEGGED ARC AG2EED TO:

Ptlblic Strategies, Inc

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V a r y t4yrtck
FE!
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- 1'73-7. 355962

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MDRC

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T h e s ~ e c i h cterms ofc o n s u l l i n ~agrcemnnts wiin II1DRC aro czvered In sac7 ? 3 r . - j ; a :
contrac;. In ar'diiicr?,tr,e fcllowing several terms apply lo all consulLa?!c

--

Ccnsul!ants aro not ernpioyees cf tbf,D2C~ J 2re
I
1n~,~peY!F71
1. wnt:ac!orz t o td32.C M U R C does no1 r e i a ~ nthe rishl lo control and 31rsct ccnsuitan:: as tc d e d s
and :he means by wh!ch sssignner,:s are a<?ompliShed. CcnsultanTS agree no: tc reDreSeT:!
Ihenselues as MDP.C'S agents cC sp3kes~ersonselther dunno or after the perlod sf r m r z;x~~ntn??:.
.'
.snb cansultan& furthe: agree to k 2 ~ ~ - ? inforrnatio&
y
or data r o n c e r n ~ nEZD4C
~
and iis coo?.-!t.jc.tors-cr .. .--Proj?cts in the strlctes: confCUence unicss such infomation or dala has begti anno-u.nce.d by t.15,'Rl~
Consult.ants are s u b l ~ c tlo-the A m i n ~ s t r a t i v e policies and procedures established by ?,lDRC %r
consl;ltants. indudinn but not limited to policies aga~ns! ~ m ~ l o y m c n
d~.s=rimlnation
t
and work;15~,c
harassment The MDRC pol~cyon workplace harassment IS atlached a ~ 1ncorp0r~:ed
d
ncretn

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Consultants assign to MORC all rights in and to t h e piuduzts 01 their
2. -tauservices under t h e ~ ragreements. including all copyngnt, trademark and patent rights in sr lo any w a l k s .
programs. systems. processes, or inventions (whether or not reduced to practice j or other rnater ials or
intellectual prcpenles of any nature.that consultants may conceive. orrginatc or develop in the course
.o f . or relaling to t h e performance ..of
their services under such appoin:meqt (collectively. - t h e
..
'pro3erties"). MDRC shall-@:~thesole-andexdu&
owner or all righls in and ,:t the propnflies at all
.
stages o i - - d i l ~ ? v e l ~ p m e n t . "may
~ d revlse, adapt, combine, alter. pubt~sh,and deal in and wi!h ine
propert~esas MDRC deems,.appropnate Consultants shall ekecute such documents to effectuate the'
inten! of this paragraph 3 as may be requested by MDRC

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'F~ n . -d
consult an!^ warrant to MDRC that all WOrKS
p r o d ~ c e dunder t h 6 ? - ~ G k ~ m MDRC
t h
are ooglnal works and tLat each work m a l l not infringe
upon or violate any copyright, proprie!ary righ!, t r a d e m r k and patent rrghts, rights Ic privacy, or
cmstitute libel or slander aga~nst.or vlolate any common law ngh:. of any perscn. firm o i cor$cr'afi6-fConsul!an:: shall defenc any such dalms and sharl indemntfy MDRC and hold MDRC harnlless agalnst
any such claims, IiaDil~ty.or 10s; w9atsoever.

5. Egxxws MDRC: rejmburses consultanls for actual e w c n s e s ~ncurredn connec!~on wl!n
assignments. lncludlnq l l v r n ~exoensej :f trav-ling at MDRC experce Extrasrdtnary expend~luressuch
as computer tlme, rnference books. sceclal equ~prnent,elc.. must be stt~ulated In the parlicuiar
contract. Expenses are pa:@directly-Dy a consulrant and itemized In reascnable dnlarl. All recripted
5otel bills. transponalion s:ubs (even ~f paid for by MDRC). and recejpts for all o:ner exoensss O! %?i?
o,r..nore must be suDrnittea to MDFIC. One signed copv of an expense rep39 is submitter! lo MDRC for
.. .
payment. an6 one CODY snould t,e retained by t h e consultant for tar purposes. ~ 0 R ' ~ ' r e s e r v eIn?
s
rloht to deny relrrburserne.11 for erpenses that 11 deems unreasonably h g h I n determtntng whether an
exoensc I5 unreasonablj n ~ g h MDRZ shall use as a reference the currsr11 federal gu~deilneson :ravel
exoenses acd D e r diem rates
.

