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INSIDE: The hunt is on for Easter eggs.

PAGE 6A

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

PAIN, PROFIT FLOW FROM CALIFORNIA DROUGHT PAGE 1B

Wyden
pushes
wildfire
funding
Payments for
counties also
have his support
By Bill Theobald
USA Today

WASHINGTON — Congress is
making progress on two issues
of special importance to the
West: fighting wildfires and
providing funding to counties
with large chunks of federally
owned land.
And on the latter, thousands
of counties and school districts
that were receiving funding
through the expired Secure Rural Schools program could see a
quick injection of federal funds
after Congress returns April 13
from its two-week spring break.
On wildfires, Sens. Ron Wyden, D-Oregon, and Mike Crapo,
R-Idaho, joined before the recess to attach a provision to the
Senate budget resolution that
should ease the way for a new
funding mechanism for fighting the most severe wildfires.
Under
the
new plan, funding for these
fires would be
treated the same
as other disasWyden
ters such as hurricanes.
This structure would reduce
what is known as “fire borrowing,” where the Forest Service
and the Department of Interior
raid funds to fight fires with
money that would have been
used to help reduce the risk and
severity of fires. Since 2002, the
agencies have exceeded their
budgets for fighting fires 11
times.
The Senate bill that outlines
the new system, called the Wildfire Disaster Funding Act, is
sponsored by Wyden. It has 12
co-sponsors, including Oregon’s
other Democratic senator, Jeff
Merkley; Colorado’s Michael
Bennett, a Democrat, and Cory
Gardner, a Republican; and
California’s Dianne Feinstein, a
Democrat.
The House version of the bill,
sponsored by Rep. Mike Simpson, R-Idaho, already has 65 cosponsors evenly split between
the parties. They include the entire Oregon House delegation;
Reps. Raul Grijalva and Kyr-

Hayes as FLO
What emails tell us about First Lady of Oregon
MORE ONLINE

By Hannah Hoffman
Statesman Journal

For all the headlines she has
made, Cylvia Hayes has been largely unknown to Oregonians.
She stood beside former Gov.
John Kitzhaber at two inaugurations
and made waves during his second
campaign as secrets from her past
came to life. She was known for her
interest in policies on poverty and
green energy. Her consulting company, 3E Strategies, was infamous
for its contracts with the state of
Oregon and some of Kitzhaber’s
colleagues.

Read previous stories about Cylvia Hayes
at StatesmanJournal.com

For all that, it has never been
clear what kind of person she is —
who she is behind the public persona.
The 94,000 emails released Friday by Gov. Kate Brown’s office
begin to paint a picture of Kitzhaber’s fiancee. Statesman Journal
reporters have examined a small
percentage of the documents, but
they show some aspects of Hayes
that previously could only be

guessed at.
The records belong to Hayes’
three personal email accounts, and
they are all correspondence with
her colleagues in Kitzhaber’s office.
Some of the details contained
within them are simply colorful bits
and pieces.
Hayes referred to herself as
“FLO” — First Lady of Oregon. She
often signed off her emails with,
“Peace.” She liked shows such as
“Battlestar Galactica,” “Scandal”
and “Grimm.”
Technology was not her strong
See EMAILS, Page 5A

From furniture repairs to ‘Battlestar Galactica,’
Hayes used state-paid staff for household duties
By Tracy Loew
Statesman Journal

Former Oregon first lady Cylvia
Hayes used her taxpayer-funded
staff to schedule meetings, book
flights and arrange talking points
related to her official duties.
Previously released documents
show she also used state-paid staff
to book travel and schedule meetings related to her private consulting business — prohibited under
Oregon ethics rules.

A new release of Hayes’ emails
shows she used state staff to perform routine household duties, such
as sorting out cable television problems and changing her cats’ litter.
“Arghhhh!” Hayes emailed Mary
Rowinski, a state-paid assistant, at
9:14 p.m. on a Sunday night last
April. “None of the channels are
showing and it says I do not (have) a
subscription to view Battlestar Gallactica (sic). This is so fricking frustrating at this point.”
“I have no words,” Rowinski

responded.
About three weeks earlier, Hayes
had emailed Rowinski at 7:09 p.m. to
complain that she could not get
“Revolution,” “Scandal” or “Grimm”
at Mahonia Hall, the governor’s
official residence.
The day after the “Battlestar
Galactica” problem, Rowinski got a
response that many other Comcast
customers would envy: The company issued a refund and an apology.
See HAYES, Page 5A

See WYDEN, Page 4A

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TODAY'S WEATHER

1

2A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

THAT WAS THE WEEK THAT WAS

NEWS QUIZ

Drug spending, Amtrak and education budgets
1. Drug prices have been going up for a long time. However, during 2014,
drug spending saw its largest annual increase since 2003. How much did the
average spending on prescription drugs rise last year?
A. 9.4 percent
B. 10.3 percent
C. 13.1 percent
D. 14.6 percent
2. Columnist Victor Panichkul wants you to extend your culinary comfort
zone. To help you along, he offered a look at six foods you should consider
on your next shopping trip as a substitute for a more common food. What
did he recommend as an alternative to ground beef?
A. Ground tofu
B. Ground goat
C. Ground buffalo
D. Ground elk
3. The Oregon Department of Transportation might now have enough money to fund the Amtrak line between Portland and Eugene. How much will it
cost to cover the route during the 2015-17 biennium?
A. $5.2 million
B. $10.4 million
C. $17.6 million
D. $28.1 million
4. On Monday, some of music’s most influential artists including Beyonce, Jay Z
and Madonna held a press conference
to announce a new music streaming
service (which has actually been
around for a while). What is the
name of the service?
A. Thump
B. Noise
C. Tidal
D. Pump
5. A public hearing was held Wednesday morning at the Capitol on
expanding the background checks for gun purchases. On Thursday, Sen.
Kim Thatcher, R-Keizer, proposed a different solution to ensure that felons
are not able to purchase guns. What did she purpose?
A. Tattooing the letter “F” on the right index finger of all felons
B. Requiring all gun purchasers to “swear” they are not felons before buying a
weapon
C. Retinal eye scans to compare against a new database of convicted felons
D. Marking the driver’s licenses, permits and identification cards of felons to
reflect their felon status
6. The Willamette Queen was pulled onto dry land this week to allow inspectors to look under the vessel. How much does the sternwheeler weigh?
A. 86 tons
B. 103 tons
C. 94 tons
D. 53 tons
7. The Oregon House of Representatives passed a K-12 education budget
this week along a 35-25 party-line vote. The budget includes a 9 percent
increase. How much was the budget that was passed?
A. $9.34 billion
B. $7.255 billion
C. $6.892 billion
D. $10.239 billion
8. The Salem Police Department announced the debut of a new tool to report crimes. What is the new system?
A. Blue and red boxes will be placed around the city with forms to fill out
B. Integration with Siri so all you have to do is say “Siri, I need to report a
crime” and you are taken to a Salem police voice mailbox
C. A website to report non-emergency crimes that do not require an officer
response
D. Personalized flood lights: You can purchase and register your own signal
design with the department and turn on when you have a crime to report
9. John Stewart announced a few weeks ago
that he was leaving “The Daily Show” at
some point this year. This week, Comedy
Central announced his replacement. Who is
it?
A. Justin Bieber
B. Will Ferrell
C. Trevor Noah
D. Kathy Griffin
10. On Friday, Gov. Kate Brown released 94,000 of Cylvia Hayes’ emails, consisting of 330,000 pages. Deep inside these pages, Hayes revealed her affection for several TV shows. Which of these shows is on her want-to watch
list?
A. “Real Housewives of D.C.”
B. “The Following”
C. “Battlestar Galactica“
B. “Glee”
Scoring guide: 10 correct: Expert; 7-9 correct: Advanced; 4-6 correct: Intermediate; 2-3 correct: Rookie; 0-1 correct: Newbie.
Answers: 1. (C); 2. (C); 3. (D); 4. (C); 5. (D); 6. (A); 7. (B); 8. (C); 9. (C); 10. (C)

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StatesmanJournal.com

LOCAL FIRST

How to become an urban farmer
Classes teach
both old pros
and first-timers

Nicole Barbuch
leaves the urban
farmer class at
Pringle Creek
Community on
March 14 with
pots already
planted with
seeds.

Cindy Ulshafer
Special to the Statesman Journal

Both first-time sowers and
veteran gardeners signed up to
attend a series of urban farmer
classes being held at Pringle
Creek Community. Under the
tutelage of Colleen Owen, who
is the gardener and beekeeper
of the community, students took
a class on March 14 focused on
collecting and starting seeds.
The class began inside the
community center — Painters
Hal — where Owen talked about
seed choices. Use the seed catalogs as references to learn
about plants you are considering, she suggested. Different
plants thrive in different climates. If you have seeds remaining from past seasons,
even three years old, there’s a
good chance they will still
sprout. Because the students
will have access to the community garden on the property and
be there frequently, Owen
urged them to get acquainted.
“We want people to talk to
each other,” she said.
Dennis Ulrich shared a recycling tip with the class: Use toilet paper rolls, scoring halfway
up the sides and folding the
flaps under to form the bottom
like a small pot. Stuff a bit of paper towel in the bottom, fill with
dirt, and plant seeds. “Worms
will like the material as it
breaks down” as well as keeping
the plant roots intact, he said.
“I love the little hints from
everybody. I’ve had a garden
for years,” said Eileen Harder,
but she was gleaning any bit of
new information that would
help her plants grow better.
Students picked through
boxes of donated flower and
vegetable seeds from Botanical
Interests, Territorial Seed Company and Ferry-Morse. They
were even able to find some
heirloom organic seeds among
the packets. Students had also
brought their own seeds.
The class then moved outside to one of the restored Lord
& Burnham glasshouses, built
in the 1930s. The greenhouses
are used by Pringle Creek residents and are available to the
students while their seeds germinate in the warmth and sun

PHOTOS BY CINDY
ULSHAFER / SPECIAL
TO THE STATESMAN
JOURNAL

Shelley Joyce, clockwise from front left, Larry Weaver, September Hawks,
Annette James and Madeline Osborne share a bench during the class.

Eileen Harder, seated, and Meagan McFarland listen to teacher Colleen
Own during the urban farmer class at Pringle Creek Community.

afforded by the glass roofs.
Owen told the participants they
could plant seeds and leave
them there, or they could take
them home. The students
helped themselves to small
pots, filling them with a soil
mixture from a wheelbarrow.
Owen said her favorite soil contains compost, peat, perlite and
natural fertilizer with minerals.
Vanda Baughman was start-

beets, which she was planting at
the time. “You can eat the
greens and then the whole
thing,” said Osborne as they
planted seeds elbow to elbow.
Kale, carrots, cucumber,
eggplant and tomatoes were in
September Hawks’ seed packets. She planned to return for
the next class about composting
and soil. Meanwhile, the students are responsible for keep-

ing late-producing crops early
— peppers, tomatoes, and winter squash — “that need a longer
growing season.” She poked
seeds carefully into the dirt.
“Sustainable gardening is part
of our future,” she stated to her
bench mate Shelley Joyce.
Madeline Osborne mentored
Annette James, giving the firsttime gardener tips about planting and sharing the benefits of

Wyden

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going to drop?
Probably not.
Will your kitchen
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Definitely not.

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Refinance transactions that exceed 100% of your current KeyBank debt may be eligible for this offer. Subject to credit
approval. Application must be submitted by 6/30/15 and loan must be booked by 7/31/15. The stated APR includes a
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25

Continued from Page 1A

sten Sinema, both D-Ariz.; Matt Salmon,
R-Ariz.; Dina Titus, D-Nev.; Mark Amodei, R-Nev.; and Devin Nunes, R-Calif.
During the last Congress, the House
version of the bill had 140 co-sponsors,
and 236 conservation, recreation, timber,
tribal and other organizations signed a
letter supporting the measure.
“Americans across the West whose
homes and lives are threatened by massive wildfires every year will tell you —
wildfires are no less destructive or devastating than hurricanes, tornadoes and
floods,” Wyden said. “Yet no other agencies are required to pay for natural disasters out of their regular budgets.”
He said during floor debate on the budget plan that the drought means “we
could literally have enormous fires —
what could be virtual infernos —
throughout the West this summer.”
The Senate budget resolution, which
was approved 52-46, also includes a provision that would pave the way for reducing hazardous fuel and other steps to improve the health of forests.
“We believe that thinning our forests
is one of the best ways to control the ballooning costs of fighting wildfires,” Republican Sens. John McCain and Jeff
Flake of Arizona said in a joint statement.
Some conservation groups, however,
would not support language in the provision that ties forest cleanup with increasing timber production on federal lands,
said Alan Rowsome, senior director of
government relations for lands at The
Wilderness Society.
The House budget resolution does not
include language about wildfires. And
Rowsome said a real sign of progress will
be if wildfire provisions end up in a compromise budget resolution the House and
Senate will attempt to negotiate.
Wyden is also behind language in the
Senate budget resolution that would extend the Payment in Lieu of Taxes and the
Secure Rural Schools programs.
PILT provides federal payments to local governments to help offset losses in
property taxes in counties with large
swaths of federal land within their
boundaries. Funding for the program expires Sept. 30.
A total of $442 million in PILT funds
will be distributed in June, up from $425
million in 2014.
PILT is also not part of the Housepassed 2016 budget resolution, but its
proponents are optimistic because a bipartisan group of more than 100 House
members sent a letter to leadership urging full funding for the program.
Democratic Reps. Jared Polis of Colorado and Ann Kirkpatrick of Arizona

ing their seeds moist during
germination. I heard two women making plans to take turns
watering each other’s plots.
“I think it’s working really
great, and people are interacting,” said Owen.
Cindy Ulshafer is a freelance
writer covering events in South
Salem. Contact her at
c_ulshafer@yahoo.com to be
considered for coverage.

FEDERAL PAYMENTS
Oregon counties received these amounts in
2014 under the Payments in Lieu of Taxes
program. Amounts are expected to increase
this year.
BAKER
BENTON
CLACKAMAS
CLATSOP
COLUMBIA
COOS
CROOK
CURRY
DESCHUTES
DOUGLAS
GILLIAM
GRANT
HARNEY
HOOD RIVER
JACKSON
JEFFERSON
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were among the lead authors of the letter.
The Secure Rural Schools program,
which expired in 2014, provided money to
counties and schools where there is a lot
of federally owned forest land.
On its last day before the recess, the
House included approval for SRS funding for 2014 and 2015 in a bill that changed
the formula for how doctors are reimbursed by Medicare.
Brian Namey, a spokesman for the National Association of Counties, said an extension would provide a total of about
$500 million to 720 counties and 4,000
school districts in 41 states.
wtheobal@gannett.com or follow on Twitter
@BillTheobald

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

5A

Oregon considers increasing speed limit
Associated Press

SALEM — Oregonians could
begin flying along certain highways at 75 mph after lawmakers heard testimony Friday on a
bill upping speed limits from 65
mph on interstate highways.
Under the proposal, passenger cars would be able to go 10
mph faster than the current limit. It also ups the speed limit on
state highways to 65 mph. Certain vehicles, such as trucks and
school busses, would have to

stick to the 55-mph limit on interstate and state highways.
Republican state Rep. Cliff
Bentz of Ontario sponsored the
bill. Safety improvements to vehicles, such as air bags, GPS
systems and seatbelts, mean the
current speed limits are no
longer as necessary to keep
drivers safe, he said. He also
noted motorists used to be able
to drive along at 75 mph before
the speed limits were dropped
to save gas in the early 1970s.
“The problem is that at one

time we did drive at 75 mph way
before the cars were as safe as
they are now and the state survived,” Bentz said. He also noted boosting the speed limit
could help bring the state closer
together by allowing people living in rural areas to travel faster.
Troy Costales, an administrator at the state Department
of Transportation, cautioned
lawmakers at the public hearing that increasing the speed
limit might lead to more crash-

es and fatalities.
“While we can change the
laws of man, we can’t change
the laws of nature. When speed
goes up for every 10 miles an
hour it doubles the energy released when something happens. So a small mistake becomes a big mistake at the higher speeds,” Costales said.
The Oregon Speed Zone Review Panel did a review of
speed limits on interstate highways in 2004, Costales said, after a law allowed the agency to

Emails
Continued from Page 1A

suit.
Emails show Hayes requesting training on Facebook, referencing “laptop meltdowns”
and fighting her Comcast service. (She also appeared to
have some trouble operating
the remote for the Mahonia
Hall fireplace.)
She had to be told where to
find a photo center when she
realized the governor’s staff
photographer could not take
her passport photo.
She harbored a strong admiration for Bill and Hillary
Clinton.
She and Kitzhaber both
shared early aspirations toward careers in marine biology.
She could be effusive and
kind at unexpected times. For
example, in an email from
April 2014, she responded to a
memo from energy policy
adviser Margi Hoffmann with
one line: “Pure magic Ms.
Hoffmann!”
The emails also show a
woman who could be self-aggrandizing and self-important.
In April 2014, she emailed
her assistant, Mary Rowinski,
and essentially invited herself
to one of Kitzhaber’s meetings.
“Please work on setting a
meeting with me and Sean
Robbins, the new Director of
Business Oregon. It may be
that something is in the works
for a meeting with him and
Gov so I could work into that
one. If not, I’d like a separate
meeting with him. Anytime in
the next month would be fine,”
Hayes wrote.
Kitzhaber’s secretary, Jan
Murdock, replied: “He starts
with Business Oregon on May
1st. I am going to be setting up
a time for the Governor to
meet with Sean, so I’ll coordinate so that the three of them
can meet at the same time.”
At other times, Hayes clearly believed she and Kitzhaber
should have some import for
national-level politicians.
In August 2012, she asked
then-Chief of Staff Curtis Robinhold about bringing the Clintons to Oregon for unspecified
reasons. (Kitzhaber was not
campaigning that year.)
Robinhold replied:
“You may recall that at the
time of our previous conversation I asked Dan (Carol) to look
into options for getting him out
here. Dan talked to the Clinton
team, who suggested that if we
want to get him out here in any
form (other than on an Obama
campaign swing, which is out
of our hands) it would likely

Hayes
Continued from Page 1A

“Please let the First Lady
know that we are sorry for the
inconvenience,” Comcast customer service supervisor Cin-

SPECIAL TO THE STATESMAN JOURNAL

Cylvia Hayes, former Gov. John Kitzhaber’s fiancee, adopted two cats from The Humane Society.

MORE ONLINE

cost us in the range of $100k.
We would need to plan to raise
that money from non-state
sources — which seemed to be
off the table for us given the
large number of other things
we have going on right now.
“If you would like to revisit
the topic of raising the money,
let me know. I just don’t think
it fits our mission-critical list
at this time. I’m going to copy
Dan on this note — and will ask
him to fill in any of the blanks
that I might have missed on
the costs associated with traveling Clintons.”
During the same month,
Hayes had demands while
preparing for a trip to Washington, D.C.
“Can you help me set up my
upcoming DC trip? In addition
to the meetings with JK that I
would like to attend (Sec. of
Interior, etc.) I’d like to set
meetings with the following:
USDA Undersecretary Kevin
Concannon, Lucy Caluetti
(Scott Nelson contact), and a
couple of others that I will
send along,” she wrote to Rowinski.
In April 2014, Hayes asked
Carol to use his “DC connec-

tions” to find a way for “our
NW team” to garner an invitation to an event hosted by
U.S. Secretary of State John
Kerry regarding ocean health.
In an email from July 2012,
she reacted badly when she
found out the audience at a
Portland Timbers soccer game
would not be what she had
anticipated.
“This has been a screwy
event. I was never told it was a
second string game. I was told
they expected a crowd of at
least 20,000. I think the Food
Bank thinks that this will become an ongoing event. I’d like
to see it handled differently if
so,” she wrote to Murdock.
Repeatedly, records show
Hayes as someone difficult to
schedule for.
She often peppered Rowinski with questions about meetings, and she often was unavailable when others needed
her.
In an exchange from April
2014, natural resources adviser
Gabriela Goldfarb asked for
time to speak with Hayes,
proposing blocks of time about
an hour long.
In response, Hayes wrote, “I

could do 3:15 for 15 minutes.”
“Let’s try for another time,”
Goldfarb said.
During the same month,
Hoffmann tried to include
Hayes in a call that Hoffmann
thought was scheduled ahead
of time.
“I had been informed that
you both knew I could not
make the next couple of weeks’
meeting at this time but that I
probably could after that,”
Hayes said.
They are notable, in part,
for what they do not contain.
There are few examples in
the emails the Statesman Journal has examined so far of
Hayes discussing policy, floating ideas or debating concepts.
She did not engage in many
substantial conversations via
email, nor did she send notes
or follow-up comments after
meetings.
She was often copied on
memos and policy briefings,
but Hayes apparently offered
her own quite rarely.
This does not appear to fit
with the role Hayes tried to
create for herself. She pushed
to be included in senior staff
meetings, over the objections
of former Chief of Staff Robinhold, and she sometimes
spoke on behalf of the Kitzhaber administration.
However, with some excep-

dy Cook wrote Rowinski.
During that time, Rowinski
also spent time helping furnish
Mahonia Hall:
“I would be open to a round
table for sure,” Hayes wrote
Rowinski on March 19, 2014.
“Might be nice to have a cool
round rug and a round table.

Definitely open to other options.”
She took on pet duty:
“Will you please check cat
boxes and food next week?
Thanks so much!” Hayes wrote
Rowinski on March 16, 2014.
And Rowinski began overseeing newspaper starts and

stops at the home:
“I hope this isn’t too much
of a pain…” Hayes wrote Rowinski on April 1, 2014. “I will
only do this when I am going to
be at or away from Mahonia
for a decent chunk of time.”
Also that month, Rowinksi
was charged with arranging to

Read previous stories about Cylvia Hayes at StatesmanJournal.com

establish speeds up to 70 mph
for passenger vehicles and 65
mph for trucks on interstate
highways. They decided the
safety of drivers outweighed
any benefit that came with raising the speed limit.
This isn’t the first effort to
increase speed limits. In 2011,
two Republicans tried to amend
legislation to raise the speed
limit in rural Oregon interstates
to 75 mph. Former Gov. John
Kitzhaber also vetoed a 1999 attempt to raise the speed limit.

tions in energy policy, she
seemed not to engage in substantive policy conversations.
In fact, on at least one occasion, it appears clear that Chief
of Staff Mike Bonetto, who
replaced Robinhold in 2014,
wanted Hayes to contribute
more to the senior staff conversations.
Staffer Grace Roth wrote to
Hayes, “Greetings. Just a
friendly reminder that weekly
reports are due on Monday’s a
9:00am if possible. That allows
me time to compile and Mike
to review before getting out at
the end of the day.”
At other times, Hayes
seemed to pass off work to
Rowinski and Murdock.
She asked Rowinski to write
a letter of recommendation for
a graduate student in China,
who had asked Hayes for one.
She said she would fill in “details” later and handed off the
student’s resume and information to her secretary.
Hayes also asked Rowinski
to create handouts and a Power
Point presentation that she
would present at a CareOregon
event in May 2014.
Also absent from the emails
the Statesman Journal has
examined so far are the personal moments co-workers
often share. She appeared not
to share funny stories, weekend plans or snide remarks
about dull meetings or even to
make lunch plans with anyone
in Kitzhaber’s office.
Only one exchange shows a
more personal side.
An email string in August
2012 between Hayes and former Gov. Ted Kulongoski’s
wife, Mary Oberst, shows the
two women arranging to have
coffee or lunch to catch up
after losing touch.
“Hi Cylvia, I hope you’re
having a good summer. You’ve
crossed my mind several times
in the last two weeks, for no
particular reason, so I figured
I’d better just check in and
make sure you’re OK. OK?”
Oberst wrote.
In a telling moment, Hayes
replied, clearly referencing a
past conversation between the
two women and hinting at the
difficulty she had adjusting to
her role in Kitzhaber’s world.
“I am doing great — so, so
much better than when we last
spoke. I now have my feet
under me and feel like I am
being very well used in this
strange (I trust you know what
I mean) position,” Hayes said.
“It is just delightful to know
that you have been thinking of
me. Thanks so much for that.”
hhoffman@statesmanjournal.com,
(503) 399-6719 or follow at
twitter.com/HannahKHoffman

have Hayes’ master bedroom
fireplace serviced, the emails
show, and with arranging repairs for two upholstered
chairs in the room.
tloew@statesmanjournal.com,
(503) 399-6779 or follow at
Twitter.com/SJWatchdog

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6A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

THE HUNT IS ON FOR EASTER EGGS
By Alexa Armstrong

Above:
Children look
for eggs
during an
Easter egg
hunt Saturday
at the Historic
Deepwood
Estate in
Salem.
Left: Knowlen
McCullough, 3,
participates in
Saturday’s
Easter egg
hunt at the
Historic
Deepwood
Estate.

Statesman Journal

Chaos ensued at the Historic Deepwood Estate as
children dashed around the garden with one thing on
their minds: candy.
Deepwood was one of several Easter egg hunts that
took place Saturday, including the egg hunt at Salem’s
Riverfront Carousel, the The Salvation Army Ray &
Joan Kroc Corps Community Center’s Easter Egg Hunt
that led kids on a wild goose chase for more than 10,000
eggs, and the second annual Easter Egg Hunt and Community Event at Belcrest Memorial Park.
If you missed Saturday’s hunts, there will be plenty
more Sunday.
» Connection Life Church
Where: 255 College Drive NW, Salem
When: 10 to 11:30 a.m.
Ages: 10 and younger
» Prince of Peace Church
Where: 1525 Glen Creek Road NW, Salem
When: following the 10:45 a.m. service
» Light House Farm Sanctuary
Where: 36831 Richardson Gap Road, Scio
When: 1 to 4 p.m.
What: Easter egg hunt, farm animal feeding

PHOTOS BY
DANIELLE
PETERSON /
STATESMAN
JOURNAL

aarmstrong@statesmanjournal.com; (503) 399-6745 or
follow on Twitter at @AlexaArletta

FREE CLASSES FOR FAMILY MEMBERS & CAREGIVERS

Children fill
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eggs during
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Saturday at
the Historic
Deepwood
Estate.

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Our free classes are for:
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25

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Our Oregon
g

LIVING TOM
MCCALL'S LEGACY

Bees relocated to Ashland
Colony of 40,000
to 50,000 moved
in Locust trunk
Tony Boom
Ashland Daily Tidings

ASHLAND — From 40,000 to
50,000 bees have kept their old
home but are in a new location.
College of the Melissae—Center
for Sacred Beekeeping moved a
10-foot long, up to one-ton Locust
trunk that houses the colony
from Talent to Jackson Wellsprings on the north side of Ashland and planted it upright Tuesday.
A three-and-one-half hour
long operation from pickup to installation in the ground was undertaken slowly. Backhoe operator Tony Corsini, a beekeeper,
changed strategies as required,
re-rigging the trunk at Wellsprings when a first attempt to
raise it ran into troubles.
“That’s the most delicate
thing I have ever done with a
backhoe. I’ve never done anything that sensitive,” said Corsini, who has worked in construction and landscaping. “I just
wanted to make sure we could

get it upright before dark.”
Tuesdays’ operation was the
largest colony move ever undertaken by Laura Ferguson, college director. The college moved
a two and one-half foot long colony out of a tree in Talent in September and installed a 300pound trunk with colony nearby
a couple weeks ago at its Wellsprings campus.
“They are a survivor colony
because they haven’t received
any treatment for bee fungus.
We want the fresh genetics that
are able to survive,” said Ferguson. Colonies that are treated
have been shown to be less fertile and shorter-lived, she said.
The colony is a survivor in another sense also.
The bees had been in the tree
at Marie and Dick Martin’s home
in the 6300 block of Colver Road
for five years, but several safety
concerns prompted their removal.
“I have little ones, great
grandchildren. I was afraid they
would swarm and sting them,”
said Marie Martin.
The tree was also rotting —
the bees were in a hollow cavity
in the base — and was a danger to
the house. The tree was probably
about three-and-one-half stories
tall and was there when she
moved in 46 years ago.

Capital Press

SALEM — A bill meant to encourage the construction of artificial beaver dams in Oregon’s
Malheur Lake drainage basin to
improve stream conditions has
divided environmental groups.
House Bill 3217 would create
a pilot project in the area
streamlining the permitting

process for these structures,
which are intended to restore
stream functions to the benefit
of the environment and landowners.
The Oregon Natural Desert
Association is supporting the
legislation but several other environmental groups came out
against it during a March 31
hearing before the House Committee on Rural Communities,

CALENDAR
THURSDAY
Luckiamute Watershed
Council’s board meeting:
Participate in the discussion of
council business, 7 p.m., Monmouth Volunteer Hall, 144 S.
Warren St., Monmouth. (503)
837-0237.

FRIDAY AND
SATURDAY
Upcycle Oregon: featuring
upcycled artwork by Oregon
artists, and highlighting re-use,
reduction, and upcycling efforts
statewide, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday and noon to 4 p.m.
Saturday. Artist reception 4 to 5
p.m. Friday and an "Upcycled
Fashion" show Saturday, Oregon State Capitol, Galleria, 900
Court St. NE. Free. (971) 2085869, www.up
cycleoregon.org.

SATURDAY

ASHLAND DAILY TIDINGS

Backhoe operator Tony Corsini, a beekeeper, carefully relocates a log with a
bee colony containing some 50,000 bees.

Fake beaver dam bill is divisive
Mateusz Perkowski

Land Use and Water.
Currently, landowners who
hope build artificial beaver
dams must undergo a difficult
permitting process, said Rep.
Brian Clem, D-Salem.
While they may benefit from
better forage conditions, the expense and bureacratic hurdles
prevent many landowners from
pursuing such projects, he said.

ABOUT EARTHFIX
EarthFix is a partnership of seven
public media stations in the Pacific
Northwest. Look for environmental
coverage at earthfix.opb.org. For
information, email EarthFix at
earthfix@opb.org.

earth411: Information and
Solutions for a Better Tomorrow: A family-friendly, zero
waste, educational event hosted
by the City of Salem, Oregon
and the Straub Environmental
Center. Vendors will be present
to provide information, demonstrations, and/or activities that
help community members learn
about the environment and
how to build community resilience. In addition to educational booths, there will be activities, food, and entertainment,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Salem’s Riverfront Park, Amphitheater and
south meadow, 101 Front St. NE.
$3 or 3 cans of food for MarionPolk Food Share. (503) 391-4145,
www.straubenviron
mentalcenter.org.
Marine Science Day 2015:
HMSC will open its doors for a
peek at the cutting-edge research, education and outreach
in marine sciences that makes
this marine laboratory unique.
Meet researchers from Oregon
State University and government agency partners, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m., Hatfield Marine
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(541) 961-8113, http://hmsc.oregonstate.edu/mari
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25

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25

Tools help find canyon mines
Lidar improves
public, fire safety

13th Street Nursery
25

StatesmanJournal.com

LOCAL FIRST

229 State St. Salem • 503-589-0491
Plenty of parking available!
Our flour is:

STRENGTHEN ECONOMY: BUY LOCAL

Santiam Canyon mining operations of yore coupled with seasonally dry trends of recent years combine to create potential safety hazards for foresters and public safety
crews such as firefighters.
Fortunately, new marking and
mapping of abandoned mine sites in
the North Santiam Mining District
has emerged following a four-year
project using lidar (light detection
and ranging). The project is a welcome one for those who work in the
Willamette National Forest, within
which the mining district falls.
Oregon Department of Geology
and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI)
Earth Science Information Officer
Ali Ryan said the U.S. Forest Service initiated the project to inventory mine sites and features, primarily with safety issues in mind.
“USFS was particularly interested in knowing where mine openings
had been closed with foam, because
it accelerates fires,” Ryan said.
One historically-related bonus
that arose through the project was
an appreciation of the tenacity and
perseverance of those who once
mined the canyon.
“The mountains are rugged, with
steep, densely forested terrain,”
said Clark Niewendorp, industrial
minerals geologist with DOGAMI.
“Prospectors had to be extremely
motivated to get in there.”
A March, 1985, report issued
through the U.S. Department of Agriculture titled “Little North Santiam Mining District Cultural Resource Inventory Report” indicates
that initial mining in the region
dates back to 1860 with claims filed
in the Marion County Clerk’s Office.
The report preparer, archeologist James B. Cox Jr., noted:
“Most of the available accounts
speak of the tremendous potential
of the area. This potential has never
been realized. Investment in mineral development in this area runs
into the millions of dollars, but reported production between 1880
and 1947 totalled $25,000 (Anon.,
1951).”
Ryan said some mining resumed
in later years; in 1977 the Shiny
Rock Mining Corporation reopened
the Ruth Mine and development of
several other claims. Mining in the
district ceased in 1992 with the clo-

SPECIAL TO THE STAYTON MAIL

Clark Niewendorp, industrial minerals geologist with the Oregon Department of
Geology and Mineral Industries, examines the entrance of an abandoned mine in
the North Santiam Mining District.

sure of the Ruth Mine.
The decades since have seen the
hundreds of former mine features
overtaken by the region’s heavy
vegetation. DOGAMI’s use of lidar
to uncover these mine features has
paid huge dividends: the project’s
maps reveal 226 abandoned mine
features in the district, including
mine entrances, exploration pits,
and waste rock areas; previous
mapping showed only 58 abandoned
mine features.
“We can now see an incredibly
detailed image of the earth’s surface,” Niewendorp said. “Lidar imagery has real value for inventorying abandoned mine land, because it
can show mine openings that
weren’t well documented, or that
were even completely unknown.”
That’s good news for foresters
and firefighters.
“Lidar aids in the inventory and
closure of abandoned mine features
with the aim to protect public safe-

ty,” said Ruth Seegar, a U.S. Forest
Service minerals geologist for
western and central Oregon and
western Washington.
Ryan said the four-year project
came together incrementally with
lidar technology providing the
foundation.
“Geologists first identified likely abandoned mine features with lidar, then field (workers) verified
those features,” she said. “Finally
we created the inventory maps.”
The safety elements go beyond
just forestry personnel.
“The area is widely used for recreation,” Ryan added. “Oregon’s
had a few dry years; the combination of people and dry conditions
can lead to fire. Knowing where
mine features are helps keep firefighters safe should a fire happen.”
jmuch@StatesmanJournal.com or
(503) 769-6338, cell (503) 508-8157 or
follow at twitter.com/justinmuch

Growing hemp
returns to center
stage as pot
rules change
Once outlawed, this fiber
will be allowed in 10 states
Associated Press

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25

LOVELAND, Colo. — Once banned because it is a close
cousin to marijuana, hemp is coming back in Colorado
and now has its own convention, attracting international interest as a new crop for farmers struggling to
find new crops to stay afloat.
Hemp, which is fiber drawn from marijuana plants,
was outlawed in 1937, but a new Colorado law allows it.
However, farmers are still trying to find ways to get
their plants and seeds to market because federal law
still heavily regulates the industry.
Ten states went ahead and allowed the growing of
hemp. Those states are Colorado, Washington, California, Kentucky, Maine, Montana, North Dakota, Oregon,
Vermont and West Virginia.
The plant’s return to legitimacy could clear the way
for U.S. farmers to compete in an industry currently
dominated by China.
The expo, featuring 70 companies and organization,
is focusing on industrial hemp. Hemp contains less than
0.3 percent of THC, the active ingredient in marijuana.
Plants surpassing that amount cannot be used commercially. Over 1 percent of THC is considered potentially
intoxicating.
“We have a lot of work to do to educate the public
about what hemp is and to educate the farmers interested in bringing hemp back to America. There is a lot of
interest from farmers to grow,” said Morris Beegle, the
Hemp Expo coordinator.
The expo will showcase products made from hemp,
including paper, food, rope and clothing. There will also
be legal experts on hand.
The seeds cannot be transported from state to state,
said Ed Lehrburger, one of three founders of Fort Lupton’s PureVision Technology, a biomass processing facility with a focus on turning hemp into different usable
products.
Hemp regulations were updated in Colorado under
new rules after voters approved the use of medicinal
and recreational marijuana. Industrial hemp must be
registered and is subject to sampling for THC content.
Growing sites must be specified and those boundaries
must be maintained, the Greeley Tribune reported.
National legislation is in the works in an attempt to
exclude industrial hemp from marijuana under the
Controlled Substances Act.
The Drug Enforcement Agency still enforces federal law on Schedule 1 drug imports, which classifies
hemp among heroin, LSD, MDMA and marijuana.

S NOW
StatesmanJournal.com

Pedestrian killed
in Albany hit-and-run
A man died in a pedestrianinvolved hit and run crash on
Century Drive near Kizer Avenue in Albany sometime late
Friday or early Saturday, Oregon State Police Lt. Josh
Brooks said.
Investigators believe that a
silver compact or mid-sized
sedan was northbound on Century Drive near Kizer Avenue

By Jeff Barnard
Associated Press

West Coast fisheries
managers will likely shut
down sardine fishing this
year as numbers decline,
echoing a previous collapse that decimated a
thriving industry and increasing worries that other species might be withheld from the commercial
market.
Fishermen are resigned to not being able to
get sardines, but they
hope the Pacific Fishery
Management Council will
not be so concerned that it
sets the level for incidental catch of sardines at zero, shutting down other
fisheries, such as mackerel, anchovies and market
squid, which often swim
with sardines.
Sardines were a thriving fishery on the West
Coast from World War I
through World War II. Today, there are about 100
boats with permits to fish
on the West Coast.

S

GET THE LATEST
NEWS, UPDATED
THROUGHOUT THE
DAY, AT YOUR
FINGERTIPS

between 11 p.m. Friday and
7:15 a.m. Saturday, when it
struck and killed the pedestrian, Brooks said.
The State Police and the
Linn County Major Crash team
are asking for help finding the
vehicle involved. The car is
thought to have a missing passenger-side mirror and damage to its passenger-side headlight and bumper.
Anyone with information is
asked to call the Oregon State

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Police Northern Command
Center at (800) 452-7888.
—Alexa Armstrong

Police warn public
of phone scam
The Salem Police Department is asking the public to
watch out for a phone scam in
which callers are representing
themselves as Salem Police
Chief Jerry Moore and FBI
agents.

The scammers appear to
call from numbers that show
up as “US Government” or
“City of Salem,” on caller identification systems. They inform victims that they have
won the Publisher’s Clearninghouse Sweepstakes, but in
order to collect the winnings,
victims must confirm their
identity by wiring $1,000 to
Mexico.
“There are multiple types of
phone scams that occur on a

regular basis,” Lt. Dave Okada,
spokesman for the Salem Police Department said.
“Often times the suspects
will impersonate police officers.”
The department suggests
looking up the phone numbers
of the agencies that appear on
caller ID, don’t give out passwords or account information
and don’t wire money to anyone you don’t know.
—Alexa Armstrong

LAST 2 DAYS!

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AFTER EASTER

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Dress shirts & ties.

Reported in the 24 hours ending
at 4 p.m. Saturday (addresses
refer to block number):

EXTRA 30% OFF
Orig.* $12-$89.
Final cost 2.10-21.80.
Clearance juniors’
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ORIG.* PRICES

EXTRA 30% OFF
Orig.* $29-$299.
Final cost
5.80-104.65.
Clearance
sportswear: tops,
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Misses & petites.
Women’s prices
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Residential and business burglaries: 100 Commercial St. NE, 2300
Heath St. S.
Stolen vehicles: 4300 25th Ave.
NE, 4500 43rd Ave. NE.
Traffic crashes: Friday: 4:53
p.m., 700 Edgewater St. NW;
5:34 p.m., Sunnyside and Boone
roads SE; 6:29 p.m., Center and
Commercial streets NE; 9:49
p.m., Rickey Street and Lancaster
Drive SE; 10:35 p.m., Chemeketa
and 21st streets NE; Saturday:
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S.

KEIZER

WHEN YOU TAKE AN
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Orig.* 7.50-$99.
Final cost 1.50-37.13.
Clearance sleepwear
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Traffic crashes: Friday: 7:58
p.m., Lockhaven Drive and
Verda Lane NE.

DALLAS
Traffic crashes: Friday: 3:35
p.m., Salem-Dallas Highway NW.

MARION COUNTY
Residential and business burglaries: 4800 Chinook Court SE, 5100
Ike Mooney Road NE.
Stolen vehicles: 7900 Cascade
Highway SE, 6200 Fiddlers Lane
SE, 100 Village East Way SE.

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Home clearance: housewares, luggage,
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50%-75% OFF

WHEN YOU TAKE AN EXTRA 25% OFF
Orig.* $20-$228. Final cost 4.50-111.15.
Clearance handbags, wallets & wristlets.

Traffic crashes: Friday: 5:38
p.m., Kuebler Boulevard and
27th Avenue SE; 9:54 p.m., State
Street and Lancaster Drive SE;
Saturday: 6:03 a.m., 6300
Silverton Road NE.

MONMOUTH
Stolen vehicles: 300 Main St. W.
Traffic crashes: Saturday: 2:23
a.m., Monmouth Avenue and
Main Street; 2:49 p.m., Pacific
Highway and Clay Street.

POLK COUNTY

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Residential and business burglaries: 3500 Salem-Dallas Highway
NW.
Traffic crashes: Friday: 2:31 p.m.,
22500 Black Rock Road.

FIRE
SALEM
Reported in the 24 hours ending
at 4 p.m. Saturday:
Friday
11:22 p.m.: nonstructure fire,
1400 25th St. NE, extinguished.
Saturday
12:15 a.m.: house fire, 13th and
D streets NE, investigated.

ORIG. PRICES ARE OFFERING PRICES, AND SAVINGS MAY NOT BE BASED ON ACTUAL SALES. SOME ORIG. PRICES NOT IN EFFECT DURING THE PAST 90 DAYS. EXTRA SAVINGS IN
EFFECT THROUGH 4/7/15. “Our lowest prices of the season” refers to our spring season from February 1-April 20, 2015 & may be lowered as part of a clearance. *Intermediate price reductions
may have been taken. Jewelry photo may be enlarged or enhanced to show detail. Fine jewelry at select stores, log on to macys.com for locations. Almost all gemstones have been treated to
enhance their beauty & require special care, log on to macys.com/gemstones or ask your sales professional. Extra savings are taken off already-reduced prices; “final cost” shows price after extra
savings. Clearance items are available while supplies last. Advertised items may not be at your local Macy’s & selection may vary by store. Prices & merchandise may differ at macys.com. N5030146.
OPEN A MACY’S ACCOUNT FOR EXTRA 20% SAVINGS THE FIRST 2 DAYS, UP TO $100, WITH MORE REWARDS TO COME. Macy’s credit card is available subject
to credit approval; new account savings valid the day your account is opened and the next day; excludes services, selected licensed departments, gift cards, restaurants,
gourmet food & wine. The new account savings are limited to a total of $100; application must qualify for immediate approval to receive extra savings; employees not eligible.

10A

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SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

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25

YLVLWXVDWHPHWDEROLFFRP

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL

SECTION B

**

IN MONEY

IN NEWS

Capitalism with
a conscience

With clock ticking on Iran
nuke deal, 3 key hurdles

04.05.15
NOAH BERGER, BLOOMBERG

BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

WHAT’S HAPPENING

ONLINE

“We’re on a real collision course
with a very dark reality.”

TODAY’S
MUST-READS

Dave Puglia, senior vice president
of the Western Growers Association

Traffic
cameras
create
political
furor

MATT KARTOZIAN, USA TODAY SPORTS

In Chicago, voters
may put foot down

uOpening Day:
We’re there as
Cardinals and Cubs
play ball.
uOpening Day:
Full database of
MLB salaries

Aamer Madhani
@AamerISmad
USA TODAY

TODAY ON TV
ABC This Week: California
Gov. Jerry Brown,
Philadelphia Archbishop
Charles Chaput.
CBS Face the Nation:
Energy Secretary Ernest
Moniz; Sen. Lindsey
Graham, R-S.C.,
former senator Rick
Santorum, R-Pa.
CNN State of the Union:
Sen. Dianne Feinstein,
D-Calif.; religion
roundtable.
Fox News Sunday:
Sen. Bob Corker, R-Tenn.;
Washington, D.C.,
Archbishop Cardinal
Donald Wuerl.
NBC Meet the Press:
Louisiana Gov.
Bobby Jindal; baseball
Commissioner Rob
Manfred; Archbishop
of New York Cardinal
Timothy Dolan.
Find it all at usatoday.com
and on our free apps.

FREDERIC J. BROWN, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Some California farmers are switching from growing vegetables to crops that need less water.

PAIN, PROFIT FLOW
FROM DROUGHT

California farmers, others face
challenges, huge economic hit
Elizabeth Weise
and Doyle Rice
USA TODAY

This is an edition of USA TODAY
provided for Statesman Journal. An
expanded version of USA TODAY is
available at newsstands or by
subscription, and at usatoday.com.

Find USA TODAY Sports in today’s local
sports section.

USA SNAPSHOTS©

Celebrating Easter
What adults say are among
their top Easter Sunday plans:

SAN FRANCISCO California’s punishing drought — which led to the
first mandatory statewide water
restrictions in state history last
week — will bring more pain to
some businesses and prosperity
to others if it doesn’t let up soon.
Now in its fourth year, the
drought has already left a swath
of losers — from farmers and ski
areas to golf courses and wildlife
— but also a few winners, as businesses and innovators find ways
to adapt to what might be the future climate of California.
“We’re on a real collision
course with a very dark reality,”
says Dave Puglia, senior vice
president of the Western Growers Association in Irvine, Calif., a
grower and packer trade group.

WHO GETS HURT ...
Visit familyy
and friends

57%

Cook holiday
meal

55%
51%

Attend church
Watch TV

42%

Source Prosper Insights & Analytics/
NRF survey of 6,106 adults
ANNE R. CAREY AND PAUL TRAP, USA TODAY

The mix of crops that’s traditionally grown is changing. Farmers
are plowing up fields where they
used to grow vegetables like broccoli, carrots and tomatoes to put
in nut and fruit trees, which demand less water.
“Cotton has gone from 1.5 million acres to almost nothing.
We’re cutting way back on rice.
The number of dairy cows is
probably going to fall by 100,000

or so,” said Dan Sumner, a professor of agricultural economics at
the University of California-Davis.
The toll on the state’s agriculture industry will get heavier and
U.S. consumers outside California
may feel it, too, when they notice
some supermarket favorites seem
less plentiful. About half of the
fresh produce consumed in the
U.S. and one-third of the nation’s
organic produce is grown in the
state’s fertile Central Valley.
Retail price spikes are unlikely
because of the drought, however.
Only a small portion of what
shoppers pay is based on what
farmers get for their crops —
shipping, handling, packaging
and marketing expenses are collectively bigger. Plus, food prices
are often set on a global scale of
supply and demand, so in a vast
world marketplace, California’s
drought may not be a big factor,
Sumner says.
Already, 17,000 jobs have been
lost in the Central Valley, says
Steve Lyle of the California Department of Food and Agriculture.
California
employed
348,900 people in agriculture in
2013.
About 1 million acres are now
idle due to the drought, according
to the University of California-Davis.

CALIFORNIA DROUGHT:
WINNERS AND LOSERS

WINNERS
Low-water use
appliance
manufacturers:
Reduce consumption
of water in homes.
Xeriscaping and
garden suppliers:
Landscaping that
reduces or eliminates
the need for water from
irrigation.
Desalination plants:
Tapping the limitless
water supply from the
Pacific.
LOSERS
Agriculture:
Thousands of jobs
lost and at least
$1.5 billion in losses.
Ski areas:
Record-low snowpack
was bad for winter
sports
Boating:
Low water levels in
lakes and reservoirs a
blow to recreation.
Source USA TODAY research
DOYLE RICE AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY

v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B

CHICAGO In the most contentious mayoral race Chicago has
seen in decades, there has been
plenty of debate about the city’s
crushing pension debt, declining
credit rating and incumbent
Mayor Rahm Emanuel’s decision
to shutter 50 schools with low
enrollment.
But another issue that is gnawing at Chicagoans keeps popping
up: anger over red-light cameras.
The angst in the nation’s thirdlargest city, where a red-light
camera violation will set you back
$100, is hardly an anomaly. From
South Florida to Southern California, the use of red-light cameras by law enforcement agencies
has emerged as one of the most
contentious issues in local and
state politics.
In Chicago, which has the most
expansive use of red-light cameras in the country, the public
outrage over red lights has been
louder than most.

“It’s been
exposed for what
it really is ... a
way for the city of
Chicago to create
a slush fund.”
Mark Wallace, a South Side resident
who has been hit over $1,000 in tickets

A recent Chicago Tribune/ARP
Research poll found that nearly
three out of four Chicagoans
want Emanuel to eliminate or reduce the use of the cameras,
which are used for the detection,
photographing and fining of leadfooted drivers who blow red
lights.
Emanuel’s opponent in Tuesday’s runoff election, Cook County Commissioner Jesus “Chuy”
Garcia, has repeatedly hit the
mayor for what he calls the “redlight ripoff” and made the issue a
central part of his effort to win
the mayoral race. If elected, Garcia has vowed to eliminate their
use altogether.
The red-light camera system
here has also been dogged by
criticism from motorists and activists who say Chicago’s threesecond yellow lights (the minimum time under federal law) are
too short, leaving drivers with the
choice of running through a light
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B

Militants vow further ‘bloodbath’ in Kenya; five arrested
Tonny Onyulo
and Doug Stanglin
USA TODAY
GARISSA , KENYA

Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, speaking
only hours after militants threatened
another
“bloodbath,”
warned Saturday of harsh measures against anyone who assists
terrorists or helps spread radicalism, particularly Islamic religious schools and rogue imams
in mosques.
The Somalia-based militant
group al-Shabab, which has
claimed responsibility for the

killings at Garissa University
College on Thursday, warned on
Saturday that more violence was
in store for other Kenyan cities.
Kenyatta said it was “time to
be honest with ourselves,” about
the source of radicalism that
breeds terrorism. He ignored
claims by al-Shabab that their
attacks were in response to Kenya sending troops into Somalia
beginning in 2011 to fight
militants.
His remarks came on the heels
of an announcement by the Interior Ministry that five people had
been arrested in connection with
the Garissa siege. Interior Minis-

A survivor of
an attack by
Islamist
gunmen
claimed by
al-Shabab on
a university
campus in
Garissa,
northern
Kenya, is
comforted
by a colleague in
Nairobi on
Saturday.
TONY KARUMBA, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

try spokesman Mwenda Njoka
said on Twitter that three of the
suspects were picked up trying
to cross into Somalia.
He said the three are associates of Mohamed Mohamud,
also known as Dulyadin Gamadhere, a former teacher at a
Kenyan Madrassa Islamic school
who authorities say coordinated
the attack on Garissa University
College.
Kenyan authorities have put a
$220,000 bounty for information leading to Gamadhere’s arrest, the Associated Press
reported.
Stanglin reported from McLean, Va.

2B

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

**

TOLL ON CALIF. AGRICULTURE WILL GROW

The water level is lower than normal in this irrigation
channel near Bakersfield, Calif.

FREDERIC J. BROWN, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

v CONTINUED FROM 1B

“The major part of one of
America’s most productive farming regions could run out of all
water and be unable to farm in
the next number of years,” says
Puglia, the Western Growers Association executive. “That’s what
the future looks like, which is
why people are so scared.”
Researchers are still calculating this year’s potential impact.
The economic hit to the state in
2015 could be $3 billion, compared with $2 billion last year,
says Richard Howitt, an agriculture and resource economics expert at the University of
California-Davis.
He estimates that 20,000 more
jobs could be lost, including in agriculture and food production.
Wildlife will be squeezed too —
not to mention the lucrative tourist dollars it pulls from sportsmen, hikers and other outdoor
enthusiasts. Snowmelt runoff
plays an important role for fish
and other aquatic species since
it’s the primary source of summertime flow for many of the
West’s rivers and streams, according to Leon Szeptycki, executive
director of Stanford University’s
Water in the West program.
That will affect both endangered species such as the Delta
smelt and recreational fish such
as salmon and steelhead.
“The lack of snowpack will
mean acutely low flows for these

Desalination may slake thirst
Doyle Rice
and Elizabeth Weise
USA TODAY
SAN FRANCISCO California has a
giant reservoir to its west that
could supply the parched state. It
is called the Pacific Ocean.
To tap this salty resource, desalination plants and related
technology are being introduced
or revived in the state.
Part of Gov. Jerry Brown’s executive order last week to manage water included streamlining
the permitting process for water
infrastructure projects such as
desalination facilities.
The $1 billion Carlsbad desalination plant, south of Los Angeles, is scheduled to open in 2016.

streams, and many of them will
run dry,” he said. “The impacts on
aquatic life and ecosystems is potentially staggering.”
... AND WHO BENEFITS

Businesses ready to help consumers and businesses change their
behavior — and save them money
through lower water bills —
should do well in California’s
browner landscape.
With strict water use rules
coming, anyone who wants a yard

Santa Barbara has a mothballed desalinization plant from
the 1990s that was built after
California’s previous severe
drought from 1986 to 1991. The
City Council is considering
whether to bring it back into operation.
Towns in Monterey County,
including Carmel, are also exploring desalination plants.
The problem with desalination
is that it’s energy-intensive and
expensive.
The holy grail of desalination is
to draw on renewable power to
remove salt from ocean water.
That’s where all natural fresh water comes from — solar energy
evaporates the water, which rises
into the atmosphere, leaving the
salt in the ocean and then falling

as pure rain.
So far, no one’s found an efficient way to mimic Mother Nature, but engineers are trying. A
competition that gets underway
Monday in Alamogordo, N.M., at
the edge of the White Sands desert, is one attempt to find that
particular grail.
Five teams of engineers will
deploy machines they’ve built to
run on renewable energy to provide clean water as part of USAID
Global Development Lab’s Securing Water for Food initiative.
They are vying to win the
Desal Prize, by producing cost-efficient, durable and easy-tomaintain water purification units.

that doesn’t look like a dust bowl
needs to redesign and replant.
Lawns are out, rocks and watersipping ground covers like sage,
yarrow and iceplant are in.
“People are coming out of the
woodwork” to get water-efficient
gardens now, says Eva Knoppel,
who owns Garden of Eva Landscape Design in Los Angeles.
She specializes in xeriscape
garden design. Xeros means “dry”
in Greek and xeriscaped gardens
are designed to require very little

water, using drought-tolerant
plants.
Knoppel installs rainwater collection systems as well as crafting
gray-water systems that reuse
bath, shower and washing machine water to irrigate gardens.
“Three years ago, I got maybe
one call a week from people who
wanted to transform their gardens. Now I’m getting two or
three calls a day,” says Knoppel.
Nurseries are stocking more
hardy dry-weather plants native

Rice reported from McLean, Va.

to California and the Mediterranean region.
Succulents like agave, aloe and
hen and chicks are popular, as are
perennial grasses like sedge and
blue oat. Manzanita and ceanothus, sometimes called California lilac, are both increasingly
must-have plants for modern
yards because, once established,
they need little water.
Appliance
sales
haven’t
changed drastically so far because
water-efficient clothes and dishwashers have been widely used
for “years now,” reports Bob Harrison with Aztec Appliance in San
Diego.
Even so, he says, he hears more
people mention water efficiency
in his showroom.
“In laundry equipment in particular, that’s where we hear it,”
says Harrison, who’s been selling
appliances for 30 years. “San Diego literally is a desert that’s
parked next to the ocean. We’ve
got to think about it.”
EYES ON THE FUTURE

This being California, the
drought could spur innovation.
Wilshire Country Club in Los
Angeles has effectively remade
the roughs on its golf course into
desert by converting them into
dry patches, which use less water.
California has 1,140 golf
courses,
according
to
GolfLink.com.
Rice reported from McLean, Va.

Ferguson, Mo., shone a light on police tactics
v CONTINUED FROM 1B

and picking up a hefty fine or
braking suddenly and risking the
chance of being rear-ended.
A bribery scandal involving a
top city transportation official
and executives from the city’s former red-light camera vendor —
which was selected by Emanuel’s
predecessor, Richard M. Daley —
hasn’t helped engender trust.
“It’s been exposed for what it
really is,” said Mark Wallace, a
resident of Chicago’s South Side
who has been hit with more than
$1,000 in red-light camera tickets
and has led protests in the city
over the use of cameras. “It’s
nothing more than a way for the
city of Chicago to create a slush
fund that brings in a lot of
revenue.”
Proponents say the cameras
change drivers’ behavior, make
roadways safer and allow law enforcement to better use their
officers.
Opponents, however, point to
studies that show that the cameras don’t reduce accidents. They
also argue the cameras tread on
treacherous
constitutional
ground, because municipalities
are effectively contracting out police work to private companies.
At least nine states (Arkansas,
Maine, Mississippi, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, South Carolina, South Dakota and West
Virginia) have laws on the books
that prohibit or significantly reduce the ability of law enforcement agencies to use red-light
cameras.
Currently, 459 communities
throughout the USA use red-light

SCOTT OLSON, GETTY IMAGES

Mayor Rahm Emanuel, facing a runoff vote Tuesday to stay in
office, has had to answer to Chicagoans over traffic cameras.
cameras, according to the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety.
That number is down from the
2012 peak use of red-light cameras, when 540 communities
were employing them.
Joseph Hummer, an engineering professor at Wayne State University in Detroit who has studied
the effectiveness of red-light
cameras, said that the cameras
have long been a hot-button issue
for many communities.
But the public’s awareness
about municipalities aggressively
pursuing revenues may be growing in the aftermath of the unrest
in Ferguson, Mo., Hummer said.
The months of protests in Ferguson were triggered by the
shooting death last August of an
unarmed black teenager by a

white police officer. But a Justice
Department report released in
March found that racial tensions
had been festering long before
Brown’s death, in large part because Ferguson police had aggressively enforced laws with an
eye on raising revenue through
tickets and fines instead of looking out for the safety of residents.
“People are much more aware
after Ferguson of law enforcement tactics that look like they
are intended for just raising revenue, and they’ve had enough,”
Hummer said.
In California, Assemblyman
Matthew Harper, a Republican
from Orange County, recently introduced legislation that will prohibit the installation of new
red-light traffic cameras in the

state and will require safety studies of existing cameras.
In Ohio, the cities of Akron,
Columbus, Dayton, Springfield
and Toledo are suing the state after it passed a law that requires a
police officer to be present at
camera locations to witness violations for citations to be issued.
The cities say the law, which
was set to go into effect last week,
defeats the purpose of the cameras, and the law amounts to an
unconstitutional ban. A Lucas
County judge granted a preliminary injunction allowing Toledo
to continue to issue citations
from traffic cameras while the
lawsuits are sorted out.
Last month in Florida, two
Broward County traffic judges
tossed out 24,000 red-light camera ticket cases, voiding more
than $6 million in fines by ruling
the program violated state law.
The judges concluded that communities were delegating police
authority to its private camera
provider and violating state law
which says only law enforcement
can issue violations.
There are also battles over redlight cameras — legal and legislative — boiling in Colorado, Iowa,
New Jersey, New York and
Tennessee.
In Chicago, Emanuel has touted the city’s red-light camera program for reducing dangerous
right-angle, or “T-bone,” crashes.
But a Chicago Tribune report last
year found that while cameras in
Chicago reduced T-bone crashes
that caused injuries by 15%, they
increased rear-end crashes that
caused injuries by 22%.
The mayor announced weeks

ago he would remove cameras at
25 of the 174 intersections and reduce the penalty for first time-offenders. That’s in addition to
cameras that were brought down
at 16 intersections earlier in
Emanuel’s term.

Corrections & Clarifications
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contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
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EDITOR IN CHIEF

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USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

**

3B

NATION/WORLD
ON POLITICS
Catalina Camia
@ccamia
USA TODAY

Indiana’s
“religious freedom” law became
fodder for the 2016 presidential
campaign as Republicans such
as Jeb Bush and Ted Cruz
defended Gov. Mike Pence. More
headlines:

WASHINGTON

INTERESTING

DANESE KENON, THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR

Former U.S. senator Evan Bayh

INDIANA
BAYH’S BUZZ

DREW ANGERER, GETTY IMAGES

U.S. Sen. Al Franken

FRANKEN GOADS LETTERMAN
ON JOINING SENATE RACE
If Al Franken can go from
“Saturday Night Live” to the U.S.
Senate, why can’t David
Letterman make a similar leap?
Franken, now a Democratic
senator representing Minnesota,
joked with his friend that he
could get back at Indiana Gov.
Mike Pence for the state’s
“religious freedom” law by going
home and running for the
Senate. “There’s an open seat
there,” Franken said, referring to
the retirement of GOP Sen. Dan
Coats. “Look, when people come
to me — young people — they
say, how do I become a United
States senator? ... Do about 35 or
40 years of comedy and then run
for the Senate. It’s worked every
time.” Letterman signs off from
his late-night show in May.
RUBIO TO ANNOUNCE
‘SOMETHING’ ON APRIL 13
Sen. Marco Rubio has a “big
announcement” coming, but he
wasn’t quite ready to say what
he’s doing. The signs point to the
Florida senator declaring he’s
running for president. Appearing
on Fox News, Rubio directed
viewers to his website for ticket
details. “I’ll announce something
on April 13th, and I hope you all
watch,” he said. Rubio later
confirmed the event will be at
Miami’s Freedom Tower, long a
first stop for exiles fleeing the
Castro regime in Cuba.

ERIC FRANCIS, GETTY IMAGES

Sen. Ted Cruz is third in a new poll.

CRUZ MOVES UP IN POLLING
Sen. Ted Cruz’s strategy to
become the first officially
declared presidential candidate
appears to be paying off.
Several polls released since his
March 23 announcement show
the Texas senator with upward
movement. In a CBS News
survey, 37% of Republicans now
say they would consider voting
for Cruz to be their party’s
standard-bearer. An ABC
News/Washington Post survey
has Cruz with 12% support from
Republicans and GOP-leaning
independents, trailing only Jeb
Bush (21%) and Scott Walker
(13%). Cruz’s status as the only
official candidate in the race
ends Tuesday when Sen. Rand
Paul of Kentucky is set to
announce his candidacy.
KLOBUCHAR TO GIVE BACK
MONEY FROM MENENDEZ
Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., will
return campaign contributions
from indicted Sen. Robert
Menendez, D-N.J. He was
charged with 14 criminal counts,
stemming from a bribery
scheme to help a political donor
and friend in exchange for
nearly $1 million in gifts and
campaign contributions.
Menendez pleaded not guilty.
The Associated Press first
reported the decision by
Klobuchar, who is not accused of
wrongdoing. Politico reports Sen.
Michael Bennet, D-Colo., will
donate $10,000 to charity —
equal to campaign funds he
received in 2010 from a
Menendez committee.

5

O’Malley
pitching
populist
melody

Former senator Evan Bayh
probably won’t attempt a
comeback now that Republican
Sen. Dan Coats is retiring, but
until he offers a Sherman-esque
refusal to run, his actions suggest
it might — just might — remain a
possibility. Bayh is sitting on $10
million in his campaign account,
and he weighed in on Indiana’s
controversial Religious Freedom
Restoration Act. “Every day this
is left to fester out there, our state
is held up to further damage and
attack, so clearly something
needs to be done,” Bayh told The
Huffington Post. Which is exactly
what a Democratic candidate for
the Senate might say.

SENATE
RACES
RIGHT NOW

Susan Davis
USA TODAY

The 2016 Senate
battlefield is still evolving,
and the most interesting
races, candidates and
trends will remain in flux
until Election Day. In an
attempt to help you
digest the campaign along
the way, USA TODAY will
offer periodic takes on
the most interesting
things happening in
Senate races.

JUSTIN SULLIVAN, GETTY IMAGES

Attorney General Kamala Harris

CALIFORNIA
THE GOP BALLOT

Fact is, the top Democrat that
emerges from California’s open
primary — state Attorney General
Kamala Harris is the early
front-runner — will be the
prohibitive favorite to win the
Senate seat next year. But that
doesn’t mean Republicans aren’t
going to put up a fight. At least six
Republicans have jumped into
the race, including two former
state GOP party chairmen, Tom
Del Beccaro and Duf Sundheim,
and Assemblyman Rocky Chavez.
Any Republican in California will
face an uphill battle running
statewide, but the debate might
shine a light on what West Coast
conservatism looks like in 2016.

JACK GRUBER, USA TODAY

VAN HOLLEN’S HAUL

Democratic Rep. Chris Van
Hollen is working to lock up his
status as the early front-runner
for his party’s nomination to
succeed Sen. Barbara Mikulski.
On Wednesday, he reported a
more than $1 million fundraising
haul in the four weeks since
Mikulski announced her
retirement. Van Hollen has
amassed a $2.5 million war chest
to kick off what could be a
bruising primary. Rep. Donna
Edwards is the only other
candidate formally in the race —
and she enjoys the backing of
EMILY’s List, a group that helps
Democratic women who support
abortion rights. A half-dozen
contenders could still jump in.

As Americans hunt Easter eggs
Sunday, people in China will burn
banknotes from hell and torch
iPhones to please dead relatives.
Each year, China’s Tomb
Sweeping Festival sparks creative
moves by entrepreneurs trying to
cash in on the tradition of honoring the deceased and giving them
a comfortable afterlife. Made
from paper and foil, the fake
phones and other items sell for
cents or a couple of dollars at
street stalls and online. They
compete with fake money — a
staple offering — and a widening
array of other paper gifts that
people place or burn beside the
tombs of family members.
The three-day national holiday
of Qingming runs through Monday and includes a massive homage today to the legendary Yellow
Emperor at a temple in Shaanxi
province. Chinese citizens are invited to mourn online at a new
Beijing government platform
commemorating martyrs who
died fighting Japan between 1937
and 1945. —
Calum MacLeod
TRANSGENDER SOLDIER
IS TWEETING FROM PRISON

Chelsea Manning, the soldier
convicted of leaking national security secrets, joined Twitter this
week — from prison.
Fitzgibbon Media, a communications firm, is writing tweets dictated on a phone by the inmate,
previously known as Bradley
Manning. The company, which

USA TODAY
NASHUA , N. H .

With his shirtsleeves rolled up but his tie still in
place, Martin O’Malley is singing
to the Young Democrats.
O’Malley, a former two-term
Maryland governor and likely
presidential candidate, usually
plays in an Irish rock band, but
tonight’s tune is This Land Is
Your Land, a song that’s both patriotic and political: It was written by Woody Guthrie as a leftist
rebuke to God Bless America.
That’s O’Malley’s pitch to voters right now: a call to greatness
combined with populist rage
against Wall Street, similar to
that of Sen. Elizabeth Warren, the
Massachusetts Democrat who
has resisted calls to run for president herself. While the prospect
of a Warren candidacy has stirred
excitement among many liberal
activists, O’Malley’s much more
likely bid has so far failed to register in opinion polls.
Whether his new message resonates with voters in coming
months could determine whether
he can emerge as a credible alternative to Hillary Clinton.
O’Malley proposes reinstating
the Glass-Steagall separation of
commercial and investment

U.S. Sen. John McCain
ALEX WONG, GETTY IMAGES

U.S. Sen. Ron Johnson

WISCONSIN
THE REMATCH

GOP Sen. Ron Johnson may get a
chance to prove his 2010 Tea
Party-fueled upset victory over
Democratic Sen. Russ Feingold
wasn’t a fluke. A Johnson-Feingold
rematch may be the Senate
do-over both Republicans and
Democrats are angling for the
most in 2016. Feingold hasn’t
announced, but he’s traveling the
state to gauge support for a bid.
Johnson, who self-funded nearly
$9 million of his money in 2010,
has announced he won’t
self-finance again. Johnson will
report a $1.2 million first-quarter
haul to kick off the cycle.

ARIZONA
RETIREMENT WATCH

Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., told
CNN in December that he would
“most likely” run for re-election,
but it’s April and he still hasn’t
made a firm announcement about
his political future. By comparison,
McCain made clear by November
2008 that he would run again in
2010. If McCain opts to retire, he
would avoid a potentially nasty
GOP primary and trigger an
open-seat general election race,
and it would continue a steady
stream of exits among the Senate’s
longest-serving, and best-known,
legislators. In recent elections, the
Senate has averaged about six
retirements. So far in 2016, just
four senators have announced
they will not run again.

IN BRIEF
CHINA APPEASES SOULS
IN SPRINGTIME TRADITION

Martha T. Moore

WIN MCNAMEE, GETTY IMAGES

U.S. Rep. Chris Van Hollen

MARYLAND

Ex-Md. governor
crafts a new message
for New Hampshire

FEATHERS FLY WORLDWIDE

NIKLAS HALLÉN, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Revelers stage a mass pillow fight in London’s Trafalgar Square
on the seventh annual International Pillow Fight Day. Over 100
cities joined in the event meant to create “urban playgrounds.”
has about 1,920 followers, made
the announcement on Twitter on
Friday. Within a day, Manning
gained 33,100 followers.
The soldier was convicted of
sending classified documents to
the anti-secrecy websiteWikiLeaks. Manning is serving a 35year prison sentence and is eligible for parole in about seven
years. —
Yamiche Alcindor
7 POLICE OFFICERS FACE
FIRINGS OVER RACIST TEXTS

San Francisco Police Chief
Greg Suhr recommended the firing of seven officers who sent or
received text messages that spoke
of lynching African-Americans
and burning crosses.

Suhr said Friday he has asked a
police oversight committee to approve dismissing the suspended
officers accused of sending racist
and homophobic text messages.
Six others face disciplinary actions such as reassignment to positions with no contact with the
public. Another officer tied to the
investigation has resigned.
The text messages, sent in 2011
and 2012, “are of such despicable
thinking that those responsible
clearly fall below the minimum
standards required to be a police
officer,” Suhr said in a statement.
Lawyers for the officers deny
the texts represent their clients’
opinions, but were naïve banter
to cope with stressful jobs.
— Jon Swartz

JOSH T. REYNOLDS FOR USA TODAY

Martin O’Malley, shown singing to
New Hampshire Young Democrats,
barely registers in polls.

banks and a breakup of banks
considered “too big to fail.”
“There is no reason that billionaires should crowd us out
from our democracy,” O’Malley
told the crowd Tuesday night.
Until recently, O’Malley’s pitch
focused on his record as an effective, data-driven mayor and governor. He still talks about the
need for elected leaders to “get
things done,” but in a Politics and
Eggs breakfast in Bedford, N.H.,
he focused on concentration of
wealth and falling wages for the
middle class. When did he start
channeling Warren? “It’s not a
matter of getting religion,” he told
USA TODAY in an interview
Tuesday. “It’s a matter of getting
how badly this behavior damaged
people throughout our country.”
New Hampshire Democrats
are longtime Clinton fans, but
O’Malley gets a warm welcome
because voters here like a contested presidential primary.
O’Malley, 52, mentions Clinton
as little as possible, though his
references to “fresh” leadership
aren’t hard to figure out.
As for where he differs on issues, he opposes the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade pact and is
no fan of NAFTA.
But O’Malley, who says he’ll
announce a decision on running
before spring is over, doubts his
own party is willing to impose the
regulations on Wall Street he
wants. “For 30 years, we have followed this economic story that
sought to change rules, change
laws, change regulations to concentrate wealth at the very top,”
he says. “That concentrated
wealth now totally owns, in my
opinion, the Republican Party
and is trying to totally intimidate
the Democratic Party. And in
many cases they’re succeeding.”

4B

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

**

WORLD

PHOTOS BY CALUM MACLEOD, USA TODAY

In southwest Tajikistan, horsemen compete to grab a headless sheep and carry it through a goal marked by mounds of earth in the traditional game of buzkashi.

Tajikistan faces tougher times
Impoverished nation’s workers depend on Russia “I want to stay
Calum MacLeod
USA TODAY
ISTIKLOL , TAJIKISTAN
Hundreds of men on horseback
wearing Soviet tank helmets
fought in the traditional sport of
buzkashi at last month’s festival
of Navruz for a chance to win a
cow, carpet, camel or a car.
Those are major prizes in this
Central Asian republic, which
was once part of the Soviet
Union and is now one of the
world’s poorest countries.
The celebration to welcome
the Persian new year offered
only temporary relief from a
looming economic crisis that exposes the vulnerability of this
nation of 8 million people.
As Navruz heralds springtime,
Nurik Babaev, 27, seeks another
construction job in distant Russia, where up to 1 million Tajik
workers — roughly half of all
working-age males — provide
cheap, seasonal labor.
Russia’s recession and the
crash of its currency have
shrunk the value of salaries,
while work permits have become
tougher to get, he said, enjoying

the buzkashi in Istiklol, 40 miles
from the Afghan border.
“I want to stay in Tajikistan,
but there are no jobs here,” said
Babaev, who has spent several
months each year laboring in
Moscow for the past decade. “I
get so tired working there.”
The money Tajik migrants
send home amounts to half of
the economy and makes Tajikistan the world’s most remittance-dependent
country,
according to the World Bank.
Russia’s economic woes, combined with weak export prices
for aluminum and cotton, will
slow Tajik GDP growth to 4%
this year, from 6.7% in 2014, the
Asian Development Bank forecast in March.
Worries about money and
family separation are commonplace. In the capital, Dushanbe,
student Ahliddin Rahmonov, 18,
misses his father, who works in
Moscow so Rahmonov and his
three brothers can stay in
school.
“At Navruz, it’s important to
be together. But the ruble fall
has made life tougher, and the
ticket home is too expensive,”
Rahmonov said.

in Tajikistan,
but there are
no jobs here.”
Nurik Babaev

A man wears a tank helmet to
protect his head in buzkashi.
He studies hydroelectric engineering and hopes for a career at
home, because hydropower
ranks among the few potential
exports of mountainous, landlocked Tajikistan. President

Emomali Rahmon, 62, promises
the country will gain prosperity
as an energy hub, given just 7%
of the land is suitable for growing crops.
Portraits of the authoritarian
ruler, who has led the nation for
23 years, stand everywhere. “We
like him. He cares so much
about the people,” Rahmonov
said as he watched Navruz dances in a public park.
Other residents question the
president’s policies. “It’s bread
and circuses, like the old (Roman) emperors,” Abdumalik Kadirov, a media expert, said about
the state-funded celebrations.
Last month, the president’s
office pledged to construct the
region’s biggest theater, a project
that follows building the world’s
tallest flagpole and largest teahouse.
“The government should take
steps to compensate the (economic) losers. Instead the state
announces a plan to build a

theater,” Kadirov said, adding
that graft, which is rampant in
Tajikistan, could plague the new
project.
In Takob village, north of the
capital and beside the mountain
snow line, farmer Baraka Niyozov, 48, hoped for peace and
smoother roads in 2015. He last
worked in Moscow two years
ago, earning $2,000 in six
months, but he warned fellow
Tajiks that “many people get
cheated there and not paid.”
These days, the whole country
feels cheated, said Tajik artist
Safarov Rakhim, 63, who grew
up in a Soviet orphanage. “Other
nations take advantage of Tajikistan. We are a weak nation,”
Rakhim said.
His latest painting has references to the unequal revenue
deal for a Russian hydroelectric
project being built in Tajikistan.
The artist’s wife cares for their
son’s children in Moscow, and
their daughter raises a family in
Turkey.
“My dream is that my children
and grandchildren live in their
motherland, and it is a prosperous country. I wish that they
were proud of their country,”
Rakhim said from his Dushanbe
studio. “It will happen but will
take a long time.”

Analysis: Iran nuclear deal
facing very tough road ahead
Oren Dorell
@OrenDorell
USA TODAY

The framework nuclear agreement announced Thursday between world powers and Iran sets
the stage for Congress and foreign nations to try to change — or
kill — a final deal.
The United States, United
Kingdom, France, Russia, China
and Germany reached an understanding with Iran on limits to
Iran’s nuclear program in return
for lifting crippling economic
sanctions.
Negotiators now have until
June 30 to fill in the critical details to assure Iran it will get relief from the sanctions as soon as
possible, and guarantee the world
powers that Iran won’t develop a
nuclear weapon. Lying in wait are
Congress, Iran’s enemies in the
Middle East, and difficult issues
that may reshape, delay or doom
a final accord.
CONGRESS: NOT SO FAST

President Obama wants a final
agreement that is short of a formal treaty to skirt approval by a

skeptical Congress, which might
make changes unacceptable to
Iran. Not so fast, lawmakers say.
The Senate Foreign Relations
Committee will take up legislation that requires congressional
approval of a nuclear deal, committee Chairman Bob Corker, RTenn., said.
“If a final agreement is
reached, the American people,
through their elected representatives, must have the opportunity
to weigh in to ensure the deal truly can eliminate the threat of
Iran’s nuclear program and hold
the regime accountable,” Corker
said.
Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.,
who has co-sponsored the bill
and had expressed skepticism as
the deal was emerging, said he’ll
“be giving the framework a very
careful look.”
Schumer’s emergence as the
next Senate Democratic leader
could give critics — now mostly
Republicans — more clout, said
Mark Dubowitz, executive director of the Foundation for Defense
of Democracies, who has testified
before Congress on Iran
sanctions.
Schumer is being lobbied

heavily by both his pro-Israel
constituents and the White
House, Dubowitz said. “He’ll be
the bellwether for which way wavering Democrats go on this.”
A second Senate bill would increase sanctions on Iran after
June 30 if there is no comprehensive agreement by then. Obama
has said he would veto both bills
because they would derail the
talks.
ISRAEL: PUT SCREWS TO IRAN

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu, a vehement opponent of any deal that leaves Iran’s
nuclear program intact, has already launched a fresh round of
sharp attacks. He’s trying to rally
Congress, other world powers
and Iran’s rivals in the Middle
East — such as Saudi Arabia — to
demand a stronger deal that ensures Iran won’t develop a nuclear bomb in secret.
Israel could disrupt the negotiations by assassinating Iran’s nuclear scientists and sabotaging or
attacking its nuclear facilities,
which Iran has accused Israel of
doing in the past. That could
scuttle a final deal, said George
Perkovich, an expert on nuclear

BEHROUZ MEHRI, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Iranian newspapers, with front-page stories on the nuclear
negotiations, are displayed for sale in Tehran on Saturday.
proliferation at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace.
DEVIL IN THE DETAILS

The framework agreement left
key details to be ironed out, including the pace of sanctions relief, when and to what extent Iran
will explain evidence of a past nuclear weapons program — which
it denies ever having — and when
it will take the steps spelled out in
the deal.
The Obama administration
and Iran showed they interpret
the deal differently just within a
few hours of its announcement.

Secretary of State John Kerry
said that “in return for Iran’s future cooperation,” relief from U.S.
and international sanctions will
be provided “in phases.” Iran
could begin qualifying for such
relief as soon as four months to a
year after any agreement begins,
Kerry said.
Iran’s Foreign Minister Javad
Zarif, however, tweeted a response that denied sanctions relief would be gradual. “Iran/5+1
Statement: ‘US will cease the application of ALL nuclear-related
secondary economic and financial sanctions.’ Is this gradual?”

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

**

5B

ACHOO! IT’S SPRING ALLERGY SEASON
The unusually cold winter in the central and eastern U.S. has delayed the start of the pollen season. It is starting to ramp up in the
Southeast and the southern Mid-Atlantic and the central Plains.

ALLERGY FORECAST AND THE TOP 10 ALLERGY CITIES1
LOW

LOW-MEDIUM

MEDIUM

MEDIUM-HIGH

HIGH

Wash.
Maine
Mont.

N.D.

Minn.

Vt.
N.H.

Ore.

9

N.Y.

Wis.

Idaho

Mass.

S.D.
Mich.

Wyo.

Pa.

Iowa
Neb.

Nev.

8
Ill.

Utah

7

Kan.

Calif.

N.J.

Ohio
Md.

Ind.
W.
Va.

2

Colo.

Va.

Del.

10

Mo.
Ky.

3
Ariz.

Providence

R.I.
Conn.

4

Okla.

5
N.C.

Tenn.

Ark.

N.M.

S.C.
Miss.

1
La.

Texas

1 – The rankings are based on
pollen counts, medication usage
and the number of allergists in a
community.
As of April 2, data for Hawaii and
Alaska are not available.

Fla.

6
McAllen

TREE POLLEN
(As of April 1)

LOW

Ga.
Ala.

GRASS POLLEN
HIGH

FACTS ABOUT ALLERGIES

LOW

MOLD SPORES
HIGH

LOW

HIGH

SPRING IS IN THE AIR
Allergy sufferers can often trace their sniffles back to tree pollen, the primary allergen in the spring. Weather
conditions determine pollen concentrations.

1
1 IN 5

Windy, dry days allow the
pollen particles to float freely
through the
air.

2

Allergy symptoms often
start when pollen
counts exceed 50
grains per cubic meter.

3

Heavy rains wash
airborne pollens out of
the air, providing some
relief for allergy
sufferers.

Winds

Americans suffer from some
form of allergies

Rain

ALLERGY TIME

Pollen
grains

Pollen counts are
typically highest
between

5 a.m.
and

10 a.m.
50 million
Estimated number of
Americans who suffer from all
types of allergies including
indoor/outdoor, food and
drug, latex, insect, skin and
eye allergies.

$14.5 billion
The estimated annual cost
of allergies.

Home sick
Allergies are the 5th-leading
chronic disease and a major
cause of work absenteeism
for adults.

$12.3 billion
is for direct costs including
$1.3 billion for doctor office visits
and $11 billion for medications.

4
ALLERGY SEASONS

The three main allergy “seasons” in the U.S. are:
Tree pollen in the spring.

AVOIDING ALLERGIES
Watch the pollen count. If pollen counts
are high, you may want to avoid outdoor
activities during early morning hours. (Find
pollen level sites such as Pollen.com and
the Weather.com)

Grass in late spring and early summer.

When driving, keep your car windows
closed.

Ragweed in late summer and fall.

When you're home, keep your bedroom
windows closed.

The time of the tree pollen season is most variable,
because it's dependent on winter weather. The
other seasons are not as variable, because they
depend more on the amount of daylight.

Sources The Weather Channel; Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America; Pollen.com; Estelle Levetin, University of Tulsa
DOYLE RICE AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY

Heavy spring rains can promote grass
growth, which can lead to greater
concentration of grass pollen later in
the spring and into early summer.

If you've been outdoors, take a shower
and wash your hair to get rid of any pollen.

