You are on page 1of 11

PRELIMINARY CHEMISTRY PROGRAM

MODULE:
WEEK

1. THE CHEMICAL EARTH

SYLLABUS OUTCOMES

TEACHING STRATEGIES &


ACTIVITIES

Jacaranda
Chemistry 1
Page Reference

Classification of Matter
1. Identify the difference between elements,
compounds and mixtures in terms of
particle theory.
2. Present information by using symbols
and formulae
3. Present information using a variety of
pictorial representations
4. Analyse information using models to
explain phenomena and/or make predictions

Classification of Matter
1. Use models to distinguish between pure and
impure substances and elements, compounds and
mixtures.
2. Recall symbols of elements and the formulae of
common compounds from Stage 4.
3. Use particle diagrams to distinguish between
elements , compounds and mixtures
4. Use molecular models to predict whether a
substance is pure or impure.
Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set
1.1

Chapter 1
1. 3-5
2. 3-4
3. 5
4. 4-5

Mixtures and the spheres of the Earth


5. Identify that the biosphere, lithosphere,
hydrosphere and atmosphere contain
examples of mixtures of elements and
compounds.

Mixtures and the spheres of the Earth


5. Use diagrams to identify the locations of the
various spheres of the earth. Use tabulated data to
analyse the composition of each of these spheres.

5. 6-10

1. Mixtures in the Earth

Revision 1.1
Page 6

Sign

6. Present information by using a variety of


pictorial representations to show
relationships and presenting information
clearly and succinctly.
7. Present information by selecting and
drawing appropriate graphs to convey
information and relationships clearly and
accurately.

6. Compare photographs and labelled drawings of


the spheres of the Earth

6. 7

7. Use tables of composition data in the text to


draw pie or column graphs.

7. 8-10

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set


1.2

Revision 1.2
Page 11

Physical Separation Techniques


8. Identify and describe procedures that can
be used to separate naturally occurring
mixtures.
9. Assess separation techniques for their
suitability in separating examples of earth
materials, identifying the differences in
properties which enable these separations.
10. Identify data sources, plan, choose
equipment and perform a first-hand
investigation to separate the components of
a naturally occurring or appropriate mixture
such as sand, salt and water.

Physical Separation Techniques


8. Identify physical separation techniques that can
be used to separate natural mixtures
9. For each technique examine the properties that
allow the separation.
(a) Separating solids - sieves; sedimentation; froth
flotation ; magnetic separation
(b) Separating solids and liquids - filtration;
centrifugation
(c) Separating dissolved solids and liquids Evaporation; crystallisation
(d) Separating liquids - separating funnel;
distillation
(e) Separating gases - cryogenic separation

Chapter 1
8. 12-18

10. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 1.1 - Separation of


a simple mixture.

10. 32

9. (a) 12-13
(b) 13-14
(c) 15
(d) 16-17
(e) 17-18

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 1.3


1.3
Page 20

Gravimetric Analysis
11. Describe situations in which gravimetric
analysis supplies useful data for chemists
and other scientists.
12. Gather first-hand information by
carrying out a gravimetric analysis of a
mixture to estimate its percentage
composition

Gravimetric Analysis
11. Use sample problems to discuss the use of
gravimetric analysis in a variety of examples.
12. PRACTICAL ACTIVITIES 1.2 AND 1.3
-Gravimetric Analysis of a mixture 1 and 2
DATA ANALYSIS 1.4 - Separation and
Analysis of a mixture

11. 21-23
12. 33-36
CD. Animated
Object 1Gravimetric
analysis

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 1.4


1.4
Page 24

Industrial Separation of Mixtures


13. Identify data sources, gather, process
and analyse information from secondary
sources to identify the industrial separation
processes used on a mixture obtained from
the biosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere or
atmosphere and use the evidence available
to: (a)identify the properties of the mixture
used in its separation (b)identify the
products of separation and their uses
(c) discuss issues associated with wastes
from the processes used

