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Department of

Economic Development

Report to Council
2016

The new University Hospital Rainbow Center for Women & Children will locate
at East 59th and Euclid on Cleveland's Health Line. The shovel-ready site was
assembled and sold by the Department of Economic Development.

Department of Economic Development


CLEVELAND CITYWIDE DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION
All loans over $40,000 go through a rigorous underwriting review by the Cleveland Citywide Development Corporation (CCDC). CCDC consists of members appointed by the Mayor & City Council and
includes bankers, local community members, business representatives and appointed officials. The
loans first are reviewed by the Loan Committee and then go for final review by the Board of Trustees.

BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Frank G. Jackson, Mayor
City of Cleveland

Stefan J. Holmes, Sr. Vice President


First Merit Bank

Anthony Brancatelli, Councilman


Cleveland City Council

Dale R. Lenzer, VP Business Banking


Citizens Financial Group, Inc.

Dr. Melissa Burrows, Director


Cleveland-Office of Equal Opportunity

Gerald Meyer, Community Member

Roger A. Carney, CPA


Community Housing Solutions

Tracey A. Nichols, Director


Cleveland- Dept. of Economic Development
N. Michael Obi, C.E.O.
Spectrum Global

Freddy Collier, Director


Cleveland-City Planning
John P. Colm, Executive Director
Wire-Net
Michael Cosgrove, Acting Director
Cleveland- Dept. of Community Development

Patricia Ramsey, VP Comm. & Econ. Dev.


Fifth Third Bank

David Ebersole, Assistant Director


Cleveland-Dept. of Economic Development

William J. Reidy, Retired Partner


Coopers & Lybrand
Daryl Rush, Director
Cleveland- Dept. of Community Development

Luke D. Elsass, Vice President


First National Bank

Jenny Spencer, Managing Director


Detroit Shoreway CDO

Colleen Gilson, Vice President


Cleveland Neighborhood Progress, Inc.

Natoya Walker Minor, Chief of Public Affairs


City of Cleveland
Henry West, Retired Banker

Juan Hernandez, Director of Business Dev.


Growth Capital

LOAN COMMITTEE
Anthony Brancatelli, Councilman
Cleveland City Council
Peter Constantino, Partner
Cohen & Company

Dale R. Lenzer, VP Business Banking


Citizens Financial Group, Inc.
Leonard E. Olsavsky, Vice President
U.S. Bank

David Ebersole, Assistant Director


Cleveland-Dept. of Economic Development

Shawn Ondrejko, Vice President


Citizens Bank

Randy Horst, Vice President


PNC Bank

Jeffrey T. Verespej, Executive Director


Old Brooklyn Community Development Corp.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 2

Department of Economic Development


SUCCESS STORIES : Health-Tech Corridor
E. 55th Street Railroad Bridge Beautification
Crossing above the intersection of Euclid Avenue
and East 55th Street, a once rusty grey railroad
bridge has been given a bright, colorful makeover,
transforming it into a symbol of the innovative
health-tech and high-tech economy that is emerging in MidTown Cleveland and the Health-Tech
Corridor. Displayed on the bridge, alongside a
graphic of DNA molecules, are the logos of the
stakeholders and partners leading this transformation,: the Health-Tech Corridor, MidTown Cleveland, the City of Cleveland, BioEnterprise and the Cleveland Foundation. The City provided a $218,445 grant to MidTown
Cleveland, Inc., who oversaw the completion of this $225,000 marketing and branding
project.
JumpStart, Inc. Health-Tech Corridor Attraction Fund
The Health-Tech Corridor Attraction Fund is a significant step in strengthening the attractiveness of the HTC by providing flexible financial resources to innovation driven
technology companies and building upon the existing innovative capacity of the HTC.
Stakeholders, including the City of Cleveland, several local developers, and the Cleveland
Foundation, have provided seed funding which was matched by the State of Ohios Third
Frontier program on a dollar for dollar basis. JumpStart, a nationally recognized business
accelerator, will administer the $2 Million fund with capital investments in innovative
technology companies ranging from $100,000 to $500,000. This fund will create a marketable competitive advantage and differentiate the HTC as a place where stakeholders support a unified vision for an ecosystem of innovation, which will both attract new companies and help the growth and retention of existing companies. The City contributed a
$200,000 recoverable UDAG grant. The fund is expected to create over 50 full-time
equivalent jobs over the next 5 years. The unique partnership between public, private
and philanthropic organizations is a first for the city.
Environmental Assessment E. 66th and Euclid Ave. ICLB
The Industrial Commercial Land Bank (ICLB) contracted with environmental professionals to conduct a Phase I and II environmental assessment to identify potential Brownfield
issues at the corner of E. 66th and Euclid Avenue at a cost of $40,035. The 1.72 acre site is
being positioned for redevelopment, continuing a strategic initiative by the Department to
assess and clean-up brownfield sites throughout the HTC. To date, approximately 47 acres
have been assessed with 31 acres cleaned. The
goal is to have shovel-ready land ready for the
next project, as the HTC attracts new investment, companies and jobs.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 3

Department of Economic Development


SUCCESS STORIES: Retention
Dealer Tire Victory
Building
Dealer
Tire
is
a
longstanding Cleveland
business, engaged in facilitating
transactions
between tire makers, auto manufacturers, and
auto dealerships currently located in 5 buildings
in Midtown. They had
outgrown their space and
began looking for vacant land or a building to serve their current and future employment
needs and to become their headquarters. The City team recognized that there were few
stand-alone properties that would work for Dealer Tires needs. Suburban locations
could offer land for a large surface parking lot, versus city sites that require structured
parking at a much higher cost. The Victory Building at 7012 Euclid Avenue was identified as the ideal space for their future growth. In addition to the renovation of 165,000
S.F., the developer, Victory Midtown, LLC will construct a parking garage to support
Dealer Tires employee parking needs. The City is providing an incentive package that
includes TIF, low-interest loans and grants totaling over $6.5 Million, mostly to help
write down the costs of the parking garage construction. This project maintains Dealer
Tires over 400 employees and over $50 Million payroll, while providing a long-term home
for their future growth, expected to create at least 100 jobs over the next five years.
Abeona Therapeutics
Abeona Therapeutics is focused on developing and delivering gene therapy and plasmabased products for severe and life-threatening rare diseases. Abeonas first drug is designed to treat Sanfilippo syndrome, a progressive disorder shortening a childs life expectancy to 10-20 years. Abeona had a recent successful exit and was purchased by a
medical technology company from Texas, who agreed to keep Abeonas name and keep
the company in Cleveland. Along with their offices, Abeona will develop one of the first
private gene manufacturing facilities in the country at 6555 Carnegie Avenue (Midtown
Tech Center III), in the Health Tech
Corridor. To assist with the development of the $6 Million, 4,000 sq. ft.
gene manufacturing facility, the City
is providing an $180,000 VPI Forgivable loan and $250,000 EDA Machinery and Equipment loan. Abeona
is committed to creating 37 full-time
equivalent jobs over a 5 year period.