6B

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

**

MONEY
MONEYLINE

@marcodellacava
USA TODAY

Beth Belton
@bethbelton
USA TODAY

Marc Benioff is
having his way with a plate of
scrambled eggs and chicken-apple sausage at a cliffside diner
overlooking the Pacific.
Casual in a sweatshirt and
baseball cap, he’s easy to confuse
for a tourist, unless you happen
to know that the logo on both
items — UCSF Benioff Children’s
Hospital — is the result of the
$200 million the Salesforce.com
founder gave to the facility that
now bears his name.
“Just look at that,” Benioff, 50,
tells USA TODAY, gesturing at
the majestic view. “We live in a
physical nirvana. I’m just saying,
let’s also make it a business nirvana, a K-12 nirvana, a social justice
nirvana. It’s a doable thing.”
Benioff’s big pronouncements
and large philanthropic footprint
are well known here in the techfocused Bay Area. But now that
the rest of the country knows his
name, many may wonder who he
is and why he cares.
Last week, Benioff led a group
of tech CEOs in opposing Indiana’s new Religious Freedom
Restoration Act on the grounds
that it was both discriminatory
toward gays and lesbians and
harmful to business-recruiting
efforts.
As Republican Gov. Mike
Pence struggled to tweak the
bill’s language — supporters
sought legal protection for business owners if they denied services to the LGBT community
based on religious beliefs — Benioff urged his customers to
avoid the state and offered relocation checks for employees.
Other CEOs followed his impassioned lead.
Apple CEO Tim Cook wrote an
op-ed essay for The Washington
Post. PayPal co-founder Max Levchin rallied dozens of signatures
for an open letter to legislators.
And Yelp CEO Jeremy Stoppelman penned a blog post saying it
would be “unconscionable” to do
business in a state that etched
discrimination into law.
“We’ve been out there attracting attention and operating on a
scale we’re not used to, and I have
to say it’s not a comfortable feeling,” he says in a soft voice that
belies his towering 6’5’’ frame.
Benioff stops to tuck voluminous curls under his hat.
“I didn’t understand this was
part of a larger matrix and it was
all going to implode, and I also
didn’t know we’d be so inspiring
to other business leaders,” he
says.
That’s because the tech leader
is convinced something bigger is
brewing, a business-led movement perhaps unprecedented in
the country’s history.
SAN FRANCISCO

BUSINESS SURVEILLANCE
GREECE IS HANGING ON
In a nutshell: Greece won’t
default on payments to the International Monetary Fund this
week even though government
coffers are nearly empty, according to a report by Bloomberg
News on Saturday.
The star: Finance minister Yanis
Varoufakis is set to meet IMF
Managing Director Christine
Lagarde in Washington today to
discuss the Greek government’s
pending reform package. The
goal is to avoid the nation defaulting on its debt and exiting
the euro.
The money: The financially beleaguered nation has an IMF
payment of about $494 million
due Thursday. And the government is in talks with European
Union officials, who are withholding aid payments until a
deal is reached on economic
overhauls, Bloomberg reports.

MICHAEL KOVAC, GETTY IMAGES, FOR VANITY FAIR

IN THE HOT SEAT
TALK ABOUT A PAYDAY
Discovery Communications’
David Zaslav was awarded
$156.1 million in compensation
last year, making him one of the
highest-paid CEOs in corporate
America. And it’s about five times
the compensation he earned in
2013. What gives? The bulk of his
pay package comes from stock
and option awards that will vest
over the course of a new six-year
contract he signed early last
year, according to the company’s
proxy filing released late Friday.
Go figure. The company’s stock
fell by 25% last year.

JEWEL SAMAD, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

ON THE FRONT BURNER
WE CAN DREAM, CAN’T WE?
Luxury is a huge trend at the 2015
New York International Auto
Show and nothing illustrates that
better than the uber-luxurious
Aston Martin Vulcan, on display
at the Javits Center. Only 34 of
the vehicles will be manufactured, each of carbon fiber. The
sale price is a cool $2.8 million.
But here’s why: Vulcan tops
speeds of over 200 mph and can
go from 0 to 60 mph in three
seconds. Vroom!
WHO’S ONLINE
YOU DON’T HAVE
TO DO IT ALONE
Doing your taxes this week?
Check out the latest tips and
advice to make filing as
painless as possible at
usatoday.com/money/

USA SNAPSHOTS©

Older folks
stay mum
Percentage who think it’s not
socially appropriate to talk with
friends about personal budget,
taxes, etc., by age group:
18 - 34
35 - 54
55+

CHANGE AGENTS

Marco della Cava

41%
63%
77%

Source GoBank survey of 1,030 adults
JAE YANG AND JANET LOEHRKE, USA TODAY

BENIOFF
WANTS
TO LEAD
CHANGE
SALESFORCE CEO:
USA NEEDS
‘COMPASSIONATE
CAPITALISM’

“We live in
a physical
nirvana. ... Let’s
also make it a
... social justice
nirvana. It’s a
doable thing.”
Marc Benioff, founder of Salesforce.com

Think back to the social issues
of the 1960s and it’s difficult to
imagine a leading CEO taking a
stand on civil rights or the Vietnam War. But, “in the future, before people do something like
this (law in Indiana), they’re going to have to look for the business community’s support,” says
Benioff, leaning forward.
He pushes his plate aside and
bears down. “We CEOs, we’re all
over the world,” he says. “We’re
talking to the presidents of other
countries often, negotiating our
own issues with them directly often. So we need to be consulted
as an integral part of the ecosystem, not like something on the
side called business.”
Part of that is down to the
force of Benioff’s personality.
When he tells you he mentors
young tech entrepreneurs, what
he really means is he isn’t afraid
to act like their big brother.
“He’s a gentle giant, but he
won’t adjust his message for an
audience and he will beat you
over the head with a point of view
if you do not have one,” says Levchin, 39, now CEO of online financial services company Affirm.
Stoppelman credits Benioff
with persuading him to have Yelp
adopt a version of Salesforce’s 11-1 giving strategy, where 1% of
the company’s equity, product
and employee time is donated to
the local community. (To date,
Salesforce Foundation has donated $80 million in grants and
840,000 hours of time, and allowed 24,000 non-profits to run
Salesforce’s cloud computing
platform for free or at discounted
rates.)
Benioff shrugs off such admiring compliments. “They’re just
my friends, and when I am thinking about something, I call them,”
he says.
Benioff goes on admiringly
about Walmart CEO Doug
McMillon, who is urging Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson, a Republican, to veto a law similar to
Indiana’s, saying it “undermines
the spirit of inclusion.”
“That’s unprecedented, frankly, that a business leader would
go straight to the governor, but
Walmart is like a nation-state
without nuclear weapons,” he
says, allowing himself a laugh. “I
tell you one thing, if Doug calls
the premier of China, he answers
the phone. If (Hutchinson) calls
the premier, he is not answering.”
Benioff was precocious, starting a company at 15 and becoming an Oracle vice president at 26
before in 1999 starting Salesforce, which is valued at $36 billion, a tenth of which is the
founder’s estimated net worth.
USA TODAY’s Change Agents series
highlights innovators and entrepreneurs looking to change business and
culture with their vision. Email della
Cava at mdellacava@usatoday.com.

DAN ESCOBAR

CUTTING THE CORD

Sony makes play for streaming TV market
New
service
available
only to
PS4
and PS3
owners
in a few
cities for
now

Mike Snider
@MikeSnider
USA TODAY

Sony has entered the cord-cutting game with its new streaming
TV service, PlayStation Vue.
For now, only PlayStation 4
and PS3 owners in Chicago, New
York and Philadelphia can sign up
for the service, which starts at
about $50 a month.
But Sony does plan to expand
into new cities later this year.
This past week, it let me testdrive the service from my home
near Washington, D.C.
On its face, PlayStation Vue answers some cord-cutting prayers
that even Sling TV, which went
live last month, does not. For
starters, it has more channels —
more than 50 in the entry-level
package and more than 85 in the
$69.95 monthly package.
And for those who can’t use an
antenna — or don’t want to use
one — to get local TV signals,
PlayStation Vue has live broadcasts from local affiliates for CBS,
Fox, NBC and Telemundo.
An obvious shortcoming: content from Disney including ABC,

SONY PLAYSTATION

ESPN and Disney channels.
Among the other channels on
board: Comedy Central, CNBC,
Discovery Channel, FX, Fox Business and Fox News Channel, USA
Network, Food Network, Nickelodeon, TBS and USA.
At the next-highest monthly
price level ($59.99), Vue has regional sports networks. The
$69.99-a-month package tosses in
more than 25 additional channels, including Fox College Sports
networks and the FXM movie
channel and Palladia.
Like Sling TV, there’s no contract and there’s no new equip-

Sony PlayStation Vue
has more
than 50 channels in its
entry-level
package, and
it goes up
from there.

ment needed; you just download
it as an app. For now, Sling TV is
available nationwide on more devices including computers, Amazon Fire, Roku and Xbox One.
Sony says PlayStation Vue will
soon be available on iPad and
other devices.
Vue’s functionality rivals that
of Sling TV, too. A guide shows
you everything available to watch.
Live TV can be paused, fast-forwarded and reversed.
You can tag a favorite show and
its episodes will be stored in the
cloud for four weeks. And you can
record individual programs that
can be found in My Shows.
Video quality is very good. The
service might appeal to homes
with multiple PlayStation owners
because up to three people can
watch different Vue content simultaneously on one account.
But there are some obvious
shortcomings. The $50-$70 price
range approaches that of some
current pay-TV packages. And
considering that Vue doesn’t have
ESPN, many consumers might
have to subscribe to Sling TV, too.
“Cutting the Cord” is a regular column
covering Net TV and ways to get it

C

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

SundaySports
y p
CAN THE EXPOS RETURN TO MONTREAL? PAGE 6C

OSU FOOTBALL

Passing game work in progress
OREGON STATE
FOOTBALL

Offense adjusting to new system
By Gary Horowitz
Statesman Journal

CORVALLIS — Spring football
has been about change for the
Oregon State football team.
New coaching staff. New nohuddle, spread offense. New 3-4
defense.
Add a new starter at quarterback that is yet to be determined and there’s a lot for players to process.
So when first year coach Gary Andersen said “you can always be better for sure” after
Saturday’s practice at Reser
Stadium, that should not be
viewed as a negative.

Coach: Gary Andersen, first season

“I think it’s important that we
remember where we’re at in
this whole process,” Andersen
said.
With the departure of fouryear starting quarterback Sean
Mannion, the Pac 12’s career
leader in passing yards with
13,600, much attention has been
focused on the quarterback
competition.
Sophomore Luke Del Rio,
redshirt freshman Nick Mitchell and true freshman Seth Collins continue to share reps, and
the passing game remains a
work in progress.

Starters returning: Nine on offense, two on defense
Spring game: 1 p.m. April 18, Reser
Stadium (Pac-12 Networks). Tickets
are $6 apiece or $5 with the purchase of four or more. For ticket
information, call (800) GO-BEAVS or
visit beavertickets.com
Season opener: 5 p.m. Sept. 4 vs.
Weber State, Reser Stadium
BRENT DRINKUT/STATESMAN JOURNAL

Oregon State quarterbacks Seth
Collins (4), Marcus McMaryion (3)
and Nick Mitchell (14) go through
drills during practice.

See OSU, Page 3C

WISCONSIN 71, KENTUCKY 64

DUKE 81,
MICHIGAN STATE 61

Devils
roll to
title
game
By Jim O'Connell
Associated Press

AP

Kentucky’s Willie Cauley-Stein walks off the court as Wisconsin players celebrate the Badgers’ 71-64 victory in the national semifinal on Saturday.

NOBODY’S
PERFECT
Badgers to play for title after handing UK 1st loss

By Eddie Pells
Associated Press

INDIANAPOLIS — Nobody ever said they were
perfect. Now, the Kentucky Wildcats aren’t undefeated, either.
The hard-nosed Wisconsin Badgers did what
nobody else could Saturday night — knocking off
the Wildcats 71-64 behind 20 points and 11 rebounds from Frank Kaminsky and a clutch comeback down the stretch.
Now, it’s Wisconsin heading to the final to play
Duke, an 81-61 winner over Michigan State in the
earlier — and much less entertaining — semifinal.
“It gives us another 40 minutes, I know that,”
said Wisconsin coach Bo Ryan, who leads the Badgers to their first final since 1941.
And Kentucky has a long ride home, finishing
the season at 38-1 — two wins short of becoming
the first undefeated team in college basketball
since the 1975-76 Indiana Hoosiers. Instead, these

NBA-ready group of Wildcats join the star-studded 1991 UNLV team as the latest to take an undefeated record into the Final Four but lose in the
semifinals.
So much has been made of Kentucky’s unflappability when things don’t look so good — like
when the Wildcats got outplayed against Notre
Dame last week but somehow pulled out a twopoint win to make it to Indy.
This time, though, it was Wisconsin that came
up clutch.
Trailing by four and gasping for breath after
going 6 minutes without a bucket, the Badgers
(36-3) responded with an 8-0 run to take a lead
Kentucky couldn’t overcome.
Kaminsky and Bronson Koenig went 7 for 8
from the line over the last 24 seconds to seal the
win.
Kentucky’s last, best chance came while trailing by three with 12 seconds left. But Karl-Anthony Towns received the ball in the post and got
fouled. He made only one free throw, and from
there, Wisconsin iced it from the line.

INDIANAPOLIS — Two star
freshmen, a solid senior and
some of the trademark defense
Duke has long been known for
have the Blue Devils back in the
national championship game.
And in Indianapolis, no less.
Justise Winslow scored 19
points, fellow freshman Jahlil
Okafor added 18 and senior
Quinn Cook had 17 to lead topseeded Duke to an 81-61 victory
over Michigan State on Saturday and into yet another title
game in the city known for a
500-mile auto race.
The Blue Devils won it all in
Indianapolis in 1991, their first
under Mike Krzyzewski. The
winningest men’s Division I
coachhas a 9-3 record in national semifinal games, led them to
their fourth and most recent title in 2010.
“The city’s great, and even if
we didn’t win tonight the city
would still be great and the venue would be great,” Krzyzewski
said. “This team, though, deserved to be in it. So it makes it
even better. They’ve been so
good in this tournament and the
stage has not been too big for
them.”
The start against Michigan
State didn’t look too promising
for a trip to Monday night’s title
game. The Spartans were ahead
14-6 just 4 minutes into the
game, making five of their first
seven shots and the first four
they took from beyond the 3point line.
Things changed and in a hurry.
“After the first four minutes,
we were a different team. We
played great basketball tonight,

See DUKE, Page 3C

DAVID J. PHILLIP/AP

Duke's Jahlil Okafor grabs a
rebound against Michigan State's
Colby Wollenman during their
national semifinal game Saturday.

REACH US: sports@StatesmanJournal.com, (503) 399-6611

2C

Sports

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

TRAIL BLAZERS ONLINE

StatesmanJournal.com

RECRUITING

Oregon adds 2 football commits
By Pete Martini
Statesman Journal

DON RYAN/AP

Portland Trail Blazers forward LaMarcus Aldridge, right,
drives on New Orleans Pelicans forward Anthony Davis
during the first half in Portland, Ore., on Saturday.

FOR LAST NIGHT’S SCORE AND GAME
INFO VISIT STATESMANJOURNAL.COM

Oregon’s football team landed
two recruits this week, bringing the
2016 recruiting class up to seven
commits.
Jacob Capra, a consensus threestar offensive lineman from Auburn, California, committed on
Thursday. At 6-foot-5, 265 pounds,
Capra is rated by Rivals.com as the
24th-best offensive lineman in the

BASEBALL
LOCAL SCORES

COLLEGE BASEBALL
Vanderbilt at Georgia..................................................9 a.m., CH425 SEC
Texas at Oklahoma State......................................11 a.m., CH411 ESPNU

COLLEGE SOFTBALL
Oregon at UCLA ..........................................................Noon, CH36 ESPN2
Alabama at Kentucky ..........................................12:30 p.m., CH425 SEC
Mississippi State at Arkansas .....................................3 p.m., CH425 SEC

COLLEGE WOMEN’S BASKETBALL
FINAL FOUR
South Carolina vs. Notre Dame ..........................3:30 p.m., CH35 ESPN

CLASS 4A
Scappoose 6, North Marion 5 (8)
Tillamook 3, Stayton 2
CLASS 3A
Warrenton 11, Willamina 1

CLASS 4A
Scappoose 6, North Marion 5 (8): Emry
Patterson went 3-for-4 with an RBI and a
double to lead the host Huskies, but the
Indians came away with the extra-innings
win on Saturday.
Scappoose
North Marion

SOFTBALL

COLLEGE WOMEN’S LACROSSE

LOCAL SCORES

California at Oregon..............................................1 p.m., CH420 PAC-12

202 001 01 —6 10 3
201 010 10 —5 9 2

Forteny, Millar (4), Nelson (6), Parsons (7), Johnson (8) and
Backus. Ensign, Robinson (3), Kendall (4), Beachy (5), Schmitz
(6) and Barrell. Win— Parsons; Loss— Schmitz. 2B— Ramon
(NM), Patterson (NM).
Records: Scappoose (6-3), North Marion (3-8).

Maryland vs. Connecticut ..........................................6 p.m., CH35 ESPN

Stanford at Colorado ...........................................11 a.m., CH420 PAC-12

CLASS 4A
Cascade at Seaside (DH), late
CLASS 3A
Warrenton/Jewell 7-2, Willamina 4-1 (9)

PGA, Shell Houston Open .......................................10 a.m., CH33 GOLF

WEST VALLEY
Dayton 14, Amity 0 (5 innings): The Pirates jumped all over the Warriors in the
early innings as they cruised to a win on
Friday.

PGA, Shell Houston Open .............................................Noon, CH8 KGW

Amity
Dayton

GOLF
Drive, Chip and Putt Championship.......................6 a.m., CH33 GOLF

LPGA, ANA Inspiration...............................................2 p.m., CH33 GOLF

HOCKEY
NHL, Pittsburgh at Philadelphia.................................9 a.m., CH8 KGW
NHL, Washington at Detroit.....................................2 p.m., CH418 NHL
NHL, St. Louis at Chicago ..................................4:30 p.m., CH32 NBCSN

MLB
Cardinals at Cubs ........................5 p.m., CH36 ESPN2; Radio 1080 AM

NBA
Rockets at Thunder ......................10 a.m., CH2 KATU; Radio 1080 AM
Bulls at Cavaliers .....................12:30 p.m., CH2 KATU; Radio 1080 AM
Warriors at Spurs.........................................................4 p.m., CH416 NBA
Clippers at Lakers...................................................6:30 p.m., CH416 NBA

SOCCER
EPL, Burnely vs. Tottenham Hotspur..............5:30 a.m., CH32 NBCSN

back Brady Breeze (Portland),
three-star tight end Cam McCormick (Bend), four-star quarterback
Seth Green (Allen, Texas), four-star
wide receiver Theo Howard (Westlake Village, California) and threestar wide receiver Dillon Mitchell
(Memphis, Tennessee).
Oregon’s 2016 recruiting class
currently ranks 13th in the nation
and No. 1 in the Pac-12 Conference,
according to 247 Sports.

Livingston hit a two-out, two-run double
in the seventh of the nightcap to give Chemeketa the lead.
Chemeketa 6-6, Corban JV 2-5 (11 innings): The Storm took two from the Warriors’ JV team on Saturday.
In the first game, Nick Livingston went
2-for-4 with two RBIs and a triple.
Game 2 needed 11 innings to determine
a winner as Kris Jackson pitched 4 1/3 innings of relief where he didn’t allow a single hit. The Storm’s Drew Seater went 3for-7 on the afternoon, but it was his third
hit that sent everyone home happy as he
drove in the winning run in the bottom of
the 11th.
Corban 6-6, Oregon Tech 3-1: The Warriors took both games of a doubleheader
against the Owls.
In the first game, Corban used a four
run fourth inning to jump ahead of the
Owls and hold on as Adam Shumka recorded his seventh save of the season.
In Game 2, Corban starting pitcher Tony
Davidson pushed his record to 2-3 on the
year with a complete game performance.
Davidson gave up 10 hits on the afternoon, but only allowed one run for the
Owls to cross home.
Nic Coffman provided the offensive
power in the game for the Warriors by going 3-for-4 with four RBIs.
Pacific 8-8, Willamette 4-1: A rough final
three innings in the first game paved the
way for a Boxers’ sweep over the Bearcats.
Willamette was up 3-1 heading into the
top of the seventh, but from there the
Boxers scored seven runs over the final
three innings to secure the win.
Willamette had two-hit days from Austin Hagarty, Hunter Gallant, Tiras Koon
and Gordie Clary, but could only push four
runs total across the plate.
In the second game, Pacific jumped out
to an early 3-0 lead by the top of the third
and never looked back.
Willamette was held to just four hits in
the second game. The Bearcats (18-9, 10-8)
will play a doubleheader at noon on Tuesday at Puget Sound.

the first inning and then padding their
lead with one in the sixth and another
pair in the seventh.
Leadoff batter Kelsie Gardner led the
way for Western Oregon (15-22, 7-5
GNAC) in the defeat, going 3-for-4 while
Lexi Jennings added a two-run homer in
the fifth.
Jenning also had a homer in the sixth inning of Game 2, but this time it was a solo
shot. She did pick up another RBI earlier in
the game as she reached on a fielder’s
choice and scored Jourdan Williams in the
first inning after Ku’ulei Siolo singled
home Zoe Clark and Amanda Evola.
Willamette 9-8, Puget Sound 0 (5)-0 (6):
The Bearcat pitching trio of Jade Smith,
Victoria Bradshaw and Hayley Glantz
combined to keep the visiting Loggers
scoreless Saturday as Jenna King had two
hits in both games to lead the way on offense.
King also had an RBI in the first game
and two in the second for Willamette (1117, 8-10 Northwest Conference), while
Kayla Rieger went 2-for-4 with three RBIs
and a triple in the nightcap.
Smith pitched the first three innings of
the opener for the win against Puget
Sound (4-26, 1-17 NWC) and Bradshaw
picked up the save in two innings of relief.
Glantz tossed a complete game in the circle for the shutout win in game 2.
Corban 13-8, College of Idaho 11-2: The
host Warriors swept the Yotes on Saturday as Kyrianna Sorensen’s five-hit day led
the offensive output.
Sorensen, a Sprague graduate, went 3for-4 with an RBI in the opener for Corban
(30-9, 13-4 CCC) and then followed that
up by going 2-for-4 with two RBIs in the
second game.
Anne Binschus also had a pair of multihit games for the Warriors, with two hits
in each contest while Kali Van Cleave and
Taylor Eilders both launched homers in
the first game.
Clackamas CC 6-5, Chemeketa 2-4 (8): The
Storm were swept Saturday by the host
Cougars as Rayne Sylvster went 2-for-4 in
Game 1and Ashlea Bowden hit a homer in
each game.
Clackamas rallied in the second contest
and won on a walk-off single in the eighth
after Chemeketa built a 4-0 lead in the
first three frames.
— Statesman Journal

AREA
HIGHLIGHTS
HIGH SCHOOLS

TODAY
ON THE AIR

2016 class.
Oregon also received a commitment from defensive back Troy
Warner on Friday. Scout.com has
Warner rated as a four-star recruit,
and Rivals has him as a three-star
talent. At 6-foot-2, 185 pounds, Warner is ranked by Rivals as the 25thbest defensive back in the 2016
class.
In addition to Capra and Warner,
the Ducks’ 2016 class has commitments from four-star defensive

000 00 — 0 3 5
383 0x — 1412 1

Pendergraft and Dumler. Ray, Couch (4) and Ringnalda.
Win— Ray; Loss— Pendergraft.
Records: Amity (2-2), Dayton (8-2).

COLLEGES
BASEBALL
Central Washington 6-9, Western Oregon
3-4: The visiting Wolves dropped a pair of
games against the Wildcats on Saturday
as Garret Harpole led the losing effort in
the opener with a 2-for-4 outing, plus a
double and a homer, while Marcus Hinkle
paced the offense in the nightcap, going
2-for-4 with a homer.
Western Oregon (16-18, 12-7 GNAC)
gave up 23 hits on the day compared to its
total of 12.
Chemeketa 5-4, Linfield JV 1-2: The Storm
swept the Wildcats JV team on Friday as
Kendall Motes tossed a complete game
four-hitter to win Game 1 and then Nick

EPL, Sunderland vs. Newcastle United................8 a.m., CH32 NBCSN

SOFTBALL
Western Oregon 5-6, St. Martin’s 9-1: The
visiting Wolves battled back from an early
defeat to take the nightcap against the
Saints on Saturday, scoring three runs in

MLS, Real Salt Lake at San Jose..............................2 p.m., CH36 ESPN2
MLS, Philadelphia at Kansas City ..............................4 p.m., CH408 FS1

TENNIS

SCOREBOARD
COLLEGE BASKETBALL

Miami Open, men’s final ..........................................10 a.m., CH35 ESPN
— Events are accurate and up-to-date as of press time —

TODAY
IN THE AREA
COLLEGE BASEBALL

Men’s NCAA Tournament Glance
All times PDT/MST
FINAL FOUR
At Lucas Oil Stadium
Indianapolis
National Semifinals
Saturday, April 4
Duke 81, Michigan State 61
Wisconsin 71, Kentucky 64
National Championship
Monday, April 6
Duke (34-4) vs. Wisconsin (36-3), 6 p.m.
Women’s NCAA Tournament Glance
All times PDT/MST
FINAL FOUR
At Tampa, Fla.
National Semifinals
Sunday, April 5
Notre Dame (35-2) vs. South Carolina (34-2),
3:30 p.m.
UConn (36-1) vs. Maryland (34-2), 5:30 p.m.
National Championship
Tuesday, April 7
Semifinal winners, 5:30 p.m.

Michigan State at Oregon, Noon

COLLEGE WOMEN’S GOLF
Oregon State at the Rebel Intercollegiate in Oxford, Miss.

COLLEGE WOMEN’S LACROSSE
California at Oregon, 1 p.m.

COLLEGE SOFTBALL

MLB
All times PDT/MST
Saturday’s Games
Detroit 1, Tampa Bay 0
Philadelphia 6, Pittsburgh 4
N.Y. Yankees 4, Washington 3
Boston 4, Minnesota 2
Toronto 9, Cincinnati 1
Texas 4, N.Y. Mets 4, tie
Milwaukee 4, Cleveland 3
Atlanta 5, Baltimore 3
Seattle 6, Colorado 3
San Francisco 2, Oakland 1
Kansas City 3, Houston 1
Arizona 4, Chicago Cubs 2
L.A. Angels at L.A. Dodgers, late
Sunday’s Game
St. Louis (Wainwright 0-0) at Chicago Cubs
(Lester 0-0), 5:05 p.m.

GOLF
PGA-Houston Open Par Scores
Saturday
At Golf Club of Houston
The Tournament
Humble, Texas

Purse: $5.9 million
Yardage: 7,441; Par: 72
Third Round
Jordan Spieth
69-66-67Scott Piercy
63-74-66Johnson Wagner
69-68-66Austin Cook
68-65-70Shawn Stefani
66-69-69Kelvin Day
68-69-68Paul Casey
68-69-68Charles Howell III
66-70-69Russell Henley
69-68-68Patrick Reed
68-71-67Keegan Bradley
70-66-70Cameron Tringale
68-70-69Sergio Garcia
67-71-69Alex Cejka
65-72-70Michael Putnam
68-68-71Hunter Mahan
67-68-72Luke Guthrie
66-68-73-

202
203
203
203
204
205
205
205
205
206
206
207
207
207
207
207
207

LPGA-Ana Inspiration Par Scores
Saturday
At Mission Hills Country Club
Dinah Shore Tournament Course
Rancho Mirage, Calif.
Purse: $2.5 million
Yardage: 6,769; Par: 72
Third Round

-14
-13
-13
-13
-12
-11
-11
-11
-11
-10
-10
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9
-9

Sei Young Kim
Stacy Lewis
Ariya Jutanugarn
Brittany Lincicome
Morgan Pressel
Shanshan Feng
Moriya Jutanugarn
Jenny Shin
Anna Nordqvist
Pat Hurst
Mi Hyang Lee
So Yeon Ryu
Lexi Thompson
Karrie Webb
Carlota Ciganda
Marina Alex
Inbee Park
Mirim Lee

72-65-6972-69-6871-73-6672-68-7067-72-7171-70-7071-70-7071-69-7171-72-6971-71-7074-68-7069-72-7172-69-7174-72-6774-71-6873-71-6974-69-7071-70-72-

206 -10
209 -7
210 -6
210 -6
210 -6
211 -5
211 -5
211 -5
212 -4
212 -4
212 -4
212 -4
212 -4
213 -3
213 -3
213 -3
213 -3
213 -3

TRANSACTIONS
BASKETBALL
National Basketball Association
ATLANTA HAWKS — Signed F Austin Daye
to a multiyear contract.
HOCKEY
National Hockey League
NHL — Fined New Jersey F Scott Gomez
$1,478.49 for elbowing Montreal D Alexei
Emelin during an April 3 game.

Oregon at UCLA, Noon

COLLEGE MEN’S TENNIS

DUCKS ROUNDUP

California at Oregon, Noon

COLLEGE WOMEN’S TENNIS
Oregon at California, Noon
— Events are accurate and up-to-date as of press time —

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Oregon softball freshman Lauren Lindvall belted a three-run homer in the top of
the seventh as the No. 1-ranked Ducks rallied from three runs down to beat No. 8ranked UCLA 6-4 on Saturday.
The Bruins scored four times in the bottom of the second to take a 4-1 lead over
Oregon and held steady through the middle innings. It wasn’t until the top of the
seventh inning where the Ducks were
able to gain some traction on a comeback.
The Ducks strung together a couple of
singles in the inning and with the score
4-2, that’s when Lindvall connected on the
home run to put Oregon ahead for good.
Karissa Hovinga (8-1) got the win for
Oregon as she pitched 5 1/3 innings in relief allowing only three hits and striking
out four.

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Michigan State 9, Oregon 4: The host
Ducks built a 2-0 lead off a pair of RBI singles, but the Spartans scored two in the
third and another four in the fifth to run
away with the victory on Saturday.
Oregon blew through five pitchers,
with each surrendering at least one
earned run, and has now lost six of its last
seven games.
Matt Eureste, Phil Craig-St. Louis and
Scott Heineman each had a pair of hits for
the Ducks (18-14, 2-7 Pac-12) but it wasn’t
enough to stop a Michigan State offense
led by Anthony Cheky’s 3-for-5 outing.
Cam Vieaux picked up the win for the
Spartans (15-14, 2-4 Big Ten). He pitched
six innings, struck out seven and gave up
three earned runs on six hits.
Michigan State
Oregon

002 040 021 —9 11 0
110 010 100 —4 8 1

Vieaux, Misiewicz (7), Borkovich (8) and Roskelly. Harber,
Stiles (3), Warren (8), Hostert (8) and Chase, Susnara. Win—
Vieaux; Loss— Stiles. 2B— Troop (MSU), Heineman (ORE);
HR— Gibson (MSU).

Michigan State 2, Oregon 1 (11): Cam Gibson’s RBI single down the line in the 11th
inning capped the visiting Spartans rally
and doomed the Ducks on Friday.
Oregon got on the board first in the
sixth inning when a bases loaded walk by
Joe Mockbee of Austin Grebeck scored
Brandon Cuddy.
Michigan State would tie things at 1-1in
eighth when Will Salter singled to left
field and scored Ryan Krill.
Mockeby and Joe Kinley combined to
hold the Ducks hitless the rest of the way
while Mockbee, who relieved Spartans
starter Mick VanVossen in the sixth frame,
finished with nine strikeouts in 4.2 innings
to earn the win.
Oregon only mustered two hits in the
contest, one by Jakob Goldfarb and another by Mark Karaviotiss, while the
Michigan State pitching trio walked the
hosts eight times.
Michigan State
Oregon

000 000 010 01 —2 7 0
000 001 000 00 —1 2 1

VanVossen, Mockbee (6), Kinley (11) and Roskelly. Irvin, Graham (6), Nogosek (8), Cleavinger (11) and Susnara. Win—
Mockbee; Loss— Cleavinger.

TRACK AND FIELD
Molly Grabill ran a personal best in the
women’s 10,000 with a time of 33:33.20,
which was good for 20th overall in the
event and ranks 10th on the Oregon alltime list.
Sophomore Maggie Schmaedick’s set a
personal best of her own, finishing second with a time of 33:46.14 in the second
heat of the 10,000.
The men’s team saw the quartet of Eric

Jenkins, Edward Cheserek, Travis Neuman
and Matthew Melancon finish their
10,000-meter race within 10 seconds of
each other. Cheserek and Jenkins finished
side-by-side with times of 29:04.06 and
29:04.08, while Neuman and Melancon
finished at 29:09.39 and 29:10.38, respectively.

MEN’S TENNIS
No. 33 California 5, No. 51 Oregon 2: Despite wins from Simons Stevens at No. 3
singles and Jayson Amos at No. 4 singles,
the host Ducks lost to the Golden Bears on
Saturday.
Oregon dropped to 11-8 overall and 0-4
in the Pac-12 while California is now 16-5
and 4-0.

WOMEN’S TENNIS
No. 3 Cal 6, No. 62 Oregon 1: Oregon’s
women’s tennis team had a tough day on
the court against Pac-12 opponent Cal.
The Ducks’ Nia Rose was the lone bright
spot for Oregon on the day as she won her
singles match against No. 22 Klara Fabikove 6-4, 7-6 (4).
Rose’s victory has given her top-25 upsets over singles opponents in back-toback weeks.

SAND VOLLEYBALL
Washington d. Oregon 5-0: No Ducks duo
managed to win a set in their season
opening loss against the Huskies on Saturday in Portland as seven of the eight
sets were decided by five points or more.
— Statesman Journal

Sports

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

3C

OREGON FOOTBALL

Nelson moves across scrimmage line
OREGON FOOTBALL

By Pete Martini
Statesman Journal

EUGENE — Charles Nelson

wants to win, no matter what his
role is on the team.
The Oregon sophomore from
Daytona Beach, Florida, has
moved from wide receiver to
defensive back this spring to
help the Ducks fill a need after
losing three starters.
“I just want to help the team
any way possible, whichever
way that is, and that’s OK with
me,” said Nelson, who had 23
catches for 327 yards and five
touchdowns for the Ducks last
year.
After the Ducks lost to Ohio
State in the national championship game on Jan. 12, the coaching staff approached Nelson
about the possible change of position.
“After the national championship game, it was up for
grabs, coaches talked about it,
but there was no permanent decision,” Nelson said. “I was OK
with it. I’m willing to help the
team wherever it’s needed.
Coaches felt like it was a better
move for me in the future-wise,
and things like that. So I went
ahead and told them I’m OK
with it.”
Oregon coach Mark Helfrich
said the decision to move Nelson to defense was to help create competition at defensive
back.
“I think Charles is a guy, intellectually and football-wise,
he is a very smart kid, and he

Coach: Mark Helfrich, third season

CHARLES NELSON

Last season’s record: 13-2, Pac-12
champion

School: Oregon
Year: Sophomore

Last season’s final national
ranking: No. 2

Position: Defensive back
(wide receiver last season)

2015 spring game: 11 a.m. May 2,
Autzen Stadium

Ht./Wt.: 5-8 / 170

2015 season opener: Sept. 5 vs.
Eastern Washington, Autzen Stadium

Hometown: Daytona Beach,
Florida

JAIME VALDEZ-USA TODAY SPORTS

Oregon’s Charles Nelson
scores a touchdown against
South Dakota lastyear. Now,
he’ll try to prevent scoring.

could move back and not miss
too many beats, which is not normal,” Helfrich said. “Just his
skillset and his attitude was tremendous. When you start to talk
to a guy about a position change,
a lot of times it’s: ‘Well, yeah, I’ll
do it.’ But in his case, it’s: ‘Yep,
I’m in.’ You know, and he’s a
great teammate and loves to
compete and run and hit, and so
we’ll see.”
The Ducks lost defensive
back starters Ifo Ekpre-Olomu,
Erick Dargan and Troy Hill, all
seniors last season.
Oregon returns starting
safety Reggie Daniels, as well
as Chris Seisay, who started the
Rose Bowl and national championship game at cornerback in

place of the injured Ekpre-Olomu.
Other players competing for
playing time at defensive back
include Tyree Robinson, Arrion
Springs, Juwaan Williams, Khalil Oliver and Ugo Amadi.
And then there is Nelson.
“He is learning quick,” Seisay said about Nelson. “It’s big
(having Nelson on defense) because he’s an explosive player.
He has real good cover skills.
He’s just an athlete, so you could
put him anywhere — safety, corner, nickel. He’ll just make
some plays.”
Oregon defensive coordinator Don Pellum said he is excited to have Nelson in the secondary.

“Charles is probably one of
the best tacklers on our team,
and probably one of the fastest
players on our team,” Pellum
said. “And so his impact in the
secondary, I think it’s going to
be dramatic. He’s fast. He’s
tough, and real exciting to
watch.”
Oregon offensive coordinator Scott Frost said he thinks
Nelson will excel at defensive
back.
“Charles is one of the better
football players I’ve been
around,” Frost said. “He came
in, and it took a little while for
him to learn it, but once he did,
he was impressive, not just
catching the football, but also
running with it, blocking, play-

ing special teams. And I have no
doubt that Charles will be great
wherever we have him.”
Nelson, who was a three-star
recruit in the Ducks’ 2014 class,
said the transition is going well
so far this spring.
“It’s going good, you know,
it’s a new beginning,” Nelson
said. “A lot of things to learn. A
new coach to take advice from,
and I’m just learning as it goes.”
Nelson is part of the defensive unit this spring, but the
door is open that he could be
used on offense again in the future.
“Right now, it’s just an experiment during spring,” Nelson said. “If everything is going
well, then I’ll just stay there.
But if I’m not getting it, and
nothing is really happening,
then they said I could always go
back to offense.”
pmartini@StatesmanJournal.com
or (503) 399-6730 or
Twitter.com/PeteMartiniSJ

BEAVERS ROUNDUP

BRENT DRINKUT/STATESMAN JOURNAL

Oregon State wide receiver Jordan Villamin celebrates
crossing the goal line during practice inside Reser Stadium on
Saturday.

OSU
Continued from Page 1C

“I’m proud of the kid’s
efforts,” Andersen said.
“I wouldn’t say I’m overly
excited where we sit in
some areas, especially
our ability to throw the
ball effectively.”
It’s not unusual for the
defense to be ahead of the
offense in spring practice, or in fall camp for
that matter.
And that’s especially
true right now at OSU. Del
Rio, who played sparingly
in three games last season
and attempted 18 passes,
is the only signal caller on
the roster with college
game experience.
“There’s still a timing
issue,” Andersen said. “At
the end of the day it’s a
new offense and it’s new
quarterbacks.
That’s
where we are.”
There were few completions from any of the
quarterbacks during Saturday’s practice.
“We may not have executed the way we want to,
but we’re getting those
mental reps where we can
continue to develop and
improve on our game,”
Mitchell said.
The Beavers have
plenty of talent back at
wide receiver, led by junior Victor Bolden, who
had a team-high 72 receptions for 798 yards last
season and two touchdowns, and sophomore
Jordan Villamin (38578-6).
Unlike the pro-style offense under former coach
Mike Riley, the spread requires a quarterback with
mobility. That seems to favor Mitchell and Collins.
But at this point, Del
Rio is probably the most
accurate passer.
“We’re still trying to
get all the tempo and timing down, but we’ll get it,”
Villamin said. “I have no
lack of confidence in what
our quarterbacks and receivers can do. We should
be fine.”
OSU defensive players
aren’t making a big deal of
having the upper hand
thus far.
“It was like that ever

since I’ve been here.
That’s what happens,”
senior defenisve tackle
Jaswha James said. “The
defense is more reaction,
we’re just flying to the
ball and making plays.
“The offense takes
time, but once they get it
perfected it’s gonna be
like a machine.”
Ground and pound:
Until the passing game
comes around, it would
come as no surprise to see
the Beavers lean on a running game led by senior
Storm Woods, who ran for
a team-high 766 yards last
season.
Add
junior
Chris
Brown and sophomore
Damien Haskins to the
equation and the Beavers
have three experienced
running backs.
“What we’re trying to
do right now is just develop a real run game. Something we can hang our hat
on,” running backs coach
Telly
Lockette
said.
“When times get tough,
we can run the ball.”
Lockette said in college football you can implement different offensive schemes, but the best
teams “can ground and
pound.”
Game-like
atmosphere: Junior safety Cyril
Noland-Lewis said it’s always enjoyable to practice at Reser.
“It’s definitely a gamelike atmosphere,” said
Noland-Lewis, who had an
interception in Saturday’s
practice. “We’ll take the
few fans, 20, 100, whatever it is. A little music, a
little energy from the
players and coaches as
well, that goes a long
way.”
Six practices remain:
The Beavers, who returned to practice this
week after taking two
weeks off for finals and
spring break, have six
spring practices remaining, including the spring
game April 18 at Reser.
OSU will have its second full scrimmage next
Saturday from 11:30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. at Reser. The
public is welcome.
ghorowitz@Statesman
Journal.com, (503) 399-6726
or Twitter.com/ghorowitz

The Oregon State baseball team collapsed by giving up five runs in the
eighth inning on Saturday to No. 9 UCLA
en route to a 10-5 loss in Los Angeles.
The teams entered the penultimate inning knotted at 5-5, but pair of doubles
and a single with two outs provided the
Bruins with a five-run cushion entering
the final frame. That final frame saw
UCLA pitcher David Berg shut down Oregon State in order.
The Beavers (22-9, 5-4 Pac-12) had an
early 5-2 lead, clustering all its runs in a
fourth inning that was capped by Elliott
Cary hitting a two-run homer down the
right-field line. Billy King started the
scoring with a groundout and then Kyle
Nobach singled up the middle for two
runs before Cary connected for his longball.
Oregon State starter Travis Eckert lasted only 4.2 innings against the Bruins
(23-6, 10-2 Pac-12) and gave up four
earned runs on seven hits.
Oregon State
UCLA

000 500 000 — 5 6 0
002 111 05x —10 14 2

Eckert, Reser (5), Tweedt (6), Heimlich (6), Pomeroy (8),
Hickey (8) and Ice. Canning, Poteet (4), Forbes (7), Virant (7),
Dyer (7), Berg (8) and Miller Jr. Win— Berg; Loss— Heimlich.
2B— Persico (UCLA), Stephens (UCLA) 2, Peterson (UCLA),
Chatterton (UCLA); 3B— Bono (UCLA); HR— Cary (OSU).

No. 9 UCLA 4, Oregon State 1: Gabe Clark
went 3-for-4 on Friday night but the visiting Beavers fell to the Bruins at Jackie
Robinson Stadium.
Kyle Nobach drove in Oregon State’s
lone run in the seventh inning with a
two-out double past the first baseman
that put the tying run at the plate. However, pinch hitter Billy King hit a slicing
ball that was caught by running UCLA
center fielder Christoph Bono.

Duke
Continued from Page 1C

especially on the defensive end,”
Krzyzewski said.
Defensively, it was a team effort, just the way Krzyzewski has
stressed for his 35 seasons at
Duke. What had been wide open 3pointers early for Michigan State
became contested shots and when
the Blue Devils started getting up
and into the Spartans, the points
were suddenly tough to come by.
“They did a good job of taking
me away,” said Michigan State’s
Denzel Valentine, who had nine of
his 22 points in that opening run, including three 3-pointers. “I got hot,
and they started denying a little bit

25

Drew Rasmussen started for the Beavers and lasted 5.2 innings before being
relieved by Mak Fox.
The win went to Grant Watson, who
struck out six and walked one for the
Bruins in six scoreless innings.
Oregon State
UCLA

000 000 100 —1 5 2
001 102 00x —4 8 1

Rasmussen, Fox (6), Flemer (7) and Lund, Ice. Watson,
Forbes (7), Dyer (7), Berg (9) and Miller Jr. Win— Watson;
Loss— Rasmussen. 2B— Clark (OSU), Nobach (OSU), Miller
Jr. (UCLA).

SOFTBALL
Arizona 7-22, Oregon State 2-3: The
Beavers hosted a doubleheader against
the Wildcats and were no match for Arizona.
Oregon State was limited in offense as
Mikela Manewa was the only Beavers
player to have a multi-hit game. That
came in the first game where Manewa
went 2-for-3.
After the three-game sweep from Arizona, the Beavers (23-14, 4-8 Pac-12) will
host Utah at home starting Friday for a
three-game series.

GYMNASTICS
NCAA Norman Regional: Madeline Gardiner won the all-around, while the Beavers took second to Oklahoma on Saturday with a total of 196.750 and advance
to the National Semifinals in Fort Worth,
Texas on April 17.
The host Sooners scored a total of
197.625 for first place in the regional.
Gardiner finished with a total of
39.350 to claim the individual all-around
by 0.100 points over North Carolina

and started forcing us to take bad
shots and the next thing you know
they had the lead.”
The two Duke freshmen put up
some impressive stats in their first
Final Four game. Winslow, who
played through some early foul
trouble, had nine rebounds and
was 5 for 7 from the field, while
Okafor grabbed six rebounds and
was 7 for 11 from the field.
“I don’t think we started the
game out with the intensity we
needed,” Cook said. “When we got
down early Coach got on us and the
last 36 minutes we played one of
our better games. It’s definitely
hard out there, but we just strung
some stops together and great defense led to great offense.”
Denzel Valentine had 11 rebounds for the Spartans (27-12)

State’s Brittni Watkins.
Taylor Keeker was Oregon State’s other top performer, finishing tied for second on the vault at 9.925, 0.025 points
off the pace of winner Ali Jackson of
Oklahoma.

MEN’S GOLF
ASU Thunderbird Invitational: The Beavers took 11th at the tournament in
Phoenix on Saturday, finishing with a
three-round total of 29-over 869.
Alex Franklin led the way individually
for Oregon State, shooting an even 210
to finish tied for eighth.
Arizona State won the team crown at
25-under, while Jon Rahm won the medalist honors at 15-under for the Sun Devils.

WOMEN’S ROWING
Oregon State Classic: The Varsity 8
swept No. 17 Louisville and Minnesota,
while the Second Varsity 8 went 3-1
against the Cardinals and the Gophers at
the Dexter Reservoir in Lowell.
Oregon State also went 4-0 against
Oregon in the Open 8 and 4 races.

TRACK & FIELD
Stanford Invitational: Helen Ann Haun
set a school record in the pole vault on
Saturday in Palo Alto, California, clearing a height of 12 feet, breaking the
mark she shared with Annie Sidor by
more than four inches.
— Statesman Journal

while Travis Trice added 16 points.
A win on Monday night against
Wisconsin would mean a fifth national title for Krzyzewski, breaking a tie with Kentucky’s Adolph
Rupp and leaving him behind only
John Wooden, who won 10 at UCLA.
“It’s an amazing thing, I mean,
just to be in the Final Four, but to
play on Monday night is the ultimate honor,” Krzyzewski said. “I
hope our guys get their rest and we
can get the same type of effort we
got tonight.
“Now they’ve got a chance to
play for a national championship,
and damn, damn how great is
that?”
The Blue Devils have won 17 of
18, with the only loss to Notre
Dame in the semifinals of the ACC
tournament.

4C

Sports

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

StatesmanJournal.com

NBA TODAY
STANDINGS

SATURDAY’S GAMES

SCOREBOARD

EASTERN
CONFERENCE

HOME team in caps.

Hornets 92, 76ers 91
PHILADELPHIA (91)
Grant 3-7 2-4 10, Noel 1-2 0-0 2, Aldemir 2-4
4-6 8, Smith 6-20 2-4 15, Covington 4-10 4-4
15, Robinson III 3-7 0-0 7, Sims 1-5 2-2 4,
Mbah a Moute 1-7 5-8 8, Thompson 3-8 5-5
14, Sampson 4-6 0-0 8. Totals 28-76 24-33
91.
CHARLOTTE (92)
Taylor 2-4 3-3 7, Ma.Williams 3-7 5-6 11, Biyombo 3-4 3-4 9, Walker 11-21 2-2 24, Henderson 3-12 0-0 7, M. Williams 5-17 8-8 18,
Hairston 3-10 0-0 6, Vonleh 3-6 0-0 6, Stephenson 0-3 0-0 0, Maxiell 2-2 0-0 4. Totals
35-86 21-23 92.

W

L Pct

GB

z-Atlanta

57

19 .750

x-Cleveland

49

27 .645

8

x-Chicago

46

30 .605

11

y-Toronto

45

32 .584 121⁄2

x-Washington

44

33 .571 131⁄2

Milwaukee

38

39 .494 191⁄2

Brooklyn

35

41 .461

Boston

35

42 .455 221⁄2

Miami

34

42 .447

23

Indiana

33

43 .434

24

Charlotte

33

43 .434

24

Detroit

30

47 .390 271⁄2

Orlando

24

53 .312 331⁄2

Philadelphia

18

59 .234 391⁄2

New York

14

62 .184

22

43

WESTERN
CONFERENCE
W

L Pct

GB

z-Golden State

62

13 .827

x-Houston

52

24 .684 101⁄2

x-Memphis

52

25 .675

11

y-Portland

49

26 .653

x-L.A. Clippers

50

26 .658 121⁄2

x-San Antonio

50

26 .658 121⁄2

Dallas

46

30 .605 161⁄2

Oklahoma City

42

34 .553 201⁄2

New Orleans

41

34 .547

Phoenix

38

38 .500 241⁄2

Utah

34

41 .453

Denver

28

48 .368 341⁄2

Sacramento

26

49 .347

36

L.A. Lakers

20

55 .267

42

Minnesota
16
x-clinched playoff spot
y-clinched division
z-clinched conference

13

21

Friday’s results
Washington 101, New York 87
Indiana 93, Charlotte 74
Milwaukee 110, Boston 101
Brooklyn 114, Toronto 109
Chicago 88, Detroit 82
Memphis 100, Oklahoma City 92
Orlando 97, Minnesota 84
San Antonio 123, Denver 93
New Orleans 101, Sacramento 95
Portland 107, L.A. Lakers 77
Today
All times Pacific
Houston at Oklahoma City, 10 a.m.
Chicago at Cleveland, 12:30 p.m.
Miami at Indiana, 3 p.m.
Golden State at San Antonio, 4 p.m.
Philadelphia at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Utah at Sacramento, 6 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at L.A. Lakers, 6:30 p.m.
Monday
Portland at Brooklyn, 6 p.m.
Tuesday
Phoenix at Atlanta, 4:30 p.m.
Charlotte at Miami, 4:30 p.m.
Golden State at New Orleans, 5 p.m.
San Antonio at Oklahoma City, 5 p.m.
Minnesota at Sacaramento, 7 p.m.
L.A. Lakers at L.A. Clippers, 7:30 p.m.

HAWKS 131, Nets 99: Al Horford and DeMarre Carroll
scored 20 points each to help the Hawks match a franchise
record with their 57th win. However, the Hawks lost forward
Paul Millsap to a right shoulder injury in a collision with
Brooklyn’s Earl Clark with 1:52 left in the first half.
PISTONS 99, Heat 98: Reggie Jackson scored 15 of his 29
points in the fourth quarter, including the winning layup with 5
seconds remaining. Andre Drummond had 11 points and 17
rebounds for his 44th double-double, Kentavious CaldwellPope scored 19 points and Anthony Tolliver added 15 for the
Pistons. Detroit rallied from 15 down in the fourth.
Wizards 92, GRIZZLIES 83: Bradley Beal scored 20 and John
Wall added 18 points and 14 assists for the Wizards, who won
their third straight. Drew Gooden added 16 for Washington,
connecting on 6 of 10 shots, including 3 of 5 from outside the
arc. Rasual Butler added 10 for the Wizards. Marc Gasol led
Memphis with 18 points, while Mike Conley scored 14 points.
Celtics 117, RAPTORS 116 (OT): Marcus Smart hit a buzzerbeating layup in overtime for Boston. With 2.6 seconds left and
Boston trailing by one, Smart took a pass from a driving Isaiah
Thomas and sneaked behind the collapsing Toronto defense
to score the winning basket, silencing the sellout crowd.

28

60 .211 461⁄2

RESULTS AND
SCHEDULE

HORNETS 92, 76ers 91 : Gerald Henderson’s driving layup
with 6 seconds left lifted the Hornets to a win over the 76ers.
Kemba Walker had 24 points and Mo Williams added 18 as
the Hornets won despite playing without three starters, including center Al Jefferson. Henderson struggled all night,
missing 10 of his first 12 shots.

Magic 97, BUCKS 90: Tobias Harris had 23 points and 10
rebounds and Nikola Vucevic scored 20 points. Victor Oladipo added 15 points to help Orlando get their second road win
in two nights after losing 12 straight away from home. Harris
made a career-best five 3-pointers on nine attempts.
Warriors at MAVERICKS (late) : The top-seeded and Pacific
Division-champion Warriors will shoot for a 12th straight win.
They are 27-11 as the visitor and recently went unbeaten on a
four-game jaunt from March 24-31. Golden State is 16-1 since
early March and handed the Phoenix Suns a 107-106 defeat its
last time out on Thursday in the desert.
Clippers at NUGGETS (late) : The Clippers jockey for positioning in the Western Conference playoff race against the
Denver Nuggets. The Clippers clinched their postseason berth,
but their seeding is nowhere close to being decided. They are
even with San Antonio for fifth in the West and only two
games out of the No. 2 spot with six to play.
Jazz at SUNS (late): The Suns' playoff chances are on life
support, but they'll keep fighting versus the Jazz. Phoenix is
four games behind Oklahoma City for the eighth spot in the
Western Conference with six to play. The Jazz have won three
straight including a win over Denver, 98-84, on Wednesday.
Pelicans at TRAIL BLAZERS (late) : The Pelicans have their
sights set on reaching the playoffs and look to win a fifth
straight game Saturday against the Trail Blazers. The Pelicans
have defeated the LA Lakers and Sacramento Kings on this
three- game road trip and recorded a 101-95 triumph in California's capital Friday night thanks to Eric Gordon's 21 points.
The Trail Blazers clinched the Northwest title earlier Friday
when Memphis beat Oklahoma City.

Philadelphia
Charlotte

16
19

35
30

18
23

22
20


91
92

3-Point Goals—Philadelphia 11-26 (Thompson 3-5, Covington 3-6, Grant 2-3, Robinson
III 1-2, Mbah a Moute 1-3, Smith 1-5, Sims 0-1,
Sampson 0-1), Charlotte 1-13 (Henderson 1-1,
Walker 0-1, Ma.Williams 0-2, Hairston 0-3, M.
Williams 0-6). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Philadelphia 57 (Smith 9), Charlotte 53 (Biyombo 9). Assists—Philadelphia
13 (Smith 5), Charlotte 13 (M. Williams 5). Total Fouls—Philadelphia 24, Charlotte 20.
A—17,286 (19,077).
Hawks 131, Nets 99
BROOKLYN (99)
Johnson 1-5 1-2 4, Young 7-13 0-0 14, Lopez
5-8 1-2 11, Williams 3-8 2-2 10, Brown 1-6 0-0
3, Bogdanovic 8-11 0-0 19, Jack 5-9 3-3 14,
Plumlee 1-2 0-2 2, Clark 4-8 1-2 11, Jefferson
3-5 1-2 7, Morris 1-4 0-0 2, Jordan 0-1 2-2 2.
Totals 39-80 11-17 99.
ATLANTA (131)
Carroll 7-9 2-4 20, Millsap 1-5 6-6 8, Horford
10-13 0-1 20, Teague 8-12 0-0 17, Korver 3-6
1-1 10, Antic 3-5 1-1 9, Bazemore 4-4 0-0 11,
Mack 4-7 2-2 10, Sefolosha 4-9 2-2 12, Muscala 2-2 2-2 7, Scott 1-3 0-0 2, Jenkins 2-6 0-0
5, Brand 0-1 0-0 0. Totals 49-82 16-19 131.
Brooklyn
Atlanta

22
31

26
35

23
42

28
23

— 99
— 131

3-Point Goals—Brooklyn 10-23 (Bogdanovic 3-5, Clark 2-3, Williams 2-4, Jack 1-2, Johnson 1-2, Brown 1-3, Young 0-1, Morris 0-1, Jefferson 0-2), Atlanta 17-33 (Carroll 4-5, Bazemore 3-3, Korver 3-5, Antic 2-3, Sefolosha
2-4, Muscala 1-1, Teague 1-2, Jenkins 1-5, Horford 0-1, Millsap 0-1, Scott 0-1, Mack 0-2).
Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Brooklyn
44 (Young 8), Atlanta 39 (Carroll 8). Assists—Brooklyn 22 (Jack 6), Atlanta 40 (Teague
8). Total Fouls—Brooklyn 15, Atlanta 16.
Technicals—Bogdanovic.
A—18,769
(18,729).
Pistons 99, Heat 98
MIAMI (98)
Deng 4-113-4 13,Haslem 3-6 0-0 6,Whiteside
5-9 3-7 13, G.Dragic 7-12 5-6 21, Wade 11-18
2-3 24, Chalmers 3-7 2-2 9, Walker 0-5 3-3 3,
Andersen 1-1 0-0 2, Johnson 0-3 0-0 0, Ennis
3-5 1-1 7. Totals 37-77 19-26 98.
DETROIT (99)
Butler 3-3 1-1 9, Tolliver 5-11 0-0 15, Drummond 5-8 1-1 11, Jackson 11-18 5-7 29, Caldwell-Pope 6-16 5-8 19, Lucas III 1-4 0-0 2,
Prince 2-7 3-6 7, Meeks 1-4 0-0 2, Anthony 1-1
0-0 2, Williams 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 36-73 15-23
99.
Miami
Detroit

24
29

31
21

26
22

17
27


98
99

3-Point Goals—Miami 5-20 (G.Dragic 2-4,
Deng 2-5, Chalmers 1-3, Ennis 0-1, Johnson
0-1, Haslem 0-1, Wade 0-2, Walker 0-3), Detroit 12-26 (Tolliver 5-9, Butler 2-2, Jackson
2-4, Caldwell-Pope 2-6, Williams 1-1, Prince
0-1, Lucas III 0-1, Meeks 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Miami 48 (Whiteside
12), Detroit 44 (Drummond 17). Assists—Miami 19 (G.Dragic 7),Detroit 20 (Jackson
11). Total Fouls—Miami 20, Detroit 21.
A—16,133 (22,076).
Wizards 92, Grizzlies 83
WASHINGTON (92)
Porter 3-7 0-0 7, Gooden 6-10 1-1 16, Gortat
2-5 2-2 6, Wall 7-15 3-3 18, Beal 10-21 0-0 20,
Butler 4-9 0-0 10, Sessions 3-6 2-2 9, Humphries 1-4 0-2 2, Seraphin 2-2 0-0 4. Totals
38-79 8-10 92.

JEREMY BREVARD-USA TODAY SPORTS

Charlotte Hornets guard Kemba Walker goes up for a shot
against the Philadelphia 76ers at Time Warner Cable Arena.

MEMPHIS (83)
Je.Green 3-7 3-4 9, Randolph 3-5 0-0 6, Gasol
7-13 4-6 18, Conley 5-15 4-4 14, Lee 4-9 0-0 8,
Koufos 2-3 0-1 4, Calathes 1-4 0-0 2, Carter
2-6 0-0 5, Udrih 2-7 2-2 6, Ja.Green 2-4 0-0 4,
Adams 3-8 1-1 7. Totals 34-81 14-18 83.
Washington
Memphis

29
18

20
20

22
21

21
24


92
83

3-Point Goals—Washington 8-22 (Gooden
3-5, Butler 2-3, Sessions 1-1, Porter 1-3, Wall
1-3, Humphries 0-1, Beal 0-6), Memphis 1-15
(Carter 1-2, Gasol 0-1, Udrih 0-1, Je.Green 0-1,
Calathes 0-1, Adams 0-2, Lee 0-2, Conley
0-5). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Washington 45 (Gortat 8), Memphis 49
(Gasol 11). Assists—Washington 24 (Wall
14), Memphis 23 (Conley 8). Total Fouls—Washington 18, Memphis 15. A—18,119
(18,119).
Raptors 116, Celtics 117
BOSTON (117)
Turner 9-17 0-0 18, Bass 4-9 3-5 11, Zeller 8-10
4-6 20, Smart 6-9 1-3 15, Bradley 3-13 0-0 7,
Thomas 10-19 2-2 25, Crowder 1-4 1-2 3, Olynyk 5-10 4-4 16, Jerebko 1-3 0-0 2, Sullinger
0-3 0-0 0. Totals 47-97 15-22 117.
TORONTO (116)
Ross 1-3 1-2 4, Hansbrough 5-5 8-8 18, Valanciunas 5-12 2-3 12, Vasquez 3-9 0-0 8, DeRozan 14-25 10-12 38, Williams 9-17 6-8 27,
Patterson 0-7 0-0 0, Hayes 0-1 0-0 0, J.Johnson 3-4 3-5 9. Totals 40-83 30-38 116.
Boston
Toronto

15
24

32
23

34
23

23
34

13
12

— 117
— 116

3-Point Goals—Boston 8-26 (Thomas 3-8,
Olynyk 2-5, Smart 2-5, Bradley 1-3, Sullinger
0-1, Crowder 0-2, Turner 0-2), Toronto 6-23
(Williams 3-8, Vasquez 2-6, Ross 1-3, DeRozan 0-1, Patterson 0-5). Fouled Out—Hansbrough. Rebounds—Boston 51(Zeller 9), Toronto 57 (Valanciunas 14). Assists—Boston
26 (Turner 10), Toronto 15 (Williams 4). Total
Fouls—Boston 28, Toronto 22. A—19,800
(19,800).
Magic 97, Bucks 90
ORLANDO (97)
Harris 8-15 2-3 23, Dedmon 2-3 1-2 5, Vucevic
10-17 0-1 20, Payton 4-111-110, Oladipo 6-19
2-3 15, A.Gordon 5-6 0-0 10, Green 3-10 3-3
10,Nicholson 2-5 0-0 4. Totals 40-86 9-13 97.
MILWAUKEE (90)
Antetokounmpo 3-12 2-2 8, Ilyasova 7-13 2-5
18, Pachulia 2-4 0-0 4, Carter-Williams 4-14
0-0 8, Middleton 6-16 3-4 15, Mayo 6-10 0-1
14, Henson 5-9 0-110, Dudley 3-4 0-0 7, Bayless 3-7 0-0 6. Totals 39-89 7-13 90.
Orlando
Milwaukee

22
31

29
22

21
20

25
17


97
90

3-Point Goals—Orlando 8-21 (Harris 5-9,
Payton 1-2, Green 1-3, Oladipo 1-5, Nicholson
0-1, A.Gordon 0-1), Milwaukee 5-16 (Ilyasova
2-2, Mayo 2-5, Dudley 1-2, Carter-Williams
0-1,Bayless 0-3,Middleton 0-3).Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Orlando 53 (A.Gordon

12), Milwaukee 53 (Carter-Williams 10). Assists—Orlando 23 (Payton 11), Milwaukee 26
(Carter-Williams 9). Total Fouls—Orlando
13, Milwaukee 19. Technicals—Orlando
Coach Borrego, Payton. A—14,090 (18,717).

LEADERS
Through Friday
Scoring
G FG FT PTS
Harden, HOU
75 604 661 2063
Westbrook, OKC 61 552 500 1675
James, CLE
65 596 361 1667
Davis, NOR
61 582 330 1495
Cousins, SAC
58 487 419 1395
Curry, GOL
73 593 293 1736
Aldridge, POR
67 623 291 1570
Griffin, LAC
61 528 286 1352
Irving, CLE
71 554 299 1553
Thompson, GOL 70 547 210 1518
Wade, MIA
56 460 253 1200
Lillard, POR
75 536 320 1573
Gay, SAC
67 499 324 1399
Butler, CHI
60 393 364 1213
DeRozan, TOR
55 364 330 1079
Vucevic, ORL
68 587 153 1329
Hayward, UTA
72 466 359 1406
Paul, LAC
76 534 267 1461
Ellis, DAL
75 568 224 1441
Gasol, CHI
72 528 271 1339
FG Percentage
FG FGA
Jordan, LAC
345 488
A. Johnson, TOR
293 510
Valanciunas, TOR
349 609
Gortat, WAS
402 713
Mozgov, CLE
287 516
Zeller, BOS
311 569
Davis, NOR
582 1081
Favors, UTA
460 863
Horford, ATL
469 884
Vucevic, ORL
587 1113
Rebounds
G OFF DEF TOT
Jordan, LAC
76 364 761 1125
Drummond, DET 76 405 613 1018
Cousins, SAC
58 181 554 735
Gasol, CHI
72 203 646 849
Chandler, DAL
70 274 519 793
Vucevic, ORL
68 225 539 764
Randolph, MEM 65 208 479 687
Monroe, DET
64 217 451 668
Davis, NOR
61 158 474 632
Aldridge, POR
67 167 520 687
Assists
G AST
Paul, LAC
76 775
Wall, WAS
76 758
Lawson, DEN
71 675
Westbrook, OKC
61 527
Rondo, DAL
63 503
Curry, GOL
73 569
James, CLE
65 473
Teague, ATL
67 470
Harden, HOU
75 522
Lowry, TOR
66 454

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OR-0000360405

AVG
27.5
27.5
25.6
24.5
24.1
23.8
23.4
22.2
21.9
21.7
21.4
21.0
20.9
20.2
19.6
19.5
19.5
19.2
19.2
18.6
PCT
.707
.575
.573
.564
.556
.547
.538
.533
.531
.527
AVG
14.8
13.4
12.7
11.8
11.3
11.2
10.6
10.4
10.4
10.3
AVG
10.2
10.0
9.5
8.6
8.0
7.8
7.3
7.0
7.0
6.9

Sports

StatesmanJournal.com

WNIT

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

5C

NCAA WOMEN’S FINAL FOUR

Duke coach’s scouting report
By Joanne P. McCallie
Associated Press

TAMPA, Fla. — Duke coach Joanne P. McCallie takes a look at
the games in the women’s Final
Four. Her Blue Devils played all
four teams this year.

South CarolinaNotre Dame

TYLER EVERT/AP

UCLA players celebrate after their 62-60 win over West Virginia in the
WNIT championship game in Charleston, W.Va., on Saturday.

Blame Canada: UCLA
edges West Virginia
By John Raby
Associated Press

CHARLESTON, W.Va. — The
gap in the middle of West Virginia’s defense was a repeating invitation that UCLA
freshman Jordin Canada
couldn’t pass up.
Canada drove to the basket
often and scored a season-high
31 points to lead UCLA to a 6260 win over West Virginia for
the Women’s National Invitation Tournament championship Saturday.
Canada was the only double-figure scorer for the Bruins (19-18) and was selected
the tournament’s Most Valuable Player.
“The driving lane was wide
open,” Canada said. “I just
tried to attack the basket as
much as I can.”
West Virginia had success
in keeping UCLA’s Kari Korver and Nirra Fields in check.
Korver had made 12 of 17 3pointers in her three previous
games and was limited to five
points Saturday. Fields, who

had averaged 20 points in the
tournament, finished with two
points on 0 of 9 shooting.
But West Virginia’s focus
on Korver and Fields meant
more chances for Canada.
“They had to expend a lot of
defensive energy to take those
two guards away,” said UCLA
coach Cori Close, who said
that made the decision easy to
let Canada keep shooting.
“Late in the game, all I was
like is keep the ball in her
hands, get out of her way,”
Close said.
Canada made 9 of 19 shots
and 13 of 15 free throws.
“Give her credit,” said West
Virginia coach Mike Carey.
“She attacked.”
The same wasn’t true for
West Virginia, which had trouble getting close looks at the
basket against UCLA’s zone
defense and was whistled for
several shot clock violations.
“We were going east and
west instead of north and
south,” Carey said. “You want
to know why Canada got 31?
She went north and south.”

Tempo, tempo, tempo. Whoever can dictate the pace of this
game has a better chance of
winning it. Both teams can get
up and down the floor, but it’s
more to South Carolina’s liking
to get post players involved.
Each team has a dynamic
player who can take a game
over with Jewell Loyd of Notre
Dame and Tiffany Mitchell of
South Carolina. Loyd can do almost anything she wants on the
floor offensively and she can
take over a game when she
needs to.
Mitchell is more about controlling the flow of the game
and taking over when needed.
The other interesting matchup is the two freshmen. A’ja Wilson and Brianna Turner were
predicted to be the top two
freshmen coming into this season. How will Muffet McGraw
utilize Turner against the big
front line of the Gamecocks?
Wilson hit the key tip-in to
beat us and wasn’t a huge factor
in the win over Florida State.
Notre Dame definitely has
the experience going for them
having been to five straight Final Fours while this is South
Carolina’s first. Although Dawn
Staley was here a few times as a
player, it’s a different entity
when you’re worrying as a
coach about all the different
time demands put on your team.
Also as a player, the ball is in
your hands when the game’s on
the line. As a coach you just
hope they make the right
choices.

PAT SULLIVAN/AP

Duke coach Joanne P. McCallie’s team played all four of the teams in the
Women's Final Four.

If the game does come to the
end in a tight contest, South Carolina has been in a few of those
this season, including a onepoint win over Duke. Notre
Dame has had just one contest
come down to the final possession.

Maryland-Connecticut
To see what Maryland has
been able to do to get back to the
Final Four for a second straight
season after losing Alyssa
Thomas is impressive. The Terrapins’ guard play is much better this season with Lexie
Brown and Laurin Mincy leading the way.
While both Notre Dame and
South Carolina saw Connecticut
this season, Maryland hasn’t.
It’s always tough when you
haven’t played them in a year to
adjust to the pace at which they
play the game. What helps
Maryland is that most of this
team did play against the Huskies last season.
Unlike last season, when the

Serv ces

Terrapins made the Final Four
for the first time since their national championship in 2006,
Maryland knows how to handle
the pressure of the big stage
better.
That said, no one has been
here more often than UConn
lately it seems. They have been
to eight straight Final Fours for
a reason.
They have five players on
the court who can score in a variety of ways and also play such
great defense. Starting with
Breanna Stewart, who is nearly
impossible to guard because
she is so versatile. Throw in Kaleena Mosqueda-Lewis and how
well she’s shooting in the tournament. Not to mention the play
of Morgan Tuck and this team is
difficult to matchup with. Who
are you going to stop?
They don’t take bad shots and
pass the ball so effectively to
get pretty much whatever shot
they want. They also play such
great defense that isn’t cookie
cutter. They take away what
you want to do.

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6C

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

QUOTE OF THE DAY
FOR THEM TO
STEP UP AND DO
WHAT THEY DID, IT
JUST GOES TO SHOW
THAT WE ARE TRYING
TO CHANGE THINGS.”
Derrick Gordon, the first openly gay Division I
men’s basketball player, on the NCAA’s
leadership against the state of Indiana’s
Religious Freedom Restoration Act
DAVID BUTLER FOR USA TODAY SPORTS

SPORTSLINE
FIRST WORD
IT’S JUST LIKE THE
MICHAEL SAM
SITUATION — IF HE WASN’T
GAY, HE WOULD HAVE GONE
UNDRAFTED.”
Jaguars defensive tackle
Sen’Derrick Marks, talking to
TMZ.com about the NFL’s hiring of
Sarah Thomas as its first female
official.

WILLIAMS BY GEOFF BURKE, USA TODAY SPORTS

MAGIC NUMBER

8

ERIC BOLTE, USA TODAY SPORTS

Miami Open titles for Serena
Williams, putting her with Chris
Evert, Martina Navratilova and
Steffi Graf as the only women to
win the same tennis tournament
at least eight times.

Two exhibition games Friday and Saturday featuring the Reds and Blue Jays drew a total of 96,545 fans in Montreal.

MONTREAL HOPES TO
PLAY REAL BALL AGAIN
Former Expos,
fans turn out
for exhibitions
Paul White

HUNTER BY KIM KLEMENT, USA TODAY SPORTS

TWEET OF THE DAY
@toriihunter48
FINALLY, SPRING
TRAINING IS OVER! FROM
TANNING TO FREEZING MY
BUTT OFF.
Twins outfielder Torii Hunter.
Minnesota opens the season
Monday at the Tigers, with whom
Hunter played the last two
seasons.
ALMOST LAST WORD
“SOMETIMES WHAT I SEE ...
IS YOU HAVE A LOT OF
PERSONNEL THAT ARE IN
POSITIONS OF POWER THAT
DON’T HAVE REAL FOOTBALL
BACKGROUNDS.”
Former NFL quarterback Jeff
Garcia, criticizing the 49ers front
office.
LAST WORD
“IT’S ALMOST LIKE BEING
DRAFTED AGAIN ... IT’S THAT
SAME FEEL.”
Pacers star Paul George, who will
make his season debut today
against the Heat. George broke
his right leg during a Team USA
scrimmage a little more than
eight months ago.
Edited by Casey Moore

USA SNAPSHOTS©

High-scoring
affairs
Most points combined in an
NCAA Division I women’s
basketball championship game:

1986: Texas (97)
vs. Southern Cal (81)

178

1990: Stanford (88)
vs. Auburn (81)

169

1998: Tennessee (93)
vs. Louisiana Tech (75)

168

1993: Texas Tech (84)
vs. Ohio State (82)

166

Source NCAA
ELLEN J. HORROW AND A. GONZALEZ, USA TODAY

@PBJWhite
USA TODAY Sports

It’s been more than a
decade since baseball turned its
back on Montreal ... or was it the
other way around?
It no longer matters, judging
by the city’s lovefest for the game,
a time-warp weekend that was a
wistful combination of nostalgia
and hope.
“We’re in Phase Two of our
journey,” says Warren Cromartie,
the former Montreal Expos player who founded the Montreal
Baseball Project with an ambitious and formidable goal of
bringing back the major league
game played there for 36 seasons.
“It was surreal for me,” says Jason Marquis, the Cincinnati Reds
pitcher who started one of two
exhibition games against the Toronto Blue Jays this weekend, his
first appearance at Olympic Stadium since 2004, the Expos’ final
season.
“It brings back good memories
playing here. These fans are
great. I remember they were
great back in the day. It would be
nice to see a team get back up
here, get a new stadium. It’s always a fun city to come to.”
The total of four games this
year and last year drew an average of 48,224 fans, including
50,231 on Saturday, to the stadium, which — but for a new video
board — looked remarkably as it
did when the Expos became the
Washington Nationals after the
2004 season. Except for the people in the seats. Each of this
weekend’s crowds was larger than
any single-game attendance for
the final 404 home games of the
Expos’ existence.
When Marquis last pitched in
Montreal, the announced attendance was 5,611 in a season that
bottomed out with a crowd of
3,609. Two years earlier, amid annual expectations any season
could be the team’s last, the Expos drew less than 4,000 four
times, with a low of 2,134.
That’s the stigma the city has
been trying to erase with this second consecutive year of bringing
in the Blue Jays, who were Canada’s second big-league team after
MONTREAL

the Expos but now can add to the
attraction with Russell Martin,
who grew up in Montreal, as their
catcher.
Martin took the same subway
ride this weekend that he used to
make with his dad, who played
the pregame national anthems
Friday on his saxophone.
“I still remember when I was
12 years old, being a fan,” Martin
says. “Here I am wearing a bigleague uniform, going to play in
front of family and friends. I
think when I go to sleep tonight
I’m going to have a lot of good
things to think about.”
STADIUM KEY TO RETURN

They’re trying to market good
things in Montreal.
A sign with the Expos’ logo on
the left-field wall says, “On me
souvient (I remember) edition
1994.”
That’s the 1994 team that had
the best record in baseball before
a work stoppage ended the season in August, one of the events
blamed for the game’s eventual
downward spiral in Montreal.
They honored former Expos
Vladimir Guerrero, Orlando Cabrera and Tony Perez during the
weekend. Fans chanted, “Let’s go
Expos.” Everything but the bright
orange mascot Youppi, now the
property of hockey’s Montreal
Canadiens.
“It feels like a regular-season
game,” Blue Jays manager John
Gibbons says. “The fans love it. I
know we enjoy coming here and
doing this. Everybody’s making a
little money, too.”
Making enough to at least get
Major League Baseball’s attention, though it’s not easy to come
up with a scenario that could put
a team in Montreal anytime soon.
“The games like those are important as an initial test of the
level of interest that the market
has in the game,” MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred says. “When
you have the kind of success
you’ve had in Montreal, you kind
of pass the first initial test of
whether it’s a market that could
support baseball.”
Hence Cromartie’s advance to
Phase Two, whether that be a
place to play or a team to play
there. Both are much more imposing than selling tickets twice a
year.
MLB has given no indication of
any expansion plans in the foreseeable future, leaving relocation
as the option. The Tampa Bay
Rays have made clear their dissatisfaction with their stadium

ERIC BOLTE, USA TODAY SPORTS

A fan expresses her hope for baseball’s return to Montreal
during Friday’s exhibition game at Olympic Stadium.
situation but have a lease that
runs through 2027. The Oakland
Athletics are in an ongoing dispute that involves the San Francisco Giants and MLB in their
attempt to get a new ballpark, but
Manfred says he expects a resolution there.
If nothing else, Montreal gives
MLB the stalking horse — a place
where teams angling for a new
ballpark can threaten to move —
it hasn’t had since the Expos
filled the void in Washington.
A stadium is the potential dealmaker in Montreal, too.
“The key thing in Montreal
would be to have a plan for an adequate facility that could support
baseball over the long haul,”
Manfred says. “I don’t expect
people to go into the ground and
build a facility without some sort
of commitment that they are going to get a team, but I do think
that you need a plan and a commitment to how that plan is going
to be executed.”
‘WE WANT TO REDO STORY’

Which brings us back to the chain
of events that doomed the Expos.
The 1994 experience soured
the city and its fans but, in reality,
there was plenty more, from
changing ownership with declining allegiance to the city to a government reluctant to part with
money it doesn’t have in the first
place to a business community no

more inclined to get behind the
necessary downtown stadium.
Plug all that into the time
warp, too.
Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre says, “I’m a bit of an ambassador for baseball in Montreal.
People miss baseball. It is clearly
in our DNA. We want to redo the
story.”
But he also says it’s clearly up
to the private sector to work with
ownership of a potential team to
make a new stadium happen. His
city and its province are in debt.
So far, there has been no visible
movement in the business community. A 2013 feasibility study
commissioned by Montreal’s
Chamber of Commerce recommended a 36,000-seat open-air
facility using Minneapolis’ Target
Field as a comparison.
For now, Montreal fans can
scream and dream for two days
and provide a hint of what those
1994 playoffs would have felt like,
and Martin can offer that “it’s
pretty special just to be in Montreal this time of the year.”
As for the future?
“I don’t know if I’m qualified to
make an assessment,” Martin
says. “My passion tells me I’d love
it. I think there are a lot of fans
who share the same passion I
have for the game. If you have a
good team anywhere, people will
come out. People show up to
watch people win.”

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

7C

MASTERS

10

Phil Mickelson is hoping to win his
fourth green
jacket.

PLAYERS
TO WATCH
World No. 1
Rory McIlroy needs a
Masters
victory to
complete a
career
Grand
Slam.

Phil Mickelson

» Age: 44
» Country: USA
» PGA Tour record: Has won
five majors, including three Masters. Is a U.S. Open title away from a
career Grand Slam. He has 42 victories and $75 million in earnings.
» Masters record: Won in 2004,
2006, 2010. Has made the cut 20
times in 22 starts and owns
14 top-10 finishes.
» How he got here: Qualified
four ways, but he’s a lifer with
the three wins.

JASON GETZ,
USA TODAY SPORTS

» Last year: Missed cut for first
time since 1997.
» Why he can win: With three
wins in 10 years, the question more
likely to be asked is, “Why won’t he
win?” But he missed the cut last
year and hasn’t played great golf
since the start of 2014. He hadn’t
played Mickelson golf this year until
this week at the Shell Houston
Open. Still, if Phil flashes back to his
previous Augusta performances, you
can look for him on Sunday. And
this is his favorite place to play golf.

PETER CASEY,
USA TODAY
SPORTS

Rory McIlroy
» Age: 25
» Country: Northern Ireland
» PGA Tour record: Has nine
wins and 40 top-10 finishes. Has
earned $23.6 million, with a U.S.
Open, British Open and two PGA
Championship titles.
» Masters record: Has made five
cuts in six. Held four-shot, 54-hole
lead in 2011 before a final-round 80
crushed him.
» How he got here: Having won
the U.S. Open, British Open and the

PGA in the past five years will do
it, and he has done all three.
» Last year: Tied for eighth
» Why he can win: Putting has
been his biggest obstacle at Augusta
National. But he is the No. 1 golfer
in the world, and his collapse in
2011 hasn’t haunted him. And he
certainly has had good days at
Augusta. Now we’ll see if he
can put four consecutive good
days together and complete
a career Grand Slam.

Bubba Watson

Adam Scott

Dustin Johnson

» Age: 36
» Country: USA
» PGA Tour record: Seven victories
and $27.7 million in earnings
» Masters record:
Has not missed the
cut in six starts and
won in 2012 and ’14.
» How he got here:
Past winners get
lifetime passes, and
he has won it twice.
» Last year: Won
by three shots over
Jordan Spieth and
Jonas Blixt.
» Why he can win:
Watson will not have JAKE ROTH, USA TODAY SPORTS
Bubba Watson is
played for four
weeks before teeing aiming for his third
title in four years.
off, but he only
played one round in four weeks before
winning last year. He loves the course,
and vice versa. His power and ability to
cut the ball with his driver provides him a
huge advantage. The last time he played
as the defending champion he was uncomfortable from the get-go and finished
in a tie for 50th. He said he’s better prepared for this go-round.

» Age: 34
» Country: Australia
» PGA Tour record: 11 wins and
$37.7 million in earnings.
» Masters record: Has one win
and four top-10
finishes in 13 starts.
» How he got
here: Lifetime pass
with his 2013 win.
» Last year: Tied
for 14th
» Why he can
win: Because he
has done it before.
And despite
ROB SCHUMACHER,
changes off the
USA TODAY SPORTS
course — he’s newly New dad Adam
Scott
married and behas gone back to a
broomstick putter.
came a father in
February — and on
the course — he has a new caddie — he’s a
seasoned veteran who can handle pressure. He’s going back to a broomstick
putter, which he used in winning in 2013,
after struggling with a conventionallength putter this year. He remains one
of the best ball-strikers and is a threat —
if the putter cooperates.

