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Faculty of Technology

Course Outlines
2.

Civil Engineering

Table 2 shows the Year 1 and Year 2 courses of the Associate of Science Civil
Engineering programme. The description for each course may be found within its
relevant Department (as shown). The course outlines for all the courses are
presented in this section.
Table 2
Engineering

Listing of Years 1 and 2 courses for the Associate of Science Civil

Year 1
Course
Codes
CIV 1102
MEC
1103
EMT
1100
CHM
1101
PHY
1105
CIV 1202
CIV 1206
MEC
1203
EMT
1200
ENG
1203

Course Title

Engineering Materials I
Applied Mechanics 1
Engineering Mathematics I
General Chemistry I
Physics for Engineers

Engineering Materials II
Building Drawing and Autocad
Applied Mechanics 11
Engineering Mathematics II
Technical Communications

Home Department

Civil Engineering
Mechanical
Engineering
Mathematics
Chemistry
Physics

Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering
Mechanical
Engineering
Mathematics
School of Education

Year 2
CIV
CIV
CIV
CIV
CIV

2107
2108
2111
2113
2115

Engineering Surveying I
Civil Engineering Designs I
Health, Safety and Professional Ethics
Fluid Mechanics I
Structures I

Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil
Civil

Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering
Engineering

EMT
2100

Engineering Mathematics III

CIV 2212
CIV 2213
CIV 2215
CIV 2201
EMN
2201

Soil Mechanics
Fluid Mechanics II
Structures II
Capstone Minor Project
Supervisory Management

2.1

CIV 1102

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:
Co-Requisites:

Mathematics
Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering
Civil Engineering
Engineering
Management

Engineering Materials I

Engineering Materials 1
CIV 1102
3
None
EMT1100

DESCRIPTION
This course provides a general introduction to the properties, uses, manufacturing
processes and environmental issues of the most common civil engineering
materials, including cement, aggregates, clay, thermoplastics, steel and timber.
Laboratory exercises to enhance the understanding of the material properties and
applications, and field trips to give the visual feel for the topics are integral to the
teaching of this course..
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
Having successfully completed this course the student should be able to
demonstrate knowledge to:

Assess the use of the common construction materials, including their


advantages and disadvantages.
Ascertain the properties, durability issues, special cements and additives.
Ascertain the properties of rebars and structural steel;
Ascertain the basic properties of timber
Describe how materials function in service conditions in civil engineering
Discuss with specialists the use of particular construction materials. such as
steel, timber, aggregates, cement, concrete, bricks and blocks
Select suitable materials for construction applications

CONTENT

Composition, manufacture and properties of Portland Cement;

Types of cement, admixtures, storage and handling;


Hydration, setting and hardening;
Properties of fresh Concrete and hardened concrete; slump, curing, shrinkage;
permeability, compressive strength; behavior in fire;
Compression Tests;
Aggregate - classification, sources and production processes; properties and
characteristics; grading of aggregates; aggregates tests; sieve analysis;
Concrete and clay Bricks and Blocks: properties; materials and manufacturing
process; classification types and sizes;
Thermoplastics and thermosetting Plastics: engineering properties and uses;
forming Methods;
Timber and its transformation; conversion and engineering properties; timber
testing;
Steel composition, types and properties;

METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour of tutorial/review session, and two hours of laboratory exercises,
each week. The lectures will cover the theoretical aspects of the course with tutorial
sessions and field trips to reinforce learning through the active engagement of
students. Written laboratory reports must be submitted after each laboratory
exercise including at least one report of a field trip.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
Course work will consist of:
Five Laboratory Reports
One field report
Two 1-hr in-course test

60%
40%
15%
5%
25%

REQUIRED READINGS
Carlissa, W. D., (2013). Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction. 9th
Edition. Wiley
RECOMMENDED READING
Jacobs, J.A. & Kilduff, T. (2004). Engineering Materials Technology: Structures,
Processing, Properties, and Selection. 5th Ed. Prentice Hall

2.2

CIV 1202

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:
Co-Requisites:

Engineering Materials II
Engineering Materials II
CIV 1202
3
EMT 1100; PHY 1105 ; CHM 1101 and CIV 1101
None