2016 Report to City Council

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Department of Economic Development


SUCCESS STORIES
Transit VillageTax Sharing Agreement & Boundary Adjustment with Shaker Hts

This year, the City of Cleveland and the City of Shaker


Heights adjusted the municipal boundary line transferring 8 parcels, which constitute approximately 2.3
acres, from Cleveland to Shaker Heights. The City of
Shaker Heights owns the parcels, and they have long
sat vacant. In that area, the municipal corporation
boundary does not follow parcel lines, and, as a result,
these parcels were located partially in Cleveland and
partially in Shaker Heights. Their location in two cities
has been an impediment for development, since each
jurisdiction has authority over permitting and the administration of taxation. Under Ohio Revised Code
709.37, the municipal boundaries for uninhabited parcels may be adjusted through a mutual agreement between the cities. Cleveland and
Shaker Heights City Councils both passed ordinances in December 2015 approving the
adjustment of the boundary line and the transfer of the parcels. To compensate the City of
Cleveland for the boundary adjustment, Cleveland and Shaker Heights entered into a Tax
Sharing Agreement to share in the income and property tax revenue that will be generated from the parcels. In concert with improvements to the Blue Line, Shaker Heights examined opportunities to conduct transit-oriented development surrounding rapid transit stops. These
parcels have been targeted for a townhome redevelopment and designated a Community Reinvestment
Area to incentivize new housing construction and
investment. Entering into this Tax Sharing Agreement and adjusting the municipal boundary has allowed for the creation of a housing development that
will benefit both the City of Cleveland and the City
of Shaker Heights in this historic Moreland neighborhood.
Cleveland Business Park Three/Expeditors International
Cleveland Business Park Three, LLC (Chelm Properties) attracted Expeditors International Washington, a global logistics company headquartered in Seattle, to open an office
at 18209 Cleveland Parkway in the Cleveland Business Park. Under the VPI program,
the City will assist by providing a forgivable loan in the amount of $180,000
for renovation of 12,150 S.F. of office
space and a new state-of-the-art 1,700
S.F. training room at a total cost of
$446,000. Expeditors will bring at least
50 jobs to the City.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 5

Department of Economic Development


SUCCESS STORIES
Bialosky and Partners Architects
Established in 1957, Bialosky and Partners has
grown from one drafting table into a multigenerational, award-winning architectural and
design firm. Their nationally acclaimed portfolio
in residential, commercial, industrial, and recreational projects includes the headquarters for
Parkwood Corporation, American Greetings, and
Progressive Insurance. The business has outgrown their current space. The City assisted Bialoskys retention and relocation to 6555
Carnegie Avenue, part of Midtown Tech Park, with an $80,000 VPI forgivable loan and
$40,000 NDP grant to assist in the $1.2 Million design and build-out of 10,400 S.F. on
the second floor of the building. Bialosky and Partners has committed to retain 34 fulltime jobs and create an additional 8 jobs over the next 5 years.
Metropolitan Coffee & Hash House
Metropolitan Coffee & Hash House purchased the
vacant Broadview Food Mart, at 4744 Broadview
Road in the Old Brooklyn neighborhood and plans
to redevelop the building as a coffee shop and breakfast restaurant. Under the VPI program, the City is
assisting with a forgivable loan in the amount of
$70,000 for plans to remodel the existing building
and upgrade the parking lot with a total cost of
$305,000. Metropolitan Coffee & Hash House will create at least 4 new jobs.
Gypsy Brewery
Gypsy Real Estate Holding LLC has purchased a vacant, 120,000 S.F. building located at
3506 Vega Avenue. The building, built in 1858, housed the former Leisy Brewing Company. The brewery closed in 1958 as a result of consolidation in the brewing industry.
The current owners are bringing beer brewing back in the form of a contract brewing
facility, as part of the first phase of the renovation of the structure. The facility will
brew beer on a contract basis for small breweries from outside the region that are growing but cannot afford to invest in equipment but are looking to enter into the Cleveland
market. The facility occupies 10,000
S.F. of the building. The total project
cost is approximately $1.2 Million.
The city provided a $180,000 forgivable loan through the Vacant Property
Initiative and $200,000 loan from the
EDA Title IX Program for the brewing
equipment. The project will create a
minimum of 31 new jobs.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 6

Department of Economic Development


SUCCESS STORIES: Nine Twelve District
NINETWELVE District Initiative
A public-private partnership came together to rebrand this blighted area that was once the hub of
the downtown area and worked to plan for its renewal. Several properties that were purchased
and renovated in 20122013 have helped attract
new tenants to the area.
Asurint
Asurint, a growing technology-based company
formed in 2004, is the developer and designer of
an integrated system of background screening
products, including technology used in drug testing, that serves public and private corporations. The 12-year old company outgrew their 12,000 S.F. space in the Playhouse
Square District. The City approved a $180,000 Vacant Property Initiative forgivable loan,
a $100,000 UDAG forgivable loan, and a Job Creation Incentive Program grant in the
amount of $155,000 to offset the costs of tenant improvements at 1111 Superior Avenue.
Total project costs are $1.34 Million. The landlord is investing an additional $1.1 Million
in construction and renovation costs to the vacant space. Asurint is projected to grow
from 104 full-time jobs to 224 jobs with an estimated payroll of $12 Million by 2018. They
recently made the Inc. 5000 list of fastest growing companies at #2,581, one of the top
10 rankings for Cleveland companies.
925 Building
The 925 Building spans just over
1.4 Million S.F., including the immense lobby, lower-level retail
corridors and office space. It is
currently 92% vacant. It was completed in 1924 as the headquarters for Union Trust, then a major
U.S. bank. Its architects also designed Terminal Tower. The lobby features enormous marble Corinthian columns, barrel vaulted ceilings, and colorful murals by Jules Guerin.
The
building was bought in June 2015 by Hudson Holdings. They plan to renovate the building to include 580 full-sized apartments plus 93 micro-apartments small living spaces
available to companies and workers participating in a business incubator planned for the
building's sixth floor. The plans also call for a 279-room hotel, almost 200,000 S.F. of offices, a fitness club and retail space. The building's ornate, L-shaped bank lobby often
described as the world's largest will function as an events space and lobby for the apartments and the hotel. The Ohio Development Services Agency awarded a $25 Million
catalytic historic tax credit in a state-wide competition. The project is estimated to create 1,500 construction and 1,800 permanent jobs.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 7

Department of Economic Development


VACANT PROPERTY INITIATIVE
In the past 8 years, 87 vacant properties were returned to productive use and over 4,700
jobs were to be created due to this important initiative. Vacant land and buildings collect
trash & graffiti, are attractive nuisances, act as a blighting influence, erode value and
discourage investment in neighborhoods. Vacant buildings are often tax delinquent and
are more likely to have police and fire calls, using valuable city resources and costing
more than the properties bring in from taxes, burdening other tax payers. To date, over
3.6 Million square feet of vacant space and 105 acres of vacant land have been redeveloped through the program, reversing sprawl and showing investment in our community.