» Age: 30
» Country: USA
» PGA Tour record: Nine wins and
$26.5 million in earnings.
» Masters record: Has not had
a top-10 finish in
five tournaments.
» How he got
here: Qualified
four ways, including a Tour
victory in 2015.
» Last year:
Missed cut
» Why he can
win: He’s tanned,
JASON GETZ, USA TODAY SPORTS
rested and ready
Dustin Johnson is
after enduring
looking for his first
personal probmajor victory.
lems in 2014. He
has threatened in majors before — the
2010 U.S. Open, 2010 PGA and the 2011
British Open. Augusta National is right
up his alley as far as length and trajectory. And he already has one win under
his belt in 2015.

Jordan Spieth

Jason Day

» Age: 21
» Country: USA
» PGA Tour record: Two victories and
$10.1 million in earnings before age 22.
» Masters record:
Finished second in
his first start in 2014.
» How he got here:
He qualifies three
ways, but the most
direct was tying for
second last year.
» Last year: Tied
for second
» Why he can win:
He’s royally honked
off that he didn’t win
last year. He had the
lead before bogeys at
ROB SCHUMACHER,
Nos. 8 and 9 cost
USA TODAY SPORTS
him, and he still can’t Jordan Spieth, who
figure out what hap- came up short a year
pened with his chip ago, has been hot.
shot on the eighth.
He’s young and hungry. And he won the
2015 Valspar Championship with shortgame wizardry, clutch play and a big dose
of cool. That was his third worldwide win
in four months. Then he added a runnerup finish two weeks later. Look out.

» Age: 27
» Country: Australia
» PGA Tour record: Three wins and
$19.5 million in earnings
» Masters record:
Four starts with two
top-three finishes,
including second in
2011 and third in
2013.
» How he got here:
Qualified four ways,
but tying for fourth
in last year’s U.S.
Open is probably the
most direct.
» Last year: Tied
for 20th
» Why he can win:
His game just fits
JAKE ROTH, USA TODAY SPORTS
Jason Day hopes to
Augusta National.
improve on his 20thHe has plenty of
place finish in 2014.
firepower tee to
green and plenty of
touch around and on the greens. His
performances at Augusta in 2011 and
2013 make it necessary to put him on the
list of guys who can hoist the hardware
on Sunday at the Masters — for years to
come.

Martin Kaymer

Jimmy Walker
» Age: 36
» Country: USA
» PGA Tour record: Five wins and
$15.4 million in earnings.
» Masters record: Tied for eighth in
first Masters last year.
» How he got here: Qualified four ways,
but his top-10
finish last year got
him another
invite.
» Last year: Tied
for eighth.
» Why he can
win: The only
two-time winner
this season played
well in his Masters
debut. He has won
five of his last 37
starts and the
late-bloomer is
JASON GETZ, USA TODAY SPORTS
playing the best
Jimmy Walker tied for
eighth in his first Masgolf of his life. In
ters a year ago.
winning the Valero Texas Open two weeks before the
Masters, he displayed the perfect blueprint for Augusta — extreme length and
solid putting. Youth is not always served,
and Walker has been dynamite as he has
aged. Whether it’s winning PGA Tour
events or having a stellar Ryder Cup, he’s
playing the best golf of his life.

» Age: 30
» Country: Germany
» PGA Tour record: Three wins and
$8.6 million in
career earnings.
» Masters record: Has made
three cuts in
seven
appearances.
» How he got
here: Qualified
five ways, but
being a past U.S.
Open and PGA
Championship
winner will do it.
JASON GETZ, USA TODAY SPORTS
» Last year:
Martin Kaymer is
Tied for 31st
confident that he can
finally tame Augusta.
» Why he can
win: For years
Kaymer was bewitched at Augusta because he couldn’t call upon a draw when
he wanted to gain distance with his tee
shots. Now, after years of practice, he can
confidently call upon his ability to draw
the ball right-to-left. And when you have
two major titles, you’ve proved to yourself and everyone you have the game to
win anywhere, including Augusta.

Henrik Stenson
» Age: 39
» Country: Sweden
» PGA Tour record: Four wins and
$17.1 million in
earnings.
» Masters record: Has made six
cuts in nine starts.
Best finish is tie
for 14th last year.
» How he got
here: Qualified
three ways, with
his top-four finishes in the PGA
Championship
and U.S. Open the
most direct.
ROB SCHUMACHER,
» Last year: Tied
USA TODAY SPORTS
for 14th
Henrik Stenson aims
» Why he can
to put together four
win: He hasn’t
solid rounds.
been outstanding
but has been solid at Augusta. But he’s
too good of a golfer to not put together
four rounds one of these years and
threaten to get his first green jacket. His
ball-striking alone makes him a threat,
but the epic greens at Augusta National
have been his nemesis.

ABOUT THE MASTERS
TV: Thursday, 3-7:30
p.m, ESPN; Friday, 3-7:30
p.m., ESPN; Saturday,
3-7 p.m. ET, CBS; Sunday,
2-7 p.m., CBS.

Purse:
$9 million.
FedExCup
points: 600

Last year: Bubba Watson
fired a final-round 69 to win
his second green jacket by
three shots over Jonas Blixt
and Jordan Spieth.

Most victories: Jack Nicklaus
holds the record with six (1963,
1965, 1966, 1972, 1975, 1986).
Tiger Woods and Arnold Palmer
are next with four each.

Widest margin of
victory: Woods
holds the record
with a 12-stroke
victory in 1997.

Wire-to-wire champions: Four
golfers have recorded wire-to-wire
victories: Raymond Floyd (1976),
Nicklaus (1972), Palmer (1960) and
Craig Wood (1941).

Full
coverage
at golf
.usatoday
.com

8C

Weather & Sports

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

THE MID-WILLAMETTE VALLEY
Variable clouds today
with spotty showers.
Winds south becoming southwest 4-8
mph. Spotty showers
tonight. Winds south
4-8 mph.

TODAY

High

Monday

LOCAL WEATHER

Tuesday

Wednesday Thursday

Low

Local Forecast
Portland
57/39

Variable clouds
with a shower

Cloudy with a
shower or two

58°/42°

64°/42°

38° 51° 52°

37°

REGIONAL WEATHER

Friday

6 a.m Noon 6 p.m

55°

StatesmanJournal.com

Variable cloudi- Mostly sunny and
ness
pleasant

61°/39°

Cloudy with
afternoon rain

64°/38°

62°/44°

Beaverton
55/37
Oregon City
55/38
McMinnville
54/37
Woodburn
SALEM
54/37
55/37
Corvallis
54/34

Shown is today’s weather. Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Pendleton
49/33

The Dalles
57/34

Newberg
54/37

La Grande
44/28

SALEM
Prineville
45/23

Lebanon
54/36

Newport
51/41

Springfield
53/33
Coos Bay
52/39

Ontario
56/32

Bend
43/23

Burns
45/22

Medford
51/34

Klamath Falls
42/20

LOCAL ALMANAC

RIVER LEVELS

Temperatures
High/low ......................................... 57°/37°
Normal high/low ............................. 59°/39°
Record high/low ...... 79° (1966)/27° (2009)

Precipitation
24 hours through 6 p.m. yest. ............ Trace
Record .................................... 0.53” (1937)
Month to date (normal) ........... 0.56” (0.44”)
Season to date (normal) ..... 29.88” (31.34”)

Today’s Pollen Index
Trees
Grass
Weeds
Molds
Source: National Allergy Bureau

Today’s UV Index and RealFeel Temp

57

56

50

2 p.m. 4 p.m.

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index™
number, the greater the need for eye and skin
protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High;
8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme. The patented
AccuWeather.com RealFeel Temperature® is
an exclusive index of effective temperature based
on eight weather factors.

Air Quality Index

Yesterday’s reading

SKY WATCH

As of 7 a.m. Saturday

Salem through 6 p.m. yesterday

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon

Lakeview
43/18

Today’s Forecast

0-50 Good; 51-100 Moderate; 101-150 Unhealthy
for sensitive groups; 151-200 Unhealthy; 201-300
Very Unhealthy; 301-500 Hazardous
OR Department of Environmental Protection

Willamette River
Flow(cfs) Stage(ft.) Change(ft.)
Eugene
1970
9.60
-0.06
Harrisburg
6300
2.90
-0.08
Corvallis
7200 11.50
-0.09
Albany
8100
4.50
-0.10
Salem
14800
7.50
-0.10
North Santlam River
Mehama
2700
4.14
+0.01
Santlam River
Jefferson
4800
3.93
-0.05
Columbia River
Vancouver
N.A.
5.72
+0.28
Nestucca River
Near Beaver
780
5.48
+0.03
Siletz River
Siletz
1220
4.58
+0.08
Alsea River
Near Tidewater 1080
3.77
+0.01

TIDES

Yaquina Bay and River at Newport
High
Ht.
Low
1:25 a.m.
7.7’
7:49 a.m.
2:04 p.m.
6.8’
7:47 p.m.
Depoe Bay
High
Ht.
Low
1:08 a.m.
8.0’
7:34 a.m.
1:47 p.m.
7.1’
7:32 p.m.
Netarts Bay at Netarts
High
Ht.
Low
1:58 a.m.
6.5’
8:45 a.m.
2:37 p.m.
5.8’
8:43 p.m.
Tillamook Bay at Bay City
High
Ht.
Low
2:14 a.m.
6.7’
9:07 a.m.
2:53 p.m.
6.0’
9:05 p.m.
Tillamook Bay at Tillamook
High
Ht.
Low
2:33 a.m.
6.2’
10:22 a.m.
3:12 p.m.
5.5’
10:20 p.m.
Willamette River at Portland
High
Ht.
Low
7:38 a.m.
0.0’
4:07 a.m.
8:18 p.m.
0.0’
4:39 p.m.

Ht.
0.3’
1.6’
Ht.
0.3’
1.7’
Ht.
0.3’
1.3’
Ht.
0.2’
1.2’
Ht.
0.2’
0.9’
Ht.
0.0’
0.0’

Sun and Moon

New
Apr 18

First
Apr 25

Full
May 3

Solunar Tables
Major periods last up to two hours after the
time listed. Minor periods are much shorter.

Today 7:21a
Mon. 8:13a
Tue. 9:07a
Wed. 10:03a
Thu. 11:00a
Fri. 11:57a

Today

P.M.
MINOR MAJOR

1:09a 7:44p 1:33p
2:01a 8:37p 2:25p
2:54a 9:32p 3:19p
3:50a 10:29p 4:16p
4:47a 11:27p 5:14p
5:43a
---- 6:11p

Monday

Hi/Lo/W

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

48/29/t
54/39/c
43/23/sn
57/36/sh
45/22/sf
55/34/sh
51/41/t
51/40/sh
47/33/t
42/20/sn
43/18/sh
44/28/sf
57/37/sh
51/41/sh

49/35/sh
58/40/sh
44/27/c
56/36/sh
47/26/pc
56/40/sh
56/41/r
55/42/sh
49/36/sh
45/29/sh
47/26/c
50/29/c
59/38/c
54/42/sh

North Bend
Olympia
Ontario
Pendleton
Portland
Redding
Redmond
Seattle
Spokane
Tacoma
Tri-Cities
Vancouver
Walla Walla
Yakima

52/39/t
58/35/c
56/32/sn
49/33/pc
57/39/sh
57/39/r
44/22/sn
56/42/c
53/35/c
56/37/c
56/36/pc
55/39/c
50/37/sh
56/33/pc

54/44/sh
57/37/sh
57/29/sh
56/34/c
59/44/c
58/45/r
47/27/c
56/43/sh
48/33/c
57/37/sh
60/37/c
55/38/pc
57/37/c
61/36/c

Today

Monday

Today

Monday

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Athens
Baghdad
Beijing
Berlin
Buenos Aires
Cairo
Dublin
Hong Kong
Jerusalem

62/57/c
83/58/s
63/39/s
49/30/pc
76/53/s
79/60/s
54/39/pc
83/74/pc
67/51/s

67/53/pc
87/59/s
57/35/c
48/29/pc
70/57/s
84/63/s
58/39/pc
84/73/r
73/53/s

London
Madrid
Manila
Mexico City
Montreal
Moscow
Paris
Rio de Janeiro
Rome

55/40/pc
71/43/s
90/78/t
77/52/pc
34/22/sf
41/30/c
51/34/pc
87/75/pc
57/43/sh

60/40/pc
66/45/pc
93/77/t
78/51/pc
41/29/pc
42/29/pc
54/35/s
82/72/r
58/40/s

Today

Monday

NATIONAL WEATHER

Sunrise today ........................ 6:46 a.m.
Sunset tonight ..................... 7:44 p.m.
Moonrise today .................... 9:14 p.m.
Moonset today ...................... 7:26 a.m.

A.M.
MINOR MAJOR

Monday

Hi/Lo/W

Ashland
Astoria
Bend
Boise
Burns
Eugene
Eureka
Florence
Grants Pass
Klamath Falls
Lakeview
La Grande
Longview
Newport

Today

Last
Apr 11

Mostly cloudy today; periods of snow,
accumulating 1-3 inches, except a
couple of showers of rain or snow
across the north. Some snow tonight,
accumulating 1-3 inches.

City

WORLD CITIES

Ashland
48/29

49

Baker
44/23

Roseburg
55/35

Brookings
49/41

42

John Day
40/28

Variable cloudiness today. A couple of
showers and a thunderstorm; arriving
during the afternoon in the north. A
couple of showers tonight. Showers
tomorrow.

REGIONAL CITIES
Today

Tillamook
53/39

Coastal Forecast

Mountain Forecast

Albany
54/35
Eugene
55/34

Astoria
54/39

Variable cloudiness today. A couple
of showers; arriving in the afternoon
across the north. Mostly cloudy tonight
with a couple of showers. Spotty
showers tomorrow.

Monday

Today

Monday

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Singapore
Sydney
Tokyo
Toronto

90/80/t
74/60/pc
60/54/r
39/29/sf

91/79/t
77/59/r
70/53/c
44/32/sh

Today

Monday

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

City

Hi/Lo/W

Hi/Lo/W

Albuquerque
Anchorage
Atlanta
Baltimore
Boston
Chicago
Charlotte
Cincinnati
Cleveland
Dallas
Denver
Des Moines
Detroit
Honolulu

76/45/s
44/35/pc
69/51/s
65/43/s
48/36/pc
64/41/pc
68/49/s
65/47/s
60/41/pc
66/59/t
72/41/pc
71/49/s
60/35/c
83/70/sh

75/44/s
46/36/r
69/61/t
70/51/s
46/39/sh
61/45/c
70/58/t
62/55/t
61/51/sh
80/66/sh
72/39/pc
69/52/t
60/46/c
82/70/t

Houston
Indianapolis
Kansas City
Las Vegas
Los Angeles
Miami
Milwaukee
Minneapolis
Missoula
Nashville
New Orleans
New York City
Oklahoma City
Omaha

75/67/c
64/46/s
65/50/pc
79/54/s
71/53/pc
84/72/pc
55/37/c
52/37/c
47/26/sh
69/51/pc
77/69/t
60/45/pc
64/56/t
72/47/s

84/68/pc
61/55/c
73/58/t
73/51/s
66/53/s
83/73/pc
50/39/c
44/35/r
47/24/sn
69/60/t
83/70/sh
65/50/pc
85/65/pc
71/50/t

Orlando
Palm Springs
Philadelphia
Phoenix
Pittsburgh
Reno
Sacramento
St. Louis
Salt Lake City
San Diego
San Francisco
Tampa
Tucson
Washington, DC

83/67/pc
85/56/s
63/45/pc
89/61/s
61/39/pc
53/31/c
60/40/sh
67/51/pc
69/43/c
69/60/pc
61/48/sh
86/70/pc
88/51/s
69/50/s

87/67/pc
78/51/s
68/53/s
84/58/s
64/50/pc
55/37/c
66/48/c
71/62/c
58/39/sh
66/57/pc
65/51/c
85/70/s
85/51/s
72/58/s

Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

-10s

In the Sky

Easter Sunday is the Sunday following the
full moon (April 4) after the vernal equinox
(March 20).

Showers

-0s

T-storms

0s
10s

Rain

Source: Jim Todd OMSI

Flurries

ROAD CONDITIONS

20s
30s
40s

Go to Statesman
Journal.com/Roadcams
to find updated information
on road conditions

Snow

Ice

WEATHER HISTORY

Tambora, a volcano in Indonesia, erupted
on April 5, 1815, sending 30 cubic miles of
dust into the atmosphere and caused the
“year without a summer” in 1816.

Cold
Front
Warm
Front

50s
60s
70s
80s
90s
100s

Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015

Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

Stationary
Front

110s

CACTUS LEAGUE: MARINERS 6, ROCKIES 3

GOLF ROUNDUP

Morrison homers
in Seattle’s victory

Spieth holds 1-shot lead over Cook

By Mike Cranston
Associated Press

SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — Eddie
Butler was shaky in his final audition for a starting job, giving
up a two-run home run to Logan
Morrison and balking in a run in
the Colorado Rockies’ 6-3 loss to
the Seattle Mariners on Saturday.
Manager Walt Weiss wanted
to see the 24-year-old pitch effectively after the right-hander
didn’t get out of the first inning
in his last start due to a tired
shoulder. Butler said he was
healthy, but was charged with
five runs and six hits while getting seven outs.
“Everything felt good with
that, but just a couple bad pitches today,” Butler said.
Weiss said they’ll decide Sunday whether Butler or Christian
Bergman gets the last roster
spot.
Seattle starter Taijuan Walk-

25

er, finished spring training with
a 0.67 ERA, more than enough to
earn the fourth rotation spot.
Robinson Cano and Nelson
Cruz each singled off Butler before exiting early in the teams’
final exhibition game.
Morrison credits his hitting
coach with helping him bust out
of a slump.
“Howard Johnson kind of
banned me from the cage. I was
taking too many swings,” Morrison said. “It wasn’t any more
than I was taking in Seattle, but
it’s a little cooler in Seattle.”
Morrison said he got too
technical as he went 0 for 19 before “clearing out all the noise.”
He followed Friday’s RBI single
by crushing Butler’s misplaced
fastball to left in his first at-bat.
It was a nice way to head into
Monday’s opener against the
Los Angeles Angels.
“Can’t wait to play in front of
a sold-out crowd,” he said.

HOUSTON — Jordan Spieth’s
pre-Masters run of extraordinary golf continued Saturday
as the 21-year-old Texas native
shot a 5-under-par 67 to take a
one-shot lead over three players through 54 holes of the
Houston Open.
A victory Sunday would be
Spieth’s third on the PGA Tour
and make him the second
youngest after Tiger Woods
with three titles since 1940. It
would also allow him to wrest
the lead in the point standings
away from Jimmy Walker and
further boost his confidence
ahead of the season’s first major championship in Augusta,
Georgia, next week. Spieth
was the runner-up to Bubba
Watson there last spring.
Spieth sank a 41-foot birdie
putt from just off the green on
the par-3 16, to get to 14 under
par, where he finished. He is a
career-best No. 4 in the World
Golf Rankings.
“Today was as comfortable
as I’ve ever been with the lead
on a weekend,” Spieth said. “I
wanted to get into contention

a tournament it’s going to be
good for you the next time you
tee up,” he said.
Austin Cook, who gained entry into the field through the
Monday qualifier, is tied for
second at 203 with first-round
leader Scott Piercy and Johnson Wagner, the Houston
Open’s 2008 champion.

GEORGE BRIDGES/AP

Jordan Spieth hits his second shot
on the 15th hole during the third
round of the Houston Open golf
tournament on Saturday.

as much as I could prior to the
Masters, to have as much experience as I could to limit those
nerves. This feels really good.
(Sunday) I’ll certainly have
nerves, but hopefully I’ll give
myself a chance to win. Then
I’ll take even more confidence
into next week.
“Anytime you can close out

LPGA: Sei Young Kim made two
late birdies Saturday to take a threestroke lead in the ANA Inspiration.
The long-hitting South Korean
player shot a 3-under 69 to reach 10
under at Mission Hills with a round
left in the year’s first major.
Kim holed a downhill 18-footer
from the fringe on the par-4 16th
and made a 10-foot birdie putt on
the par-3 17th. She two-putted for
par from the back fringe on the
par-5 18th.
Stacy Lewis was second after a 68.
She bogeyed Nos. 15 and 17 and
missed a 6-foot birdie putt on 18.
Morgan Pressel, Brittany Lincicome and Ariya Jutanugarn were 6
under. Lincicome drove into the water on 18 and closed with a 70. Pressel had a 71, and Jutanugarn shot 66.
— Wire services

1D

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Mid-Valley
y
LOCAL FIRST

CAPI LYNN / STATESMAN JOURNAL

A 1941 Chevy pickup is parked in front of the Fussy Duck on Commercial Street SE on Wednesday. The Fussy Duck is a retail store that sells gifts, home decor,
funky junk and more. Owner Risa Cowley bought the truck to draw attention to the store.

’41 Chevy truck is show piece
Vehicle draws attention
to the Fussy Duck store
At least a couple times a month, someone
stops by the Fussy Duck not to shop for gifts
or home decor, but to ask about the rusty old
pickup in the parking lot.
What year is it? Is it for sale? One person
offered $10,000 on the spot.
“It’s usually gentlemen, and they come in
and want to talk to my husband,” store owner Risa Cowley said. “That’s when he tells
them, ‘It’s not mine, it’s hers.’ ”
She bought the 1941 Chevy truck a year
ago, shortly after the Fussy Duck opened at
its current location, 3170 Commercial St. SE.
And she bought it for one reason only — to
draw attention to the store.

“We call it a show piece,” she said. “It
draws your eye up to the store. If you look at
a lot of fun, funky junk kind of stores, a lot
of them have trucks as display pieces.”
She purchased it locally from a man who
had two of the same
year and model and
decided to restore the
other one. Her husband
Jim, for the record,
didn’t want her to buy
it, although he now
recognizes the benefits
Capi Lynn
of it being a billboard
F O RWA R D T H I S
for the business.
Risa Cowley didn’t
know any history about the truck, referring
me to the previous owner, Tim Fleming. He
acquired the truck about five years earlier
from an 89-year-old man in La Grande who

once operated a towing service.
“He drove it for years and used it in his
business,” Fleming said. “When it wasn’t
serviceable, it was sitting outside for years.”
Cowley has no idea what the truck is
worth — the truck sold for $655 retail in 1941
— but she said she got a good deal on it.
Fleming even delivered it and helped park it
where it is today, under the store’s towering
street-front sign.
The body of the vehicle, which Cowley
fondly calls the Fussy Duck Truck, is intact
but there are many dents and cracks. Two of
the windows are broken, and the one on the
passenger side has rows of clear tape covering it. A couple of the tires could use some
air. Stenciled on the wooden bed of the truck
is “Troop 118.”
See TRUCK, Page 2D

Saturday Seder
symbolizes journey
By Alexa Armstrong
Statesman Journal

Abbey Vanderbeek stirred a
huge bowl of sliced potatoes
seasoned with fresh rosemary
and olive oil.
Also in Temple Beth Sholom’s kitchen, her fellow congregation members busily prepared salmon and ratatouille
for Saturday’s community Seder in Salem, the evening meal
that marks the beginning of

Li Tubman
prepares the
holiday candles
prior to the
start of a
Community
Passover Seder
on Saturday at
Temple Beth
Sholom in
South Salem.

Passover.
“We are celebrating life, and
being together,” Vanderbeek
said.
In the center of every table at
the meal sat a communal plate
— the Seder plate — of boiled
eggs, spring herbs, strips of
horseradish, a mixture of diced
apples and chopped walnuts, a
beet and matzo bread.
And at the table of Rabbi Yis-

DANIELLE
PETERSON /
STATESMAN
JOURNAL

See SEDER, Page 10D

SJ NOW
SATURDAY'S LOTTERY

A Facebook post reprinted Saturday on
Page 6A, the Daily Download page, was
incorrect. The post should have identified
the Corban University sports player as
Deen Castronovo’s niece.

Megabucks:
4-13-17-38-39-41
Jackpot: $2.2 million;
0 winners
5 of 6: 2 winners,
$952.50
4 of 6: 265 winners,
$46.90

CORRECTIONS

Pick 4
1 p.m.: 2-8-1-9;
4 p.m.: 6-9-5-1;
7 p.m.: 0-0-0-3;
10 p.m.: N/A
Win For Life:
17-45-51-66

To report a correction or clarification, call
the newsroom at (503) 399-6773.

REACH US: Don Currie, local editor, (503) 399-6677; dcurrie@StatesmanJournal.com

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Recognizing positive stories
that drive us forward

Classes teach veterans and
and novices alike the basics of
urban gardening. Page 4A

Powerball:
33-39-40-41-54
Powerball: 28
Lucky Lines:
1-5-12-14-19-23-26-32

GoodNews
25

CORRECTION

2D

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Eugene slams brakes on Uber
Ride-sharing
service owes city
$66,000 in fines
Associated Press

EUGENE — Easter Sunday
marks the end of Uber in Eugene, at least for now.
The Register-Guard newspaper reported Saturday that a
hearings official imposed a civil
penalty of $1,500 a day on the
ride-service company after deciding it is violating city code.
Moreover, the official upheld
penalties levied by the city,
which means Uber must pay
$66,000 in fines accrued since
February.
“The hearings official’s decision reaffirms what the city has
said all along,” Eugene officials
said in a statement late Friday.
“Uber needs to apply for a Public Passenger Vehicle Company
License in order to operate legally in Eugene.”
Uber said on its Eugene blog
that it must make “the difficult
decision to pause operations,”
starting at 10 a.m. Sunday.
Uber started service in Eugene about seven months ago,
allowing people to use a smartphone app to hail and electronically pay a driver who has
signed up with Uber and uses
his or her privately owned vehi-

DANIELLE PETERSON / STATESMAN JOURNAL

The Uber app as shown from an iPhone. In Eugene, the ride-booking service is suspending operations starting
Sunday over a city code issue. Uber owes the city $66,000 in fines accrued since February,

cle to transport passengers.
As in many other places, Uber ran into problems with existing taxi regulations.

The city views Uber as a
transportation company subject to the city’s licensing requirements. Uber maintains it

is basically a technology company that links customers to
drivers who are independent
contractors, and that the city’s

policies and regulations don’t
apply.
The city’s statement said
Mayor Kitty Piercy and staff
met with Uber representatives
last month and offered them the
opportunity to operate legally
under a temporary operating
agreement.
“The proposal did not require Uber to meet the same requirements as taxis,” the statement said, “just the three minimum safety requirements.”
Those requirements were:
» Driver background checks
through the police department’s
law-enforcement database.
» Proof of adequate commercial liability insurance.
» Verification of vehicle
maintenance and safety equipment.
A sticking point has been the
requirement that the company
provide what the city considers
adequate insurance for the time
when an Uber driver is seeking
a passenger but does not have
one.
An Uber spokeswoman said
the company has worked out a
deal with several major insurance companies to provide commercial insurance to cover the
period when a driver is looking
for a passenger. The limit that
was agreed on at this point, however, was $1 million per incident, lower than the $1.3 million
required by Eugene.

DIVORCES
The following are divorces received between March 27 and April
2. For more, go to StatesmanJournal.com/Records.

MARION COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT
Divorces granted
Candy Juarez Candy and Johnny W. Pagan Jr.; Boyce Ray Wakefield and Rhonda Sue Wakefield; Karen A. Roth and Stephen E.
Roth; Ashley Chanthakhoun and Michael Chanthakhoun; Trishah
Susanna Schwartz and Justin Charles Schwartz; Michael Larry
Starkey and Dona Rae Starkey; Troy D. Kirkland and Gloria J.
Kirkland; Cassandra L. Flowers and Harry E. Flowers; Deborah Rae
Romano and William George Shortis; Yessica Yazmin Chavez
Olvera and Leonardo Gonzalez Perez; Jessica A. Ovalle and Hugo
V. Rocha; Kodi Walters and Michael Walters; Maria Consuelo
Flores and Joel DeJesus Bermundez; Arthur B. Cummins and
Pamela J. Cummins; Katherine L. Strubel and Thomas J. Strubel;
Stacie Lynn Watts and Lawrence B. Watts; Doreen Ann Backus
and Fred Albert Hibben; Lynda J. Stein and William F. Stein; Luis
Alberto Galindo-Muniz and Laura Marie Galindo; Eric Cassidy and
Danielle Cassidy; Tricia Ann Bates and Ryan Michael Bates; Susan
Christine Vollmer and William Alan Vollmer; David Richard Earnest and Cheryl Lynn Earnest; Victoria Simmons and Joey Simmons; Maria Guadalupe Estrada-Silva and Jesus Estrada-Alvarez;
Janine Carranza Wisniewski and Michael Wisniewski; Tera Christine Spradling and Jennifer Lee Spradling; Jason Riley Pacheco
and Michelle Lynn Pacheco; Mildred Sue Courson and Kenneth D.
Courson; Fran Boone Collins and Clenard Howard Collins; Nancy
L. Hatch and Scott C. Hatch; Andrew S. McCoy and Brooke N.
McCoy; Hilda Murillo and Alejandro Maciel; Desseare Ellen Jones
and Arion Gerald Jones; Jason A. Tuck and Karen P. Tuck; Michael
Henry Wilt and Breanne Wilt; Todd Alan Pote and Sandy Cristi
Pote.
CAPI LYNN / STATESMAN JOURNAL

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The 1941 Chevy truck parked in front of the Fussy Duck on Commercial Street SE has a long hood with rugged front fenders and
a bold front grill. Chevy trucks from 1941 to 1946 are known as “The Art Deco Series” and are somewhat rare.

Truck
Continued from Page 1D

There is no for sale sign in the
window. But that doesn’t stop car
enthusiasts from inquiring, like
the gentleman who offered her
$10,000 for the truck.
“I don’t know if he was serious,”
Cowley said. “But I said no.”
Chevy trucks from 1941 to 1946
are known as “The Art Deco Series.” They have long hoods and
small cabs with rugged front fenders and bold front grills. The
trucks are somewhat rare because
of a limited production span. Chevy halted production for the civilian market after the United States
entered World War II and didn’t
resume until late 1945.
Everything is for sale in Cowley’s business, though, right?
“It would have to be a pretty
good offer,” she said. “I looked for
months and months and months
for a truck like this — even when I
was at the old store — and couldn’t
find one in the price range I was

looking for.”
She saw this one on Craigslist
when she was caring for her ailing
mother. She couldn’t leave her
mom’s side, so she called Fleming,
told him she wanted to buy it, and
then asked if he could go to the
Fussy Duck, where her husband
could write him a check. The man
sent his wife to the shop, and the
deal was done.
“I didn’t even look at it,” Cowley
said. “All I saw was pictures.”
She didn’t care what year it
was. She just wanted a vintage
truck.
“I like the style, and I like the
rust,” she said. “It sounds so silly,
but I like rust.”
Electrical power has been extended to the area where the truck
is parked. During the holidays, it
was decorated with a lit Christmas
tree.
“Eventually, we’d like to decorate it for certain times of the
year,” Cowley said.
She has other ideas of trimming
the truck, including filling the bed
with produce and flowers to make
it look like it just returned from

the farmer’s market.
Fleming, who lives in South
Salem and drives by the truck all
the time, warned her to expect
offers if she planned to put it on
display. He also warned her that
its parts could be susceptible to
theft.
“We’ve screwed everything
shut. You can’t get into it,” Cowley
said.
It’s sole purpose to is to lure
people inside the store, which is
set back considerably from Commercial Street SE. And it has
worked, to Jim Cowley’s surprise.
Business is better than ever at the
Fussy Duck, which opened in Salem five years ago.
“He’s learned a lot since he’s
been working with the women,” his
wife said.
“Forward This” appears Wednesdays
and Sundays and highlights the people,
places and organizations of the
Mid-Willamette Valley. Contact Capi
Lynn at clynn@StatesmanJournal.com
or (503) 399-6710, or follow her the rest
of the week on Twitter @CapiLynn and
Facebook @CapiLynnSJ.

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StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

LOCAL FIRST

3D

Causes
CALENDAR
TODAY
Easter egg hunt and fundraiser:
Collect brightly colored eggs filled with
treats that you can feed to the animals.
Visit with Helen, the American bison.
Other activities include door prizes and
more. 1 to 4 p.m., Lighthouse Farm
Sanctuary, 36831 Richardson Gap Road,
Scio. $10 suggested donation. (503)
394-4486,
www.lighthousefarmsanctuary.org.

THURSDAY
Victor Point School chili feed and
auction: Hosted by Victor Point’s Parent
Teacher Community Club, the 40-plusyear-old event raises money for students
and teachers at this rural K-8 school. It’s
a dinner, dessert and huge raffle, featuring more than 100 items. Cakewalk will
feature baked goods made by school
families. 5 to 8 p.m., Victor Point School,
1175 Victor Point Road SE, Silverton.
Meal tickets are $5 for adults, $3 for
children and seniors. Raffle tickets are
$1; ticket-holders need not be present to
win. (503) 873-4987.
PETtalks: Ideas for Caring: Guest
speaker will discuss caring for pets. Light
refreshments provided. 6 to 8 p.m.,
Willamette Humane Society, Education
Hall, 4246 Turner Rd SE. $5 suggested
donation. (503) 585-5900,
https://whs4pets.org/services/
behavior-training/pet-talks/.

ASHLEY SMITH / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Lisa Heitmann talks with her daughter Guinevere Cooper, left, 6, while she holds 16-month-old Rosetta Shields, a friend’s baby,
Thursday at the Salem Interfaith Hospitality Network’s day center in Salem.

THURSDAY-SATURDAY

Loving their neighbors
Interfaith network
unites to shelter
homeless families
By Kaellen Hessel
Statesman Journal

C

hurches will be packed
Sundayfor Easter, but
those same buildings
stand vacant most nights
of the week.
Through Salem Interfaith Hospitality Network, 18 congregations
have banded together to provide
some of the only available emergency housing for homeless families in
Marion and Polk counties.
These churches rotate hosting the
families a week at a time. Families
eat dinner and sleep at the churches
and then spend their days at school,
at work, or at the nonprofit’s day center as they search for jobs and permanent housing.
All families that went through Interfaith’s program last year moved
into their own homes, Executive Director T.J. Putman said. Since the
network began in 1999, more than
1,000 children and their parents have
been served, he said.
The network is made up of Christian churches, ranging from Protestant to Catholic to nondenominational, and a Unitarian congregation, but
others are able to join.
“It’s a tenet of every faith to love
your neighbor,” Putman said.
Four families have spent the past
week staying at the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of Salem,
5090 Center St. NE. Volunteers prepared dinner, welcomed guests and
spent the night. Volunteers at the
congregation have activities available in the evenings, but oftentimes
families are so exhausted by the end
of they day go to their own rooms,
said Samantha Scales, office manager.

503-589-9844

Upcycle Oregon: featuring upcycled
artwork by Oregon artists, and highlighting re-use, reduction and upcycling
efforts statewide. 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Friday and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday.
Artist reception 4 to 5 p.m. Friday and
an "Upcycled Fashion" show Saturday.
Oregon State Capitol, Galleria, 900
Court St. NE. Free. (971) 208-5869,
www.upcycleoregon.org.

GET INVOLVED

Salem Interfaith Hospitality
Network is in need of a new van.
The 15-passenger van they use to
shuttle families between the
churches and day center has a
broken heater and other problems, said Executive Director T.J.
Putman.

SATURDAY
Alexia’s Cozy Covers blanket making
day: Create blankets of all types for
foster children, youth and others in
need. Fleece and quilt top kits available
for you to sew. Donations of completed
quilts, quilt tops, other blankets and
blanket-making supplies are needed. 10
a.m. to 2 p.m., Salem Evangelical Church,
455 Locust St. NE. Free. (503) 576-1775.

To volunteer or make a donation, contact Putman at tj@salemihn.org or (503) 370-9752.

In the three weeks the Shieldses
have been in the program, they’ve
bonded with the other families. Everyone feels like they’re in this together, Cara Shields said. Her fellow
guests have offered to baby-sit her
16-month-old daughter, Rosetta,
while she ran errands. It’s wonderful
to have that kind of trust, she said.
“This has been a really wonderful
experience, and that’s not something
you expect out of this kind of situation,” Shields said.
Interfaith was inundated with
families looking for shelter after the
YWCA shuttered its shelter and The
Salvation Army stopped serving
families in 2013.
In July, Interfaith started a rental
assistance program where the organization pays for families’ security
deposit and first six months of rent
while providing case management.
The families then take on the financial responsibility.
Now, the network is housing families in Salem and Keizer but is looking to expand in Polk County. It held a
pilot program at Christ’s Church in
Monmouth recently that was supported by several churches in the
county.
“We have the resources in our
faith community to end homelessness, and I think we can do that,” Putman said.

Walk MS 2015: Bringing more than
5,000 people together to rally for a
good cause and raise critical funds that
benefit the nearly 8,000 people living
with MS in Oregon and Southwest
Washington. 10 a.m., Riverfront Park,
200 Water St. NE. No fundraising minimum; encouraging everyone to invite
four friends and family members to
contribute $35 each. (503) 445-8342,
www.walkMSoregon.com.
Ice cream social: Current and prospective volunteers at the Salem Art Association are encouraged to celebrate each
other and their efforts. 1 to 3 p.m., Bush
Barn Art Center, 600 Mission St. SE. Free.
(503) 581-2228, www.salemart.org.
Spring fashion show and tea: A
fundraiser to support the activities of
the senior center, the show features a
formal tea, refreshments and a fashion
show of the finest clothing and accessories from the center’s Nifty Thrifty Rummage Center and gift shop. 2 to 4 p.m.,
South Salem Senior Center, 6450 Fairway
Ave. SE. $5. Must purchase in advance.
(503) 588-0748.

THROUGH APRIL
Fabric Drive: Three nonprofit organizations, CAFA, PAL, and Alexia’s Cozy
Covers, all in the Salem area need your
unwanted fabric. Donate cotton and
home dec fabrics. Fabric will be measured, folded and sold at the fabric fair
in May. Proceeds benefit spay/neuter
programs for dogs and cats in the community, as well as Alexia’s Cozy Covers in
making blankets for people in need. Call
or text to donate. (503) 409-2543.

Reporter

Forward This

Out and About

Calendar

Editorial Assistant

Editor

KAELLEN HESSEL

CAPI LYNN

LEANN MOORE

LEE CLARKSON

DAN BENDER

Phone: (503) 399-6743
Email: khessel@
StatesmanJournal.com
Twitter: @KaellenHessel

Phone: (503) 399-6710
Email: clynn
@StatesmanJournal.com

MARY LOUISE
VANNATTA

Phone: (503) 399-6785
Email: calendar@StatesmanJournal.com
Upload your events at
www.statesmanjournal.com/calendar

Phone: (503) 399-6833
Email: lclarkson@
StatesmanJournal.com

Phone: (503) 399-6731
Email: dbender@
StatesmanJournal.com
Twitter: @DanBender_SJ

Email: outandaboutsj
@live.com

503-589-9844

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Everything the organization does
is through the local church, Putman
said. Churches provide housing,
food, in-kind donations and volunteers. Sixteen additional churches
support the organization but don’t
provide housing. These partnerships
keep the nonprofit’s overhead costs
minimal, Putman said.
Although the nonprofit is faithbased, there’s no requirement for
participating families to practice a
faith or participate in any religious
activities. The churches and their
volunteers live out their faith
through their actions rather than
their words, Putman said.
The only criteria for eligibility are
that families must have kids, be willing to work to regain their independence, pass a background check and
pass a drug test, Putman said.
Families tend to stay in the program for about 35 days, Putman said.
During that time, a case manager
helps meet each family’s needs. Lifeskills classes are offered each week.
They cover parenting, budgeting,
CPR and first aid, how to be a good
tenant, credit counseling, conflict
resolution, and self-care. A case manager continues to follow up with families after they’ve been placed in a
permanent home.
The day center, at 1055 Edgewater
St. NW, is meant to feel like a home. It
features living rooms where families
can bond or meet with a case manager, a play room overflowing with
toys and a well-engineered box fort, a
kitchen, a laundry room and a computer room.
Most shelters are segregated by
gender, meaning that homeless families must split up in order to stay
there.
The Shields family became homeless in February after Cara Shields
lost her job as a switchboard operator to automation. Her husband receives disability pay, but it wasn’t
enough to support them.
“Our big issue was staying together, and that’s something that’s really
hard to find,” Cara Shields said.

Used book sale: 5 to 8 p.m. Thursday; 9
a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday; 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Saturday. Stayton Community Center,
400 W Virginia St., Stayton. (503) 7698886, www.folstore.org.

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4D

StatesmanJournal.com

Causes
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Monthly giving increases donor’s impact
Summer is coming, and the director
of your favorite nonprofit may be worried.
This is especially true for charities
that depend heavily on donors to fund
their missions. It
makes sense if you
think about it; summer means many
distractions.
Perhaps even
now you are planning a really cool
Phil McCorkle vacation, or maybe
S M A RT G I V I N G
all the great weather we have been
appreciating has
you looking eagerly ahead to summer activities you will enjoy. You’re not alone
and, since so many of us cram so much
into our June through August, we forget
to support our nonprofits.
Summer is statistically one of the two
slowest times of the year for charitable
donations. The other dip occurs in January to February, right after the tradition-

al holiday giving season.
Since expenses happen every month
of the year, dips in income can mean that
the nonprofit must tap reserves to operate in the lean months, trusting that the
months with strong donations will be
good enough to make up the difference.
If you want to help your favorite charity eliminate this boom-or-bust cycle,
there is an easy answer. Consider becoming a monthly sustainer donor by completing a form that gives your chosen
nonprofit permission to automatically
deduct your donation from your account
each month.
For a nonprofit, a core group of sustainer donors means dependable income
that can be counted upon all year long.
That gives the organization’s leaders
confidence in planning and the ability to
make mission-necessary expenditures
even during months when traditional donated income lags. In short, it helps them
do a better job of achieving the mission
you care about.
Monthly giving has its advantages for

you, too. Once you sign up, you no longer
have to find and address an envelope,
write a check, buy a stamp, and drive to
the post office. It allows you to plan and
budget your contributing so that you
know exactly how much support you are
providing to your favorite charity.
There is another advantage of sustainer giving that is often overlooked. As
a donor, you are probably giving because
you believe in a cause. It is equally likely
that you wish you could have a larger impact.
Most people find that monthly giving
allows them to comfortably increase
their support. For example, it tends to be
a lot easier to give $50 a month than it is
to write one check for $500. But, if you do
the math at the end of the year, you will
find that you have actually contributed
$600, and that is a bigger impact for your
charity. Typically, the nonprofit will mail
you one summary report of all your contributions at the end of the year for use in
preparing your taxes.
Always, you retain control of your do-

nating. Stopping or changing your
monthly giving — at any time — is as
easy as a phone call, an email or a letter
to your nonprofit.
The sum of all these advantages make
monthly sustainer giving something you
may want to explore as a way to support
all the charities you care about.
I look at it this way: If you are planning that vacation, chances are that you
are making arrangements with a neighbor to care for your home by picking up
your mail and watering your lawn. Similarly, signing up as a monthly sustainer
donor assures your favorite nonprofit is
cared for while you are away. And, you
just might ease the worry of a nonprofit
director wondering how to accomplish
the mission during an uncertain summer.
Phil McCorkle is president of the Center for
Community Innovation, a Salem-based
nonprofit whose mission is to strengthen
and support area nonprofits. He can be
reached at pmccorkle@ccioregon.org.

GET INVOLVED
Adaptive Riding Institute: Volunteers needed to help with riding
sessions. Adaptive Riding Institute is a nonprofit that provides therapeutic recreational horseback riding for children and adults with
disabilities in the Salem area. (503) 743-3890, www.adaptiveridingin
stitute.org.
AARP Driver Safety Program: Volunteers teach the six-hour classroom refresher course for experienced motorists. Training and materials are provided. $15 for AARP members/$20 non-AARP members.
(503) 320-8246, www.aarp.org/drive.
American Cancer Society’s Cancer Resource Center in Salem
Hospital: Seeking volunteers to help patients and their families get
the information they need regarding diagnosis, treatment and free
services. (503) 795-3914, julie.robertson@cancer.org.
American Cancer Society Road To Recovery: Seeking volunteer
drivers to help get community members battling cancer to their
treatments. (503) 795-3971, lily.westlund@cancer.org.
American Red Cross Blood Drive: Seeking volunteers to help with
blood drive events and serve as administrative assistants. (503) 7791263, marisa.wyckoff@redcross.org.
American Red Cross Disaster Relief: Seeking local and national
disaster volunteers. (503) 585-5414, volunteer.cascades@redcross.org.
American Wildlife Foundation: Seeking volunteers in areas of
operation including animal care, landscape maintenance, education
programs and pen construction and repair. (971) 227-4036 or
www.awildfound.org.

CASA of Marion County: Seeks volunteers to advocate in court to
help abused and neglected children in foster care find safe, permanent homes. Training provided. (503) 934-1298,
lene.garrett@state.or.us.
Center for Hope & Safety: Seeking English and Spanish-speaking
volunteers to provide emotional support and local resources on a
24-hour crisis hotline (and occasionally in person). Center for Hope &
Safety is a Marion County nonprofit that provides services to victims
and survivors of domestic and sexual violence. Training provided.
(503) 378-1572 or volunteer@hopeandsafety.org.
City of Salem: Seeking volunteers for the Citizens Advisory Traffic
Commission, Citizen Budget Committee, Civil Service Commission,
Downtown Advisory Board, Housing & Urban Development Advisory
Commission, Human Rights & Relations Advisory Committee, North
Gateway Redevelopment Advisory Board, Salem Housing Advisory
Committee, Senior Center Advisory Commission, Salem Social Services
Advisory Board and West Salem Redevelopment Advisory Board.
(503) 588-6255, Ext. 7269, kwest@cityofsalem.net,
www.cityofsalem.net/boardsandcommissions.
Deepwood Gardeners: Seeking individuals to join this group of
dedicated volunteers that have been servicing the gardens for 35
years. Official work time is Mondays from 9 a.m. to noon. The group
works most of the year except for cold and wet months. The group
also helps Friends of Deepwood decorate the house for the holiday
season. Contact Karen at (503) 749-3039 or Georgia at (503) 3939452.

Birthright of Salem: Help women who are pregnant or think they
might be pregnant by providing free pregnancy tests, listening to
their stories and finding resources and clothing for them and their
babies. (503) 585-2273.

Department of Human Resources: Seeking volunteers for clerical
and transportation positions. Clerical volunteers are utilized in offices
and branches throughout Marion, Polk and Yamhill counties. Transportation volunteers drive children and adults to appointments. (503)
373-7502, www.oregon.gov/dhs/volunteer.

Boys & Girls Club of Salem, Marion and Polk Counties: Volunteers needed to help prepare and serve daily hot meals to our members. Opportunities available at four sites Monday to Friday. Email
ecardella@bgc-salem.org to apply, www.bgc-salem.org.

Disabled American Veterans Transportation Network: Seeking
volunteer drivers for the Salem area. Must be a licensed Oregon
driver and pass a physical conducted by the Veterans Administration.
(800) 949-1004, Ext. 55042.

Bush Barn Art Center: Seeking volunteers to assist gallery staff in
greeting the public, installing exhibitions, working with artists and
planning special events. Flexible hours. (503) 581-2228, catherine@sa
lemart.org, www.salemart.org.

Eagle Charter School: Looking to expand its board of directors,
which meets on the third Thursday of each month.
www.eaglecharterschoolsalem.org, (503) 339-7114.

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Gordon House: Seeking volunteers interested in guiding tours, gardening, office work, collections maintenance, special events and more. The work of the staff and volunteers
support the fundraising needs and mission of education. The Gordon
House is the only Frank Lloyd Wright building in Oregon and the
only one open to the public in the Pacific Northwest. The Gordon
House exemplifies the Usonian architectural style of iconic American
architect Frank Lloyd Wright. www.thegordonhouse.org/volunteers.
Friends of the Jefferson Public Library: In need of corporate
sponsors and volunteers. The library has been determined to be
severely structurally deficient and is collapsing, literally and figuratively, under increased demand for services. (541) 327-2423,
library2010@q.com.
Friends of Oregon School for the Deaf: Seeks a volunteer to take
minutes at monthly board meetings. Occasionally design publicity
materials, assist with mailings and help with fundraising activities.
couoh_@hotmail.com.
Friends of Silver Falls State Park: Seeking volunteers to work in
the Nature Store. Meet people from all over the world, answer
questions and help park visitors get as much enjoyment as possible.
(503) 873-8735, admin@friendsofsilverfalls.net,
www.friendsofsilverfalls.net.
Gentiva Hospice: Volunteers visit with patients for companionship,
support and respite. They also help patients at meal times. Volunteers must be at least 18 years old and be able to visit the patients
wherever they live. (503) 574-2900, Ext. 213, (866) 977-2752, bben
nett@odyshealth.com.
Historic Deepwood Estate: Seeking history buffs to lead tours of
the house. Will train. (503) 363-1825, info@historicdeepwoodes
tate.org.
Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Advisory Committee: The twelve-member committee will meet monthly to provide
oversight of the Marion County Community Developmental Disabilities Program as the disability issues advisory committee. Members are appointed by the Board of Commissioners to serve four-year
terms and must be at least 18 years old. The county is looking for
individuals or family members from the developmental disabilities
community, service providers and advocates to serve on the committee. (503) 588-7990, ccrocker@co.marion.or.us, or
http://www.co.marion.or.us/BS/VOL/.
Joys of Living Assistance Dogs: Seeking volunteer puppy raisers
to care for, train and socialize puppies. Raisers attend weekly training
classes with puppy so both can learn together. New batch of puppies
ready for volunteer homes soon. (503) 551-4572, www.facebook.com/
JLADjoydogs.

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Keizer Heritage Center: Seeking volunteers in event hosting,
museum hostess and/or office help and special tasks. (503) 393-9660,
www.keizerheritage.org.
Lighthouse Farm Sanctuary: Volunteer each Saturday from 10 a.m.
to 1 p.m. and each Wednesday from 10 a.m. to noon to help care for
the animals that call the sanctuary their home. (503) 394-4486,
www.lighthousefarmsanctuary.org.

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Marion County District Attorney’s Office, Victim Assistance
Division: Seeking volunteers to provide victims with emotional and
informational support through the criminal justice process, in addition to accompanying them to court and appropriate resource referrals. Training provided. Spanish speakers also needed. (503) 5883571, www.co.marion.or.us\DA\victimassistance.
Marion County Historical Society WHC Library Archives: Seeking volunteers to help with research on local historical topics and
data entry. (503) 585-7012 or amyv@willametteheritage.org.
Marion County Retired & Senior Volunteer Program: Program
designed for community members ages 55 and older. Six RSVP volunteer placement stations in Silverton/Mount Angel. (503) 982-5388,
marta.trinidad@ci.woodburn.or.us.
PanCAN: Volunteer opportunities for several core leader roles, as
well as general support for our pancreatic cancer awareness and
fundraising walk in November: Portland PurpleStride 2014. Contact
Affiliate Coordinator Debra Mayer at dmayer@pancanvolunteer.org.

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Marion County Citizen Review Board: Recruiting volunteer board
members. The board consists of a diverse group of volunteers who
review cases of children in foster care and bring a community perspective to the foster care system. (503) 986-5888, rakeem.a.washing
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The Lord & Schryver Conservancy: Seeking volunteers to help
maintain the historic Lord & Schryver gardens at the Historic Deepwood Estate, the classic Salem design firm's only residential gardens
presently in the public domain. We meet Thursday mornings from 9
a.m. to noon, with a convivial and educational coffee break, from
February to October. Volunteers bring their own hand tools. (503)
365-7102.

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5D

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

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Easter egg hunting at the Community Easter Egg Hunt and Party at Our Savior’s Lutheran Church on March 28.

Our Savior’s Lutheran Church hosts community hunt, party
I remember the community Easter egg hunts that
took place when I was a very little girl. Our Savior’s
Lutheran Church continued the tradition March 28 at
the Community Easter Egg Hunt and Party. We were
fortunate that while the grass was damp, the sun was
peeking through the clouds and children’s treats remained dry on the lawn.
The church staff worked for
weeks to plan the program, collect candy from the congregation and stuff the plastic eggs
used in the hunt. Children’s Ministry Director Sarah Aguilar
supervised the activity, along
Out & About
with volunteer Annelise HartM A RY L O U I S E
inger.
VA N NAT TA
Families started by joining a
kid-friendly musical opening and
a puppet show. Pastors Tom Hux and Don Brandt
were involved in providing a positive message that
focused on the true meaning of Easter for Christians.
Brandt’s wife, Susan; son, Jason; daughter-in-law,
Natalie; and grandchildren, Mya and Kyra, also enjoyed the morning.
Children were divided into age groups and were

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released to head outside with their parents. Although
they were anxious to get going, I caught Daniel and
Ryley Stuckrath and Genesis and Everson Williams
to grab a picture. The egg hunt began and ended in
minutes as the children moved at top speed — and not
a piece of Laffy Taffy was left untouched.
The fun wasn’t over, though, as the gym opened up
for games and crafts. Kellie Nguyen and Alexis Salchenberg monitored an egg-shaped bean bag toss
game, Suzie Costic and Brenda Kraschel helped with
crafts, Julie Francis painted faces, and Pastor Hux
and Bryce MacGregor helped print pictures of guests
with the bunny. While many children were reluctant,
Kason and Hinton Ralston happily posed.
Our Savior’s Lutheran Church, at 1770 Baxter Road
SE, was founded in 1960. The church has Saturday
night and Sunday morning services, along with various studies and youth activities. The Ark Angels
School at the church has classes for preschool to second-grade students. For more information, visit
www.OurSaviorsSalem.org or call (503) 399-8601.
Mary Louise VanNatta is the Out and About Columnist for
the Statesman Journal. Invite her to your event at
OutandAboutSJ@live.com.

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6D

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Opinion

Opinion pages constitute a modern town square, where readers should find a variety of
viewpoints — ones that will challenge their own as well as complement their own.

OUR
VIEWPOINT

Hayes emails raise need for reform
C

ylvia Hayes’ 94,000 emails that
were released late Friday underscore how clueless she was.
They also show that state government
remains stuck somewhere in the 20th
century.
Much has been written about Hayes’
seemingly inappropriate mixing of her
personal ambitions, her role as first
lady to Gov. John Kitzhaber, and her
private consulting business. The
330,000 pages of emails and attachments certainly help flesh out that
picture. But they also raise deep questions about the proper role of a contemporary first lady, or first gentleman, and the use of state resources in
supporting that role.
Gov. Kate Brown has already said
that her husband, Dan Little, will have
no policy role in her administration as
first gentleman. She, he and the governor’s staff also will not accept outside
compensation for any work related to
state government.
But what of future first gentlemen
and first ladies?

Hayes sought expanded public and
private roles that were unprecedented
for a first lady. For someone with a
more sophisticated understanding of
effective personal and government
relationships, that might not have been
a problem.
It certainly is conceivable that a
governor could want to appoint her or
his spouse or companion to a highprofile role. President John F. Kennedy
named brother Robert Kennedy as
attorney general — a controversial but
profound choice — and President Bill
Clinton tried to have Hillary Clinton
lead national health care reform. A
strong argument can be made that
America is being shortchanged by
having Michelle Obama, a brilliant and
exceptionally talented individual, fulfill a largely traditional first-lady role
in President Barack Obama’s administration.
For Hayes’ part, the emails reinforce that she simply didn’t “get it.”
She sometimes treated the governor’s
staff as her personal errand-runners.

Such is the danger of falling in love
with the trappings of a position instead
of respecting the role and dignity of
that position.
The emails illustrate why the state
— both the executive and legislative
branches — must establish 21st-century guidelines for the function of the
first spouse or first companion. Public
employees also need an ethics office or
ombudsman to whom they can turn,
without fear of reprisal, if they see
those guidelines being abused.
“Trust but verify,” as popularized
with President Ronald Reagan, applies
throughout government. Oregonians
should be able to trust their local,
state and national governments. But
the processes also must be in place
to verify that the trust is being honored.
Brown took an important step early
on by committing to the public release
of the emails that were requested by
the U.S. Department of Justice, which
is investigating Hayes and Kitzhaber.
The DOJ subpoenaed the emails in

February, and the state completed its
review on March 30. Four state lawyers had worked full time for three
weeks reviewing and redacting records, and other staff members had
devoted about 100 hours, as well. The
state then had a vendor upload and
prepare all the documents in a way
that they could be accessed by the
public.
Once the vendor’s work was
completed, the governor’s office
had planned to release the emails Friday morning. But the massive amount
of documents crashed the computer
system, delaying release until afternoon.
Brown and her staff deserve credit
for making them publicly available as
soon as possible, in contrast to the
Kitzhaber administration, and for doing so without charge.
Few Oregonians might read all
330,000 pages. But the issues they
raise should cause the Legislature and
the governor’s office to make thoughtful changes in state policies.

Readers argue value of Hayes’ emails
RAPID RESPONSE

On Friday afternoon, the governor’s
office released 94,000 emails and attachments from three personal accounts used by Cylvia Hayes, the companion of former Gov. John Kitzhaber.
Gov. Kate Brown’s office posted the
emails for public view after turning
them over to the Department of Justice. That prompted us to pose these
questions to our corps of Rapid Responders:
“Does posting the emails strengthen
or weaken (or neither) your faith that
state government is being transparent,
especially about the Kitzhaber-Hayes
investigations?
“If you have read some of the
emails, what have you gleaned from
them?”

Interested in joining our corps of Rapid Responders?
Email Executive Editor Michael Davis at mdavis4@
StatesmanJournal.com with your full legal name,
address, telephone number and email address.
All applications are vetted for authenticity. Each
Thursday afternoon we submit a question to the
members of the Rapid Response team. They have
until noon Friday to submit a response. All of
the responses are published Saturday afternoon
at StatesmanJournal.com. Some responses are
published in the Sunday paper.

What they said
Neither. No matter what, it’s still
related directly to politics and I don’t
trust politicians.
— Tina Blacksmith, Salem
It does neither for me. I haven’t read
any of the emails and don’t plan to. I am
trusting my elected officials to work
their way through them and make an
informed decision as to what to do. If I
can’t trust them to do that, then we
need new officials. Hopefully, they
won’t waste too much time doing it.
— Emily Duerfeldt, McMinnville
No, the release of the emails by Gov.
Brown does not strengthen my faith
that state government is being more
transparent. First, these emails were
already turned over to the FBI by subpoena and were already a public rec-

LETTERS

ord. For the governor to refuse to make
them available to the public would put
her in the position of a coverup. So she
was just protecting herself from scandal.
— Larry R. George, Salem

available. It will take someone with
more time and patience than I have to
find information that was worth the
trouble. I have enough trouble keeping
up with my own email.
— Richard Pine, Salem

It is positive for the government in
this case. All can see what was said.
The law will still prevail as the case will
be tried. Transparency is really important for our leadership right now to
exhibit.
— Ann Watters, Salem

While this information release does
imply greater transparency, the Friday
afternoon timing of the dump and the
ongoing nature of the investigation do
raise questions about the wisdom and
motive of doing so at this time. Might
this action affect the outcome improperly?
— Erin Cramer, Stayton

My faith in government is not impacted, but I agree with Gov. Brown’s
decision to err on the side of openness.
From what I could see, many of the
emails are still under review and not

The new governor’s swift kick of
emails to the public does nothing to
strengthen my faith in transparency in

VISUAL VIEWPOINT

Enough of the special
treatment for owners of
the sternwheeler boat
How is it that the Willamette Queen
sternwheeler can commandeer our
public boat ramp for three days? Did
we not not pay them $250,000 for five
years so that we could build a pedestrian bridge — for three weeks a year of
high water?
I went to the public boat launch
Tuesday and Wednesday and could not
launch my boat because the Willamette
Queen was being inspected.
How far are we expected to bend
over for the Chesbroughs to keep the
sternwheeler at our riverfront? I feel
like I have been taken advantage of.
The sign at the boat ramp says that
we have 15 minutes usage only, yet the
Queen gets 48 hours plus?
C.E. Emery
Salem

Outcomes-based funding is a
harmful distraction from issue
The Higher Education Coordinating

Commission’s proposed outcomesbased funding model would be extremely detrimental to rural universities instead of being the quick financial

fix that many make it out to be.
This model pits public universities
against one another, making them compete for shares of the higher education

government. Those in power and those
wannabees hovering close to them, too
often, come to believe the rules for
ethical conduct don’t apply to them. My
sad takeaway from scanning emails is
how many staff were aware something
was amiss, yet it took the Feds to let
sunshine in.
— G. Mick McLean, Lincoln City
It certainly will make the investigation more clear for everyone. It may
make the governmental officials and
ones in the background hesitant to use
emails and start doing it only verbally,
where we will again lose transparency.
We see that way too much was done in
secret for too long.
— William K. Dettwyler, Salem
Transparency always strengths my
faith in any organization. I would rather
know the good, the bad, the trite, the
eyebrow-raising than what an imagination can conjure. We human beings are
so easily seduced by power or nearness
to power.
— Anita Blanchard , Salem

budget.
The model inevitably harms rural
schools because they serve communities that are already less likely to meet
the desired outcomes. Rural schools
also face higher operation costs than
their city counterparts because they
lack the advantages of economies of
scale. The dismantling of university
shared services has already placed a
bigger burden on rural students.
Consider the potential loss of rural
colleges in Oregon. Southern Oregon
University and Eastern Oregon University are already struggling through
retrenchment due to many years of
disinvestment from the Oregon Legislature.
With an outcomes-based funding
model, the lack of support these schools
would receive from the state would
hike up tuition and destroy access to
college for Oregon’s low-income and
rural communities.
Outcomes-based funding is not a
cure-all for our higher education woes,
but rather a distraction from the fundamental problem of insufficient state
funding for our public universities.
Torii Uyehara
Ashland

JOIN THE CONVERSATION
LETTERS

INCLUDE

ONLINE

QUESTIONS?

EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS

For publication of 200 words or fewer, 500 words for guest opinions. You
may submit a letter every 60 days. Submissions are subject to editing and
publication guidelines. Not all submissions can be published.
Email: letters@StatesmanJournal.com
Mail: Letters to the Editor, Statesman Journal, P.O. Box 13009, Salem, OR
97309-1015
In Person: 280 Church St. NE, across from Courthouse Square

Your full name, town and for
verification (not publication) day and
evening phone numbers and home
street address. Guest opinions are
published with a photo and information
about the writer. Out-of-area
submissions are discouraged.

Additional opinions are presented
each day in the Opinion section of
StatesmanJournal.com. Under
News, click on Opinion. You'll also
find guidelines for writing letters
and for meeting with the Editorial
Board.

(503) 399-6864 or
(503) 399-6727; (800)
556-3975, Ext. 6864 or
6727; or go to
Statesman
Journal.com/
Opinion.

TERRY HORNE,
President and Publisher
MICHAEL DAVIS, Executive Editor
DICK HUGHES, Editorial Page Editor

Columns, letters, guest opinions, blogs, Facebook posts and cartoons represent the views of their authors. Editorials ... Our Viewpoint ...
represent the composite view of the StatesmanJournal Editorial Board and are the institutional voice of the newspaper.
EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR: Dick Hughes, (503) 399-6727; dhughes@StatesmanJournal.com; twitter.com/DickHughes

Contact the Editorial Board:
Salemed@StatesmanJournal.com

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

7D

Opinion

Why is it so hard to fund K-12?
The Oregon House of Representatives has passed a $7.255 billion K-12
education budget. The voting was along
party lines.
Democrats, who control the state
House and Senate, voted yes for the
$7.255 billion, which fairly closely follows the $7.235 billion K-12 funding
suggested in the
Democratic Ways
and Means cochairs’ budget.
Republicans voted
no, arguing that
K-12 should be
getting more fundDan Lucas
ing. Some
C O M M E N TA RY
Republicans felt
the K-12 funding
should be as high as $8 billion.
Democrats agree that K-12 needs
more funding, yet they voted for the
$7.255 billion anyway. Why would they
do that? Back in the third week of
March, Sen. Jeff Kruse, R-Roseburg,
explained, “The answer is very simple,
(Democrats) want to set up a scenario
where tax increases are necessary and
they also want to take the Kicker away
from the people unnecessarily if indeed
it does kick.”
The Democrats have already begun
telegraphing their next moves, and it
looks as if Sen. Kruse was right.

Rep. Phil Barnhart, D-Eugene, says
in his newsletter, “Getting to the (K-12)
funding levels that are really needed
won’t be possible with our current revenue system, where the largest and most
profitable businesses pay among the
lowest effective tax rates in the nation.” Sen. Michael Dembrow, D-Portland, wrote in a recent newsletter, “we
may still find ourselves unable to keep
any of those new revenues because the
kicker will have kicked … the only way
we’ll be able to get additional money to
K-12 is by voting to hold back or modify
the kicker.”
This is a tried-and-true approach for
Democrats in Oregon. Back during
Measures 66 and 67 in 2010, Democrats
told Oregonians “it’s for the kids.” But
after those measures passed, K-12 funding was actually cut $150 million while
other agencies, most notably the state
Department of Human Services, saw an
increase. DHS alone increased $330
million in that budget cycle (general
and Lottery funds).
There is $1.8 billion of increased
revenue in the coming $18.5 billion
2015-2017 Oregon general and lottery
funds budget. Funding K-12 education
at $8 billion would still leave $405 million of increases available to other
budget areas. That’s on top of the $2
billion of increased revenue already

contained in the current $16.75 billion
budget.
But it’s never enough, is it? There is
an infinite number of “good” things that
government can do. But in order for
some people to get “free” or subsidized
college or health care from the government, some other people have to pay
for those “free” things in the form of
higher taxes.
Oregonians have shown a willingness to raise taxes on other people, but
a reluctance to raise taxes on themselves. Oregonians voted for more
taxes on businesses and “the rich” with
Measures 66 and 67, but soundly
defeated Measure 86 last November.
Measure 86 would have let the state
borrow money to create a fund where
the investment returns paid for college
financial aid. Taxpayers would have
been on the hook to repay the principal,
expected to be $100 million, and they
said no to that.
Interestingly, around $23 million of
the increased state revenue not going
to K-12 in the co-chairs’ budget is to
increase the Oregon Opportunity Grant
— college aid that doesn’t have be repaid — for eligible students from families with adjusted gross income of less
than $70,000. According to their
website, “Opportunity Grants are funded primarily by Oregon taxpayers.”

ONLINE
Go to statesmanjournal.com/media/latest/
opinion to view “Editorial cartoons: School,”
including political cartoons about education
funding in Oregon.

Looks like the Democrat-controlled
Legislature has found a way to circumvent the will of the Measure 86 voters.
Spending someone else’s money is
more likely to result in solutions like
that, to just looking for more money to
give college students. A better approach would be to find out why college
tuitions are increasing nearly twice as
fast as medical costs and then start
taking steps to reduce tuitions.
If we’re ever going to get to stable
and adequate K-12 funding in Oregon,
we’re going to have to stop the bait-andswitch budgeting approach used by
Oregon Democrats. We’re going to have
to truly prioritize K-12 funding and stop
viewing taxpayer dollars as an endless
supply of other people’s money to do
“good” things with.
Dan Lucas of Salem is an independent
researcher and policy advocate, and the
chief editor for the blog Oregon Catalyst.
Follow his work at www.dan-lucas.com or
contact him at dan_lucas@ymail.com.

California water crisis is a real issue
SAN DIEGO — In the Bible, Jesus
turns water into wine. But in California,
there are those who would take that
miracle in the other direction.
The Golden State needs water, and
lots of it. The place has been parched
for the past four years as it suffers
through a record drought — the worst
one since California started keeping
records 120 years ago.
Think of California — which boasts
the world’s eighth-largest economy, and
whose name conjures up images of a
coastal paradise of lush golf courses,
picture-perfect landscapes and abundant waterfalls —
having to ask Arizona to borrow a
glass of water.
Actually, neighbor, could we
make that 1.5 million acre-feet of
Ruben
water?
Navarrette Jr.
One acre foot of
C O M M E N TA RY
water equals
about 325,000
gallons. And 1.5 million acre-feet would
cover the 25 percent reduction in water
usage over the next nine months that
Californians have been ordered to
achieve.
Gov. Jerry Brown has announced the
Golden State’s first-ever mandatory
statewide water restrictions. Brown is
instructing the State Water Resources
Control Board to compel cities and
towns to cut back drastically.
Other restrictions include cuts in
water use on college campuses, golf
courses, cemeteries and other sprawling green spaces. Large farms are exempted, but farmers will have to document more carefully how much water
they use.
State officials claim that they will
impose fines if necessary to force compliance from individuals, but they also
say that they hope many Californians
will comply voluntarily. People can
expect the usual lectures from public
officials about taking quicker showers,
washing cars less often, and watering
lawns more sporadically.
Brown hit those notes as he announced the water restrictions in a
news conference southwest of Lake
Tahoe.

“We’re in a new era,” he said. “The
idea of your nice little green grass getting lots of water every day, that’s going to be a thing of the past.”
The California water crisis — the
one we’ve heard about, but most Cali-

fornians haven’t experienced up to now
— just got real.
Too many folks believe that, as long
as something comes out when they turn
on the faucet, there’s no problem. In
fact, according to media reports, there

are towns in Central California where
people lack running water. They use
donated bottled water to cook, bathe,
even use the toilet.
It matters that Brown was in the
Sierra Nevada mountains, a picturesque setting where the reality was
unavoidable. Reporters stood on dry
brown grass that would normally, this
time of year, be covered in snow.
That’s one of the keys to this story.
Those who know about water policy
will tell you that, while it’s refreshing to
have scattered rain, what really matters is snowpack. For farmers, that’s
the storage fund for a not-so-rainy day.
Dear water advocates: You have my
attention. Organizations such as the
California Water Alliance, which was
founded by farming interests in 2009,
have been like a town crier that was
ignored. These groups warned us this
sort of crisis was coming. Some people
listened. Many didn’t.
Most of the water in the state goes to
farming, which supplies more than half
the produce in the United States, while
California’s overall agricultural industry brings in more than $45 billion a
year. But even farmers are divided —
depending on how water-intensive their
crops are. The folks growing lettuce,
broccoli, peaches or avocados have
been up in arms because they need lots
of water. Sadly, those with crops that
get by with less water have largely
been on the sidelines.
In my case, I’m sorry it took so long
for the message to get through. I may
have been born and raised in the once
fertile farmland of Central California,
but — since moving back to the state 10
years ago — I’ve been living in a city.
And for the last few years, along with
other city dwellers, I’ve been deluding
myself into thinking that this water
crisis I kept hearing so much about was
someone else’s problem.
I was so wrong. It’s my problem too.
I’m ashamed to admit that, for a while,
I lost sight of this reality. Still, in California, on this issue, there’s plenty of
shame to go around.
Ruben Navarrette Jr. writes for the
Washington Post Writers Group, 1150 15th St.
NW, Washington, DC 20071. Send email to
ruben@rubennavarrette.com.

Support Klamath agreements to help feed the world
The Family Farm Alliance board of
directors formally supports the concept
captured in recent Senate legislation to
advance the settlement agreements
developed for the Klamath River watershed.
The Alliance is a grassroots, nonprofit organization that represents
family farmers, ranchers, agricultural
water purveyors and allied industries
in the 17 western states. We have long
advocated that the best solutions to the
challenges faced by western irrigators
come from the ground up, driven by
local interests.
The three Klamath agreements —
the Klamath Basin Restoration Agreement, the Klamath Hydro-Electric
Settlement Agreement and the Upper
Klamath Basin Comprehensive Agreement — reflect an intensive effort that
has consumed much of the last decade.
Without these agreements successfully making it through Congress, local
irrigators face no protection from enforcement of significant tribal water
rights, no viable plan for dealing with
the Endangered Species Act issues and
no identifiable path for working toward

Dan Keppen

Patrick O’Toole

GUEST OPINION

GUEST OPINION

target power rates that are similar to
other western agricultural regions.
Our organization views the Klamath
settlement agreements in a fairly
straightforward way: This approach
provides the best means of keeping
basin family farmers and ranchers in
the business of producing food and
fiber for our country and the world.
The settlement agreements are a
unique solution that advances this critical need. What happens or does not
happen for Klamath Basin irrigators
could set a precedent, not only for all
western family farms and ranches, but
also for other areas of the country
where agricultural production is beset
with environmental challenges.

Understandably, the idea of removing dams is a sticking point for some in
the agricultural community, and the
alliance does not universally endorse
the removal of dams. In fact, the alliance is a leading proponent of creating
more surface water storage in the west.
Alliance representatives have been
invited to testify before congressional
committees several times to offer up
ideas intended to streamline existing
daunting and expensive permitting
processes. In 2014, the alliance released
a white paper on the need for new, appropriate storage projects, which was
intended to support related legislative
efforts pushed in Congress.
Thus, the potential impacts and precedents of removing any dam are concerns to us as advocates for irrigated
agriculture.
The alliance endorses advancing the
Klamath agreements in Congress because, overall, they are good for irrigated agriculture in the Klamath Basin.
We see the agreements as unique to the
Klamath Basin and its issues and their
dam-removal components have no bearing on other agricultural region’s deci-

sion-making. Moreover, no irrigation
dams or flood control dams are removed as part of these settlements.
In this instance, agricultural producers stand to gain increased water
supply reliability in exchange for the
expected fish passage benefits associated with removal of these dams, a
measure supported by the dams’ owners, PacifiCorp.
Our job is to advocate for approaches that keep farmers and ranchers in
business so they can continue to feed
and clothe the world. Reliable water is
an essential component to this approach in the west.
Patrick O’Toole, a Wyoming cattle and
sheep rancher, is president of the Family
Farm Alliance. He is a former member of
the Wyoming Legislature and 2014 recipient
of the Leopold Conservation Award. Contact
him at h2otoole@gmail.com.
Dan Keppen of Klamath Falls has over 25
years of experience in western water
resources engineering and policy. He has
served as executive director of the Family
Farm Alliance for 10 years and can be
reached at dankeppen@charter.net.

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Funerals Today

Sunday, April 5, 2015

Clell R. Radmacher

June 24, 1940 - March 18, 2015

SALEM - Clell R. Radmacher
was born on June 24, 1940
(No services are listed for today).
in Portland, OR to Ewald and
Marjorie Radmacher and went
Obituaries and Guest Book available online at
home to be with his Savior on
www.StatesmanJournal.com
March 18, 2015. Clell graduated
The Statesman Journal Obituary Office is open
from Pendleton High School
Monday - Friday from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
and attended Multnomah Bible
Obituaries must be submitted by 1 p.m.
College. He started his 24 year
You can reach us by phone at 503-399-6794 ,
career with the US Forest Service
email at obituary@statesmanjournal.com, or by going to our
followed by 16 years as facilities
www.StatesmanJournal.com/Obituaries
website,
manager for Calvary Church in
Kristine (Kris) Teresa
Los Gatos, CA and then moved to Salem, OR where he
Carl
M.
Emmert
October 31, 1931 - March 30, 2015
Kostenborder
was a much-loved Salem-Keizer school bus driver for
June 3, 1987 - December 19, 2014
Celebration of Life April 11 at
6 years. On Dec 30, 1961 Clell married his high school
11
am
Foothills
Church
in
Molalla,
A celebration of her life will be
Saturday, April 18, 2015 at 2:00 OR.
sweetheart, Marilyn Coulombe and they shared 53 years
P.M. at Pringle Creek Community,
together. He is also survived by daughters, Shelley (Tim)
Painters Hall, 3911 Village Center
Dr S, Salem, Oregon.
Sherman, Karin (Graydon) Knappett and Kristin (Jeff )
Brenda M. Myers
February 24, 1947 - April 1, 2015
Goodwin; 6 grandchildren, Andrew Sherman, Stephen
De Cosby
Memorial Service to be held
February 11, 1940 - March 27, 2015
on April 7, 2015 at 11AM at Scio (Katie) Sherman, Seth Goodwin, Hailey (Kaleb) Forseen,
In keeping with De’s request, Christian Church. Arrangements
no public services will be held. entrusted to Weddle Funeral Katie & Brianna Knappett and 4 great grandchildren. A
Assisting is Virgil T. Golden Funeral Services.
Life Celebration will be held at Salem First Baptist on
Service.
April 9 at 11 AM. In lieu of flowers, gifts may be made
Cornelia
“Corkie”
Colen
to the New Property Fund of Salem First Baptist in Clell’s
Leona
P. Jennison
November 3, 1932 - January 3, 2015
August 4, 1915 - March 16, 2015
Memorial Service will be held memory. Arrangements by Restlawn Funeral Home.
Arrangements through Gates
Kingsley, Culver City CA. Memorial
service at St. Bede’s Parish, Mar
Vista, CA on April 26, 2015 at 1 pm.

on April 11th, 10am at St. Paul’s
Episcopal Church, Salem.

Helen
Laurence Keyser
July 7, 1916 - April 2, 2015

W.
Wes Galloway
May 9, 1925 - March 25, 2015

SALEM - No services will be
held. Arrangements by Unger
Funeral Chapel, Silverton.

Dorothy Prange

At his request there were no
formal services.

185 Memorials & Markers

Clifford N. Swift

December 29, 1925 - March 29, 2015

MILL CITY - No
information provided.

service

Capital Monument Co.
140 Hoyt St. S
503-363-6887

Kenneth Wayne Hall

August 3, 1952 - April 1, 2015

Kenneth Wayne Hall, a
resident of Salem, Oregon, died
on April 1, 2015 in Salem. He was
62 years of age.
Kenneth was born on August
3, 1952 in Silverton, Oregon ad
was the son of Oller and Marietta
(Scharback) Hall. He graduated
from Silverton High School in
1971 and enlisted in the Navy.
He worked as a Janitor for the
Silverton School District and for
the State Hospital.
Kenneth was a self-taught painter and guitarist. He
enjoyed riding his Harley Davidson.
He is survived by his siblings, Larry Hall of Salem,
Linda (husband, Bob) Reis of Salem, Darlene (husband,
Alan) Spaulding of Lynden, Washington and Jerry (wife,
Patty) Hall of Keizer along with many nieces and nephews.
A private family service will be held at a later date.
Contributions may be made in memory of Kenneth to
the Union Gospel Mission. Howell, Edwards, Doerksen
Funeral Home is handling the arrangements. You can
view Kenneth’s online memorial at www.hed-fh.com.

Deloris M. “Dee” Hamilton
December 1, 1923 - March 29, 2015

Dee Hamilton, 91, passed away Sunday, March 29,
2015 at Salem Hospital after a short illness. Dee was
born December 1, 1923 in Sioux City, IA the daughter of
Christian and Meta Soegaard. She and her mother moved
to Berkeley, CA in 1938 after the death of her father. She
met Howard, the love of her life, when they were both
juniors at Berkeley High School. They were married in
1944 during World War II and lived happily for 42 years
until his death in 1986.
Dee and Howard had three children and lived in the
San Francisco Bay Area until 1957, when they moved to
Salem. In their later years, they loved to travel and play
golf. Dee continued to play until 2009, when she retired
her golf clubs. She also enjoyed playing bridge and
volunteered with the Salem Boosters at Walton House.
Dee was a member of Westminster Presbyterian Church
for over fifty years.
Dee is survived by three children: Christie (Dennis)
Batterman, Newberg, OR, Janice (Dennis) Pierce,
Newberg, OR, and Robert Hamilton, Salem, OR; 4
grandchildren, and 7 great-grandchildren. In addition
to her husband, she was preceded in death by a sister:
Dorothy Strauss, a brother: Donald Soegaard, and a
daughter-in-law: Barbara Hamilton.
A “Celebration of Life” service will be held at 3:00pm
on Sunday, April 19, 2015 at Westminster Presbyterian
Church, 3737 Liberty Rd SE, Salem, OR 97302. In lieu
of flowers, memorial donations may be made to the
Building Fund at Westminster Presbyterian Church.
Assisting the family is Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

Beverly R. Weekly

February 15, 1931 - February 27, 2015

Beverly R .Weekly was born
on February 15, 1931 and left this
earth February 27, 2015 at age 84.
She lived in Salem her entire life.
She is survived by her husband
Robert R. Weekly, daughter Karen
K. D’Eagle, son James C. D’Eagle
and
daughter-in-law
Dana
D’Eagle, granddaughters Flora
and Fauna. Survivors also include
sister Glenda K. Hart, brother-inlaw William E. Hart, nephew Tracy
Hart and his children Rachael, Jacob, and Joseph; niece
Malia and William Phillips and their children Amy and
Abbey.
She is preceded in death by her parents Conrad and
Florence Fox, first husband Ambrose D’Eagle, BeBe and
Cloudy Weekly, and Bella and Max D’Eagle.
She married Robert June 1, 1978 at the Reno
Nevada Courthouse and they spent thirty seven years
inseparable. Beverly worked for the International
Brotherhood of Teamsters. After twenty eight years she
retired to stay at home to be a homemaker. She enjoyed
reading and cooking. She and Bob purchased a retreat in
Florence Oregon where they spent weekends for fifteen
years with family and friends enjoying the ocean air,
parties and telling stories around the fire-pit.
Beverly is best remembered for her love of laughter
and has been known as “Bubbles” since a young age.
Everyone who knew her was blessed by her laughter and
joy of life. A private celebration of life will be held April
18th, 2015. In lieu of flowers, donations will be greatly
appreciated, made in Beverly’s name to the Union Gospel
Mission/Simonka Place (PO Box 431, Salem, OR 97303).
Assisting the family is Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service.

May 5, 1920 – March 26, 2015

Dorothy was born in
Aberdeen, S. Dakota to Helen and
Joe Biegler. When Dorothy was
16, the family moved to Oregon.
She met her soul mate, Conrad
Prange, and they married in 1943.
They had 6 children and she is
survived by 5: sons Mike (Sharon)
Prange and Joe Prange; daughters
Marge (Don) Kucera, Ginny (Ric)
McNall and Beth Boock.
In 1975 Conrad and Dorothy
moved to Omaha, Nebraska and later to Denver, Colorado
when Conrad changed careers. When they retired they
moved back to Oregon to be closer to family.
Dorothy enjoyed playing bridge and golf and loved
socializing with friends and family. She was Grandma
and Great Dot to her 10 grandchildren and 4 greatgrandchildren.
She is preceded in death by her husband Conrad,
daughter Helen Butsch, and sons-in-law Paul Butsch and
Dennis Boock.
Thank you to Tierra Rose for taking loving care of our
mom.
Memorial service will held at St. Joseph Catholic
Church in Salem on April 7th at 10:30 a.m. In lieu of
flowers, donations can be made to your favorite charity.
Virgil T. Golden Funeral Service is assisting the family.