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W l c , - z of

~ternizedin reasonable de!aiiand s u p w r t e d by aclual reckipts.

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0 t h ~ MORC
~ .
w:ll not reimburse consultants for any payments made by them
in obfaining .the s e ~ c e (si n c l ~ ~ l secretarial)
iri~
of other persons to asslsl lhem in their work Tor hfDRC.
unless stlpulaled in their panicular contrac!~. R t ? i r n b u r s e r n c ~ f cservices
r
o l other perso-ns .shaLkbe

4.

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I ht. p3ilc:t of ',lcRC
IS 1~ >r3v!de ecc7-mv-c;ass ::_=-?:::a:
c.' FI.:.L-T!J:T !:a:-'
wnen ec~rl~ny-cl;:;
:rave: ;s no! ada~ia-nlecr ivcc;c: ?rlz!: a ,Talc: zf:;.::..r.za,-.:qc
:3';5":he
consuI!an! tr: m s s an 4773253r: S u s ~ n p S2 2 ~ 0 i r ! h e n l 2 r , Y . ~ n e r 2 :-e-' i:.r;..::?rri:
'as
ottacncd advanre w:incn a p c ~ 2 v a 'l 7 9 ~rw',Y"F.S. Ci3nsul!ants are au:nor:zoc ;?c. ra.::j.;.c
. - 3 ls~:;~-re:
p:cv.dcd Sy domes!!: air!~nes

6;.

...

3

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~v'IDRC
7. ~
C
E carries 'raveiers ~nstjrance' caver:nc all sra? azr! c-7su::sr:ls ~ ~ n i ; ?
p ~ r f o r r n i ~MDRC
g
busrness duties C=nsultants are ccmpi~tetyC ~ V S ~f ~P autcl
r~
i~c..'!;; .+;;lr,i~~
Cn
business travel fgr MDRC. Consul:an:s \%iI'not .be reimbu~ssdfcr insurance Duug? 1r-<:,~:3ua!
.y Ir.
acditior; tc tnl+ coverage

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-=MDt?Crecc.ts a!\?& :o :k In:erna: E-verwc Seyict...+s_.:e;.111r~!3,by :htt.!n!oriml - E .Taro..
"FikvtSnue Code ang to N e w - ~ b r C
k i b and State t f agpl~cable. MDRC does not w i : P r , M . F d e r & . S t s : ~ .
and Ci?y.iriccme :ax and SoCial S e a e l y tax frcm ten.5 pard to consutlanls.
-

9, m : - n n c
o r : ~r
ifm.
~ The specific terms of a cons-~ltanlconlract n a y ~ n l vb;;.
amended, extended. or caflcele3 by mutual writlen acreemerll. Exceptior,. The Obl~~ai.:ns o! i h e
COPsUltant stated in paragraDhs 2 and 3 abcve will survive the cancellat~onor expjral~onof the ccntract.
and nothing kereln shall rostrlcl MDRC's right t0 terminate the consultant), upon w m e n notice when 11
determines lhat s u c h a terrninat~or~
is in rts best interests.
10.
A c3nsulbnt contract is In effect -only after-receipt -by MDRS of the
countersigned copies 3f the contract. Paymen! of any authorized fees and expenses by MDRC shall
be made only upon f d ~ ~ . ~ x e c u t contrads
ed
and supporting involces with nexssary expense.
dotumenta!ion.

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Specific terns art?~sJg!l.oll;5,.;.

- period from actual start ofa S u s i n ~ s s!np to rclurn covennq
accidental death and dtsmenrtrerment to S ~ W J . ~ D ~ !

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Fucello, Mark (ACF)
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Jocelyn Page [Jocelyn.Page@mdrc.org]

From:
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Sent: : Thursday, March 2 4 ~ 2 0 0 53:26 P M
To :

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Barbara Goldman; Fucello, Mark (ACF)

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Subject: RE: Voice mail re Mary M.
Mark.
A S Barbara mentioned below, we have o signed agreement with Public Strate~iesio: 2004 - see c:rati?ec,- :YE
-recenfiy
sent Fu5lic Skategies an cgreemenkfor 2005 and have not yet received a signec copy. 1- c33i:;2r r.,;7! 1
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T a t e ~ i e has
s not yet invoiced us.f5r dny work done for the SHM Prolec:.
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I om in touch with Public Strategies about getting the new agreernent and invoices and hope to send this tc ysi.'