2008
2009
2010
2011

9 Loans
16 Loans
4 Loans
12 Loans

City
Assistance
$10,122,500
$9,970,000
$340,000
$3,795,000

2012

7 Loans

$1,023,275

$20,278,656

218

95

2013
2014
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015
2015

20 Loans
7 Loans
Abeona Therapeutics, Inc.
Asurint
Bialosky and Partners Architects
CBGC
Cleveland Bricks
Cleveland Business Park Three
Empire Paving

$2,780,000
$845,000
$430,000
$180,000
$120,000
$330,000
$180,000
$180,000
$180,000

$131,699,610
$256,368,276
$6,000,000
$1,340,000
$1,200,000
$625,000
$436,000
$446,438
$288,954

465
439
37
60
8
7
25
50
35

136
48
0
104
34
0
0
0
0

2015
2015
2015
2015

Fabco Flats
Grow Lorain
Gypsy Brewery
Left Side Developments

$35,000
$70,000
$180,000
$70,000

$1,012,500
$92,900
$585,000
$4,126,000

7
7
25
7

0
3
0
0

2015
2015
2015
2015

Metropolitan Coffee & Hash House


Ohio Awning
OLM LLC
Slavic Village Development

$70,000
$140,000
$70,000
$40,000

$305,000
$300,000
$4,795,141
$90,000

4
14
7
4

0
0
0
0

2015

The Beauty Shoppe, LLC

$780,000
$31,930,775

$3,000,000
$711,225,747

50
4,744

0
2,160

Year

Borrower

Total Project
Cost
$58,730,673
$112,946,629
$2,565,000
$103,993,970

Jobs to be
Created
2,279
306
18
672

Jobs Retained
75
173
1,224
268

Empire Paving
Empire Paving, a locally owned and operated paving contractor serving the Cleveland
area, approached the City with plans to purchase and redevelop the long vacant site located at 2910 W 3rd Street from the ICLB. Empire intends to create a new asphalt facility, using recycled materials to make asphalt production a greener process. The City is
providing a $180,000 VPI loan for the development.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 8

Department of Economic Development


VACANT PROPERTY INITIATIVE
Cleveland Bricks
Cleveland Bricks, a residential construction and property
management company, relocated its headquarters from Independence to 1925 St. Clair Avenue. The second story will hold offices for Cleveland
Bricks and five other committed tenants including Rebiz, The Wireless Center, Mobile
Center, Blink Marketing & Signs, and Yellowlite. The first story will be rented out to
other businesses. The 6,000 S.F. basement will include a cafeteria, storage space, and
gym. The total project cost for this renovation is $436,000. The City provided a VPI
Loan of $180,000. Cleveland Bricks will bring an additional 25 jobs to the City.
Ohio Awning
After the successful completion of the Fairmont
Creamery project, Sustainable Community Associates embarked on their second development
project in Cleveland. As part of the redevelopment of the historic Ohio Awning Building located at 2658 Scranton Road, the development
team sought the assistance from the Department of Economic Development to help purchase vacant property adjacent to the development project, which will be turned into public
parking for up to 63 vehicles. The combined total project cost for the property located at the corner of Scranton Road and Auburn Avenue is $300,000. The City of Cleveland provided a Vacant Property Initiative Local
Parking Needs Loan in the amount of $140,000. The project will create a minimum of 14
jobs within three years and provide public parking for an area where there is a lack of
parking.
Our Lady of Mercy Church
MCM Company, Inc. is undertaking a redevelopment of the former Our Lady of Mercy
Church located at 2425 West 11th Street into
an office building for several tenants. The
building was vacant for over 7 years and will
be renovated to include an onsite fitness center, game room and a large shared conference
room. The site also includes bike racks, high
efficiency heating and cooling systems, LED
lighting and 50 secure onsite parking spaces.
Total project cost is approximately $4.7 Million. The City of Cleveland provided a Vacant
Property Initiative Loan in the amount of
$70,000 to pay for acquisition costs. The project will create 7 jobs within three years.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 9

Department of Economic Development


SMALL BUSINESS INITIATIVES : Partner Funding
Economic and Community Development Institute (ECDI)
In 2012, ECDI was recruited to Cleveland after a study of credit
availability found that there is an estimated $38 Million of
unmet loan demand annually in Cuyahoga County. The
Economic and Community Development Institute, a U.S. Treasury designated CDFI micro lender, is a non-profit organization providing micro lending and technical assistance.
The City provided $200,000 to ECDI to structure microloans to small businesses in Cleveland that would not be eligible for traditional bank funding. A portion of the funding
($50,000) is specifically geared toward immigrant and refugee businesses. ECDIs lending efforts in 2015 have resulted in the following:
82 loans to small businesses, 22 in the City of Cleveland
$1,731,005 of capital investment, $850,600 to Cleveland-based businesses
50 loans to female-owned businesses, 14 in the City of Cleveland
42 loans to minority-owned businesses, 15 in the City of Cleveland
6 loans for immigrant / refugee businesses, 4 in the City of Cleveland
118 jobs created, 51.5 in the City of Cleveland
138.5 jobs retained, 56 in the City of Cleveland
40 entrepreneurs received technical assistance, 3 in the Food Incubator Program.
Grow Cuyahoga County Fund
The Grow Cuyahoga County Fund is a partnership between the City of Cleveland, Cuyahoga County and the
Grow America Fund, Inc., a subsidiary of the National
Development Council. The partnership works to identify
small business with potential to grow and create jobs. The Fund provides loans from
$100,000 to $3.4 Million at or below market rates with longer loan terms, up to 25 years.
In 2015, the Grow Cuyahoga County Fund approved 4 loans to 4 businesses for a total of
$1,107,000. Two of the businesses were located in the City of Cleveland and included Undercar Express; and AMLCO Group LLC. The loans leveraged $850,000 of additional
funds creating 10 new FTE jobs and retaining 90 FTE in the City of Cleveland. City
funds leverage a minimum of $5 for every $1 in City loan funds for City businesses.
Goldman Sachs 10,000 Small Businesses
Goldman Sachs 10,000 small businesses is an educational program for small businesses. Through
the program, business owners gain skills in negotiation, marketing, management, and they receive
customized growth plans to take their businesses to the next level. The program also
partners with Community Development Financial Institutions to provide access to capital. 10,000 Small Businesses is administered through Cuyahoga Community College and
has completed 10 cohorts since 2013, their first year in Cleveland. In 2015, 10,000 Small
Businesses completed 3 cohorts, graduating a total of 94 businesses, including 40 femaleowned and 14 minority-owned businesses.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 10

Department of Economic Development


SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE : Neighborhood Retail
The City of Cleveland is one of the few cities in the nation to provide loans to restaurants
and retail. The Citys goal is to help make Cleveland a great place to live, work, play and
raise a family. The projects we fund both add to our quality of life and provide entrepreneurs with a funding source to create local jobs. The Neighborhood Retail Assistance Program also coordinates with our Gardening for Greenbacks program, providing local chefs
with access to local food and the Culinary Launch Incubator, helping new businesses find
permanent space.
Loan Recipient