Molly Rebecca Walker

Anna Lee Freitag

September 25, 1924 – March 21, 2015

Anna passed away on Saturday, March 21st at
Harmony Adult Foster Care Home in Albany, OR. She was
born to Lum and Elise Hollingsworth in their farm house
on Spicer Drive outside of Lebanon, OR.
In 1947 she married Forrest Freitag and shortly after
bought their farm in the Jefferson area where they raised
crops, animals and a large family garden with lots of
dahlia flowers. Mom was known for taking in baby lambs
and chicks and nursing them to good health.
In later years she started entering flower shows,
and later became a certified floral arrangement judge,
judging many flower shows and county fairs.
She was a member of the Oregon State Federation
of Garden Clubs, judges counsel, Lebanon, Fircrest,
Grandprarie, Salem Rose Society, and Grow & Show
Garden Clubs. She also was a member of the Capital
Arrangers Guild in Salem.
Anna competed at the Oregon State Fair for over 40
years showing landscaped gardens, large floral themed
indoor displays and many floral arrangements and fruits
and vegetables.
She also volunteered for the clubs at the Christmas
Green Show at the State Fairgrounds – selling homemade
decorations, and also entering arrangements for the
show.
She was preceded in death by her husband, Forrest,
and brother, Neal. She is survived by her sons, Jim and
Lee. At her request no service will be held. Aasum-Dufour
Funeral Home is handling arrangements.

Jason Robert Cunningham
October 25, 1974 – March 28, 2015

Jason Cunningham, 40,
passed away Saturday, March
28, 2015 in Meza, AZ. He was
born in Corvallis, Oregon to Bob
Cunningham and Phyllis McCall.
Jason grew up in Salem, and
graduated from South Salem
High School. After receiving an
Associate’s Degree in Electrical
Engineering at ITT Tech and
graduating with Honors, he
accepted a positon with Decatur
Electronics in Phoenix, AZ.
Jason is survived by his wife, Marty; daughters
Kyrsten and Ashley; son Robert; mother Phyllis (Bill)
McCall; father Bob (Karen) Cunningham; sister Amanda;
and 7 nieces and nephews. He is preceded in death by
his brother, Eric.
Jason loved camping, fishing, riding motorcycles
and especially loved fixing things. Jason was quick to
help others and will be missed by so many.
A memorial service will be held at West Salem
Foursquare Church, 3094 Gehlar Rd NW, Salem, OR
97304, on Friday, April 10, 2015, at 12:00 Noon.
In lieu of flower, contributions can be made in
memory of Jason to Crisis Chaplaincy Services, PO Box
1018, Turner OR 97392. Assisting the family is Virgil T.
Golden Funeral Service.

October 31, 1958 - March 30, 2015

Molly Rebecca Walker of
Salem, beloved wife of James
Rockwell Walker, lost her life to
mental illness on March 30, 2015.
Molly was born in Gold Beach on
October 31, 1958 to Robert and
Betty Templeman Van Leer, and
attended local public schools,
graduating from Gold Beach High
in 1976.
Molly
briefly
attended
Southwestern
Oregon
Community College in Coos Bay, then joined her family
at the Curry County Reporter where she continued to
work as an owner and editor until 2008. Most recently
Molly worked for the Yamhill News-Register from 2008
to 2014 where she wrote features, business columns and
covered religious topics in the local community until the
end of October 2014 when she took a hiatus from work
to assist Jim with his Rotary preparation for becoming
District Governor in 2015-16.
Molly and Jim were married in 1983, blending four
boys into a family unit including Dale, Jim, Rob and Chris.
Theirs was a very happy marriage as the two joined their
souls and began their journey through life. They were
almost inseparable, and enjoyed life’s little pleasures, like
spending time with family and friends.
Molly’s upbringing led her to have a passion for
gardening and the outdoors although she will be
remembered by most for her passion and dedication
to community journalism. She dedicated herself to
providing a medium to her communities for gathering
local information as well as being a supporter of local
causes. Her tireless efforts and practical advice were
never un-noticed by those around her as she assisted
breaking down the gender barrier in Rotary by joining
the organization in 1988 and was recognized as the Gold
Beach Citizen of the Year in 1995. She also served as the
Gold Beach Rotary club president in 1997-98 and helped
in making Rotary a family legacy by including husband
Jim on many of her initiatives and helping him become a
leader in District 5110.
Molly and Jim enjoyed most of their hobbies
together, which included sports car racing, hiking
local trails and roads, attending family sporting events,
spoiling their grandkids and visiting family. They also
enjoyed traveling having visited much of the United
States, Canada, the Cooke Islands, Africa, Europe and
Australia. While traveling Molly, being the big hugger
type, often sidestepped the offered handshake for a
warm embrace and enjoyed exploring new cultures and
making new friends.
She is missed terribly by her husband; two sons
and families: Rob and Becca of Toronto, Canada, Chris
and Emily of Medford; two stepsons: Dale Walker of
South Beach, and Jim and Kathi Walker of Salem; her
sisters: Sherry and Scott Wills of Portland, Amy and Doug
Bornemeier of Milwaukee, and Sally and Dave Shuey of
Portland; plus her seven grandchildren: Alex and Greyson
Walker (parents: Jim and Kathi), Travis, Caleb and Olivia
(Chris and Emily), and Sadie and Charlie (Rob and Becca).
Molly is also survived by nieces and nephews Jordan
and Maya Shuey and Jon and Anna Bornemeier.
Everyone who met Molly loved her for her genuine
interest in them and her infectious smile and bubbly
personality. She loved her community, her family and
sharing almost 32 years with husband Jim, her children,
grandchildren and sisters and families.
Rest in peace, my wonderful, beautiful wife and best
friend, Molly. You’ll live forever in our hearts.
Cremation services were provided by Virgil T. Golden
Funeral Service of Salem, and a memorial service is
scheduled for 2 p.m. Saturday, April 11 at Bethany
Lutheran Church in Gold Beach.

City View

Funeral Home
Cemetery
& Crematorium

Family owned & operated since 1893

The great gift of Easter
is hope
www.city viewfh.com

503-363-8652
390 Hoyt St S • Salem
Above Historic Pioneer Cemetery

OR-0000360629

We listen.
We care.
We have a variety of urns
for scattering, placement
in a cemetery or a home.
Locally owned since 1949, we provide
cremations from direct cremation to
memorial and celebration of life services.

akleaf
O
Crematory

25

8D

VIRGIL T. GOLDEN FUNERAL SERVICE

605 Commercial St SE, Salem

vtgolden.com

503-364-2257

Salem
412 Lancaster Drive NE
Salem, OR 97301
(503) 581-6265

Low Cost
Cremation & Burial
Funerals & Memorials
Simple Direct Cremation $495
Simple Direct Burial $550
Traditional Funeral $1975
Discount Priced Caskets, Urns
And Other Memorial Items

• Privately owned cremation facility
• A Family Owned Oregon Business

www.ANewTradition.com
25

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

LOCAL FIRST

COURT RECORDS

BIRTHS
Catherine E. Stover, M.A., L.P.C.

The following are new complaints, foreclosures
criminal convictions received between March 27
and April 2. For more, go to StatesmanJournal.com/Records.

State of North Dakota County of Burleigh vs. RW’s
Truck Shop LLC, Brian Rybloom.

MARION COUNTY CIRCUIT COURT
New complaints

NCEP, LLC vs. Debra Regele.

Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Mickey Bare.
Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Heather Hager.

Melissa Gray vs. Travis Harris.

Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Juan J. Sifuentez, Yolanda Sifuentez.

Steve Resch vs. Vincent Webb.

Bobbie Newton vs. Doni Jo Howe.

Brooke Marie Bowman vs. Max J. Harmon.

Midland Funding LLC vs. Tracy Cates.

Acctcorp International of Salem vs. Eileen Turner.

Ray Klein Inc. vs. Danielle Marie Welsh, Timothy
Welsh.

Jeffrey Collins Utter vs. Walt Beglau.
B & G Ditchen, LLC vs. Golden Valley Farms, LLC.

Morgan Nelson vs. Rescue Carpenter, Inc., David
M. Peschong.

American Express Centurion Bank vs. Jeffrey
Freeman.

Roland Lee Smith vs. Jeff Premo.

Marion and Polk Schools Credit Union vs. Mearl
Capelle.
Marion and Polk Schools Credit Union vs. Eli
Jeremiah Huie.
The Equitable Finance Company vs. Steven Craig
Duncan.
The Equitable Finance Company vs. Maritza Pallanez, Juan Carlos Carrillo.

JD Duarte vs. Jennifer Smith, et al.

CSO Financial, Inc. vs. Clarke Adam Ralls, Jamie
Nicole Ralls.

William Wolfard vs. Kathryn Rieger.
Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Luis Brambila, Jose Brambila.

Midland Funding LLC vs. Mark Reed.

Mitzi Eleanor Heiden vs. Ruben Rocha, Safeco
Insurance Company of Oregon.

Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Charlene Robinson.

State of North Dakota County of Burleigh vs. RW’s
Trucking & Hauling LLC, Brian Rybloom.

Monroe Bank & Trust vs. Thomas Sliwka.

Curtis Lee Hollins vs. Guy Hall.

JD Duarte vs. David Garren, et al.

The Equitable Finance Company vs. Derek G.
Pinkerton.

Signature Real Estate Inc. vs. Paul Forbes, Athena
Forbes.

Sharon Rose Brand vs. Joseph S. Regimbal, Holly
Ann Regimbal.

The Vandermay Law Firm vs. Shannon Maisar.

Brittany Crossing vs. Kaci Hall, All Others.

The Equitable Finance Company vs. Benjamin
James Smith.

Reed Townhomes LLC vs. Tony Medina, Crystal
Nichols, All Others.

The Equitable Finance Company vs. Tasia N. Cuesta.

Elwaco vs. Jerry Smith.

State of Oregon, ex rel. Ellen F. Rosenblum Attorney General for the State of Oregon vs. Henry
Cricket Group, LLC, Maximillian, Inc., Liberty
Publishers Service, Inc., Orbital Publishing Group,
Inc., Express Publishers Service, Inc., et al.

The Vandermay Law Firm vs. Roy Enquist.
The Vandermay Law Firm vs. Andrew Watson,
Alice Watson.
The Vandermay Law Firm vs. Jason Asbill, Diane
Asbill, A. Scott Asbill.
Cso Financial Inc aka Credit Services of Oregon vs.
Dustin James Baker.
Cso Financial Inc aka Credit Services of Oregon vs.
Maura Anne Schomus.
Atlas Financial Services vs. Jennifer Karnes, Sarah
Karnes.
Atlas Financial Services vs. Christie Christensen.
Quick Collect vs. James Moyer, Terri Moyer.
AcctCorp International of Salem vs. Kenneth
Childress.
Guillermo De Paz vs. Olga Soto, Karen Sobrak.
Marty Mayfield vs. Robert Morris, M.S., L.P.C.,

Bluestone & Hockley Realty, Doing Business As
Bluestone & Hockley Real Estate Services vs. Thomas Graff, All Others.
Laurel Gate Court vs. Justino Acosto Pantaleon.
Pat Gander vs. Jessica Snegirev, All Others.

Jimmy Lee Thompson vs. GEICO Casualty Company, a Maryland Corporation.

The Vandermay Law Firm vs. David Haslebacher,
Beverly Haslebacher.

Merchants Acceptance Corp. vs. Jacob Stallsworth.

The Vandermay Law Firm vs. Robert Blodgett,
David Blodgett.

Jefferson Capital Systems LLC vs. Jose Hernandez.

Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Don Newkirk.

Jefferson Capital Systems LLC vs. Terry Wolf.

Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Lloyd Borkholder.
Asset Management Outsourcing Recoveries Inc. vs.
Steven Eyman.

Larry Zeek, Ollie Zeek vs. Mary A. Zeek Trust.

Jefferson Capital Systems LLC vs. William R. Grover.

The following are birth announcements received between March 28 and April 3. For more,
go to StatesmanJournal.com/Records.

SALEM HOSPITAL
Bergam, Everly Rae: To Jessica Guerrero and
Zack Bergam, Salem, 8 pounds 7 ounces, April 1.
Bizon, Deklin Ryker: To Kayla Gamma and
Trevor Bizon, Salem, 7 pounds 2 ounces,
March 31.
Blauvelt, Clara Renee: To Alyssa Blauvelt and
Isaac Ledezma, Salem, 6 pounds 10 ounces,
April 1.
Carr, Henry Patrick: To Alyssa Holdsclaw and
Steven “Kyle” Carr, Salem, 7 pounds 6 ounces,
March 29.
Fraenza, Mason Cole: To Tabitha and Bryan
Fraenza, Salem, 7 pounds 2 ounces, March 30.
Gergen, Brian James: To Alanna and Eric
Gergen, Salem, 9 pounds 5 ounces, April 1.
Green, Brody Jaxson Lee: To Catherine Twete
and Alex Green, Salem, 7 pounds, March 26.
Loftin, Owen Matthew: To Erika and Colby
Loftin, Stayton, 7 pounds 7 ounces, March 29.
Patton, Jaxson James: To Ashley Chandler and
Justin Patton, Dallas, 7 pounds 13 ounces,
March 26.
Pickett, Allyson Mae: To Michelle and Brian
Pickett, Salem, 8 pounds 4 ounces, March 25.
Smith, Irie Rain: To Alisha Wareham and
James Smith, Salem, 7 pounds 4 ounces,
March 25.
Tippett, Lyah Mae: To Laila Lawson and Jordan Tippett, Salem, 7 pounds 3 ounces,
March 29.
Weimer, Scottlynn Grace: To Melissa and
Josiah Weimer, Salem, 6 pounds 14 ounces,
March 30.

Jefferson Capital Systems LLC vs. Jerrilee Lewis.

Wyler, Carter Glen: To Shelby and Jacob,
Aumsville, 8 pounds 15 ounces, April 3.

Raymond L. Borschowa, Gertrude C. Borschowa,
Lawrence A. Borschowa vs. Patricia Graber, Kermit
Lee Stewart, Donna Ray Northey, Janice Fogg.

Zielinski, Alyce Day: To Kattie and Josh Zielinski, Salem, 5 pounds 12 ounces, April 2.

DUII CONVICTIONS
The following are DUII convictions received March 30. For more, go to StatesmanJournal.com/Records.

UNDER THE INFLUENCE
The following residents of Marion and
Polk counties have been convicted of
driving under the influence of intoxicants, according to records provided by
the state Driver and Motor Vehicle Services Division. Included are the defendant’s name, age, address, date of conviction and the court.

SSGT Louis O Lucas
Farrell, James Michael: 52, 4190 45th
Ave. NE, Salem, Feb. 6, Marion.
Flaming, Hilary Janelle: 32, 12800 Clow
Corner Road, Dallas, Feb. 24, Benton.
Frays, Megan Sue: 23, 236 Filbert Way,
Silverton, Feb. 6, Marion.
Garcia, Salvador: 52, 13814 Woodburn
Monitor Road, Woodburn, Feb. 19,
Marion.
Garcia Quiros, Florencio: 38, 3848
Sunnyview Road NE, Salem, Feb. 17,
Salem.

Antonio, Zaid Victorio: 41, 7777 Battle
Creek Road SE, Salem, Jan. 13, Marion.

Garcia Tolentino, Domingo: 38, 1125
16th St. SE, Salem, Feb. 6, Marion.

Arellano Aguiar, Antonio: 39, 2605
Monarch Ct. NE, Salem, Feb. 18, Marion.

Grube, Aaron Matthew: 20, 1894
Liberty St. NE, Salem, Jan. 26, Marion.

Behringer, Robert Charles: 25, 9972
Brownell Drive SE, Aumsville, Feb. 13,
Linn.

Johnson, Benjamin Allen: 20, 4665
Edwin Court NE, Salem, Feb. 19, Marion.

Carlson, Kayla Leona: 25, 1334 Rhoda
Lane, Independence, Feb. 11, Monmouth.

Large, Desiree Lynn: 37, 137 Olympic
Ave. SE, Salem, Feb. 23, Salem.

Lopez Gutierrez, Miguel Agustin: 58,
750 Hardcastle Ave., Woodburn, Feb. 10,
Marion.

Skillings, Jacob Boone: 22, 5264 Tree
Haven Road SE, Sublimity, Jan. 13,
Marion.

Martin, Ron Leigh: 40, 277 Edwards
Road S, Monmouth, Feb. 11, Monmouth.

Solis Rojas, Jaime: 31, 1204 James St.,
Woodburn, Feb. 10, Marion.

McMurtry, Andrew Michael: 26, 188
Walnut Drive S, Monmouth, Feb. 11,
Monmouth.

Solorio Torres, Gerardo: 34, 3649
Hawthorne Ave. NE, Salem, Jan. 29,
Marion.

Medrano Aburto, Osiel M.: 22, 8457
Darley Road SE, Aumsville, Feb. 10, Marion.

Stevenson, Craig Douglas: 54, 656 SE
Azalea Ave., Dallas, Feb. 17, Lane.

Morris, Jessica Opal Jean: 22, 5134
Nordic Ct. N, Keizer, Feb. 12, Dallas.

Stewart, Kristopher Drew: 29, 38172
Franklin Butte Road, Scio, Feb. 6, Linn.

Ochoa Oliveros, Maria Guadalupe: 27,
4831 Cougar Ct. SE, Salem, Feb. 3, Marion.

Suarez Berumen, Manuel Alejandro:
29, 3853 Ward Drive NE, Salem, Feb. 17,
Marion.

Offield, Jessica Nicole: 28, 1152 Orchard
Ct. N, Keizer, Feb. 20, Marion.

Tennis, Amber Lee: 36, 178 Oakmont Ct.
SE, Salem, Feb. 20, Linn.

Perdue, Sage Danielle: 42, 788 Lockhaven Drive NE, Keizer, Feb. 20, Linn.

Zavala Corona, Israel: 29, 4667 Treeside
Drive NE, Salem, Feb. 12, Marion.

Rookstool, Maria: 43, 2375 Madison St.
NE, Salem, Feb. 19, Marion.

REUNIONS
SCHOOLS
Cascade High School class of 1965:
50-year class reunion, June 11-13. June 11
events include Scramble Golf Tournament
at Santiam Golf Club and no-host gathering 6 p.m. at the Wooden Nickel in Sublimity; June 12 dinner cruise on the Willamette Queen Sternwheeler; and June 13
is a pig roast with all the fixings. All
events require RSVP except the gathering
at Wooden Nickel. Alumni of other
Cascade classes are welcome. Sharon
Hanson, (503) 851-8957, sharonh@wbcable.net.
Central High School classes ’70s and
’80s multi-class reunion: Aug. 8 at
Riverview Park Amphitheater. Food, fun,
adult beverages and live music. $15 per
person or $25 per family if paid by May 1.
Like us on Facebook and register ASAP!
Fundraiser and food drive for the local
Ella Curran food bank so please bring two
cans of food per person. Contact Sherry
Lindley-Lowells, (503) 931-3201, sherrylowells@comcast.net.
Gervais High School classes of 1962 to
1968: Seven classes of Gervais alumni are
invited for a fun night of no host bar,
dinner and music, Aug. 1 at Bob Zielinski’s
Scenic Valley Vineyards and new Farm
Museum. Barbara Neliton, (503) 3936439, barbara.neliton@gmail.com.

1962: Monthly class luncheons, 11:30 a.m.,
second Thursday of each month at Izzy’s
on Lancaster Drive NE. kb7scc@wildblue.net.
Gervais High School class of 1970:
45-year class reunion, Aug. 15 at McNary
Restaurant & Lounge. RSVP to Rita Rasmussen at (503) 580-0612 or Frank or
Karen Slyter at (503) 538-1942.
Independence High School all-school
annual reunion: Luncheon, Aug. 22 at
Henry Hill multipurpose room. $15. To
register, send check to ISH Reunion, PO
Box 291, Independence, OR 97351. Al
Oppliger, (503) 838-1353, jcoppliger@aol.com.
Independence High School class of
1950: 65-year class reunion, Aug. 21 at
Rock-n-Rogers at Farrol’s Restaurant in
Rickreall. Al Oppliger, (503) 838-1353,
jcoppliger@aol.com.
Lebanon High School class of 1959:
56th class reunion, Aug. 8 at Santiam
Place. Festivities begin at 5 p.m. with
registration and happy hour, then dinner
at 6:30 p.m. Judy Peters, (503) 910-9018 or
(503) 838-6216, judejj03@hotmail.com.
McNary High School class of 1975:
40-year class reunion, Aug. 7 and 8.
mcnaryhighschool1975@gmail.com or
McNary 1975 Reunion c/o 1156 Manzanita
Way NE Keizer, OR 97303-3545.

Gervais High School all-class reunion:
All alumni are invited to join the class of
1955, 5 to 10 p.m. Sept. 26 at Silverton
Elks. RSVP to Pat Hupp, (503) 873-2608 or
Larry Jebousek, (503) 871-8262.

North Salem High School class of
1956: Class luncheon, 11:30 a.m. first
Friday of each month. Contact: Diane,
(503) 364-1104 or judy, (503) 393-7070.

Gervais Union High School class of

North Salem High School class of
1957: No-host luncheon meetings fourth

Thursday of each month at Keizer Elks,
4250 Cherry Ave. NE, Keizer. Contact:
Donna Kelley-Dayton, (503) 881-2123.
North Salem High School class of
1958: Class luncheon, noon second Friday
of each month at Keizer Elks Lodge.
Contact: Judie Mapes, (503) 390-0960.
North Salem High School class of
1960: Gathering of classmates, 11:30 a.m.
third Wednesday of each month at Keizer
Elks Lodge. Contact: Becky, (503)
390-1225.
North Salem High School class of
1965: 50-year class reunion, July 31 at
Northwest Wine Studies Center. (425)
644-1044, info@ReunionsWithClass.com.
Register at www.ReunionsWithClass.com
North Salem High School class of
1970: 45-year class reunion, Aug. 14 and
15. Friday informal gathering place at the
Lucey Barn. Saturday golf scramble;
dinner buffet at McNary Restaurant.
govikings1970@gmail.com, https://
sites.google.com/site/1970north
salemvikings/; www.facebook.com/
northsalem45 threunion.
Salem High School class of 1942:
Luncheon at Rudy’s at Salem Golf Club,
2025 Golf Course Road S. 11:30 a.m. to 2
p.m. third Monday of each month. Contact: (503) 362-8078.
Salem High School class of 1944:
Monthly luncheons at 11:30 a.m., third
Tuesday of each month at The Sizzler
Restaurant on Lancaster Drive NE. All
classmates are invited, guys included.
Contact: (503) 363-1814.

Salem High School class of 1952:
Monthly no-host luncheon, 11:30 a.m.
third Thursday of each month, Schroeder’s Guest House Restaurant, 4850
Portland Road NE. Contact: Jim Kinkaid,
(503) 581-8679.
Salem High School class of 1954:
Monthly class luncheons, third Wednesday of each month at Keizer Elks, 4250
Cherry Ave. NE. Contact: (503) 551-6556.
South Salem High School class of
1956: Monthly class luncheons, noon
second Thursday of each month, Keizer
Elks, 4250 Cherry Ave. NE. Contact: Sue or
Jean, sshs56@comcast.net.
South Salem High School class of
1965: 50-year class reunion, Aug. 14-16.
Join Facebook page, “South Salem High
School Class of 1965”; the Facebook event
titled, “Our 50th Reunion”; email to our
reunion address: southsalem65@gmail.com or write to: South
Salem Class of 1965, PO Box 21341, Keizer,
OR 97307.
South Salem High School class of
1975: 40-year class reunion, July 18 at
Illahe Country Club. E-mail
1975SSHS@gmail.com or https://
www.facebook.com/southsalemhigh40threunion.

PUBLIC NOTICES
POLICY
Tyler Zachary Gray, 30, Jefferson, and
Amanda Kay Anderson, 28, Jefferson.
Tyler Douglas Chase, 30, Salem, and Chelsea Rose Davis, 30, Ephrata, Washington.

Aaron Allen Johnson, 40, Salem, and
Joelynn Aren Sinclear, 40, Orland, California.
Neil Patrick Messer, 46, Keizer, and Ling Li
Babcock, 30, Woodstock, Connecticut.

Marion County applications
Kenny Wonne, 25, Keizer, and Donnia
Captel, 18, Keizer.

Donald Gene Johnson, 63, Stayton, and
Sandra Celia Windsor, 63, Stayton.

Ryan James Bradley Evans, 34, Salem, and
Shannon Marie Luis, 35, Salem.

Travis Glenn Godeaux, 35, Dallas, and
Katrina Sue Brooks, 35, Salem.

Terrance Alvin Langston, 53, Silverton,
and Renee Shannon Robinson, 51,
Silverton.

Javier Mota Cervantes, 48, Salem, and
Rosalia Sanchez Cruz, 45, Salem.

Miguel Angel Chavez Nunez, Jr., 38,
Keizer, and Matha Herrera, 43, Keizer.
Juan Antonio Orozco Cruz, 23, Salem, and
Evelin Romero-Nova, 27, Salem.
James Dean Sturgis, 22, Salem, and Kayla
Marie Jones, 21, Salem.
Christopher Richard Muhs, 44, Salem, and
Sirikanda Jeenwong, 34, Salem.

Louis was born April 3,
1932 to Alfred and Minnie
Essie Maude Lucas. He
passed away peacefully in
his sleep on March 31, 2015.
He married his wife Corrine
on January 13, 1954. They
were married 52 years. He
was preceded in death by
his loving wife Corrine and
oldest daughter Louise.
He is survived by his sons,
Louis G of Salem, Terry of
Newberg, Leon of Salem,
Loren of Salem, and his
daughters Leona of Salem
and Lori of Newberg, 29
grandchildren and 31
great-grandchildren.
Louis joined the USMC
in 1950 where he served in
the Korean War including
the
Chosin
Reservoir
and the Vietnam War. He
received numerous medals
and the Presidential Unit
Citation. He retired after
22 years of service. He then
went to work as a guard
for the Oregon Dept. of
Corrections, retiring in
1994.
There will be a viewing
on Wednesday, April 8,
2015 from 9:00am to 5:00
pm at Weddle Funeral
Chapel in Stayton. The
service will be in April 15th
at 11:00am also at Weddle
Funeral Chapel followed
by interment with Military
Honors at Willamette
National Cemetery in
Portland. In lieu of flowers,
we ask that you donate
to the Oregon Patriot
Guard in honor of Louis.
Arrangements entrusted
to Weddle Funeral Services.
Online condolences at
Weddle-Funeral.com.

USS IWO JIMA Shipmates Organization reunion: For all ships company and
embarked Navy and Marine Corps. personnel who were on board the LPH2 or
LHD7, Sept. 13-16 in Baton Rouge, LA.
(757) 723-0317, yujack46709@gmail.com,
http://ussiwojimashipmates.cfns.net

Uriah Michael Dean McKinley, 23, Pendleton, and Danielle Marie Potter, 23,
Silverton.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

April 3, 1932 – March 31, 2015

MILITARY

MARRIAGES
The following are marriage license applications received between March 27 and April
3. For more, go to StatesmanJournal.com/
Records.

9D

Gabriel Steven Alvarez, 22, Salem, and
Talisha Christine Parker, 20, Salem.
Blaine Retford Kirk, 24, Salem, and Shylo
Marie Armstrong, 24, Salem.
Aron Paul Reyes, 42, Salem, and Michelle
Darlene Wolfe, 40, Salem.
Michael Emanuel Carroll, 58, Salem, and
Heather Lue Lopez, 43, Salem.

Christopher Dean Lynde, 36, Salem, and
Bonita Karen Rushing, 48, Salem.

John Allen Lampman, 49, Salem, and Roni
Dianne Paswalk, 47, Salem.
Wyatt Hardy Ward, 36, Silverton, and
Valerie Jean Duncan, 34, Silverton.
Gary Warren Bathke, 56, Salem, and
Katherine Marie Bathke, 58, Salem.
Aaron Thomas Stiegeler, 38, Eugene, and
Sarah Alisha Brozovich, 34, Eugene.

Public Notices are available online at www.StatesmanJournal.com.
The Statesman Journal Legal Clerk is available Monday - Friday from 9
a.m. to 5 p.m. You can reach them by phone at 503-399-6789. In order
to receive a quote for a public notice you must E-mail your copy to
SJLegals@StatesmanJournal.com, and our Legal Clerk will return an
ad proof with cost, publication date(s), and a preview of the ad.
LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICE DEADLINES
All Legals Deadline @ 1:00 p.m. on all days listed below:
***All Deadlines are subject to change when there is a Holiday.
ŘMonday publication deadlines the Thursday prior
ŘTuesday publication deadlines the Friday prior
ŘWednesday publication deadlines the Monday prior
ŘThursday publication deadlines the Tuesday prior
ŘFriday publication deadlines the Wednesday prior
ŘSaturday publication deadlines the Thursday prior
ŘSunday publication deadlines the Thursday prior

LEGAL/PUBLIC NOTICE RATES

Statesman Journal:
ŘWeekday - $65.67/per inch/per day
(25% discount would apply to subsequent full pages (ie. pages 2
through xxx) that appear in the same ad in the same publication on
the same publication day.)
ŘWeekend/Holiday - $76.87/per inch/per day
ŘOnline Fee - $21.00 per time
ŘAffidavit Fee - $10.00 per Affidavit requested
OR-0000360917

10D

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Inmates train dogs in Ore. prison
Pooches being readied for adoption
the gaps.
The program kicked off
about a month ago. If all goes to
plan, the dogs will be ready for
adoption eight to 10 weeks from
when they arrived at the prison.
Zoey spends the bulk of her
days with her primary trainer,
inmate Justin Schiller-Munnemann. He picks her up at the recently constructed prison kennels each morning and takes her
back each evening.
“She goes wherever I go,”
Schiller-Munnemann said.
When he needs a break or has
a conflict, either secondary
trainer Philip Florek or sitter
Geoff Hendrickson takes over.
At first, Zoey was timid. She
startled when prison doors
clanked open and shut. She refused to climb the metal staircase leading to his second-floor
cell. Schiller-Munnemann sat
down on the stairs and coaxed
her up one step at a time.
During training sessions,
Zoey learns basic obedience
and manners. Each week, her
trainers take her through a dif-

By Kathy Aney
East Oregonian

PENDLETON — If Zoey could
talk, she would likely tell a sorrowful tale.
Police confiscated the border collie cross several weeks
ago during a drug raid on a
Umatilla County house. They
took the dog to the Pet Rescue
animal shelter, where she shied
away from strangers.
A month later, Zoey is a
changed pooch. She greets people with her tail wagging and
her brown eyes free from fear.
The transformation took
place in what might seem the
unlikeliest of places — a prison.
Inside the Two Rivers Correctional Institution, 18 inmates
train rescue dogs for adoption.
Richland dog trainer Tracy Hill
runs weekly sessions in the
prison’s visiting room. Six dogs
each have a team of three inmates at its bark and call. One
inmate serves as primary trainer and the other two (a secondary trainer and a “sitter”) fill in

ferent scenario. One week, the
visiting room became a farmer’s market. This week, SchillerMunnemann and Zoey visited a
pretend veterinarian’s office
where Hill examined the dog by
running her hands over her soft
brindle, black and white fur. Afterwards, Schiller-Munnemann
stopped by a makeshift receptionist’s desk and pretended to
write a $250 check. Zoey sat patiently.
Schiller-Munnemann
slipped her a kibble from his
pocket.
By the end of the training,
the six dogs should be able to
pass the American Kennel Club
Good Citizens test. The canines
must sit politely for petting, react calmly to the approach of a
friendly stranger, walk on a
loose lead, come when called
and behave politely around other dogs. They must react to unexpected distractions without
panicking, barking or running
away.
Hill distracted the dogs during this week’s session by doing
jumping jacks and having inmate trainers and assistant instructors whistle, clap and yell.
Hill said all the dogs have

come far, but none have come
out of their shell more than
Zoey.
“When she came in, she
wanted nothing to do with anybody,” Hill said. “She cowered.”
Hill, who runs 4 Paws DogWorks in Richland, said the inmate trainers benefit as much
as the dogs, or more.
“I’ve watched the relationships between dogs and inmates
grow to the point where I’m
amazed,” she said.
The men each had to apply
for their positions, like any job
in the real world. Some were invited for interviews. Fewer received invites for a round of
second interviews.
The inmates say having dogs
among the prison population is
healing. David Keever, a sitter,
said he witnessed a tattooed lifer get down on his knees and bury his face in a dog’s fur.
“A lot of us haven’t seen a dog
for a long time,” Keever said.
“They do a lot for your soul.
They mend a lot of holes.”
Schiller-Munnemann takes
Zoey when he visits a friend in
the prison hospice program.
“Everyone in the infirmary

lights up when Zoey comes in,”
he said. “One guy with tears in
his eyes said he hadn’t petted a
dog for 20 years.”
Members of the public will
have a chance to interact with
the six dogs during a meet and
greet April 16 at 1:30 p.m., on the
lawn near the TRCI administrative offices. Those who want to
adopt one of the dogs may fill
out adoption papers. If more
than one person requests the
same dog, a name will be picked
from a hat. The owners will
have the opportunity to go inside the prison and watch their
dog interacting with its trainer.
Owners will receive training
logs kept by the trainers. The
adoption fee is $150.
The trainers are keeping
their mission in mind. Zoey’s
secondary trainer, Philip Florek, came up with a creative slogan for the program: “From no
house to the big house to your
house.”
After the current batch of
dogs leaves, another group will
arrive. Roles among each dog
team member will switch.
Schiller-Munnemann said he
will miss Zoey when she leaves.

OREGON BRIEFS

Japanese Steakhouse
& Sushi Bar

Sheriff: 1-year-old Woodland
girl dies in home drowning

Warm Springs fires official
who alleged financial fraud

WOODLAND, Wash. — The Clark
County sheriff’s office says a 1year-old Woodland, Washington,
girl died Friday evening in an apparent drowning at a home.
The Columbian reports the sheriff’s office says the child was found
unconscious and unresponsive.
CPR was begun and the child was
taken to a hospital but she could not
be revived.
The girl was not identified. No
additional details were provided
about what happened.

BEND — The Confederated
Tribes of Warm Springs has fired an
official whose concerns led to a federal investigation.
The tribes’ director of human resources told The Bend Bulletin on
Friday that secretary-treasurer
Jake Suppah was let go.
Suppah was hired by the tribes in
2013 for the job that is comparable
to a city manager.
The Warm Springs native told
The Bulletin last month that he uncovered troubling financial patterns within the tribes, including

theft of time, mismanagement of
federal grants and missing funds.

Ore. woman fears missing
goat will wind up as dinner
WOODBURN — A woman who
lives in a rural area of Oregon is
worried that her missing pet goat
could wind up as a dinner entree. In
a public plea, Deidra MacKimmie is
offering a $250 reward for Pete’s
safe return. That’s more than she’s
seen goats sell for recently.
The Oregonian reports that the
Woodburn woman says the 7-yearold goat vanished late Tuesday or
early Wednesday from her yard.

Seder
Continued from Page 1D

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O
F
F

raela Tubman, who performed the
service, a lamb shank bone also
could be found.
The word Seder means “order,”
because each item of food on the
plate is introduced in a specific order. The process symbolizes the
journey from slavery to freedom
for Jews, thus community members
did not just eat on Saturday evening; they interacted with the foods
throughout the service.
The greens represented spring.
The eggs symbolized sacrifice.
Horseradish reminded participants
of the bitterness of slavery. And the
apples and nuts symbolized mortar,
which recalled the bricks made by
their ancestors as slaves in ancient
Egypt.
“The whole thing is done through
symbolism,” Vanderbeek said.
“Then we eat a wonderful meal.”
The rabbi had a more comfortable, if less sweeping, view of the
evening.
“It’s really just a big family dinner,” Tubman said.
Although the Seder is primarily
for those who practice Judaism,
other religions are welcome.
“The coolest thing about Seder
dinner, I think, is that people who
aren’t Jewish come, as well,” Kathi
Shuriman said. “It’s a different way
to connect with different religions,
because this is everyone’s day. It is a
universal story.”
aarmstrong@statesmanjournal.com;
(503) 399-6745 or follow on Twitter at
@AlexaArletta

PHOTOS BY DANIELLE PETERSON / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Rabbi Yisraela Tubman explains the items on a Seder plate during a Community
Passover Seder on Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom in South Salem.

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Tables are set for a Community Passover Seder on Saturday at Temple Beth Sholom in South Salem. The seder plate traditionally
holds five or six items, each of which symbolizes a part of the Passover story.

E

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

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Journal.com/Life.

BEER

NAVIGATOR

EASTER GAME

Oregon wild ales abound. See
how our tasting panel ranked
some of them. Page 4E

Plan out your week from Scottish
Heritage Festival to Boys II Men
with symphony. Page 5E

‘Clip and play’ board
game will keep kids busy
this Easter. Page 6E

ERIC SWANSON / SPEICAL TO THE
STATESMAN JOURNAL

Upcycle artist Nancy Morris-Judd
models her “Faux Fur Coat,” which
is made from cassette tape woven
onto the fabric of a second-hand
coat.

Upcycle
event
takes trash
to fashion
runway
By Tom Mayhall Rastrelli
Statesman Journal

Have you ever looked at bin
of aluminum cans, a shelf of
unused cassette tapes or any
pile of junk and seen potential?
Or art? Or even a dress? If
you’re thinking, “That’s nuts”
— or “That’s cool” — then you
might consider attending Upcycle Oregon at the State Capitol on Friday and Saturday,
April 10-11.
Upcycle Oregon is an art
and fashion festival that aims
to raise awareness about waste
reduction and reuse by highlighting Oregon artists and
innovators, providing waste
reduction education and encouraging the reuse of materials in new and creative forms.
In other words, the capitol will
be full of junk and models
wearing trash.
But this is not your everyday landfill trash. This is art.
In fact, the festival’s emcee,
Nancy Morris-Judd, who has a
20-year career in recycling and
waste reduction, has a piece in
the Smithsonian Institution’s
permanent collection. Her
“Obamanos Coat” is a cocktail
dress made from discarded
yard signs from the 2008 presidential campaign.
“Working with waste materials frees up my creative
juices,” Morris-Judd said.
“There’s also the feel-good
aspect that goes with upcycling art and making the conscious choice to not use new
materials.”
Upcycle Oregon is a collaboration led by DIY Studio with
Capitol History Gateway Project, Willamette University
and Marion County. It seeks to
create positive environmental,
social and economic benefits in
Oregon.
“We are looking forward to
highlighting the creativity and
ingenuity of people from
across Oregon,” said event
co-organizer Carlee Wright,
who also is a reporter at the
See UPCYCLE, Page 2E

IF YOU GO
What: Upcycle Oregon
When: Noon to 4 p.m. Saturday
Fashion show: 1 p.m. Saturday
Artist’s reception : 4 p.m. Friday
Business and policy panel discussion on creative reuse: Noon
to 1:30 p.m. Friday
Where: Oregon State Capitol Building, 900 Court St. NE
Cost: Free
Information: upcycleoregon.org

COURTESY OF MICHAEL BRUSASCO

Willamette University graduate Michael Brusasco (left) performs in Utah Shakespeare Festival’s production of “The Tempest.”

BIOS

To be or not to be ...

SUCCESSFUL
Alumni of Willamette University’s top-rated
theater program discuss their education
and how they are making it as professionals
By Tom Mayhall Rastrelli
Statesman Journal

In February, OnStage, a popular theater blog, ranked the top college theater
programs in the nation. Willamette University’s Department of Theatre placed
first among programs offering bachelor’s
degrees. As I interviewed Willamette
faculty members about the honor, I was
curious about the success of their graduates.
Jonathan Cole, associate professor at
Willamette, said the faculty’s responsibility is to make sure graduates know how
to succeed professionally.
“We cultivate a culture of lifelong
learning and curiosity, and that leads to
lifelong passion for exploration and the
art,” Cole said.
Professor Chris Harris said Willamette’s “old school apprenticeship” approach involves students working side by
side with faculty. He said students who
go on to succeed develop a hunger for the
collaborative and creative process.
“When a ‘no’ comes, they don’t give up
or get discouraged or throw in the towel.
It’s tenacity. They say, ‘Next time,’ and
they keep going,” Harris said.
Here is what six Willamette graduates
— Shana Cooper, Sarah Juliet Quigley,
Zach Fischer, Tess Falcone, Joellen Sweeney and Michael Brusasco — said about
their education and how they built successful careers in the performing arts.

Do you feel as if you’ve made it?
Fischer: “It’s funny because most actors don’t ever feel like they’ve made it.
There’s such a humbling uncertainty in
the business, so it’s in our nature to be
distrustful of success.”
Falcone: “ ‘Making it’ in this industry
is so subjective ... it could be argued that
I ‘made it’ as soon as I started doing my
job and didn’t need to supplement my
income by working outside of my industry. But for me, I won’t have ‘made it’
until I have my designs utilized in the
biggest tours out there. So, let me know if
Justin Timberlake calls anytime soon.”
Brusasco: “What’s most difficult to
learn for me is there is no ‘made it.’ It’s
about continually moving forward in
exploring what I love to do, which is telling a good story to a group of people.”

What was the most difficult thing
you had to do to succeed?
Cooper: “The challenge in making a
living in this art form is that you’re only
ever as good as your last job, so there’s a
constant challenge to succeed with each
production. You never really lose the

REACH US: Heather Rayhorn, (503) 399-6720, hrayhorn@StatesmanJournal.com

feeling that each job may be your last
job, which is a harrowing feeling to live
with. A lot of being successful in this
industry is learning to live with uncertainty. That is the biggest challenge.”
Quigley: “It always comes back to
money. New York is not the easiest city to
live in, but the opportunities available
here are unparalleled, so I have to make
it work. I have a good job — actually, I
have three jobs — and I don’t feel like I’m
a starving artist in the way one might
think. It’s when making money compromises my time spent on theater, that’s
when I feel like a starving artist.”

What was the most important thing
you learned at Willamette?
Falcone: “There are no sick days. In
this industry, the show really must go on,
no matter what happens.”
Sweeney: “The value of commitment
— to your choices onstage, to your work
offstage, to being part of a company.
When you arrive in the theater department as a freshman, your name goes up
on the wall of the theater building, and
you become part of the company. It’s a
big commitment, but if you invest, the
rewards are huge.”
Brusasco: “I will always be learning.
The learning never stops.”

What do you know now that you
wish you had known at graduation
from college?
Cooper: “I wish I’d have known that
it’s as important to invest in the people in
your life as it is to invest in your work,
and that long term, there’s a deeper kind
of happiness that comes from your relationships than you’ll ever find in your
work no matter how important that part
of your life is.”
Fischer: “College theater is a cocoon
where the opportunity to work on great
material is always available, and your job
is to just be an artist. Then you get out
into the industry and you’re suddenly
faced with being a professional, and you
really have no idea ... You have to crash
learn the politics of casting offices, the
science of auditioning, how to conduct
yourself in agent meetings and on and on.
But on the other hand, I’m glad I had to
just live it and figure it out as I went.”

What advice do you have for young
people who dream of a career in
theater?
Cooper: “I recommend making work
and making as much of it as you can. You
See THEATER, Page 5E

Michael Brusasco
Stayton native Brusasco is
currently acting in “The Three
Musketeers” at Quintessence
Theatre Group in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania.He graduated
from Willamette with a theater degree in 1999
and has a master’s degree from the University of
Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He built a career
as an actor, director and teacher who has
worked extensively in regional, off-Broadway
and off-off-Broadway productions. For information, go to michaelbrusasco.com.

Shana Cooper
Shana Cooper, Willamette
class of 1999, is a freelance
director originally from Ashland. She is currently directing
at the Woolly Mammoth
Theatre Company in Washington, D.C. She has a master’s degree from Yale
School of Drama. She is considering a transition
into artistic director positions and hopes to
continue directing. For information, go to
shanacooper.com.

Tess Falcone
Reno native Falcone is a freelance entertainment lighting
designer based in Denver,
Colorado. While very involved
in theater at Willamette,
Falcone majored in biology.
After graduation in 2010, she interned and built
a career designing lights for concerts.

Zach Fischer
San Diego native actor Fischer
can be seen in some upcoming
television shows, including
FX’s “The Americans,” NBC’s
“American Odyssey” and “The
Jim Gaffigan Show” on TV
Land and Comedy Central. At Willamette, he
double majored in theater and political science,
graduating in 1998. He has an M.F.A. from Florida State University. He lives in New York CIty.
This fall, he will return to Willamette as a visiting assistant professor to teach acting and
voice.

Sarah Juliet Quigley
Quigley grew up in Seattle
and is a 2012 graduate of
Willamette University with a
B.A. in theater and a Spanish
minor. While at Willamette,
she completed a summer apprenticeship at the
Shakespeare Theatre of New Jersey that helped
her establish an acting career in regional and
New York City theater. Her “survival job” is
office manager for NeroDoro, a Brooklyn restaurant. For information, go to
sarahjulietquigley.com.

Joellen Sweeney
Portland native Sweeney
graduated from Cleveland
High School. She graduated
from Willamette in 2014 with
degrees in Spanish and theater. She acts and teaches in Portland at Young
Musicians & Artists, Northwest Children’s Theater and School and Third Rail Repertory Theatre.
She’s completing an apprenticeship program at
Third Rail and will perform June 18-28 in the
company’s Final Showcase Performance. For
information, go to
facebook.com/thirdrailmentorshipcompany.

2E

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Heritage Oregon

ONLINE
Go to StatesmanJournal.com/Heritage for more on area history.

Salem similar but not same city Roosevelt visited
By Kylie Pine
Special to the Statesman Journal

At 9 a.m. on May 21, 1903, President
Theodore Roosevelt stepped off a train
onto the platform at Salem’s old railroad depot and into a crowd of thousands eager to catch a glimpse of him.
His few hours
in Salem were
spent touring the
city, giving
speeches, receiving gifts and accolades with lots of
hand shaking and
small talk. Most of
the sights that he
saw on his whirlwind trip would be
unrecognizable to modern residents,
just a century later.
The train depot at which the president disembarked did not resemble
today’s brick structure, which would be
constructed 15 years after the presidential visit. Although it stood on the
same property, Salem’s train depot in
1903 was a wooden affair, with dainty,
spindly decorations. A portion of the
station that Teddy Roosevelt would
have visited still stands today as the
baggage depot, now a stand-alone building that was salvaged from the remains
of the older depot.
As the president drove off in the
horse-drawn carriage that would carry
him around the city, he was followed by
15 other carriages and surrounded by a
battalion of Oregon National Guardsmen on foot. As they drove through the
city on their way to the first ceremonial
stop, the only currently standing buildings the president would have seen
were the Thomas Kay Woolen Mill,

Upcycle
Continued from Page 1E

Statesman Journal.
“Upcycling” is the process
of converting and elevating
waste materials into items of
greater environmental benefit, economic value or aesthetic beauty. Morris-Judd explained that it’s different from
recycling in which items are
broken down into smaller
parts and remade through a
manufacturing process.
“Upcycling is about creativity,” she said. “Creativity
is about how we solve problems ... and find local solutions.”

WILLAMETTE HERITAGE CENTER, 1998.010.0055.

Teddy Roosevelt leaves the Oregon State Capitol in 1903.

Willamette University’s Waller Hall and
Gatke Hall (although Gatke was the
brand new post office and located much
farther west on State Street), the First
Methodist Church and large swaths of
buildings along State and Commercial
streets including the current homes of
the Brick, Wild Pear and Cooke’s Stationery, parts of U.S. Bank, Ma Valise,
Earle’s Antiques, Gallagher Fitness, the
Night Deposit and Greenbaum’s Quilted Forest.
Visitors past and present would recognize the entourage’s destination,
Marion Square Park, but maybe not the
large stage that had been constructed
there or the thousands of schoolchil-

Upcycle Oregon will feature
a number of family-friendly
events. There will be a two-day
art exhibit in the capitol. Saturday’s headline feature is an
interactive fashion show of
clothing made from reused
materials.
Salem gallery owner Mary
Lou Zeek and Oscar Lopez, a
local fashion designer who
showed at Portland Fashion
Week, will judge and award
winners. Guests will be able to
meet the fashion designers.
“The fashion show is a really popular part of recycled art
events,” Morris-Judd said.
“Often times, it’s a way of engaging teenagers in looking at
environmental issues that they
might not otherwise become

Trashion, which
is fashion made
from trash, will
be featured on
the runway at
Upcycle Oregon
on Saturday,
April 11, at the
Oregon State
Capitol.

DIY Studio accepts donations of
materials for creative reuse. Learn
more at diystudio.net.

engaged in. Teenagers love
fashion.”
Other Saturday events include electronics recycling by
Garten Services and children’s
activities by Gilbert House
Children’s Museum. On Friday,
Willamette University’s Sustainability Institute will host a
panel discussion on advancing
Oregon’s environmental and
economic well-being through
creative reuse and waste reduction.
“We hope people who attend

Aries (March 21-April 19).
Knowing a little about a
problem is worse than
knowing nothing. So once
you have a glimpse of the
issue, go deeper.

COURTESY OF DIY
STUDIO

Upcycle Oregon will see new
value, inspiration and get their
own ideas for upcycling,”
Wright said.

Gemini (May 21-June 21).
Oscar Wilde said, “Always
forgive your enemies —
nothing annoys them so
much.” Your acknowledgment will make a difference.
Cancer (June 22-July 22).
You usually take full responsibility when things don’t go
as planned. Enjoy the unexpected turn of events.
Leo (July 23-Aug. 22). You
will risk by not risking, but
what exactly? Life, goodness,
happiness— it’s all on the
table.
Virgo (Aug. 23-Sept. 22). As
you strengthen and grow
your best qualities, less
desirable ones disappear.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct. 23). You
know what it’s like to be
lonely in a crowd. That’s why
you reach out to those who
seem like they need extra
care.
Scorpio (Oct. 24-Nov. 21).
Helping others helps you. Go
where the needy people are.
Sagittarius (Nov. 22-Dec.
21). Putting your judgments
aside and check your expectations at the door.

CROSSWORD PUZZLE SOLUTION
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Capricorn (Dec. 22-Jan. 19).
To relax in the company of
new people is not easy. The
awkward moments are that
much more real.
Aquarius (Jan. 20-Feb. 18).
You’re clear about what
you’re passionate about. It’s
this passion that will move
an obstacle out of your path.
Pisces (Feb. 19-March 20).
Separate what is truly happening to you from the
emotions attached to it.
Today’s Birthday (April 5).
There’s no such thing as
“normal” over the next
three months because you’re
so willing to do life in new
ways. Your lucky numbers
are 13, 29, 44, 26 and 11.
Write the astrologer, Holiday
Mathis, at Creators Syndicate at
www.creators.com.

TRastrelli@StatesmanJournal
.com, (503) 983-6030,
facebook.com/RastrelliSJ and on
Twitter @RastrelliSJ

Husband doesn’t go with
wife to emergency room

Taurus (April 20-May 20). It’s
time to speak out loud what
you’ve been rehearsing in
your head.

Sudoku is a numberplacing puzzle based on
a 9x9 grid with several
given numbers. The
object is to place the
numbers 1 to 9 in the
empty squares so that
each row, each column
and each 3x3 box contains the same number
only once. The difficulty
level of the Conceptis
Sudoku increases from
Monday to Sunday.

Kylie Pine is the curator at the Willamette
Heritage Center, a 5-acre historical park
and museum in dedicated to preserving and
sharing the history of the Mid-Willamette
Valley. She can be reached at
kyliep@willametteheritage.org.

HOW TO DONATE

HOROSCOPES

CONCEPTIS SUDOKU

dren lined up to greet the president
with song. The park itself, though, looks
very much like it did over 100 years
ago, less one gazebo and plus one skate
park.
The final stop of the tour was the
state capitol. Even this looked quite
different in Teddy’s day, with a round
copper dome and ornate façade rising
between a neighborhood of grand Victorian mansions to the north (now the
capitol mall) and the university to the
south. Completed in 1872, this capitol
building faced west, its entry looking
out to what is now Willson Park. It was
on the steps here at the front of the
capitol that a huge platform 15 feet

above the ground was constructed in
preparation for the presidential visit.
As an article in the Oregonian describes: “The platform is about twothirds the way up the steps and is large
enough to hold about 150 persons. From
tests made today, it was determined
that the President can be heard distinctly at any place on the Capitol
grounds west of the building, so that it
is certain that all who attend the exercises will be able to hear.”
Photographs of the visit show the
platform festooned with patriotic
stripes and stars standing far above the
heads of the anywhere from 10,000 to
40,000 people who were estimated to
have gathered to view the scene.
After the requisite speech making
and ceremonies, the president was
returned to the train depot to catch a
train northwards, leaving Salem at
noon, just three hours after he had
arrived.
President Roosevelt, or at least a
reincarnation of him, will be returning
to Salem on April 27. Joe Wiegand, the
premier Theodore Roosevelt re-creator,
will give a presentation and answer
questions at the Willamette Heritage
Center as part of his Oregon Roadshow
presented by the Oregon Historical
Society and Wells Fargo. Tickets ($20 if
bought by April 20) are available at the
Willamette Heritage Center. Call (503)
585-7012 or go to
willametteheritage.org.

Mitchell
and Sugar
A N N I E ' S M A I L B OX

Dear Annie: My husband has the emotional
IQ of a 10-year-old. I
recently spent six hours
in the emergency room
for some tests to rule out
a potentially life-threatening problem. I asked
my husband to please
drive me to the ER because the doctors did not
advise that I drive myself home afterward. His
response was that he
needed to stay home and
take care of our dog.
This is the second

time he has done this.
Years ago, I had some
outpatient surgery. When
the nurse went to look for
him, he was nowhere to
be found. He had driven
45 minutes back to our
house to take care of our
dog and hadn’t returned.
After the six hours in
the ER, I drove myself
home. I was extremely
tired, hungry and
stressed out. Due to nearby construction, I had to
walk several blocks in
the cold and the dark to
get to my car.
When I got home, my
husband didn’t even
bother to ask how I was. I
had hoped (silly me) that
he would buy me flowers
or take me out to dinner.
What I got instead were
stupid jokes and snarky
comments. I blew my

top.
He still doesn’t get that
he let me down when I
needed him. I told him he
couldn’t have caused me
any greater hurt than if
he had hit me. Talking to
a counselor is out of the
question. I’m a very private person and would
not be comfortable talking to someone about this.
How do I make him understand?
— Devastated in Dixie
Dear Dixie: We suspect your husband is
highly uncomfortable
dealing with hospitals and
sick people, so he avoids
you during these times.
The dog provides a good
excuse, but he shouldn’t
be let off the hook. You
need to be very blunt on
these occasions: “Honey, I
need you to stay with me
at the hospital because I
get scared all by myself.
Can you watch TV in my
room?” If you know you’ll
be there all day, make
arrangements for the
dog. If these efforts still
don’t work, find a friend
to accompany you so your
husband’s emotional inadequacy doesn’t leave you
stranded and upset.
Annie’s Mailbox is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy Sugar, longtime
editors of the Ann Landers column.
Please email your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net.

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

3E

F L AV O R S
Treat your palate to a taste of Oregon
Text and photos by Victor Panichkul
Statesman Journal

Try these sauces
in marinades for
meat. Drunken
Garlic Black Bean
Sauce ($6.25) and
Drunken Jerk
Jamaican
Marinade ($6.49),
available at
Natural Grocers.

A selection of cereals from Peace Cereal in Eugene, including Mango Peach, Goji Berry and Chia, and
Blueberry Pomegranate (all $4.49 each), available at Natural Grocers.

A trio of hot sauces from Fire on the Mountain in Portland,
including Buffalo Lime Cilantro, Buffalo Wing Sauce and
Bourbon Chipotle ($5.25 each), available at Natural Grocers.

Two nut-based flours and coconut flour from Bob’s Red Mill in Milwaukie. The Hazelnut meal/flour ($9.99)
and the almond meal/flour ($8.45) would be great in cookies. The coconut flour ($5.69) is great for
gluten-free baking. All are available at Natural Grocers.

A selection of salsas from Charlie’s Salsa in Beaverton and
Grandma Chonga’s in Dundee, including Tomatillo Wasabi ($4.39),
Chunky Salsa ($5.49) and Tropical Salsa ($5.49), available at Natural
Grocers.

A selection of Thai curries and sauces for use in stir-fry from Thai and True and its Thai creator Susie Kasem,
made in Lake Oswego. The selection at Natural Grocers at 4250 Commercial St. SE includes red, green, panang,
prik-king curries ($5.89 each), hot chili oil ($5.89), peanut sauce ($7.35) and hot sauce ($6.59).

CALIFORNIA, HERE I COME

1

2

3

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13

14

15

16

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18

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48

49

50

85

86

BY ALAN ARBESFELD / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ
20

ACROSS

1 Small drums
7 Leaves of grass
13 Folded like a fan
20 East Coast national
park
21 Early stone tool
22 Go wild
23 Ancient Peruvian
using Netflix?
25 Washington post?
26 Newbie: Var.
27 Senator Mike from
Wyoming
28 1965 hitmakers Dino,
____ & Billy
30 Start to lose it
31 Exactly 72, maybe
33 “No fishing here!”?
38 Be up
39 Ending with Vietnam
40 Vietnam ____
41 Like the headline
“ELVIS
FATHERED MY
ALIEN BABY”
42 Sheer
44 Lines from Homer
and Erasmus
47 Some art projections
51 Dog whose rocket
went off course?
55 Make the podium
56 Some black-tie events
57 Refrain syllable
58 “Network,” for one
59 Never
Online subscriptions:
Today’s puzzle and more
than 4,000 past puzzles,
nytimes.com/crosswords
($39.95 a year).

62 “Is that so?”
64 A minimus is a little
one
65 Comment to an
annoying blackjack
dealer?
71 TV ET
72 Pub fixture
73 “Ta-da!”
74 Up-to-the-minute
77 Letters after Sen.
Kirsten Gillibrand’s
name
78 Less deserving of a
laugh, say
81 Sealer, maybe
82 Part of a jumbo trail
mix?
87 Sorry sort
89 Lit
90 Marie Antoinette, par
exemple
91 First name on the
“America’s Got
Talent” panel
93 State on the Miss.
94 Bouncer’s
concern
96 AAA offering: Abbr.
97 Agent for Bogart’s
partner?
102 Wild
104 Declare
105 Filmmaker
Riefenstahl
106 Hold it!
108 “When I was ____
…”
109 President John
Tyler’s wife
111 “12-Point Type:
A History”?
116 Tied up

117 They might grab
some food before a
flight
118 Hard and unyielding
119 Bar order that’s not
drunk
120 “Me as well!”
121 Isn’t completely
truthful
DOWN

1 It may be on the tip of
your tongue
2 Put in play
3 It holds a lock in place
4 Classic theater
5 Marshy place, perhaps
6 Identical to
7 Auto pioneer Karl
8 “When dealing with
people, let us
remember we are
not dealing with
creatures of ____”:
Dale Carnegie
9 Will Smith
biopic
10 When repeated, a
child’s meal
11 Yadda, yadda, yadda
12 Tangerine or peach
13 Force divided by
area, in physics
14 ____ brothers,
inventors of the
motion picture
(1895)
15 Having five sharps
16 Cause of a great
loss?
17 Option for a quick
exit
18 Quaint letter opener

19 Classic British
Jaguar
24 Concerning
29 Sharp turn
32 Projected image
34 High-tech
surveillance
acronym
35 Major account
36 Site of a 1776 George
Washington victory
in the Revolutionary
War
37 ____ Rudolph, U.S.
sprinter who won
three golds in the
1960 Olympics
43 British racetrack
site
44 ____ Hardware
45 It’s in the 60s
46 Rock singer?
48 Photoshop user, e.g.
49 Egyptian king
overthrown in a 1952
revolution
50 Wintry mixes
52 Barely touch, as a
meal
53 Visibly stunned
54 Grp. with a launch
party?
58 Criticism
59 Spiral-horned
antelopes
60 “C’est magnifique!”
61 Like some titmice
62 Fist bump, in slang
63 It might say “Happy
Birthday!”
66 Ancient Assyrian foe
67 Old lab burners
68 Ambushed

21

23

22

24

26

25

27

31

32

38

39

42

28
33

35

44
52

60

45

46

53

47
54

61

58

62
66

71

67

63

75

69

77

78

82

87

98

109

84
90

93

94

100

104

101

105
110

80

89
92

99

79

83

88
91

106
111

112

113

95
103

107

108

114

115

117

118

119

120

121

70 Mess (around)
75 Catholic rite
76 “Delphine” author
Madame de ____

78 Waxing and waning,
e.g.

79 U.K. honour
80 Free

82 Thomas Jefferson
and Calvin Coolidge,
e.g.
83 Quiet period
84 Menial
85 Showstopper?
86 When school’s open
88 More slapstick
92 Novelist McEwan
94 ____-bodied
95 Board’s opposite

96

102

116

69 One calling foul?

70

73

76

81

64

68

72

74

55

57

65

97

37
41

56
59

30

36

40

43

51

34

29

97 Maryland’s largest
city, informally
98 ____ Fisher Hall,
longtime venue at
Lincoln Center
99 Whale constellation

103 Tasty
107 “In that case …”
110 China’s Lao-____
112 Suffered from
113 Jeff Lynne’s band,

100 Capone henchman

for short

101 Something you
might get a charge
out of

114 Patch of land
115 ____ season

4E

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Taste of Oregon
Oregon brewers get wild with wild ales
From the first sip of a Belgian Lambic Kriek years ago when I lived in
Baltimore and my first bite of seafood
cooked in Belgian ale at a gastropub
called Brewer’s Art, I have been nurturing a wild
fascination with
Belgian wild ales.
Unlike most of
the beers we’re
used to in Oregon,
IPAs and such,
which are ferVictor
mented with carePanichkul
fully selected
strains of yeasts,
TA S T E
OF OREGON
traditional Belgian ales are
brewed by spontaneous fermentation
using wild yeasts, which gives the beer
its distinctive dry, fruity and sour
flavor.
Belgian wild ales or farmhouse ales
usually are lower in alcohol than their
stout cousins, and the citrus flavors of
the beers make them perfect for
spring and summer sipping while
you’re enjoying the great outdoors and
the great weather here.
The lawn and yard work seem less
tedious when a cold Belgian-style ale is
waiting for the after-chore chill on the
back deck.
Browsing Capital Market in Salem,
I discovered a small selection of Oregon Belgian ales earlier this year to
try. When I heard that there was an
actual wild ale and farmhouse ale festival in Portland, there was nothing that
was going to keep me from venturing
to the land of bearded, tattooed,
pierced and gauged hipsters to attend
along with my fellow hop heads (I
mean beer panel members). It was a
wonderful experience marred only by
the shocking image of three men in
kilts with scrawny legs and bulbous
knees — unlike the hunky Jamie Fraser of “Outlander.”
Saraveza Bottle Shop and Pasty
Tavern, The Bad Habit Room and a
small stretch of North Michigan Avenue that connected the two became
wild ale central last weekend.
On March 28-29, several hundred
beer lovers packed the space for the
third annual Portland Farmhouse and
Wild Ale Festival, tasting wild-brewed
wonders from Portland, Eugene, the
coast, Washington, California, Colorado, Texas and as far away as New
York. I was amazed that there were so
many Oregon brewers making wild
and farmhouse ales.
Among the brewers represented
were Logsdon Farmhouse Ales from
Hood River, de Garde Brewing in Tillamook, Double Mountain Brewery in

SAEROM’S
PICKS
Saerom Yoo, health
reporter
Saerom Yoo

Age: 28

Favorite craft
brews: Double Mountain Lulu, Fort
George 3-Way IPA, Pfriem Blonde IPA
Favorite mass-market brews: Dos
Equis, Modelo, Tecate
Beer turn-off: Overly malty or sweet
Favorite beer food: Tacos or a nice
medium-rare burger with fries

DAVID DAVIS / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Sampling Belgian style wild ales at Saraveza
Bottle Shop in Portland during the Portland
Farmhouse and Wild Ale Festival.

Hood River, The Commons Brewery in
Portland, Humble Brewing in Portland, Agrarian Ales in Eugene, Oakshire Brewing in Eugene, Solera Brewery in Parkdale, Block 15 Brewing Co.
in Corvallis, Pelican Brewing Company in Pacific City and Pfreim Family
Brewers in Hood River.
It was a rare treat to get to taste so
many Belgian-style wild ales, and
there were no two that were alike. The
brews ranged from lip-pucker sour on
one extreme to citrus and fruity and
hoppy on the other extreme. It seems
like many brewers took the idea of
wild ales and gave it their own twist
with their unique interpretations, producing results that ranged from tasty
to crazy.
The most unusual entry at the festival was the Colorado Wild Sage beer
from Crooked Stave Artisan Beer Project in Colorado. I like the flavor of
sage, but this beer had me drowning in
it and looking around for a place to spit
it out. My favorite of the event was the
Raspberry Bu from tiny de Garde
Brewing in Tillamook. It was the perfect dry, fruity Belgian-style wild ale
with notes of rich and tart raspberry.
Check out our beer panel’s favorites
from the event.
Victor Panichkul is food, wine and beer
columnist from the Statesman Journal.
Reach him at (503) 399-6704,
Vpanichkul@StatesmanJournal.com,
follow at Facebook.com/WillametteValley
FoodWine and on Twitter @TasteofOregon.

29(5:(,*+7"

» Akane by Agrarian Ales (Eugene):
Good play between the wheat and
apple flavors. Avoids tasting like a cider.
» Admiral Raspberry of the SS Coolship by Oakshire Brewing (Eugene):
Another light saison that integrates
well with berry flavor. The minor role of
hops helps let all flavors have presence.
» Saison Gris by Elysian Brewing
(Seattle): I really wanted to like this, but
the wine flavor gets washed out by the
heavy wheat influence.

ERICH’S PICKS
Erich England of
Portland

» Strawberry Fields by Block 15
Brewing Company (Corvallis): Nice
balance of sour, oaky and a hint of
strawberry at the end. Yum!
» Hibernal Dichotomous (Batch #2)
by Jester King Brewery (Austin, Texas): Refreshing, herbal, slightly sour with
a slight bitter note. Nice brew for a hot
day outside.
» Akane by Agrarian Ales (Eugene):
Aroma of apple, sweet and smooth.
» Admiral Raspberry of the SS Coolship by Oakshire Brewing (Eugene):
Sour and fizzy with a slight raspberry
aftertaste. Super nice!
» Raspberry Bu by de Garde Brewing (Tillamook): Refreshing, crisp and
tart with raspberry flavors. What you’d
expect from a sour.

DAVID’S
PICKS
David Davis, digital
producer
Age: 31
David Davis

Favorite craft
brews: Deschutes
Chainbreaker White IPA and Ninkasi
Spring Reign
Favorite mass-market brews: Rainier,
Olympia
Beer turn-off: Overwhelming bitter
flavors or long-lasting aftertastes
Favorite beer food: Soft pretzels
» Saison Troisieme by de Garde
Brewing (Tillamook): Dry hoped sour
saison that hits with a great sour flavor
that melts into mild hops and oak flavor.
» French Tickler by Solera Brewery
(Mt. Hood): Effervescent and crisp citrus
front flavors, light body. Great session

Age: 29
Favorite craft
brews: Double
Mountain Kolsch,
Sierra Nevada Torpedo Extra IPA, 10
Barrel Swill

Erich England

Favorite mass-market brew: Olympia
— “It’s the water”
Beer turn-off: Anything too sweet or
too bitter
Favorite beer food: Chicken wings
and tots
» Admiral Raspberry of the SS Coolship by Oakshire Brewing (Eugene):
Crisp, refreshing and sour. The raspberry
flavor shines through. I found it to be
quite a great surprise!
» Myrtle by The Commons Brewery
(Portland): A nice floral nose. The flavor
is sour with a hint of bitter that complements and reins in the sour flavor. It is a
delight!
» Little Saison by Pfriem Family
Brewers (Hood River): This is a light
floral beer with a low ABV. In my mind,
this is a perfect beer for enjoying a
warm spring day. I could drink this all
day.
» Strawberry Fields by Block 15
Brewing Company (Corvallis): A wonderfully light, sour beer with a nice
sweet nose. The strawberry does not
overwhelm by any stretch. I would love
to have this paired with a rich dessert.
» Zephyros by Propolis Brewing
(Port Townsend, Washington): A really
solid Saison. It is a touch of tart, a dash
of herbal and some floral thrown in. It
is a beer to sit with and mull over the
flavors throughout.

WINE AND
BEER BRIEFS
crease in visits to our winery. Awards
such as these inspire us to continue to
refine the quality and depth of our
wines and enhance the experience for
visitors.”
Maryhill is at 9774 Highway 14 in
Goldendale, Washington. For information, call (877) 627-9445 or go to
Maryhillwinery.com.

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Celebrate ‘Red Lips and Tulips’
at St. Josef’s Vineyards

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COURTESY OF MARYHILL WINERY

Maryhill co-owners Craig and Vicki Leuthold
and winemaker Richard Batchelor have been
honored by Wine Press Northwest with the
Pacific NW Winery of the Year award.

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Maryhill Winery named
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Maryhill Winery in the eastern Columbia River Gorge has been named
Pacific NW Winery of the Year by Wine
Press Northwest.
Founded in 1999, Maryhill Winery is
known for delivering excellent wines
from acclaimed Washington vineyards
at affordable prices. Maryhill has
claimed more than 3,000 awards, including the 2014 Winery of the Year
award at the San Francisco International Wine Competition, one of the
most prestigious international competitions in the United States. Also in 2014,
the World Association of Wine Writers
and Journalists named Maryhill Winery
among the World’s Top 10 Wineries.
“We’re incredibly thrilled by the
award,” said Craig Leuthold, co-owner
of Maryhill Winery. “To be a part of the
Washington wine industry and being
here in the Pacific Northwest is such a
wonderful thing. What a great time it is
to be in the Pacific Northwest and the
attention the region is getting for the
quality of the wine that’s being produced,” Leuthold said. “Since receiving
the Winery of the Year Award at the
2014 San Francisco International Wine
Competition, we’ve expanded our distribution and seen a significant in-

“Red Lips and Tulips” will celebrate
the founding of St. Josef’s winery and
the beginning of the season as spring
begins in the vineyard.
The owners, who emigrated from
Europe, wanted to pass on a little bit of
the European wine-growing spirit.
“Red Lips and Tulips” will feature
lively music from Portland Gypsy Jazz
Project and homemade Hungarian
Goulash, along with other Europeanstyle foods. New releases of estategrown wines including the highly rated
pinot rose and Kitara Reserve syrah
and pinot noir will be available.
St. Josef’s grows and makes wine
from its five estate vineyards including
pinot noir, pinot gris, chardonnay, syrah
and gewurztraminer. The winery is just
down the road from the Wooden Shoe
Tulip Farms, which will be in full
bloom.
Festival hours are noon to 6 p.m.
Saturday and Sunday with music from 1
to 5 p.m. Admission is $5 for ages older
than 21 and includes souvenir wine
glass, tasting and tours.
St Josef’s is at 28836 S Barlow Road
in Canby.
Contact (503) 651-3190 or
stjosefswinery.com for more information.

Enjoy live music at Coria Estates
Visitors can enjoy free wine tastings
and live music at the Coria Estates
tasting room in South Salem the last
two weekends in April.
Leanne McClellan will perform Saturday, and there will be food by Chef
De Cuisine (Michael Sullivan). Jerry
Meier will perform April 18, and Ben
Thede will perform April 25.
Coria Estates is at 8252 Redstone
Ave. SE. Tasting room hours are noon
to 6 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays,
noon to 7 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays
and noon to 6 p.m. Sundays. For information, call (503) 363-0525.
— Victor Panichkul
To publicize wine and beer news, email
Vpanichkul@StatesmanJournal.com.

NWNavigator

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

5E

DON’T MISS
UPCOMING
EVENTS

Hit the road for entertainment
in the Northwest.
WEEK OF APRIL 5-11, 2015

PORTLAND
APRIL 12-16
Garth Brooks with Tricia
Yearwood: Country, 4 and
8 p.m. April 12; 7:30 p.m.
April 13, 15 and 16, Moda
Center, One Center Court,
Portland. $74.89. Ticket
master.com.

N
Seattle

SEATTLE
APRIL 14
Ariana Grande: Pop, 7:30
p.m., KeyArena, 305 Harrison St. $25.50 to $65.50.
Ticketmaster.com.

8

9
Hillsboro

7
Farm Fest
and Plowing
Competition
April 11

McMinnville
Mc
M
cM
Miinn
nnv
viille
lle
ll

PAC
AC I F I C O C E A N

5
Monmouth
Monm
Mo
mo
ou
uth
th
Newport

3

Newberg

COLUMBIA RIVER

LINCOLN CITY
APRIL 17 AND 19
Travis Tritt: Country, 8
p.m., Chinook Winds Casino
Resort, 1777 NW 14th St.
$23.50 to $38.50. (888)
624-6228, Chinookwind
scasino.com.
APRIL 17-19
Great Oregon Coast
Garage Sale: Visitors from
all over and local residents
alike participate in this
annual event. The sales are
listed in a guide indicating
dates, times, locations and
brief driving directions to
each sale, throughout
Lincoln City. (541) 994-3070,
Oregoncoast.org.

Portland
P
tl d

2

1

Silverton
on

Salem
S
alem

Scio
o
Albany
A
Al
Alba
lb
ba
any
y

Local Roots
Music Festival
April 11

4

6

10
Florence

Boyz
II Men
April 7

EUGENE
APRIL 18
An Evening with Bill
Maher: Stand-up comedy,
8 p.m., Hult Center for
Performing Arts, Silva Concert Hall, 1 Eugene Center.
$49.75 to $69.75. Hult
center.org.
MAY 28
The Eagles: “History of the
Eagles” tour, 8 p.m., Matthew Knight Arena, Matthew Knight Arena, 1776 E
13th St. $49 to $179.
Matthewknightarena.com.

Eugene
Bend
Oregon
Scottish
Heritage
Festival
April 11

11

12

ONLINE NOW
Go to StatesmanJournal.com/
NWNavigator for an interactive map
showing the top things to do in the
Northwest. You’ll also find a link to a
calendar of events for activities in the
Mid-Valley.

Jefferson
Starship
April 10-11

HOME BASE

Today
WCWC Live Event: Alexander Hammerstone, Matt
Striker, Joey Ryan, Eric Right,
Jeremy Blanchard, The Grappler and his Wrecking Crew
and more, 5 to 7:30 p.m.,
Houck Middle School, 1155
Connecticut St. SE. $5 to $15.
(971) 600-8215, Wc-wc.com.

Saturday
Local Roots Music Festival
and KMUZ Fundraiser:
Performances from 21 acts
appearing on the “Local
Roots Vol II Compilation CD,”
includes different genres
from folk to pop to rock to
Texas Swing, all day, Willamette Heritage Center at The
Mill, 1313 Mill St. SE. $10.
(503) 585-7012, Kmuz.org.

fourth and final concert of its
30th anniversary season, with
songs composed and arranged by Ashia & the Bison
Rouge Ginastera, 3 p.m.
Sunday, with preconcert talk
with conductor and artistic
director Nikolas Caoile and
guest artists, 2 p.m. Sunday,
plus Sound Bites Luncheon
and open dress rehearsal, 10
a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday,
Willamette University, Hudson Hall, 900 State St. $20 to
$45; $10 to $23 students; $10
lunch or $5 open dress rehearsal. (503) 480-1128,
Salemchamberorchestra.org.

MIL
MI
M
IIL
LES
ES
0

Jose James and The American Metropole Orchestra:
7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Western
Oregon University, Rice Auditorium, 345 Monmouth Ave.
N. $25 advance; $28 at door.
(503) 838-8333, Wou.edu/sfa.

Friday through April
26
“A Bench in the Sun”: A
comedy by Ron Clark about
two elderly friends that
spend their days bickering
and reminiscing on the garden bench at their retirement
home, 7 p.m. Fridays and
Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, Brush Creek Playhouse,
11535 Silverton Road NE. $10
or $8 ages 60 and older,
students and children younger than 12. (503) 508-3682,
Brushcreekplayhouse.com.

Saturday-Sunday

3 MONMOUTH

Masterworks IV: This Noble Company: Join Salem
Chamber Orchestra for the

16.8 MILES

Saturday

Continued from Page 1E

are going to learn something
new on each project that you
do. Not waiting for someone
else to give you a job but to
create the opportunity for
yourself.”
Fischer: “Your natural talent
is predetermined. You have no
control over how much or little
you’ve been given, so don’t
waste time worrying about it.”
Falcone: “Just because
you’ve been told that you’re
good at what you do does not
mean that you can get away
with not working hard.”

What is your favorite
Willamette memory?
Fischer: “On performance
nights, as I walked to the playhouse, I had a tradition of taking a detour to the star trees on
the north side of campus ... I
would spend a few minutes
each night beneath the star
trees, just being still, listening
to the swaying branches, think-

10 2
10
20
0

40
40

blacksmith, horseshoeing
demos, log skidding, pioneer
kid’s area, museum and
Hutchcroft schoolhouse
open, old timey music, food
and more, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Yamhill Valley Heritage Center, 11275 SW Durham Lane.
$5; free ages younger than
12. (503) 434-0490,
Yamhillcountyhistory.org.

27.1 MILES

Saturday

4 SCIO
24.7 MILES

Saturday
Meet the Lambies Day:
Meet the new spring lambs,
along with chickens, border
collies, flock-guardian dogs
and barn cats, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., Wolston Farm, 39562
Highway 226. (503) 394-2021.

5 MCMINNVILLE
26.1 MILES

Saturday
Farm Fest and Plowing
Competition: More than 20
teams of draft horses and
mules in competition, photography contest, sawmill,

60
60

80
80

10
10
100
00
0

traditional art and demonstrations that will highlight
the cultures of Asia and the
Pacific-Rim, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Chehalem Cultural Center,
415 E. Sheridan St. Free. (503)
487-6883, Newbergcame
lliafestival.com.

8 PORTLAND
46.7 MILES

Tuesday

6 ALBANY

2 SILVERTON

Theater

MAY 9
“Remember when Rock
was Young": Elton John
Tribute featuring Craig A.
Meyer, 7:30 p.m., Historic
Elsinore Theatre, 170 High
St. SE. $20 to $50. Tickets
west.com.

S

Ashland

1 SALEM

SALEM

Oregon Scottish Heritage
Festival: Pipe bands, dances
and Celtic music, plus a special focus of sharing stories of
Scottish heritage and educational and interactive booths
that tell the stories of clans
and information on the
achievements and contributions of Scottish people to
science, education and the
formation of our own country’s constitution, 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., Linn County Fair and
Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte
Road. $10; $8 students and
seniors; free ages 12 and
younger. (541) 979-0801,
Oregonscottishsociety.com.

7 NEWBERG
29.4 MILES

Saturday
Newberg Camellia Festival: Blooms, entertainment,

Boyz II Men: R&B group
performs with the Oregon
Symphony, 7:30 p.m., Arlene
Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037
SW Broadway Ave. $55 to
$120. Orsymphony.org.

84.1 MILES

Saturday
Marine Science Day: Hatfield Marine Science Center
will open its doors for a peek
at research, education and
outreach in marine sciences
that makes this marine laboratory unique, 10 a.m. to 4
p.m., 2030 SE Marine Science
Drive. Free. (541) 961-8113,
Hmsc.oregonstate.edu/
marinescienceday.

11 FLORENCE
127.7 MILES

Friday

Friday and Saturday

Chris Tomlin: Contemporary
Christian music artist, 7 p.m.,
Moda Center, One Center
Court. $25 and $35.
Ticketmaster.com.

Jefferson Starship: Psychedelic rock, 8 p.m. Friday and 7
p.m. Saturday, Three Rivers
Casino, 5647 Highway 126.
$19.99 to $24.99.
Threeriverscasino.com.

9 HILLSBORO

12 BEND

51.2 MILES

131.4 MILES

Friday-Sunday
Hillsboro Gem Faire: Fine
jewelry, precious and semiprecious gemstones, millions
of beads, crystals, gold and
silver, minerals and more,
noon to 6 p.m. Friday, 10 a.m.
to 6 p.m. Saturday and 10
a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Washington County Fairgrounds,
873 NE 34th Ave. $7 weekend
pass. (503) 252-8300,
Gemfaire.com.

UPCOMING THEATER
AT WILLAMETTE
UNIVERSITY

Friday-Sunday
Northwest Crossing Bend
Spring Festival: Live music,
fine artists promenade, street
chalk art competition, conscious living showcase, activities, 5 to 11 p.m. Friday, 11
a.m. to 11 p.m. Saturday and
11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday, Mt.
Washington Drive at Northwest Crossing Drive. Free.
C3events.com.

in the theater department, is
like choosing your favorite
parent ... I am so grateful to
them for their continued support ... My theater professors
taught me how to fight for the
theater industry and to look for
work that is challenging and
dangerous.”
Falcone: “Associate professor Rachel Kinsman Steck
(current academic co-chair)
taught me loads about lighting
and set construction and gave
me such an appreciation for
the behind-the-scenes aspect
of theater. She inspired me to
follow the career path I have
chosen.”

What: “The Country Wife” directed
by Jonathan Cole
Where: Willamette University, M.
Lee Pelton Theatre, 289 12th St. SE
When: April 1--May 2
Tickets and information: (503)
370-6221

ONLINE
For full interviews and more
photos, find this story
at StatesmanJournal.com/life.
TOM FALCONE / SPECIAL TO THE STATESMAN JOURNAL

ing about the play. And then
the adrenaline would come.
When I’m waiting in a little
trailer on a film set, I still think
about the excitement and focus
that I could find beneath those
trees.
Sweeney: “In my senior
year, my dear friend Becca
Wirta, who is also a Willamette
Theatre graduate, and I directed and produced an outdoor
production of “A Midsummer

10 NEWPORT

Willamette University graduate Tess Falcone adjusts lighting equipment.
She is a freelance entertainment lighting designer based in Denver.

Night’s Dream.” The show had
the actors running all over
campus with the audience
following the story from place
to place. It was a total labor of
love ... It really felt like we had
built a community around the
show, which, for me, is the

more rewarding part of making theater.”