soon.
Please let me know if you have any questions.
Jocelyn

Jocelyn M. Page

MDRC

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16 East 34th Street, 19th FIO~&'.
N e w York, NY 10016
phone: 2 1 2-340-8884
fax: 2 1 2-684-0832
website: w . m d r c . o r G - - * . - . - - '
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From: Barbara Goldman
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2005 3:03 PM
To: Mark FFucello
Cc: Jocelyn Page
Subject: RE: Voicemail re Mary M.
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We are tracking this down - in fact we just sent Public Straegies another agreement to sign-- tiutfia'\ienlt~otthe
signed version back yet. We also had an agreement with PS in 2004. We will send you the materials tomorrow.
although PS has not yet invo~cedus. Barb
*..***.*

Barbara Goldman
Vice-President
MDRC':.:'
16 East 34th Street
NYC, NY 10016
21 2-340-8654 (or 21 2-532-3200)
Fax: 212-684-0832
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E-mail, barkara.goldman@mdrc.org
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

_. . . . . . . . . . . .

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From: Fucello, Mark (ACF) [mailto:MFucello@acf.hhs.gov]
Sent: Wednesday, March 23, 2005 10:43 AM
To: Barbara,&oldman; Karen GGardiner
Subject: Voice mail re Mary M.

Barbara:
Karen:

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DEPARTMENT OF
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

G?ECUISI7I:>:I i.JCi!.'Sf

PURCHASEISERVICEISTOCK REQLllSlTlON

A FA 0002445
OFF!CE CGSE:SY:.!SC:

BPA and Call No.
7.I

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PSC;D:.ISIO~of Acquisition h . h g e m e n t

REQUEST FOE

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PURCHASE

RZQUESTING 09GANIZkTIOt~1

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OPRE

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FOR REFERENCE CALL

EXTEtdSION

K A. Jagannathan

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FIEI:T:L.LE:\SE

I OEJEZT C i k S S

06.0?;?002
I

25.13

APPROPRI.ATION

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7531536

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Administration for Children and Families
Office of Planning. Research and Evaluation
3 70 L'Enfant Promenade, SW, Washngton, D. C. 20447
6)

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5 STOCK ISSVE

SERVICE

CUSTODIAL AREA

ACF/Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation

D E L ~ V E RT O

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D A T E REOUISED

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DESCRIPTION

lTEh4 N O

QUANTI*
REQUIRED

- - ( I N C L U D E S T O C K N U M E ' E R . ' ~ U ~ E U P A R T NO.. E T C . )

06/15!2003
..
OF-'-

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€057

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,iSUE
-.TOTAL
UNIT
:

1

Provide expen advice and support the development of
several marriage-related research initiatives of the
Administration for M d r e n and Farmlies.
.

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Si4.500.00

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Vendor:
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h4aq Myrick
'ax. .
Public Strategies, Inc.
301 Northwest 63rd, Suite 215
Oklahoma City, OK 731 16
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DATE

1 c e n ~ t ylhat Ihe properly/serv~cesrequested are required tor
Government business, and ere not available from excess or

Current assets:

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'EQUESTEP BY, i S i g ~ a l u r e A i l l e ) '

,. . . . .,
:

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K.A. J~@.~nnart~an

TOTAL
I

L. I(!

K . A . 1 a y n n n a r h a n . B u d ~ e Officcr
t

DATE

,

DATE

..pPRO':f D 6'; (&,jnarure:711le.i'
f - l r > \ \ . ~ r dR o l s ~ o n .Dircctnr, OPKE
: ? O P E f i T ' i l . l ~ : l c ~ E ! . : E l i TOFFICER (Signai-re;'

y.2,i;
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RECEIVING OFFICIAL - I cenijy lhal Ihe suant>~,es
~nbrcd!ed~nlhe -0uanliiy
Reou~reC"Cournn above have been receved n lolal or a s annolaled
RECEIVIPJG OFFICIAL (S~gnature,Tiilej

DATE

ORDER t J 0 ( F O , 00. F E O S T R i P . E T C )

ORDER DATE

VOUCHE~)~ J O

\.:OUCHEP DATE

I DATE
DATE

cz

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:E~UISTICIJ r.~ur.ia~i!