Ward

City
Assistance

Total Project
Cost

Jobs to be
Created

Jobs
Retained

Dynomite Uptown LLC dba Dynomite Burgers &


Sushi

40,000

160,000

10

Cest Macaron LLC

27,000

30,000

Ushabu LLC

40,000

150,000

Luciano Restaurant Inc. dba Sainatos

40,000

60,000

Utopia LLC dba Alley Cat

40,000

600,000

25

Weenie World LLC dba Weenie A Go Go

16,000

18,000

Payne Commons LLC

40,000

100,000

Jessicas Gallery LLC

9,000

10,000

PM Group LLC dba Vita Urbana

15

40,000

88,000

Restore Cold Pressed LLC

25,000

150,000

$ 317,000

1,506,000

68

Total

Payne Commons
Payne Commons is a minorityowned retail building located at
3710 Payne in the Asia Town
Neighborhood. Payne Commons
utilized financial assistance from
the Neighborhood Retail Assistance Program (NRAP) in the
amount of $40,000 to assist with
the $100,000 project. The NRAP
funds will be used to assist with
construction, renovation, soft costs associated with the build out of retail space and upgrades to the parking lots for the small retail building. These improvements helped to
fill one of the last remaining storefronts in the commercial building. Han Chinese Kabob
and Grill opened in the building, creating 5 full-time equivalent jobs.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 11

Department of Economic Development


SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE : Neighborhood Retail
Dynomite Burgers and Sushi
Chef Zachary Bruell teamed up with John and
James Catanese of Catanese Classic Seafood
to establish Dynomite Burgers & Sushi. The
project opened Spring 2015 at 11500 Euclid
Avenue as part of the new Uptown development. The new restaurant features a selection
of burgers in addition to a variety of fresh sushi. The menu concept offers a hip and cool but
inexpensive place to eat and network with fellow co-workers, students, and friends in
one of the regions fastest growing neighborhoods. Total project costs are $300,000. The
City assisted with a loan in the amount of $40,000 to close the gap on financing. The project has created 10 jobs with a total new payroll of $250,000.
Ushabu
Ushabu is a female, minority and immigrant-owned Japanese restaurant
slated to open at 2173 Professor Avenue in early 2016. The restaurant
will serve shabu-shabu, a Japanese
style of dining similar to fondue,
which features hotpots at the table
for patrons to cook their own fresh
meat, seafood and vegetables in a selected style of broth, all accompanied by a variety of
dipping sauces. The restaurant will occupy 800 S.F. of first floor retail space. The City
partially funded the construction/renovation, acquisition of machinery, equipment, furniture & fixtures with a $40,000 loan. Total project costs are approximately $150,000. The
restaurant will create 3 full-time equivalent jobs with an estimated payroll of $90,000.
Sainatos
Sainatos, an Italian restaurant located
at 1852 Columbus Road, serves pizza,
pasta, calzones, salads and other classic
Italian-American dishes. The restaurant
is owned by Luciano and Carmela Sainato. The City of Cleveland provided a
$40,000 loan to finance costs associated
with their expansion. Project expenses
include renovation, acquisition of restaurant equipment, furniture & fixtures and
other eligible costs under the program.
Total project costs are approximately $60,000. As part of the expansion, Sainatos will
create 4 full-time equivalent jobs.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 12

Department of Economic Development


SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE : Neighborhood Retail
Alley Cat Oyster Bar
Alley Cat Oyster Bar is part of the
newly developed East Bank of the
Flats. Again, Chef Zachary Bruell
teamed up with the Catanese
brothers of Catanese Classic Seafood to open his 10th restaurant in
the City of Cleveland. Alley Cat
Oyster Bar is considered to be the
flagship restaurant for the Flats East Bank development, located at 1056 Old River
Road. The new restaurant features a variety of fresh seafood as well as oysters, clam
chowder and many signature seafood entrees. The restaurants location abuts the new
boardwalk and occupies 8,500 S.F. of space in a two-story building with outdoor patios on
both floors that overlook the river and Lake Erie. The City of Cleveland provided a
$40,000 loan to assist with the $600,000 project to acquire restaurant equipment, furniture & fixtures for the new restaurant. Alley Cat is required to create 25 full-time equivalent jobs with an estimated payroll of $300,000.
Weenie A Go Go
Weenie A Go Go is a gourmet hotdog diner
set to open in the Ohio City neighborhood
early 2016. The start-up female-owned
business is operated by Jessica Johnson.
The new location will be in the first-floor
retail space at 1836 West 25th Street, formerly occupied by a vintage retail store.
Her product, gourmet hotdogs, are served
fresh with buns made from Orlando Bakery, sauerkraut from Cleveland Kraut and hot dogs made in Ohio City. Weenie A Go Go
received a loan in the amount of $16,000 from the Neighborhood Retail Assistance Program. The project is expected to result in the creation of at least 4 new full-time equivalent jobs.
Jessicas Gallery
Jessicas Gallery is an art gallery that started as a
home-based business and now has a 600 S.F. retail
shop on the ground floor of the historic Tudor Arms
Hotel building located at 10660 Carnegie Avenue. The
owner, Jessica Maron, uses the space to display and
sell her own art, in addition to work by other local
artists. The new business received a $9,000 City loan.
Total project cost was $10,000. The project resulted in
the creation of 1 new full-time job.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 13

Department of Economic Development


SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE : Neighborhood Retail
Als Deli
Alphonso Mitchum, a minority, second generation
entrepreneur, owns a neighborhood corner store
that was established by his father in 1969 located at
10604 Superior Avenue in the heart of the Glenville
Neighborhood. The store currently sells groceries,
hot coffee, fresh pastries, toiletries, napkins, soap
and other products. Many of the residents walk to
the store or take public transportation to get their
goods and services. The City assisted with a $23,000
S.B.R.L. Fund Recoverable Grant and $12,000 Ward
9 Casino Fund Grant to renovate the exterior of the brick building, add exterior LED
lighting and incorporate new signage. Total project costs are estimated at $39,971. The
project will retain 3 jobs with a total estimated annual payroll of $65,000 and create 1 job
with an estimated payroll of $20,000.
Restore Cold Pressed
Restore Cold Pressed is a new organic coldpressed juice caf, located in the Playhouse
Square district. The new business is owned and
operated by Christie Pritt and Adam Wright,
both Northeast Ohio natives who recently
moved back to Cleveland from New York City.
The caf serves healthy, organic dishes such as
oat bowls and avocado toast. The new space
boasts a welcoming atmosphere to enjoy healthy
vegetable and fruit juices while offering Wi-Fi,
study space for CSU students, and a gathering
place for nearby residents. Restore Cold Pressed received a City loan in the amount of
$25,000, with a total project cost of $150,000. The project resulted in the creation of 6
new full-time equivalent jobs in the City of Cleveland.
Vita Urbana
Vita Urbana is a new gourmet food
market, coffee shop and bistro at 1200
West 76th Street. It is located on the
first floor of the recently renovated
Shoreway apartment building in close
proximity to the Battery Park neighborhood in Detroit Shoreway. The gourmet market will feature a selection of
fresh vegetables and fruits. Vita Urbana received a loan in the amount of $40,000. The project will create at least 9 new jobs.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 14

Department of Economic Development


SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE : Neighborhood Retail
Tonda Lanton Gant
Tonda Lanton Gant, a minority female entrepreneur, owns a 1920s retail building located at 1204-1212 E.
105th Street in the Glenville Neighborhood. She has utilized a $23,000
S.B.R.L. Fund Recoverable Grant
and $12,000 Ward 9 Casino Fund
Grant to renovate the exterior of the
building. The single story structure
contains 5 commercial storefronts
which are all currently leased to locally-owned small businesses that provide services and
goods to the neighborhood. The businesses include a small grocer, barber shop, beauty
salon, community resource center run by Bethany Church and a caf. The exterior renovation included brick repair, new lighting and awnings.