Who was your favorite
professor?
Quigley: “Choosing my
favorite professor, especially

Is there anything I didn’t
ask about that you think
readers need to know?
Quigley: “Support Willamette Theatre; they do incredibly high-quality, relevant and
honest work.”
TRastrelli@Statesman
Journal.com, (503) 983-6030,
facebook.com/RastrelliSJ and on
Twitter @RastrelliSJ

6E

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Chocolate
Bunny Forest

Easter Egg Orchard
Be careful. Don’t break the eggs. Wait one
turn here in the orchard, but don’t say a
word! Be absolutely silent and you start at
square 11, otherwise start at square 1.

R ou

tim

2

Tell everyone and
move one space
forward.

1

Help the Easter Bunny deliver
all of his goodies! Make your way
around the game board.

start

How many Chocolate Bunnies
are made each year?
A. 28,000 B. 90 million
C. 5 million D. 850,000

finish

Move one more space forward
for a right answer

Ro

Sta u nd
n
cir d
cl

28

rner

Stan nd t
d
h
circ up,
le 3

e c pi n i s
e
s

29 Trivia

Egg drop

What’s your
favorite candy?

e c o in a
th spin es
,
up 8 tim
e

er
or n n a

The Chocolate Bunnies are hopping
with glee because Easter is here. You
should hop too. If you can hop the
entire time that the other players take
their turns, you can hop to square 27

HOW TO PLAY

3

88%!

Percentage of U.S.
parents that will
decorate and hide
Easter baskets for
their kids.

1. Use your favorite Easter egg as
your game piece.
2. Each player rolls the jelly beans.
You will need one black, red, yellow,
green and blue or purple jelly bean.
Place the jelly beans in a cup and
shake them. Each player closes his
or her eyes and reaches into the
cup and pulls out one jelly bean.

Blue jelly bean = move 1 square
forward
Red jelly bean = move 2 squares
forward
Black jelly bean = move 3 squares
forward
Yellow jelly bean = move 0 squares
Green jelly bean = move 1 square
back

3. The object is to move around the
board. The first player to reach the
end wins.
TRIVIA ANSWERS
Hold this up to a mirror to find the
answers to the trivia questions on
the page.
B :92 A:22 C :41 euS retsiS :9 ymmoT :4

4 Trivia

RULES
1. Start with the youngest player
2. If you land on a space that
already has an Easter egg – you can
move that player’s Easter egg one
square back.
But first you must hop like a bunny.
3. Have fun!

27

Oh, No!

You lost your eggs
in the flood.
Go back to the
Easter Egg Orchard.

Chocolate River

In the song, “Here
Comes Peter
Cottontail,” he’s got
jelly beans for who?
Move one more space
forward for a right
answer

Each player who passes must make believe paddle’as the other players take their turns.

COLOR YOUR OWN BUNNY!

26
The Chocolate
River is flooding.
Wait 1 turn.

5
Do your best
impression of
the Easter
Bunny!

25

The chicks
still need
help!

6

Visit the
Marshmallow
Chick Hatchery.

You broke
an egg!

24

Take a trip to the
Easter Egg Orchard
to get more.

Bonnet Time!
Take a page from the
newspaper and
make yourself an
Easter Bonnet.

7
Chocolate
eggs were first
made for Easter
in Europe in the
1800s in
Germany.

23
1878!
The first year of
the White House
Easter Egg Roll.

8
The chicks
need help!

22Trivia

Visit the
Marshmallow
Chick Hatchery.

Who makes
Cream Eggs?
A. Cadbury
B. Cabbury
C. Creamery

9

Move one more space
forward for a right
answer

21

Hold your egg in a
teaspoon and walk
around the board
three times in 10
seconds. If you break
your egg, go to the
Easter Egg Orchard.

101861!

a
o
e c pi n i n s

R ou

Stan nd t
d
h
circ up,
le 6

s me
ti

17

rn e

r

er
ornin a
c
e n

i
sp mes
ti

Move one more space forward
for a right answer

a
o
e c n in
i
sp mes
ti

14

15

R ou

Trivia

How many ‘Peeps’ do
Americans buy during Easter?
A. 2000 B. 3 billion
C. 700 million

Take five chocolate
bars and build a
house. If it stands for
1 minute, visit the
Chocolate Bunny
Forest.

Stan nd t
d
h
circ up,
le 5

13

Marshmallow
Chick
Hatchery

19 Oh, No!
You lost your eggs in
the swamp. Go back to
the Easter Egg Orchard

EASTER WORD SEARCH

16
Bunny house!

12

Hold your egg in a
teaspoon and walk
around the board
three times in 10
seconds. If you break
your egg, go to the
Easter Egg Orchard.

You’re stuck in the
swamp, wait 1 turn

Each player who
passes must tiptoe
once around the
other players.

Can you find
these words?
EGG
DYE
LILY
CHICK
BUNNY
GRASS
CANDY
SPRING
BASKET
BONNET
FLOWER
CARROTS
GUMDROP
JELLYBEAN
CHOCOLATE
COTTONTAIL

ner

r
rn e

n

Oh, No!
You lost your eggs in
the swamp. Go back
to the Easter Egg
Orchard

You must lose a turn to care for the
chicks — squawk, flap your arms and
build a nest from your pillow. Go to
square 14 when you rejoin.

Marshmallow
Swamp

18

R ou

11

20

Like all chicks, marshmallow
chicks need care and tending.

Stan d t
h
circ d up
le 7 ,

William Schrafft,
creates the first jelly
beans in Boston. He
urges people to send
them to loved ones in
the Civil War.

or a
e c n in
i
sp mes
ti

Trivia

In the song, “Here
Comes Peter
Cottontail,” he’s got
colored eggs for
who?
Move one more space
forward for a right
answer

*THE WORDS ARE IN THE SEARCH AT LEAST 3 TIMES
SO MULTIPLE CHILDREN CAN SOLVE THE PUZZLE

F S C B U N N Y A A G UMD R O P
L PHCH I CKAG J E L L YB E
OROG BONNE T C AR RO T S
WI C CANDY E GRA S S A I D
E N O O S A G C H I C K F L OWE
RG L TKGAGDLUKE T J AY
B G A T E AWG R Y O A E C H O C
AUT O TDY E T AEKBA S KE
SME N S P R I NG S GU S L U I
K D L T A D Y E G A A S G UMD R
E R I AA L A E BUNC O T T ON
T O L I I BONNE T CHO C O L
A P Y L F L OWE R J E L L Y B E

C
A
C
A
R
R
O
T
S
O
T
A
A

ANDY C E C CA
NAB E OGHAB
J AUG T G I NU
NHNG T J CDN
C GNDO EKYN
KRYYNL I L Y
LA T E T L C S A
A S C BAYAP C
A S L O I BRRH
PA I NL E R I I
A I LN I AONC
T E Y E LNT GK
NAHT YB S AN

Stan nd t
d
h
circ up,
le 4

R ou

‘A.D. The Bible Continues’ goes beyond the resurrection
By Paul Schemm
Associated Press

The people are restive, the
priesthood is scheming and a
fanatic band of insurgents
known as the zealots are plotting assassinations — and now
to make matters worse, the
body of a condemned cultleader known as Jesus has
disappeared from the tomb.
Politics in Jerusalem 33
A.D. was just as complex and
dangerous as it is today and

NBC’s new series, “A.D. The
Bible Continues” fuses the
biblical epic with the current
rage for taut political dramas
— “House of Cards” in sandals.
The first of the 10 episodes
airs at 9 p.m. EDT Easter, picking up where its predecessor,
the wildly popular “The Bible”
series from the History Channel left off and going on to tell
the story of what happened to
Christ’s disciples after the
crucifixion.
It is choosing this time peri-

od that makes “A.D.” such a
departure from past Bible
stories, most of which end with
the resurrection.
Here, it is just a beginning,
with an anguished Mother
Mary (played by Greta Scacchi) watching her son die on
the cross while the terrified
apostles fear the rage of the
crowd and try to distance
themselves.
“The decade following the
crucifixion, from the perspective of the Apostles, it was the

best of times, it was the worst
of times,” creator Mark Burnett, whose credits include
“The Bible” and “Shark Tank,”
told The Associated Press
from his home in Malibu. “Every day, they thought they
could be killed.”
He and his co-producer and
wife, Roma Downey, actress
and former star of CBS’
“Touched By an Angel,”
touched a chord with the original Bible series that debuted in
2013 to 13 million viewers,

prompting NBC to pick up
their plans to craft a sequel for
network television.
This new series, however,
goes for a more gritty and
human approach that tries to
understand the characters as
humans caught up in the politics of the day.
“This is not Sunday school,”
said Downey. “This is Sunday
night drama.”
Entertainment writer David Bauder contributed to this report from Malibu, Calif.

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

7E

Faith
Local pastors reflect on meaning of Easter
Today is Easter. For the Christian
faithful, it is the most significant event
in the biblical record of their savior and
king, Jesus Christ, who rose from the
dead nearly 2,000 years ago.
Sunrise services are a staple of this
holy day, as the Bible records a group
of women finding the tomb empty just
after sunrise on that first Easter morning.
As 19th-century
hymn writer Robert Lowry put it in
the refrain of
“Christ Arose,”
which is sung
often today: “Up
from the grave he
Hank Arends arose; with a
M I D - VA L L E Y
mighty triumph
RELIGION
o’er his foes.”
With the resurrection event, Christian believers accept that Christ completed his earthly
journey and became the victor for all
who accept him, taking on the penalty
of their sin and even defeating death
with the promise of a new, heavenly
life.
The Rev. Bret Truax of Calvary Baptist Church in Salem described his collection of expensive plates received as
wedding gifts 33 years ago, which only
come out for special meals on Easter,
Christmas and Thanksgiving.
“That’s what Easter is all about —
God presenting humanity the best he
had to offer through his son,” the pastor
wrote in the church newsletter.
“As a result of the resurrection and
Jesus’ victory over sin and death, each
of us has the opportunity to experience
God’s forgiveness, his grace, the assurance of eternal life and the presence of
the Holy Spirit.
“So this Easter, as you’re enjoying a
delicious meal after church on your
nice dinnerware, pause for just a mo-

RELIGION
CALENDAR
TODAY
Easter sunrise service: Led by K.P.
and the Kings from Falls City, 6:30
a.m., Spring Valley Church at Zena,
Brush College and Zena roads NW.
(503) 364-8567.
Easter Sunday worship: Sunrise
services at 7 a.m. with traditional
alleluia services at 8 and 9:30 a.m.,
contemporary worship at 11 a.m.

ment to thank God that he chose not to
save the best for later, but instead sent
his son at just the right moment for all
of humanity,” Truax continued.
A trip to the Holy Land provided an
Easter reflection for the Rev. Steve
Knox of the Silverton First Christian
Church. He was sitting outside of the
Church of the Holy Sepulcher in Jerusalem while waiting for his group.
The location has been called the
“most sacred site on earth” for Christians as the location of Christ’s death
and resurrection. Knox watched as
visitors to the location climbed the hill
the church is built on and gazed at a
nearby empty tomb.
He was intrigued by the reverence
of the kisses and tears of the visitors at
the Stone of the Anointing, where tradition says Jesus’ body was prepared for
burial.
“It struck me as sweetly odd, and I
worried that this was some Christianized form of idolatry. As I kept watching the faces of the people who knelt
there, with such profound love and
tenderness, I found myself deeply
moved.
“More than the rock, their faces
caused me to remember Jesus and his
sacrificial love and my eternal debt of
gratitude,” the pastor concluded.
The impact of Christ’s time on earth
was considered by the Rev. Paul Materu, priest at St. Boniface Catholic
Church in Sublimity.
“The life and death of Christ have
not only benefited the human being’s
life on earth; it has impinged on the
conscience of humankind and has
changed the very purpose of human
existence,” he wrote on the parish website.
“It has changed the course of history. It has changed our relationship with
God and opened for us the gate of heaven,” Materu added.

The Rev. John Neal of John Knox
Presbyterian Church in Keizer declared, “Easter is a time of celebration.
Christ is risen. Death is conquered.”
Writing in the congregation’s online
newsletter, he added, “Let all the people
worship the Lord.”
He described how the solemn and
somber activities of Lent and Holy
Week give way to the festive activities
of Easter.
“It seems that almost every year I
am asked if it bothers me that some
people only come to church at Christmas and Easter. And I have to honestly
answer that just the opposite is true!
“If a person only comes at Christmas
and/or Easter, at least they are sensing
that these are important and wonderful
times that draw them.
“How will you celebrate Easter this
year? Reluctantly? Faithfully? Searching for answers? Thankful for what
God still does, especially through the
people of God? In the midst of the holy
celebration of Easter, God has a gift for
you,” the pastor said.
The Rev. Leah Stolte-Doerfler of
Immanuel Lutheran Church in Silverton considered a truck accident when
thinking about Easter.
She wrote in the church newsletter
about the truck driver going too fast for
a corner and ending up in a ditch. He
tried to fix the situation by rocking the
big truck back and forth. When that
didn’t work, he tried backing up as far
as he could so he could go forward to
“jump” out of the ditch.
Smashing into a culvert, he blew out
a tire, mangled the side of the truck,
likely cracked the axel and then finally
called for help.
The pastor wrote, “Seems another
telling story about people. Left to our
own devices, one sin will lead to another and another and another.
“Down, down, down we will sink,

until at last we realize that we really
cannot save ourselves. And then, finally
…maybe … we are willing to listen and
accept the salvation that has been
awaiting us.
“Easter morning we will find an
empty tomb because our God has been
willing to go to battle with sin, death
and the devil for us. Life abundant is all
prepared and waiting. The question is
how long will we keep banging around
in our ditches?” she asked.

Talk to address ‘How America
Became a Christian Nation’
An upcoming book by a Salem professor will be the background for the
next “Big Questions Over Lunch” gathering at Willamette University at 11:45
a.m. Tuesday, April 7.
Steve Green, professor of law and
director of the Center for Religion, Law
and Democracy, will speak on “How
America Became a Christian Nation —
From Myth to National Creed.”
The hour-long event will be in the
Alumni Lounge of Putnam University
Center. Participants are invited to bring
their lunch or arrive early to purchase
it in the Cat Cavern Café.
The program will draw from his
research for “Inventing a Christian
America: The Myth of the Religious
Founding,” which is to be published
soon.
This is the final installment of the
academic year for the discussion series
sponsored by the university’s chaplains’ office. Chaplains may be reached
at (503) 370-6213 or at
willamette.edu/dept/chaplain.
Hank Arends is a retired
religion/community events writer for the
Statesman Journal who writes a weekly
column on religion. He may be reached at
hankarends@msn.com or (503) 930-9653.

1661 Boone Road SE. Free. (503)
364-7088.

and Easter breakfast served from
7:30 to 11 a.m., Our Savior’s Lutheran
Church, 1770 Baxter Road SE. (503)
399-8601.

music performance at 11 a.m., Fellowship Missionary Baptist church,
4520 Fellowship Way NE. Free. (541)
270-9801, fellowshipsalem.org.

Easters presentation: True stories
of how Jesus is still bringing victory
in people’s lives today, 8:30 a.m. to 1
p.m., Peoples Church, 4500 Lancaster
Drive NE. Free. (503) 304-4000,
peopleschurch.com.

RISE Easter celebration: Egg hunt,
bouncy castle, puppet shows, live
music and more for ages 3 to 11, plus
message and baptisms, 8:30 a.m.,
10:30 a.m. and 1 p.m., Fellowship
Church, 4059 Market St. NE. Free.
(503) 383-1090, fellowshipsalem.com.

Outdoor praise service: Outdoor
praise service in the amphitheater
followed by a family-style breakfast,
9 a.m., and Easter worship service,
10:45 a.m., The Salvation Army Ray
& Joan Kroc Corps Community
Center amphitheater, 1865 Bill Frey
Drive NE. (503) 566-5762, kroc.
salvationarmysalem.org.

Easter breakfast: 9 to 10:30 a.m.,
South Salem Church of the Nazarene,

Easter Sunday worship: Easter
worship service with Holy Commu-

Free Easter breakfast: Breakfast,
8:30 a.m. to 9:45 a.m., kids choir at 10
a.m., kids crafts at 10:15 a.m. and kids

nion, 9:15 to 10:30 a.m., Peace Lutheran Church, 1525 Glen Creek
Road NW. (503) 362-8500.
Downtown Easter service: Music
and a message for all ages followed
by a giant balloon egg hunt for ages
10 and younger, 10 to 11:30 a.m.,
Connection Life Church, 210 Liberty
St. SE. (971) 239-5541, CLCSalem.org.
Easter celebration: 10:45 a.m. to
noon, South Salem Church of the
Nazarene, 1661 Boone Road SE.
(503) 364-7088.

SUNDAY EVENING APRIL 5, 2015

7:00

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Monopoly Millionaires’ Club ’ Å

KGW News at 10 How I Met Your
on Portland
Mother ’ Å
The Listener “Amuse Bouch” A cooking
show contestant is poisoned. ’
Battle Creek “Cereal Killer” An assassination attempt. (N) ’ Å

The Listener “Man in the Mirror” Toby
faces a mentally unstable suspect. ’
60 Minutes Jeh Johnson; Gerry Adams;
Jimmy Wales. (N) ’ Å

Two and a Half
Two and a Half
Men ’ Å
Men ’ Å
The Listener “White Whale” A mayoral
candidate is questioned. ’
Madam Secretary “Spartan Figures”
Henry considers a job offer. (N) ’ Å

Two and a Half
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Men ’ Å
Men ’ Å
The Listener “The Fugitive” The team
must find a treasure. Å (DVS)
The Good Wife “Loser Edit” Leaked
emails result in questions. (N) ’ Å

Dateline NBC “Hope & Heartbreak” A
investigation into private adoption. (N)
’Å

Dateline NBC “Bible Stories: The New
Blockbuster” Mark Burnett and Roma
Downey. (N) ’ Å

A.D. The Bible Continues “The Tomb Is American Odyssey “Gone Elvis” (Series KGW News at
Open” (Series Premiere) Calaphas and Premiere) Files point to funding of terror- 11 (N)
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KOIN 6 News at 11 (:35) Game On!
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(12:05) Raw Travel
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Alaskan Bush People The Browns set Alaskan Bush People “Birdy Get Your Alaskan Bush People: Revisited “Episode 3” (N) ’ Å
Gun” The family searches for food. ’
Salem City Council

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11:30

(:42) KATU News at 11 (N) ’ Å

Antiques Roadshow “Birmingham”
Call the Midwife Barbara treats a first- (:05) Masterpiece Classic “Mr.
Wolf Hall on Masterpiece (Series Pre- (:07) Secrets of Henry VIII’s Palace
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Family Guy Meg The Last Man on Earth “Sweet Melissa; 10 O’Clock News (N)
Oregon Sports
Everybody Loves Raising Hope
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to Earth” ’
ball camp. ’
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model. ’
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Glee “Born This Way” Glee club learns The Good Wife “Bitcoin for Dummies” A The Good Wife “Another Ham SandOregon Sports
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Graham Bensinger Show ’ Å
Theory “The Bene- Theory ’ Å
about self-acceptance. ’ Å
lawyer conceals a client’s identity. ’ Å wich” Wendy Scott-Carr tries to put Will Final
factor Factor” ’
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’Å
››› “The Passion of the Christ” (’04, Drama) Jim Caviezel, Monica Bellucci, Claudia Gerini. Jesus Changed Lives: Miracles of the Pas- “The Final Inquiry” (’07, Drama) Daniele Liotti, Dolph Lundgren, Mónica Cruz. A
endures the agony of his final 12 hours.
sion “The Passion of the Christ.” ’
Roman warrior has a forbidden romance in Jerusalem.
›› “Mr. Moto’s Last Warning” (’39, Mystery) Peter Lorre, Ricardo Cortez,
›› “The Big Trees” (’52, Western) Kirk Douglas, Eve Miller, Patrice Wymore.
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Virginia Field. Conspirators plot to blow up the Suez Canal.
Homesteaders protect their timber from a greedy land baron.
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Music Videos.
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11:00

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To God Be the Glory
Mercy Meeting
Community Bulletin Board
The Habitable
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TBD
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GOLF A Bradley are expected to compete.
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Boxing Golden Boy Live: Rocky Juarez vs. Robinson CastelROOT B Scramble - Part 1.
Scramble - Part 2. (Taped)
lanos. From San Antonio.
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ESPN C Tournament -- Huskies vs. Terrapins
(5:00) MLB Baseball St. Louis Cardinals The Grantland Basketball Hour
ESPN FC Highlights, news, reactions
NBA Basketball Houston Rockets at Oklahoma City Thunder. From Chesapeake SportsCenter
ESPN2 D at Chicago Cubs. (N) (Live)
and opinions from the day in soccer.
Energy Arena in Oklahoma City. (N Same-day Tape) Å
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Story of Samaritan
woman shows
God’s covering
I am almost positive everyone has, at one time or
another, heard a lesson or a sermon about the Samaritan women at the well that Yahshua stopped and
talked to. I have heard this story over and over again
since I was a child. But when I
looked at it recently, I began to
see some things I hadn’t seen
before, and it really made me dig
deeper to see what was really
being discussed there.
First of all, most often this
women is called a prostitute.
Rick Chesher Now at this point, we really need
CORNERSTONE
to stop and think! Yahshua said
BA P T I S T C H U RC H
that she had been married five
times, and the one she was living
with now wasn’t her husband. But prostitutes don’t
get married, and they really don’t live with the men.
Now I understand she doesn’t have a good track record, but this really doesn’t describe a prostitute.
You see, in her day, it was pretty hard to get by
without a man, so it is likely that she had been married to these men as a covering for her and these men
had found some kind of problem with her and divorced her. Maybe she couldn’t have children.
Now let’s look at this in another way. Yahshua asks
her for a drink, and she is astonished that a Jew would
talk to a Samaritan women.
Yahshua says something profound. He says if you
knew the gift of God and who was asking you, you
would ask him and he would give you living water.
The Greek word for gift is dorea and means gift, but
dorea comes from the root word doron, which means
sacrifice. So really, what Yahshua was offering her
was a sacrifice that would give her living water and
provide the covering for her that she had been trying
to do for herself all of this time.
This is exactly what took place over 2000 years ago
just about this time of year. Yahshua was crucified on
the execution stake, or cross as you my know better.
The Lamb of Yahweh, or the Passover Lamb that
would not only deliver us from our enemy and wash
us clean from our sins but would also provide the
covering that we so desperately need, would also
cause living waters to flow from within us.
For me, this changes the story because we can see
this happening from the beginning when Adam and
Eve fall. Once they committed the sin, they were
naked or uncovered, and it was Yahweh who provided
the covering for them. This women was trying to do
for herself what could only be done through Yahshua.
Remember, Adam and Eve tried fig leaves; she was
trying men and marriage. This message is really
about all of us because we all try and cover or meet
our needs ourselves, when in reality we cannot provide the covering we need, but Yahshua is right there
and is offering us himself as the sacrifice that is the
real covering.
The Rev. Dr. Rick Chesher is pastor of Cornerstone Baptist
Church. Reach him at pastor@cornerstonebaptist.net.

8E

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Arts
Salem Chamber Orchestra
closes season with cellist
By Tom Mayhall Rastrelli
Statesman Journal

Salem Chamber Orchestra,
under the direction of Nikolas
Caoile, will welcome Ashia &
the Bison Rouge, a five-piece
chamber ensemble led by singer, songwriter and cellist Ashia, for the final concert of its
30th season at 3 p.m.April 12 at
Rodgers Music Center in Hudson Hall at Willamette University, 900 State St.
The concert features songs
that Ashia composed and arranged for Salem Chamber
Orchestra. The program will
also feature one of Brazilian
composer Ginastera’s most
revered works, “Variaciones
Concertantes.”
Late Night with SCO, the
orchestra’s new mini-concert
series that brings chamber
music into local restaurants,
will feature Ashia & the Bison

Rouge at 6 and 8 p.m. Saturday,
April 11, at Christo’s Pizzeria,
Restaurant & Lounge, 1108
Broadway St. NE. Late Night
features a cabaretlike setting
in which patrons eat, drink and
engage in quiet conversation
while watching the performance. Those wishing to order
dinner should arrive 30 minutes early.
Ashia was born in Poland
and raised in the United States.
Her music reflects the combination of her Slavic roots and
the pop, rock, classical and
indie-folk American genres.
She said the themes of ancestry
and love pervade her music.
“Throughout the set, the
listener will be exploring their
own ancestry, learning to love
and finding home in lush orchestral sounds,” Ashia said.
As usual, the orchestra will
host a series of additional concert-related events in Hudson

Hall. The open dress rehearsal
will be at 10 a.m. Saturday,
April 11. Guests will sit on
stage with the musicians to
learn how an orchestra prepares and have permission to
take photos and ask questions.
Willamette Valley Music Co.
will present an “instrumental
petting zoo” at 9:30 a.m. where
attendees will learn to play
different instruments. Tickets
are available at the door, $5 for
adults and free for children,
students with ID and Oregon
Trail Card holders.
The “Sound Bites” luncheon
will follow at 12:30 p.m. This
casual backstage lunch includes a discussion with conductor Nikolas Caoile. Tickets
are $10, which includes admission to the dress rehearsal and
must be purchased by noon
Thursday, April 9.
“Nik’s Notes,” an informal,
pre-concert talk with the con-

COURTESY OF SALEM CHAMBER ORCHESTRA AND CEZAR MART PHOTOGRAPHY

Ashia & the Bison Rouge is a five-piece chamber ensemble led by singer,
songwriter and cellist Ashia. They will perform with Salem Chamber
Orchestra April 11-12.

ductor, begins at 2 p.m.April
12. Admission is free with a
concert ticket.
Admission is $20 to $45 for
adults and $10 to $23 for students. A limited number of $5
tickets are available for Oregon Trail Card holders as part
of salemforall.org. Tickets are
available at Travel Salem, 181

High St. NE, by calling (503)
581-4325, or at
salemchamberorchestra.org.
For information, call (503)
480-1128.
TRastrelli@StatesmanJournal.
com, (503) 983-6030, facebook.
com/RastrelliSJ and on Twitter
@RastrelliSJ

THIS WEEK
IN THE ARTS
SE. Free. (503) 302-4645,
facebook.com/theartstudio
satmissionmill.

GENE PERSEY JR. / SPECIAL TO THE STATESMAN JOURNAL

Shannon Copeland (from left), Norman Gouveia and
Candace Pressnall star in Brush Creek Playhouse’s
comedy “A Bench in the Sun,” opening April 10.

Hot Pick: Brush Creek comedy takes
look at pair in retirement home
Brush Creek Playhouse
will open “A Bench in the
Sun,” a comedy by Ron
Clark, on Friday at 11535
Silverton Road, Silverton.
The play centers on two
lifelong and elderly
friends who spend their
days bickering and reminiscing. One wears pajamas all day so as not to
interrupt his frequent
naps. The other is an
eternal optimist, despite
his three failed marriages,
five failed businesses and
failed relationships with
his children. Their lives
are rocked when they
both fall for a famous
movie star who moves
into the retirement
home.
Director Sonja Persey, a
veteran of Aumsville
Community Theatre, is
excited to be involved in

TUESDAY
Middle School Band and
Orchestra Festival: Festival
for regional middle school
performing groups, with each
group performing on stage
and receiving feedback from
guest adjudicators, all day,
Corban University, Psalm
Performing Arts Center, 5000
Deer Park Drive SE. (503)
375-7019.
Art Conservation Demonstration: Museum visitors
have a rare opportunity to
observe and talk with art
conservator Tom Fuller as he
works with objects from the
Native American collection,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Hallie Ford
Museum of Art, Maribeth
Collins Lobby, 700 State St.
Free. (503) 370-6855, willametted.edu.

her first Brush Creek production.
“It’s very cool to see two
little community theaters
coming together to work
and share resources,”
Persey said. “I never felt
that community theater
stands on its own but
should rather share resources, ideas and, yes,
actors and wisdom.”
Performances will be at 7
p.m. Friday-Saturday and
April 17-18 and 24-25, plus
2 p.m. April 12, 19 and 26.
Tickets are $10 or $8 children, seniors and students
with ID. They can be purchased in advance in Salem
at Runaway Art & Craft
Studio, 311 Commercial St.
NE, and in Silverton at
Books-N-Time, 210 N Water St. For information, call
(503) 508-3682 or go to
brushcreekplayhouse.com.

Curator’s talk: Ross Sutherland, Bush House Museum
director and permanent
collection curator, will give a
brief talk about the current
show, “Faces of Art: Realism
to Abstraction,” on display in
the Focus Gallery, 11 a.m. to
noon, Bush Barn Art Center,
600 Mission St. SE. Free. (503)
581-2228, salemart.org.
Tuesday gallery talk: Join
docent Sandy Resis at the
Hallie Ford Museum of Art
for a guided tour that explores ancient Greek and
Roman art, 12:30 p.m., Hallie
Ford Museum of Art, 700
State St. Free. (503) 370-6855,
willamette.edu.
The Drunken Paintbrush —
Sip and Paint: Instructors
will walk you through a
painting step-by-step, 6:30 to

OREGON SYMPHONY
ASSOCIATION IN SALEM

Renowned pianist
Jean-Philippe Collard
will perform April 10.

Hot Pick:
Oregon
Symphony
welcomes
renowned
French pianist
The Oregon Symphony, under the direction
of Carlos Kalmar, will
welcome renowned
pianist Jean-Philippe
Collard for a performance of Bartók’s
“Piano Concerto No.
3” at 8 p.m., Friday at
Smith Auditorium,
Willamette University,
270 Winter St. SE.
The concert also will
feature Sibelius’ “Tapiola” and a rare
complete performance
of Dvořák’s “Slavonic
Dances,” the highspirited compositions
that launched his
career.
For prices and to purchase tickets, go to
orsymphonysalem.org
or call (503) 364-0149.

9 p.m., Union Barrel, 136 High
St. SE. $30. (503) 551-3558,
thedrunkenpaintbrush.com.

THURSDAY
“Art After Dark”: Compass
Gallery will host a reception
for its April exhibition, “Celebrating Nature: Oil Paintings
by Molly Reeves,” and Salem’s newest gallery, the
Willamette Trading Company, will host a reception for
“Leather and Dust: Western
Photography by Doug Landreth,” plus activities also will
include an art demonstration
with Dayna Collins and leather bookbinding with Max
Marbles, 5 to 7 p.m., Willamette Heritage Center, Wool
Warehouse, 1313 Mill Street

“Mind the Gap: Landscape
Works by Eric Loftin”: Eric
Loftin is a mixed-media,
cross-disciplinary artist focused on breaking down the
border between drawing and
painting, April 9-30 by appointment, and reception 5
to 7 p.m. April 9, Mameres B
and B, ACAC Gallery, 212
Knox St N, Monmouth. Free.
(503) 838-1811, Ext. 204,
ashcreekarts.org.
The Drunken Paintbrush —
Sip and Paint Class: Instructors will walk you
through a painting step-bystep, 6 to 8:30 p.m., The
Drunken Cook, 1555 12th St.
SE. $35. (503) 551-3558,
thedrunkenpaintbrush.com.

FRIDAY
Jazz Band Concert: Celebrate the tradition of the jazz
suite featuring a variety of
pieces by notable composers
with guest artist Emily Stanek
performing Claude Bolling’s
“Suite for Jazz Flute,” 7:30
p.m., Corban University, 5000
Deer Park Drive SE. Free.
(503) 375-7019, corban.edu.

FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Upcycle Oregon: Upcycled
artwork by Oregon artists
highlighting re-use, reduction
and upcycling efforts statewide, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Friday
and noon to 4 p.m. Saturday,
plus artist reception 4 to 5
p.m. Friday and an “Upcycled
Fashion” show Saturday,
Oregon State Capitol, Galleria, 900 Court St. NE. Free.
(971) 208-5869,
upcycleoregon.org.

stration: Museum visitors
have a rare opportunity to
observe and talk with art
conservator Tom Fuller as he
works with objects from the
Native American collection,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Hallie Ford
Museum of Art, Maribeth
Collins Lobby, 700 State St.
$6; $4 ages 55 and older; $3
students ages 18 and older;
free ages 17 and younger.
(503) 370-6855,
willamette.edu.
Ice cream social: Current
and prospective volunteers
are encouraged to celebrate
each other and their efforts, 1
to 3 p.m., Bush Barn Art
Center, 600 Mission St. SE.
Free. (503) 581-2228,
salemart.org.
Organ recital: Organist and
composer Christopher Wicks
will present an hour-long
cycle of twelve “praeludia,”
which he has composed, on
the Bond pipe organ, 3 to 4
p.m., Presbyterian Church
First, 950 N Boones Ferry
Road, Woodburn. Free.
Donations accepted. (503)
873-3461.
The Drunken Paintbrush —
Sip and Paint Class: Instructors will walk you
through a painting step-bystep, 4 to 6:30 p.m., The
Drunken Cook, The Drunken
Cook, 1555 12th St. SE. $35.
(503) 551-3558,
thedrunkenpaintbrush.com.
Jose James and The American Metropole Orchestra:
7:30 to 9:30 p.m., Western
Oregon University, Rice Auditorium, 345 Monmouth Ave.
N, Monmouth. $25 advance;
$28 at door. (503) 838-8333,
wou.edu/sfa.

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Oregon Scottish Heritage
Festival: Pipe bands, dances
and Celtic music, plus a special focus of sharing stories of
Scottish heritage, with educational and interactive booths
that tell the stories of clans,
accounts of immigration to
America, information on the
achievements and contributions of Scottish people to
science, education, and the
formation of our own country’s constitution, 9 a.m. to 5
p.m., Linn County Fair and
Expo Center, 3700 Knox Butte
Road, Albany. $10; $8 students and seniors; free ages
12 and younger. (541) 9790801,
oregonscottishsociety.com.

Willamette Valley Jazz

Society: Live Dixieland and
traditional jazz, 12:30 to 5
p.m., Salem Eagles, 2771
Pence Loop SE. $8 guest, $6
society member and free first
time; memberships may be
bought at the door. (503)
363-5780.
Organ recital: Christopher
Wicks, organist and composer, plays an hour-long cycle of
twelve praeludia, which he
has composed, one on each
tone of the chromatic scale, 3
to 4 p.m., Trinity Lutheran
Church, 500 N Second St.,
Silverton. Free-will offering.
(503) 873-3461.
Junior recital: Haley
Wangberg, on piano, will
perform works by Bach,
Mozart, Brahms, Debussy and
Dohnanyi, 7:30 p.m., Corban
University, Psalm Performing
Arts Center, 5000 Deer Park
Drive SE. Free. (503) 3757019, corban.edu.

ART EXHIBITS
Bush Barn Art Center:
“Young Artists’ Showcase,”
through April 25; “Faces of
Art: Realism to Abstraction,”
through April 25; Featured
Artist: Rebekah Rigsby,
through April 25; and new
items that are available at
many price points through
Aug. 31, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Tuesdays-Fridays and noon to
5 p.m. Saturdays-Sundays,
600 Mission St. SE. Free. (503)
581-2228, Ext. 302,
salemart.org.
Capitol Galleria: “Combined Visions: Collaborative
Works by Oregon Artists &
Poets,” 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April
13-17, plus reception, 4 to 6
p.m. April 13, Oregon State
Capitol, 900 Court St. NE.
(503) 859-3045.

CELEBRATIONS
RECOGNIZING THE SPECIAL
OCCASIONS OF YOUR LIFE

To include your celebration,
call 503-399-6789 or visit:
www.STATESMANJOURNAL.com
/MILESTONES

Art Conservation Demon-

Claud and Margie
Mattox
Claud and Margie were married
on April 3, 1955 in Vancouver,
Washington at the home of friends.
They made their first home together in
Fort Worth, Texas where Claud was
stationed in the U.S. Air Force. After
his discharge, the couple lived in Florida
and Washington before making their
home in Oregon.
They have two children, three
grandchildren, and two greatgrandchildren. A family dinner was
held in their honor to commemorate
their 60th wedding anniversary.

290 Commercial St NE, Salem
503-589-9794
www.footwearexpress.com
OR-0000361047

Anniversary

3.26
- 71st Anniversary Marlin & Arlene Hammond
celebrated 71 years of marriage
and Arlene’s 91st birthday on
March 26, 2015. They were
married at the courthouse before
Marlin entered the Navy in 1944.
Arlene says Marlin is her most
durable birthday present! Their
children are Ronda (Mike)
Divers-Moody, JoAnne (Chuck)
Krause, Karen (Paul) Kirsch, and
Dean (Sue) Hammond. They
have 15 grandchildren and 14
great-grandchildren with 2 more
on the way! Thanks, Mom &
Dad, for being such a great
example to all of us. Happy
Anniversary & Happy Birthday!

F

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

InsideBusiness

ONLINE
StatesmanJournal.com/insidebiz

STATESMAN JOURNAL
MEDIA CLASSIFIEDS

INSIDE

STARTING ON XX

Comings and goings in
commercial real estate
Report lists ’14
Salem changes
By Laura Fosmire
Statesman Journal

Thanks to the ongoing economic
recovery, industrial and retail activity in the Salem area was on the rise in
2014.
Sperry Van Ness Commercial Advisors, a Salem company that provides commercial real estate brokerage, produces an annual publication
called The Advisor, which details various industrial, retail and commercial
transactions that have occurred in the
market.
The report also includes forecasts
from the team for what 2015 may
bring, providing a comprehensive
overview of the comings-and-goings
among business and industry in the
Salem area.

Downtown Salem is buzzing
Jennifer Martin, who works on retail and investment properties for
Sperry Van Ness, credits the recent
renovation of the McGilchrist & Roth
Buildings with creating “a catalytic
buzz in downtown — one that has been
needed for a long time.
“The apartments at Pringle Square
South and the additional 250 people it
will bring who are residing on the
fringe will definitely alter the face of
downtown,” she added in the report.

Grocery store changes in
South Salem
The site of the former Safeway in
South Salem, located at 3285 Commercial St. SE, has officially been sold.
The buyer, Martin confirms, is Wilco.
“We all hope that Wilco will begin
their remodel of that property soon to
add to the renewed vibrancy of the
Vista area of Commercial Street SE,”
she said in the report.

Vacancies linger on Lancaster
Drive
Proximity to the Lancaster Mall
and affordable leasing rates don’t
seem to be doing much for the vacant
spots at Academy Square, located
near the intersection of D Street and
Lancaster Drive NE.
According to Martin, the location

ANNA REED / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Jemima Onio boxes bags of chips at Kettle Foods in Salem. Diamond Foods Inc., the company that owns Kettle Brand chips, is leasing
warehouse space in the former Seneca Cannery building at 1745 Oxford St. SE.

should be generating more activity
than it has been for the past three
years.

Demand on the rise for
farmland
With ongoing drought in California, farmland in the Willamette Valley
is experiencing an increase in demand. But locals may not be so keen to
give it up to outsiders.
“The one limiting factor ... is the
lack of available farm land coming to
the market,” said George Grabenhorst, a Sperry Van Ness adviser specializing in agricultural and land
property. “The farm community is a
very close knit group and many farms
never come to the market, but are sold

THOMAS PATTERSON / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Renovations were completed in the fall of 2014 on the McGilchrist and Roth Buildings on
State and Liberty Streets in downtown Salem.

See REAL ESTATE, Page 3F

Follow these tips to stay ahead of your competitor
dictable.
6. A learning company is a growing
company. Every year work with every
employee on their personal learning
plan. What books should they read?
What seminars should they attend?
What organizations should they belong
to?
7. Spend some time every day in
isolation for the purpose of thinking.
This means you have to stop doing,
stop rescuing employees and stop
calling customers. Just think.
8. Stop telling and start asking. You
are paying people to think, so let them
use their brains allowing them to solve
problems. If they fail, you can help
them pick up the pieces.
9. The single most important success factor in life is who you hang

your own trade association Chamber of
Commerce. (Marcia’s
contribution: Here at
Chemeketa, we also
have Opportunity
Knocks, a peer adMarcia
visory board proBagnall
gram.)
4. Your database
CCC SMALL
BU S I N E S S
is a hard asset and
CENTER
should include every
customer’s name,
address, phone number, email address, web address and buying history.
5. Stay connected with customers
by combining direct mail, telephone,
email and social media to keep the
connections fascinating and unpre-

MID-VALLEY CITIES HOUSING REPORT

35.8%
$150k

$200k

Sublimity

$200k

35.2%

$150k

$100k

19.6%
$50k

SOURCES: Willamette Valley Multiple Listing Service, Zillow, RealtyTrac, Bank Rate Monitor, Freddie Mac

ONLINE To read news about local and regional businesses,
go to StatesmanJournal.com/market.
REACH US: Don Currie, Business Editor, (503) 399-6677; dcurrie@StatesmanJournal.com

19%

12.6%

37.1%
28.6%

United States average

3.93%

39.7%

Highland

$50k

6.8%

Average mortgage rates
The following are all rates
based on a fixed 30-year
mortgage.

Turner

Dallas
Woodburn
19.2%

$100k

Marcia Bagnall is Director of the
Chemeketa Small Business Development
Center and instructor of Small Business
Management Program. The Small-Business
Adviser column is produced by the center and
appears each Sunday. Questions can be
submitted to SBDC@chemeketa.edu. Visit the
SBDC at 626 High St. NE in downtown Salem
or call (503) 399-5088.

Regional West average

16.8%

3.70%
Oregon average

Southeast
Mill Creek

Stayton

Grant

Silverton

around with. To grow your business,
hang around business owners who
have grown a business bigger than
yours is today.
10. Say “no” to work that does not
fit your goals or talents. Use your gifts
whenever possible, and focus on
where you and your business are going (and not where someone else
needs you to go).

Movers and shakers by neighborhood
Average sales prices for the
Salem neighborhoods with
largest annual
30.9%
percentage change.

$250k

Northeast Salem

$250k

Movers and shakers by city
Median sales price for cities with
largest annual percentage change.

Southeast
Salem

as of February, 2015

Morningside

Valuable advice stands the test of
time. Here are some great tips from a
PBS Program called “Small Business
School” by Hattie Bryant. With her
permission, I will share it with you in
its entirety:
1. Stop trying so hard to sell and
start trying harder to serve. If you do
not have happy customers who come
back for more and refer you to new
business, your business is on the way
to the grave.
2. Fall in love with technology. If
you don’t, the competitor who does
will eat your lunch.
3. Peer-to-peer learning is the most
powerful. Meet regularly with business owners like yourself to learn how
they solve problems. This can be in a
“master mind” type group, through

3.93%
Salem average

3.69%
LAURA FOSMIRE / STATESMAN JOURNAL

INSIDE BUSINESS is a weekly feature of the Statesman Journal,
with essays by local business leaders as well as other business news.

2F

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Changing home equity into better retirement
Imagine you are in your
60s, looking over your shoulder for signs that your job
will soon disappear. Imagine
you don’t have a pension.
Imagine you don’t have much
money in your 401(k) plan.
Indeed, you may have next to
nothing. What you have is
your home, one you have
lived in for a long time — long
enough to have paid off the
mortgage.
For millions of people, this
situation requires no imagination. It is almost exactly what
they are facing. Is there a
way to turn an ugly situation
into something better and
more secure?
I believe there is. It involves re-imagining shelter. It
means using what you have to
transform your basic circumstances. Consider Bill and
Ann, a couple in this situation.
They own a home valued at
$208,000, the recent median
sales price for existing
homes. They own it free and
clear.
But they’re both 65 and
have just lost their jobs.
Worse, a previous period of
unemployment forced them

to draw
down most
of the money in their
401(k)
plans. Now,
their largScott Burns est reP E R S O NA L
source is
F I NA N C E
their Social
Security
checks. As average workers,
that’s $1,215 a month for each,
a total of $2,430 a month.
Now involuntarily retired,
the house they love has become a major cost burden.
Taxes, insurance, repairs,
services and utilities cost
them about $8,400 a year or
$700 a month. That leaves
them with $1,730 a month to
cover the cost of everything
else, including Medicare premiums.
What can they do?
Here’s the transformation.
They can sell their house and
move to a resident-owned
manufactured home community. Doing so will provide
them a two bedroom, two bath
home with about 1,000 to 1,200
square feet. It’s not a palace,
but palaces aren’t good de-

NASDAQ
NAME

WK
CLS

NAME

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

A-B-C
AcadiaPh
31.49
Accuray
9.74
Achillion
10.19
ActivsBliz
22.64
AdobeSy
75.68
AdventSoft 43.60
Akorn
47.24
Alexion
169.94
Alkermes
60.10
AllscriptH
11.77
AlteraCp lf 43.10
Amarin
2.36
Amazon
372.25
Ambarella u74.00
AmAirlines 49.18
ACapAgy
21.42
AmCapLtd 15.08
ARltCapPr
9.92
Amgen
155.88
AmkorTch
8.75
AnalogDev u62.24
AngiesList
5.95
ApolloEdu d18.44
ApolloInv
7.76
Apple Inc s 125.32
ApldMatl
22.27
Approach
7.33
ArenaPhm
4.46
AresCap
17.14
AriadP
8.18
ArmHld
48.84
ArrayBio
7.44
ArrowRsh
7.60
ArubaNet
24.48
AscenaRtl 14.26
Atmel
8.14
AuspexPh u100.55
Autodesk
59.82
AutoData
85.92
AvagoTch 125.02
AvisBudg
57.44
BGC Ptrs
u9.81
Baidu
208.51
BedBath
76.80
Biocryst
9.76
Biogen
412.44
BioMarin 120.38
BlackBerry
9.04
BloominBr 24.01
BreitBurn
5.78
Broadcom 42.23
BrcdeCm
11.92
CA Inc
31.93
CH Robins 71.34
CME Grp
92.91
Cadence
18.50
CdnSolar
33.89
CpstnTur h
.64
Carrizo
50.05

-.47
+.44
+.03
-.12
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-.47
-1.24
-10.65
-3.23
-.06
-1.29
-.05
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-3.49
-.16
+.14
+.02
-6.71
+.12
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-.39
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+.29
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-.21
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-17.43
-8.40
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-1.69
-1.75
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-.59
+.01
-.12

46.48
9.80
16.87
24.18
80.30
44.36
55.86
203.30
75.17
18.40
45.00
3.33
389.37
77.39
56.20
24.06
16.10
14.17
173.14
12.27
64.95
14.65
35.23
8.87
133.60
25.71
23.07
7.22
17.93
9.19
54.64
8.59
18.87
24.97
18.34
9.76
100.86
65.00
90.23
136.28
69.76
9.72
251.99
79.64
14.62
480.18
133.54
12.63
26.25
23.15
46.31
12.96
33.42
77.49
100.61
19.54
41.12
2.32
70.49

15.64
5.99
2.45
17.73
57.15
25.42
20.52
136.37
38.49
11.00
30.47
.78
284.00
21.60
28.10
20.74
13.59
7.38
108.20
5.77
42.57
4.36
18.30
6.80
73.05
18.27
4.28
3.26
14.63
4.90
37.75
2.98
4.95
15.65
10.50
6.32
14.75
44.76
64.37
57.27
45.94
6.40
140.66
54.96
7.29
272.02
55.04
7.01
15.01
4.55
28.86
7.95
25.25
51.10
66.44
13.63
18.68
.56
31.70

-0.8
+29.0
-16.8
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-8.2
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-4.5
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+9.8
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-3.0
+91.6
-0.4
+3.1
+24.3
-13.4
+7.2
-8.5
+0.8
-19.7
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+33.2
-17.7
-3.0
-17.4
-2.5
+0.7
+4.9
-4.7
+4.8
-2.5
+40.1
-13.4
+20.3

WK
NAME
CLS
Catamaran u59.26
Celgene s 114.31
Celladon
17.73
CelldexTh 26.43
CentAl
14.03
Cerner
72.77
CharterCm u189.58
Cisco
27.13
CitrixSys
62.18
CleanEngy 5.45
CognizTch 62.57
Comcast
57.94
Comc spcl 57.60
CommScpe 28.95
ConatusPh 6.13
Conns
30.84
Costco
151.63
Cree Inc
34.13
Ctrip.com
59.25
CyberArk n 53.81
CypSemi
13.86
CyrusOne 31.61
CytoriTher
1.16

WK
CHG
+10.94
-4.37
-3.36
-.74
-.13
-.51
+9.58
+.21
-1.43
+.18
-.43
+2.25
+2.19
-.04
-1.62
+1.05
+1.16
-.90
+.04
+1.58
-.50
-.03
-.03

52-WEEK
YTD
HIGH LOW %CHG
60.24 36.98 +14.5
129.06 66.85 +2.2
28.25
7.82
-9.2
32.82 10.76 +44.8
31.75 12.63 -42.5
74.83 48.39 +12.5
199.00 116.78 +13.8
30.31 22.30
-1.8
72.89 53.86
-2.5
11.79
3.99 +9.1
64.69 41.51 +18.8
60.70 47.74
-0.1
60.19 47.21 +0.1
32.00 19.68 +26.8
11.74
5.06 -12.4
51.99 14.02 +65.0
156.85 110.36 +7.0
58.98 27.25 +5.9
69.74 40.74 +30.2
70.48 22.12 +35.7
16.25
8.04
-2.9
32.86 19.52 +14.7
2.88
.36 +137.2

D-E-F
DirecTV
DiscCmA s
DiscCmC s
DishNetw h
DollarTree
DonlleyRR
DryShips
DyaxCp
E-Trade
eBay
ElectArts
Endo Intl
EndurIntl
EngyXXI
Ericsson
Esperion
Exelixis
Expedia
ExpScripts
Facebook
FairchldS
FairwayGp
Fastenal
FifthStFin
FifthThird
FinLine
FireEye
FstNiagara
FstSolar
FT DWF5
FiveBelow
Flextrn
Fortinet
FrontierCm
FuelCellE

86.37
32.15
30.65
70.96
81.12
19.32
.75
u27.05
u28.47
56.91
u57.65
90.42
19.71
3.95
12.56
99.79
2.66
u97.98
84.58
81.56
18.53
6.83
41.05
7.11
18.98
24.73
38.66
8.85
61.19
23.89
35.91
u12.52
34.39
7.32
1.27

+1.05 89.46
+.88 44.99
+.88 44.00
+.33 80.75
-.60 84.22
+.66 19.91
-.08
3.55
+10.51 26.11
+.62 28.67
-.72 60.93
-.59 60.21
+.38 93.03
+1.46 20.45
+.32 24.30
-.13 13.61
+9.14 118.95
+.12
4.55
+4.30 96.45
+2.20 88.83
-1.75 86.07
-.06 19.23
+.86
8.40
-.12 52.21
-.11 10.20
+.07 23.41
+1.11 31.90
-1.15 65.65
+.06
9.61
+1.58 74.18
-.14 24.86
+.67 47.89
+.14 12.78
-.19 35.69
...
8.46
+.03
2.84

73.54
28.72
27.66
55.45
49.69
14.32
.72
6.05
18.20
46.34
26.64
53.62
11.67
2.30
11.20
12.75
1.26
66.93
64.64
54.66
12.01
2.12
39.46
6.80
17.14
22.40
24.81
7.00
39.18
17.39
28.51
8.46
20.04
5.41
1.05

-0.4
-6.7
-9.1
-2.6
+15.3
+15.0
-29.2
+92.4
+17.4
+1.4
+22.6
+25.4
+6.9
+21.2
+3.8
+146.8
+84.7
+14.8
-0.1
+4.5
+9.8
+116.8
-13.7
-11.2
-6.8
+1.7
+22.4
+4.9
+37.2
+8.4
-12.0
+12.0
+12.2
+9.7
-17.5

NEW YORK STOCK EXCHANGE
NAME

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

A-B-C
AES Corp 12.84
AK Steel
4.45
AT&T Inc
33.13
AbbottLab 46.13
AbbVie
57.01
Actavis
298.37
AlcatelLuc
3.82
Alcoa
13.14
Alibaba n
82.28
AllyFin n
20.57
AlphaNRs
1.01
AlpAlerMLP 16.61
Altria
51.19
Ambev
6.04
AMovilL
21.40
AEagleOut u17.02
AmExp
79.70
AmIntlGrp 55.14
Anadarko
84.55
AnglogldA
9.42
Annaly
10.45
ArcelorMit
9.48
ArchDan
47.35
Autoliv
u119.05
Avon
7.97
Axalta n
27.93
BB&T Cp
38.96
BP PLC
39.65
BakrHu
63.76
BcoBrad s 9.87
BcoSantSA 7.64
BkofAm
15.54
BkNYMel
40.55
BarcGSOil 10.51
Barclay
15.20
B iPVixST d25.06
BarrickG
11.88
Baxter
68.00
BerkHa A 216500
BerkH B
143.56
BestBuy
38.22
Blackstone 38.77
BostonSci 17.72
BrMySq
63.23
C&J Engy 11.37
CBS B
61.16
CMS Eng
35.29
CNO Fincl 17.79
CSX
33.32
CVS Health 102.71
CabotO&G 30.76
CalifRes n
8.18
Calpine
22.75
CarMax
u74.73

+.36
-.04
+.38
-.65
-.64
-5.19
+.12
+.44
-2.30
+.01
+.03
+.13
+.85
+.38
+.90
+.33
+1.99
+1.11
+2.36
-.44
-.08
-.17
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+3.60
+.10
+.58
+.47
+.04
+.97
+1.01
+.17
+.23
+.80
+.26
+.47
-.68
+.59
-.55
-500
-.33
-.26
+.76
-.11
-1.66
-.55
-.05
+1.01
+.85
+.12
+.21
+2.10
+.63
+.96
+8.04

15.65 11.53
-6.8
11.37
3.62 -25.1
37.48 32.07
-1.4
47.88 36.65 +2.5
70.76 45.50 -12.9
317.72 184.71 +15.9
4.20
2.28 +7.6
17.75 12.34 -16.8
120.00 80.03 -20.8
25.30 18.63 -12.9
5.08
.78 -39.5
19.35 16.01
-5.2
56.70 37.13 +3.9
8.67
5.51
-2.1
26.95 19.08
-3.5
17.41 10.12 +22.6
96.24 77.12 -14.3
56.79 48.56
-1.6
113.51 71.00 +2.5
18.79
7.45 +8.3
11.95 10.29
-3.3
16.80
9.21 -14.1
53.91 41.63
-8.9
119.96 87.15 +12.2
15.80
7.10 -15.1
29.64 20.11 +7.3
40.95 34.50 +0.2
53.48 34.88 +4.0
75.64 47.51 +13.7
15.56
8.43 -11.4
10.75
6.61
-8.3
18.21 14.37 -13.1
41.79 32.66
25.96
9.24 -16.2
17.90 13.27 +1.3
46.35 24.50 -20.5
19.49 10.04 +10.5
77.31 65.95
-7.2
229374 181785
-4.2
152.94 121.10
-4.4
42.00 23.87
-1.9
39.62 26.56 +14.6
18.17 11.10 +33.7
69.20 46.30 +7.1
34.93
9.10 -13.9
65.24 48.83 +10.5
38.66 27.90 +1.6
19.00 14.89 +3.3
37.99 27.14
-8.0
105.46 72.37 +6.6
39.46 26.01 +3.9
9.71
3.75 +48.5
24.37 19.60 +2.8
69.60 42.54 +12.2

NAME

WK
CLS

Carnival
u47.97
Caterpillar 80.24
Cemex
9.73
Cemig pf
4.47
CenovusE 17.46
CenterPnt 20.72
CntryLink
35.43
ChesEng
14.59
Chevron 105.28
Chimera
3.14
Citigroup
51.86
CitizFin n
24.62
CliffsNRs
4.59
CobaltIEn
9.78
CocaCola 40.68
ConAgra u37.82
ConocoPhil 63.18
ContlRes s 46.04
Corning
22.32
CSVInvNG
7.11
CSVLgNGs d2.43
CSVLgCrde 2.45

+.85 48.08
+.57 111.46
+.26 13.81
+.50
9.02
+1.04 32.64
+.10 25.75
+1.33 45.67
+.56 31.49
+1.00 135.10
-.02
3.41
+.86 56.95
+.14 25.84
-.14 21.25
+.39 19.77
+.60 45.00
+1.06 37.46
+.25 87.09
+3.28 80.91
-.42 25.16
-.53
9.15
+.14 31.08
+.14 43.99

33.11 +5.8
78.19 -12.3
8.72
-4.5
3.51 -10.1
16.11 -15.3
20.23 -11.6
32.45 -10.5
13.38 -25.4
98.88
-6.2
3.02
-1.3
45.18
-4.2
21.35
-1.0
4.12 -35.7
7.40 +10.0
38.04
-3.6
28.60 +4.2
60.57
-8.5
30.06 +20.0
17.03
-2.7
2.50 -11.6
2.12 -38.9
1.79 -49.9

+.38
+1.58
-2.63
+.32
+.15
+3.40
+.02
+.17
-.42
-.54
-.82
+3.23
+1.63
+.52
+.57
+.97
+.48
-.26
+1.97
+3.00
+.48
+2.15
-.01
-2.34
-1.00
+.54
+.60
+.18
+.95
+.72
-.30

16.22
19.29
30.12
6.04
25.11
51.76
13.16
8.17
9.81
6.51
11.07
53.50
54.02
76.31
53.00
25.46
41.45
63.70
68.81
24.58
24.92
81.07
4.29
57.35
54.95
10.53
19.78
1.29
30.66
82.68
34.85

D-E-F
DDR Corp 18.85
DR Horton u29.01
DeltaAir
42.25
DenburyR
7.84
DBXEafeEq 30.28
DevonE
62.55
DrGMnBll rs 19.04
DxGldBull 10.55
DrxSCBear 10.03
DirGMBear 10.44
DirDGldBr 16.63
DrxSCBull 90.28
Discover
58.20
Disney
106.00
DollarGen 75.56
DEmmett u30.32
DowChm
48.24
DuPont
71.39
DukeEngy 76.97
Dynegy
31.29
EMC Cp
25.53
EOG Rescs 92.71
EldorGld g
4.85
EliLilly
71.24
EmersonEl 55.54
EnCana g 11.47
ENSCO
21.88
ExcoRes
1.94
Exelon
33.38
ExxonMbl 84.30
FMC Tech 37.15

20.41
28.77
51.06
18.59
31.36
80.63
360.00
53.22
19.59
41.83
51.50
93.37
66.75
108.94
76.28
30.53
54.97
80.65
89.97
36.57
30.92
118.89
8.60
77.46
69.94
24.83
55.89
6.60
38.93
104.76
63.92

+2.7
+14.7
-14.1
-3.6
+12.1
+2.2
-21.8
-5.5
-16.4
-33.5
-32.6
+11.6
-11.1
+12.5
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-3.4
-7.9
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-14.2
+0.7
-20.2
+3.3
-10.0
-17.3
-26.9
-10.6
-10.0
-8.8
-20.7

NORTHWEST STOCKS
NAME
AlaskaAir s
AllegTch
Amazon
AsburyA
Avista
Banner Cp
BarrettB
Boeing
CascdeBcp
ColBnkg
ColSprtw s
Con-Way
Costco
CraftBrew
Data IO

WK
CLS
63.07
30.57
372.25
u83.79
34.01
u45.72
41.98
149.28
4.88
29.08
u60.33
41.62
151.63
13.60
3.57

WK
CHG
-2.52
+.55
+1.69
+2.25
+.74
+.83
-.18
+.43
+.05
+.59
-.59
-2.04
+1.16
-.05
-.13

52-WEEK
YTD
HIGH LOW %CHG
71.40 40.69 +5.5
46.32 27.12 -12.1
389.37 284.00 +19.9
83.62 52.88 +10.4
38.34 29.91
-3.8
46.26 37.03 +6.3
63.45 18.25 +53.2
158.83 116.32 +14.8
5.73
4.11
-6.0
29.48 23.59 +5.3
62.19 34.25 +35.5
53.54 39.12 -15.4
156.85 110.36 +7.0
17.89 10.07 +1.9
3.83
2.18 +5.6

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG
-.06 10.03
5.96 -21.4
+2.81 106.91 72.74 -13.4
-.16 37.42 28.32
-4.1
+1.09 37.29 25.53 +17.1
+1.91 78.32 42.29 +9.6
-.09 41.10 31.03 -21.8
+1.89 70.48 51.70
-4.6
-1.19 37.90 25.62 -15.1
-.10 11.68
9.09 +2.7
+.09 14.70 11.50
-2.3
+.80 77.74 43.33 +20.1
-.30
9.19
5.87
-8.7
+2.96 100.25 63.05 +14.9
-.14 17.76 12.46
-1.6
+.55 25.43 18.25 +11.0

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

d46.49
18.00
49.21
3.73
98.43
5.07
4.58
26.82
541.31
535.53
41.96
u7.85
7.06
47.22
u31.51
15.55
14.69
1.96
u63.45
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6.14
u32.95
30.44
u25.97
10.49
11.04

-1.18 62.05 46.62 -12.0
-.10 19.06 13.17
-0.4
+1.65 52.29 31.93 +34.4
-.12
4.49
1.69 +14.8
-2.57 116.83 63.50 +4.4
+.17
7.60
3.27 +30.0
... 16.32
3.57 +1.1
+.53 28.98 18.87
-6.1
-16.24 608.91 490.91 +2.0
-12.81 604.83 487.56 +1.7
-.74 98.47 28.65 -33.6
+1.50
8.70
2.42 +187.5
-.55
8.43
5.18 -14.5
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+1.28 31.42 22.18 +6.8
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3.13
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5.05
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5.70 -23.8
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-.43 39.37 25.13 +2.2
+4.16 26.46
7.85 +101.5
+.18 10.77
8.53 +3.7
+.21 11.30
8.80 +4.9

have some actual savings and
more spending power. It will
make their retirement much
more secure.
The basic structure for this
is simple. You transform your
retirement with the proceeds
from selling your conventional home. The proceeds need to
be about three times the cost
of your new manufactured
home and co-op shares. (Yes,
you can do the same with a
more conventional downsizing.)
This takes shelter out of
the spending equation. It
leaves Social Security and
income from other savings
free. You can spend that money on everything else.
Funding our shelter is a big
deal. Keeping a roof over our
heads is expensive for everyone. Shelter accounts for 40.2
percent of the consumer
price index for urban consumers (CPI-U). But it is even
more important for the elderly. The cost of shelter is 44.5
percent in the experimental
consumer price index for the
elderly (CPI-E). It dwarfs the
12.8 percent spent on food, the
11.3 percent spent on medical

NAME

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

HyperTher
iSh ACWI
iShNsdqBio
IconixBr
ImunoGn
Infinera
Insmed
IntgDv
Intuit
InvBncp s
Isis

u45.89
60.56
339.70
d33.18
9.40
u18.90
20.84
19.75
98.50
11.75
61.63

+3.15 46.96 20.23 +91.2
+.44 61.37 54.55 +3.5
-7.76 374.97 207.48 +12.0
-2.56 44.81 32.70
-1.8
+1.16 15.59
5.34 +54.2
-.69 20.23
7.89 +28.4
+.34 22.59 11.25 +34.7
-.04 21.73 10.86 +0.8
+1.44 100.88 72.44 +6.8
+.11 11.98
9.80 +4.7
-1.74 77.80 22.25
-0.2

J-K-L
JD.com n
JDS Uniph
JetBlue
JunoTher n
KLA Tnc
KeurigGM
KitePhm n
Kofax Ltd
KraftFGp
LKQ Corp
LPL Fincl
LamResrch
LexiPhrm
LibtyGlobA
LibtyGlobC

29.49 -.59 33.10
12.98
... 14.54
18.91 -.37 19.60
u57.04 +.44 64.55
58.09 -.91 73.12
114.13 +.93 158.87
53.95 -5.83 89.21
10.93 +.01 11.02
u88.95 -.15 90.75
25.58 +.81 29.84
43.97 -.82 54.07
70.75 -1.29 85.70
.96 +.01
1.86
52.08 +.57 55.86
50.07 +.50 53.66

19.94
10.29
7.61
34.71
49.39
90.08
21.00
5.65
53.33
22.90
38.34
50.54
.80
37.98
36.98

+27.4
-5.4
+19.2
+9.2
-17.4
-13.8
-6.5
+55.5
+42.0
-9.0
-1.3
-10.8
+5.4
+3.7
+3.6

NAME
LibtyIntA
LinearTch
LinnEngy
LinnCo
lululemn gs

WK
CLS
29.37
46.12
11.51
10.23
63.35

care, and the 14.4 percent
spent on transportation.
So here is another perspective.
Changing your home equity into a manufactured home
and a lifetime expense fund
covers 44.5 percent of your
cost of living. That leaves 55.5
percent to come from other
sources.
Social Security will provide a lot of that money. A
worker with typical earnings
can expect Social Security
benefits to replace 39.5 percent of gross earnings. Add
shelter and Social Security
and you have replaced 84
percent of income.
And don’t forget the money
you never see. Things like the
employment tax and possible
federal income tax payments.
Toss in a bit of savings while
working and, presto, retirement doesn’t look like walking off a cliff.
It looks like a change of
address.
Scott Burns is a syndicated
columnist and a principal of the
investment firm AssetBuilder Inc.
Email questions to
scott@scottburns.com.

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG
+.42
-.56
-.06
+.39
-.98

29.77
51.77
32.74
31.57
68.99

22.37
-0.2
37.56 +1.1
9.05 +13.6
8.58
-1.4
36.26 +13.5

M-N-0
MSG
u83.92
MannKd
5.34
MarIntA
80.15
MarvellT
14.77
Mattel
d22.65
MaximIntg 34.82
Medivation 130.21
MelcoCrwn 23.10
MemRsD n 17.54
MerrimkP
12.07
Michaels n 27.11
Microchp
48.18
Mondelez 36.63
Mylan NV 58.10
NXP Semi 99.27
Navient n
20.36
NektarTh
11.00
NetApp
35.63
Netflix
414.08
NewsCpA 16.18
NorwCruis u54.46
Novavax
7.94
NuVasive
42.37
NuanceCm 14.16
Nvidia
21.06
OfficeDpt
9.19
OnSmcnd 11.70
Orexigen
7.77
OvaScience 35.06

+3.19 87.27 48.16 +11.5
+.10 11.48
3.80 +2.4
-.67 85.00 55.00 +2.7
-.47 16.78 11.65 +1.9
+.04 40.79 22.44 -26.8
+.18 36.37 25.28 +9.3
-1.79 141.58 54.37 +30.7
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-9.1
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-2.7
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4.13 +6.8
+.17 30.00 14.51 +9.6
-1.03 52.44 36.92 +6.8
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-3.54 65.63 44.74 +3.1
-.65 108.50 53.81 +29.9
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-5.8
-.09 17.53 10.10 -29.0
+.53 43.75 33.34 -14.1
-.69 489.29 299.50 +21.2
+.03 18.41 14.28 +3.1
+.64 55.35 29.08 +16.5
-.28
9.95
3.34 +33.9
-2.23 51.23 31.35 -10.2
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-0.8
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-.05
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3.84 +7.2
-.10 13.31
6.76 +15.5
+.23
9.37
3.11 +28.2
-8.41 55.69
5.51 -20.7

P-Q-R

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TECH

TRAVEL

OPINION

WEATHER

Smarter. Faster. More Colorful.

FiatChry n
FirstEngy
FordM
FrptMcM

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

16.69
35.34
16.03
19.00

+.27
+.70
+.05
+.20

17.08
41.68
18.12
39.32

GenElec
24.94
GenGrPrp 30.04
GenMills u56.55
GenMotors 36.50
GenesWyo 97.34
Genworth
7.76
Gerdau
3.22
GlaxoSKln 46.71
GoDaddy nud26.50
GoldFLtd
4.23
Goldcrp g 18.85
GoodrPet
3.56
HCP Inc
43.99
HalconRes 1.59
Hallibrtn
43.96
Hanesbds s 34.14
HartfdFn
42.13
HeclaM
3.18
Hertz
21.22
Hilton
u29.36
HollyFront 37.85
HomeDp 114.54
HostHotls
20.49
IAMGld g
1.98
ICICI Bk s 10.69
iShBrazil
33.24
iShEMU
39.39
iShGerm
30.33
iShJapan
12.69
iSTaiwn
16.07
iShSilver
16.02
iShChinaLC u45.66
iSCorSP500 207.76
iShEMkts
41.24
iShiBoxIG 121.53
iSh20 yrT 130.73
iS Eafe
65.19
iShiBxHYB 90.46
iShR2K
124.65
iShREst
79.84
iShHmCnst u28.61
iShUSEngy 43.82
IBM
160.45
IntlGame
17.77
iSh UK
18.22
iShCorEM 49.65
ItauUnibH 11.77

8.54 +44.1
29.98
-9.4
13.26 +3.4
16.43 -18.7

+.08
+.49
+1.56
-.81
+.70
+.47
+.16
-.31
...
-.14
+.42
+.28
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-.06
+.70
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+.18
+.09
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-.39
-1.69
+.68
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-.04
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+.38
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-.04
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-.20
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+.66
+1.78
+.25
-.33
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-.01
+1.55
+.83
+.82
+.76
+.05
-.01
-.12
+1.98
+1.32

27.53
31.70
57.25
38.99
106.02
18.74
6.65
56.48
26.84
6.01
29.65
30.52
49.61
7.50
74.33
34.80
43.42
3.54
31.61
30.06
53.42
117.99
24.50
4.27
13.24
54.56
44.19
32.38
12.91
16.59
20.64
45.25
213.74
45.85
123.90
138.50
70.79
95.43
126.32
83.54
28.57
57.86
199.21
18.00
22.11
54.89
18.49

23.41
21.67
48.32
28.82
80.61
6.75
2.99
41.25
25.49
3.09
17.01
2.35
37.90
1.06
37.21
18.03
33.26
2.00
18.50
20.72
30.15
74.61
19.90
1.42
8.31
28.82
34.41
25.00
10.73
14.36
14.63
34.27
182.41
37.23
116.08
107.17
58.29
86.12
103.54
67.09
21.22
40.71
149.52
12.14
17.11
44.91
10.12

-1.3
+6.8
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-8.7
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60.52 +1.37 63.49
99.64 -.70 109.49
22.58 +.29 26.88

52.97
95.10
18.41

-2.7
-4.7
+1.2

G-H-I

+3.0
+1.1
+5.6
-9.5

J-K-L
JPMorgCh
JohnJn
JnprNtwk

NAME
WK
NAME
CLS
ElectSci
6.10
FEI Co
78.26
FLIR Sys
30.97
Gannett
u37.39
GreenbCos 58.89
HewlettP
31.40
Idacorp
63.16
Intel
30.81
JewettCam 10.40
KeyTech
12.89
Kroger
77.13
Lattice
6.29
LithiaMot u99.63
LaPac
16.29
MentorGr
24.34

WK
CLS

G-H-I
Garmin
Gentex s
Gentherm
GeronCp
GileadSci
GluMobile
GoldenOcn
Goodyear
Google A
Google C n
GoPro n
Gordmans
Groupon
GulfportE
HD Supply
HMS Hldgs
Halozyme
HanwhaQ
Hasbro
HercOffs h
HimaxTch
Hologic
HomeAway
HorizPhm
HudsCity
HuntBncsh

NAME

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

signs for aging-in-place, anyway. Homeowner association
dues cover outdoor work —
such as lawn mowing. And
they will have neighbors
watching out for them as they
get older.
They will net about
$185,000 after the costs of
selling their house and moving. Next, they buy a manufactured home for about
$65,000 to $70,000. That’s a
common price level for manufactured home resales in resident-owned communities. The
cash left over will be an
$115,000 retirement fund.
They will be able to withdraw
enough from that fund to
cover every dime of their new
shelter expenses, a bit over
$4,000 a year.
With the operating costs of
shelter no longer coming out
of their Social Security income, they will have the full
$2,430 a month to spend on
everything else. That’s a $700
a month difference, a 40 percent increase from the $1,730
a month they had left before
their move. The difference
won’t put them in Fat City or
Hog Heaven. But they will

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

MicronT
26.73 +.05 36.59 21.02 -23.7
Microsoft
40.29 -.68 50.05 38.51 -13.3
Nautilus
15.64 +.55 16.20
7.94 +3.0
NikeB
99.66 -.22 103.79 70.60 +3.7
Nordstrm
79.96 +.23 83.16 59.97
+.7
NwstNG
48.97 +1.41 52.57 41.81
-1.9
NwstPipe
22.84 -.30 41.43 20.50 -24.2
OraSure
6.56 +.37 10.93
5.78 -35.3
Paccar
61.20 -.97 71.15 55.34 -10.0
Pixelwrks
5.04
...
9.83
3.86 +10.5
PlanarSy
6.33 +.07
9.17
1.93 -24.4
PlumCrk
43.41 -.01 45.45 38.70 +1.4
PopeRes
62.50 +.16 71.00 59.00
-1.8
PortGE
37.18 +.88 41.04 31.41
-1.7
PrecCastpt 210.80 -1.38 275.09 186.17 -12.5
RadiSys
2.20 +.02
3.82
1.79
-6.0
Rntrak
53.62 -1.80 87.40 43.62 -26.4

NAME

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

KB Home
15.87 +.59 18.98
Kellogg
66.38 +2.54 69.89
Keycorp
14.25 +.25 14.74
KindMorg
41.72 +.45 43.18
Kinross g
2.32 -.04
4.47
KrispKrm
20.01 -.10 22.32
LaredoPet 14.30 +1.55 31.23
LVSands
56.17 +1.42 84.24
LennarA u53.19 +2.76 52.17
Lorillard
u69.25 +1.06 69.61
Lowes
74.84 +1.17 76.25
LumberLiq 33.20 +2.64 96.75
LyonBas A 87.98 +1.42 115.40

11.76
58.83
11.55
32.04
2.00
14.82
7.00
49.82
35.74
51.84
44.13
27.15
70.06

-4.1
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-1.4
-17.7
+1.4
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-3.4
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+8.8
-49.9
+10.8

M-N-0
MGIC Inv
MGM Rsts
Macerich
Macys
MagHRes
MarathnO
MVJrGold
MktVGold
MV OilSvc
MV Semi
MktVRus
Masco
MasterCrd
McDrmInt
McDnlds
Medtrnic
Merck
MetLife
MKors
Molycorp
Monsanto
MorgStan
Mosaic
NRG Egy
Nabors
NBGreece
NOilVarco
NwGold g
NewfldExp
NewmtM
NobleCorp
NobleEngy
NokiaCp
NorthropG
NStarRlt
OasisPet
OcciPet
Oi SA s
OmegaHlt
Oracle
Organovo

9.73
21.34
80.66
u67.85
2.80
27.07
23.70
18.99
34.29
54.91
18.40
26.62
87.03
4.18
95.83
76.87
57.10
51.10
d63.39
.40
116.30
36.06
45.87
23.99
14.07
1.23
51.01
3.65
36.28
22.34
14.76
49.92
7.65
161.63
18.22
14.94
74.55
d1.94
41.48
42.62
d3.72

+.30
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+.41
-.22
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9.96
7.16 +4.4
27.64 17.25
-0.2
95.93 61.41
-3.3
68.30 54.82 +3.2
9.10
1.60 -10.8
41.92 24.28
-4.3
46.50 20.68
-1.0
27.78 16.45 +3.3
58.01 31.51
-4.5
58.47 43.69 +0.5
27.46 12.50 +25.8
27.40 19.50 +5.6
93.00 68.68 +1.0
8.43
2.10 +43.6
103.78 87.62 +2.3
79.50 55.85 +6.5
63.62 52.49 +0.5
57.57 46.10
-5.5
98.96 63.31 -15.6
5.15
.28 -54.3
128.79 105.76
-2.7
39.19 28.31
-7.1
53.83 40.32 +0.5
38.09 22.78 -11.0
30.24
9.91 +8.4
5.79
.98 -31.3
86.55 46.08 -22.2
6.78
3.22 -15.1
45.43 22.31 +33.8
27.40 17.60 +18.2
30.27 13.15 -10.9
79.63 41.01 +5.2
8.73
7.00
-2.7
172.30 116.11 +9.7
19.74 14.06 +3.6
58.09 10.64
-9.7
105.64 71.70
-7.5
14.90
1.54 -39.2
45.46 33.11 +6.2
46.71 35.82
-5.2
9.25
3.29 -48.7

NAME

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

SareptaTh 14.25 +.68 40.00 11.33
-1.5
Schmitt
2.70 +.01
3.55
2.53
-8.5
Schnitzer
16.33 +1.06 30.04 15.20 -27.6
StancrpFn 68.92 +1.65 71.80 57.77
-1.3
Starbucks 94.39 -.68 99.20 67.93 +15.0
Supvalu
u11.68 +.31 11.75
6.55 +20.4
Umpqua
17.37 +.49 19.36 14.70 +2.1
US Bancrp 43.71 +.85 46.10 38.10
-2.8
VBI Vac rs
2.75 +.15
7.45
1.90 -17.4
Valmont
121.98 +1.33 163.23 116.71
-4.0
WashFed
21.82 +.37 23.56 19.52
-1.5
Weyerhsr
32.64 -.41 37.04 27.48
-9.1
WillmValV
6.15 +.07
6.59
5.14 +6.0

PDL Bio
7.01 -.03 10.26
PacBiosci
5.78 +.19
8.78
PanASlv
8.97 -.16 15.97
PattUTI
19.37 +.42 38.43
Paychex
49.25 -.30 51.72
PnnNGm
15.67 +.14 17.06
PeopUtdF 15.18 +.09 15.50
PilgrimsP
24.44 +.73 32.62
PwShs QQQ105.12 -.40 109.42
PriceTR
81.96 +.75 88.64
PrUltPQQQ 101.42 -1.17 114.39
PShtQQQ 27.11 +.24 63.16
ProspctCap 8.42 -.02 11.05
QIAGEN
25.18 -.23 25.91
Qorvo n
77.79 -1.49 85.63
Qualcom
67.97 +.95 81.97
RaptorPhm 10.48 -1.49 12.20
Receptos u169.31 +21.88 203.25
RexEnergy 3.85 -.01 22.00
RigelPh
3.64 +.30
4.20
RiverbedT 20.92 +.02 21.00
RosettaR
18.14 +1.51 55.45
Rovi Corp 17.70 -.78 26.44

NAME

WK
CLS

6.52
3.87
8.49
13.30
39.79
10.07
13.61
16.49
83.28
71.78
52.18
24.41
8.02
19.46
63.02
62.26
7.12
24.54
2.47
1.56
16.71
15.92
17.52

-9.1
-26.3
-2.5
+16.8
+6.7
+14.1
-11.7
+1.8
-4.5
+4.1
-9.1
+1.9
+7.3
+10.5
-8.6
-0.4
+38.2
-24.5
+60.4
+2.5
-18.7
-21.6

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

P-Q-R
PG&E Cp 53.59 +1.58 60.21
PPL Corp
33.85 +.70 38.14
Pandora
16.22 -.10 33.70
PeabdyE
d4.87 -.26 19.63
PennVa
7.30 +.26 18.20
Penney
9.13 +1.50 11.30
PepsiCo
95.69 -.26 100.76
PetrbrsA
6.80 +1.02 22.14
Petrobras
6.76 +1.06 20.94
Pfizer
34.38 -.15 35.45
PhilipMor d77.26 +.47 91.63
Phillips66
78.17 +.56 87.98
Pier 1
13.11 -1.03 19.39
Potash
32.70 +.67 38.58
PS SrLoan 24.18 +.14 24.94
PrecDrill
6.57 +.36 14.65
ProUltSP 129.21 +.73 136.10
PUltVixST 14.41 -.83 71.72
PrUltCrude 7.35 +.28 40.17
ProctGam 82.43 +.12 93.89
ProgsvCp 26.84 -.19 27.90
ProUShSP 21.34 -.15 30.07
PUShtSPX 36.05 -.35 61.22
PSEG
41.34 +.01 44.45
PulteGrp
22.70 +.68 23.36
QEP Res
21.70 +.63 35.91
RegionsFn
9.58 +.46 11.28
ReynAmer 73.39 +2.79 76.23
RioTinto
41.20 -.68 59.33
RiteAid
u8.79 +.22
8.86
Ryder
94.39
... 99.32

41.89
31.31
14.50
4.71
4.32
5.90
81.99
5.00
4.90
27.51
75.27
57.33
11.38
31.39
23.47
4.53
98.84
14.00
5.89
77.29
23.20
20.43
33.76
34.05
16.56
18.15
8.59
53.04
40.70
4.42
77.14

+0.7
-6.8
-9.0
-37.1
+9.3
+40.9
+1.2
-10.3
-7.4
+10.4
-5.1
+9.0
-14.9
-7.4
+0.6
+8.4
+0.7
-42.7
-29.1
-9.5
-0.6
-3.2
-5.2
-0.2
+5.8
+7.3
-9.3
+14.2
-10.6
+16.9
+1.7

S-T-U
SpdrDJIA 177.33
SpdrGold 115.28
S&P500ETF206.44
SpdrHome u36.99
SpdrLehHY 39.15
SpdrOGEx 50.81
SABESP
5.76
Salesforce 66.68
SandRdge
1.82
Schlmbrg
84.39
Schwab
30.01
SeadrillLtd
9.66
SiderurNac 1.74
SilvWhtn g 19.19
SouFun s
6.18
SouthnCo 44.64
SwstAirl
42.86
SwstnEngy 24.04
SpectraEn 36.06
SpiritRltC
12.30
Sprint
4.85
SP Matls
48.97
SP HlthC
71.99
SP CnSt
49.13

+.52
+.22
+.70
+.79
+.01
+2.19
+.60
+.13
+.04
+1.08
-.22
+.02
+.06
-.43
+.22
+.63
-1.38
+1.72
+.02
+.46
+.13
+.36
-1.05
+.42

182.68 158.27
-0.3
129.21 109.67 +1.5
212.97 181.31 +0.4
37.31 27.66 +8.4
41.82 37.26 +1.4
84.04 41.63 +6.2
10.99
4.77
-8.4
71.00 48.18 +12.4
7.43
1.13
118.76 75.60
-1.2
31.73 23.35
-0.6
40.44
8.58 -19.1
5.33
1.50 -16.3
27.66 16.57
-5.6
15.67
5.25 -16.4
53.16 41.87
-9.1
47.17 22.35 +1.3
49.16 21.46 -11.9
43.12 32.43
-0.7
13.00 10.23 +3.4
9.76
3.79 +16.9
52.22 44.09 +0.8
76.01 55.39 +5.3
50.22 42.70 +1.3

NAME

WK
CLS

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG

9.44
u24.13
d64.57
.68
11.05
52.45
41.28
3.93
4.79
31.56
3.92
96.51
52.31
d7.93
59.23
35.80
16.23
20.43
d52.89
31.47
23.55
4.45
d1.98
25.00
u38.98
191.00
56.72
10.89
24.68
82.51
15.71
34.04
33.24
9.65
17.37
3.80
43.97

+.47
+.25
-.02
+.01
+1.06
-.31
-1.12
+.03
-.05
+.45
+.07
-2.32
+2.14
-.07
-1.17
+2.65
+.12
+.94
-1.83
-.21
+.20
+.14
-.32
-.26
+3.08
+6.00
-.04
+.42
+.43
-1.29
-2.07
+.34
+.51
-2.86
+.49
+.14
-1.50

S-T-U
SLM Cp
SabreCp n
SanDisk
Sanofi rt
SciGames
SeagateT
SearsHldgs
Sequenom
SilvStd g
Sinclair
SiriusXM
SkywksSol
SolarCity
Sonus rs
Splunk
Sprouts
Staples
StlDynam
Stratasys
SunPower
Symantec
SynrgyPh
SyntaPhm
TakeTwo
TerraFm n
TeslaMot
TexInst
TiVo Inc
TrimbleN
TripAdvis
TrueCar n
21stCFoxA
21stCFoxB
UTiWrldwd
Umpqua
Unilife
UrbanOut

10.47
8.19
-7.4
24.55 14.86 +19.0
108.77 63.00 -34.1
1.06
.29 -14.2
15.66
6.97 -13.2
69.40 48.49 -21.1
48.25 24.10 +25.2
4.19
2.35 +6.2
11.17
3.92
-4.3
36.14 23.88 +15.3
4.04
2.98 +11.9
102.77 34.30 +32.7
79.40 45.79
-2.2
21.25
7.56 -60.1
76.26 39.35 +0.5
38.45 25.73 +5.4
19.40 10.70 -10.4
25.51 16.51 +3.5
130.83 51.50 -36.4
42.07 22.75 +21.8
27.32 19.57
-8.2
5.52
2.45 +45.9
4.97
1.85 -25.3
30.80 18.45 -10.8
38.91 21.58 +26.2
291.42 177.22 -14.1
59.99 41.47 +6.1
14.29 10.27
-8.0
40.14 23.68
-7.0
111.24 66.04 +10.5
25.00
9.05 -31.4
39.27 31.01 -11.4
37.83 30.11
-9.9
14.75
9.00 -20.0
19.36 14.70 +2.1
4.90
2.00 +13.4
47.25 27.89 +25.2

V-W-X-Y-Z
VanTIntBd
VertxPh
ViacomB
VimpelCm
Vivus
Vodafone
WalgBoots
Wendys Co
WDigital
WholeFood
Windstrm
WisdomTr
Wynn
XOMA
Xilinx
Yahoo
Yandex
ZillowGp
ZionsBcp
Zogenix
Zulily
Zynga

53.95 +.07 54.19 50.37
117.23 -3.11 136.33 59.79
67.59 -.26 89.76 63.11
5.37 +.16
9.73
3.09
d2.43 -.14
6.28
2.28
32.89 -.57 38.54 28.63
85.97 +.68 88.81 57.75
10.93 +.05 11.50
7.61
93.00 +.77 114.69 80.78
52.18 +.25 57.57 36.08
d7.92 +.48 13.30
7.23
21.73 +.34 22.60
9.11
129.40 +3.15 231.00 121.53
3.54 -.10
5.95
3.22
42.06 -.26 55.22 36.24
44.15 -.95 52.62 32.15
16.24 +.79 35.90 13.90
100.87 +.26 164.90 84.64
27.11 +.69 31.87 23.72
1.47 +.13
3.10
1.07
13.81 +.88 56.81 12.34
2.78 +.01
4.66
2.20

NAME

WK
CLS

SP Consum 75.69
SP Engy
77.72
SPDR Fncl 24.21
SP Inds
55.43
SP Tech
41.37
SP Util
44.55
Suncor g
30.77
SunEdison u25.15
Sysco
37.64
TaiwSemi
23.69
TalismE g
7.70
Target
u82.67
TeckRes g 13.67
TevaPhrm u63.80
TherapMD
6.38
TW Cable 154.81
TimeWarn 85.00
Transocn
14.99
TriContl
21.65
Twitter
50.42
TwoHrbInv 10.67
Tyson
38.63
UnionPac s 107.13
UtdContl
61.88
UPS B
96.47
US Bancrp 43.71
US NGas d13.60
US OilFd
17.56
USSteel
24.66
UtdTech
117.13
UtdhlthGp u117.36

WK
52-WEEK
YTD
CHG HIGH LOW %CHG
+.78
+1.32
+.28
-.12
...
+.67
+1.66
+.79
-.52
+.75
+.04
+1.11
-.19
+1.82
+.38
+8.28
-.11
+.50
+.06
+.41
+.10
+.47
-1.31
-5.87
-.12
+.85
+.27
+.42
-.12
+.23
-.65

77.13 61.68 +4.9
101.52 71.70
-1.8
25.14 21.19
-2.1
58.23 48.83
-2.0
43.46 35.13
49.78 40.07
-5.7
43.49 26.56
-3.2
25.19 13.09 +28.9
41.45 35.31
-5.2
25.32 19.39 +5.9
11.22
3.46
-1.7
82.81 55.25 +8.9
25.03 10.45 +0.2
64.08 47.36 +10.9
6.75
3.42 +43.4
159.94 128.78 +1.8
88.25 62.44
-0.5
46.12 13.28 -18.2
22.20 19.12 +1.1
55.99 29.51 +40.6
11.00
9.60 +6.5
44.24 34.90
-3.6
124.52 90.36 -10.1
74.52 36.65
-7.5
114.40 94.05 -13.2
46.10 38.10
-2.8
26.88 12.98
-7.9
39.44 15.61 -13.8
46.55 20.13
-7.8
124.45 97.30 +1.9
123.76 73.61 +16.1

V-W-X-Y-Z
VaalcoE
Vale SA
Vale SA pf
ValeroE
VangTSM
VangREIT
VangEmg
VangEur
VangFTSE
VerizonCm
Vipshop s
Visa s
VoyaFincl
WPX Engy
WalMart
WeathfIntl
WellsFargo
WstnUnion
WhitingPet
WmsCos
WT EurHdg
WTJpHedg
WT India
Xerox
Yamana g
Zoetis

d2.47
d5.76
d4.94
59.80
107.39
84.83
42.06
55.25
40.41
49.47
u29.11
65.29
43.97
11.74
80.73
12.91
54.37
u20.91
32.81
50.30
66.75
55.39
23.26
12.77
3.74
46.50

-.75
9.67
+.09 15.59
+.01 13.99
-2.07 64.49
+.52 110.09
+.97 89.27
+1.98 46.49
+.25 61.89
+.04 43.48
+.91 53.66
+.49 29.98
-.25 69.66
+.66 44.97
+1.04 26.79
-.62 90.97
+.56 24.88
+.25 56.29
+1.21 20.87
+2.31 92.92
+1.02 59.77
+.83 67.27
-.10 57.68
+.98 24.37
+.18 14.36
-.09
9.04
+.28 47.92

2.12
5.51
4.73
42.53
93.58
69.79
37.30
49.81
36.32
45.09
12.30
48.71
32.60
10.01
72.61
9.40
46.44
14.60
24.13
39.31
51.67
44.75
18.72
11.01
3.33
28.14

-45.8
-29.6
-32.0
+20.8
+1.3
+4.7
+5.1
+5.4
+6.7
+5.8
+49.0
-0.4
+3.8
+0.9
-6.0
+12.8
-0.8
+16.8
-0.6
+11.9
+20.0
+12.5
+5.5
-7.9
-7.0
+8.1

INDEXES
52-WEEK
HIGH
LOW
18,288.63 15,855.12
9,310.22 7,346.24
657.17
519.56
11,142.56 9,886.08
5,042.14 3,946.03
2,119.59 1,814.36
1,542.16 1,269.45
22,388.10 19,160.13
1,268.16 1,040.47

NAME
LAST
Dow Jones Industrials
17,763.24
Dow Jones Transportation 8,605.31
Dow Jones Utilities
589.87
NYSE Composite
10,953.17
Nasdaq Composite
4,886.94
S&P 500
2,066.96
S&P MidCap
1,523.94
Wilshire 5000
21,946.62
Russell 2000
1,255.66

FRI
CHG
+65.06
-66.82
+1.86
+61.56
+6.71
+7.27
+5.17
+77.56
+3.95

WEEK
CHG
+50.58
-95.03
+9.36
+78.02
-4.28
+5.94
+15.43
+99.83
+15.25

WEEK YTD
%CHG %CHG
+.29
-.34
-1.09
-5.85
+1.61
-4.56
+.72 +1.05
-.09 +3.19
+.29
+.39
+1.02 +4.92
+.46 +1.28
+1.23 +4.23

Stocks in bold changed 10% or more from the previous weekly close. Footnotes: d - New 52-week low.
g - Dividends and earnings in Canadian dollars. lf - Late filing with SEC. n - Stock was a new issue in the last year.
The 52-week high and low figures date only from the beginning of trading. pf - Preferred stock issue. rs - Stock has
undergone a reverse stock split of at least 50% within the past year. s - Stock has split by at least 20 percent within
the last year. u - New 52-week high. vj - Company in bankruptcy or receivership, or being reorganized under the bankruptcy law. Appears in front of the name. Source: The Associated Press.