Industrial Separation of Mixtures


13. Select one industrial separation process (from
one selected sphere of the Earth) and process and
analyse the information to identify the properties of
the mixture that allow it to be separated and discuss
issues related to waste management.
DATA ANALYSIS 1.5 - Extraction of
aluminium from the lithosphere

13. 25- 29

Data Analysis
37-38

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 1.5


Page 29-31
1.5

Chapter 2

2. Elements
Classifying elements

Classifying elements

14. Classify elements as metals, non-metals


and semi-metals according to their physical
properties.
15. Plan and perform an investigation to
examine some physical properties,
including malleability, hardness and
electrical conductivity, and to present
information about the classification of
elements as metals, non-metals or semimetals.
16. Process information from secondary
sources and use a Periodic Table to present
information about the classification of
elements as:(a)metals, non-metals and semimetals.(b)solids, liquids and gases at 25C
and normal atmospheric pressure.

14. Observe and classify a range of supplied


elements into groups based on their appearance.
Classify elements as metals, non-metals and semimetals based on a range of physical properties.
Solve a range of problems related to the
classification of elements.

The properties and uses of elements


17. Explain the relationship between the
reactivity of an element and the likelihood
of its existing as an uncombined element.
18. Account for the uses of metals and nonmetals in terms of their physical properties.
19. Plan and perform an investigation to
examine some uses of a range of common
elements.

The properties and uses of elements


17. Examine examples of reactive and unreactive
elements. Relate their activity to the stability of
their compounds.
18. Relate the uses of elements to their physical
properties. Tabulate examples.
19. DATA ANALYSIS 2.3 - Properties and uses
of elements

14. 40-44
15. 49
16. 50

15. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 2.1- Investigating


the physical properties of elements
16. DATA ANALYSIS 2.2 - Classifying elements
Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 2.1
Page 45
2.1

17. 43
46
18. 47
19. 51

20. Analyse information from secondary


sources to distinguish the physical
properties of metals and non-metals.

20. Use second hand data to compare the


properties of metals and non-metals

20 43-44
46-47

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 2.2


2.2
Page 48

The structure of the atom


21. Recall the particle nature of matter. Recall that
The structure of the atom
21. Identify that matter is made of particles the particles of matter are in motion.
22. Use diagrams to describe the sub-structure of
that are continuously moving and
the atom.
interacting
22. Describe qualitatively the energy levels 23. Identify elements using their atomic numbers.
Describe atoms using their atomic numbers and
of electrons in atoms.
23. Describe atoms in terms of mass number mass numbers. Solve problems using nuclear
symbolism. Describe the electron energy levels in
and atomic number.
an atom.
Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set
3.1

3. Compounds

Ions and ionic bonding


24. Describe the formation of ions in terms
of atoms gaining or losing electrons.
25. Apply the Periodic Table to predict the
ions formed by atoms of metals and nonmetals.
26. Apply Lewis electron dot structures to
the formation of ions.

Ions and ionic bonding


24. Use knowledge of the electron configuration of
atoms to explain how ions form by gaining or
losing electrons.
25. Examine the stable electron configuration of
noble gases and explain the stability of the ions of
other elements in terms of noble gas structures.
Relate these ideas to the periodic table.
26. Draw Lewis diagrams of atoms and ions.

Chapter 3
21. 53
22. 53-54
23. 54 - 56

Revision 3.1
Page 57

Chapter 3
24. 57-59
25. 59-61
26. 59-62

27. Describe the formation of ionic


compounds in terms of the attraction of ions
of opposite charge.
28. Construct formulae for compounds
formed from ions.
29. Construct ionic equations showing metal
and non-metal atoms forming ions.
30. Apply systematic naming of inorganic
compounds as they are introduced in the
laboratory.

Molecules and covalent bonding


31. Describe molecules as particles which
can move independently of each other.
32. Distinguish between molecules
containing one atom (the noble gases) and
molecules with more than one atom.
33. Describe the formation of covalent
molecules in terms of sharing of electrons.
34. Apply Lewis electron dot structures to
the electron sharing in some simple
molecules.
35. Analyse information by constructing or
using models showing the structure of
metals, ionic compounds and covalent
compounds.
36. Apply systematic naming of inorganic
compounds as they are introduced in the
laboratory.