SMALL BUSINESS ASSISTANCE : Entrepreneur Support


StartMart
StartMart opened its doors in September
2015 in the 35,000 S.F. second floor of Terminal Tower in Downtown Cleveland as an
entrepreneurial hub for the Citys startup
community. StartMart is the second largest co-working space in the country, currently housing 18 startups with a membership of approximately 60 people. The City
of Cleveland provided a $40,000 grant under the Neighborhood Development Program to assist with the acquisition of office
equipment, furniture & fixtures to be used
towards the furnishing of the space. Total
project costs are $70,000. By providing entrepreneurs and startups low cost co-working space and flexible arrangements for office
space, StartMart has centralized the workspace of entrepreneurs. StartMart not only provides networking opportunities to the entrepreneurs but also the space to grow and expand as needed. Other critical resources under the startup accelerator include: professional services, telepresence technology, startup events, networking and capital. Created
by the Cleveland-based startup accelerator and venture fund, Flashstarts, the density
and diversity the StartMart model provides to Clevelands startup and co-working community has the capacity to transform our Citys growing entrepreneurship ecosystem and
catalyze job creation, investment and further development in our community.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 15

Department of Economic Development


2015 JOB CREATION INCENTIVE PROGRAM
The Job Creation Incentive Program (JCIP) is utilized to attract or retain businesses.
The program provides a valuable tool to compete with similar products in suburban communities. Total expected value of the incentive is shown below, however the amount paid
is based on actual new payroll, verified annually.
Client Name

Jobs Created

Jobs Retained

City Assistance

Everykey, Inc.
StreamLink Software, Inc.
NPA Coatings, Inc.
GCA Services Group, Inc.

17
135
25
30

0
38
139
67

$14,405
$131,250
$12,650
$32,000

Pirhl LLC

31

$40,000

Asurint
Fox Sports Ohio

120
32

104
0

$155,000
$77,425

Gabriel Partners

50

75

$37,500

Total

440

423

$500,230

PIRHL
PIRHL is a developer, general contractor, and owner of affordable high quality senior, single and multi
-family housing that has been recognized nationally
as one of the Top Affordable Housing Developers
and as the 13th fastest growing privately-held company in Northeast Ohio by Crains Cleveland Business. Pirhl outgrew their headquarters in Warrensville Heights and identified 9,000 sq. ft. of vacant
space at 800 W. St. Clair Avenue to accommodate
the expansion of their operations. The City provided
a JCIP grant in the amount of $40,000 to reduce costs associated with their relocation.
The company relocated 25 full-time employees with a payroll of $2.1 Million to the City
and will create an additional 6 jobs over the next three years. The costs to renovate their
new office space were approximately $275,000.
Everykey, Inc.
Everykey, founded in 2013, designed a wearable that functions as a Master Key to your
phone, computer, online accounts, and more. When your personal Everykey is close to one
of your devices, it connects by Bluetooth and unlocks the device then re-locks it when it is
out of range, eliminating the need to input complicated
passwords or keys. Everykey will move their current staff
of 3 from Lakewood to 1988 Ford Drive. The company expects to add 14 employees and grow to a $1.2 Million payroll by 2019. The City of Cleveland will provide a grant of
up to $19,405 under the JCIP program.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 16

Department of Economic Development


2015 LOANS /GRANTS UNDER $250,000
Under Ordinance 90-10 the Department of Economic Development may enter into loan or
grant agreements for financial assistance for projects up to $250,000 with the approval of
the Cleveland Citywide Development Corporation (CCDC), the Mayor and the
Councilperson in whose ward the project is located. The loans are thoroughly vetted by
both the Loan Committee and the Board of Trustees of the CCDC, and the grants are
reviewed for impact to the community by the CCDC Board of Trustees. Annually, the
Department must report these loans and grants to City Council. Below is the activity for
2015.
Borrower

Program

City
Funding

Total
Project
Cost

Jobs
Created

Jobs
Retained

1318 W 58th LLC

NDP

$6,410

$26,410

20

Alphonso Mitchum dba Al's Deli


Ariel International Center, LLC
Barrio Commissary
Bialosky and Partners, Architects, LLC
Bialosky and Partners, Architects, LLC

SBRL

VPI

$23,000
$16,000
$15,040
$40,000
$80,000

$39,971
$16,200
$15,040
$55,000
$1,200,000

1
12
25
0
8

3
6
0
0
34

CBGC, LLC
Certified Aircraft Maintenance LLC

VPI
EDA

$200,000
$179,756

$625,000
$540,000

7
6

0
35

UDAG

$180,000

$436,000

25

Cleveland Business Park Three, LLC

VPI

$180,000

$446,438

50

Cleveland StartMart, LLC


Columbus Road Foundry, LLC
Community Cooperative Development
Crooked River Partners6512 Carnegie
Empire Paving

NDP

$40,000
$40,000
$40,000
$40,000
$180,000

$70,000
$40,000
$60,000
$40,000
$288,953

5
1
15
0
10

0
0
0
0
0

Fabco Flats LLC


Green City Growers Cooperative
Grow Lorain LLC
IRG - Warner Swasey

VPI

NDP

$35,000
$120,000
$70,000
$20,000

$1,012,500
$525,000
$92,900
$25,000

7
5
7
1

10
32
3
0

OCI: Koulos Marketplace4700 Bridge

NDP

$10,000

$10,000

Metropolitan Coffee & Hash House, LLC

VPI

$70,000

$305,345

Ohio Awning Grant Lender Inc

NDP

$40,000

$40,000

OLM LLC
Slavic Village Development

VPI
VPI

$70,000
$40,000

$4,795,141
$90,000

7
4

0
0

Slavic Village-6305 Fleet Ave.