Shopping for a home? Get
your mortgage first!

503-588-3511
503
588 3511
Apply or make an appointment at
www.MortgageSalem.com NMLS 40558

+1.6
-1.3
-10.2
+28.6
-15.6
-3.7
+12.8
+21.0
-16.0
+3.5
-3.9
+38.6
-13.0
-1.4
-2.9
-12.6
-9.6
-4.7
-4.9
+7.3
-41.0
+4.5

StatesmanJournal.com/subscribe

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

3F

How to create an excellent small business prototype
Do you have an idea for a
new gizmo that will take the
world by storm? Are you
about to create a whatchamacallit that will finally enable
you to launch your own small
business?
Hold on. Before you invest
your life savings or launch a
crowdfunding campaign on
Kickstarter, you need to create a prototype.
A prototype is a pre-production model or sample of a
potential product that helps
you work out the kinks before
you start producing large
quantities for sale. A prototype demonstrates to potential customers, suppliers and
investors what you envision
your product to be. Most important, it helps you figure
out ways to save money and
make your product more appealing to customers.
Let’s say you’ve got an idea
for a new specialty food item
— a new gluten-free peanut
sauce. You’ve been playing
around with recipes for
months and are sure you now

have a
killer
sauce.
Before
you buy
hundreds
of bottles
Rhonda Abrams and line
GA N N E T T
up a commercial
kitchen
and a bottling plant, take time
to test your complete product:
not just the sauce, but the
bottle, label and other packaging.
In prototyping your product, examine how well it will
do when made in quantity.
How long will your sauce stay
fresh — and attractive — in
the bottles you chose? Do the
bottles have to be refrigerated or are they shelf-stable?
Seth Goldman, the founder
of Honest Tea, (HonestTea.com), told me how surprised he was at the amount
of sediment found in the company’s tea when made in large
quantities and how cloudy the
tea was. The company had to

change its production process
to deal with that.
Developing a prototype
helps you figure all costs, not
just for ingredients but for
every part of the process,
including sales and shipping.
For example, when choosing
bottles for your peanut sauce,
consider not only the cost of
the bottles, but how many will
fit in a case and how much
they’ll weigh when shipped.
Choosing labels? Find out the
sizes that standard label-affixing machines can handle. And
consider how the shape and
size of the bottles fit on retailers’ shelves.
As you develop your prototype, focus on these issues:
» Will the product work?
Does the product actually
function as you’ve envisioned? If you’re building a
mechanical, electrical or electronic product, it must be
perfectly functional from an
engineering standpoint.
» Can it be produced in
sufficient quantities? If you
will be manufacturing the

Pinterest celebrates 5
years by looking ahead
The social site blends
shopping. searching
By BARBARA ORTUTAY
Associated Press

NEW YORK — In its five short years of

life, Pinterest has become ‘the’ place
where brides-to-be create wish boards
of wedding china photos and do-it-yourself home renovators bookmark shiny
turquoise tiles for bathrooms. It’s
where people share ideas and ingenuity
and get creatively inspired. And it’s
fueled a new way of searching for items
that’s even stolen traffic from tech giant Google.
The San Francisco-based venture
capital darling was recently valued at
$11 billion. While its core audience has
always been female, Pinterest says its
popularity is growing faster than ever
among men. It is winning in the all-important social-mobile space — the vast
majority of “pinners” connect from mobile devices — and is enjoying a healthy
expansion overseas.
As Pinterest celebrates its fifth
birthday this week — hopefully with
perfect bacon cupcakes topped with a
single, artisanal beeswax candle — here
are five things to know about the site
and where it’s headed.

Who uses Pinterest?
Pinterest had 79.3 million unique visitors in February (the latest data available), up 47 percent from a year earlier,
according to Internet research firm
comScore. The vast majority were
women, but male visitors grew at a
much faster clip: 62 percent for men
versus 42 percent for women.
Enid Hwang is the company’s community manager and the fourth employee ever hired at Pinterest. She wouldn’t
disclose what percentage of users are
male but says Pinterest’s male user base
in the U.S. has doubled in the past year.
She doesn’t think Pinterest is for women
any more than it is for men.
“At its most fundamental, we believe
that Pinterest is a tool for unlocking
people’s creativity,” she says.
Pinterest often gets lumped in with
popular social networks like Facebook,
Twitter and Instagram, but there are
plenty of ways that it stands apart.
Hwang sees it as more intimate and personal. While Facebook is about sharing
what you did, read or saw recently with
400 of your closest “friends,” Pinterest
users pin stuff for their own inspiration
and benefit. While others can see it, she
says Pinterest people are “saving stuff
that means a lot to them personally.”

These pinners found “creative ways of
solving what they might do if there is a
zombie apocalypse,” she adds, or a more
mundane natural disaster. There are
Pinterest boards of basement fallout
shelters, disaster preparation and the
contents of survival backpacks.
After Pinterest introduced “Place
Pins” in late 2013, the vast trove of pinners’ travel-inspired boards became
easier for people to find. Users pin photos, links and videos inspired by past
trips or travel aspirations. Place Pins
are designed to work sort of like an online travel magazine combined with an
interactive map.

By the numbers
» There are now more than 50 billion
“pins” on Pinterest. One billion boards
have been created.
» Headquartered in San Francisco,
Pinterest has six international offices:
in Britain, France, Germany, Japan and
Brazil. More than 40 percent of Pinterest users are outside the U.S., up from
28 percent in 2013.
» About two-thirds of the content on
its site was created by brands. “If we
were in the magazine business, (that)
would be 50 billion pages being ripped
out and referenced,” says Joanne Bradford, head of partnerships at Pinterest.
» Earlier this year, Pinterest raised
$367 million that valued the company at
$11 billion. It says it may raise as much
as $211 million more, and plans to use
the more than half a billion dollars for
international expansion and other corporate purposes.

Expect more industrial space
construction

Continued from Page 1F

With Salem’s available industrial
space getting scooped up, developers
are seeing a prime opportunity to create
more of it. A development company, Vista Property Investments, LLC, has announced plans to build another industrial
park in southeast Salem sometime this
year.
There’s certainly room for it. According to an Economic Opportunities Analysis conducted by the city of Salem and
presented to council in March, Salem has
a surplus in land zoned for industrial use.
The city has approximately 900 acres
of more land than needed for anticipated
employment growth.

Diamond Foods improvements
underway
Last year, Diamond Foods leased
about 242,000 square feet of industrial
space at 1745 Oxford St. SE for Kettle
Chips.
Improvements on the building, which
is the former Seneca Cannery, will bring
it up to appropriate standards to become
Kettle Chips’ new logistics and distribution warehouse.
The improvements are scheduled to
be completed in the fall of 2015.

2015-17 Kickoff: Justice
Reinvestment Summit:
conference highlighting
outstanding and innovative
public safety programs that
effectively reduce prison
populations and avert future
growth, reduce recidivism
through evidence-based
practices and data-driven
research, increase public safety
and increase offender accountability, 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.,
Salem Convention Center, 200
Commercial St. SE. Free. (503)
378-4078, www.regonline.com
.
High Noon Toastmasters:
Speaking and leadership
training in a friendly setting,
noon to 1 p.m., Revenue
Building, Fishbowl Meeting
Room, first floor, 955 Center
St. NE. (503) 399-9915,
www.highnoontoastmas
ters.org.
Bootstrappers Toastmasters: Meets to improve individual speaking, listening,
evaluation and meeting management skills for adults ages
18 and older. Guests and new
members welcome, 6:15 p.m.,

Diversity

Real estate
within that community.”

MONDAY

Pinterest’s penchant for exposing
people to something new has turned its
site into a learning and shopping hub
that can be more useful than Google and
other search engines for certain topics.
Many people now go to Pinterest first
when they are looking for ideas on planning a wedding, preparing an exotic dinner, planning a kids’ birthday party or
finding the perfect pair of shoes for a
new outfit.
Pinterest co-founder Evan Sharp likens this phenomenon to “search without
typing,” making it particularly well
suited for smartphones.

Popular “man trends,” as Pinterest
put it recently, range from do-it-yourself home projects such as making a
wooden couch sleeve for your drinks, to
different ways to tie knots, to the
world’s best hiking trails. And then
there’s the more unusual.
“Last year, we noticed a trend of survivalists using Pinterest,” Hwang says.

‘Man trends’

lfosmire@StatesmanJournal.com, (503)
399-6709 or follow on Twitter at @fosmirel

funding sites such as Kickstarter (kickstarter.com),
IndieGoGo (IndieGoGo.com)
or Fundable (fundable.com).
Some of these sites require
you to have a prototype, but
for all, having attractive visuals and a video of a working
prototype helps you be far
more effective in getting attention and raising money.
Don’t worry, though —
developing a prototype
doesn’t mean you can’t change
or refine your product later.
But the process should help
move you to market faster by
forcing you to get your idea
off the drawing table and into
reality.
So start building a working
prototype of the gizmo of your
dreams. As you do, remember
Google’s product-development motto: “Experiment,
expedite, iterate.”
Among Rhonda Abrams’ recent
books is the 6th edition of Successful
Business Plan: Secrets & Strategies.
Register for her free newsletter at
PlanningShop.com. Twitter:
@RhondaAbrams.

AGENDA

A new way to search and shop

The heat is on tech companies for
lacking gender and racial diversity
among their employee base, especially
in the highest ranks. Pinterest is no exception. At the same time, the company
seems to be doing better on this front
than some of its Silicon Valley counterparts. According to statistics released
last July, 40 percent of the company’s
employees are women. This compares
with 20 percent at Apple Inc. and 30 percent at Twitter Inc. and Google Inc.
Among Pinterest executives though, it’s
a different story. Nineteen percent are
women, compared with 21 percent at
Google.
“We’re not close to where we want to
be, but we’re working on it,” wrote Tracy Chou, a software engineer and tech
lead at Pinterest, in a blog post last July.

product in bulk, judge whether you can ensure consistent
quality of both components
and the final product when
made in large quantities.
» Can you make a profit?
Can it be made efficiently and
cost-effectively? Can you use
standard, easily available
ingredients or components
that will reduce costs? Can
you command a price that
results in a profit?
» Will you need to manufacture the product on your
own? Will you need to build
your own costly facility or can
you use contract manufacturers, lowering your costs and
increasing the speed with
which you can get to market?
Having a prototype — especially of an appealing product — also helps you raise
money. It’s far easier for potential investors to understand and appreciate what
you’re trying to achieve when
they can see, touch or taste it.
Moreover, a lot of small
businesses are raising money
for new products on crowd-

25

University of Phoenix, Room
106, 670 Hawthorne Ave. SE.
(503) 510-9695.

TUESDAY
Active Business Promoters:
Business and professional
networking group dedicated
to the success of our members
through referrals, exchanging
business ideas and networking, 6:50 to 8 a.m., Broadway
Commons, 1300 Broadway St.
NE. (503) 991-6892.
Business Networking International - Salem Partners
for Success: BNI is the largest
business networking organization, offering members the
opportunity to share ideas,
contacts and most importantly,
business referrals, 7 to 8:30
a.m., Chemeketa Center for
Business and Industry, 626
High St. NE. (503) 375-2707,
www.bnioregon.com.
LeTip of Salem Professionals Networking: 7 to 8:30
a.m., Broadway Commons,
Keizer Room, 1300 Broadway
St. NE. (866) 818-8381,
www.philwebb.
us/letip/home.html.

WEDNESDAY
Mid-Willamette Jobs Council Meeting: 2 to 3 p.m., Incite
Inc., 626 High St NE Suite 305.
(503) 581-1002,
www.inciteworks.org.

THURSDAY
PRO Salem: Your source of
referrals, 7:30 to 9 a.m., Broadway Commons, China Room,
1300 Broadway St. NE. (503)
485-9888.
My Referral Club of Salem:
A resource for your clients and
yourself. It is a group of individuals that enjoys referring
business to each other, 9 to
10:15 a.m., Willamette Heritage Center at the Mill, Card
Room, 1313 Mill St. SE. (503)
399-7881,
www.salemor.myreferralclub.
com.
Keizer Communicators
Toastmasters: Learn to overcome your fear of public
speaking, improve your communication skills, increase your
self-confidence level, and learn
how to host meetings, 7 to 8
p.m., Avamere Court at Keizer,
Building 3, 5210 River Road N,
Keizer. (209) 380-3872.

4F

Jobs

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

Find a job:

ONLINE
CareerBuilder.com

Place an employment ad:

BY EMAIL

Place an employment ad:

StatesmanJournal.com

BY PHONE

1-888-692-7340

sjjobs@gannett.com

ADULT OUTPATIENT
TEAM MENTAL HEALTH
SPECIALIST II
Hiring for an experienced mental
health therapist to work with adults
who experience a range of symptoms
including PTSD, depression, and
anxiety. Candidate should be skilled
in assessment, individual and group
therapy, case management and
consultation. As well as have familiarity
with Evidence Based Practices.
Minimum requirements: Master’s
degree and licensure in mental health
field. Salary Range: MHS II (licensure)
$3888 - $4964.

Send Resumes to:

25

Tanya Thompson, LCSW, Linn County
Mental Health Services; P.O. Box 100,
Albany, Oregon 97321. tthompson@
co.linn.or.us

EOE.
Closing date: April 1st, 2015
or until filled.

All classified ads are subject to the applicable rate card, copies of which are available from our Advertising Dept. All ads are subject to approval before publication. The
Statesman Journal reserves the right to edit, refuse, reject, classify or cancel any ad at any time. Errors must be reported in the first day of publication at 503-399-6789.
The Statesman Journal shall not be liable for any loss or expense that results from an error in or omission of an advertisement. No refunds for early cancellation of order.

StatesmanJournal.com

General

515

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

515

General

$800 to $1200+
Per Week
Weekly Paycheck
Full & Part Time
We’re expanding our
sales territory & looking
for competitive people
who would enjoy working with an awardwinning sales team. If
you enjoy working with
people & are selfmotivated
Call: (503) 610-8428
We Need: People to market our
in-store & Special Event Promotions
for the:

This solicitation is for services within the Sales Division of Circulation Promotions Unlimited Inc.
Qualified applicants will serve as independent
contractors, not employees.

Business Opportunity
The Statesman Journal Newspaper
is seeking applicants for

Newspaper Delivery

521 Healthcare 521 Healthcare 523

Professional

ASSISTANT HEALTH SERVICES
ADMINISTRATIVE MANAGER
(LCDHS Classification 031)
Full-time, 37.5 hours/week Accounting/Payroll
position with Linn County Department of Health
Services
ESSENTIAL FUNCTIONS:
Ability to perform moderately complex financial
accounting functions.
Ability to maintain and monitor financial records.
Assist in management of accounts payable,
payroll, ledgers, revenues/expenditures and
reporting for department.
Ability to work with confidential personnel related
documents and processes including, new hire
processing, voluntary and involuntary
terminations, FMLA/OFLA paperwork and other
personnel related information.
Experience with Microsoft applications,
specifically Word/Excel/Outlook.
Ability to use collaborative problem solving and
communication skills in a team setting.
GENERAL QUALIFICATIONS:
Four years of experience of a responsible nature
in accounting.
Graduation from high school or equivalent GED
certificate supplemented by business school or
college training in bookkeeping, accounting or
related field OR satisfactory equivalent
combination of experience and training.
Computer skills in Microsoft Word, Excel,
Outlook, etc.
Possession of valid Oregon driver license and
good driving record.
Ability to pass a criminal history check.

SALARY RANGE:

$3272 - $4116
CLOSING DATE:
April 10,
2015
HOW TO APPLY:
Submit Linn County
Employment Application, Resume, and Cover
Letter
Brandi Aston, MBA, Administrative Manager
baston@co.linn.or.us
Linn County Department of Health Service, PO
Box 100, Albany, OR 97321
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY/AFFIRMATIVE
ACTION EMPLOYER
A copy of the Job Classification for this position
as well as the Employment application may be
obtained from the Linn County Board of
Commissioner’s Office, Room 201, Linn County
Courthouse, PO Box 100, Albany, OR 97321; at
the Oregon Employment Division Office in
Albany, or online at http://www.co.linn.or.us.

as independent contractors
in all areas.
Independent contractors should
have:
1. A reliable vehicle that is insured.
2. A valid driver’s license.
3. Available to deliver newspapers
to residential areas in the early
morning hours, 7 days per week.
Our routes are designed to provide
part-time supplemental income to
qualified individuals looking for a
business opportunity.
Our routes have the potential to
profit up to $1000 per month,
depending on delivery area
and route size.

RN Educator
Senior Living Community that
serves the Willamette Valley
is looking for an RN
Educator.
* Must have 1-2 years
experience in long term care

Professional

Case Manager 1
For persons selected at TL 20.0 - Two-years
experience in supervisory capacity.
For persons selected at TL 19.0 Must have some
knowledge of supervisory practices.
For persons selected at TL 19.0 or TL 20.0:
- A Bachelors Degree in social work or an
equivalent degree in sociology, psychology,
counseling or law.
- One-year of full time experience working in
Indian Child Welfare or two-years of full time
experience including assessment or case
management experience in another public child
welfare system or child welfare agency working
in both child protective services and
permanency.
Location: Siletz, OR
Salary: $21.22/hr - $23.31/hr DOE
Open Until Filled; Job Posting #: 201507

For an application and job
description visit us at
www.ctsi.nsn.us or call
800-922-1399.
Job Coach
Job Coach 2: Supported
Employment Specialist serving
clients with serious mental illness.
Considerable understanding of
Supported Employment techniques,
job development and retention
strategies, and integrating mental
health treatment. Coordination with
employers, liaison with community
agencies and treatment team.
Albany as primary work site.
Bachelor’s degree in behavioral
sciences field with satisfactory
combination of work/education; or
four years of progressive experience
serving individuals with serious
mental illness, physical disabilities
and vocational rehabilitation.
Criminal history check, valid Oregon
driver’s license and acceptable
driving record required. Salary $3197
- $4085 per month; excellent
benefits. Open until April 10 or until
filled. Submit signed application and
resume to: MaryDale Salston, Ph.D.,
LMFT, Linn County Mental Health
Services, PO Box 100, Albany, OR
97321. msalston@co.linn.or.us EOE

525 Restaurant 525 Restaurant
& Food

*Excellent Benefit and
compensation package
* Fun and exciting
environment to work in

523

& Food

NOW HIRING!!!
McMenamins Wilsonville Pub
Line Cooks, Servers, Hosts and Dishwashers!

Please contact our hotline at

503-399-6827

or apply online at
http://online.statesmanjournal.com/
services/subscriber/carriers.cfm

Please email resumes to:
living_senior@yahoo.com

523

Professional

Come Join Our Growing
Team !
Forest River RV wants you.
Immediate Openings for
Fiberglass Repair & Painting and
Production Assemblers.
Energetic, positive, and team
focused applicants are desired.
Competitive wage & benefit package
to be discussed at interview.
Pre-employment Drug Screen
required.
Please apply in person at
1429 SE Uglow Ave.
Dallas, Oregon.

Begin The Journey at Forest
River RV !

BE SEEN
with color!

BE SEEN
with color!

Classifieds

Classifieds

503-399-6789

General

515

Busy Salem Corporate office seeks
experienced A/P Specialist for a growing food
service chain with experience in all phases of
A/P for multiple entities.
Good project management, communication
and people skills essential in this fast-paced
deadline oriented environment. Detail
oriented and proficiency in MS Excel and
Word required. Experience using Great
Plains Dynamics and Access software a plus.

Please apply online 24/7 at mcmenamins.com
or pick up an app at any McMenamins
location.
Mail your complete app to:
McMenamins
Attn: Human Resources
430 N. Killingsworth St. Portland, OR 97217
or
fax to: (503) 221-8749.

Please no phone calls or emails to
individual locations!!!
Equal Opportunity Employer

Send Resume via E-Fax 1-866-700-6637

DOWNLOAD
OUR FREE
APPS NOW

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OUR FREE
APPS NOW

StatesmanJournal.com
/NewApps

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/NewApps

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/NewApps

503-399-6789

515

General

515

General

Part-time, on call to provide
court security in the Yamhill
County courthouse. Position
requires knowledge of or training
in the use of fingerprinting,
photographing, and video
monitoring equipment, first aid
(including CPR), and experience
with the use of restraints and
firearms. Applicants must be
U.S. Citizens and 21 years of
age. Closes 04/15/15. For salary
info and details about
Job #SO15-019 and other
current openings, visit
www.co.yamhill.or.us/hr.
EOE.

Closing date: 4/13/15.
OSU is an AA/EOE.
25

General

515

General

You’re
MOBILE.
So are we.

You’re social?
So are we.

Court Security Deputy
Reserve - Yamhill
County Sheriff’s Office

To review complete posting
and apply, go to
http://oregonstate.edu/jobs
posting #0014102.

515

StatesmanJournal.com/findnsave

Salary DOE with benefit package

Full-time (1.0 FTE),
12-month,
fixed-term position.

General

Professional

Accounts Payable Specialist

Instructor
(Seed Certification Specialist)
position at Department
of Crop & Soil Science,
Oregon State University.

515

523

Qual. apps will have prev related exp, open &
flex sched incl days/eve/wknd/holiday avail
and a positive and professional demeanor.
We are also willing to train those with relevant
experience. Applicants must enjoy working
in a busy customer-service oriented
environment!

515

General

Nationwide Federal Government
Contractor seeks highly experienced
and qualified

515

General

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515

General

pinterest.com/SJPinner

HVAC Mechanics and
General Maintenance Workers
for facility maintenance positions in
Corvallis and Newport, OR.
Qualified HVAC candidates must
possess at least 8 year’s proven
HVAC industrial experience.
Qualified GMW candidates must possess
at least 5 years experience in general
maintenance duties to include but
not limited to, changing light bulbs,
carpentry, painting, plumbing, and
changing filters on HVAC equipment.
These are highly compensated
Union positions with superior
benefit packages including
fully paid family health care.
The ability to obtain and maintain a
Federal Government security clearance
and pass a pre-employment drug and
alcohol screenings is mandatory.
Drug Free Work Place EOE M/F/D/ V
Please submit your resume in
confidence to us at:
corvallisnewport@yahoo.com
OR-0000360668

instagram.com/Salem_Statesman

Join the conversation.

5F

6F

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SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015 

 
 

     
     
 

   

   
       
 
     

  
   
      

    

  
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StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

CLASSIFIEDS

503-399-6789

Rentalfinder

StatesmanJournal.com/rentals

SALEM - NORTH EAST

SALEM - NORTHEAST

SALEM - NORTH EAST

SALEM - SOUTH

Brook Hollow Apartments
BEAUTIFUL COMMUNITY
1&2 BR Apts. Gated Community
μ Washer/Dryer Hook-ups μ 24 Hr
Fitness Center μ Beautiful Grounds μ
Seasonal Pool μ Carport μ On Site
Management μ Playground
4154 Sunnyview Rd NE
503 585-5505

Foxhollow Apartments

SALEM - SOUTH EAST

Falcon View Apartments
Ask About Our Specials!
Near Chemeketa Comm College
Easy I-5 Access
Water, Sewer, Garbage Paid
Dishwasher / Garbage Disposal
Washer/Dryer Hookups
Covered Parking, On-Site Manager
Please come visit us at 3800 Ward Dr
(503) 393-8385 or (503) 581-2485
2005grs@mail.com

Autumn Chase Apartments
Ask about Manger Special
2 & 3 bedroom units starting at
$730.00
Pets welcome. W/d hook-ups
3211 Autumn Chase Way
503-589-9245
Norris & Stevens Management

1 BR starting at $675.00
2 BR starting at $725.00
W/D Hook-ups μ Energy Efficient μ
Fitness Center μ Heated Seasonal
Pool μ On-Site Laundry μ Additional
Storage Unit μ Dog Friendly
w/Deposit
4892 Liberty Rd S. 503-375-3462
Norris & Stevens Management

Saddle Club Apartments
Best of the Mid Willamette Valley
Silver Winner
1, 2, 3 BR Apts starting at $650
Washer/Dryer Hook-ups μ Seasonal
Heated Pool & Sauna(s) μ Fitness
4665 Campbell Drive SE
503 371-6242
Norris & Stevens Management

Norris & Stevens Management

To get your listings on StatesmanJournal.com/rentals
» Call Terri McArthur at 503-399-6630 or email tmcarthur@statesmanjournal.com

To place an ad in the Statesman Journal
» Call Terri McArthur at 503-399-6630 or email tmcarthur@statesmanjournal.com

SALEM - SOUTH

SALEM - NORTH EAST

IVANHOE SOUTH APARTMENTS

Chancellor Apartments

Choose from innovatively designed
2br/1ba, 1000sf, priv patio, dishwasher,
walk-in closet, Quiet apartment homes,
where cats are allowed. Surrounded by
luxurious spaces, sunlight, and wonderful
views, you’ll find unlimited possibilities to
reflect your lifestyle. $625 503-362-3217

Cozy Small Complex!
Washer/Dryer Hookups
Water, Sewer, Garbage Paid
Diswasher/Disposal/Microwave
Near W.U. Campus and Capital
821 Cottage St. NE
(503) 581-2485

FAIR HOUSING LAWS
"The Federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination in
the sale, rental, leasing and financing of housing, as well
as discriminatory advertising, on the basis of RACE,
SEX, COLOR, RELIGION, NATIONAL ORIGIN, MENTAL or PHYSICAL HANDICAP, or FAMILIAL STATUS.
In addition to these categories, the State of Oregon also
prohibits discrimination based on MARITAL STATUS.
(Our local jurisdictions also have specific applicable regulations)"
"These laws cover any potential or actual sale, lease,
rental, eviction, price, terms, privileges or any service in
relation to the sale of or us of housing. The not only prohibit advertisements which clearly restrict access to
housing based on the protected categories, but also prohibit advertisements which indicate a preference for or
against a person based on a protected category. In particular circumstances, use of colloquialisms, symbols or
directions to real estate for sale or rent may indicate a
discriminatory preference."
"It is the intent and goal of this newspaper to have each
advertiser who wishes to place a covered advertisement
in the newspaper comply with the Fair Housing laws.
Any advertisement which is perceived to contain language contrary to these laws will be rejected or changed
to remove the offending reference. There may be situations where it is not clear whether particular language is
objectionable. Such advertisements should be referred
to a supervisor for consideration and determination. Under certain circumstances, advertisers may claim that because of the nature of the housing being advertised,
they are not subject to the Fair Housing laws. Such
claims are irrelevant for purposes of considering advertisements for publication in this newspaper. Every housing advertisement published in this newspaper is subject
to the Fair Housing laws"

712 Firewood 733 Bazaars &
& Fuel

Flea Markets

Cherry wood, u-haul.
$100/cord, less for pickup or small trailer load.
$150 del. 503-606-2773

POLK FLEA MARKET
Polk County Fairgrounds
Sun, April 5, 2015, 9-3
Admission $1.00

Lawn &
Garden Equipment

718

ROTOTILLER, rear tine,
Tecumseh engine. $375.
503-390-5618

721

Misc.
Wanted

CASH FOR DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30/box.
Free pick-up.
Call Sharon 503-679-3605.

DOWNLOAD
OUR FREE
APPS NOW

233

Homes
For Sale

2 HOUSES W/
BIG GARAGE $199,000
2 houses 3bdr 1850sf
2brd @ 1200sf in Keizer
Call: Tom 503-320-9540

StatesmanJournal.com

StatesmanJournal.com
/NewApps

The Mid-Valley’s
Number
One
News and
Information
Website.

811 Pet Food

& Supplies

ATTENTION
PET OWNERS:
WARNING!
Sometimes pets
are sold for
research without
your knowledge.
When offering your
animal for sale (or
free to a good
home), you may
want to verify the
name and address
of the person
answering your ad.

BE SEEN
with color!
503-399-6789

Classifieds

Source: SiteCatalyst, 2010

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LOCAL RIDES

MID-VALLEY CAR CLUBS
● Open

Statesman Journal

to any pre-1916 through 1927 auto enthusiasts.
at 7:30 p.m. on the fourth Thursday of each month at
Marion County Fire Station No.1 on Cordon Road NE in Salem.
● Meets

To submit or update club information, email
pbruce@statesmanjournal.com.

Salem Area Auto Council
● Salem

Bent 8 Street Rod Club
● Salem
● Contact: (503)

362-3799, www.bent8.org
at 6 p.m. on the first Sunday of each month at Walery’s
Pizza on Edgewater Drive NW in Salem.
● Meets

● Contact: Jeff Foster, (503) 884-1906 or (503) 588-1932,
president@wvsr.org,
● Meets the last Monday of each month at Capitol Chevrolet.

Silver T Horseless Club
● Silverton

Capitol Area Mustang Club

● Contact: Larry

● Salem
● Contact: Jim

Ramsden, (503) 585-7311,
www.capitolareamustangclub.org
● Meets at 7 p.m. on the second Tuesday of each month at Walery’s
Pizza on Edgewater Drive NW in Salem.

Capital City Corvettes
● Salem
● Contact: Glen Campbell, (503) 970-5990,
batf169@msn.com, www.capitalcitycorvettes.com
● Meets at 6 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at Flight Deck
Restaurant in Salem.

Cherry City Bombers
● Salem
● Contact: Brian Taylor, (503) 510-3995,
cherrycitybombers@gmail.com,
www.cherrycitybombers.com
● Meets at 7 p.m. on the first Thursday of each month at the Eola Inn
Rock-N-Rogers, 4250 Salem-Dallas Highway NW, Salem.

Chevelle and El Camino Club of Oregon
● Stayton
● Contact: Marina Anderson, (503) 263-4001,
ceccopresident@gmail.com, www.chevelles.net/oregon
● Meets on the last Sunday of each month.Visit the website or call for
time and location.

Early Ford V-8 Club of America,
Mid-Willamette Regional Group

● Meets

Brown, (503) 873-2738,
at 7 p.m. on the first Monday of each month at Silverton

Realty.

Silverton Flywheels
● Silverton
● Contact: Wes Oster, (503) 873-2573,
www.silvertonflywheels.org
● Open to all car enthusiasts.

Willamette MG Club
● Salem
● Contact: Terry Harris, (503) 393-3836,
chancellor@willamettemgclub.org,
www.willamettemgclub.org
● Meets at 7 p.m. on the third Tuesday of each month at McNary
Estates Golf Club Restaurant, 155 McNary Estates Dt. N. Keizer.

Willamette Motor Club
● Salem

and Keizer
Davie, (503) 873-4952, web@wmclub.org,
www.wmclub.org
● Meets at 7:30 p.m. the third Thursday of each month at Round
Table Pizza at Keizer Station.
● Contact: Chris

Willamette Valley Corvette Club
● Salem
● Contact: Tom Paddock, (503) 409-6115, President@willamettevalleycorvettes.com, www.willamettevalleycorvettes.com
● Members must attend two meetings and two club events.
● Meets the first Thursday of each month at Capitol Chevrolet.

● Salem
● Contact: Bruce

Reynolds, (503) 364-7675
at 7 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at 990
Cordon Road NE in Salem.
● Meets

Mid-Valley Cruzers Club
● Salem,Albany

and Jefferson
● Contact: Ray Lancaster, (503) 362-7589
● Meets for dinner and club business starting at 6 p.m. the first Thursday
of each month at the American Legion Post #10

Mopar Club and Pentastar Pride Club
● Salem
● Contact: Lee

Morgan, (503) 364-3569, geetex@aol.com,
www.pentastarpride.com
● Meets at 7 p.m. on the second Thursday of each month at Elmer’s
Restaurant on Lancaster Drive NE in Salem.

Northwest Vintage Car and Motorcycle Museum
● Salem
● Contact: Doug

Nelson, (503) 399-0647, buickdoug@yahoo.com,
nwcarandcycle.org
● Meets at 6:30 p.m. on the third Wednesday of each month at vintage
Texaco service station at Antique Powerland, 3995 Brooklake Road
NE, Brooks.

Willamette Valley Model A
Ford Club of America
● Salem
● Contact: Beauford Averette, (503) 856-9675,
beauforda@comcast.net, www.willamettevalleymodel-a.org,
info@willamettevalleymodel-a.org
● Meets the first Thursday of each month at the Mission Mill in
the Card Room.

Willamette Valley Model T Ford Club
● Salem
● Contact: Louise “Cookie” Feskens, (503) 362-7157, cfeskens@
comcast.net
● Meets at 7:30 p.m. on the first Wednesday of each month at
Marion County Fire Station No.1 on Cordon Road NE in Salem.

Willamette Valley Miata Club
● Salem
● Contact: Chris

McCarty, (503) 851-1549, www.oregonmx5.com
informally at 9 a.m. every Saturday at Subway,
5765 Commercial St. SE, Salem.
● Meets

Willamette Valley PT Cruiser Club
● Salem

area

● Contact: (503)

Obscure Imports
● Not

available
● Contact: Zach Steffen, (503) 302-9581, Obscure-1@live.com; or
Alex Thomas, (503) 798-3366
● Membership is free. Call or e-mail for meeting information.

999-7400, community-2.webtv.net/suziep/
WillametteValley
● Meets at 7 p.m. first Friday of each month (except January)
at Almost Home Restaurant on Market Street in Salem. Social
hour at 6 p.m.

Willamette Valley Street Rods

Obsolete Fleet Classics

● Salem

● Salem
● Contact: Jim

Billings, (503) 930-7151,
jimz28427@comcast.net, www.obsoletefleetclassics.org

Oregon Pioneer Regional Group of Horseless
Carriage Club of America

● Contact: Dave

LeCompte, (503) 393-6330,WVSRHQ@gmail.com,
wvsr.org, www.wvsr.org
● Meets the first Tuesday of each month at Pietro’s Pizza on
Hawthorne Avenue NE in Salem.

● Salem
● Contact: (503)

363-2619, woodspokes@aol.com

Outlet

Donofrio’s

Ford

WANTED:
19ft Nice Arima boat Sea Ranger or Sea Chaser.
4 stroke main, 115hp or above, with soft
complete top. 503-474-8212

WE BUY USED
CARS & TRUCKS

WE CONSIGN RV’S, CARS, AND TRUCKS
1999 FORD EXPLORER
EDDIE BAUER

OUR PRICE

STK# 147569A

ALLOY WHEELS, HEATED
SEATS, LEATHER, OUTSIDE
TEMPERATURE GAUGE

$

4,995

2007 FORD TAURUS SE
4DR SEDAN

OUR PRICE

VIN##5259Q
004740
STK

OUR PRICE

STK# 147795A

V-6, AUTOMATIC,
AIR, FULL POWER

$

6,995

2004 HONDA CIVIC
2DR COUPE

4 CYL, 5 SPD,
VALUE PACKAGE

$

6,995

$

OUR PRICE

STK# 158042A

5,995

2006 HYUNDAI
ELANTRA GT
HATCHBACK 4 DR
AUTOMATIC, LEATHER,
VERY NICE CAR!

$

OUR PRICE

STK #148028A

6,995

2010 FORD RANGER XLT
SUPERCAB 4X4
16,774 ACTUAL MILES!
4.0L V-6, LOADED, 5SPD
MANUAL TRANSMISSION

OUR PRICE

STK# 5237P

$

Cadillac

25

’93 Ford E150 conversion van/V8/tow pkg./cruise 1998 Cadillac
Eldorado
control/power everything!
(Independence,OR) $2800 OBO (503)838-1024 $4,950 OBO
97351 pra1947@yahoo.com
Loaded, low miles
@ 120K. Excellent
care & maintenance.
New tires . Very clean. Runs great!
Acura
503-365-2886

Chevrolet

503-399-0771

Mitsubishi
2006 Mitsubishi Lancer
ES $5,950
5Speed, Stereo, Custom
Wheel’s, CD

21,995

503-339-7 356

UNDER $5000

1991 Honda Accord EX
$2,950
Alloys, sun roof $300
down x $150
x 24mo. 18% APR
Call 4 Approval
VIN#152557
Toy Co

Vin #004343

1940 MISSION STREET SE | Salem, OR

Toy Co 503-399-0771

Plymouth
1996 Plymouth Neon
$1,950
4 Dr Auto Aero kit
Alloy’s $300 down x
$100 x 24mo. 18%
APR Call 4 Approval
VIN#603970
Toy Co

503-399-0771

Saab
2007 Saab 9.3
Convertable $6,950
Leather Heated Power
Seats, Alloys, Extra
Sharp.
VIN#007443

Toy Co

503-399-0771

$$$$
Lulay’s will pay top dollar

CALL BJ OR JIM
503-588-5000

Travel Tlrs & 5th Wheels
Honda

WWW.SKYLINEFORDDIRECT.COM

ACURA OF SALEM
503-588-5000 or
WE NEED
1-800-336-4148
GOOD CLEAN USED CARS
FREE APPRAISAL
TOP DOLLAR

1-800-307-4447
www.hillyers.com

2002 FORD FOCUS
ZX3 HATCHBACK
AUTOMATIC, AIR,
ALLOY WHEELS

Toyota

for your clean, carfax
certified vehicle!

The Mid-Valley’s
Number One News
and Information Website.

StatesmanJournal.com
Source: SiteCatalyst, 2010

503-363-3426
lulayscarconnection.net

Boats & Equipment

1994 Toyota Corolla DX
$1,950
4 Dr, Auto, PW, PL, CD
$300 down x $100 x
24mo. 18% APR. On
Approved Credit
VIN#127648
Toy Co

503-399-0771

2016 Wolf Pup
$13,985
Front Queen Bed,
rear bunk beds,
kitchen & more!
503-393-3365
4843 Portland Rd. NE

www.alstrailers.com

2009 Rock Climber
$15,900
Very clean,light
weight, with small
pop-out.
503-393-3365
4843 Portland Rd. NE

www.alstrailers.com

2000 Artic Fox
$8,985
1 Slide-out, wet
bath, front bed, AC,
luggage rack.
503-393-3365
4843 Portland Rd. NE

www.alstrailers.com

2012 Rockwood A128
$10,985
Hard Side Pop-Up,
kitchen, refer,
furnace.
503-393-3365
4843 Portland Rd. NE

www.alstrailers.com

2005 Fleetwood
$6,890
Very clean and light
weight, many
extras, sleeps 6.
503-393-3365
4843 Portland Rd. NE

www.alstrailers.com

Get

Inside
Business

Every Sunday in the
Statesman Journal

14F

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

WWW.POWEROREGON.COM

HASSLE FREE BUYING

14,200

1 AT
-$1,250 IF FINANCED WITH KMF*

30

HWY
MPG

$3,185

OFF MSRP!

$

12,950

SALE PRICE

NEW 2015 CHEVROLET CRUZE DIESEL

MSRP $16,135. Sale price after $1,935 Power Discount & *$1,250 KMF Bonus Cash. *Must finance with KMF to receive.
Tier 1-7. 620+ Beacon. On approved credit. 1 at this price. DMV & dealer admin fee not included. Vin 790978. Model B1511. Expires 5/4/15.

2015 KIA RIO
UP TO

EPA
ESTIMATED

37

AUTOM
AUTOMATIC

$3,280

OFF MSRP!

$

12,950

1 AT

HWY
MPG

MSRP $16,230. Sale price after $2,780 Power Discount & $500 Kia Customer

Cash Rebate. 1 at this price. DMV & dealer admin fee not included. Vin 528054. Model
34122. Expires 5/4/15.

2015 KIA FORTE

15,700
$
SALE PRICE 13,950
1 AT
-$1,750 IF FINANCED WITH KMF*

37
HWY

AUTOMATIC

UP TO

$

EPA
ESTIMATED
MPG

$4,810

OFF MSRP!

MSRP $18,760
MSR

VIN#187652. MSRP $28,315, Dealer Discount $5,000.
One at this price + lic title and doc fee

5,000 OFF
MSRP

$

NEW 2015 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ
VIN#153690. MSRP $35,310, Dealer Discount
$8,000. One at this price + lic title and doc fee

8,000 OFF
MSRP

$

NEW 2015 CHEVROLET SONIC 5DR

. Sale price after $3,060 Power Discount & *$1,750 KMF Bonus Cash. *Must finance with KMF to receive.
Tier 1-7.
1 7 620+
62 Beacon. On approved credit. 1 at this price. DMV & dealer admin fee not included. Vin 374135. Model C3422. Expires 5/4/15.

2015 KIA OPTIMA

18,950
$
SALE PRICE 16,950

1 AT
-$2,000 IF FINANCED WITH KMF*

37

BLUETOOTH &
TRACTION CONTROL

UP TO

$

EPA
ESTIMATED
HWY
MPG

$5,630

OFF MSRP!

VIN#135561. MSRP $15,670, Dealer Discount $2,675. One
at this price + lic title and doc fee

$

MSRP $22,580. Sale price after $3,630 Power Discount & *$2,000 KMF Bonus Cash. *Must finance with KMF to receive.
Tier 1-7. 620+ Beacon. On approved credit. 1 at this price. DMV & dealer admin fee not included. Vin 441634. Model 53222. Expires 5/4/15.

2015 KIA OPTIMA HYBRID
NOT YOUR
AVERAGE HYBRID

UP TO

$6,570

OFF MSRP!

EPA
ESTIMATED

1 AT

40

23,450

$

-$2,000 IF FINANCED WITH KMF*
-$500 LOYALTY OR COMP BONUS**

HWY
MPG

MSRP
MS
RP $27,520. Sale price after $4,070 SALE PRICE

$

20,950

Power Discount, *$2,000
*$2,0 KMF Bonus Cash & $500 Loyalty or Comp Bonus. Must finance with KMF to receive. Tier 1-7. 620+ Beacon. On approved credit. **Must currently own and have
register
regi
stereded aann apapplic
registered
appliplicab
cabable competitive model or own a Kia with a current registration. 1 at this price. DMV & dealer admin fee not included. Vin 081353. Model Z5222. Expires 5/4/15.

2016 KIA SORENTO

EPA
ESTIMATED

UP TO

$5,275

OFF MSRP!

1 AT

29
HWY

THE PERFECT
GETAWAY VEHICLE

$

23,450

-$500 IF FINANCED WITH KMF*
-$1,000 LOYALTY OR COMP BONUS**

MPG

SALE PRICE

MSRP $27,225
M

$

21,950

NEW 2015 CHEVROLET EQUINOX
VIN#124920. MSRP $25,395, Dealer Discount $5,400.
One at this price + lic title and doc fee

$

powerkia.com
866-981-1264
TEXT US AT 503-847-9374

3705 MARKET ST NE • SALEM

Art for illustration only. Prices do not include Title, License, Doc Fees. Prices expire Mon. following publication.

19,995

NEW 2015 CHEVROLET TRAVERSE
VIN#124268. MSRP $32,270, Dealer Discount $6,275.
One at this price + lic title and doc fee

$

. Sale price after $3,775 Power Discount, *$500 KMF Bonus Cash & **$1,000 Loyalty or Comp Bonus. *Must
finance
fin with KMF to receive. Tier 1-7. 620+ Beacon. On approved credit. **Must currently own and have registered an applicable competitive
model
mo or own a Kia with a current registration. 1 at this price. DMV & dealer admin fee not included. Vin 002096. Model 73222. Expires 5/4/15.

• 10-year/100,000-miles limited powertrain warranty
• 5-year/60,000-miles limited basic warranty
• 5-year/100,000-miles limited anti-perforation warranty
• 5-year/60,000-miles 24-hour roadside assistance*

12,995

25,995

503-769-7691
www.powerchevrolet.com

500 SW Sublimity Blvd, Sublimity
Just minutes east of Salem on Hwy 22 in Sublimity
Prices expire Monday following publication. Art for illustration only.
Prices do not include Lic, Title, Doc Fees. Prices expire Mon following publication.

• POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM •

L ET
V RO
C HE

Power
Chevrolet

I-5

CASCADE HWY

UP TO

$

EPA
ESTIMATED

BLUETOOTH &
ACTIVE ECO SYSTEM

M

2015 KIA SOUL

SA
LE

KIA

• POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM •

POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM •POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM •

POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM • POWER
POWERKIA.COM • POWERKIA.COM •

YOU’LL ALWAYS DO BETTER AT POWER

HWY 22

NEW 2015
ALTIMA 2.5S

NEW 2015 VERSA
NOTE SR HATCHBACK
QUALITY PRE-OWNED
2011 ALTIMA HYBRID SEDAN $
STOCK #P13307, VIN #C185578

2013 NISSAN ROGUE AWD
STOCK #N2953A, Vin #606989

2013 NISSAN QUEST
STOCK #P12263, VIN #064933 SV

2013 NISSAN JUKE SL AWD

APR
FOR

1.9% 60 MONTHS
$31668 A MONTH
Model #11715, 1 @ this price, Vin #368276, Stock #N2889, MSRP $17,530, + DMV
Docs. Must finance with NMAC, Tier levels 1-3, on approved credit. Expiration 4/5/15.

STOCK #N3167A, VIN #T214150

2014 NISSAN MURANO
STOCK #P13238, VIN #510681

2013 NISSAN FRONTIER
STOCK #P12742C, VIN #714206

15,977
$
17,888
$
21,872
$
21,988
$
24,451
$
24,988

877-351-5689 | 503-581-3849 | www.powernissansalem.com
2755 Mission St SE | SALEM

When financed with Oregon Community
Credit Union or Fifth Third Bank.
Tier 1-3. On Approved Credit.

0

% AVAILABLE FOR UP TO
60 MONTHS ON SELECT
NEW VEHICLES
APR offer in lieu of factory rebates,
contact dealer for details and availability

BUYATPOWER.COM

Buying Has Never
Been Easier

2014 GMC

SIERRA

CREW
CAB 4WD
STK#G1837 / VIN#518016, MSRP $49,035, POWER
DISCOUNT $10,058.

FINAL SALES PRICE $

2014 GMC

38,977

2015 GMC

SIERRA

SIERRA

1500

2500 4WD

STK#G1808 / VIN#350616, MSRP $27,170, GM
STK#G1827 / VIN# 131388, MSRP $44,640, GM
CUSTOMER CASH $5,750, POWER DISCOUNT $2,093. CUSTOMER CASH $2,000, POWER DISCOUNT $4,863.

19,327

FINAL SALES PRICE $

2015 GMC

TERRAIN

37,777

FINAL SALES PRICE $

2015 BUICK

LACROSSE

SLT

STK#G1984 / VIN#174363, MSRP $38,230, GM
STK#G1973 / VIN#181129, MSRP $34,560, GM
CUSTOMER CASH $1,000, POWER DISCOUNT $3,453. CUSTOMER CASH $1,250, POWER DISCOUNT $2,583.
FINAL SALES PRICE$

2015 BUICK

ENCLAVE

32,777

30,727

FINAL SALES PRICE $

2015 GMC

ACADIA
DENALI

STK#G1994 / VIN#198621, MSRP $49,580, GM
STK#G2065 / VIN#147206, MSRP $52,085, GM
CUSTOMER CASH $1,500, POWER DISCOUNT $4,503. CUSTOMER CASH $2,000, POWER DISCOUNT $3,028.

$
43,577
47,777
O V ER 70 0 P R E- O W N ED AVA I L A BL E
FINAL SALES PRICE

OR-0000361059

B U YAT P O W E R . C O M
3675 MARKET ST., SALEM

I-5

1-877-461-9045

BUICK
GMC
CARS SOLD
HERE!

Market St

N

Market St

I-5

FINAL SALES PRICE $

Prices expire Monday following publication. Art is for illustrations
purposes only. All vehicles subject to prior sale. Tax, license, title
and registration processing fees extra.

• powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS • powermazda.com •

Art for illustration
Prices60
do not
include Title,
License, Doc Fees.FLAG
Prices expire Mon. following publication.
LOOK
FORonly.
THE
FOOT
AMERICAN

powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS• powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS• powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS•

90

DAYS TO
FIRST PAYMENT

Model # 13115, 2 @ This price, Vin # 101312 & 100921. Vin # 101312, MSRP
$24,355, + DMV Docs., Vin # 100921, MSRP $24,035 + DMV Docs. Must
finance with NMAC, Tier levels 1-3, on approved credit. Expiration 4/05/15

POWER

NEW 2014 Mazda3

3,000
Off MSRP!
$

5 @ This Price, Vin#212097,162344,112406,174643,140533.
Example: MSRP $31,005, Power Discount $3,000, Total Sales Price $28,005.

$500 Discount
towards a New 2014
or 2015 Mazda
when you trade in
your Honda!

2015 Mazda3

2.99% APR for 84 Months
$250 Per Month

Sale Price $18,475, after $781 Power discount. MSRP $19,256, payment based on
84 monthly payments at 2.99% APR with 0% down payment + dealer discount. 1 @ This price. Vin#241555. On approved credit.

2015 Mazda6

2.99% APR for 84 Months
$315 Per Month

Sale Price $23,323 after $1,317 Power discount. MSRP $24,640, payment based on
84 monthly payments at 2.99% APR with $0 down payment + dealer discount. 1 @ This price. Vin#209541. On approved credit.

2015 Mazda CX-5

2.99% APR for 84 Months
$370 Per Month

Sale Price $27,652 after $953 Power discount. MSRP $28,605, payment based on
84 monthly payments at 2.99% APR with $0 down payment + dealer discount. 1 @ This price. Vin#509302. On approved credit.

2015 Mazda3 HATCHBACK

2.99% APR for 84 Months
$270 Per Month

Sale Price $20,128, after $887 Power discount. MSRP $21,015, payment based on
84 monthly payments at 2.99% APR with $0 down payment + dealer discount. 1 @ This price. Vin#262957. On approved credit.

*Special APR rates are based on approved credit. Must finance through Mazda Capital to
receive the advertised rates. Credit Tier level 1-4, 680 Beacon and above.

866-980-5279
SERVICE & PARTS OPEN SATURDAYS!

3230 Market St. Salem

powermazda.com

Art for illustration only. Prices do not include Title, License,
Doc Fees, Prices expire Mon. following publication.

powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS• powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS• powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS•

POWER

0% APR
FOR 72 MONTHS
$33865 A MONTH

• powermazda.com • WE BUY USED CARS • powermazda.com •

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL

APRIL 5, 2015 SECTION U

*

When rain
won’t go
away, take
it in stride,
3U

SUNDAY
CALENDAR
Plan your week in entertainment with these highlights
and pop-culture milestones.

MONDAY
Buy: Season 5 of HBO’s
‘Game of Thrones’
premieres next Sunday,
but fans can pick up the
newest GOT beer, ThreeEyed Raven, today. The
dark saison ale is part of the
collection crafted by Brewery
Ommegang.

TUESDAY
Listen: American
jam band Blues
Traveler releases
its newest studio
album, ‘Blow Up
The Moon,’ today via Loud &
Proud Records. The album will
feature an array of familiar
artists, including Hanson,
Jewel and Bowling for Soup.

Disney for VIPs: It’s a
luxe world after all, 4U
KENT PHILLIPS, DISNEY

MUSIC

IT’S FESTIVAL SEASON —
BUT WHERE HAVE ALL THE

WOMEN
GONE?

WEDNESDAY
Watch: Lifetime Movie Network’s newest original series,
‘I Love You ... But I Lied,’
will portray true stories of family
secrets and personal deception
in a documentary-like style.
The show premieres tonight
at 10 ET.

THURSDAY

RICK KERN, GETTY IMAGES, FOR SAMSUNG

Billy Crystal joins Josh Gad
at SXSW last month in Austin.

Watch: FX is set for a big night
of comedy on TV as its new
series ‘The Comedians,’
starring Billy Crystal, premieres
tonight at 10 ET, followed by
the Season 5 premiere of
Emmy-Award winning comedy
‘Louie’ at 10:30.

FRIDAY
See: A new Nicholas Sparks
adaptation hits theaters today:
In ‘The Longest Ride,’ Scott
Eastwood is a rodeo guy, and
Britt Robertson is a student
heading to New York. Is it love?
Compiled by Kristin Musulin

USA SNAPSHOTS©

Full of beans
More than 16 billion jelly beans
are made for Easter.
Most popular flavors:

24%

Cherry
Strawberry

19%
15%

Licorice

13%

Lemon

8% Grape
Some 22% prefer “other” flavor; exceeds
100% because of rounding
Source National Confectioners’
Association survey of 1,335 U.S. adults

CHRISTOPHER POLK, GETTY IMAGES, FOR COACHELLA

Of nearly
160 acts
at this
year’s
Coachella
festival,
only 26
are
femalefronted —
about
16%.
Other
festivals’
numbers
are
similar.

Patrick Ryan
USA TODAY

f you want to headline a music festival, it helps to have
a Y chromosome.
Paul McCartney,
AC/DC,
Kendrick
Lamar and Sam Smith are
among the dozens of male music acts with top billing at this
summer’s major fests, which
kick off Friday with the mammoth Coachella in Indio, Calif.,
and continue through August
across the country.
But only a handful of women
are headlining this year’s events,
including Florence and the Machine, Alabama Shakes, Lana
Del Rey and Sleater-Kinney.
Tally up all the female artists’
names, and the gender imbalance is even more startling.
Out of nearly 160 artists, only
26 at Coachella are femalefronted acts — about 16%. Similarly, fewer than 20 of the 100
artists appearing at Bonnaroo
(June 11-14 in Manchester,
Tenn.) are female. Roughly 30 of
the 135 bands playing Lollapalooza (July 31-Aug. 2 in Chicago)
are women-led. Smaller fests
such as Hangout (May 15-17 in
Gulf Shores, Ala.) and Sweetlife
(May 30-31 in Columbia, Md.)

I

MERRICK ALES, FILMMAGIC

“There’s no nice
green room
where you can
take a nap and
someone’s going
to blow a fan
at you.”
Sarah Barthel, Phantogram

fare slightly better, with
about 25% and 35%
female
artists,
respectively.
The gap is not new, either. Despite women
such as Lorde, Haim and
Ellie Goulding playing
multiple fests on the circuit last year, Coachella still
had only 28 female-fronted
acts in 2014, according to Slate.
And in 2013, Buzzfeed ran
through Coachella’s lineups
since its inception in 1999 and
reported that only two women
have had the festival’s highest
billing: Björk in 2002 and 2007,
and Portishead in 2008. The
event has never had more than a
25% female lineup.
Coachella producer Goldenvoice declined interviews for
this article, and an e-mail to
Bonnaroo co-producer Superfly
Presents was not returned.
But other festival promoters
say the shortage of women is not
for a lack of trying.
“A lot of it is just timing:
Who’s got a record cycle? Who’s
going out? Are they playing other stuff that’s in the radius?”
says Hangout director Sean
O’Connell. “It’s unfortunate, but
it’s going to happen. There’s
definitely offers going out.”

Ellie
Goulding
was one
of the few
female
artists performing at
Coachella
last year.

Fests
for all
tastes
Listings 2U

v STORY CONTINUES ON 2U

ANNE R. CAREY AND A. GONZALEZ, USA TODAY

TELEVISION

‘Mad Men’ set the bar low, then shattered it
Bill Keveney
USA TODAY

As many things as
they did right with Mad Men, creator Matthew Weiner and star
Jon Hamm were not the best
handicappers of the AMC drama’s prospects before it premiered in 2007.
Weiner says he didn’t expect
big success, and Hamm, who
brought brilliant, troubled ad
man Don Draper to life, “was
even less delusional. From the beLOS ANGELES

MICHAEL YARISH, AMC

Jon Hamm plays the complex,
conflicted Don Draper.
ginning, he was saying the pilot
would be the end of it but that we

had a great time.”
The writer and actor were off
by seven seasons, not to mention
four consecutive Emmys for best
drama. Weiner’s critically acclaimed story of 1960s New York
advertising men became a cultural phenomenon and helped usher
in an era of quality drama on basic-cable networks. Men returns
for its final seven episodes tonight at 10 ET/PT.
Men’s influence is apparent in
current museum exhibits, such as
one at New York’s Museum of the
Moving Image that features Don’s

office and the Draper kitchen. “It
remains an incredibly evocative
thing,” Hamm says.
After career, romantic and
family ups and downs, Don spent
last year’s episodes “fighting to
get his job back, fighting to repair
his relationship with (colleague)
Peggy, fighting to get his self-respect back” even as colleagues
and family members focus on
their own lives, Weiner says.
He believes viewers have been
drawn to the real-life nature of
the drama. “Someone is not saying, ‘You killed my father.’

They’re saying, ‘You lied to me.’
What people in the audience have
responded to, and what we’ve
tried to do, is say, ‘That is the drama in our life,’ ” Weiner says.
“Don has been behaving in a universe that we occupy.”
Hamm can’t pick a favorite episode or moment. “It’s been a singular experience in many ways. ...
a field of points of excitement. At
the end of it, you step back and
you realize all those points have
created this picture. I’m thrilled
to have been part of it and of the
impact it has made with people.”

2U

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

*

CELEBRITY SUPERLATIVES
Electric Forest Rothbury, Mich.,
June 25-28
Just three hours outside Detroit, this
wooded escape comes alive with
eccentrically dressed patrons, psychedelic art installations and dozens of
EDM, folk and bluegrass artists. Headliners: The String Cheese Incident,
Bassnectar, Skrillex, Flume, Kaskade.
electricforestfestival.com

GET YOUR SUMMER
MUSIC FEST ON
With dozens of music festivals scheduled between now and Labor Day, there
are plenty of choices for every taste.
USA TODAY’s Patrick Ryan rounds up
this season’s top tuneful escapes:
Coachella Indio, Calif., April 10-12, 17-19
The colossal desert fest, in its 16th year,
is back for two weekends. Headliners:
Jack White, Drake, AC/DC, Florence and
the Machine, The Weeknd.
coachella.com
Stagecoach Indio, Calif., April 24-26
Less than a week after Coachella
shutters here, the biggest names in
country music ride into town. Headliners: Tim McGraw, Miranda Lambert,
Blake Shelton, Dierks Bentley, The Band
Perry. stagecoachfestival.com
New Orleans Jazz and Heritage
New Orleans, April 24-May 3
The longstanding fest is a cultural
mecca for food, crafts and genrespanning performances. Headliners:
Elton John, The Who, Keith Urban,
Jimmy Buffett, Tony Bennett and Lady
Gaga. nojazzfest.com
Welcome to Rockville
Jacksonville, April 25-26
Goth-rock icons and heavy-metal
upstarts converge on Metropolitan Park.
Headliners: Korn, Marilyn Manson,
Slayer, Halestorm, Ministry.
welcometorockvillefestival.com
SunFest West Palm Beach,
Fla.,
April 29-May 3
More than 175,000 visitors
annually flock to Florida’s
largest waterfront arts
and music festival. Headliners: Fall Out Boy, Pixies,
Lenny Kravitz, Paramore,
Hozier. sunfest.com

CHRIS WEEKS, GETTY IMAGES FOR REEBOK

Kendrick Lamar headlines multiple festivals, including Bonnaroo.
Rocklahoma Pryor, Okla., May 22-24
A part of World’s Loudest Month series,
this hard-rock fest welcomes veteran and
up-and-coming bands to its campgrounds outside of Tulsa. Headliners:
Linkin Park, Tesla, Godsmack, Slayer,
Volbeat. rocklahoma.com
Boston Calling Boston, May 22-24
Now in its third year, the twice-a-year
fest kicks off at Boston’s City Hall Plaza.
Headliners: Beck, My Morning Jacket,
Pixies, Tame Impala, Ben Harper and the
Innocent Criminals. bostoncalling.com
Sasquatch! George, Wash., May 22-25
Attendees have been trekking to this
Northwest fest, held at the renowned
Gorge Amphitheater, since 2002. Headliners: Kendrick Lamar, Modest Mouse,
Sleater-Kinney, Lana Del Rey, Of Monsters and Men.
sasquatchfestival.com
Sweetlife Columbia, Md.,
May 30-31
The D.C.-area fest expands
to two days in its sixth year.
Headliners: Calvin Harris,
Kendrick Lamar, The
Weeknd, Charli XCX, Bleachers. sweetlifefestival.com

Stopover Seaside Heights, N.J.,
June 5-6
GETTY IMAGES
iHeartRadio Country Festival
This intimate New Jersey event is
Sam Smith is the first of four U.S. festivals
Austin, May 2
Before iHeartRadio Music
set for sever- Mumford and Sons has curated
Festival invades Sin City in the
al festivals.
for the summer, with stops in
fall, it throws this one-day
Iowa, Washington and Colorado
country jamboree. Headliners: Tim
to follow. Headliners: Mumford and Sons,
McGraw, Brad Paisley, Dierks Bentley,
The Flaming Lips, Alabama Shakes,
Rascal Flatts, Darius Rucker.
Jenny Lewis, Dawes.
news.iheart.com/features/
gentlemenoftheroad.com/stopovers
iheartradio-country-festival-25
Governors Ball, New York, June 5-7
Big Guava Tampa, May 8-9
City slickers make the hike to Randall’s
Alt-rock and EDM acts take over four
Island by subway, bus, car and ferry for
stages at the Florida State Fairgrounds
this three-day event. Headliners: Drake,
and MidFlorida Credit Union Amphithe- The Black Keys, Deadmau5, Lana Del Rey,
ater. Headliners: The Strokes, Pretty
Florence and the Machine.
Lights, Passion Pit, TV on the Radio,
governorsballmusicfestival.com
Awolnation. bigguavafest.com
Free Press Summer Houston, June 6-7
Shaky Knees Atlanta, May 8-10
Paint slides and music workshops are a
The Peach State-fest hosts indie rock,
couple of the additional attractions at
pop and folk acts for a third year.
this two-day event, organized by local
Headliners: The Strokes, Pixies, Mastarts newspaper ‘Free Press Houston.’
odon, Brand New, James Blake.
Headliners: Skrillex, R. Kelly, Charli XCX,
shakykneesfestival.com
Weezer, Major Lazer. fpsf.com
Rock in Rio USA Las Vegas,
Bonnaroo Manchester, Tenn., June 11-14
May 8-9, May 15-16
Despite broiling temperatures, music
The North American edition of the
fans nationwide continue swarming to
popular global fest kicks off its inauguthis sprawling, eclectic fest. Headliners:
ral run. Headliners: (week 1) No Doubt,
Billy Joel, Mumford and Sons, Kendrick
Metallica; (week 2) Taylor Swift, Bruno
Lamar, Florence and the Machine, My
Mars, Ed Sheeran. rockinrio.com/usa
Morning Jacket. bonnaroo.com
Hangout Gulf Shores, Ala., May 15-17
CMA Music Festival Nashville, June 11-14
More than 40,000 festivalgoers flock to
Along with the nightly ticketed entertainthe beach for three days of songs, sand ment, there are seven stages of free
and sunshine. Headliners: Foo Fighters,
concerts in downtown Nashville. HeadlinSam Smith, Zac Brown Band, Beck,
ers: Brad Paisley, Eric Church, Brett
Skrillex. hangoutmusicfest.com
Eldredge, Lady Antebellum, Cole Swindell. cmaworld.com/cma-music-festival
Rock on the Range Columbus, Ohio,
May 15-17
Spring Awakening Chicago, June 12-14
Started in 2007, this fest has regularly
Popular DJs and EDM newcomers light
drawn more than 100,000 heavy-metal
up Chicago’s Soldier Field stadium for a
fans to Mapfre Stadium (formerly Crew
fourth year. Headliners: Zedd, Hardwell,
Stadium). Headliners: Slipknot, Judas
Diplo, Tiësto, Afrojack.
Priest, Linkin Park, Godsmack, Marilyn
springawakeningfestival.com
Manson. rockontherange.com
Firefly Dover, Del., June 18-21
Lightning in a Bottle Bradley, Calif.,
A diverse mix of hip hop, pop and classic
May 21-25
rock artists, set against the forest backMeditate, practice yoga and chill out to
drop of the Woodlands. Headliners:
electronic music at this desert oasis
Paul McCartney, Kings of Leon,
gathering. Headliners: Flume, SBTRKT,
The Killers, Morrissey, Snoop Dogg.
Odesza, Tycho, Panda Bear.
fireflyfestival.com
lightninginabottle.org
Summerfest Milwaukee,
CounterPoint Kingston Downs, Ga.,
June 24-28, June 30-July 5
May 22-24
Touted as the “world’s largest musical
Enjoy food, art installations and EDM at
festival,” it welcomes more than 800 acts
this three-day event an hour outside
over 11 days and draws 900,000 music
Atlanta. Headliners: Widespread Panic,
fans. Headliners: Florida Georgia Line,
Zedd, The Roots, Kygo, Dillon Francis.
Keith Urban, Kendrick Lamar, Ed Sheecounterpointfestival.com
ran, Kings of Leon. summerfest.com

Essence New Orleans, July 2-5
The popular fest celebrates the best in
African-American talent and culture,
with a diverse group of artists and
speakers on its annual slate. Headliners: Usher, Mary J. Blige, Kendrick
Lamar, Missy Elliott, Common.
essence.com/festival
Bunbury, Cincinnati, July 5-7
The banks of the Ohio River are flooded
with craft beer, indie rock and six stages
during this three-day event (named for
an imaginary friend in an Oscar Wilde
play, whom a character invents as an
excuse to escape from relatives).Headliners: The Black Keys, The Avett Brothers, Snoop Dogg, Tame Impala, The
Decemberists. bunburyfestival.com

(Hangout offered four potential
headlining slots to female artists,
none of which panned out due to
scheduling, O’Connell adds.)
When taste-making music publication Pitchfork organizes its
annual Chicago fest, diversity is
“something you definitely keep in
mind; you want to make sure the
festival is representative of all
genders and races,” says Pitchfork
president Chris Kaskie. Given
that most artists playing this
year’s event (such as Sleater-Kinney and Chvrches) have already
been covered extensively by the
site, “the good news is that we
don’t obsess over the consideration, because it’s already a pretty
natural thing anyway.”
Pitchfork’s priority is to accurately represent the current musical landscape — a philosophy that
promoter Huston Powell of C3
Presents adopts while organizing
Lollapalooza’s yearly rosters.
“It’s not like I’m counting, out
of 130 bands, ‘How many are
fronted by women?’ ” Powell says.
“I feel like in a given year, if we
take care of the musical diversity,
the rest will kind of play out.”
Instead, it could come down to
the continued scarcity of women
in rock, hip-hop and electronic
dance music — all heavily featured at summer music festivals,
unlike pop. Also, most promoters
don’t pursue top-40 staples for
top slots, although there have
been exceptions, such as Lady Gaga (who headlined Lollapalooza in
2010) and Beyoncé (who closed
U.K.’s Glastonbury fest in 2011.)
“Every festival thrives on exceptions. Taylor Swift or Lady Gaga could kill it at Coachella, and
they’d be the exception there,”
says Billboard editor in chief Joe
Levy. “That said, the question is
whether or not festivals in general
can afford the kind of wildly en-

USA TODAY’s Cindy Clark digs through the latest celebrity news for highlights ... and lowlights. Think high
school yearbook superlatives — if Angelina Jolie and
Beyoncé were classmates.

Pitchfork Chicago, July 17-19
The taste-making music publication
offers up its 10th festival in Chicago’s
Union Park, hosting indie royalty and
virtual unknowns for more than 50,000
attendees. Headliners: Wilco, Chance
the Rapper, Sleater-Kinney, Future
Islands, Chvrches.
pitchforkmusicfestival.com
Forecastle Louisville, July 17-19
Founded in 2002, the homegrown
festival draws thousands to Louisville’s
85-acre Waterfront Park. Headliners:
Sam Smith, My Morning Jacket, Widespread Panic, Modest Mouse, Cage the
Elephant. forecastlefest.com
Newport (R.I.) Folk Festival July 24-26
Since its 1959 inception, the festival has
helped introduce the likes of Joan Baez
and Bob Dylan to the masses. Headliners: The Lone Bellow, Brandi Carlile, First
Aid Kit, Courtney Barnett, Shakey
Graves. newportfolk.org
Lollapalooza Chicago, July 31-Aug. 2
The all-embracing Grant Park festival
sold out in just 45 minutes when tickets
went on sale last month. Headliners:
Paul McCartney, Metallica, Florence and
the Machine, Sam Smith, Alt-J.
lollapalooza.com
Newport (R.I.) Jazz Fest July 31-Aug. 2
The famed event has hosted icons such
as Miles Davis, Duke Ellington and Billie
Holiday; it celebrated its 60th anniversary last year. Headliners: Chris Botti,
Jamie Cullum, Cassandra Wilson, Arturo
Sandoval, Dr. John.
newsportjazzfest.org
Telluride (Colo.) Jazz July 31-Aug. 2
Nestled in a narrow canyon, the annual
celebration has welcomed jazz, soul
and brass bands for nearly 40 years.
Headliners: Ernie Watts, The M&Ms,
Maceo Parker, Bill Frisell Trio, Joey
DeFrancesco. telluridejazz.org
Outside Lands San Francisco, Aug. 7-9
Along with the smorgasbord of headliners, festivalgoers can sample a wide
selection of gourmet cuisine. Headliners: Elton John, Mumford and Sons, The
Black Keys, Kendrick Lamar, D’Angelo
and the Vanguard. sfoutsidelands.com

BEST GIRL GROUP REUNION: DESTINY’S CHILD

Surprise! Former Destiny’s Child trio Beyoncé, Kelly Rowland and
Michelle Williams reunited on stage at the Stellar Gospel Music
Awards, where they performed Say Yes. It’s actually a song from
Williams’ fourth studio album, Journey to Freedom, which features
her former girl group members and was nominated for several
awards. The performance was the first time the ladies have sung
together since Beyoncé’s 2013 Super Bowl halftime show.
CUTEST “WE WON!” FACES:
ANGELINA JOLIE’S KIDS

It doesn’t get much cuter than this!
Angelina Jolie and two of her children, Zahara and Shiloh, celebrated
March 28 after the actress was
named best villain for her role in
Maleficent during Nickelodeon’s 28th
Annual Kids’ Choice Awards.
SWEETEST BABY PHOTO
REVEAL: CARRIE
UNDERWOOD

The singer finally shared a
photo of her newborn son
on Instagram, and she did it
in an adorable way. Underwood’s hubby, Mike
Fisher, plays hockey for the
Nashville Predators, so it
would only seem natural
that little Isaiah would
inherit a love for the game,
right? In the photo, Isaiah
clutches a mini hockey stick
— and Underwood jokes
that the napping newborn
is prepared to step in!

KEVIN WINTER, GETTY IMAGES FOR IHEARTMEDIA

Brian Kelley, left, and Tyler Hubbard of Florida Georgia Line.
Texas Thunder
Gardendale, Texas, Aug. 21-23
This laid-back, farmland fest, now in its
third year, is revving up another A-list
set of country headliners. Headliners:
Florida Georgia Line, Brad Paisley, Big
and Rich, Thomas Rhett, Clare Dunn.
texasthunderfest.com

Fans notice the disparity
v CONTINUED FROM 1U

Best, brightest
and the bomb

you see on tour and the girls you
meet, because they’re usually
just as dirty as you and you kind
of have to think like a guy.
There’s no nice green room
where you can take a nap and
someone’s going to blow a fan at
you.”
Most artists at festivals are the
hungrier bands that “tour their
(butts) off and spend as much
time as they can on the road,”
she adds. “You don’t see many
women in that world because it’s
pretty hard to do in that aspect.
It’s not very glamorous.”

BEST ROYAL PHOTOBOMB:
A PICTURE OF GEORGE

Prince Charles recorded a
video for Earth Hour, but we
have no idea what he said; we
were too distracted by the
adorable photo of his grandson, Prince George, in the
background. It’s a pic of
Prince Charles holding the
future heir to the throne,
who couldn’t be cuter!
MOST PLAYFUL AWARD TEASE:
JUSTIN TIMBERLAKE

It’s no surprise that when Taylor
Swift wins an award, she gets
really, really excited — and
makes lots of faces to show it. So
when her name was announced
for winning best lyrics for her
song Blank Space at the iHeart
Radio Music Awards, Justin Timberlake followed suit, jumping up
and making excited faces of his own!

THE DEMAND IS THERE
TAYLOR HILL, WIREIMAGE

Carrie Brownstein and Sleater-Kinney will perform at
Pitchfork Music Festival July
17-19 in Chicago.
tertaining spectacles the biggest
women in touring put on.”
Acts of that caliber “can go on a
stadium tour and make more than
they would at a festival show,”
says Alex Young, founder of music/film site Consequence of
Sound. After all, the likes of
Beyoncé, Katy Perry and Cher all
scored some of the top-grossing
tours of 2014, Billboard says. Upcoming jaunts from Madonna and
Taylor Swift are guaranteed to be
hot tickets, as well.
MORE INCLUSIVENESS

That doesn’t change the fact that
there are still so few midsized and
up-and-coming female acts on
festival rosters. Sarah Barthel, one
half of electronic-rock duo Phantogram (with Josh Carter), has
played nearly every major event
on the circuit in recent years, and
soon heads to Hangout, Sweetlife
and Electric Forest (June 25-28 in
Rothbury, Mich.).
“A lot of times we’d go to a festival and I’d be the only person
wearing high heels,” Barthel says.
“You always respect the women

But fans still want to see more
female faces. Brittnay Johnston,
23, of Los Angeles is going to
Coachella, whose lineup features
St. Vincent, FKA Twigs and
Sylvan Esso. Johnston didn’t notice how few women were playing until she saw buzz on social
media, with Photoshopped lineups that eliminated male artists
to make a point about women’s
festival numbers.
“It definitely does make me
more inclined, when I’m figuring
out the smaller bands I want to
see, just to pick one who maybe
features a woman or just a solo
female act,” Johnston says.
Alison Gary, 40, of Greenbelt,
Md., says she has noticed fewer
women on lineups as festivals
become more “homogeneous.”
But with so many ways to discover new artists online, she
says, it’s fans’ responsibility to
spearhead the change they want
to see.
“I think music festivals used
to be about the people and now
they’ve started to become about
the ad revenue and sales,” Gary
says. “Festivals are successful
based upon their attendance, so
we should use social media and
let our voices be heard, and get
what we want at these events.”