*FA0002445

1

62; AIJD CALL

1.10

To

PSCKhvision of Acquisition Nanlgemenr

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I

iESCRlPTiOll ( I n c l u d e Slock Pic . ,$fodei/Parf lic elc

:riS-3Y2 (Re: G / ? Q ]

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CONTINUATION PAGE

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Julia Sa\.oy, Contracting Officer - - .. .
Department of Health & Human Resources
Program Support Center
Division of Acquisition Management
Room 5-1 01, Parkla\x*nBuilding
500 Fishers Lane
Rockville, h,ID 20857
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Facsimile
Transmission .to. 30 14143-3849
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DearMs. Savoy

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I am pleased on behalf of Mary Mynck and Public Stratezies to respond to Request for
Quote 03Y002445. We have modified our proposal after Ms. Mynck's discussion with
you earlier today.
We have studied the DescriptionlStatement of Work and based on Ms. Myrick's
discussion with you, rye offer the following proposal:
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Mary Myrick's time to provide expert advice and support of the develop~nentof
several maniage-related initiatives as directed by ACF: up to 120 hours at a cost of
-. .
:I
!hour for flo~%lo f 2
bb

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George Young, senior staff !;me under the d~rectionof Ms. hlyrick: a t 3 c o e d
/hour up to a total o f
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Related travel as directed by ACF and miscellaneous direct costs to support the
activities above: $5,000.
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This proposal includes a December 3 1 ,:2003 timeframe for the duration;of this
contract as discussed.
i
The total of $35,000 and the specific breakdown of the costs will be in large part
dependent on the directions received by ACF.

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Public Strategies, through the efforts of Ms. Myrick, looks fonvard to tl;e'oppo~-tunityto
assist ACF with the development of marriage-related initiatives. Ms. Myrick has been at
the forefront of nlnrriage initlatiire development, beginning with the Oklahonla Marriage
~nitiative,the first state related effot? of i ~ kind.
s
1 have included with this correspolldence
Ms. Myrick's, bio~raphicalinformation.
Please contact Karen Johnst011 at (405) 84s-2 17 1 i f you have any questions

Julia Savoy
July 23, 2003
Page Two

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Thank- you
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for this opportunity.
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Sincerely,

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Ronald E. Bussert
Chief Financial Officer

cc: Mary Mynck
Karen Johnston

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30;-443-3648
DEPARTWEN r

OK

HEALTH AND HUMAN S E R l I C E S

-

PURCHASOSERVICUSTOCK REQUlSlTLON

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REWESTING ORGANIZATION

ACFmce

of PI-

1

REQUEST FOR

EPUXWEC]SER~(JE

CUSTODIAL AREA

-

~ S T O C ~ I J S ~ E
WNTWLUSZ

OAT€

OPRE

FOR REFERENCE CAU

EXTENSION

K A J~~
M W E R TO

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'

APPROPRATICN

7531536
Ow

Admimation for W e n and F a d e s

G998035

Offioe of Plannmg, &search and E v J ~ a a o n
370 L'Enfant Pmmmuk, SW,Washugton, D.C. 20447

DATE ~ ~ K ~ U I R E D

CVTD.li

QSJECT CLASS

06AnLloo3

06A5R003

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RECEIVING OFFICIAL - I c m + mar mr plantme o-tODetcd in hexmannb
R q u d mum amve a m r r o c l v c a m ~ ~ tIJ
sn
l umma~.

25 1 3

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REWISTION NUMBER

BPA AND W

A FA 0002445
OESCPJPTION

L NO.

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i06.~~.",033

(mclde Sot* N o . Moocl/Pm NO. eu

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07-22-03

1 1 :44a&

From-

hlarv 3ivrick
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.

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Ms. Mary Myrick will consult Gih and assist ACF on Gveral marriagerelatexi iniliativa

and projects that are currently the foci of the Administration's and Department's agenda
Consultation will cover several tasks that will require implementation throughout FY 2003.
The tasks m y be discrete and may require intense effort during short time periods.
Examples of the tasks are as ioUows: -

-

-6

Review specific ACF initiatives in tbe area of strengthening healthy marriages for
program design and content, soundness of the technical approach, impact on
stakeholders, and potential r s o l t s from their implementation.
. --

-

-

-

Evduate the irnplemen&tion of specific projects funded or to be funded by ACF in the
area of strengthening healthy marriages for their structure, approach, overdl design,
and their potential for promoting ACF's mission and goals.
Provide guidance and technical assistance to marriage-related projects upon request
by the project officer to enhance the utiJity of project results.