DESCRIPTION
This course continues from CIV1101 with the discussions on the more advanced
applications of Timber and introduces other materials, including metals and
composites. Their physical properties will be examined in detailed along with a
plethora of application, especially to the Guyanese construction industry. The course
will also introduce concrete technology, asphaltic concrete technology and mix
designs for use in rigid and flexible pavement designs. Enhancement of the theories
via laboratory exercises and field trips are a major part of this course.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Describe the different application of metals formed by various
methods/techniques
Select the types of timber, metals and composites for specific construction
purposes
Describe the chemical composition of asphaltic cements, their physical
structure, aging, rheological properties, and classification.
Describe the properties of asphalt concrete, the structure, components,
additives, its response to loads, the effect of temperature and moisture,
durability, etc.
Develop and interpret the StressStrain relationship and behaviour of metals
under load.
Describe the required welding processes for different metals and applications
Analyze and solve problems related to the corrosion of metals
Conduct mix designs for asphaltic concrete to meet design specifications.
Keep abreast of new design and construction methods involving materials
such as metals, composites, concrete and asphalt.
CONTENT

Timber: Physical Properties density, specific gravity, porosity, moisture


content; influence of rate of growth on physical properties.
Orthotropic nature of Timber: Elastic properties; Strength properties; Biodeterioration and other types of decay.
Preservation of timber: Types of preservatives; Timber grading, Wood
composites: plywood, chip wood and particle boards.

Ferrous and non-ferrous Metals: production processes; stress-strain behavior


and engineering properties.
Forming and joining of metals.
Corrosion processes and methods of protection.
Composite materials including fiber and particular composites materials.
Properties of fresh and hardened concrete; consistency workability,
permeability
Concrete mix design; purpose and methods of mix design; Factors affecting
mix design;
Concrete construction practices
Quality Control in concrete production and construction
Materials for road construction
Types and properties of asphalt
Types of asphaltic mix designs for different pavement designs

METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour of tutorial/review session, and two hours of laboratory exercises,
each week. The lectures will cover the theoretical aspects of the course with tutorial
sessions and field trips to reinforce learning through the active engagement of
students. Written laboratory reports must be submitted after each laboratory
exercise. At least one comprehensive report of a field trip must be submitted within
a designated time.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
Course work will consist of:
Five Laboratory Reports
One field report
Two 1-hr in-course test

60%
40%
15%
5%
25%

REQUIRED READINGS
Carlissa, W. D., (2013). Materials Science and Engineering: An Introduction. 9th
Edition. Wiley
Jones, D. R. H. & Ashby, M. F., (2011). Engineering materials. (3 rd Edition)

RECOMMENDED READING

Jacobs, J.A. & Kilduff, T. (2004). Engineering Materials: An Introduction to Properties,


Applications and Designs, 4th Ed. Butterworth-Heinemann

2.3

CIV2107

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:
Exemption:

Engineering Surveying
Surveying Engineering I
CIV 2107
3
EMT1100/1200. Civ1206
SLS Certificate

DESCRIPTION
This introductory course covers the fundamentals of plane surveying and the
concepts of geodetic surveying and exposes students to the uses of surveying
equipment including calibration and testing, traversing, area and volume
computations and site layout. The course provides geospatial information for
construction projects such as terrestrial relative horizontal and vertical position or
three-dimensional position of points (levels) and features and the distances and
angles between them. Plane surveys are the most commonly practised method of
surveying for construction and treat the earth as a flat or "plane" surface. Geodetic
surveys, which take into account the true shape of the earth, are typically carried
out with great precision, often over long distances. The calibration, application and
error analyses of surveying equipment is embedded in this course.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
List and describe different types of maps and plans
Demonstrate the calibration process for surveying instruments and explain
their operational principles.
Analyze surveying information, data and survey plans.
Explain the principles of traversing and site layout.
use surveying equipment to calculate the area and volume of earthworks,
borrow pits and excavated materials and other objects related to construction
and land development
Undertake survey computations from raw field observations/measurements to
support a range of engineering applications.
Design and organize a comprehensive survey, and draw survey plans of
different sections
Perform error estimates for all surveying processes.
CONTENT

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.

Basic principles of surveying.