DESTINY’S CHILD BY MATTHEW EMMONS, USA TODAY SPORTS; JOLIE BY KEVIN WINTER, GETTY IMAGES;
UNDERWOOD BY CARRIE UNDERWOOD VIA INSTAGRAM; PRINCE CHARLES BY THE WORLD WILDLIFE FUND;
TIMBERLAKE BY KEVIN WINTER, GETTY IMAGES, FOR IHEARTMEDIA

Corrections & Clarifications

PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER

Larry Kramer

USA TODAY is committed
to accuracy. To reach us,
contact Standards Editor
Brent Jones at 800-8727073 or e-mail accuracy@usatoday.com.
Please indicate whether
you’re responding to
content online or in the
newspaper.

EDITOR IN CHIEF

David Callaway
PRESIDENT, ADVERTISING SALES

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PUZZLE ANSWERS

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

*

3U

FASHION

Here’s the gear;
just add water
April showers bring May flowers ...
and a whole host of fashion issues!
USA TODAY’s Alison Maxwell rounds up
ways to stay dry — and look cute doing it.

Pieni Unikko
umbrella, $69 at
Marimekko.com

BUY A RELIABLE
UMBRELLA
Oversized fuchsia blooms on
this unique umbrella serve
as a reminder of what’s
to come in May.

INVEST IN
A RAINCOAT
Who says you have to
sacrifice style to be
protected from the
elements? Marimekko
combines high fashion and
practicality in this slicker.

A sure way to rain on
your parade?
Losing your
umbrella!
Davek’s got
you covered
with the Alert
umbrella, which
contains a bluetooth chip
that connects with an app on
your smartphone. If the
distance between the
umbrella chip and your
smartphone exceeds 30 feet,
you receive a warning.

There’s something to be
said for simplicity when
Mother Nature wreaks
havoc on your fashion
plans. A classic trench
coat goes with just
about anything and
will take you all the
way through April.

Sadellen
raincoat,
$325 at
Marimekko.com

Bootsi Tootsi
Moto rain
boots, $43.97
at Kohls.com

SWAP
STILETTOS
FOR RAIN
BOOTS

$125 at Davekny.com.
Available in late
summer/early fall.
Preorder on Davek’s
Kickstarter page
through April 11 and
receive 20% off.

Coat, $49 at
JoeFresh.com
Martha Stewart
Pets T-shirt,
$8.99 on sale at
Petsmart.com

PROTECT
YOUR POOCH
Let’s face it: Fido
isn’t a fan of getting
sopping wet, either.
Keep him covered
and stylish with a
slicker.

Kamik
Poppies
floral rain
boots,
$59.99 at
Kohls.com

Prove that your pup
is the sweetest in the
neighborhood with a
cute “Rain or shine
you are a friend of
mine” shirt.

Prance through
puddles in
poppy-festooned boots!
Or, if you’re looking for something a
little less sweet and girly, try these
edgy ankle boots. From a distance,
we’ll bet nobody can even tell
they’re rain gear.

Martha Stewart
Pets flower raincoat,
$14.99 on sale at
Petsmart.com

HEALTH

Anti-wrinkle creams promise a lot, but . . .
Overblown claims
get products into
trouble with FDA

HOW TO PROTECT
YOUR SKIN
The American Academy
of Dermatology has this
advice on preventing and
fighting wrinkles:
uWear sunscreen
every day.
uDon’t try to tan, whether
outside or in a salon.
uMoisturize to improve
skin’s appearance.
uDon’t smoke — it
contributes to wrinkling.
uIf you try a wrinkle
cream, give it some time
to work, but expect modest
results. Stop using any
product that stings or burns,
unless you are using it under
medical supervision.

Kim Painter
Special for USA TODAY

Wrinkles happen. And when
they do, many women, and some
men, start searching store aisles
or the Internet for a cure.
Although there is no such
thing, stores and websites are
happy to sell consumers wrinkle
creams and other “anti-aging”
products that, typically, promise
to reduce “the appearance of fine
lines and wrinkles.”
Lately, some are promising a
lot more — and getting into trouble with the Food and Drug
Administration.
“The number and type of
claims that we are seeing has
been increasing over the past five
to 10 years, with the growth in the
market of anti-aging products,”
Linda Katz, director of FDA’s office of cosmetics and colors, said
in an email.
In a recent update for
consumers, the agency reminded
the public that products sold as
cosmetics — a category that includes makeup and all non-prescription wrinkle creams — are
not reviewed for effectiveness by
the FDA and so cannot make the
kind of claims allowed for approved drugs.
NO FOUNTAIN OF YOUTH

Claims that a product can
change the skin’s structure or function (by
stimulating the production of skin-firming collagen, for
example) are illegal,
the FDA says.
In recent years,
the agency has
sent
warning
letters to several
skin-care com-

LUISCAR/ISTOCKPHOTO
VIA GETTY IMAGES

THINKSTOCK/GETTY IMAGES

“Boomers are
all fried, because
we grew up in an
era when there
wasn’t any
sunscreen use.
Hopefully, the
Millennials will
do better.”
Dermatology professor Richard Glogau

panies for making such claims.
Recipients have included Avon
and Lancôme.
The most recent warning went
to StriVectin, a company that
makes pricey anti-aging potions
sold online and at stores such as
Bloomingdale’s and Nordstrom.
FDA called out the company
for, among other things, claiming
its Potent Wrinkle Reducing
Treatment ($99 for 1.7 oz.) was
“clinically proven to change the
anatomy of a wrinkle” and that its
Advanced
Tightening
Neck
Cream ($95 for 1.7 oz.) could
“restore the elastin fiber architecture … improving resistance to
gravity.”
In a statement, StriVectin said: “We
stand by the efficacy of our
products” and
“are doing everything in our power to ensure that
our communication to the public
complies” with the law.
The agency can’t comment
on ongoing cases, Katz says.
Dermatologists say consumers
should know that there’s no fountain of youth in a bottle — and

that even drugs and procedures
offered by doctors can’t undo a
lifetime of aging and sun damage.
“There is nothing that is going
to take skin that looks 50 and
make it look 20,” says Fayne Frey,
a dermatologist in West Nyack,
N.Y.
A CHEAPER SOLUTION

Frey, whose website FryFace
seeks to debunk skin care myths,
says non-prescription wrinkle
remedies can have a modest
effect, but so can any good moisturizer, including brands sold in
drugstores for less than $20 a
bottle.
“You get a temporary increase
in water in skin,” she says, and
that can help mask fine lines and
wrinkles.
The heavily marketed extra ingredients in anti-aging formulas
are mostly vitamins or watereddown retinoids, the active ingredient in drugs such as Retin-A,
Frey says. If they add anything to
the moisturizing effects, she says,
it’s minimal. They can also add
side effects, such as skin irritation, she says.
At her site, Frey recommends
some products from drugstore
brands such as Olay, Neutrogena
and Aveeno, but she says she has
no financial ties with any of the

companies.
Over-the-counter products, including some with retinoids, can
improve the appearance of aging
skin when used every day “for a
long time,” says Jenny Kim, a dermatologist and researcher at the
University of California-Los
Angeles.
There’s no reason to think the
most expensive versions have any
advantages, she says — unless the
high price makes users more likely to stick to their skin care regimens and stay out of the sun.
For patients who are willing to
spend even more — and endure
more discomfort and risk — there
are options available from doctors, including higher-dose prescription
retinoid
creams
approved by the FDA.
Some people find those creams
too irritating at first, so they may
want to start with lower-dose
options, says Richard Glogau, a
clinical professor of dermatology
at the University of CaliforniaSan Francisco.
Other options include Botox
injections, filler procedures and
laser resurfacing, all of which cost
at least several hundred dollars
per session and must be repeated
every few months or years, Kim
and Glogau say. Both have a financial relationship with Botox
maker Allergan; Glogau also has
relationships with companies
that make fillers.
But Frey, Kim and Glogau all
say the first product they recommend for anyone concerned
about wrinkles is a broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sun protection factor of at least 30.
The FDA does allow cosmetics
containing proven sunscreens
(which are considered drugs) to
claim that they reduce the risk of
“early skin aging caused by the
sun.”
Sun exposure — including the
light we get through car windows
and on cloudy days — is the most
important cause of wrinkling, and
keeps causing damage as we age,
the doctors say.
“The Boomers are all fried, because we grew up in an era when
there wasn’t any sunscreen use,”
Glogau says. “Hopefully, the
Millennials will do better.”

4U

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

*

TRAVEL
DISPATCHES

STEVEN FREEDMAN, PISGAH INN

Pisgah Inn on the Blue Ridge Parkway is No. 1 in readers’ hearts.

National park
lodges to love
The winners of the 10Best
Readers’ Choice award for Best
National Park Lodge are in.
Nominees in the contest, sponsored by USA TODAY and
10Best.com, were chosen by a
panel of experts and then voted
on by the public.
1. Pisgah Inn
Blue Ridge Parkway
2. Many Glacier Hotel
Glacier National Park
3. Jackson Lake Lodge
Grand Teton National Park
4. El Tovar
Grand Canyon National Park
5. Lake Crescent Lodge
Olympic National Park
6. Crater Lake Lodge
Crater Lake National Park
7. Old Faithful Inn
Yellowstone National Park
8. Paradise Inn
Mount Rainier National Park
9. Ahwahnee
Yosemite National Park
10. Chisos Mountains Lodge
Big Bend National Park
CHIME IN
A new Readers' Choice category
launched this week. Vote for
Best Family Travel Essential at
10best.com/awards/travel/.

JAZZMINE BEAULIEU

Premium seats on Megabus will
have special features.

Megabus adds
reserved seating
Taking a cue from the airline
industry, Megabus, an express
bus company, has started charging travelers for the most popular
seats.
For an extra fee of $1 to $7, customers can choose from 10 premium seats. The reserved seats,
which allow groups or families to
sit together, have solid blue coloring and large numbers embroidered onto the seat fabric.
“Our customers have always
found certain seats on the bus to
be highly desirable,” Megabus
.com CEO Dale Moser says.
“Reserved seating, now available
on all of our double-decker
routes, allows our customers to
book their favorite seats in advance without the hassle of arriving over an hour early to secure
them.”
The double-decker buses have
81 seats. The premium seats have
unique features such as a view or
tables, Moser says. Megabus operates in 130 cities around North
America. Popular routes include
Boston to New York and New
York to Washington, D.C.
Nancy Trejos

MATT STROSHANE, DISNEY

A private deck and plunge pool at the Bora Bora Bungalows allow a perfect view of the nightly fireworks.

OVER-THE-TOP DISNEY
SPLURGE ON LUXURY, CONVENIENCE
From
yachts to
spas, the
House of
Mouse
offers
amenities
that will
cost you
quite a bit
of cheese

“As soon
as I enter
the lobby,
I feel as
though
I’m no
longer in
Walt
Disney
World,
but on a
luxurious
resort
getaway.”
Disney expert
Lou Mongello

Sarah Sekula
Special for USA TODAY
ORLANDO A gentle breeze billows
off the water as seagulls squawk
and nearby spring breakers assume lounge position. On the
deck of a beach bungalow, I swing
in a hanging wicker chair in cadence with the waves rolling in. It
has the relaxing vibe of the dreamy South Pacific. Just one major
difference: the views of Space
Mountain.
Dotting the shoreline of Disney’s Polynesian Village Resort,
the 20 Bora Bora Bungalows are
the first of their kind on any Disney property. Each comes with a
private plunge pool (a prime spot
to view the nightly fireworks).
And don’t worry, you won’t miss
out on the music: The soundtrack
is piped in through an individual
sound system.
The bungalows sleep as many
as eight guests in a cozy, two-bedroom setting. Starting at $2,137 a
night (or the equivalent amount
of DVC member points), it’s the
newest way to live out your
champagne wishes and caviar
dreams. Of course, beyond this
there are plenty of ways to add
sparkle on your next visit to The
Mouse. In other words, dishing
out the extra moolah, in these
cases, can be worth it.

SKIP THE LINES

Continue the diva-style vacation by signing up for a Private
Premium VIP Tour (starting at
$360 an hour with a minimum of
six hours). Here’s how it works:
Your personal guide picks you up
at your Orlando-area hotel and
whisks you away to the parks of
your choice. Want hints on
where to find hidden Mickeys? No problem. How
about sitting in the
front row for the Fantasmic! show?
It is expensive,
indeed, but you
can bring as many
as nine guests,
and you will
squeeze a heck of
a lot into your day.
Your guide will
breeze you through
the lines and score
special viewing areas
for
fireworks
and
parades.
Be warned, though: After
this type of treatment, “you’re
spoiled for visiting the parks any
other way, especially during popular vacation seasons, such as
summer and the Christmas holidays,” says Robert Niles, editor of
ThemeParkInsider.com.
INDULGENT EATS

When hunger kicks in, go beyond
the typical turkey legs and burgers, and book the chef’s table at
Victoria & Albert’s, a AAA FiveDiamond winner.
“It remains one of my most
memorable dining experiences
anywhere in the world,” says Lou

KENT PHILLIPS, DISNEY

Guests can unwind with a day of wellness and pampering, including
couples massages, at Senses Spa at Disney’s Grand Floridian Resort.
SLEEP AT THE FANCIEST HOTEL

If the bungalows are booked, the Grand Floridian (starting at $517 a night) is
another swanky option.
“For many guests looking for a high-end experience, it is their first choice,” says
Lou Mongello, Disney expert and host of the WDW Radio podcast. “There is something wonderful and special about feeling as though you are indulging yourself a
bit, yet nothing about the resort is pompous or stuffy.”
Here, parents can bump up the pampering with a couples massage ($275) at
Senses spa, while kids hit the Wonderland Tea Party or the Pirate Cruise.
“What I love about it is the sense of escapism and elegance,” Mongello says. “As
soon as I enter the lobby, I feel as though I’m no longer in Walt Disney World, but
instead on a luxurious resort getaway.”
Plus, if you can afford it, staying on Disney property can bump up your experience, big-time.
Says Niles, “It allows you to book reservations for the park’s attractions 30 days
before anyone staying off-site and gets you access to the extended ‘Extra Magic
Hours’ before or after the parks close to off-site guests.”

GENE DUNCAN, DISNEY

In the Walt
Disney
Resort’s fleet
is the 52-foot
Sea Ray
yacht, which
can include
a gourmet
five-course
meal and
private
butler.

Mongello, host of the WDW
Radio podcast. “From the
staff to the presentation
of your meal, the overall experience is
remarkable.”
Only one party
per evening is
seated for the
four-hour,
10course dining extravaganza.
Prices start at
$250 per person
with wine pairings
available for an addition $105 per guest.
From Italian truffles to
Japanese beef to an extensive wine list, it’s a popular choice for foodies.
If wine is your thing, California
Grill has 250 selections on its list,
and Trattoria al Forno has more
than 30 wines by the glass and
more than 60 by the bottle. Not
only can you sip the finest of
wines, but there’s a good chance
you’ll be served by an expert. The
Walt Disney World Resort now
has more than 400 sommeliers.
CRUISE IN STYLE

When it comes to bragging rights,
what could be better than boarding a 52-foot yacht (starting at
$699)? Oh, and bringing up to 17

friends. Certainly this is how
Jay-Z and Beyoncé must roll. You
can arrange for a gourmet, fivecourse menu; be sure to request
the tuxedo strawberries. And
splurge for the private butler.
“Being on a boat on the Seven
Seas Lagoon offers you a lovely
view of the fireworks, but perhaps
more importantly, it allows you to
see them without being stuck in
the crush of visitors massed to
watch them on Main Street USA,”
Niles says. “And it gives you a
huge head start on getting back to
your hotel or the parking lot after
the show.”
ONE-ON-ONE WITH HIPPOS

The Wild Africa Trek (starting at
$189 per person) at Animal Kingdom is something special. Guests
don safari vests for a private,
31⁄2-hour tour of the popular Kilimanjaro Safari attraction. They
feed hippos, cross a suspensionbridge (above dozens of crocs)
and dine on the deck of a savannah hut where animal sightings
are a guarantee. (Don’t worry: A
professional photographer is with
you to capture it all.)
“We were all surprised by how
isolated we managed to feel,” says
Carina Graham, who took her son
for his 10th birthday. “Like we
were not even at a Disney park.”

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

*

5U

BOOKS

New &
noteworthy
USA TODAY’s Jocelyn
McClurg scopes out
the hottest books on sale
each week.

4

Michelle Obama
by Peter Slevin (Knopf, non-fiction,
on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: A

portrait of the first lady,
tracing her journey
from reluctant candidate’s wife to activist for
military families and
childhood nutrition.
Peter
Slevin THE BUZZ: “Informative ...
thoroughly researched,”
Publishers Weekly says.

1

2

So That Happened

by Jon Cryer (New American Library, non-fiction, on sale Tuesday)

A Fine Romance

WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Cryer’s just-Duckie memoir covers
everything from his first Hollywood romance (with
Demi Moore) to his years on the hit sitcom Two
and a Half Men.
THE BUZZ: The Hollywood Reporter recently excerpted
the juicy stuff about Charlie Sheen.

by Candice Bergen (Simon
& Schuster, non-fiction,
on sale Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S
ABOUT: Thirty

years after she
wrote Knock
Wood, the
actress, 68,
returns with a
new memoir
looking at her
years on Murphy Candice Bergen attends a
Brown and marball with her
riage to the late
first husband,
filmmaker
film director
Louis Malle.
Louis Malle.
THE BUZZ: You’ve got to
love a former model
who proudly declares,
“I am fat” and “I live to
eat” in her new book.

3

WHAT IT’S ABOUT: The author of Still

Alice tackles Huntington’s
disease in this novel about a
stricken Boston cop
and his family.
THE BUZZ: It’s an
Indie Next pick
of independent
bookstores.
“This is Genova
at her best and a
Lisa
story that will
Genova
provoke many
discussions,” says Linda
Bond of Auntie’s Bookstore in Spokane, Wash.

BOOK BUZZ
NEW ON THE LIST
AND IN PUBLISHING

Digi-dating: BookCon is
turning into a Parks and Recreation reunion special. Aziz Ansari,
who played Tom Haverford on
the just-wrapped NBC sitcom, is
the latest TV star with a new
book signed up for the New York
event. He’ll appear May 30 to
promote Modern Romance, which
explores dating in the digital age
(Penguin Press, on sale June 16).
Nick Offerman, also late of Parks
and Rec, has an event that day to
talk up his book, Gumption (Dutton, on sale May 26). Last year,
Parks and Rec star Amy Poehler
appeared at the inaugural BookCon to hype Yes Please. It became
a best seller, peaking at No. 5.
BookCon is open to the ticketbuying public.
Jocelyn McClurg

5

A Curious Mind: The
Secret to a Bigger Life

by Brian Grazer and Charles Fishman
(Simon & Schuster, non-fiction, on sale
Tuesday)
WHAT IT’S ABOUT: Producer

Grazer’s “curiosity conversations” with the likes
of Andy Warhol,
Princess Diana, Michael
Jackson and Barack
Obama have helped inspire his movies and TV
Brian
shows, from Apollo 13 to
Grazer Arrested Development.
THE BUZZ: Features a jacket blurb by
best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell: “A captivating account of how
the simple act of asking questions
can change your life.”
WHAT
AMERICA’S
READING®

BOOKLIST.USATODAY.COM
n Rank this week

THE TOP 10

It’s a ‘Girl’: Publisher Knopf
has released the title and jacket
for a new book in the Millennium
series created by
the late Stieg
Larsson. The
Girl in the Spider’s Web, by
Swedish author
David Lagercrantz, continues the “Girl”
theme of the
first three blockbusters: The Girl
With the Dragon Tattoo, The Girl
Who Played With Fire and The
Girl Who Kicked the Hornet’s
Nest. Dragon Tattoo and Hornet’s
Nest both were No. 1 USA TODAY
best sellers. The authorized sequel, due Sept. 1, brings back
hacker Lisbeth Salander and
journalist Mikael Blomkvist.

Julianne
Moore won
an Oscar in
the title role
of Still
Alice.

Inside the O’Briens

by Lisa Genova (Gallery Books, fiction,
on sale Tuesday)

BERGEN AND MALLE BY SIMON AND
SCHUSTER; MOORE BY LINDA KALLERUS,
SONY PICTURES CLASSICS; GENOVA
BY GREG MENTZER; CRYER AND SHEEN
BY GREG GAYNE, WARNER BROS.;
SLEVIN BY ANDREW JOHNSTON;
GRAZER BY JEFF LIPSKY

Coben express: Harlan
Coben is no stranger to USA
TODAY’s Best-Selling Books list.
His new thriller, The Stranger,
lands at No. 1. Coben derails The
Girl on the Train, which drops to
No. 2 after five straight weeks at
No. 1. Paula Hawkins’ debut psychological thriller has been the
breakout hit of 2015, selling more
than 1 million copies. The Stranger, about a vigilante who exposes
secret online activities, is the
second Coben thriller to land at
No. 1. Six Years did so in 2013.

Jon Cryer
had a wild
ride with
Charlie
Sheen on
Two and a
Half Men.

n Rank last week (F) Fiction (NF) Non-fiction (P) Paperback (H)Hardcover (E) E-book

Publisher in italics

1

The Stranger
Harlan Coben

A wife disappears after her husband
learns a devastating secret about her from
a stranger (F) (E) Dutton

6

5

Dead Wake
Erik Larson

Subtitle: “The Last Crossing of the
Lusitania” (NF) (H) Crown

2

1

The Girl on the Train
Paula Hawkins

Psychological thriller about the disappearance of a young married woman (F) (E)
Riverhead

7

4

American Sniper
Chris Kyle, Scott
McEwen, Jim DeFelice

Subtitle: “The Autobiography of the
Most Lethal Sniper in U.S. Military History”
(NF) (P) William Morrow Paperbacks

3

3

The Longest Ride
Nicholas Sparks

An injured old man remembers love with
his wife, and a new relationship (F) (E)
Grand Central Publishing

8

6

Paper Towns
John Green

Youth: Young man goes in search of his
missing crush (F) (E) Speak

4

Becoming Steve Jobs Subtitle: “The Evolution of a Reckless
Brent Schlender
Upstart into a Visionary Leader” (NF) (E)
and Rick Tetzeli
Crown Business

9

7

All the Light We
Cannot See
Anthony Doerr

The lives of a blind girl in France and a
member of the Hitler Youth converge
during World War II (F) (E) Scribner

5

2

NYPD Red 3
James Patterson,
Marshall Karp

10 8

Insurgent
Veronica Roth

Youth: War looms as conflict grows between the factions; second in series (F) (E)
Katherine Tegen Books

Detectives Jordan and MacDonald investigate the disappearance of a billionaire businessman (F) (E) Little, Brown

The book list appears
every Thursday.
For each title, the format
and publisher listed are
for the best-selling
version of that title this
week. Reporting outlets
include Amazon.com,
Amazon Kindle, Barnes &
Noble.com, Barnes &
Noble Inc., Barnes &
Noble e-books,
BooksAMillion.com,
Books-A-Million, Costco,
Hudson Booksellers,
Joseph-Beth Booksellers
(Lexington, Ky.; Cincinnati,
Charlotte, Cleveland,
Pittsburgh), Kobo, Inc.,
Powell's Books (Portland,
Ore.), Powells.com, R.J.
Julia Booksellers
(Madison, Conn.), Schuler
Books & Music (Grand
Rapids, Okemos,
Eastwood, Alpine, Mich.),
Sony Reader Store,
Target, Tattered Cover
Book Store (Denver).

THE REST

11 15 The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up
Marie Kondo
12 11 The Nightingale/Kristin Hannah
13 29 Unbroken/Laura Hillenbrand
14 25 Allegiant/Veronica Roth
15 20 To Kill a Mockingbird/Harper Lee
16 26 The Husband’s Secret/Liane Moriarty
17 96
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27

12
27
23

17
22
49
18
24
9

28
29
30
31

28
19
21
30

32 —
33 —
34 37
35
36
37
38
39


39


40
41
42
43

45

33

44 98
45 41
46 38
47 74
48 —
49 35
50 36

Subtitle: “The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” (NF) (H) Ten Speed Press

Historical fiction about the choices two sisters must make in Nazi-occupied France (F) (E) St. Martin’s Press
Subtitle: “A World War II Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption” (NF) (P) Random House Trade Paperbacks
Youth: Tris must battle to comprehend the complexities of human nature; final in series (F) (E) Katherine Tegen Books
1960 coming-of-age classic about racism; Pulitzer winner; 1962 movie (F) (P) Grand Central Publishing
While her husband is away, Cecilia Fitzpatrick stumbles upon a letter meant to be opened upon his death (F) (P)
Berkley
The Escape/David Baldacci
Military investigator John Puller is called in when his own brother, convicted of treason, escapes from a high-security
prison (F) (P) Grand Central Publishing
Gone Girl/Gillian Flynn
When Nick Dunne’s wife Amy disappears on their fifth anniversary, he is considered a suspect (F) (E) Crown
Divergent/Veronica Roth
Youth: Tris harbors a secret that may help save those she loves (F) (E) Katherine Tegen Books
The Boys in the Boat/Daniel James Brown
Subtitle: “Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics” (NF) (E) Penguin
Shopping for a Billionaire: The Collection/Julia Kent Contains the first five books of the series (F) (E) Julia Kent
A Spool of Blue Thread/Anne Tyler
A look at three generations of a family, as Abby and Red Whitshank grow older (F) (E) Knopf
Wild/Cheryl Strayed
The author recounts her life-changing journey hiking the Pacific Crest Trail (NF) (E) Knopf
The 20/20 Diet/Phil McGraw
Subtitle: “Turn Your Weight Loss Vision Into Reality” (NF) (H) Bird Street Books
Fifty Shades Darker/E.L. James
The erotic romance continues between Christian and Ana; second in trilogy (F) (E) Vintage
Still Alice: A Novel/Lisa Genova
The story of a 50-year-old woman’s sudden descent into early onset Alzheimer’s (F) (E) Pocket
Get What’s Yours/Laurence J. Kotlikoff, Philip
Subtitle: “The Secrets to Maxing Out Your Social Security” (NF) (H) Simon & Schuster
Moeller and Paul Solman
Last One Home/Debbie Macomber
Prodigal daughter Cassie Carter returns to her hometown hoping to start over (F) (E) Ballantine
Fifty Shades of Grey/E.L. James
A literature student and a young entrepreneur enter into an erotic relationship (F) (E) Vintage
Fifty Shades Freed/E.L. James
Christian and Ana navigate their differences to make their relationship work; final in trilogy (F) (E) Vintage
Government hit men Will Robie and Jessica Reel have a new assignment from the president (F) (P) Grand Central
The Target/David Baldacci
Publishing
I’ve Got You Under My Skin/Mary Higgins Clark
A little boy witnesses the murder of his father, a Manhattan doctor, at a city playground (F) (P)
Think Like a Freak/Steven D. Levitt, Stephen J.
Subtitle: “The Authors of Freakonomics Offer to Retrain Your Brain” (NF) (E) William Morrow
Dubner
Dark Places/Gillian Flynn
Libby Day testified her brother killed their family, but years later, facts emerge that lead her to question her belief
(F) (E) Broadway Books
Ready Player One/Ernest Cline
Wade Watts escapes his grim life by searching for a lottery ticket in a virtual world (F) (E) Crown
Outlander/Diana Gabaldon
Claire Randall is hurled back in time; first in series; basis for Starz series (F) (E) Dell
Cuba Straits/Randy Wayne White
Doc Ford investigates the disappearance of an old friend; 22nd in series (F) (E) G.P. Putnam’s Sons
The Six Wives of Henry VIII/Alison Weir
The story of the English monarch and the six women he married (NF) (E) Grove/Atlantic
Manwhore/Katy Evans
Journalist Rachel Livingston is assigned to write an expose on Malcolm Kyle, Chicago’s premier playboy; first in series
(F) (E) Gallery Books
Diary of a Wimpy Kid: The Long Haul/Jeff Kinney
Youth: Greg Heffley’s family road trip takes an unexpected turn (F) (H) Amulet Books
Deep Storm/Lincoln Child
The discovery of Atlantis might be a cover for something far more sinister (F) (E) Anchor
Prodigal Son/Danielle Steel
Peter returns home and reuniteswith his twin, Michael, who is not all he appears to be (F) (H) Delacorte
The Silent Girls/Eric Rickstad
Frank Rath retires from the force to raise his daughter only to be pulled back in to help the police when a local girl
goes missing (F) (E) Witness Impulse
Happy Easter, Mouse!/Laura Joffe Numeroff,
Children: The mouse from If You Give a Mouse a Cookie tries to figure out who’s leaving Easter eggs all over his
Felicia Bond
house (F) (H) HarperFestival
Orphan Train/Christina Baker Kline
The story of two women separated by generations but united with a common past (F) (E) William Morrow Paperbacks
The Assassin/Clive Cussler and Justin Scott
Private detective Isaac Bell hunts down an assassin targeting opponents of Standard Oil (F) (E) G.P. Putnam’s Sons
Detective Harry Bosch and his rookie partner, Detective Lucia Soto, investigate a cold case (F) (H) Grand Central
The Burning Room/Michael Connelly
Publishing
Consolation /Corinne Michaels
Widow Natalie finds solace with her late husband’s best friend; first in series (F) (E) BAAE Publishing
One Wish/Robyn Carr
Grace moves to Thunder Point to escape her old life, and finds more than just a friend in Troy (F) (P) Harlequin MIRA
StrengthsFinder 2.0/Tom Rath
Lifetime strategies for using your talents (NF) (H) Gallup

6U

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, APRIL 5, 2015

*

SCREEN CHECK
WEB TO WATCH

Compiled by Daniel Hurwitz
and Lorena Blas

OUR TOP PICKS

Weird Loners
Channel: Hulu
A new Fox comedy about four relationship-challenged mid-thirtysomethings.
hulu.com/weird-loners

ACORN TV

Sarah Adams (Marta Dusseldorp) returns home
to find Australia has changed since she left.

SARAH IS SEARCHING FOR HER ‘PLACE’

Season 2 of A Place to Call Home, the Australian family drama set in the 1950s, makes
its debut Monday on Acorn TV. Season 1 is
available on the streaming service for those
who need to catch up with the story about a
woman who returns home after decades
overseas. Marta Dusseldorp is Sarah, who
hopes for a new life in Australia. Season 2’s
10 episodes will be released Mondays
throughout April.
acorn.tv

PaleyLive panel: The cast of ‘Veep’
Channel: Yahoo Screen
The cast of the HBO comedy talk about
the show in a live-streaming presentation.
screen.yahoo.com

DHX MEDIA/NETFLIX

GO, GO CATCH UP WITH INSPECTOR GADGET

ALL ONLINE TV
WEBTOWATCH.USATODAY.COM

Check out webisodes, Internet TV
and online programming.

Go-go Gadget has arrived at Netflix. The animated reboot of Inspector Gadget,
the beloved 1980s cartoon about the bumbling bionic private eye, is available
on the streaming platform. Look for every episode of the CGI animated show.

The Brothers Grimm
Channel: Amazon
Heath Ledger and Matt Damon star in the 2005
feature film about the famous siblings.
amazon.com

netflix.com

TONIGHT ON TV
CRITIC’S
CORNER
Robert Bianco
@BiancoRobert
USA TODAY

A.D. THE BIBLE CONTINUES
NBC, 9 ET/PT

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS
ABC, 7 ET/PT

The producers of The Bible return with this sequel, which will
(eventually) more fully explore
the early years of the new Christian church. First, however, A.D.
revisits territory covered in the
earlier miniseries, starting with
this opening episode on the
death and resurrection of Christ.
The success of The Bible, however, seems to have blessed this
second effort with a larger budget and a stronger, more diverse
cast — all in service of a straightforward and sincere retelling of
the Crucifixion, brought lovingly
to life with a few expansions but
without any significant revisions.
If you loved The Bible, you’re
probably going to love A.D. If
you found The Bible hokey, A.D.
probably will at least strike you
as an improvement.

The production is lavish, the special effects
still dazzle, and the performances are, well,
unusual — which makes this beloved ABC
Easter tradition one of those films people
enjoy on different levels for different
reasons. On this holiday, let’s allow
everyone to enjoy it in peace.

CHARLTON HESTON AND YUL BRYNNER BY PARAMOUNT

PUZZLES

ON THE VERGE KELSEA BALLERINI
SPOTLIGHT ON BREAKTHROUGH ARTISTS

One eye on the road,
another on stardom
Brian Mansfield
USA TODAY
GOOD WAY TO HAVE A WRECK:

The first time Kelsea Ballerini
heard her single Love Me Like
You Mean It on the radio, she had
her steering wheel in one hand
and her GPS in the other, trying
to merge onto the interstate. “I
turned it up, and it was awesome,” the 21-year-old country
singer says. Also awesome: having
Taylor Swift tweet about driving
around with Ballerini’s EP on repeat. Now, Love Me Like You
Mean It is No. 22 on USA TODAY’s Country airplay chart and
has sold 126,000 copies, according to Nielsen SoundScan. Album
The First Time is due May 19.
CAN’T TRUST A COW: Ballerini
grew up near Knoxville, Tenn., on
a small farm with three cows and
a goat. She liked to play with the
animals, though sometimes they
didn’t play nice. “I always thought
it was a goat that kicked me over
the fence,” she says. “My mama
told me the other day it was a
cow. Now I’m scared of both.”
A GIFT THAT KEEPS ON GIVING:

A professed procrastinator, Ballerini wrote her first song for her
mother because she hadn’t
bought a Mother’s Day present.
“I called it Oh Mama, and she
loved it — she cried,” Ballerini
says. “For a while, I would write
her another verse every Mother’s
Day.”
Though she
already had begun writing songs,
Ballerini was drawn into country
music by Keith Urban’s 2006 single Stupid Boy. One can easily
imagine Love Me Like You Mean
It being sung to Urban’s “stupid
boy.” After Urban’s record, she
says, her songs started “coming
URBAN INFLUENCE:

JEREMY RYAN

from a place of confidence,
whereas what I was writing before came from heartbreak.”
FALLING SLOWLY, THEN ALL AT
ONCE: She took 10 years of dance

Ballerini
has earned
Taylor
Swift’s
stamp of
approval.

lessons as a child, so naturally
other kids called her “Ballerini
the Ballerina.” In college, though,
her nickname became “The
Fainting Kitten.” “There’s a YouTube video of these two kittens
that just fall over
and pass out,” she
says. “My blood
Don’t be “a
sugar’s crazy, so I
voice that’s
would pass out
sometimes, like
already
a voice
the
fainting
— find what
kittens.”
A SWIFT LESSON:

you want to say

As a 14-year-old,
and how you
Ballerini went to
want to say it.”
Nashville to meet
with record laOn the best lesson she has learned
bels. At her first
appointment, she
pulled her guitar out of its sparkly
pink case and played a song, only
to have an executive tell her,
“Don’t you know there’s already a
Taylor Swift?” “I thought it was
the meanest thing anybody could
ever say to me, and I canceled my
second meeting and went home,”
she says. “It ended up being the
most valuable lesson I could have
learned that early: not to be a
voice that’s already a voice — to
find what you want to say and
how you want to say it.”

VIRGINIA SHERWOOD, NBC

Odelle (Anna Friel) is drawn
into a sinister conspiracy.

AMERICAN ODYSSEY
NBC, 10 ET/PT

Three far-flung Americans
separately stumble upon a
secret military-industrialcomplex plot to finance
terrorists. Eventually fate
will bring them together,
assuming viewers and
NBC have enough patience
to get them there.

Answers placed on Life page 2
Play more puzzles at puzzles.usatoday.com
Puzzle problems? Contact us at feedback@usatoday.com

CROSSWORD
EDitED Timothy Parker
By Kenneth Holt

10,000 POUNDS
ACROSS
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4 Deprive, in a way
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vacation in
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crosshairs
26 Some abridged
books
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36 Table, in meetings
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pastor
41 Hall in New Jersey?
43 Place below decks
44 Like a decorated
Christmas tree
46 Line on a letter
48 Time pieces (Abbr.)
49 Fabrics or textiles
51 Capital city named
for Queen Victoria
53 Having feelings
55 Cocktail contents,
sometimes
58 Pro ___ (in
proportion)
60 Say without really
saying
61 Adam didn’t
have one
67 You can get one
from a bottle or a
booth
68 Bermuda or pearl

© Universal Uclick

69
70
71
72

Accomplishing
Lennon’s bride
Privately for two
They’re crossed
in Olympic
competition
73 Homer Simpson’s
next-door neighbor
DOWN
1 Danger notice
2 Sayings of Jesus
3 Insect’s hard outer
covering
4 Chew out
5 Soccer zero
6 Longtime Chinese
chairman
7 Auth. unknown
8 Wandering one
9 Runs, as a business
10 Coddled thing
11 Mouse’s cousin
12 Fed’s document
producer

4/5

13 Cant ending?
19 Egyptian fertility
deity
21 Anago, really
24 Chills, as a beverage
25 Marathoners’
measures
27 Pilots’ announcements,
briefly
28 Titanic’s departure
point
29 Teach one-on-one
30 Beef entrees
32 Snuffy Smith’s kid
34 Afterbath powders
35 Boxer Griffith
37 Yesteryears
40 Cashews, e.g.
42 Near, poetically
45 Passage to the
stomach and lungs
47 Harsh dismissals
50 Knife thrust
52 “Bus” or “rod”
attachment

Answrs: Call 1-900-988-8300, 99 cents a minute; or, with a credit card, 1-800-320-4280.

54 Practice piece for one
instrument
56 Speedy transport
57 Assembly of church
delegates
59 At the summit of
61 Flamboyant wrap
62 Place to burn a
candle?
63 Be less than honest
64 Strongman
Ferrigno
65 Overtime
justification
66 Smallest dining
party

CROSSWORDS
ON yOUR PhONe
mobilegames.usatoday.com 

 
  
 

  

LOCAL FIRST
SPORTS

CAUSES

TRIPLE CROWN

A PLACE TO PLAY

TODAY'S WEATHER
90° HIGH

Volunteers will help construct the Keizer Big Toy, a
15,000-square-foot play structure organizers hope
will draw families from all over the area. Page 3D

American Pharoah has completed one of the most
difficult feats in sports — an accomplishment that
hasn't been seen in 37 years. Pa ge 1C

58° LOW
Full report, 8C

Statesman Journal
Sunday

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

FOREIGN INVESTORS GIVE U.S. CITIES A BOOST, CREATE JOBS PAGE 1B

PHOTO COURTESY OF IMBA

The popularity of mountain
biking has grow in leaps and
bounds in Oregon over the
past few decades.

Oregon culture evolves from hunting to hiking
By Zach Urness |

Statesman Journal

Once upon a time in Oregon and the United
States, if you identified yourself as an outdoorsman, there was a good chance you were talking
about hunting and fishing.
The ethos of Ernest Hemingway’s hunting and
fishing stories and the philosophical nature of
Norman Maclean’s “A River Runs Through It”
permeated a culture in which men traveled to the
forest with a rifle or fishing rod in hand.
In the 1970s, one in four Oregonians went fishing and one in seven went hunting, according to
the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.
That was the culture that I grew up with. In my
family, you didn’t go hiking without a gun or boating without a way to catch fish.
But as the decades have passed, the concept of

ZACH COLLIER / NORTHWEST RAFTING COMPANY

Stand-up paddle-boarding has become increasingly
popular for those exploring rivers in the Pacific
Northwest.

outdoor recreation has undergone a slow but
steady transformation. The outdoor experience is
no longer dominated by fishing and hunting but
has broadened with the expansion of traditional
activities such as hiking and new activities such as
stand-up paddle-boarding.
Despite a statewide population that has almost
doubled, there are fewer fishers and hunters in
Oregon today than in the 1970s.
The rate of participation has declined by half,
Fish and Wildlife says, with one in eight Oregonians fishing and one in 17 hunting since 2010.
So what happened?
Well, a number of things.
The decline of fisheries and game is one major
factor.
See OUTDOORS, Page 6A

Hunters, anglers fear proposed license fee raise
By Henry Miller | Statesman Journal

Many anglers and hunters who have shouldered the bulk of the financial load for the Oregon Department of Fish Wildlife say proposed
license and tag increases will be the straw that
breaks their backs.
Even the department estimates that the incremental license and fee increases in the 201517 budget proposal working through the Oregon
Legislature would lead to 10,000 dropping out.
“If we lost 10,000 customers, the last thing
Bridge.............................................2E
Business ..........................................1F
Causes ............................3D, 4D, 5D
Comics .....................................Insert

that we would do is raise our prices,” said
Brooks Eilertson, of Sherwood, who works at
Fisherman’s Marine & Outdoor in Portland.
Some said they were already feeling the
pinch.
“I cannot afford these fee increases any
longer,” said Don Voeks, of Gresham, who
testified at the Capitol during a hearing on the
budget. “My wife has stopped fishing from an
annual license and has gone to individual days.
“My son and daughter-in-law are very serious about maybe we won’t go fishing from

Editorials ......................................8D
Horoscope ....................................2E
Lottery ..........................................1D
Mid-Valley.....................................1D

Nation/World ...............................1B
Obituaries .........................10D, 11D
Puzzles ....................................2E, 3E
Sports .............................................1C

annual licenses anymore. These fees are too
much.”
Voeks is not a casual angler. He is a member
of the Sandy River Chapter of the Association of
Northwest Steelheaders and a volunteer anglereducation instructor for the department.

Examples of fee hikes
Under the proposal, a resident hunting license
See FEES, Page 5A

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New quiz: A thunder crack, a
crackdown and a kick start
1. A Lincoln joined the field for the 2016 presidential race – and he is not a
Republican. Name him.
A. Independent Todd Lincoln of Illinois
B. Independent Harold “Hot Rod” Lincoln of Nebraska

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C. Democrat Lincoln Chaffee of Rhode Island
D. Green Party candidate Lincoln Logge of Vermont
2. What is the title of Bill O’Reilly and Martin Dugard’s next nonfiction book
about the death of a historical figure?
A. “Killing Time: The Life-and-Death Saga of the Cuckoo
Clock’s Inventor”
B. “Killing Reagan: The Violent Assault That Changed a
Presidency”
C. “Killing Kennedy: Part II”
D. “Killing Me Softly: The Roberta Flack Story”
3. According to a story by reporting intern Natalie
Pate in Wednesday’s edition, plainclothes Salem police officers will be cracking down on what this summer?
A. Panhandlers
B. Pedestrian crosswalk enforcement
C. Drivers who unlawfully park in handicap spaces
D. Loiterers
4. From Sunday to Monday morning, thunderstorms produced 25 lightning strikes in the Salem area. How many were
registered throughout the state?
A. 520
B. 1,270
C. 1, 271
D. 2,700
5. In Wednesday’s Oregon Life, food, beer and wine
columnist Victor Panichkul calls this in-season vegetable one “that people either love or hate.”
A. Asparagus
B. Brussels sprouts
C. Kale
D. Pearl onions
6. According to USA Today, which television series generated the most tweets
on Twitter in the just-ended TV season?
A. ABC’s “The Bachelor”
B. HBO’s “Game of Thrones”
C. AMC’s “The Walking
Dead”
D. USA’s “WWE Monday
Night Raw”
7. A Corvallis-based company has started a Kickstarter campaign for a tabletop game with a simple premise: kill or be killed. What’s the name of the
game?
A. Vampira
B. Werewolves of London
C. BANE
D. Steven King’s Bloody Red Sock
8. According to the Wall Street Journal, PepsiCo will be rolling out a line of
“exotic” flavored sodas, including agave vanilla cream and black cherry
with tarragon. Name the new line.
A. Stubborn Soda
B. Artisanal Quenchers
C. Tonsil Lubricators
D. Better Thank You Think Drinks
9. Last week, a federal advisory panel recommended approval of flibanserin, the first drug to treat what?
A. Underarm “bat wings”
B. Unsightly ear and nose hair
C. Lack of sexual desire in women
D. Manic Mondays.
10. Why is Salem’s Ciera Eastin, a stay-at-home mother of two, in Cambodia?
A. She is competing in next season’s “The Amazing Race”
B. She is getting a second chance at the $1 million prize on “Survivor”
C. She invented a new slip-on shoe being manufactured there
D. She is gathering recipes for a Cambodian food truck

Scoring guide: 10 for 10: Lighting strike; 7-9 correct: thunder crack; 4-6 correct:
fog horn; 2-3 correct: awkward silence; 0-1 correct: a stack of dishes crashing.
Answers: 1. (C); 2. (B); 3. (B); 4. (D); 5. (A); 6. (C); 7. (C); 8. (A); 9. (C); 10. (B)

StatesmanJournal.com

Statesman
Journal’s

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

SUNDAYBEST

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Michael Davis

ON FORWARD THIS

ON OPINION

The B-17 museum grand
opening is Saturday in Salem.
Meanwhile, we’ve added 13
names our Century of
Sacrifice list. Page 1D, 6D

News that a bear was
lumbering and plundering
through Salem neighborhoods
sent this editor into a state of
high alert. Page 9D

Tom Mayhall
Rastrelli

Brandon
Southward

ON ARTS & CULTURE

ON INSIDE BUSINESS

At 13, Juan Valdez chose to
study music at West Salem
when his parents were forced
to return to Mexico. Page 1E

Orbis Robotics’ CARL robot
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funeral arrangements even if
they aren’t together. Page 1F

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•›‘—””‡–‹”‡‡–‘
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25

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3A

4A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

Detroit Free Fishing event

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The Silverton Reservoir offered free fishing to visitors on Saturday in collaboration with the Free Fishing Weekend organized by
the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife.

Change of venue lead to kids having a blast at ‘fishing hole’
By Henry Miller

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DETROIT – For about the first 45
minutes, volunteers outnumbered
participants by about a dozen to,
well, none at the annual Free Fishing Weekend event Saturday, June
6, at Detroit Lake.
Because of low water, the event
sponsored by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, the U.S.
Forest Service and the Oregon Paralyzed Veterans of America had
been moved from the traditional
site at Hoover Campground on the
east side of the lake to Detroit Flats
Recreation Site just east of town.
But gradually beginning about 10
a.m. parents, grandparents and
youngsters showed up at the special
kids’ “fishing hole,” a collapsible orange plastic-lined square pool generously stocked with rainbow trout
in sizes ranging from about 10 inches to a pair of 2-plus-foot bruisers.
Sydney Kaufman, 12, of Portland, caught her first-ever fish at
the pond.
“It was cool,” she said.
“Want that on your wall?” her
dad, Steven, asked.
Sydney made a face and said emphatically, “No, I don’t”
“Where’s the fish?” asked Gabriel Sniffen, 3, of Keizer, looking over
the lip of the pool just as one of the
monsters swam right in front of
him. “EWWW, big fish,” he said excitedly.
Despite catching a smaller fish
than Gabriel, his sister Kalia, 13,
who goes to Houck Middle School,
pronounced the experience “awesome.”
“It was great,” she said about
each child getting a fishing rod, a
reel, a goodie bag of tackle and a Tshirt. “I didn’t know that they let
you keep the pole.”
There also were free hot dogs
and beverages for all who attended.
When asked if all the work for
the small turnout, a couple dozen
kids and adults, was worth it, Darrin
Neff, the fish biologist for the Forest Service’s Detroit Ranger District said absolutely.
He said he was a little nervous
about the initial lack of participants, “what with the very-low lake
and the forecast of hot weather.
“But it’s always worth it because
of the few kids who caught their
first fish.”
All of the Free Fishing Weekend
events, fishing clinics, derbies and
other activities took place Saturday,. But you still don’t need a license or tags to fish or go crabbing
or clamming on Sunday, June 7.

Above:
Emily Nemnich, 4,
of Vancouver,
Wash., gets an
assist from Alexis
Toney, a fisheries
technician at
Marion Forks Fish
Hatchery during
the Free Fishing
Weekend event
at Detroit Flats
Recreation Site
on Saturday.
Left: Gabriel
Sniffen, 3, of
Keizer didn’t
have to to be
asked twice if he
wanted to touch
the first fish that
he ever caught
during the Free
Fishing Weekend
event.
HENRY
MILLER/STATESMAN
JOURNAL

hemiller@StatesmanJournal.com,
(503) 399-6725 or follow at
twitter.com/henrymillersj and friend or
facebook.com/hmillersj

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OR-0000363291

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

5A

Fee increases and other concerns
Statesman Journal

The Legislature is considering a plan
to incrementally increase fees for
hunting and fishing licenses over six
years. Opponents have raised
questions. Curt Melcher, director of
the Oregon Department of Fish and
Wildlife, and Roger Fuhrman, the
administrator for the department’s
Information and Education Section,
answers some of them.
Question: What is the new $10 ocean
endorsement?
Melcher: “Basically a new surcharge
associated with ocean fishing. Bottom
fish such as sea bass, lingcod and other
species were basically unmanaged until
the last decade or so … to now being aggressively managed. Money collected
from the endorsement will be dedicated
to the increased costs to the department
to pay for that management.”
Question: Will the fee increases be
the last for the six-year span?
Melcher: “Certainly as our plan proposed and the governor proposed, it’s a
six-year time frame, just like in the last
process we expect ... the fee structure to

last for a six-year horizon. And that is
our intent with this one. We’ve done the
last two; they’ve both been six years,
and we made it through.”
Question: There is a repeated theme
from many of the people at the meetings
and hearings who oppose the fee hikes
that they are “paying more, getting
less.”
Melcher: “Our budget proposal right
now maintains all of our hatchery production. It maintains our fundamental
district staff structure. It maintains all
of the fishery-related programs be they
marine or Columbia River. So saying
that they’re getting less, we don’t agree.
“You might say it’s less opportunity
when actually the fishing over the last
couple of years has been actually quite
good, an exceptional opportunity. So we
don’t agree there’s less program, nor do
we agree that they’re getting less opportunity.”
Question: How about the argument
heard frequently that you should lower
the fees and get a resulting increase in
anglers and hunters?
Fuhrman: “I had our economist look
at that, and it doesn’t pencil out. Reducing the price doesn’t bring in enough ad-

ditional sales to cover what you would
lose in revenue.
“To avoid having to do a fee increase
… we’d have to be selling licenses back
at the levels that we were in the 1980s,
license levels that we’ve never hit before. You can’t raise enough by reducing the price.”
Question: What about the charter operators’ heartburn about losing tourists
because of the increased costs of daily
fishing licenses and three-day shellfish
licenses for out-of-staters?
Melcher: “We heard it in the testimony, and we’re looking at that for ways
that we can help minimize that effect,
the effect of losing nonresident customers.”
Question: What about the argument
that the fee increases will be a barrier to
families starting or staying in hunting
and fishing?
Melcher: “When you go back and
look at some of our customer-preference surveys that we’ve done, when you
look at the cost of participation as a barrier, it’s usually very, very far down the
list. ... It wasn’t because they didn’t want
to pay $3 more for a fishing license. It’s
because of other factors in their life that

Fees
Continued from Page 1A

that now costs $29.50 would rise to
$33.50 in 2016, $34 in 2018 and $34.50 in
2020. A resident fishing license that
costs $33 would rise to $38 in 2016, $41 in
2018 and $44 in 2020.
And for saltwater anglers, there
would be an add-on “ocean endorsement” required for fishing outside of estuaries, which would cost a fixed $10 annually during the six-year period.
There also would be incremental increases in the costs of hunting tags; one-,
two- and three-day fishing and shellfish
licenses; and the all-in-one fishing/hunting Sports Paclicense.
And for the first time, a fee would be
charged for pioneer licenses. The program now offers free hunting and fishing licenses for 50-year Oregon residents 65 or older.
It might make economic sense because the $6 annual pioneer fee would leverage $20 from federal programs that
reimburse states based on fishing and
hunting licenses sold. To get the federal
money, $6 is the smallest amount the
state could charge.
But it has caused ill will among some
hunters and anglers who hold the licenses or whose parents and grandparents hunt and fish with them.
To retain anglers and hunters, another proposal is to sell three- and five-year
fishing and hunting licenses for the first
time. And as an incentive for youth
recruitment, the prices of youth licenses
and tags, including the juvenile Sports
Pac, would be unchanged or decreased
in future years.
“We’re looking at it six years from
now, my husband and I, spending $300 to
fish and crab,” said Liz Hamilton, the executive director of the Northwest Sportfishing Industry Association, which advocates for industry stakeholders such
asmanufacturers, wholesalers, retailers
and fishing guides.

Pricing out tourists
Tourist-dependent
fishing-charter
operators said the proposed bump in
fees for nonresidents already were scaring customers away and pricing Oregon
out of competition with California and
Washington.
“At present, a one-day fishing license
is $16.75, and a nonresident shellfish license is $11.50,” said Loren Goddard,
owner of Dockside Charters in Depoe
Bay. “That’s scheduled to increase by
2020 to a total of $45, including the endorsement.
“I’ve already heard a lot of comments
from my clients who are from out of
state that say that these fee increases
will put family recreation out of reach in
the state of Oregon.”
Chris Olson, who owns Newport Marina Store & Charters, was more blunt.
“In the last week during spring break,

ASHLEY SMITH / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Brian Daggett, a hatchery truck driver with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, stocks
rainbow trout in Lake Detroit on Friday, April 24, 2015, in Salem.

we had families from five different bordering states and out to Montana come
out and fish through our office,” he said.
“And your licenses are $150 for a fishing
trip for four, five, six hours out there?
It’s just, I see it as a nail in the coffin for
the charter fleet and recreational fishing.”

Changing attitudes
Six years ago, when the department’s
proposal for the most recent round of license and fee increases went to the Legislature, groups such as the Oregon
Hunters Association and the Association
of Northwest Steelheaders backed the
plan even in the depths of the economic
downturn.
Neither supports the current proposal.
During hearings on Senate Bill 247
there was a very real sense of fatigue
and frustration, and several commented
that the department is mismanaged or
tone-deaf to anglers and hunters.
There were comments about imposition of barbless hooks and a recreational
closure on the Columbia River from anglers.
Hunters complained about lack of
hunting opportunities and animals.
And both complained about lack of
management of predators — cougars
and now wolves on the hunting side;
salmon- and steelhead-killing sea lions,
Caspian terns and double-crested cormorants on the fishing side.
“We’re just certainly exhausted that
the bulk of the burdens of the fish and
wildlife management programs are
placed squarely on the backs of hunters
and fishers,” said Bob Rees, the executive director of Northwest Steelheaders.
“So the theme is: Stop the bleeding.
“Every six years, we were asked to
raise our fee increases to support them
just to maintain the status quo. You know

status quo is losing anglers, so it’s not
working. We don’t want to see fee increases, especially as significant as the
ones we’re facing right now, to maintain
the status quo.”
There are some groups, including the
League of Women Voters, WaterWatch
and the Oregon Foundation for North
American Wild Sheep, that support the
increases.
Several of those groups’ representatives said that fee increases were necessary and that nobody could say they
didn’t know they were coming.
“We have supported the fee increase
from the outset. We think it’s a prudent
approach,” said Jim Myron, of the Native Fish Society. “ODFW is only doing
what they said they were going to do six
years ago when they got their last fee increase.
“They said, ‘We’re going to make this
last six years and then we’ll be back
again.’ So they’ve upheld their end of the
bargain, and we feel like we need to uphold ours as well.”

How we got here
The proposed fee increases and a separate request for increases in generalfund dollars are designed to maintain
current programs and stave off a $32
million shortfall during the 2015-17 biennium.
There are multiple causes for the predicted shortfall. There are increased
costs on everything from fish food for
the hatcheries to salaries and benefits
and increasing payments to the Public
Employees Retirement System. There is
also the issue of mission creep – biologists and other staff members spending
a substantial amount of time for non-fish
and wildlife burdens such as preparing
reports and analysis for permitting
processes for other agencies along with
anemic contributions from general fund

have changed. ...
“Our current approach with these incremental increases over time as opposed to one large increase is designed
to minimize that negative effect.”
Question: A lot of anglers and hunters who oppose the increases say that it
looks to them like a never-ending cycle
of increased fees with no increased benefit.
Melcher: “They’ve got a couple of
things in the works. House Bill 2402,
which creates a legislative task force to
take a broad look at the department’s
funding and the needs for alternative
funding.
“We obviously believe that our programs provide great public benefit to
all Oregonians, not just ones that fish,
hunt, camp or backpack, but all Oregonians. Therefore, the general fund is a
reasonable funding source for all of
those activities.
“(HB) 3315 would have us track the
precise amount of time and the costs associated with the costs of us participating in other agencies’ permit processes,
and then in subsequent biennia give us
the authority to invoice those other
agencies for the costs of the services.”

and Oregon Lottery.
And that’s along with long-term declines in angler and hunter numbers.
During the 1970s, one in seven Oregonians, or 340,000, were hunters and one
in four, or 560,000, went fishing, according to figures cited in a secretary of
state’s audit. As of 2010, those figures
were one in 17, or 240,000, for hunters
and one in eight, or 490,000, for anglers.
A hunting license cost $7 in 1976, compared with $29.50 in 2013. A fishing license cost $9 in 1976, compared with $33.
There were 5,000 hunting licenses
and 130,000 fishing licenses sold to nonresidents in 1976. In 2013, it was 15,000
hunting licenses and 120,000 fishing licenses.
So the trajectory is unsustainable,
with rising outflow mostly on the backs
of diminished numbers of what are
known as consumptive users, hunters
and anglers. And the bleeding already
has begun.
Fish and Wildlife is in the process of
cutting about 50 positions. — about one
in 20 at headquarters and one in 50 in the
field. The department also has reorganized the state into just two regions and
is implementing efficiencies such as
consolidating functions with other agencies.

The ‘what if’ question
The department has outlined a grim
strategy for dealing with the worst-case
scenario if fee increases are not approved, a $9.15 million loss just in the
2015-17 budget.
The plan calls for a loss of 42 positions
– seven at Salem headquarters and 35 in
the field – along with the elimination of
the Bandon and Alsea River fish hatcheries, the Oregon Hatchery Research
Center, the North Santiam River summer steelhead program at Leaburg
Hatchery on the McKenzie River, 13
field positions in the Wildlife Division,
and money to pay for five Fish and Wildlife Division troopers with the Oregon
State Police.
It also would eliminate $400,000 that
the department budgeted to pay for the
purchase of rainbow trout from private
hatcheries that raise the fish for the
statewide stocking program.
That’s on top of the current cuts to positions.
“We know where we spend license
dollars. We spend license dollars in fish
hatcheries, district field offices and on
state police enforcement,” said Curt
Melcher, the department director. “So
insofar as we know where we spend the
big bulk of our license dollars, we know
that any shortfall in that revenue, either
because license sales fall off or we don’t
have a fee increase, will impact those
programs.
“We know one thing: We’re going to
balance our budget. We have to.”
hemiller@StatesmanJournal.com, (503)
399-6725 or follow on Twitter @henrymillersj
and facebook.com/hmillersj

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6A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

Outdoors
Continued from Page 1A

Dominic Aiello, president of the Oregon Outdoor Council, pointed out that
the success rate for bagging mule deer
in Oregon dropped to 28 percent in 2010
from 57 percent in 1970. For bucks, it
dropped to 17 percent in 2011 from 28
percent in 1971.
And the days when you could walk
across Oregon’s rivers on the backs of
salmon and steelhead, as the old-timers
like to say, have long passed into history.
“The lack of game is probably the
largest influencing factor,” Aiello said.
“If you go four years without filling
your freezer with meat, you’re probably
going to try hunting somewhere else or
quit altogether.”
But the biggest reason for the shift
probably has less to do with hunting and
fishing themselves than with the way
people consume the outdoors in general.
The rise of hiking, mountain biking,
kayaking, rock climbing, wildlifewatching, photography and any number
of similar subsets, such as adventure
racing and stand-up paddle-boarding,
have spread out the ways people enjoy
rivers, lakes and forest.
These “not-consumptive” outdoor
sports, ones that do not involve physically consuming the natural resource,
are often viewed as easier and cheaper
than hunting and fishing, and they are
particularly popular among younger
generations.
According to the 2015 Outdoor Participation Report, produced each year
by the Outdoor Foundation in Washington, D.C., the most popular outdoor activities among people ages 6 to 24 are:
1. Running, jogging and trail running.
2. Bicycling (road, mountain and
BMX bikes).
3. Camping (car, backyard and RV).
4. Fishing (freshwater, saltwater and
fly).
5. Hiking.
The fastest-growing outdoor sports,
according to the same report, include
adventure racing, kayaking, backpacking and biking.
The shift can be seen everywhere
and felt in the culture, particularly in
Oregon, Washington and California.
Instead of Hemingway, perhaps the
best-known scribe of outdoor literature
today is Portland’s Cheryl Strayed,
whose book “Wild” is about backpacking the Pacific Crest Trail.
Travel Oregon, the state’s tourism
commission, has broadcast a vision that
is heavy on postcard beauty and fitnessfocused activities, such as hiking, biking and camping, and light on fishing
and hunting.
On the wild section of Southern Oregon’s Rogue River, a stream famous for
salmon and steelhead for a century, outfitter-supported hiking trips have surpassed fishing trips.
The implications of the shift are easy
to spot. Oregon’s Department of Fish
and Wildlife, which relies on fees from

ZACH URNESS / STATESMAN JOURNAL

Going into the wild to backpack instead of hunting has been a trend growing for decades. Seen here is Ice Lake in the Eagle Cap Wilderness.

PHOTO COURTESY OF IMBA

The Sandy Ridge Trail system is one of the first systems to feature mountain- bike-specific trails
in Oregon.

hunting and fishing licenses, is facing a
$32 million budget shortfall.
Meanwhile, the Oregon Parks and
Recreation Department, which specializes in non-consumptive outdoor experiences at its state parks, has seen attendance jump from 28 million in 1975 to

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OR-0000362720

Zach Urness grew up hunting grouse, ducks
and deer in Minnesota and spent more time
trying to catch steelhead on the Rogue River
with a fly rod than anything else. He’s been
an outdoors writer, photographer and
videographer in Oregon for seven years.

If You are Newly Qualified
for Medicare, You are
Qualified for Even More.

• What to expect as their condition progresses

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l ess
offered online
and in-person at
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Hunting has seen some growth nationwide, though not in Oregon, and remains a big part of the culture in Oregon’s rural areas. It remains an economic powerhouse, as well, with no better
evidence than the opening of Cabela’s
sporting goods stores in Springfield and
Tualatin in the past few years.
Fishing, meanwhile, remains one of
Oregon’s most popular outdoor activities and economic drivers, and that
seems unlikely to change soon. Even
though it has declined over the years,
there are still 490,000 resident anglers
— with an additional 120,000 coming
from out of state — which ranks fishing
as one of Oregon’s best-loved activities.
But times have changed, and I should
know.
Today, when I go to the forest, I’m
more likely to shoot with a camera than
a shotgun. When I head to the river, I’m
just as likely to hold a whitewater kayaking paddle as a fishing rod.
I still fish and occasionally hunt —
and love both — but Oregon is blessed
with a landscape that fits so many outdoor adventures it doesn’t make sense
to limit yourself to just two.

503.428.5602
TOLL FREE 1.877.672.8620
TTY/TDD USERS 1.800.735.2900
OFFICE HOURS:
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Pacific
CUSTOMER SERVICE HOURS:
Mon-Fri, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Pacific

Thurs, June 11, Salem Center 50+
2615 Portland Road NE, Salem
Tues, June 16, Keizer Senior Center
930 Plymouth Drive NE, Keizer
Wed, June 17, South Salem Senior Center
6450 Fairway Ave. SE, Salem

A sales person will be present with information
and applications. For accommodation of persons
www.ATRIOhp.com with special needs, please call the number listed.
Visit us online at

This information is available for free in other languages. Please call our
customer service number listed. Esta información está disponible de forma
gratuita en otros idiomas. Por favor llame a nuestro número de servicio al
cliente listado. ATRIO Health Plans has PPO and HMO D-SNP plans with a
Medicare Contract. Enrollment in ATRIO Health Plans depends on contract
renewal. The benefit information provided is a brief summary, not a complete
description of benefits. Limitations, copayments, and restrictions may apply.
You must continue to pay your Medicare Part B premium. Medicare
beneficiaries may also enroll in ATRIO Health Plans through the CMS Medicare
Online Enrollment Center located at http://www.medicare.gov.
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OR-0000363457

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

Our Oregon
g

LIVING TOM
MCCALL'S LEGACY

State issues first local advisories

CALENDAR
TODAY
Mother Earth News Fair: Sustainable living event that features 200
hands-on workshops and demonstrations from experts on real food,
organic gardening, homesteading,
renewable energy, green building
and remodeling, DIY projects,
small-scale livestock, green transportation, natural health, and
related topics, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Linn
County Fair and Expo Center, 3700
Knox Butte Road, Albany. $20
weekend passes advance; $30 at the
gate; free ages 17 and younger.
(800) 234-3368, www.motherearth
newsfair.com.

By Kristian Foden-Vencil
OPB

In the event of a distant tsunami coming to the Oregon
Coast, you might not expect
boat owners to head out to sea.
But that’s what many commercial and sports fishers do —
to protect their vessels from the
groundings, capsizes and collisions in harbors when tsunami
waves near the shore. In deep
water, a passing tsunami is such
an elongated hump that sailors
might not even notice.
The state has released the
first in a series of local advisories showing coastal boat operators where to go and what to do
in the event of a distant tsunami.
Back in 2011, when boat owners heard a tsunami was on its
way to the West Coast from Japan, many headed out to sea.
The passing tsunami wasn’t a
problem for them.
But in Crescent City, California, for example, the fleet
couldn’t return because of harbor damage.
Jonathan Allan, with the Oregon Department of Geology and
Mineral Industries, says to
make matters worse, a storm
was approaching.
“It presented some challenges because people were
evacuating quickly and weren’t
necessarily adequately prepared, both in terms of having
support staff on their vessels,
you know fuel, etc., to be out
there for extended periods of
time, or food etc.,” he said. “And
so they were having to come up
with alternative options for
where to safely move to.” Those
who didn’t have enough fuel returned to Crescent City, but had
to anchor in some unusual spots.
Others had to sail to Humboldt Bay or Brookings Harbor,
in Oregon, ports that some captains had never negotiated before.
The new DOGAMI advisory’s focus on a distant tsunami is
important.
When a Cascadia Subduction
Zone earthquake hits right off
the Oregon Coast, the resulting
tsunami is expected to reach
land in about 10 minutes. So

7A

SATURDAY
Little Sprouts: Carnivorous
Plants: Young gardeners are learning all about carnivorous plants,
what they eat and how to care for
them. Each child will take home a
carnivorous plant of their own, 11
a.m., Garland Nursery, 5470 NE
Highway 20, Corvallis. $7 per child.
Registration required. (541) 7536601, www.garlandnursery.com.

JUNE 16

The state has released the first in a series of local advisories showing coastal boat operators where to go and what
to do in the event of a distant tsunami.

ABOUT EARTHFIX
EarthFix is a partnership of seven
public media stations in the Pacific
Northwest. Look for environmental
coverage at earthfix.opb.org. For
information, email EarthFix at
earthfix@opb.org.

there won’t be time for boaters
to head out to deep water.
But if the earthquake happens in Alaska, boat operators
will have about four hours; if it
occurs in Japan, they have
about nine hours.
In 2011, after the Japan
earthquake, what boat owners
did in the end was keep close
contact and help each other out.
Allan says the state’s new ad-

visories focus on Newport and
Toledo, but other locations will
follow.
“The regionally released
map is the first of its kind on the
Oregon coast for a specific port
community,” he said “It’s providing information to recreation and commercial boat operators as to the types of responses they can take in the event of a
distance tsunami taking place.”
Terry Thompson is a commercial fisherman and a Commissioner for Lincoln County,
and he thinks the advisory will
help boat owners make good decisions.
“A lot of people think they’re
just going to go a short distance
off shore,” he said. “They don’t
realize that in a major tsunami,
they’ve go to get outside of 100
fathoms. In a distant tsunami —
that would be one like in Alaska
or Japan — they’re going to
have to get a shorter distance.”
In Newport and Toledo, that

“shorter distance” could still
take a couple of hours to reach.
Boat operators would have to
reach an area where the water
was 30 fathoms.
Thompson says when the
next tsunami hits, boat owners
need to take account of more
than just the new map — they
need to ask themselves questions like: “What’s the weather
forecast?” and “How much time
do I have?”
“Can you get to port and get
up the hill before the tsunami
hits, is the question,” he said.
“In a distant tsunami, I’d have a
chance. In a near shore tsunami
and I’m off shore, I may just
gamble for going to the deep,
but I may be out there for a
while.”
Walter Chuck’s small fishing
boat was out of the water in 2011,
so he didn’t have to make any
difficult decisions. But he
served on the committee that
put the new advisories together.

Salem Chapter, Association of
Northwest Steelheaders: The
fishing-, conservation-, and education-oriented non-profit organization is open to anglers of all ages,
interests and ability levels, 7 to 9
p.m., Keizer Heritage Community
Center, 980 Chemawa Road NE,
Keizer. Free for visitors. www.sa
lemnwsteelheaders.org.

JUNE 17
Marion SWCD Board Meeting: 7
to 9 p.m., Marion SWCD , 338 Hawthorne Ave. NE. (503) 391-9927.

JUNE 18
Amateur Naturalist Series: Energy Trust: Energy Trust speaks of
how to make our homes more
energy efficient, 7 to 8:30 p.m.,
Straub Environmental Learning
Center, 1320 A St. NE. $5. (503)
391-4145, www.straubenvironmen
talcenter.org.

JULY 18
Willamette River Float and Clean
Up Event: Activities include invasive
plant removal, litter cleanup, native
planting, maintenance and monitoring, and erosion control, Willamette
Park, end of SE Goodnight Ave.,
Corvallis. Free. Donations accepted.
(541) 286-5031, www.oceanbluepro
ject.org.

Your business could be hanging
out with more people.
We’ll introduce you to some fresh faces.
The way people get their information is evolving. Fast. But one thing remains the same — our ability to
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8A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

The importance of bonding
over a good weather story
When temperatures hit 100
degrees in May or a foot of
snow falls on the Willamette
Valley floor overnight, weather is a priority in the newsroom.
Weather is always a priority
story in the newsroom. Any
newsroom.
Often these stories don’t tell
readers anything they don’t
already know — at least generally. They also can be filled
with common-sense material
that could easily be acquired
by glancing at a smartphone.
Still, they play an important
role in the news media’s relationship with the public.
So why do we do them?
Because they confirm our
readers’ common experience,
and that helps bring us together.
Did you hear the thunder?
Did it rain hard where you live,
too?
Yes, and Yes.
Statesman Journal Executive Editor Michael Davis
said he loves a good weather
story.
“Weather is a common denominator regardless of what
you do in life,” he said.
“Whether you’re working full
time, are retired, are a student, or a teacher — the weather is a factor in your life, even
if you’re not aware of it.”
Davis described several
ways in which weather plays a
role in daily life.
“For a lot of people, the
weather provides documentation of their lives,” he said.
People are really interested in
the details. I don’t know how
many people (I know) that

alisha

ROEMELING

ALISHA ROEMELING covers the police
beat and court proceedings. Contact
herat aroemeling@Salem.gannett.
com or 503-399-6884.

THOMAS PATTERSON / STATESMAN JOURNAL

keep a weather log.”
The importance of a weather story can also be illustrated
in the sheer amount of people
it can resonate with.
Marty Kaiser, a former
editor at the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, said weather is
relatable.
“It affects everybody’s
lives,” Kaiser said. “Stories we
do in newsrooms often don’t
have as big an effect on people
as a weather story does because almost everybody cares
about it.”
Davis agreed.
“Weather unites us in a

Surviving
cancer
Matters to me

Anyone can get cancer, at any age, for
any reason. If you have a suspicion at
all, insist on getting checked.
—Kris P., cancer survivor

This is the face of someone surviving lung
cancer—the leading cause of death, next to
heart disease. Surprised?
Kris is a non-smoker who was diagnosed with stage
four lung cancer in November 2013. Read her story at
welcometothefamilycancer.com.

Surviving cancer represents a journey for many people.
Celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day with us on
Monday, June 8 from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Salem Hospital,
Building C. For information, call 503-562-4321.

25

COPS & COURTS

Salem Police officers Brian Shaw and Josh Edmiston shut down the Marion Street bridge due to hazardous
conditions as snow and high winds blow across the state Feb. 7, 2014.

way,” Davis said. “It provides
conversational pocket change.
If you don’t know what to say
to a person, you can always
talk about the weather, and it
provides a jumping-off point
for a conversation.”
While the weather seems to
be a daily topic of discussion
across the globe, it also seems
to be a way of remembering
things.
Think of the best memory
you have with your mom, dad,
girlfriend, husband or sibling.
Do you remember what it was
like outside? The same thing
applies for your worst memo-

Join us every Thursday in June from
10 to 11:30 a.m. for our Cancer Survivorship
Education Series.
To register call: 503-814-2432

TODAY’S DEEP DIVE:

ries — it’s easy to recall what
time of the year you crashed
your car or lost a loved one
because you know how cold
and rainy or sunny and hot it
felt that day.
Davis recalls the day his
daughter got married. It was a
105-degree day in Baltimore,
and his daughter was worried
about whether they’d be able
to take a photo outside at all.
“The best photo from that
day was taken in the late-night
hours, maybe the early morning,” he said. “Everyone’s ties
were loosened standing on the
rooftop, and that midnight

temperature dropped enough
for people to head outside.
“I remember thinking and
telling my daughter that they’d
find that photo,” Davis said.
“But the topic of the weather
was talked about for days leading up to the wedding.”
It’s assumed that for those
huge events like college graduation, your wedding or any
outdoor gathering, weather
will inevitably be a part of the
conversation. But it’s more
important than that.
When was the last time you
looked at the weather forecast? Was it this morning when
you were getting dressed for
work? Maybe it was just before lunch when you were
deciding how many layers to
wear when you walked outside.
My weekend plans revolve
around weather conditions. If
it’s going to be hot, I’m going
swimming and exercising
early in the morning. If it’s
raining, I’m probably reading
or hiking, and when it’s a good
72-degree, sunny, beautiful
day, I’m going on a bike ride.
Come to think of it, I don’t
know the last time the weather
didn’t play a role in my day.
“It’s seemingly mundane,”
Davis said. “But it’s never
mundane. It gives us journalists a chance to use our imagination and be creative. To not
only put together something
that people will read and enjoy,
but that people come away
with it with a takeaway.”
aroemeling@statesmanjournal
.com, (503) 399-6884 or follow on
Twitter @alisharoemeling

June 4: Move for good health
June 11: Sexual health and renewal
June 18: Eating well after cancer
June 25: Regaining emotional wellness

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

9A

New Crooked House Playground celebrated
By Alisha Roemeling
Statesman Journal

The Crooked House Playground at
Bush’s Pasture Park isn’t known for its
traditional structure, but it sure is loved.
About 40 people gathered Saturday
for the official ribbon cutting to celebrate the brand-new digs at the north end
of the park.
Brightly colored playground equipment, swings and slides captured the attention of many children, and laughter
filled the air as parents watched their
kids climb on the dark blue spinner bowl
and twirl on a stand-up revolving toy
called a Spica.
John Kleeman with the city of Salem
Parks Operations Division said the playground equipment was chosen through
extensive public outreach and requests.
“The equipment is designed to be safe
and accessible,” Kleeman said. “The
playground was created so people won’t
easily hurt themselves but can learn and
challenge themselves.
The former equipment was ripped out
in 2014, as the city of Salem Parks Operations Division had determined the structure was rotting and needed replacing in
2012.
The new playground reflects the 1968
original theme, with the most prominent
structure being the crooked house. The
grounds also met the approval of the
Americans with Disabilities Act. One of
the three swing set seats accommodates
a child with limited abilities.
“The project total is $162,000, and that
includes play equipment and installation, tile surfacing, site preparation, and
design and project management,” said
Toni Whitler, with parks operations.
The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department approved a $75,000 local government grant through its small-grant
program for matching funds for the
playground. Whitler noted that the city
identified funds from a reserve account
to combine with additional donations for
the project.
Eldo Murphy and his wife, Janet, at-

ASHLEY SMITH / STATESMAN JOURNAL

A celebration and ribbon cutting was held Saturday for the new Crooked House Playground at Bush's Pasture Park.
Mia
Schultze, 3,
left, plays
with her
twin sister,
Bryndle, and
their cousin
Samson
Siegrist, 3, at
the new
Crooked
House
Playground
in Bush's
Pasture Park
on Saturday.

tended the short ceremony. The couple,
who donated the original Crooked House
Playground to the the park in 1968, were
happy to see so much joy as a result of
the structure.
“It’s a nice that it gets used so much,”
Eldo Murphy said. “It looks like it will be
popular.”
City Councilor Tom Andersen, representing Salem’s Ward 2, described
Bush’s Pasture Park as the crown jewel
of the city.
“Every time I come here, rain or
shine, this place is packed with families,” Andersen said. “It’s a lovely addition to the central park of Salem.”

ASHLEY SMITH /

aroemeling@statesmanjournal.com, (503)
399-6884, or follow on Twitter
@alisharoemeling

STATESMAN
JOURNAL

EVERY SUNDAY

Wildfire season kicks
off early in Oregon

Local
BUSINESS
News
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;OL :WYPUNZ H[ :\UU`]PL^ PZ [OL WSHJL MVY HJ[P]L
ZLUPVYZ ^OV [Y\S` ^HU[ [V SP]L SPML [V [OL M\SSLZ[
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HUKLU[LY[HPUMHTPS`7VWVUPU[OLJVMMLL»ZVU\Z

05+,7,5+,5;30=05.

Subscribe: 1-800-452-2511
Advertise: 503-399-6602 

[O(]LU\L5,‹:HSLT69‹  
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OR-0000363421

Board Certified Ophthalmologists
U. John Berzins, M.D. • Robert E. Tibolt, M.D.
Marcus A. East, M.D. • Ryan W. Lapour, M.D.
John G. Dodd, D.O.
Optometrist
Erika C. Bury, O.D.

AP

In this Sept. 14, 2014, a plume of smoke churns out of the Onion Mountain fire in the Rogue
River-Siskiyou National Forest 15 miles west of Grants Pass.

Drought conditions increase wildfire danger
By Tracy Loew
Statesman Journal

Oregon’s fire season is
kicking off about three
weeks earlier than normal.
It’s the second consecutive year for an early
start to the season, which
began Saturday in the
Oregon Department of
Forestry’s Central Oregon District.
“We have not received
enough precipitation to
significantly change the
ongoing drought conditions, and the larger fuels
remain dry with fuel
moistures that are below
average,” said George
Ponte, Central Oregon
District forester. “The
smaller fuels will dry out
very quickly with the return of hot and dry conditions, and this will result
in the rapid increase of
fire danger levels.”
“Fire season” is a legal
designation that imposes
restrictions on the public,
forestland owners, and
people working in state
and private forests.
It prohibits outdoor
burning without a permit
issued by the Department
of Forestry or a local fire

department; the use of
fireworks, exploding targets, or any bullet with a
pyrotechnic charge; and it
requires forest operators
to
have
firefighting
equipment on site.
“Most people in Central Oregon are aware of
the predictions for a very
severe fire season, and I
hope those conditions do
not come true, but we will
be ready in any case,”
Ponte said.
“Ultimately the severity of this season will be
determined by three factors: how much lightning
we get, how much rain
comes with those storms,
and, most importantly,
how much help we get
from folks in preventing
human-caused fires,” he
said.
The Department of
Forestry’s Central Oregon District includes 2.2
million acres of public
and private forestland in
Crook, Deschutes, Gilliam, Grant, Harney,
Hood River, Jefferson,
Morrow,
Wasco
and
Wheeler counties.
So far this year, ODF
has reported eight lightning-caused fires burning
7 acres and 111 human-

Your Eye Health

caused fires burning 303
acres. That’s slightly
higher than the 10-year
average for this time of
year.

is our vision
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tloew@statesmanjournal
.com, (503) 399-6779 or
follow at
Twitter.com/SJWatchdog

25

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10A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

Klamath Falls vet recalls ‘Longest Day’
Boehm remembers ‘the ocean was red with blood’ on D-Day
Herald and News

It was wet and cold on the beaches of Normandy,
France, on June 6, 1944, Army veteran and Klamath
Falls resident John Boehm recalls.
“And the ocean was red with blood from all the
boys,” Boehm told the Herald and News in a recent interview.
“A big bunch of ships sunk in the harbor there,”
Boehm said, “and dead boys floating in the water just
like that, side-to-side, just everywhere you looked.”
Boehm, 93, served as a tank driver and tech sergeant
in the Third Army under Gen. George S. Patton when

the Allies invaded France on June 6, 1944, to take the
continent back from Germany’s Third Reich.
It’s known as D-Day or “The Longest Day,” as recalled by the classic book by Cornelius Ryan
Boehm was driving his division’s tank over the
beach when the 60-ton vehicle blew up. He had entered
the beach in the tank at about two or three in the afternoon, dropped off by a landing craft before a German
artillery shell hit.
“Just a big explosion,” Boehm said.“Three of the
boys got killed, and two of us, we got pretty badly hurt.
“I just got knocked all over that tank, you know,” he
added.

What did it sound like?
“Good god, you couldn’t hear yourself think,” Boehm
said.“All the guns going off, little ones, big ones, and the
sky was black with airplanes, and the loud roaring from
the airplanes — it was really, really loud.
“It stays with you,” he added.
From there, Boehm recalls being flown to a tent hospital in Africa to recuperate in a body cast.
“That’s where the darned ants almost ate me up,”
Boehm said...Ants crawled inside his cast, biting him so
much someone had to remove the cast.
“I was fighting them ants, and getting them out of my
bed,” Boehm added.
Marks on his back to this day are a stark reminder of
what he survived.
Was it luck that he survived, or something else?
“I think the good Lord was with me,” Boehm said.
“The Army issued a little Bible to carry in your pocket,
and I carried that with me all the time.”