-

Serve as a paneli$t to rwiew proposals on strengthening healthy marriages and assist
ACF in the idcntidbrion of outstanding concepts, ideas. and projects worthy of
funding merit.

Develop brief.xespar.cWgoacept papers, on sbort notice, on specific themes selected by
ACF project offScer. These papers are expected to provide support to senior staff for
making policies in the area of strengthening healthy marriages.
.-- 4

Justification for the Services of Ms. M a w 1Mvrick:

p)ayq

.

.

.

Ms. M u y .Myrick is a nationally recognized expert on marriages and bas
a major
role in developing Oklahoma Marriage initiative. S h e be.&
Public Strategik,Inc, which
has provided consultation to several states, public organizations, and national Hodatioas
on several aspects of marriage initiative. M a Myrick's expertise and knowledg'e ip this
specific area have been keeaty sought by legislators, public service organizations, advocacy
groups, and state administrators, For these reasons, Ms. Myrick i s uniquely q"alifitd to
serve as a consultant for ACF..

07-22-03

From-

l I :dlaa

.-~

ta:

K A Jagannathan

fia:

202-205-3598

.

--

,

D.

re:

- -.

rO,

.

date:

.

03Y00244S " Provide expert advice an support the developmcnt.of several mimiagerelated^ research initiative-of the ACF".
.
.
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07/22L?003
.. .-....

-

Contract Special.ist, PSC
Julia C. Savoy

FROM :

Please r w l e w and approve this proposal- f o r $25,000. Will need
additional funds if approved. I f I can be of f u r t h e r assistance,
please give me a,, c a l l .
%<.

Attachment

From the desk of ...
Julia C. Savoy
"Contract Specialist
DHHS. PSC. DAM
5500 FISHERS M E
Parklawn Bldg. 5-101
Rockville, MD 20857
Tele: 309-443-1386
Fax: 301 -443-3049

July 2 1,2003

_

-

WC~T=T -

-1.-Julia Savu);Contr;+ding

-

P q m e n t of Health & Human Resources
Program Supposr Center
Division of Acquisition M a n a g e m a
R w m 5- 101, Parklawn Building
5 0 0 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857

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.I

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Facsimile Transmission to 301443-3849
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-..

Dear Ms. Savoy:,

.

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I am plmsed on behalfof Mary Myrick and Public Stmiegiar to respond to Request for
Quote 03YO02445.,

We have studied the Description/StatemeatofWork &d%fferthe fallawing proposal:
Mary MMck's time to provide expert advice and support of the devcloum~ntn C
several mmiaeerel$ed initiatives as dutcttd by ACF. ' hours at a cost of
' <3
for a total of
Sesior staff's time under the direction of Ms.Myrick:
mur for a %Z@I,~?,

hours at a cast of

Relatcd travel as d~rectedby ACF and miscellaneous direct coets to- suppqrt
- the-- -activities above: $5,000.

The total of $25,000 and the specific breakdown of the c o s will
~ be in large part
dependen~onthe directions received by ACF and the time availability ofMs.Myrick
- ..

.

,

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.

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~

Public strategies, t h r o b the efforts of Ms.Myiick, lmka fosFir;ud to the opp&-$'6
assist ACP with the developmeat of marriage-related initiatives. Ms.Myrick has been at
the forefront of marriage injtiativc development, beginning wxth the Oklahoma Marrriagr,
laitiative, the first state rslated effort ofits kind. I have included with this corrwpcmdcnce
Ms.Myrick's biographical information.
-Please contact Karen Johnston at (405) 848-2171 if you have any questions.
.-.

-.
-.

Julia Savoy
July 21,2003
Page Two

Z'&/@W

fbank you for this opportunity.

~

Sin

...

Ronald E..%ussert
Chief Financial Officer

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s

cc: Mary Myrick
Karen Johnston

. .. . ..

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RtiQUEBT FOR QYQTATlONS

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Pravide expert advice mad support tk dovdopmmt
reseuEh Faicintivea of + m A d m l n l s r r a t i m f o r ftLi
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f h e C a n r r a c t e r chsll ccmsolt with

and assipt
k r p l l i e a (Awl an %evere:"baniage-relaced
eurrtnrly the foci af Lhe

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coves w a r d racks

CURS

may b r diecrrte snd

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tn&m

a r e as

follows:

1

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DIIFlslPsC/AoS/DAM

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07-22-03
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181

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R m - m i c : A W *ti
program dehign rad cancar
akak3ders. a& potearial ,.asults iroa t h e i r 1

,for

.

haluate

a amplemeatat:

ia tSre a r e a 0: eczrPgsbaaiPg
overall deelga, and their pol

pxcnrlda gd.daaca and tsal
requm~b~ &I pro3 .a off ioq
3.