Chain surveys; systems and methods of measurements;
Surveying instruments.
Field notes: booking and plotting, detailing, errors and mistakes.
Maps and Plans: scales, grids. Obstacle surveys: types and execution.
Simple optics and coordinate geometry; optics of survey instruments.
Leveling: principles, types of leveling; heights, elevations and topography.
Level instruments design and use. Types of levels; reading and stadia hairs.
Calibration of Levels: two peg test. Leveling staves, booking and reductions.
Flying levels, bench marks.
10.Sectioning principles: longitudinal sections, cross-sections; contours.
11.Compass surveying: Compass traverses and adjustments.
12.The Theodolite: principles, design, calibration, tests and use.
13.Planimeter and computing scales.
14.Booking of angles and other survey data
15.Traversing: principles, use and adjustments.
16.Booking and adjustments of traverses.
17.Areas and Volumes of earthworks.
18.Setting out works: sewer, drains, small buildings, simple curves.
METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour tutorial or review classes, and very involved three hours of
laboratory and measurement exercises. Students will practice using the surveying
instruments to do relevant measurement of selected areas on, and off, the
university campus. Such hands-on engagement will enhance the learning of the
theories as covered in the lectures as well as ensuring that the requisite training is
achieved. Tutorial and some laboratory sessions will be used to interpret and
analyze some of these field measurements and to develop survey plans.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
50%
Course work will consist of:
Six Laboratory Reports
One field report
Four Survey Map designs

50%
15%
5%
20%

REQUIRED READINGS
Kavanaugh, B. & Mastin, T., (2013). Surveying: Principles and Applications
(9th Edition).

RECOMMENDED READING
2.4

Whyte, W. & Paul, R., (1997). Basic Surveying, 4th Edition. Routledge
CIV2103
Fluid Mechanics I

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Fluids Mechanics I
CIV 2103
3
EMT1101/ EMT1201, MEC1103/MEC1203

DESCRIPTION
This course involves the basic principles of fluids and their static and dynamic
behavior and response as they relate to civil engineering applications. The course
helps students develop an understanding of the behavior of fluids by illustrating the
physics and mathematical equations with several real-life applications.
Enhancement of the theories via laboratory exercises and field trips are a major part
of this course.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Take and interpret readings of fluid parameters using measuring instruments
or devices
Analyze the buoyancy and stability of submerged body
Apply mass conservation principles to a floating body
Compute dynamic forces using the momentum principle
Analyze frictionless flows, using Bernoullis equation
Sketch and interpret energy and hydraulic grade lines
Compute hydrostatic forces on structures such as dams or sluice gates.
Arrange dimensional variables into dimensionless groups in accordance with
Buckingham Pi Theorem.
CONTENT:
Properties of fluids: mass density, specific weight, specific gravity, specific
volume, viscosity, surface tension, compressibility, vapor pressure.
Pressure intensity, pressure head, hydraulic jack, pressure gauges, and
barometer.
Hydrostatic pressure: total and resultant pressure on vertical and inclined
plane surfaces; pressure diagrams; Sluice gates:
Lock gates; Curved
surfaces; cylindrical gate parabolic surface; Buoyancy.
Metacentric height and stability of floating vessels.
Dimensional analysis, Hydraulic and geometric similitude.
Froude number; Reynolds number.
METHOD OF TEACHING

This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive


lectures, one hour tutorial session and two hours laboratory sessions, each week.
Selected sites will be visited and students will be required to submit a written report
on at least one of these field trips. The lectures will cover the theoretical aspects of
the course with tutorial sessions to reinforce learning through the active
engagement of students. Laboratory exercises will complement the lectures are
intended to provide the needed practical feel of the course.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
Course work will consist of:
Five Laboratory Reports
One field report
Two 1-hr in-course test

60%
40%
15%
5%
25%

REQUIRED READINGS
Hibbeler, R. C., (2014). Fluid Mechanics. Prentice Hall
RECOMMENDED READINGS
Kundu, P. K. & Cohen, I. M., (2015). Fluid Mechanics, 6th edition. Academic
Press

2.5

CIV2203

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Fluid Mechanics II
Fluid Mechanics II
CIV 2203
3
CIV2103