27. Use Lewis diagrams to explain how sodium


chloride forms from its elements. Describe ionic
compounds in terms of their constituent ions.
28. Solve problems involving the formulae of ionic
compounds.
29. Write ionic equations to show that metals react
with non-metals to form ionic compounds.
30. Apply nomenclature rules to name a variety of
ionic compounds.
Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set
3.2
Molecules and covalent bonding
31. Define the term molecule and distinguish
molecules from ions and atoms.
32. Use model kits to examine types of elemental
molecules with different numbers of atoms per
molecule.
33. Investigate how sharing electrons can lead to
stable octets in the valence shell.
34. Draw Lewis diagrams to show covalent bond
formation.
35. Use molecular model kits to compare and
contrast the structures of metals, ionic compounds
and covalent compounds.
PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 3.1- Analysing crystal
structures
36. Use IUPAC nomenclature rules to name
covalent molecular compounds.
Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set
3.3

27. 61-62
28. 62-63
29. 61-63
30. 63-64
Revision 3.2
Page 65
Chapter 3
31. 43, 65- 66
32. 65-66
33. 66
34. 66- 68
35. 72-73
36. 69

Revision 3.3
Page 70

4. Chemical Extraction
Physical and chemical change
37. Identify the differences between
physical and chemical change in terms of
rearrangement of particles.
38. Summarise the differences between the
boiling and electrolysis of water as an
example of the difference between physical
and chemical change.
39. Gather information using first-hand or
secondary sources to observe the
electrolysis of water and analyse the
information provided as evidence that water
is a compound and identify an application
of the use of this reaction.
40. Analyse and present information to
model the boiling of water and the
electrolysis of water tracing the movements
of and changes in arrangements of
molecules.
41. Gather and present information from
first-hand or secondary sources to write
equations to represent chemical reactions.

Chapter 4
Physical and chemical change
37. Demonstrate the difference between a physical
and chemical change by gently heating sulfur till it
melts to form a clear yellow liquid and then heating
it strongly till it turns red-brown. Summarise the
differences between physical and chemical change.

37. 75-77
38. 88-89
39.84-85

38. Use particle diagrams to compare the boiling


and electrolysis of water. Determine which process
involves a physical change and which a chemical
change.

40.88-89

39. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 4.1 - Investigating


the electrolysis of water
Identify a use for this decomposition reaction.

CD Animated object
2- Boiling and
electrolysing water

41. 78

40. DATA ANALYSIS 4.4 - Boiling and


electrolysing water. Process the supplied data.
41.Practice writing equations for the relevant
processes or reactions in this chapter.

Revision 4.1
Pages 78-79

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set


4.1
CD- CHECKPOINT REVISION - Chapters 1,2
and 3

CD Checkpoint
revision of Chapters
1,2 & 3.

4. Chemical Extraction

Energy and chemical change

Chapter 4

42. Demonstrate how heat can cause the


decomposition of compounds such as copper
carbonate. Identify other examples of energy
sources such as electricity and light that can also
cause decomposition. Burn steel wool in oxygen or
chlorine to demonstrate that heat is necessary to
synthesise compounds.
43. Use tabular information to compare the
strengths of chemical bonds and therefore the
amount of energy need to break these bonds.

42. 79-81

Energy and chemical change


42. Identify light, heat and electricity as the
common forms of energy that may be
released or absorbed during the
decomposition or synthesis of substances
and identify examples of these changes
occurring in everyday life.
43. Explain that the amount of energy
needed to separate atoms in a compound is
an indication of the strength of the
attraction, or bond, between them.
44. Plan and safely perform a first-hand
investigation to show the decomposition of
a carbonate by heat, using appropriate tests
to identify carbon dioxide and the oxide as
the products of the reaction.
45. Gather information using first-hand or
secondary sources to observe the effect of
light on silver salts and identify an
application of the use of this reaction.