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b
w M a prruliet t o r'.tvkw m e a l s as IF
a~sistruzr iP the identaticr-im af ourat~ndiogc
of hrading wit.

3.

W c e l q hrief rasaareh/cmcrp+s papars, os
eelearad by ACF project offl a u . fbeeo papem ax
esaiur mafX for mkbs pol isle i a ebe area oZ

5.

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act re*ults.

Ms. Rlar?, hlyrick will consult \r.itl~and assist A C F on several marriage-relhted initiati\.es
and projects that a r e currently the foci of the Administration's and Departnle~lt's agenda.
Consultation \vill cover several tasks that Kill require implementation throughout FY 2003.
T h e tasks may be discrete and may require intense effort during short time periotls.
Examples of the tasks a r e as follows:

..

-

~ e v i e w s ~ e c i fB
i cC F initiatives-ie the a r e a of strengthening healthy marriages for
~ . * % . program design and content, soundness of the technical appro-ach, impact
--. . - o n ' : '
--.
.
stakeholders, a n d potential results from their implementation.

.
-.

-.

- --

..
.--

.
.

.

Evaluate the irnplem&tation of specific projects funded or to be funded by A C F in the
area of strengthening healthy marriages for their structure, approach,
overall
design,
.
..
and their potential for promoting ACF's mission and goals.
Provide guidance and technical assistance to marriage-related projects upon request
by the project offic.er .to enhance the utility of project results.
q<::

Serve as a panelist to review proposals on strengthening healthy marriages and assist
A C F in the identification of outstanding concepts, ideas, a n d projects worthy of
funding
. ;'-;"".
-" .-'>
. -.. .

..

.

.,..

--

.

Develop brief researeh/concept papers, on short notice, on specific themes sdected-hy
A C F project officer. These papers a r e expected to provide support to senior staff for
making policies in the area of strengthening healthy marriages.

..
.

. Justification

. .- -.

for the Services of Ms. hlarv_Mvrick:
_

*

I

=+..

. .. . . ..

- -. -.

.

-.

Rls. M a r y hIj.rick is a nationally recognized expert on marriages and has played a major
role in developing Oklahoma Marriage Initiative. S h e heads Public Strategies, Inc., which
has provided consultation to several states, public organizations, and national associations
on several aspects of marriage initiati\.e. hls. hlyrick's expertise and knowledge in this
specific area have been keenljvsought by legislators, public service organizations, advocacj
group's', a n d state administrators. For these reasons, Rls. hlyrick is ~rniquglyqualificd to
serye as 2 r o n s u l t a ~ for
t .4CF.

-

ids 'i.:ary M~I:):
F ;bi\c S:r~:rt, e ; , Inc

0ecr31a S!a;e Llr'i\'E?rS~:'/

P

?.a?N ~ r t ? w e s l6 j r CSu112
,
2 15
5L;'jhprnn City. CK 73'

--.,,.:

4

Cons:jllinq Aqreement for "Eupp_qrtncr H e a l t h ~
hlarriaqe" Proiect
HHS Ccntract #233-32.01:32
-.
:

Cesr fijls. hlyric4. *

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.

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This Ir?t!er cion!irms that MDRS is retaining Fcblic StrategLes, Inc. c r the
"5vppc:tina Healthy kdz:r~age' (SHFAj ?reject in order to c j t a i n the Dersoral
ccns~:l:tnc,je:;.lces cf U s Mar, FLyr!ck This work wlil be In con;uncticn wllt'i
V l r ~ n ~;c.r.cr.
a
Senlor Research Asssc.ate at rdGRC gr her desirjnee.