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This is a more advanced course in fluid mechanics which builds on the fundamental
topics in the course in Fluid Mechanics I. This course focuses on advanced topics in
fluid flow and measurement, the dynamics of flow in pipes and open flow, as well as
the forces and energy at different points in the system. Enhancement of the
theories via laboratory exercises and field trips are a major part of this course.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Ascertain the physical significance of the Reynolds Number, Froude Number,
Mach Number, Weber Number and Drag coefficient
Characterize uniform flow in channels using Mann Equation.
Characterize frictional and minor energy forces in pipelines
Perform volume analysis
Analyze and design pipe lines to deliver a specified flow and to meet pressure
constraints

CONTENT

Steady and unsteady flow.


Onedimensional, twodimensional and threedimensional flows.
Uniform flow, laminar flow; streamlines, stream tubes.
Nonuniform flow; turbulent flows; boundary layers; Radial pressure gradient.
Dynamics of fluids in steady motion
Bernoulli equation; computation of total head.
Steady flow energy equation.
Energy grade line; Flow nets.
Forces on nozzles, pipe bends and forces due to the impingement of jets on
surfaces.
Flow measurement and instrumentation: Pitot tube.
Orifices, Venturi meter, Flow meters, floats, stream gauges, etc.
Open channel flow. Weirs, Sluices.

METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour tutorial session and two hours laboratory sessions, each week.
Selected sites will be visited and students will be required to submit a written report
on at least one of these field trips. The lectures will cover the theoretical aspects of
the course with tutorial sessions to reinforce learning through the active
engagement of students. Laboratory exercises will complement the lectures are
intended to provide the needed practical feel of the course.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
Course work will consist of:
Five Laboratory Reports
One field report
Two 1-hr in-course test

60%
40%
15%
5%
25%

REQUIRED READINGS
Hibbeler, R. C., (2014). Fluid Mechanics. Prentice Hall
RECOMMENDED READINGS
Kundu, P. K. & Cohen, I. M., (2015). Fluid Mechanics, 6th edition. Academic
Press

2.6

CIV2105

Structures I

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Structures I
CIV 2105
3
EMT1101/ EMT1201, MEC1102/MEC1202

DESCRIPTION
This course introduces the student to the fundamental principles of structural
analysis and design as they relate to basic civil engineering structures. The
theoretical concepts described in the mechanics of solids course from year 1 will be
applied here. Mathematical and graphical solutions to various structural forms will
be demonstrated using firm examples of current applications to bridge designs and
structural integrity. Field trips and laboratory exercises to elaborate on the concepts
are integral to this course.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Explain the different kinds of structures
Use the analytical techniques applicable to different kinds of structures
Construct and analyze Bending moment and shear force diagrams.
Determine the deflection of beams by different methods
Determine the failure of columns by Eulers formula
CONTENT
1. Structural forms, equations of equilibrium, static determinacy.
2. Beams: loads, supports and reactions.
3. Plane frames; solution of forces by method of sections, tension coefficients,
method of inspection and stress diagrams.
4. Space Frames.
5. Bending moment and shear force diagrams.
6. Mathematical and graphical solutions of bending moment and shear force
diagrams for simply supported, cantilever and overhanging beams for
concentrated and distributed loading.
7. Deflection of beams by the Double Integration method, Macaulays method
and area-moment theorems.
8. Eulers theory of buckling
9. Suspension Cables and Bridges.
METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour tutorial and two hours of laboratory exercises per week. Students
will perform structural analyses exercise in selected laboratories and observed

selected sites during field trips. Written laboratory and field tri reports must be
submitted.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
40%
Course work will consist of:
Three Laboratory Reports
One field report
One 1-hr in-course test

60%
15%
5%
20%

REQUIRED READINGS
Hibbeler, R. C. (2014). Structural Analysis, 9th edition. Prentice Hall
RECOMMENDED READINGS
Kassimali, A., (2014). Structural Analysis, 5th edition. CL Engineering

2.7

CIV 2205

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Structures II
Structures II
CIV 2205
3
CIV2105

DESCRIPTION
This course builds on the introductory concepts from Structures I and advances the
students knowledge of structural analysis and design in terms of static and
kinematic Indeterminacy and constructive relations. The course focusses on the
various methods/techniques of analysis and design of different structural elements
including reinforced concrete and structural timber. Selected laboratory exercises
and field trip will be used to augment the theoretical underpinnings of this course.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Use the various analytical methods of structural elements in static and
dynamic applications
Show how influence lines are determined
Analyze and design structural elements and systems by analytical and
graphical methods.
Use models in structural analysis and design
CONTENT

Introduction to structural philosophy of structural design.