NDP

$2,500

$2,500

Tonda Gant Lanton

SBRL

$23,000

$26,875

15

$1,760,706

$10,824,273

222

138

Cleveland Bricks, LLC

NDP
NDP
NDP

NDP
NDP
NDP
VPI

UDAG
VPI

2016 Report to City Council

Page 17

Department of Economic Development


2015 GARDENING FOR GREENBACKS
Policy, Programs and Incentives to Improve Community, Economy and Environment with Urban Agriculture and a Local, Sustainable Food System.
Recipient

Location

City Assistance

Maggies Farm

3164 W. 61st St.

$5,000

Eat to Live Farms

E. 82nd St. and Higbee Ave.

$5,000

North Coast Farms

14119 Miles Ave.

$5,000

Mobite Products

2949 East 82nd St.

$5,000

TOTAL

$20,000

In the summer of 2012, the City revised the Gardening for Greenbacks Program by
increasing grant amounts up to $5,000 per eligible business. The increase in grant
funding is due to a financial grant contribution of $135,000 to the program by CoBank,
AgriBank, and Farm Credit Mid-America. These entities decided to contribute to the
program due to its focus on Economic Development and their belief that Cleveland is a
leader in the area of urban gardening. Each year,
City staff collects data on both revenue and pounds
raised from each urban farm.
Maggies Farm
Maggies Farm is a female-owned urban farm that expanded its operations at 3164 W. 61st Street in the
Clark-Fulton neighborhood. Through the use of a
$5,000 Gardening for Greenbacks grant, Maggies
Farm installed two high tunnels and also set up a
new rain capture system, which helps create a more
sustainable watering system at the farm. Some of the
funds were also used to build fencing around the
farm. The business owner sells produce to specialty
shops, restaurants, and farmers markets. The Gardening for Greenbacks grant was integral to help the
garden increase yields and assisted with the mission
to building a healthy sustainable food system in
Cleveland. The total project cost was $5,500.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 18

Department of Economic Development


2015 GARDENING FOR GREENBACKS
Eat to Live Farms
Eat to Live Farms is a minority-owned urban farm which operates on the Kinsman
Farm at the corner of East 82nd St. and
Higbee Avenue. The urban farm sells organic produce to various local restaurants and
markets across the city. Eat to Live Farms
established the urban farm with the financial assistance of the Citys Gardening for
Greenbacks Program. The small farm received a $5,000 grant from the Gardening
for Greenbacks program to assist with eligible costs of equipment, tools, irrigation system, fencing and other project costs to further establish the urban farm and to sell produce on-site at the Kinsman Farm. The total project cost was $6,000.
North Coast Urban Farms
North Coast Urban Farms is a minorityowned sole proprietorship that cultivates
an urban garden to grow produce that is
sold at local restaurants and farmers markets. The urban garden is located at 14119
Miles Avenue in Ward 1. The business received a $5,000 grant from the Gardening
for Greenbacks program. The grant funds
were used towards the cost of construction
and installation of a fence around the urban garden. The project cost was $7,200,
with the remaining $2,200 coming from
the owners equity.
Mobite Products
Mobite Products is a female and minority owned small business
operating an urban garden to grow produce sold at local restaurants and farmers markets. The urban garden is located at the
Kinsman Farm at 2949 East 82nd Street. Mobite Products received a Gardening for Greenbacks grant in the amount of
$5,000, out of a total project cost of $5,500. The grant funds
were used to purchase tools such as rake, tiller, back hoes, pitch
forks, materials to build an irrigation system, a generator, and
vents for the hoop house.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 19

Department of Economic Development


2015 SBA MUNICIPAL SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM
The City and County partnered with the Small Business Administration (SBA) to provide
recoverable grants to businesses that may face difficulties meeting the SBAs 25% equity
requirement. The City and County provide up to $50,000 (7.5% of total project cost each,
for a total of 15%), reducing the business equity need to as little as 10%. The City administers both the City and County portion of the SBA Municipal Business Program
(Muni Program), making it easier for businesses by having only one application.
Borrower
Advanced Server Management Group
Anthony Flooring
Banter Beer and Wine
E & E Premier Properties
Geiger's Downtown
Lava Room Recording
Major Works, LLC
Parkers Downtown
Poison Berry Bakery
Recess Creative
Relevation Physical Therapy and Wellness
SFS-SAS Holdings LLC
Six Shooter Coffee
Strawbridge Memorial Chapel
WOW Media, LLC

City Assistance

Total Project Cost

$50,000
$7,500
$22,500
$50,000
$41,250
$13,200
$60,000
$50,000
$7,500
$30,000
$9,000
$50,000
$13,248
$26,250
$50,000
$480,448

$944,400
$62,500
$150,000
$335,000
$435,000
$88,000
$432,000
$500,000
$50,000
$200,000
$60,000
$650,000
$88,327
$175,000
$460,000
$4,630,227

Jobs to be
Created
2
1
1
2
2
1
2
20
1
1
3
2
1
1
2
42

Jobs
Retained
15
0
0
4
0
1
0
0
0
15
0
10
0
2
0
47

Banter Beer and Wine


Bottles on 25th LLC dba Banter Beer and Wine (Banter) is a
restaurant with a small retail store that features one of the regions greatest selections of craft beers and wines. The newly established small business is modeled after New York style bodegas
that specialize in house-made gourmet sausages and Quebec-style
poutine (a Canadian french-fry dish served with gourmet sauces).
The business is located at 7320 Detroit Avenue in the DetroitShoreway Neighborhood. Banter is leasing 1,700 S.F. of space in
a building which had been vacant at least 10 years. Banter will
be required to create 1 full-time equivalent job. The company received City assistance under the Muni Program for construction &
renovation, acquisition of machinery & equipment, furniture &
fixtures, soft costs and working capital. Banter utilized an SBA
loan through the Economic and Community Development Institute (ECDI) in the
amount of $75,000 to partially fund total project costs of $150,000. The small business
received a $22,500 recoverable grant from the City providing 15% of the total 25% equity
for the project.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 20

Department of Economic Development


2015 SBA MUNICIPAL SMALL BUSINESS PROGRAM
Advanced Server Management Group
Advanced Server Management Group, Inc. (ASMGi) is a global technology consulting and services firm founded in 2002.
ASMGi provides connectivity, network infrastructure and data
management solutions to their clients, which together serve to
improve the security and reliability of their IT services. The
City provided a recoverable grant through the Muni Program
in the amount of $50,000 as part of a $944,400 project for ASMGi to grow and expand its program development, operational resources, sales and
marketing reach. ASMGi will retain 15 jobs and create 2 additional jobs at their location in downtown, with a new estimated payroll of $100,000 over the next 3 years.
Anthony Flooring
Anthony Flooring, located at 5318 St. Clair Avenue, specializes in VCT, Ceramic, Laminate, and Hardwood floor installations in both residential and commercial settings.
Theyve been in business for more than 14 years and are a certified MBE through the
city and are State of Ohio EDGE-Certified. They perform work in Northeast and Central Ohio, with offices in Cleveland and Westerville. Anthony Flooring had an immediate need for labor and materials and received an SBA loan in the amount of $62,500.
The City provided Anthony Flooring with a recoverable grant in the amount of $7,500 to
help offset the equity requirement for SBA loans. As a result of our assistance, Anthony
Flooring will create 1 job.
E & E Premier Properties
E & E Premier Properties, LLC has been a mold and dye manufacturing company since
1999, manufacturing and selling special dies, tools, die sets, jigs and fixtures, and industrial molds. The company was leasing space at 4605 Manufacturing Avenue, and
developed an interest in acquiring the building, to allow for a more efficient manufacturing process. The total project costs for the project were estimated to be $335,000. The
City assisted by providing $50,000 from the Muni program. The company will create 2 jobs and retain 4 jobs.
Geigers Downtown
Geigers is a long-standing, family-owned business that
has existed since 1932 selling casual apparel, footwear
and accessories. In 2015, Geigers opened a third location in downtown Cleveland in the historic Ivory Building at 1020 Euclid Avenue. The boutique retailer absorbed 4,200 S.F. of first floor retail space that had been vacant for 10 years. The project has helped bring retail shopping back for the residents, businesses and tourists.
The City provided a recoverable grant in the amount of $41,250 through the Muni Program as part of a $435,000 project. Funds were used for construction, renovation and
acquisition of equipment, furniture & fixtures. Geigers will create a minimum of 2 fulltime jobs with an approximate new annual payroll of $60,000 over the next three years.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 21