have 2 ~ r ~ that
e d Setv~eFnJ z n ~ s r ) .i . 20C4 :br>ugh December 31, 2004 the
Ins:~lutew.3 len5 the knowledge 3 r d expgrtiss of Ms. FAyrick to further the 3ci.l~ zf
IPe projec!. TPe extent to wnich her exper!ise ti required r a y vary over me
course ~ f ' i ~ . ~ r o ] eand
c r n a y depecd u73n !ne s ? ~ c i f i cinlerveri[icns lhaf erid 32
being tes:ed'~rpopula:rons tarsered In par[~cularsrtes. Subject to Ms. Myrick's
nteresi and availabil~ly,tasks may lncigde: oreoarlag background dccuments:
cmductin(,: analyses: co-aulbcr~roprcject pu5'1cations;v~sitingpalent~aisiles:
review:r,ay~r_jten~ a l e r ~ a lleqdlr.3
s:
expertise and g~idance;attending ar.d
-c... C.
par:itl~a!tn3 In :earn neel;:iys a r d cc!nferer,c-e calls. All work conducted for :hc
9rc;ect is ;uSlec: lo lye prior apcro..jai of NORC an3 !he St-iM projecl dires!or.
.'Jiruinla iinox.
$
' :?

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-

A

These ser,:icos will be r e n d e r ~ d:or a maxi~nurnof ten (:O) days during tho perioc
r' ,his agyeement, a1 a rate of J'740.00 per Pour, fcr an eight (8) hour day, for a
rnavlrccIrn of S11.20O.C)C. In 'ot?~. Payment will be made to Po911c Siralegies. Inc.
-upon K 3 R C s r e c ~ ~of
p ;signed tr,.mcesvrhlch are identified by MDRC code ~3'14 1 3 1100.Q0.01. ~temlz,nccansul!ing serv2es rendered and expenses. .~ .:i n ~ u r i e d Px%j~cS l r a l q i e s snall :e!aln -sli 6riginal back-uc, docurren1a::cn In rt;
recnrcc; fur ar'y a : l d ! purz~oses:qal may b e rsqutred by M3.qZ or anv
gc;verq~,enfaIagzncy

I t is ucderstood tna: !he terms of tbis agr2emen: are scSject to Ihe a3proval cf

kHS, and :ha: any rec;uirements sf !Pe federal gcverrrnen: which impact ttie
t0rms of I ~ Ile!ier,
S
s?all r e a ~ i r ezcxopria!e rnorl~fica:lon or resclsslon 3s
appr2c::ate. In :he event that any o f t h ~ swcric fo- MPRC shall 1nv3lve preparing
a:d ,rcb~idinsra:a f i l e s theq Put?l~cC;tra!cg~esshall ensilre that the collaztr-? and
r ; t s i n l ~ n ? r z ec' da:a *P!cQ c m l 2 5 3ers3nal irfefi:.fiers.1s in corncl~ancev:i:h
!~rip:?!s:s!u:es a s tc orlvacy acc :orfi?.anr.a!l:y, ~ n c l u j w st h e pri:.acy Act, Socia:
S?z;lI!y A:! an6 h e t-!ai::? 1 ~ ~ ~ Pcl??'si!ii,
3 1 ~ 02nd A r c ~ u n t j b i l i t yk ~ i ?>IS
.
15

17, a;:i:r.rjy

Ft.,cf;i Sirate;!es

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"+jS urjjer

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:c :ne -ro:,sior ir '..:?qC':p : ; ~ f

$ p a ! / 2 5 2c:?2

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Ca!a.S---t-;
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v , ?rbi-''.
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~jn:psf::s;ej r:c!-,:s to Co3yr:qhl e 7 d @zblis;i aij r e x f l s z.7.z nor
c ~ - , ' ~ d c r ~ irlrzrr.nllr?n
:~ai
anr; da;a res,; :in3 from :he 2 e r f o r n a n t e c I r3e Prime
~ ~ ~
TO
~
ihzie:<:ecl
; i ~
:;at !M32',:
.
,s ab!c :G taz:l~:at?@ubl~calior;
::gh!s ;:a,
a':rihc;;iun :o F u c i ~ cStra!ec:?s I c r iil?rk i! I S al~:nr)ring.MDRC shill! do sc?
Fqr:hermcre, rh:? fo-ecjoin; federa reculat~onaisd .Teans Ikar P:~blc S!:ale~i;.s
i37d >As 4,1yr!c)o shall not St.per-ni:led tc relsasb or ~ ~ S Z I C Sve:bal;;i
IS.
o? ir,
w r : l i r . ~ any
,
dala or a r y ~nlormat;o?pprlaning :3 wzr4 pc?ormed under Inis
-a;ree~en!,cr a r y 9:try,rPsult_c Gr I~r?dinqof it's v:zr/( jin:::irling da;a rsiiec::c?.
,,-,-I~T