Analysis of continuous beams, portals and other frameworks by moment
distribution method, slopedeflection, moment area and three moment
theorems.
Deflection of beams and frames by Castiglianos theorems; Maxwells
reciprocal theorem, MullerBreslau principles, WilliotMohr diagrams.
Strain energy methods: Use of models.
Influence lines for beams and frames; Moving loads.
Design theories Elastic, Limit State, Load and Resistance Factor and Plastic
Designs.
Design of reinforced concrete beams, slabs and columns; Structural timber
design.

METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour tutorial and two hours of laboratory exercises per week. Students

will perform structural analyses exercise in selected laboratories and observed


selected sites during field trips. Written laboratory and field tri reports must be
submitted.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
40%
Course work will consist of:
Three Laboratory Reports
One field report
One 1-hr in-course test

60%
15%
5%
20%

REQUIRED READINGS
Hibbeler, R. C. (2014). Structural Analysis, 9th edition. Prentice Hall
RECOMMENDED READINGS
Kassimali, A., (2014). Structural Analysis, 5th edition. CL Engineering

2.8

CIV2202

Soil Mechanics

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:
1102/1202/CIV2101

Soil Mechanics
CIV 2202
3
EMT

1100/1200; MEC 1104/1204; CIV

COURSE DESCRIPTION
This course provides an introduction to Geotechnical Engineering and provides the
basic mechanics necessary for the detailed study of Geotechnical Engineering. This
course aims to provide: an understanding of the nature of soils as an engineering
material; common soil classification schemes; the importance of water in the soil
and the effects of water movement; methods of predicting soil settlements; and the
stress- strain- strength response of soils.

STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES


After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:

Evaluate and classify soils based on the Unified Soil classification system
(USCS)
Perform laboratory tests such as Atterberg limits, compaction, hydrometer
analysis and shear strength
Calculate fundamental soil properties using phase relations
Evaluate the state of stress in a soil mass using the principle of effective
stress
Calculate seepage volume through a soil mass based on Darcys law
Estimate settlement magnitude of compressible soils.

CONTENT

Introduction and weight-volume relationships

Atterberg Limits and classification of soils

Soil compaction

Hydraulic Conductivity and Seepage

Effective stress concept and stresses in a soil mass

Settlement and consolidation of soils

Shear strength of soils

METHOD OF TEACHING
This course will be delivered through a combination of two hours of interactive
lectures, one hour tutorial and two hours of laboratory exercises per week. Students
will perform structural analyses exercise in selected laboratories and observed
selected sites during field trips. Written laboratory and field tri reports must be
submitted.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best test the students attainment of the learning
outcomes are outlined as follows:
One 3-hour written final examination
Course work
40%
Course work will consist of:
Three Laboratory Reports
One field report
One 1-hr in-course test

60%
15%
5%
20%

REQUIRED READINGS
Budhu, M., (2010). Soil Mechanics and Foundations 3rd Edition. Wiley
RECOMMENDED READINGS
McCarthy, D. F., (2006), Essentials of Soil Mechanics and Foundation: Basic
Geotechnics, 7th edition. Prentice Hall