Department of Economic Development


WEBSITE, SOCIAL MEDIA & BRANDING PROJECT
The new website has seen a steady increase in visits, with most visitors viewing multiple
pages. The website has also proven valuable to staff, who use the InSite tool to list industrial and commercial properties available in the City, and for site selectors and businesses. Staff can quickly search sites for parameters such as number of acres, square
feet or ceiling height to respond to a location inquiry. The website has been kept fresh by
the team and has been able to sustain interest from around the globe thanks to our
teams social media efforts. Visit us on Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn. Our social media has helped us reach those involved in Clevelands Entrepreneur scene and to promote
the City and our brand. An example is our Buy Local program that Economic Development staff ran through social media from Thanksgiving through New Years Eve. We encouraged residents to spend their dollars on local goods, explaining how that helps our
local economy. We had our biggest social media surge of followers with this campaign
and linked to other local organizations with similar efforts.
Branding & Advertising
Last year we took our new tagline, Built by Industry, Inspired by Innovation, and
developed advertising to help people understand the positives about doing business in
the City of Cleveland. We also had ads printed on large display boards to be used when
we have convention or conference booths and other presentations. We participated in a
booth at the International Economic Development Council (IEDC) annual conference in
Alaska and had great foot traffic from attendees.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 22

Department of Economic Development


BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT:
Site Assessment Program
Brownfield Assessments remain a priority for the Department of Economic Development.
With available EPA and State funding reduced, the Department took on a greater role in
funding assessments throughout the city. In addition, our expertise was sought to evaluate several greenspace issues.
Program

Ward

City
Assistance

Acres

Jobs To Be
Created

Jobs
Retained

Tremont Field

Assess-LB

$86,246

41.53

N/A

N/A

E. 66th/Euclid Ave.Phase I/II

Assess-LB

$40,035

1.72

N/A

N/A

4242 Lorain Ave.

Assess-LB

$5,800

1.47

N/A

N/A

15210 St. Clair Avenue

Assess-LB

10

$5,800

0.76

N/A

N/A

E. 55th Tire ShopGreenspace

Assess-Coalition

12

$7,700

0.30

N/A

N/A

IRG1318 W. 58th Street

Assess-Coalition

15

$10,500

0.68

38

LaSalle Theatre

Assess-Coalition

$30,450

0.43

27

Former Fashion Wallcoverings

Assess-Coalition

11

$9,362

3.22

10

Schaefer Printing

Assess-Coalition

$5,750

1.0

N/A

N/A

Zak Funeral Homes

Assess-Coalition

$5,453

0.37

Bell Tire Site

Assess-Coalition

$7,375

0.8

N/A

N/A

Even Cut Abrasives

Assess-Coalition

10

$34,255

6.0

40

5506 Dolloff Ave. Greenspace


Project

Assess-Coalition

12

$34,255

0.30

N/A

N/A

NDP

$15,040

0.52

25

NDP

$40,000

1.17

N/A

N/A

NDP

$10,000

0.37

Slavic Village-6305 Fleet Ave.

NDP

12

$2,500

0.10

N/A

N/A

IRG1318 W. 58th St.

NDP

15

$6,410

0.65

N/A

N/A

USEPA TBA

$140,000

4.9

TBD

TBD

USEPA TBA

$80,000

7.5

TBD

TBD

JobsOhio

$200,000

72.5

TBD

TBD

$776,931

146.29

103

41

Project

Barrio Commissary
Crooked River Partners6512
Carnegie
Ohio City- Kolous Marketplace
4700 Bridge

Opportunity Corridor E. 75th Site


Phase II (In-Kind)
Burke Lakefront AirportPhase II
(In-Kind)
Scranton Peninsula
Total

21 Sites

2016 Report to City Council

Page 23

Department of Economic Development


BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT:
Industrial/Commercial Land Bank Program
CURRENT PORTFOLIO
Property

Location

Acres

End Use Requirements

Status

11905 Superior

6.46

Site of Sav-A-Lot & Forman Mills


Future Site of Advance Auto

SOLD August 2011


OUTLOT SoldOctober 2012
ADDITIONAL DEVELOPMENT - 2014

Green City Growers 5800 Diamond

9.85

Food ProductionGreenhouse

SOLD December 2011

E. 69th-70th/Chester- Chester from E.


Euclid
69th to E. 70th

2.42

Incorporate green design guidelines and meet job requirements

Phase II Assessment Complete.


Working with a potential Development
Partner

E. 61st & Chester


Block

Chester Ave. at
E. 61st and
63rd St.

2.53

Incorporate green design guidelines and meet job requirements

Hemingway Development to begin


construction in 2016.

E. 66th & Euclid


Block

Euclid Ave. at
E. 65th and
66th St.

1.72

Incorporate green design guidelines and meet job requirements

Phase II Assessment Underway.


Examining Development Strategy,

E. 57-59th/Chester- Chester Ave.


Euclid
from E. 57th to
E. 61st

7.37

Incorporate green design guide- University Hospitals & Hemingway Delines and meet job requirements
velopment to begin construction in
2016.

Midland Steel

10615 Madison
Ave.

22.0

Incorporate green design guidelines and meet job requirements.

OEPA Covenant Not-to-Sue Issued


July 2012 Currently On Market

Trinity Building

9203 Detroit
Ave.

5.6

Proposed City of Cleveland


Kennel Site

Site design underway. MOCAP


anticipates construction to begin in
2016.

Ward Bakery

4501 Chester
Ave

2.5

Third District Police Station site

Third District Police Station opened


Summer 2015.

Warner Swasey

5701 Carnegie
Ave

Incorporate design guidelines


and meet job requirements

Developer conducting feasibility study

Coke Plant-CVIC

Independence
Ave.

54

Incorporate design guidelines


and meet job requirements

15 Acres sold and to be developed in


early 2016. Multiple developers interested in remainder of site.

Asphalt Plant

West 3rd Ave.

2.7

Incorporate design guidelines


and meet job requirements

Empire Paving to begin site work and


construction in 2016.

Crescent Avenue

3418 Crescent
Ave.

10.77

Support Maritime Industry


Development

NFA for eastern site to be filed in


January 2016. GLRI Project in
partnership with Port underway.