ZranlS

!! P u b i ; ~
S:ratsgies agrees : v I : ~!?is le!!er and :he i n ~ o r p o r a i e dlvlORC Gfqerai
T ~ l r : ~~nsd ~ - C o n d i t ~Elder.
c ~ n s (excecl to rne exlen: same is nodif:ed by
C G C ~ P ~ ; ~wltt~ Z E9r0pr1e13ry rlghls ~ ~ C V I S ~O(
O Ihe
?
E:IS Prime Contrzcl as
er.?ressed 250'~~).
>'ease sign a r d r e h n one of the two enclosed copies cf :h~s
Ieiter, alorg t-~ith:?o f\~lDEcConf~cteni~ai!ly
Pledge to the a:tontion cf Wendy E
'it'el!~.Esq., on behalf cf !JIDRC

..++-c<*.<

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F~CYFJO~.'L'LEBGED
A h C AGREED TO.
Public Strategies, 1 . n ~ .

,

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n.,.
-Y.

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Mary Mynck
r r l 3: 7 .
3...- i 355Q62

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Date
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MDRC

G

G

-,

I ne soecific icrms of consulting agreements wit3 hlCRC are zcvered In eaci saCl:gia:
contrac:. In additic?, the fcllowing yefieral terms apply l o all consultantr:.

w.

a-

--

Consultants a r t not enployees cf MDRC but r r e ~ncepe?acn:
7.
tn
contrac!ors to MDRC. MDRC does not retain the richt lo control and direct ccnsuitan!: as tc deiails
and :he means bv which assignmeri:~ are ackomplislled
consultanrs agree not to r e ~ r e s e n t
themselv~sas MDRC's agents cr ~ p ~ k e s p c r s o nerther
s
d!.inng or after the perloc! cf tneir sp;.ointnert. '
.and consultank further agree to k 2 s p . a " ~informa~iofior data concerninc MDRC and its conLf$c)ors-or .a n n o u c e p by ,klI?%.
.'PTCJFIC!S in lhe strictest confidence unless such infcrmat~cnor dala has
Consultan% are subjeu l o - the admin~strative policies and procedures establishec by !;lD%C for
consultants, including but not limited to policies against employment discriminalion and workglacc
harassment The IJDRC ?ol~cyon workplace harassment is attached and inc01p3r3ted ncreto

-

-

2. - l a m .
Consuhants assign to MDRC all rights in and lo the products of their
services under their agreements. induding all copyright, trademark and patent rights In or to any works,
programs, systems. processes. or inventions (whether or net reduced to pradimj or other materials Or
intellectual properttes of any nature-bat consultants may conceive. originate or develop in the course
of or relaring to the performance of their services under such appointment (collectively. the
'properties"). MDRCshall 3e the sole and exclusive ownec of all ngnls in and to the prcpertles at all
~ ' ~ revise, adapt, comblnc?, alter. publish, and d ~ a lin and with the
stages of d e v e l ~ p m e n ! ~may
properties as MDRC deems;appropnate. Consultants shall execute such documents to effcc:uate !he.
intent of this paragraph 3 as may be requested by MDRC
.
.
of (3 . .
.Consultants warrant to MORC rha: ail works
prodvcod u % % % F ; i g ; e n R C
are orig~nalworks and that each work shall not infrinee
upon or vtolate any copyright, proprie!ary right, t r a d e m r k and paten1 r~ghts,r~ghtsto privacy, or
constitute libel or slander against. or violate any common law nght, of any person, f n w o r cot$cratic%i.;_
tonsul?ants shall defend any such claims and shall indemnify MDSC and hold MDRC harnllrss agains:
any such claims, liability, cr loss whatsoever.

3.

r

5. E m . MORE reimburses consultant5 lor actual ewenses Incurred in connection wilh
assignments, includinq lrvlng expenses if travcling at MDRC expense. Extraordinary expenditures such
as cornpufer lime. reference bonks, scecial equtprnent. etc.. must be ~ t l ~ u l a t ein
d the particuiar
contract. Expenses are paid directly -by a consultanr and itemized in reasonable detail. All receipted
hotel hills. transportalion Stubs (even if paid for by MDRC). and rece!pts for ail otner exozzscs of 810
or-more must be submitted to MDRC. One signed copy of an expense r e p x i is subm~ttec!tc MORC for
payment, and o n e copy should be retained by the consu~ta~lt
f u r t a x purpose;.
the
right to den