43. 81-82
44. 85-86
89-90
45. 87-88

44. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 4.2 - Thermal


decomposition of magnesium carbonate
DATA ANALYSIS 4.5 Investigating the
purity of limestone by thermal decomposition.
45. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 4.3 - Effect of light
on silver halide salts

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 4.2


4.2
Pages 82-83

5. Bonding and Structure


Properties and classification
46. Identify differences between physical
and chemical properties of elements,
compounds and mixtures.
47. Describe the physical properties used to
classify compounds as ionic or covalent
molecular or covalent network.
48. Perform a first-hand investigation to
compare the properties of some common
elements in their elemental state with the
properties of the compound(s) of these
elements (eg magnesium and oxygen).

Lattices
49. Distinguish between metallic, ionic and
covalent bonds.
50. Describe metals as three-dimensional
lattices of ions in a sea of electrons.
51. Describe ionic compounds in terms of
repeating three-dimensional lattices of ions.
52. Explain why the formula for an ionic
compound is an empirical formula.

Properties and classification


46. Use tabulated information to distinguish
between the properties of two elements and the
compound formed from these elements.
47. Develop a key to classify compounds into three
classes- ionic, covalent network and covalent
molecular , based on their properties.
48. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 5.1- Comparing
the properties of a compound and its component
elements.

Chapter 5
46. 92
47. 93
48. 102-103

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 5.1


5.1
Page 94

Lattices
49. Recall the similarities and differences between
metallic, ionic and covalent bonds.
50. Use tabulated data to develop a model of the
metallic crystal in terms of ions and delocalised
electrons. Use this model to explain the properties
of a metallic lattice.
51. Use particle diagrams and models to describe
an ionic lattice.
52. Use examples to show that the formula of an
ionic compound is an empirical formula.

49. 95, 59, 64


50- 95
51. 96
52. 96-97

53. Identify common elements that exist as


molecules or as covalent lattices.
54. Explain the relationship between the
properties of conductivity and hardness and
the structure of ionic, covalent molecular
and covalent network structures.
55. Choose resources and process
information from secondary sources to
construct and discuss the limitations of
models of ionic lattices, covalent molecules
and covalent and metallic lattices.
56. Perform an investigation to examine the
physical properties of a range of common
substances in order to classify them as
metallic, ionic or covalent molecular or
covalent network substances and relate their
characteristics to their uses.

53. Identify a range of elements (eg oxygen,


nitrogen , sulfur and phosphorus) that exist as
molecules and other elements (eg graphite) that
exist as covalent lattices.
54. Classify lattices according to their conductivity
and hardness. Develop a key to classify lattices
55. PRACTICAL ACTIVITY 5.2- Modelling
crystal lattices
56. DATA ANALYSIS 5.3 - Comparing the
properties of crystals

53. 97-99
54. 98-99
55. 103-104
56 104-105

Revision Questions - Jacaranda Chemistry 1. Set Revision 5.2


5.2
Page 100

GENERAL REVISION

CD- Preliminary MODULE 1 - REVISION


QUESTIONS - Chapters 1,2,3,4,5
Use the supplied set of questions to revise all of
Module 1.
15 Multiple Choice and 20 open-ended questions in
the style of the HSC are available.
Model answers are available on the CD.
CD- MODULE 1 REVISION SET
Two sets of ten short and long answer questions
based on Module 1.
Set 1- Mixtures, extraction and gravimetric analysis
Set 2- Formulae, Lewis diagrams and lattices
Model answers are supplied
CD- MODULE 1 PROBLEM SOLVING SETS
Two problem-solving worksheets are available.
Set 1- Chemical formulae and nomenclature
Set 2- Writing and balancing chemical equations
Worked answers are supplied.

CD Preliminary
MODULE 1
REVISION
QUESTIONS
REVISION SET
PROBLEM
SOLVING SETS