Former Tops
Superior and
Lakeview

2016 Report to City Council

Page 24

Department of Economic Development


BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT:
Industrial Commercial Land Bank Properties
In 2005, the City of Cleveland created the Industrial/Commercial Land Bank (ICLB) as a
tool to hold and remediate brownfield sites for redevelopment. ICLB Projects are more
time-consuming and can be more expensive than traditional development projects.
However, the City must have shovel-ready available land to facilitate development. In
2015, the Department negotiated the transfer of several of these properties and expects
construction to begin on several ICLB sites in 2016. With the closing of these transactions, the Department is in the process of identifying new redevelopment targets.
University Hospitals Rainbow Center
for Women & Children
University Hospitals is locating their UH
Rainbow Center for Women and Children to
the ICLB site at the corner of E. 59th and Euclid Avenue. The new facility will be approximately 40,000 S.F. and UH will invest approximately $15 Million. The clinic will serve
the communitys most vulnerable women and
children, and will offer services including childrens wellness and parenting programs.
The site strategically offers greater accessibility for patients due to the surrounding public transportation access along the RTA Health Line.
Hemingway DevelopmentLink 59
Concurrent with the UH development, Hemingway Development, a subsidiary of Geis
Companies, will break ground on this multibuilding, 8 acre 140,000 S.F.. urban medical
campus that will encompass office buildings,
labs, research facilities and a small food market in Spring 2016. The campus will complement and leverage the University Hospitals
investment, as the combined investment is
approximately $50 Million. In total, the campus will bring approximately 260 full-time
equivalent jobs with a payroll in excess of $15 Million.
Third District Police Station
In July 2015, the City opened the new Third District
on Chester Avenue. This collaborative effort between
Economic Development, MOCAP, and Public Safety
led to the redevelopment of a brownfield site into a
state-of-the-art district station and communications
facility. As a result, a blighted vacant property was
turned into a highly visible community asset.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 25

Department of Economic Development


GRANT FUNDING RECEIVED
The Department supported several companies in securing financial assistance from
JobsOhio. While brownfield assessment grant funding availability has been reduced, the
Department worked with USEPA to secure two in-kind Phase II Site Assessments
through the Targeted Brownfield Assessment program. Finally, the Northcoast Brownfield Coalition was successful in receiving an assessment grant from USEPA.

Grant and Pass Through Loan Funding Received

$60,000,000

12

$50,000,000
$40,000,000
$30,000,000
$20,000,000
2
$10,000,000

2
1

2004

2005

2006

$0
2003

7
7

12

2
2007

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

Number of Grants/Pass Thru Loans by Year

Grant Name

Funding Source

Ward

Year
Awarded

Amount

Drury Hotel

Jobs OhioRevitalization Grant

2014

$500,000

Drury Hotel

JobsOhioRevitalization Loan

2014

$1,000,000

Enviroserve

JobsOhio Revitalization Grant

2015

$450,000

Ohio Awning

JobsOhioRevitalization Grant

2015

$300,000

Scranton Peninsula

JobsOhioRevitalization Phase II Grant

2015

$200,000

Citywide

2015

$500,000

2015

$140,000

2015

$80,000

Northcoast Brownfield Coalition


U.S. EPA
Assessment Grant
Targeted Brownfield Assessment U.S. EPA
E. 75th Site Phase II (In-Kind)
Targeted Brownfield AssessmentBurke
U.S. EPA
Lakefront Airport Phase II (In-Kind)
TOTAL

2016 Report to City Council

$3,170,000

Page 26

Department of Economic Development


2016 BUDGET
FUNDING SOURCE

BUDGET

UDAG REPAYMENTS

$5,998,588.85

EDA TITLE IX (WORKING CAPITAL)

$963,065.44

JOB CREATION INCENTIVE PROGRAM

$1,022,417.44

NDIF

$2,278,967.27

NDP

$1,132,674.31

EMPOWERMENT ZONE 108

$6,419,557.89

EMPOWERMENT ZONE EDI

$847,104.41

HUD 108 & BEDI Grant

$6,625,000.00

N.R.A.P., Food Cart & Gardening for Greenbacks

$607,549.00

Municipal Small Business Initiative (with SBA)

$440,052.00

Small Business Revolving Loan Funds (CD Funds)

$65,049.92

TOTALS

$26,400,026.53

Department of Economic Development wins Local and National Recognition


City of Cleveland Rebranding and Website Design Initiative: The International
Economic Development Council (IEDC) awarded the City of Cleveland Department of
Economic Development with a bronze award for its website design and rebranding efforts. This award recognizes exceptional and inventive use of the internet and new media for economic development. The focus of the
website and our branding effort is to help
businesses and site selectors Rethink Cleveland. The website, rethinkCleveland.org, provides up-to-date information including available properties, incentives, key industries data
as well as news updates and is available in 80
languages.
International Economic Development Council Elects Director Nichols as New
Board Member: The Board of Directors of the IEDC elected Tracey Nichols, Director of
Economic Development to its Board of Directors for a two-year term. This year, Director
Nichols has also received multiple honors, including the Crains Cleveland Business
Women of Note Award; Novogradac Journal of Tax Credits Public Executive of the
Year Award; the Northcoast Minority Media & Diversity Chamber MBE/Urban Professional Award for Government; and the Council of Development Finance Agencies
(CDFA) Excellence Award for Leadership. While these awards have gone to Nichols, she has said, These awards are really a reflection of the incredibly talented team we
have assembled at the Department of Economic Development who have worked hard to
move the City of Cleveland forward and gain national attention.

2016 Report to City Council

Page 27

Tracey Nichols, Director


216-6643611 tnichols2@city.cleveland.oh.us
David Ebersole, Assistant Director
216-6642204 debersole@city.cleveland.oh.us
Marilu Acevedo, Administrative Assistant to the Director
216-6643677 macevedo@city.cleveland.oh.us
Stephanie Phillibert, Economic Development Specialist
216-6643627 sphillibert@city.cleveland.oh.us

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT & TECHNOLOGY


Robin Brown, Project Manager
216-6643612 robin.brown@city.cleveland.oh.us
Michael Elliott, Project Coordinator
216-664-4470 melliott@city.cleveland.oh.us
Shashonna Duckworth, Development Finance Analyst I
216-664-3610 sduckworth@city.cleveland.oh.us
SMALL BUSINESS
Kevin Schmotzer, Executive for Small Business Growth
216-6643720 kschmotzer@city.cleveland.oh.us
Anthony Stella, Project Coordinator
216-664-4363 astella@city.cleveland.oh.us
Ethan Lawson, Intern
216-6643684 elawson@city.cleveland.oh.us
Esther Kim, Fellow
216-664-3682 ekim@city.cleveland.oh.us
SPECIAL PROJECTS/BROWNFIELD REDEVELOPMENT
Richard Barga, Special Projects Manager
216-6644274 rbarga@city.cleveland.oh.us
Zach Fela, Development Finance Analyst I
216-664-3605 zfela@city.cleveland.oh.us
Briana Butler, Economic Development Specialist
216-664-2202 bbutler2@city.cleveland.oh.us
FISCAL/ADMINISTRATION
Dan Rehor, Fiscal Manager
216-6643610 drehor@city.cleveland.oh.us
Byron Demery, Controller
216-6642203
Greg Perryman, Assistant Controller
216-6643672
Kim Frezza, Auditor
216-664-3622

2016 Report to City Council

Cleveland Economic Development Team

Department of Economic Development

Page 28