2.9

CIV2108

Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Civil Engineering Designs I


Civil Engineering Designs I
CIV 2107
3
Completion of all Year 1 Courses

COURSE DESCRIPTION
Civil engineering deals with the design and construction of various structures. This
course introduces the development and design solutions in response to civil
engineering challenges. It exposes students to civil engineering design and
introduces the theory, tools, and techniques of engineering design and creative
problem-solving, as well as design issues and practices in civil engineering. The
course includes several design cases, with an emphasis on built facilities (e.g.,
buildings, bridges and roads) including potential risks and environmental impact.
CAD drawing and GIS techniques are integral to this course. Project design explicitly
concerns technical approaches as well as consideration of the existing built
environment, natural environment, economic and social factors, and expected life
span. A large design case is introduced, which will be expounded on in more
advanced project classes of the undergraduate civil engineering programme.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Use appropriate CAD tools to create conceptual designs and drawings
Use GIS and EIA in assessing a viable area for implementing a structure
Create basic designs for bridges, building and roads
Arrange work in reports and oral and visual presentations
Develop portfolio to document engineering designs
Work in teams to implement assigned projects.
CONTENT
1. Civil Engineering Design
2. The role of geomatics, the environment and scientific laws in design
3. Introduction to the design of buildings, roads, hydraulic systems, dams and
other civil engineering infrastructure
4. Civil Engineering drawing
5. CAD techniques
6. Site appraisal
7. Risk and vulnerability in design
8. Environmental impact assessment (EIA)
9. introduction to GIS techniques

METHOD OF TEACHING
The course constitutes six contact hours per week and is divided into two hours of
lectures and project discussions, and four hours of laboratory sessions with tutorials.
Four design projects will be assigned and students are expected to learn about the
design process through practice and where possible through implementation. Some
design projects will be team based and as such students need to learn how to work
effectively with peers. Sketching and CAD (Computer Aided Design) will also be
introduced. Students will start with the development of a portfolio documenting
their design projects.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
Students will be graded on four design projects. The portfolio will also be graded.
The sketching and CAD assignments will also be checked for completion. The
assessment procedure that best tests the students attainment of the learning
outcomes is outlined as follows:
Course work
Course work will consist of:
Four Design Projects
Portfolio
Two Assignments

100%
80%
10%
10%

REQUIRED READING
Khoi, Y-K., (2004). Principle of Applied Civil Engineering Design. American
Society of Civil Engineers.

RECOMMENDED READING
Hansen, K. & Zenobia, K., (2011). Civil Engineering Handbook of Professional
Practice. Wiley

2.10 CIV2111
Course Title:
Course Code:
No of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Health, Safety and Professional Ethics


Health, Safety and Professional Ethics
CIV 2111
2
None

DESCRIPTION
Apart from the required technical skillsets, civil engineers need a range of skills to
aid their practice. A safe and healthy environment is not only a legal requirement
but enhances worker morale and increases productivity, as does ethical practices.
The course includes provisions concerning safety regarding the work environment
and equipment, fire protection, noise, ionizing radiations and explosives. The theory
and practice of engineering ethics using a multi-disciplinary and cross-cultural
approach will be introduced. Each student will carry out case studies which will be
orally presented in a class room setting.
STUDENT LEARNING OUTCOMES
After successfully completing this course, students should be able to:
Explain the importance of maintaining a safe workplace in compliance with
national and international regulatory bodies.
Demonstrate an awareness for the need for injury prevention, risk
management, and incident investigations.
Anticipate, recognize, and evaluate hazardous conditions and practices
affecting people, property and the environment, and develop and evaluate
appropriate strategies designed to mitigate such risk.
Describe the policies, procedures and equipment needed to deal with
hazardous materials.
Integrate ethical, social, current, and global issues and responsibilities in their
engineering practice.
Locate, describe, and apply the content of the code of ethics/conduct of at
least one professional society.
CONTENT
Overview of occupational health and safety in civil engineering
Safe work environment and safety equipment
Fire protection and safety
Noise suppression and environmental considerations
Health and safety when using various engineering machinery
Engineering ethics
Tradeoffs in engineering designs: cost vs ethics
Case studies of ethics in civil engineering

METHOD OF TEACHING
This course constitutes three contact hours per week and is divided into two hours
of interactive lectures and one hour tutorial and discussion session. The lectures will
cover the theoretical aspects of the course with tutorial sessions to reinforce
learning through the active engagement of students. Several outside-the-classroom
readings will be assigned from which summary reports are to be submitted by each
student. Such assignments will include examples of good and bad engineering
practices. Examples of professional conduct and misconduct will be presented via
an oral presentation at the end of the semester.
ASSESSMENT PROCEDURES/METHODS
The assessment procedure that best tests the students attainment of the learning
outcomes is outlined as follows:
One 2-hour written final examination
Course work
Course work will consist of:
Three Assignment Reports
One Case Study Presentation
One 1-hr in-course test

60%
40%
15%
10%
15%

REQUIRED READINGS

Barnard, M., (1998). Health and Safety for Engineers. Thomas Telford Ltd.

Davis, M., (2005). Engineering Ethics. Ashgate Publishing Co.

RECOMMENDED READINGS
Institution of Civil Engineers, (1995). The Management of Health and Safety
in Civil Engineering. American Society of Civil Engineers
Hansen, K. & Zenobia, K., (2011). Civil Engineers Handbook for Professional
Practice. Wiley
McCuen, R. H., Ezzell, E., & Wong, M. K., (2011). Fundamentals of Civil
Engineering: An Introduction to the ASCE Body of Knowledge. Kindle Edition.
CRC Press.

2.9

CIV 2201

Course Title:
Course Code:
No. of Credits:
Prerequisites:

Minor Project in Civil Engineering


Minor Project
CIV 2201
3
Must be in semester 2 of year 3

Course Description:
This course allows students to develop competence in the conceptualization, design
and implementation of a solution to a simple civil engineering problem, which may
include construction and testing of hardware solutions, simulation/modelling and
testing, and analysis and inference. Students will need to manage their time while
setting realistic goals. A prototype will be presented at the end of the course via
written report and an oral presentation.
It is expected that the student will use the knowledge and engineering skills that
he/she has gathered over the first three semesters since the start of the
programme. However, it is not unusual for a project to require a student to rely on a
body of knowledge outside of that taught in the program. The course, therefore,
presents the opportunity to build upon the core of learning gained in the earlier
years and to broaden the scope of knowledge already gained.
Student Learning Outcomes:
Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:

Clearly formulate a problem specification which embodies the original


definition of the project.
Demonstrate an acceptable level of expertise in planning and managing a
project.
Apply mathematical, scientific, and engineering principles and techniques to
describe the characteristics and behavior of civil engineering systems.
Analyze the functional and performance characteristics of civil engineering
systems, sub-systems, and relevant processes.
Use technical information, crediting the origins of ideas and other intellectual
property, in the solution of engineering problems.
Select appropriate techniques and tools to realize engineering designs.
Demonstrate competence in applying standard analytical tools in the
implementation of engineering solutions.
Design engineering solutions to meet functional as well as performance
specifications.
Plan and realize engineering objectives as an individual or within a team.
Demonstrate an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in
the work environment.
Communicate effectively, conveying technical material through a variety of
media, such as written products, graphics, and oral presentations.

Project Requirements/Content
The department will produce a list of projects along with the academic staff named
as project supervisor. The student will decide on a list of preferred projects and
commence consultations with the project advisor/proposer to begin to the formal
selection process.
For this minor project course the students will not normally be required to write their
own proposals. The department will provide a listing of projects for the student(s) to
make their choice. This will be done at the start of the semester.
Project Implementation Methodology
The project must be viewed as a special course, one which should be viewed with
the same level of seriousness as all other courses. Success in this course will be
determined by the level of effort made by the student. Proper project management
requires working throughout the whole semester and use should be made of the
available project management tools and meaningful consultation with the
supervisor. All relevant information is to be recorded a log note book and each page
must be dated and signed by each student. The information recorded includes, but
is not limited to, designs, data, graphs, calculations, references, research results,
flow charts and communications. The log notebook is signed and dated by your
supervisor during each meeting.
Method of Assessment/ Evaluation
A team of two examiners will evaluate the project looking for its key elements. The
project supervisor will be automatically appointed the first examiner while the
second examiner will be appointed by the Project Coordinator. The second examiner
is usually a member of the Department's academic staff but qualified persons from
outside the department may also be appointed to this role. The evaluation is as
follows:

Progress Reports
Prototype/Research
o Conduct
o Comprehension
o Methodology
o Results
Final Written Report
Final Oral Presentation

10%
10%
10%
10%
30%
15%
15%

Required Reading(s):
LeBlanc, S. & Scott Fogler, S., (1994). Strategies for Creative Problem Solving.
Prentice Hall.

Recommended Reading(s):
Nocera, R., (2014). Planning and Controlling Civil Construction with Microsoft
Project 2013. RJN Books (Kindle edition).