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His service took him to Algeria, Tunisia, Morocco
and Italy.
Boehm spent three days of 140-plus degree Fahrenheit weather in Africa, and more than 70 days of rain in
Italy.
He ran out of food and had to scrounge for whatever
he could find off of cadavers.
He also remembers being face-to-face with Gen.
Patton.
“I hauled him one time in the Jeep,” Boehm said,
matter-of-factly.
“He had a straight face on him,” Boehm said, of Patton, who he also described as big,tall, imposing.
“He was a very rough talking guy and he didn’t care
what you said. He mostly talked about his men, you
know,” he added. “He didn’t believe in any sissies; he
believed in good men, you know. It was business, strictly business.”
Boehm remembers the light-hearted moments, too.
He pulled letters from a box while sitting on his
couch in Klamath Falls. He remembers it could take
three to four months to receive the mail, but once received, each letter or package was treasured.
One time, he even received a cake.
“When I got the cake, it was old and rotten and moldy
and probably about three to four months old,” Boehm
said. “There was a pint of whiskey baked in this cake. So
we took the bottle out, washed it out ... then we drank the
whiskey,” he said with a laugh.
The medallions and photographs from the war laid
out on a box in his home tell the story for themselves.
Holding a photograph of himself in the service,
Boehm questioned whether he was 24 or 25 years old at
the time the photograph was captured.

REMY DE LA MAUVINIERE/AP

A young visitor carrying the U.S. flag walks among graves at
the Colleville American military cemetery in Colleville sur Mer,
western France, on Saturday, the 71th anniversary of the
D-Day landing. D-Day marked the start of a Europe invasion.

“I had to be around 25,” Boehm said.
But that’s about the only thing that the man wasn’t
certain about of his service.
Boehm thinks he could be the only surviving member of his division that he knows of, and his aim is to tell
their stories.
“How many come home?” he asked. “There was I’d
say half of the old boys (came home). We had a lot of new
boys coming all the time, getting killed.”
Boehm pulled a handful of medallions and honorary
awards from a briefcase; pulling out medals, including
his Purple Heart, among other awards that help tell the
story of his service.
“We were all scared,” Boehm said. “You don’t know if
you’re going to live one minute to the next. You’ve got
all that in your mind.
“I got to the point where I wasn’t scared of anything,”
Boehm said. “Mostly toward the end of war, we’d been
through all kinds of hell. I was wanting to get back
home.”
And he did come home.
Thousands of Allied forces were killed or wounded
in the invasion, according to the U.S. Army, including
some of Boehm’s friends.
“What hurts you more than anything else is your
buddies that get killed,” he said.
His three brothers, who served in other parts of the
theater, returned home.
Boehm has kept his medals and patches from the
war and recently received praise for his service during
a visit to Washington, D.C., with Honor Flight. The
flight brings veterans to the nation’s capital to see the
World War II memorial.
“He’d go back in a minute,” his companion, Shirley
Golly, said.
“I tell ya, wherever we go, people just congratulate
him,” she added.

A TASTE OF OREGON AT BROOKS WINERY

Taste
A

– OF –

OREGON
VICTOR PANICHKUL

WI NE PAI R I NG
DINNER
Saturday, June 13, 6 p.m.
Brooks Winery, 21101 SE Cherry Blossom Lane, Amity, OR 97101
Join us for an evening featuring a four-course dinner created by Victor Panichkul that highlights
Brooks wines. Each course has been especially selected to pair with one of Brooks’ wines.
Price is $80 per person.
Purchase your tickets online at http://www.brookswine.com/events/A-Taste-of-Oregon-at-Brooks-Winery
Or by calling Heather Kirk at

503.435.1278
VICTOR PANICHKUL

is a longtime food and wine journalist,
recipe developer and chef. He’s currently the wine,
food and beer columnist for the Statesman Journal. His
food blog, TheTasteofOregon.com was recognized
as one of the country’s top regional cuisine
blogs by Saveur Magazine.

VICTOR PANICHKUL

OR-0000363246

StatesmanJournal.com

S NOW

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

GET THE LATEST
NEWS, UPDATED
THROUGHOUT THE
DAY, AT YOUR
FINGERTIPS

Oregon Connections Academy celebrates
The Oregon Connections Academy held its annual
spring celebration to commemorate the end of the
school year at Salem’s Riverfront Park.
Oregon Connections Academy is the state’s largest
online K-12 public charter school. It is authorized
under law by the Scio School District and operated by
a nonprofit. It is governed by a board of directors.
The spring celebration is meant to bring students
and families together to connect with teachers and
peers in a fun atmosphere. They could choose to participate in activities at a variety of booths, including
face painting, crafts, a scavenger hunt and a bean bag
toss.
Between 50 and 75 teachers and staff members
worked the booths Friday.
Oregon Connections Academy also held a ceremony for eighth grade students moving on to high
school next year.
Next week, the school will hold a high school graduation for 330 graduates at the Oregon Convention
Center. Kaeli Baxter has attended the academy since
seventh grade and is set to graduate high school next
week.

S

Website: StatesmanJournal.com Mobile: Go
iPhone & Android apps: Download free fro
Mobile: Go to m.StatesmanJournal.com Tw
Facebook: Facebook.com/StatesmanJournal

“It’s focused. It teaches a lot of other skills than
normal school,” Baxter said.

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Salem police corporal promoted to sergeant
Cpl. Donald Vidrio was promoted to sergeant in the
Salem Police Department.
Salem Police Chief Jerry Moore presided over his
promotional ceremony, in front of Vidrio’s family and
colleagues, June 1, according to a press release.
Vidrio began working with Salem police in 2008
after having served eight years as a reserve officer
and full-time officer with the Dallas Police Department. While working in Salem, Vidrio served as a
field training officer, field sobriety training instructor and a member of the Field Training Officer Steering Committee.
He was recognized as the DUII Officer of the Year
in 2010 by the Oregon DUII Task Force, a statewide,
interagency effort, said Lt. Dave Okada.
Vidrio will remain in the Patrol Division as a patrol
supervisor.
— Kaellen Hessel

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REUNIONS
SCHOOLS
Albany Union High School Class of 1965: 50-year class reunion,
June 27 at Wheelhouse Event Center. For more information on other
weekend activities, contact Sharon Sease, (541) 979-0790, sease1169@comcast.net.
Cascade High School Class of 1965: 50-year class reunion, June
11-13. June 11 events include Scramble Golf Tournament at Santiam
Golf Club and no-host gathering 6 p.m. at the Wooden Nickel in
Sublimity; June 12 gathering at Willamette Valley Vineyards; and
June 13 is a pig roast with all the fixings. All events require RSVP
except the gathering at Wooden Nickel. Alumni of other Cascade
classes are welcome. Sharon Hanson, (503) 851-8957, sharonh@wbcable.net.
Central High School Class of 1968: Annual gathering, Aug. 15 at
Redgate Vineyard in Independence. Food and beverages available
for purchase. Contact: Charlotte Iliff, (503) 362-3416,
char.iliff@gmail.com.
Central High School Classes 70s and 80s Multi-class Reunion:
Aug. 8 and 9. Aug. 8 at Riverview Park Amphitheater. Food, fun,
adult beverages and live music. $15 per person or $25 per family if
paid by May 1. Aug. 9 9-hole person best ball golf tournament with
prizes. Like us on Facebook and register ASAP. Fundraiser and food
drive for the local Ella Curran food bank so please bring two cans of
food per person. Contact Sherry Lindley-Lowells, (503) 931-3201,
sherrylowells@comcast.net.
Gervais High School Classes of 1962 to 1968: Seven classes of
Gervais alumni are invited for a fun night of no host bar, dinner and
music, Aug. 1 at Bob Zielinski’s Scenic Valley Vineyards and new Farm
Museum. Barbara Neliton, (503) 393-6439, barbara.neliton@gmail.com.
Gervais High School All-Class reunion: All alumni are invited to
join the class of 1955, 5 to 10 p.m. Sept. 26 at Silverton Elks. RSVP to
Pat Hupp, (503) 873-2608, or Larry Jebousek, (503) 871-8262.
Gervais Union High School Class of 1962: Monthly class luncheons, 11:30 a.m., second Thursday of each month at Izzy’s on
Lancaster Drive NE. kb7scc@wildblue.net.
Gervais High School Class of 1970: 45-year class reunion, Aug. 15
at McNary Restaurant & Lounge. RSVP to Rita Rasmussen at (503)
580-0612 or Frank or Karen Slyter at (503) 538-1942.
Corvallis High School Class of 1965: 50-year class reunion, Aug. 7
and 8. Friday informal meeting at 7 p.m. at Old School at the Children’s Farm Home. Picnic at 10 a.m. Saturday at Avery Park. Buffet at
5:30 p.m. at the CH2M Hill Alumni Center. Contact: corvallishsreunion65@gmail.com, www.chs65.info.

North Salem High School Class of 1957: No-host luncheon meetings fourth Thursday of each month at Keizer Elks, 4250 Cherry Ave.
NE, Keizer. Contact: Donna Kelley-Dayton, (503) 881-2123.
North Salem High School Class of 1958: Class luncheon, noon
second Friday of each month at Keizer Elks Lodge. Contact: Judie
Mapes, (503) 390-0960.
North Salem High School Class of 1960: Gathering of classmates,
11:30 a.m. third Wednesday of each month at Keizer Elks Lodge.
Contact: Becky, (503) 390-1225.
North Salem High School Class of 1965: 50-year class reunion, July
31 at Northwest Wine Studies Center. (425) 644-1044, info@ReunionsWithClass.com. Register at www.ReunionsWithClass.com
North Salem High School Class of 1970: 45-year class reunion,
Aug. 14 and 15. Friday informal gathering place at the Lucey Barn.
Saturday golf scramble; dinner buffet at McNary Restaurant. govikings1970@gmail.com,
https://sites.google.com/site/1970northsalemvikings/;
www.facebook.com/northsalem45threunion.
Sacred Heart/Serra Catholic High Schools: Reunion, 7 to 10 p.m.
July 24 at Blanchet School; 5 p.m. July 25 at Keizer Elks Lodge. Contact: Clem Unrein, (503) 845-6742 or Norma (Rupp) Bernardy, (503)
390-1915.
Salem High School Class of 1942: Luncheon at Rudy’s at Salem
Golf Club, 2025 Golf Course Road S. 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. third Monday of each month. Contact: (503) 362-8078.
Salem High School Class of 1944: Monthly luncheons at 11:30 a.m.,
third Tuesday of each month at The Sizzler Restaurant on Lancaster
Drive NE. All classmates are invited, guys included. Contact: (503)
363-1814.

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ATLAS
GLOVE SALE
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Salem High School Class of 1950: Ladies no-host lunch, noon June
15 at Sizzler restaurant. Contact: Marilyn Lee, (503) 364-3743.

All Atlas Gloves
in stock

Salem High School Class of 1952: Monthly no-host luncheon, 11:30
a.m. third Thursday of each month, Schroeder’s Guest House Restaurant, 4850 Portland Road NE. Contact: Jim Kinkaid, (503) 581-8679.
Salem High School Class of 1954: Monthly class luncheons, third
Wednesday of each month at Keizer Elks, 4250 Cherry Ave. NE.
Contact: (503) 551-6556.
Scio High School Alumni Reunion: 10 a.m. June 28 at Scio Centennial School. Potluck at 1 p.m. Contact: Alfreda Bales, (503) 363-6360.

Through 6/30/2015.

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Hopewell Grade School All-Class Reunion: All classes invited to a
potluck, 2 to 6 p.m. Aug. 8 at Hauer of the Dauen Winery in Dayton.
Canned food drive for Hopewell Community Church Food Bank.
Bring your favorite dish to share. Contact Debbie Buck (Hackworth),
(503) 551-7236.
Independence High All School Reunion: 11 a.m. Aug. 22, Henry
Hill Library, 750 S Fifth St. Catered Luncheon. $15. To register, send
check to IHS Reunion, PO Box 291, Independence OR 97351. Questions: Al Oppliger, (503) 838-1353, jcoppliger@aol.com
Independence High School Class of 1950: 65-year class reunion,
Aug. 21 at Rock-n-Rogers at Farrol’s Restaurant in Rickreall. Al Oppliger, (503) 838-1353, jcoppliger@aol.com.
John F Kennedy Mount Angel High School Class of 1975: 40year class reunion, Aug. 1 at Evergreen Golf Course. Contact John
Gooley at johnegooley@yahoo.com.
Lebanon High School Class of 1959: 56th class reunion, Aug. 8 at
Santiam Place. Festivities begin at 5 p.m. with registration and happy
hour, then dinner at 6:30 p.m. Judy Peters, (503) 910-9018 or (503)
838-6216, judejj03@hotmail.com.
McNary High School Class of 1970: 45-year class reunion, July 17
and 18. Friday no-host bar at Walery’s West Salem. Saturday social at
6 p.m. and buffet at 6 p.m. at Keizer Elks Lodge. Deadline for registration and payment is June 27. Email mcnary1970@gmail.com.
McNary High School Class of 1975: 40-year class reunion, Aug. 7
and 8. mcnaryhighschool1975@gmail.com or McNary 1975 Reunion
c/o 1156 Manzanita Way NE Keizer, OR 97303-3545.
North Salem High School Class of 1956: Class luncheon, 11:30 a.m.
first Friday of each month. Contact: Diane, (503) 364-1104 or judy,
(503) 393-7070.

CRIME LOG
POLICE
POLICE
Reported in the 24 hours ending at 4 p.m. Saturday (addresses refer
to block number):

SALEM
Residential and business burglaries: 1000 Fir St. S, 1300 Plaza St. NW,
1000 Fairview Ave. SE.
Traffic crashes: Friday: 10:55 a.m., 3200 Arbon St. NE; 3:06 p.m.,
Commercial and Hoyt streets SE; 4:03 p.m., 12th and Marion Streets
NE; 4:23 p.m., Lancaster Drive and Glendale Avenue NE; 5:02 p.m.,
1200 Cross St. SE; 9:53 p.m., 2200 Sunnyview Road NE; 10:02 p.m.,
Garth and Turner roads SE; Saturday: 5:08 a.m., 3100 Hammel St. NE;
1:06 p.m., 4120 Commercial St. SE; 1:17 p.m., 300 Senate St. NW.

INDEPENDENCE
Stolen vehicles: 900 Walnut St.
Traffic crashes: Friday: 6:27 p.m., 1500 Monmouth St.; Saturday: 1:39
a.m., 100 C St.

MARION COUNTY
Residential and business burglaries: 8300 Enchanted Way SE, 4300
Lancaster Drive NE.
Traffic crashes: Friday: 5:08 p.m., 9600 Marion Road SE; Saturday:
2:21 a.m., 3700 Silverton Road NE; 12:36 p.m., 29000 North Fork Road
SE.

POLK COUNTY
Stolen vehicles: 10000 Rickreall Road.

11A

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Serving customers of Portland General Electric,
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Traffic crashes: Saturday: 1:45 a.m., Highway 99W, milepost 61.

25

12A

StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

Fake orca nearly
drowns prior to
scaring sea lions
By Terrence Petty
Associated Press

BRENT DRINKUT/STATESMAN JOURNAL

Trevor Spear puts on his gown as he arrives for the 17th annual commencement at Blanchet Catholic School on Saturday.

Embarking on new path

PORTLAND — When a 32-foot replica killer whale
buzzed through the water to scare off hundreds of
sea lions piled on Oregon docks, onlookers cheered.
And then the dummy orca went belly-up.
The motorized fiberglass orca was brought
Thursday to the seaside town of Astoria as a sort of
maritime Clint Eastwood called upon to deal with
ne’er-do-wells, in this case sea lions crowding onto
docks and making it difficult for locals to access
their boats.
But the orca’s first day on the job was a flop.
About 1,000 people cheered as the dummy whale
— with its human operator inside — took to the water
Thursday night. Jim Knight, executive director of
the Port of Astoria, said sea lions that were crowded
onto the docks became “deathly silent.”
But as a cargo ship passed by, the phony orca
started to list from the vessel’s wake. And then the
bogus orca capsized.
“Our crew from the port had to go rescue the operator so he didn’t drown,” Knight said.
So what did the sea lions think about this spectacle?
“They probably think it’s dead now that it’s belly
up,” Knight said. “You can’t make this stuff up.”
Sea lion numbers along the West Coast have
grown sharply since they were protected under a
1972 federal law. As water temperatures increase
off the coast of California because of climate
change, the animals have sought cooler waters to the
north in Oregon. The sea lions who have been taking
over docks at the Port of Astoria are also attracted
by bountiful runs of salmon and smelt in the nearby
Columbia River, biologists say.
While the thousands of tourists who visit Astoria
each year might find the sea lions amusing, many locals see them as a nuisance. Officials say the sea lions break the docks, poop, smell, block access to
boats, and eat the fish on which the port’s fishing industry and the town’s economy depend.
The Port of Astoria has tried just about everything to keep the sea lions away — including beach
balls, colorful tape, chicken wire and electrified
mats.
The fake orca was outfitted with recordings of
real killer whale calls.
The orca capsized before the recording could be
tried out.

BRENT DRINKUT/STATESMAN JOURNAL

Graduating senior Shania Cessnun walks through the floral
arches during graduation inside Gallaspy Stadium at Dallas
High School on Saturday.

It’s high school graduation season, and the
Statesman Journal will be there chronicling the
ceremonies of schools throughout Marion and
Polk counties. On June 14, look for a special
graduation section in print and online with photographs of the ceremonies and lists of graduates from local schools. Go to Statesman
Journal.com/grad for photo galleries of local
ceremonies.

Kennedy High School graduated its class of 2015 at the
Festhalle in Mt. Angel on Saturday.

JOSHUA BESSEX, DAILY ASTORIAN/AP

John Wifler, the pilot of a fake fiberglass orca, is pulled
from the capsized vessel Thursday in the Columbia River.

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USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL

SECTION B

E2

IN MONEY

IN LIFE

Sony’s latest
profit strategy

Story behind the making
of ‘Jurassic World’ movie

06.07.15
KAZUHIRO NOGI, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

‘A MAN OF CHARACTER’

WHAT’S HAPPENING

$500K
for a
green
card,
new life

ONLINE
TODAY’S
MUST-READS

Foreign investors
give U.S. cities
boost, create jobs

TONY AWARDS

uThe Tonys: Photos
and stories from
Broadway’s big night

Sara Roth
KGW.com

uCavs and Warriors
battle in Game 2 of
the NBA finals

PORTLAND, ORE .

uStories, analysis as
world leaders gather
for G-7 summit
uWe’re there as for
the French Open final
KEVIN LAMARQUE, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

TODAY ON TV

President Obama hugs Vice President Biden during the funeral Saturday for Biden’s son Beau.

uABC This Week:
Gov. Scott Walker, R-Wis.
uNBC Meet the Press:
Pre-empted by coverage
of the French Open.
uCBS Face the Nation:
Gov. Chris Christie, R-N.J.;
Republican presidential
candidate Rick Perry;
uCNN State of the
Union: Republican
presidential candidates
Rick Perry and Lindsey
Graham; Democratic
presidential candidate
Lincoln Chafee
To find these items, go to
onlinetoday.usatoday.com

This is an edition of USA TODAY
provided for Statesman Journal. An
expanded version of USA TODAY is
available at newsstands or by
subscription, and at usatoday.com.

Find USA TODAY Sports in today’s local
sports section.

USA SNAPSHOTS©

States cash in
on lotteries

9

$19.9

24

billion

12

Obama eulogizes
Beau Biden
David Jackson
USA TODAY

President Obama lauded Beau
Biden on Saturday as “a man of
character” who honored his family and nation and as a military
veteran and public servant who
met life’s challenge of making a
difference.
“The world noticed,” Obama
told the Biden family during a eulogy at a Catholic church in Wilmington, Del. “They felt it — his
presence. Beau lives on in the
lives of others. ... What a good
man. What an original.”
Beau Biden, 46, a former Delaware attorney general who had
planned to run for governor, died
a week ago after a long bout with
brain cancer.

2

7

Source North American Association of
State and Provincial Lotteries
TERRY BYRNE AND VERONICA BRAVO, USA TODAY

Vice president’s
son died after
battle with
brain cancer
“Beau lives on
in the lives of
others. ... What
a good man.
What an
original.”
President Obama

“Because he was a Biden, the
titles that come with family —
husband, father, son, brother, uncle — those were the ones Beau
valued above any other,” he said.
The president, his voice nearly
cracking, spent part of the eulogy
delivering heartfelt tributes to his
vice president, noting that four
decades ago he survived the death
of his wife and their infant
daughter.
“Joe, you are my brother,” the
president said.
Obama, first lady Michelle
Obama and their daughter Sasha
— “we’ve become part of the Biden clan, we’re honorary members now,” the president said —
joined a host of political dignitaries attending the Saturday
morning funeral at St. Anthony of
Padua Roman Catholic Church.

Kai Lu and his
wife, Helen Shu, were raising their
young daughter in China when an
ultra-modern Marriott Courtyard
hotel was built just minutes from
their home in Suzhou, a congested
suburb of Shanghai.
The couple went to check out
the new hotel and noticed a flyer
in the lobby advertising a similar
hotel in Portland, Oregon. The
flyer was seeking investors who, in
exchange for half a million dollars,
could receive green cards for their
immediate family.

SARA ROTH, KGW.COM

The EB-5 program funded a Marriott hotel in Portland’s Pearl District.

“We were planning to move to
the U.S. or Canada,” said Lu. “We
got a very good impression of the
hotel group, so we were very confident in that investment.”
Lu combined the family’s savings along with some money from
the couple’s parents to come up
with the $500,000 investment.
Three years later, they moved to
Sammamish, a suburb of Seattle.
Lu is one of thousands of people who help fund major commercial real estate projects every year
in exchange for U.S. residency
through the federal program
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B

Texas may soon see ‘campus carry’
Bill allows concealed weapons at universities
Rick Jervis

The lump sum that state
lotteries transferred to their
coffers in 2014 – a mere
1.78% boost over 2013.

UNIVERSAL PICTURES

USA TODAY
AUSTIN College students across
Texas could soon be carrying
handguns into dorms and classrooms.
Texas lawmakers a week ago
passed a bill allowing for firearms
to be carried on public university
campuses. The bill came on the

heels of another approved bill
making it legal to openly carry a
holstered gun in public in Texas.
Both bills await the signature of
Gov. Greg Abbott, who has said he
supports expanding gun rights.
If signed, the “campus carry”
bill will allow only concealed
handguns on campuses by those
21 years or older and who hold a
handgun license. The rule will go
into effect Aug. 1, 2016.

The campus gun bill was
passed despite written protests
from University of Texas System
Chancellor William McRaven, a
former Navy admiral who directed the Special Forces attack on
Osama bin Laden.
“Overall, horrible idea,” said
Jonathan Panzer, executive director of Texas Gun Sense, an Austin-based advocacy group that
opposed the measure. “The presidents don’t want it. The faculties
doesn’t want it. The students

don’t want it. It’s incredibly dangerous to add firearms to an already volatile situation on
campus.”
Texas joins a growing number
of states that have changed the
rules to allow guns on campuses
since the 2007 Virginia Tech
shooting, where a student shot
and killed 32 people and wounded 17 before turning the gun on
himself. Gun rights proponents
v STORY CONTINUES ON 2B

Royal babies Charlotte, George star in new family photos
Maria Puente and
Jayme Deerwester
USA TODAY

Hello, Princess Charlotte, don’t
you look cute in your new baby
pictures.
Prince William and Duchess
Kate of Cambridge released their
first family photos Saturday, four
pictures featuring new baby
Princess Charlotte, just 2 months
old, and big brother Prince
George, who turns 2 years old
next month.
To stress the point that these
are family photos, Kensington

Palace said the pictures were taken by Duchess Kate herself in
mid-May at Anmer Hall, the family’s country retreat in Norfolk on
the royal Sandringham estate.
The pictures are expected to be
a sensation around the world, but
especially in Britain, where the
Cambridge-loving public and
media are ever eager to feast on
rare official photos of the royal
babies.
It may be another four weeks
before Charlotte is seen in public
again, when she’s christened
Charlotte Elizabeth Diana on
July 5 at St. Mary Magdalene
Church near Anmer Hall, where
Will’s late mother, Princess

The
photos
of the
children
were
sent out
via
Twitter
first.
DUCHESS OF CAMBRIDGE, PRESS ASSOCIATION

Prince George and Princess Charlotte are
shown in a photo taken by their mother.

Diana, was herself christened.
Although that ceremony will
be private, as royal christenings
usually are, official photos will be
taken, the palace said.
To stress the new royal savvy
about social media, the family
photos released Saturday were
sent out to the world via Twitter
first, as a thank you, the palace
said, to all the new followers of its
Twitter feed.
The palace publicly signaled
the pictures were coming in a
tweet early Saturday, followed by
more tweets with pictures of the
piles of presents baby Charlotte
has received from fans since her
birth.

2B

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

E2

WORLD

Mexico votes amid strife, corruption
Many jaded over its
form of democracy;
‘they’re all thieves’
David Agren
Special for USA TODAY
MEXICO CITY Sandra Ramirez,
46, has voted all her adult life, but
like many in this corruptionplagued nation, Ramirez says she
has become disenchanted by
Mexican democracy. Politicians
and political parties have taken
over the system and don’t act in
the people’s interests, she says.
“They’re all thieves. They’re all
corrupt. None of them cares
about solving problems. They all
look out for personal interests,
getting rich and doing business,”
Ramirez says. “There’s disappointment — in giant letters.”
Many Mexicans are expressing
similar disappointments as the
country prepared to hold midterm elections Sunday for the

PEDRO PARDO, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Members of the Popular Movement of Guerrero State confront
police in Mexico’s Guerrero state on Friday.
500-seat Congress as well as a
number of governorships and
mayorships.
“Spare some cities, I have the
impression that we’re not going
enthusiastically into a civic festi-

val, rather a funeral,” says Sergio
Aguayo, political science professor at the Colegio de México.
The process is proving tense in
some areas, especially in southern states such as Oaxaca, Chia-

pas and Guerrero. Teachers there
have attacked offices belonging to
electoral officials, burned ballots
and even prevented the provision
of gasoline to service stations in
Oaxaca city.
It’s an attempt at sabotaging
the elections — part of the pressure they’re applying to have the
government roll back an education reform, which would subject
them to evaluations and curb
union control of teacher hiring
and firing. The government has
temporarily canceled the evaluations for unexplained reasons.
National Electoral Institute
President Lorenzo Cordoba told
Televisa on Friday that 5,042
polling stations in Oaxaca — 3%
of the total — would not be installed due to security.
President Enrique Peña Nieto
assumed office in December 2012
and immediately pursued reforms in areas such energy, telecommunications and taxation.
He achieved a multiparty pact to
accomplish his agenda, starting

with an overhaul of the school
system — something González
says has been reversed with the
government suspension of teacher examinations.
It’s the latest setback for Peña
Nieto, who has been sidetracked
by a steady stream of scandals.
Investigative reporters revealed
last year that his wife, actress Angelica Rivera, had bought a $7
million mansion from a prominent government contractor —
which also provided credit. TheWall Street Journal later reported
that the president and his finance
minister, Luis Videgaray, also
purchased properties from contractors — with Videgaray receiving a preferential interest rate.
The president, first lady and Videgaray deny any wrongdoing.
Mexico’s 10 registered political
parties collect roughly $350 million annually in public money.
IMCO released a report in May
that showed 91% of Mexicans
consider political parties corrupt,
worse than any other institution.

NATION

A slice of the American dream
v CONTINUED FROM 1B

called EB-5. The program has
backed projects in cities including
New York, Los Angeles, San Francisco and Seattle.
Critics of the program say it’s
too secretive, putting national security at risk and making investors
vulnerable to fraud. Three Republican senators called for a federal
audit of the program, which began
in December 2014. But that hasn’t
stopped EB-5 from gaining popularity in Portland as developers
hope these foreign investors can
help the city boom.
“You will see more [EB-5] activity in Portland and beyond,”
said Marvin Kau, vice president of
project development at American
United, a regional center that
manages EB-5 investments in
Oregon.
HOW EB-5 WORKS

The EB-5 program allows people
to invest $500,000 into a building
project in a high-unemployment
area (150% higher than the national average), or $1 million in a
location with normal employment
rates — although almost no one
chooses the $1 million option. The
investment must create at least 10
full-time, permanent jobs.
In exchange, the investor receives a green card for themselves,
their spouse and any children under the age of 21. The process is
quicker and easier than the traditional green card application process, and most people can move to
the U.S. a couple years after the investment is made.
The EB-5 program started in
1990 as a temporary way to get
people from out of the country to
move to the U.S. and create new
companies. Instead, it’s become a
fast-track solution for building hotels and office towers.
“The original design of the program was for foreigners to move
to the U.S. and hire people,” said
Kau. “It’s evolved to be primarily a
real-estate funding source over
time. You can put EB-5 money
into any business that creates
jobs.”
Hotels are the easiest to finance, Kau says, because it’s easy
to explain a hotel to investors.
Right now, there are 10,000
green cards available through the
program each year and around
85% of the investments come
from China, where families of
three are the norm. That means
that just over 3,000 investments,
on average, are pumped into the

FAMILY PHOTO

Kai Lu and his wife, Helen
Shu, and their daughter, Qingyan, visit Santa Cruz, Calif.

“I think they do it,
in part, to get the
citizenship and
also of course
to benefit their
children.”
John Mangan, spokesman for Portland’s
Williams and Dame Development

you have to build your project.”
SARA ROTH, KGW.COM

Portland’s Hyatt House development site.
economy — allotting for around
$1.5 billion nationally.
The investors work with regional centers, such as American
United, to connect with developers in the U.S. in exchange for a
cut of the investment return. Although the green card process and
the general program are managed
by the Department of Homeland
Security, the regional centers are
private and a DHS spokesman
said even the government doesn’t
know how much money has been
brought in through EB-5.
The program is not only extremely popular with investors —
The New York Times reported

that all 10,000 investments allotted for 2015 were snapped up by
May — but also with developers,
especially during tough economic
times. Cobbled together, EB-5 investments can fund multimilliondollar projects even when banks
might be white-knuckling their
purse strings.
“In order to build a hotel or office tower from scratch, you need
a lot of investment,” said John
Mangan, spokesman for Portland’s Williams and Dame Development, the group behind
Portland’s first two EB-5 investment properties. “The more investors you have, the better chance

WHO EB-5 INVESTORS ARE

Half a million dollars may seem
like a huge investment to some,
but most EB-5 investors are not
extremely wealthy. Instead, most
look like Lu’s family — a couple
who is hoping to send their child
to U.S. schools and perhaps seeking a new adventure, borrowing
money from family in order to
make their dreams happen.
“I think they do it, in part, to get
the citizenship and also of course
to benefit their children,” Mangan
said.
That was the driving factor for
Lu and Shu, whose daughter, Qingyan, is now 4 years old. She will
start preschool in the fall, then go
to public schools.

Allowing firearms on campus ‘just a bad idea’
v CONTINUED FROM 1B

claim armed students could stop
such spree shooters in their
tracks, while opponents say guns
on campus are unnecessary and
present a liability.
Texas would became the eighth
state to allow concealed weapons
on public post-secondary campuses, according to the National
Conference of State Legislatures,
or NCSL. The others are Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Mississippi,
Oregon, Utah and Wisconsin.
In 2014, 14 states introduced
bills to allow guns on campuses,
said Suzanne Hultin, a policy specialist at NCSL. This year, that

climbed to 16 states. Most of
those measures fail or are
shelved, due mostly to opposition
from university leaders, she said.
But each year, new ones pop up.
“There’s definitely a strong lobby to get guns on campus,” Hultin
said.
Similar proposals failed in Texas for years. But this year a compromise allowing university
officials to determine “gun-free
zones” where weapons are not allowed helped pass the bill.
A University of Texas/Texas
Tribune poll in February showed
Texans are nearly split even on
allowing concealed handguns on
college campuses, with 47% sup-

porting the idea and 45%
opposing.
Besides making campuses safer, allowing faculty and students
to carry weapons at colleges and
universities extends their Second
Amendment rights, said Mike
Newbern, a spokesman with Students for Concealed Carry, a
Michigan-based non-profit group
that advocates for gun rights on
campuses.
The argument that guns in the
hands of students will lead to
more gun violence is baseless, he
said. In Colorado, for example,
crime around campuses that allow guns has gone down, Newbern said. “This whole idea that

law-abiding citizens in possession
of firearms is going to result in
some apocalyptic terror is just
not true, and lawmakers are
starting to realize that,” he said.
But allowing firearms into an
arena that already sees alcohol
and drug abuse, depression and
domestic violence could lead to
increased gun violence, Panzer
said.
Also, colleges and universities
that allow guns on campus will
likely see a rise in their insurance
premiums to cover potential liabilities, which could translate to
higher tuition costs, he said.
“Guns on campus are just a bad
idea,” Panzer said.

Through their $500,000 investment, the couple is able to live the
American dream. They even have
a single-family home with a yard.
It’s something they could never
have in Suzhou.
The signs of development in
Portland are inescapable. Take a
walk downtown and the decibels
spike as you pass massive projects
that take up city blocks. Drive over
the Fremont Bridge and you see
cranes rising high out of the Pearl
district and South Waterfront past
that, rapidly building condos and
hotels.
Two of these big projects — the
Marriott Residence Inn in the
Pearl District and the Hyatt
House in the South Waterfront —
are funded by EB-5 investments.
Both are projects of the development group run by Homer Williams and Dyke Dame, the men
behind the revitalization of the
Pearl
District
and
South
Waterfront.
The program is so popular that
the federal government is considering raising or lifting the cap on
investments, so Portland could see
an even bigger influx of EB-5 investors in the future.
For investors such as Lu and
Shu, the economic benefit to the
country and any investment return is just an added bonus. While
they expect to get their money
back in a couple of years, they
have already started putting down
roots in Washington, settling into
their cozy neighborhood and relishing mundane tasks many
Americans take for granted.
“We have to take care of our
yard — it’s totally different,” Lu
said. “It’s tough work but a lot of
fun. We have such a big yard and
beautiful flowers, grass and trees.
We can see sparrows and rabbits
in our yard. That’s pretty
amazing.”
The only thing the family
misses about China so far?
Shu chuckled.
“Dim Sum,” she said.

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USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

E2

3B

NATION/WORLD
ON POLITICS
Cooper Allen

Spending bills on collision course
All measures
passed in House
face veto threats

@coopallen
USA TODAY

Congress debated, and
ultimately settled, the dispute
over expired Patriot Act
provisions. And, of course, more
candidates jumped into the
2016 presidential race. Other
news from the world of politics:
CRUZ TELLS BIDEN JOKE,
THEN APOLOGIZES
Texas Sen. Ted
Cruz quickly
apologized
last week
after making a crack
he’d used
in the past
at Vice President Biden’s
expense durBLOOMBERG
ing a speech to
Texas Sen. Ted
Cruz, a Repuba GOP group in
lican candidate
Michigan. “You
for president,
know the nice
took to Facething? You
book to admit
his “mistake.”
don’t need a
punchline,” he
joked after mentioning the name
of Biden, whose son died May
30.
Cruz, a GOP presidential candidate, quickly took to Facebook
to say he was sorry after realizing how ill-timed the quip was
coming so soon after Beau Biden’s death. “It was a mistake to
use an old joke about Joe Biden
during his time of grief, and I
sincerely apologize,” he wrote.
GEORGE W. BUSH
GAINING FAVOR
The 43rd president left office in
January 2009 with a favorability
rating in the mid-30s. Nearly 6 ½
years later, Bush has recovered a
bit in the public’s eyes. A CNN/
ORC poll out last week showed
that 52% of Americans have a
positive view of the former president, the first time Bush’s favorable rating has eclipsed his
unfavorable rating since early in
his second term.
Bush’s uptick is consistent with
a historical pattern of former
presidents gaining in esteem as
the years pass from their days in
the White House. So perhaps
Barack Obama has something to
look forward to: His positive
rating had dipped to 49% in the
poll, a far cry from the stratospheric number (78% in January
2009) he enjoyed shortly before
taking office.

RONALD MARTINEZ, GETTY IMAGES

No. 43 sees post-presidential bump.

CLINTON UNVEILS
DETAILS OF KICKOFF EVENT
We already knew she was in —
she announced in April — but
Democratic presidential frontrunner Hillary Clinton announced
this week the site of her official
campaign kickoff: Roosevelt
Island in New York City.
The former secretary of State’s
speech on June 13 “will lay out
her view of the challenges facing
this country and her vision and
ideas for moving the country
forward,” according to her
campaign. So far, Clinton’s
campaigning has focused on
small events and roundtable
discussions with voters in
early-voting states, but the
Roosevelt Island event will mark
a new phase in her 2016 bid.
MILLENNIALS GET POLITICAL
NEWS FROM FACEBOOK
A Pew Research Center poll last
week showed what many likely
suspected: The younger generation relies more on social media,
especially Facebook, than local
news for political coverage.
Sixty-one percent of Millennials — defined as those born from
1981 to 1996 — “report getting
political news on Facebook in a
given week, a much larger percentage than turn to any other
news source,” Pew reports.
Contributing: David Jackson

Susan Davis
USA TODAY

Congress is on a
collision course with the White
House this year over federal
spending priorities, and it could
force another government shutdown battle later this year.
“The Senate is going to stonewall all of the appropriations bills.
So the question becomes: When
do we reach an agreement?” said
Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., a member of the House Appropriations
Committee.
The House panel is plowing
WASHINGTON

through the 12 annual spending
measures that determine the federal government’s priorities. For
the 2016 fiscal year, Congress is
authorized to spend $1.016 trillion, with $523 billion for defense
programs and $493 billion for
non-defense programs.
All the bills are in line with the
GOP budget resolution but clash
with the Obama administration’s
spending priorities. Negotiating
bills that both a GOP-controlled
Congress and President Obama
can support will be a formidable
challenge. The fiscal year ends
Sept. 30. Without an agreement
in place by then, or at least a stopgap measure, another shutdown
scenario looms.
So far, each of the Housepassed spending bills has received a veto threat because they
maintain austere spending levels

“The Senate is going
to stonewall all of the
appropriations bills.
So the question
becomes: When do
we reach an
agreement?”
Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa.

— the result of a 2011 deal that
forces a decade of across-theboard cuts for discretionary
spending.
A two-year deal to ease the
cuts, known as sequestration, was
reached in 2013 by Sen. Patty
Murray, D-Wash., and Rep. Paul
Ryan, R-Wis., but that deal is expiring, and lawmakers, mostly
Democrats, want a new one.
“I think what we’re all agreed
upon is that we do need a sequel

to Ryan-Murray,” Sen. Barbara
Mikulski, D-Md., the top Democrat on the Senate Appropriations Committee, said late last
month. “And we need it sooner,
rather than later, so we can write
realistic bills that keep America
safe and invest in our future.”
There is broad, bipartisan
agreement that sequestration is
bad policy, but equally strong disagreement on how to turn it off.
Republicans want other spending cuts, particularly from mandatory spending on entitlement
programs like Medicare, while
Democrats insist that any deal include some new taxes. Republicans have found ways to ease
defense cuts by increasing funding to an off-budget war account,
but Democrats are frustrated by
spending levels they say are choking critical domestic priorities.

PHOTOS BY ALAN GOMEZ, USA TODAY

PUBLIC HOUSING:
HOPE, PITFALLS
Some fear they won’t return to rebuilt Miami complex
Alan Gomez
USA TODAY
MIAMI When the demolition
crews start tearing down the
nearly
80-year-old
Liberty
Square public housing project, it
will be welcome news to residents such as Lucille Rackley, 81,
a retired janitor who has lived
here for 25 years.
Rackley has watched the rows
of one- and two-story buildings
known as the Pork ’n Beans slowly fall apart, lived through riots in
1980 and witnessed a recent resurgence of violence that left her
scared to sit outside.
Yet she worries she won’t have
a home to come back to. Political
and legal fights delayed the rebuilding of her daughter’s complex nearby more than a decade,
and Rackley fears she and her
neighbors may suffer the same
fate. “Sometimes they just don’t
bring you back,” Rackley said.
Miami-Dade County’s plan to
replace Liberty Square’s 700
units with a complex where subsidized recipients live with higher-income residents mirrors
similar efforts around the country to move from federal public
housing projects to mixed-use
private developments.
The result has been fewer government-run public housing
units, from a peak of 1.4 million in
1991 to fewer than 1.1 million in
2013, according to the Department of Housing and Urban Development.
Replacing public housing com-

plexes like Liberty Square, one of
the nation’s oldest, often results
in disorganized relocations that
leave residents scattered, confused and lacking a support network, housing experts say.
It happened in Chicago, where
11 high-rise public housing buildings were destroyed in the 2000s,
and fewer than 20% of the original residents returned to the new
buildings, according to an Urban
Institute report in 2013. And it
happened in Miami, where most
of the original 850 residents of
the Scott Carver homes never
made it back once the new buildings were built a decade later.
“Pretty much all the research
shows that even where replacement housing was built that was
affordable, very few of the original tenants moved back,” said
Barbara Sard of the Center on
Budget and Policy Priorities in
Washington.
The Urban Institute’s report
concluded that such widespread
relocation isn’t necessarily bad.
Chicago residents were able to
use housing vouchers to rent private units or live in other public
housing, getting them out of dangerous environments.
Others say displacing families
can hurt. Robert Damewood, an
attorney with Regional Housing
Legal Services who represented
residents of a demolished complex in Pittsburgh, said people in
housing projects help each other
in ways that are difficult to replicate.“Relocation often destroys
the social networks that low-income families depend upon for

Lucille Rackley, 81, says her
Liberty Square apartment
must be torn down and rebuilt, but she worries whether
she’ll be able to come back.

Earline Anderson, 47, says
rebuilding Liberty Square
won’t do anything to stop the
violence that has raged
through the neighborhood.

Buford Redding, 57, says security has gotten so bad around
Liberty Square that criminals
have been “killing people like
flies out here.”

A nearly $300 million plan
would replace Great Depression-era homes in Miami with
mixed-income buildings.
survival,” he said.
Edith Deris depends on such a
network in Liberty Square. Deris,
70, can’t drive anymore so her
neighbors bring her groceries,
take her to doctor appointments
and drive her to church. “We look
out for each other,” she said.
“That’s why I love it here.”
Some residents of Liberty
Square say the government
should spend the money improving safety rather than rebuilding
the project. The complex was in
the middle of riots in 1980
sparked by the acquittal of four
Miami-Dade
police
officers
charged with killing an unarmed
black man. More recently, residents say, the complex has been
overrun by out-of-town gang
members and drug dealers who
contributed to 43 shooting deaths
over six months in 2014.
“I’ve taught my baby to drop
on the floor since he was old
enough to play outside,” Ericka
James, 28, an out-of-work security guard, said of her son, 8.
Michael Liu, head of the county housing authority, said the
agency has devised a way to slow
the crime wave and ensure that
residents can return. It will use
nearby county land to build temporary housing until residents
can move into their new homes.
Liu, a former assistant HUD
secretary, said a combination of
county, state, federal and private
funds will cover the $285 million
cost. He said $500,000 is being
spent to add security cameras
and police officers to patrol the
area. That combination should finally turn the maligned Liberty
Square into a safer, more prosperous place, he told residents
during a recent meeting. “It’s
been great to see ... maybe not total agreement, but a groundswell
of support that something has to
be done,” Liu said. “It will be a
great community initiative.”

IN BRIEF
THOUSANDS PROTEST G-7
SUMMIT IN GERMANY

Several thousand protesters
crammed into Garmisch-Partenkirchen, a small town in the Bavarian mountains in Germany
Saturday as rallies across the
southern part of the country
gathered steam ahead of the start
of two days of economic and security talks between world
leaders.
Around 20,000 police and security officers, some in full riot
gear, stood by in 90-degree heat
as demonstrators marched from
their camp on the outskirts of the

town — a popular resort destination a few hours south of Munich
— to its central train station and
then on toward the Schloss Elmau hotel. Garmish-Partenkirchen sits directly in the shadow of
Zugspitze, Germany's highest
mountain.
President Obama, German
Chancellor Angela Merkel, British Prime Minister David Cameron and others will convene at the
castle-turned-hotel Sunday and
Monday for the 41st Group of
Seven, or G-7, summit.
For the second year running,
Russia is excluded because of its

continuing military and apparent
territorial ambitions in Ukraine,
accusations it continues to deny.
The protesters — from all
across Germany and Europe —
carried slogans and banners voicing concerns about a range of
geopolitical and economic issues
from climate change to poverty to
crises in the Middle East to what
they consider predatory banks.
— Kim Hjelmgaard
HURRICANE BLANCA GROWS
TO CATEGORY 4 STORM

Hurricane Blanca intensified into
a Category 4 storm off the Mexi-

can coast Saturday, but was forecast to weaken before it nears
land late Sunday.
The system is now packing
130-mph winds, and tropical
storm warnings and hurricane
watches have been issued along
the Pacific coast of Mexico, including for Cabo San Lucas, Santa
Fe and La Paz.
The storm was expected to
dump 6 to 10 inches of rain, with
isolated amounts of 15 inches
over much of the Baja California
Sur, according to the National
Hurricane Center.
— Katherine Lackey

4B

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

E2

WORLD
‘Love locks’ prove a scourge to bridges
Romantic
symbols,
spurred
by an
Italian
novel, are
removed
in Paris

“If they
take
down the
locks they
need
to be
displayed
somewhere.”
Fiona Bliss, a
visitor to Paris

Elena Berton
Special for USA TODAY
PARIS Lovers may no longer be
able to place locks on a Paris
bridge to symbolize their love,
but what started as a teen novel
set in Rome remains the scourge
of bridges across Europe, and as
far away as China and Australia.
Called “love locks,” these symbols of romance have taken over
bridges, building gates and other
landmarks to the point that frustrated Paris authorities last week
began removing the nearly 1 million padlocks that encrust the
Pont des Arts and threaten the
pedestrian bridge’s structure.
On Friday, Parisian authorities
replaced the Pont des Arts’ metal
grilles with temporary paintings
by street artists before lock-proof
plexiglass panels are installed later this year.
Cities around the world have
struggled to deter tourists from
attaching locks to their historical
landmarks, which attract scores
of illegal lock sellers as well as
loving couples.
The practice has become so
widespread that some enterprising firms now sell personalized
locks online, shipping them to
lovers worldwide. Sebastian Hensel, owner of Berlin-based
mylovepadlock.com, said he was
surprised to spot padlocks supplied by his company during a
visit to Brooklyn.
Still, the news of their removal
in Paris has caused heartbreak
among lovers who have left behind symbols of their affection on
the Pont des Arts.

STEPHANE DE SAKUTIN, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

“We have a trip planned in
September back to Paris — we intended to go back and see how
our love had weathered on our
anniversary, however we can no
longer do that,” said Lily Tillett, a
teacher from England. “What a
shame that an icon has gone
along with so many people’s
memories.”
The Italian who unwittingly
spurred the phenomenon, Romebased novelist and filmmaker
Federico Moccia, is still bemused
that a plot device in one of his
best-selling novels has gone global. The two teenage protagonists
of Ho Voglia di Te (I Want You),
published in 2006 and followed

by a movie adaptation a year later, attach a lock to Rome’s Milvio
Bridge and throw the key into the
Tiber River as a sign of eternal
love.
The night before its publication, Moccia placed a lock on the
third lamppost of the bridge as a
surprise to any curious readers
who wanted to check whether the
love-lock tradition in the novel
was real. “I thought only someone particularly engrossed by the
story would have wanted to
check,” Moccia said. “I went there
a week later and there were already 300 locks.”
Padlocks made their appearance on the Pont des Arts as early

A worker
removes
“love locks”
attached to
the Pont des
Arts last
week in Paris.
The love
locks tradition has
spread to
bridges
worldwide.

as 2008, when visitors found its
metal grilles were the ideal place
to affix their romantic tokens.
As the locks spread to the entire structure of the bridge, the
city of Paris periodically replaced
whole sections, only to see them
covered again with padlocks in a
matter of days.
Two American-born Parisians,
Lisa Anselmo and Lisa TaylorHuff, so despise the practice that
they launched an Internet campaign, nolovelocks.com, to demand the removal of the locks in
Paris.
“The problem here is enormous, and it doesn’t show any
signs of ending,” Anselmo said.
“There are locks over 11 bridges
and landmarks including the Eiffel Tower, so one bridge does not
victory make, but it’s a great start
for Paris.”
Fiona Bliss, a British beauty
therapist, said the locks on Pont
des Arts were one of the reasons
she visited Paris with her partner.
“I think if they take down the
locks, they need to be displayed
somewhere like a museum or as
wall art somewhere as it’s part of
the romance of Paris.”
Moccia, whose blockbuster
novels have been translated into
several languages but not yet into
English, is working on a follow-up
to I Want You. He admits he
would like to come up with another plot device that could find
its way into real life.
“But I need to think about
something that wouldn’t create
problems like these,” he said.
“Something that could take the
test of time and not threaten any
bridges.”

Seizing a golden opportunity in Iran
Oren Dorell
USA TODAY

Visiting business delegations
are streaming into Iran with an
eye on lucrative new deals before
a June 30 deadline for a sanctions-lifting nuclear agreement
with six world powers.
Tehran saw “an explosion” of
foreign business delegations in
the weeks after the framework
for a nuclear accord was announced in March. “Everyone is
now waiting for the end of Round
2 in June,” said Heinz-Joachim
Heise, a Switzerland-based management recruiter who opened an
office in Tehran last summer.
Multinational
corporations,
mostly from Europe and Asia,
that did business in Iran before
U.S. and international sanctions
forced them out are making plans
to return. They include many
well-known brands, such as German auto manufacturer Mercedes-Benz, French oil giant
Total and U.S. electronics manufacturer Hewlett-Packard, according to news accounts.
Companies that haven’t done
business in Iran are not “knocking on my door wanting to open
business here,” Heise said.
U.S. sanctions date to the Iranian revolution in 1979, but international sanctions were added or
tightened in recent years as Iran
expanded its nuclear program,
which the West suspects has military aims but Iran says is for
peaceful purposes.
Iran represents enormous potential to investors. It boasts an
educated population of 81 million, comparable to Germany’s,
that is hungry for Western products. Its natural gas reserves rank
second in the world, and its oil reserves rank fourth. Yet production in the energy sector, mining
and manufacturing is far from
fully developed.
Even so, most foreign firms are
holding off on new operations,
say several investment advisers to
Western companies in Tehran.
Their caution is fueled by uncertainty that a deal to curb Iran’s
nuclear program in exchange for
an end to most economic sanctions will actually materialize.
Even if a deal is made, there are
concerns the United States would
still prohibit most American
companies from doing business
with Iran if it continues to violate
human rights, develop ballistic
missiles and support terrorists.
There’s also apprehension
about Iran’s outsize role in the
economy through networks of
pension funds and semi-state
groups with shares in many firms.
Corruption, red tape and “legal
ambiguity about ownership of

Foreign delegations hope to score big if a nuclear deal allows
them to return, but uncertainty has others thinking twice

BEHROUZ MEHRI, AFP/GETTY IMAGES

Iranians wait at a bus station in Tehran, which has seen “an
explosion” of foreign investors since March testing waters.

Multinational corporations,
mostly from Europe and Asia,
that did business in Iran before
U.S. and international sanctions
forced them out have started
making plans to return.

EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

Visitors tour the “Iran Oil, Gas and Petrochemical International Exhibition” in Tehran, Iran, last month.
companies” will remain, said Bijan Khajehpour of Atieh International, a consulting firm in
Vienna that focuses on Iran.
“Even if all sanctions are lifted,
there will still be blacklists of Iranian companies that Western
companies should avoid,” he said.
“Assets in the economy controlled by the semi-state organizations are gradually approaching
the size of government.”
The Iranian government “has a

huge presence in the market,”
said Amir-Ali Amiri, founding
partner of the Tehran-based investment firm ACL. “Quasi-government entities could cause
legal tangles for a lot of (Western)
companies” because the United
States will continue to ban goods
that could be used for military
purposes. That would impact sellers of trucks, copiers and computer printers — all sectors
Amiri’s companies represent —

and even steel producers, whose
railroad tracks might be used to
deliver goods to a military facility.
Another problem: Western
companies left Iran without delivering spare parts for machinery
they sold before tighter sanctions
were imposed in 2012, Heise said.
“Iranian businesses will demand
damage payments for machines
that broke because they had no
spare parts,” and Iran’s courts will
probably back such claims.
Andreas Schweitzer, managing
partner at Swiss-Iranian investment firm Arjan Capital, has seen
a lot of French, Spanish, German
and Italian companies sending
lawyers and accountants to learn
how to remain in compliance
with European and American legal requirements once doing
business in Iran is permitted.
“The ramp-up period is not trivial,” said Schweitzer, who started

out in Iran in 2009 by developing
wind farms and helps foreign investors do business there. His clients are a handful of midsize
companies, including one that
sold a $15 million waste-to-energy plant to Iran, and companies
selling digital gas meters.
Schweitzer offers advice on Iranian negotiating culture.
“A signed contract for me is an
expression of goodwill, but this is
not the end of the negotiations,”
he said. “The Iranians love postcontract negotiations.”
There are also political risks.
Khajehpour’s company was based
in Tehran until he was arrested
during Iran’s crackdown on a prodemocracy movement in 2009.
Khajehpour said he faced charges
similar to those leveled against
Jason Rezaian, The Washington
Post’s Tehran bureau chief
charged with spying.

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

E2

5B

MONEY
MONEYLINE

Beth Belton
@bethbelton
USA TODAY

H. DARR BEISER, USA TODAY

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen.

ON THE FRONT BURNER
EGGS HARDER TO COME BY
Believe it or not, egg rationing
has started in the USA, according
to a Washington Post report.
H-E-B, a nationwide supermarket
operator, late Thursday, told
customers in Texas that they
were limited to buying three
cartons of eggs per customer,
the Post report said. The culprit:
avian flu. Some 46.7 million
birds, including poultry, have
been affected nationwide.
Guess we’ll be eating oatmeal
for breakfast.

LARRY W. SMITH, EUROPEAN PRESSPHOTO AGENCY

No free lunch with Warren Buffett.

WHO’S ONLINE
TALK ABOUT A POWER LUNCH
Late Friday night, an unidentified
bidder committed to spending
just under $2.4 million in the 16th
annual eBay power lunch with
iconic investor Warren Buffett.
The auction benefits GLIDE, a
San Francisco group that provides food, health care and social services to the needy. The
annual winning bidder gets to
lunch with seven friends and
Buffett at the Smith & Wollensky
steakhouse in midtown Manhattan and pick his brains. Have fun!
USA SNAPSHOTS©

A matter of trust

62%
would trust an industry
expert the most
as a company
representative.

Source Edelman 2015 Trust Barometer
survey of 1,000 adults
JAE YANG AND KARL GELLES, USA TODAY

Kirk Spitzer

Kazuo Hirai,
CEO of Sony
Corp.

USA TODAY
TOKYO Since late last year, tens of
millions of consumers worldwide
have purchased small, high-tech
and highly profitable cameras
made by Sony Corp. — probably
without even knowing it.
The cameras, sophisticated image sensors, are tucked inside every new Apple iPhone 6 and 6
Plus, and in some models made
by Samsung.
The sensors have boosted sales
and profits in Sony’s important
Devices unit and are a centerpiece of a new strategy that the
long-suffering electronics giant
hopes will return it to financial
health.
Sony was once known for creating iconic products such as Trinitron TVs and Walkman
portable audio players that dominated their market category.
Now, it no longer insists on
stamping its name on every product, fighting for market share or
maintaining popular but moneylosing products. The priority now
is profitability.
This represents a major cultural shift at Sony, according to a
senior executive who agreed to
discuss company strategy on the
condition that his name be withheld. He and other company executives declined to talk about
the company on the record.
In the past, when faced with
heavy competition, Sony would
lower prices to maintain market
share, even at the expense of
profit margins. Now its chief focus is to boost the bottom line,
even if that means retrenching in
some markets, the executive said.
Toward that end, Sony sold off
its Vaio personal computer business last year and split off its TV
division into a wholly owned subsidiary. It laid off more than a
third of the staff at corporate
headquarters in Tokyo and
trimmed its worldwide sales staff
by 20%.
The moves followed years of
losses in Sony’s core electronics
businesses
that
prompted
Moody’s to downgrade the company’s credit rating to junk status
in January 2014.
So far, investors approve of the
new direction. Sony shares on the
New York Stock Exchange have
nearly doubled the past year and
jumped 10% since officials announced a three-year restructuring plan in February.
Investors in Japan are even
more bullish. Shares on the Tokyo Stock Exchange have more
than doubled from a year earlier
and are 20% higher than before
the re-structuring announcement.
Some analysts caution that it is
too early to declare victory. “Sony

KIMIMASA MAYAMA, EPA

BUSINESS SURVEILLANCE
YELLEN BALKS AT SUBPOENA
uIn a nutshell: Federal Reserve
Chair Janet Yellen is ignoring a
subpoena from a key House
lawmaker in his probe of a
possible leak of market-sensitive
information, the Associated
Press reported late Friday.
uThe issue: Yellen says turning
over the requested info would
jeopardize a Justice Department
investigation into an alleged
leak in 2012 of interest-rate
information to a Medley Advisors
financial newsletter, the AP
reported. The Fed’s own probe of
the incident found no
wrongdoing.
uThe lawmaker: Rep. Jeb
Hensarling, R-Texas, is a vocal
critic of the Fed and it’ll be
interesting to see what his next
move is. “The Fed once again is
acting in a manner that can only
be characterized as resistant to
accountability, transparency and
oversight,” Jeff Emerson, an aide
to Hensarling, said in a
statement.

BOTTOM
LINE IS
NOW TOP
PRIORITY
STRUGGLING ELECTRONICS
GIANT SHIFTS STRATEGY
IN EFFORT TO STEM LOSSES
SONY’S FINANCIAL STRUGGLES

Sony’s results for fiscal years ending March 31:
SALES REVENUE (in billions)

NET INCOME LOSS (in billions)

$90

$2

$60

0

$30

63.9

$68.5

1.06

-$2
-1.05
-$4

0
2005

2014

Source Sony Corp. consolidated
financial results

-$6
2005

2014

VERONICA BRAVO, USA TODAY

“Sony did not have a good
strategy in the past and may
not even now.”
Sea-Jin Chang, a business professor at the National University of Singapore
and author of Sony vs. Samsung

did not have a good strategy in
the past and may not even now.
Its financial performance improved recently due to the weak
yen, but not due to restructuring,” said Sea-Jin Chang, a business professor at the National
University of Singapore and author of Sony vs. Samsung.
In the fiscal year that ended in
March 2015, Sony’s overall sales
grew by 5.8% to $68.5 billion.
Nonetheless, the company lost
$1.05 billion for the year.
“Sony, in my view, is on a multi-year turnaround,” said Atul
Goyal, an analyst at Jefferies in
Singapore.
This is not Sony’s first attempt
to stop the bleeding. A three-year
restructuring plan announced in
2012 missed all three of its primary sales and financial targets —
a failure that Sony CEO Kazuo
Hirai blamed on “insufficient understanding of the competitive
landscape.”
“Our previous business plan
was one that was overly reliant on
solving our problems through increased scale in each of our business segments,” Hirai said in
introducing the new three-year
plan in February.
Although Sony made its reputation on groundbreaking consumer electronic products like
the Walkman and PlayStation
video game consoles, the company in recent years has relied on
its entertainment and lesserknown financial services division
for much of its profits.
For example, Sony’s insurance
and banking division — yes, it has
one — produced $1.61 billion in
operating profits last year. Its
music and motion picture divisions earned a combined $979
million, even counting $41 million that Sony had to spend dealing with a cyberattack in
November 2014.
A group claiming responsibility
for the attack had demanded cancellation of the Sony-produced
film The Interview, a comedy
about a plot to assassinate North
Korea’s leader Kim Jong-un.
The new plan puts much of Sony’s hopes for overall sales and
profit growth in its imaging sensors business.
And in a major break from the
past, those sensors are no longer
limited
to
Sony-branded
products.
The new strategy doesn’t mean
that Sony is giving up altogether
on its past reputation for developing unique, outside-the-box
consumer products. At Sony’s
showroom in the tony Ginza district of Tokyo, a display showcases an LED light bulb that
doubles as a high-end audio
speaker.
The light bulb is stamped with
the Sony logo. For now.

REVENUE DECLINES

A sour taste for food, beverage companies
Consumers, dollar’s
value pose challenges
Matt Krantz
USA TODAY

Think selling ice to Eskimos is
tough? Try selling cereal, large
canisters of coffee or cans of soup
to consumers.
The disappointing quarterly
results from J.M. Smucker on
Thursday underscore the tough
time many packaged food and
beverage companies are enduring.
Twelve of the 52 companies in
the packaged foods and meats
and beverage industries, including Nabisco owner Mondelez,
General Mills and Coca-Cola,
posted lower revenue in the past
12 months than they did in 2013,
according to a USA TODAY
analysis of data from S&P Capital
IQ. The universe is limited to

DANIEL ACKER, BLOOMBERG

General Mills, maker of Fiber One, is seeing lower revenue.
stocks in the Russell 3000 index.
The weakness many packaged
foods companies are encountering shows how changing tastes of
consumers are challenging even
the most established food brands.
It also underscores how the
strength of the U.S. dollar is a major headwind for many of these
companies.

The biggest revenue decline
was posted by Mondelez, where
revenue the past 12 months is
down 5.5% from the level in 2013.
The company — formerly
known as Kraft Foods — makes
everything from Oreo cookies to
Trident gum. Many of the product categories that company has
relied on in the past aren’t grow-

ing now. The company in the first
quarter blamed the 10.2% decline
in first-quarter revenue on
currency.
Both the big cereal makers,
Kellogg and General Mills, are
having trouble staying in the
breakfast bowls of consumers as
cereal is being replaced with alternatives.
These companies’ revenue
over the past 12 months is down
more than 2.5% from 2013 levels.
Even Coca-Cola has seen revenue the past 12 months drop 1.5%
from 2013 levels — despite rolling
out all sorts of new beverages
with different sugar levels. The
company is trying to get growth
fizzing again — and sees 2015 “as
a transition year,” according to
CEO Muhtar Kent in the firstquarter earnings release.
Many packaged food companies can’t do much about the dollar’s value. But consumers will
want to see what they’re doing to
whet consumers’ appetites again.

6B

USA TODAY — STATESMAN JOURNAL
SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

E2

RETIREMENT

Know where your
ride will take you
I

t’s hard to believe. Has it really been 2½
years since I started writing this retirement
column?
I’ve talked to hundreds of retirement planners,
financial advisers and authors from just about
every part of the country. I made sure I got the
view from the heartland — in an effort not to
focus on the so-called high-net-worth clients.
It’s been a wonderful ride. And I’m sorry to
say, the ride is coming to an end. (More on that
later.) But first, I’m going to give you some of the
best retirement tips I’ve heard and written about
the past 2½ years.
Do a budget, hire a
2
financial planner and
get a retirement plan.

@perfiguy
USA TODAY

1

be afraid
5Don’t
of the stock market.

benefits by about 30%.

Rodney Brooks

Wait for Social
Security (if you can).

Only one topic generated more
email than my columns on Social
Security, and that was my columns on taxes. The big question:
When should you take benefits?
There’s no easy answer, but here’s
my best shot: If you can afford to,
wait until you’re 70.
I’m not naive. I realize most
people take benefits early because
they have to. According to Voya
Financial, 75% of workers take Social Security before 70, and more
than half start benefits between
60 and 64. But if you can, you
should wait. For every year you
wait after age 62, your benefits increase by about 8%. Even if you
wait only till 67, you increase

Wow, that’s a mouthful. But they
are all interrelated. Find a financial adviser you can trust. They
will help you determine what your
needs will be in retirement, and
hopefully keep you from running
out of money.
The first thing any financial
planner will tell you is you have to
do a budget. If you don’t know
how much you’re spending, there’s
no way to figure out what you
need in retirement.
But the planner will get you and
your spouse to sit down together
and make sure you both have the
same vision for retirement. A good
planner will help you figure out if
you want to stay in your house,
how much it will take to travel (if
that’s your goal) and when is the
best time to take Social Security.
But they also might tell you that
you can’t afford to retire because
you haven’t saved enough. In any

I’m not saying that everything
is going to be fine. People who
haven’t saved must adjust their
way of thinking about what retirement is. They will most likely have
to work longer, if they can. Even a
part-time job will help. And they
will likely have to reduce their
standard of living in retirement.
But they must start saving now,
especially if they have a companysponsored 401(k) with a company
match. The power of compounding will make a big difference even
over 10 years.

GETTY IMAGES

Some must adjust their way of thinking about what retirement
is because they will most likely have to work longer, if they can.
event, you’ll know where you
stand.

not retire
3Do
without a plan.

As I’ve written many times, it’s
not your father’s retirement. You
can’t retire without knowing what
you will be doing for the rest of
your life. Think about it. If you retire at 60, you could live another
30 years.
And do you really think you can
sit in that easy chair and watch
movies for 30 years? Even those
who thought they would love to
play golf every day for the rest of
their lives are in for a rude awakening. Most get bored within six
months.
I talked with one 90-year-old

college lecturer and author recently who retired from his teaching jobs, but he still continues to
work on his other ventures. He
has no intention of retiring. And
every day his friends tell him they
retired too early.

never too late
4It’s
to start saving.

I did a radio show not too long
ago. A woman called in for some
retirement advice. She was very
proud to have put her daughter
though an Ivy League college. But
she was 60 years old and had
saved nothing for retirement.
Sure, it sounds grim. But I talk
to people every day who are in
their 50s and 60s who have not
saved a dime.

When you have watched the daily
travails of the market, it’s not hard
to see why so many people are
afraid of stocks. And the big market crash of 2008 is still fresh on
our minds. But any any financial
planner will tell you that one of
their biggest gripes is people being
too conservative with investments. That can be huge over a
lifetime of retirement saving.
Consider this: $10,000 invested
in stocks 20 years ago would have
been worth $65,484 at the end
2014. The same amount invested
in government bonds would have
brought you $31,058. And Treasury bills would have returned a
measly $16,900. Enough said.
And that brings me to my last
column. Though I have been a columnist for the last two years, I
have worked at USA TODAY for
30 years. They have been some of
the best years of my life. My company has offered a buyout package
for us veteran editors and reporters. I accepted.
I’ve made some great friends
and worked with some of the best
journalists in the world. And most
of all I want to thank our readers,
especially the ones who have taken the time to call or email me to
either compliment me or complain. I appreciated the engagement either way.
And I am taking my own advice:
I am not really retiring. I will be
writing a retirement column for
The Washington Post, among
other things. You may find me
elsewhere on the Web. And
you can email me at rbrooks
@srbcommunications.com.
Thank you. It has been an honor and a privilege. 

       

 

     

     

    

 
 

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StatesmanJournal.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

SundaySports
y p
BALLPARKS NEED MORE NETTING FOR FAN SAFETY PAGE 6C

BELMONT STAKES

NBA FINALS

American Warriors’ goal stays the same
Pharoah With Irving out, short-handed Cavaliers in trouble in series
runs into
history
By Brian Mahoney
Associated Press

OAKLAND, Calif. — The NBA
Finals hyped as LeBron
James vs. Stephen Curry now
seems like James against the
Golden State Warriors.

The Cavaliers are down another important player, with
Kyrie Irving having surgery
Saturday back in Cleveland to
repair his fractured left kneecap.
And with what was an already short-handed Cavs

team down 1-0 heading into
Game 2 on Sunday night, a series that just started has the
feel of one that could end
quickly.
“(I) understand that we
were the underdog coming
into the series and with Kyrie

being out people are writing
us off,” James said. “So, I
mean, that’s fine. That’s fine.
I’m motivated to get our guys
ready to go tomorrow and we
will be ready.”

See NBA FINALS, Page 5C

By Beth Harris
Associated Press

NEW YORK — Finally, a Triple
Crown winner, and after 37 years of
waiting, this one was never in doubt.
American Pharoah led all the way
to win the Belmont Stakes by 5 ½
lengths on Saturday, becoming the
first horse since 1978 to sweep the
Kentucky Derby, Preakness and Belmont Stakes — one of the sporting
world’s rarest feats.
“Wow! Wow!” jockey Victor Espinoza said moments after crossing the
finish line. “I can only tell you it just
an amazing thing.”
The bay colt with the unusually
short tail easily defeated seven rivals
in the grueling 1 1/2-mile race, covering the distance in 2:26.65 — sixthfastest in Belmont history — to end
the longest stretch without a Triple
Crown champion in history.
“That little horse, he deserved it,”
trainer Bob Baffert said. “He’s the
one that did it. We were basically just
passengers.”
American Pharoah is the 12th
horse and first since Affirmed in 1978
to win three races on different tracks
at varying distances over a five-week
span. He won the Derby by one length
on May 2 and then romped to a sevenlength victory in the rainy Preakness
two weeks later before demolishing
his rivals Saturday.
“I still can’t believe it happened,”
said Baffert, at 62 the second-oldest
trainer of a Triple Crown winner.
Baffert and Espinoza ended their
own frustrating histories in the Triple
Crown. Baffert finally won on his record fourth Triple try, having lost in
1997, 1998 (by a nose) and in 2002. Espinoza got it done with his record
third shot after failing to win in 2002
and last year on California Chrome.
“I was prepared for somebody
coming because I’ve been through
this so many times,” Baffert said.
Nobody did.
Espinoza hustled American Pharoah to the lead leaving the No. 5 post
and quickly got him over to the rail.
Materiality was on his outside in second, but never applied any serious
pressure traveling on the backstretch
before falling away on the second
turn.
American Pharoah started kicking
away heading into the stretch turn.
He opened up on the field as he pow-

OREGON SOFTBALL

BRENT DRINKUT/STATESMAN JOURNAL

Oregon shortstop Nikki Udria tosses the ball to teammate Danica Mercado (2) after an out against Louisiana-Lafayette at Howe Field on
April 25 in Eugene.

LOOKING FOR

ANSWERS
Oregon coaches and players are
wondering what went wrong at
Women’s College World Series

See BELMONT, Page 5C

By Pete Martini | Statesman Journal
EUGENE — Mike White admits he
doesn’t have the answer.
Oregon’s softball coach, who has
taken the program to new heights in
his six seasons, can’t explain why the
Ducks struggle in the Women’s College
World Series after such dominance in
the regular season, regionals and super regionals.
“We’re doing a lot of finger-pointing
this way,” said White, pointing to himself. “What can we do better as a coaching staff? And then as a team, what
changes do we need to make to be able
to make sure we’re able to bring home
that national championship one day?”
Oregon, which was ranked No. 1 in

See DUCKS, Page 5C

OREGON STATE MEN’S BASKETBALL

Junior Robbins dismissed from the team
Statesman Journal

FRANK FRANKLIN II/AP

2015

American Pharoah rounds the final turn on
his way to winning the Belmont Stakes.

CORVALLIS

Oregon
State’s Victor Robbins is no
longer a member of the
mens’ basketball team, coach
Wayne Tinkle said Saturday.
Robbins, a 6-foot-7, 197pound junior forward from
Compton, California, aver-

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“Victor is no longer with
the team,” Tinkle said. “We
are trying to help him, we
want him to finish school as
strong as he can this quarter.
We hope to help him find his
next place to go to school and
get his degree, and finish his
basketball career.”
Without Robbins, OSU had
a lack of depth, especially in

the front court. The Beavers
(17-14, 8-10 Pac-12) lost seven
of their last eight games.
OSU returns its entire
starting lineup for the 201516 season, including firstteam all-Pac-12 guard Gary
Payton II.
ghorowitz@Statesman
Journal.com, (503) 399-6726 or
Twitter.com/ghorowitz

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2015

By Gary Horowitz

2C

Sports

SUNDAY, JUNE 7, 2015

StatesmanJournal.com

MLB DRAFT

AREA
HIGHLIGHTS
HIGH SCHOOLS

Saturday’s result
Tualatin 10, Westview 0
CLASS 5A
Saturday’s result
Putnam 3, Pendleton 2
CLASS 4A
Saturday’s result
McLoughlin 4, Banks 0

BASEBALL
STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS
All games at Volcanoes Stadium
CLASS 6A
Saturday’s result
Sheldon 2, West Linn 1
CLASS 5A
Saturday’s result
Hood River Valley 2, Liberty 0
CLASS 4A
Saturday’s result
Scappoose 11, Henley 6
SOFTBALL
STATE CHAMPIONSHIPS
All games at OSU Softball Complex
CLASS 6A

COLLEGES
MEN’S ROWING
Oregon State: The Beavers saw 10 from the
men’s rowing team named to the Pac-12 AllAcademic team.
Aidan Daly-Jensen earned his third consecutive first-team award, with Bobby Vernazza
earning his second first-team award. Michael

Jagielski earned his first first-team award.
Clark Fisher, Martin Forde, Taylor Heen, Max
Cantrell and Nathan Smith all were named to
second-team. It is the third time being All-Academic team for Fisher, Forde, and Heen.
Honorable Mention selctions went to Tyler
MacDonald and Grant Van Kampen.

AROUND OREGON
ADULT SOFTBALL
Coed Int.
Slow Motion 14, Sante 4 (Forfeit)
Annette’s 12, Team Chaos 2
Betty Lous 17, Freeloader 15
Slow Motion 17, Freeloader 14
Team Chaos 8, Sante 6 (Forfeit)
Annette’s 22, Betty Lous

Coed Rec.
Rubino’s Gems 15, SWAT 11
Low Five 18, Norpac 5
SWAT 14, Low Five 6
Rubino’s Gems 11, Norpac 2
Mega Foods 12, Dirt Bags 2
Coffee in Motion23, SpitVallers 1
Coffee in Motion 16, Dirt Bags 3
Mega Foods 22, SpitBallers 4
Men’s
Remix 18, Blackwater Tactical 7
Standard Utilities 18, Diamond Jaxx 12
Renegades 19, Davidson’s Masonry 12
Blackwater Tactical 19, Davidson’s Masonry 9
Remix 19, Diamond Jaxx 15
Standard Utilities 17, Renegades 7

— Statesman Journal
MARK HUMPHREY/AP FILE

Vanderbilt starting pitcher Walker Buehler is among the
top prospects entering next week’s MLB draft.

SCOREBOARD
NBA
Daily Playoff Glance
All times PDT/MST
FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Thursday, June 4
Golden State 108, Cleveland 100, Golden
State leads series 1-0
Sunday, June 7
Cleveland at Golden State, 5 p.m.
Tuesday, June 9
Golden State at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Thursday, June 11
Golden State at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Sunday, June 14
x-Cleveland at Golden State, 5 p.m.
Tuesday, June 16
x-Golden State at Cleveland, 6 p.m.
Friday, June 19
x-Cleveland at Golden State, 6 p.m.

NHL
All times PDT/MST
Daily Playoff Glance
FINALS
(Best-of-7; x-if necessary)
Wednesday, June 3
Chicago 2, Tampa Bay 1
Saturday, June 6
Tampa Bay 4, Chicago 3, series tied 1-1
Lightning 4, Blackhawks 3
0
2 1 —
Chicago
Tampa Bay
1
2 1 —

Monday, June 8
Tampa Bay at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Wednesday, June 10
Tampa Bay at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Saturday, June 13
Chicago at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.
Monday, June 15
x-Tampa Bay at Chicago, 5 p.m.
Wednesday, June 17
x-Chicago at Tampa Bay, 5 p.m.

MLS
All times PDT/MST
EASTERN CONFERENCE
W

8
5
6
4
4
4
4
4
4
2

L

4
3
5
5
4
6
9
4
7
7

T Pts GF GA

4
6
1
5
5
4
3
2
2
5

28
21
19
17
17
16
15
14
14
11

20
20
19
19
17
20
18
13
17
12

15
18
16
19
17
21
25
15
20
18

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Seattle
Sporting KC
Vancouver
FC Dallas
Los Angeles
Houston
Portland
San Jose
Real Salt Lake
Colorado

W

8
6
7
6
5
5
5
5
4
2

L

4
2
6
4
4
5
5
5
5
4

T Pts GF GA

2
6
2
3
6
5
4
3
5
7

26
24
23
21
21
20
19
18
17
13

20
22
17
18
15
21
13
14
13
11

11
15
15
19
17
19
14
15
18
12

Wednesday’s Games
D.C. United 3, Chicago 1
Philadelphia 3, Columbus 0
Montreal 2, Vancouver 1
Friday’s Game
Houston 4, New York 2
Saturday’s Games
Toronto FC 2, D.C. United 1
NY City FC 2, Philadelphia 1
Montreal 2, Columbus 1
Sporting KC 1, Seattle 0
Orlando City 3, Chicago 2
Vancouver at Los Angeles, late
New England at Portland, late
Sunday’s Games
Colorado at Real Salt Lake, 2 p.m.
FC Dallas at San Jose, 4 p.m.
Saturday, June 13
Montreal at NY City FC, 4 p.m.
Los Angeles at Columbus, 4:30 p.m.
Chicago at New England, 4:30 p.m.
FC Dallas at Seattle, 7 p.m.
Sunday, June 14
D.C. United at Orlando City, 4 p.m.

COLLEGE BASEBALL
NCAA Division I Super Regionals
All times PDT/MST
Best-of-3; x-if necessary
Host school is Game 1 home team; visiting
school is Game 2 home team; coin flip determines Game 3 home team
At Davenport Field
Charlottesville, Va.
Friday, June 5: Virginia 5, Maryland 3
Saturday, June 6: Virginia 5, Maryland 4, Virginia advances
At Alfred A. McKethan Stadium
Gainesville, Fla.
Friday, June 5: Florida 13, Florida State 3
Florida 11, Florida State 4, Florida advances
At A-Rod Park at Mark Light Field
Coral Gables, Fla.
Friday, June 5: Miami 3, VCU 2
Saturday, June 6: Miami 10, VCU 3, Miami
advances
At Jim Patterson Stadium
Louisville, Ky.
Saturday, June 6: Cal State Fullerton 3,
Louisville 2, 10 innings
Sunday, June 7: Louisville (46-17) vs. Cal
State Fullerton (38-22), 9 a.m.
x-Monday, June 8: Louisville vs. Cal State
Fullerton, TBA
At Illinois Field
Champaign, Ill.
Saturday, June 6: Vanderbilt 13, Illinois 0
Sunday, June 7: Illinois (50-9-1) vs. Vanderbilt (46-19), 6 p.m.
x-Monday, June 8: Illinois vs. Vanderbilt,
TBA
At Alex Box Stadium
Baton Rouge, La.
Saturday, June 6: LSU 4, Louisiana-Lafayette
3
Sunday, June 7: LSU (52-10) vs. LouisianaLafayette (42-22), 4 p.m.
x-Monday, June 8: LSU vs. Louisiana-Lafayette, TBA
At Baum Stadium
Fayetteville, Ark.
Friday, June 5: Arkansas 18, Missouri State 4
Saturday, June 6: Missouri State 3, Arkansas
1
Sunday, June 7: Arkansas (39-23) vs. Missouri State (49-11), Noon
At Lupton Stadium
Fort Worth, Texas
Saturday, June 6: TCU 13, Texas A&M 4
Sunday, June 7: TCU (50-12) vs. Texas A&M
(49-13), 11:15 a.m.
x-Monday, June 8: TCU vs. Texas A&M, TBA

TENNIS
French Open Results
Saturday
At Stade Roland Garros
Paris
Purse: $30.86 million (Grand Slam)

HORSE RACING
Belmont Stakes Winners
2015—American Pharoah
2014—Tonalist
2013—Palace Malice
2012—Union Rags
2011—Ruler On Ice
2010—Drosselmeyer
2009—Summer Bird
2008—Da’ Tara
2007—Rags to Riches
2006—Jazil

AUTO RACING
3
4

First Period—1, Tampa Bay, Paquette 2
(Callahan, Hedman), 12:56.
Second Period—2, Chicago, Shaw 5 (Kruger, Desjardins), 3:04. 3, Chicago, Teravainen 4
(Hossa, Sharp), 5:20 (pp). 4, Tampa Bay, Kucherov 10 (Garrison, Coburn), 6:52. 5, Tampa
Bay, Johnson 13 (Kucherov), 13:58.
Third Period—6, Chicago, Seabrook 7
(Toews, Oduya), 3:38. 7, Tampa Bay, Garrison
2 (Hedman, Callahan), 8:49 (pp).
Shots on Goal—Chicago 11-8-10—29. Tampa Bay 12-10-2—24.
Goalies—Chicago, Crawford. Tampa Bay,
Bishop, Vasilevskiy, Bishop, Vasilevskiy.
A—19,204 (19,204). T—2:34.

D.C. United
New England
Toronto FC
Orlando City
New York
Columbus
Philadelphia
Montreal
Chicago
NY City FC

Surface: Clay-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Semifinals
Novak Djokovic (1), Serbia, def. Andy Murray
(3), Britain, 6-3, 6-3, 5-7, 5-7, 6-1.
Women
Championship
Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Lucie
Safarova (13), Czech Republic, 6-3, 6-7 (2),
6-2.
Doubles
Men
Championship
Ivan Dodig, Croatia, and Marcelo Melo (3),
Brazil, def. Bob and Mike Bryan (1), United
States, 6-7 (5), 7-6 (5), 7-5.

NASCAR Sprint Cup-Axalta We Paint
Winners 400 Lineup
After Friday qualifying; race Sunday
At Pocono Raceway
Long Pond, Pa.
Lap length: 2.5 miles
(Car number in parentheses)
1. (41) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 177.599.
2. (19) Carl Edwards, Toyota, 177.55.
3. (78) Martin Truex Jr., Chevrolet, 177.522.
4. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 177.211.
5. (4) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 177.2.
6. (3) Austin Dillon, Chevrolet, 176.526.
7. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 175.967.
8. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 177.676.
9. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 177.385.
10. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 177.193.
11. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 176.8.
12. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 176.07.
13. (31) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 176.036.
14. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 176.005.
15. (42) Kyle Larson, Chevrolet, 175.943.
16. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 175.895.
17. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 175.699.
18. (13) Casey Mears, Chevrolet, 175.671.
19. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 175.531.
20. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet,
175.466.
21. (55) David Ragan, Toyota, 175.418.
22. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 174.832.
23. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 174.236.
24. (9) Sam Hornish Jr., Ford, 173.819.
25. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 174.791.
26. (47) AJ Allmendinger, Chevrolet,
174.771.
27. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 174.683.
28. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 174.652.
29. (33) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 174.317.
30. (51) Justin Allgaier, Chevrolet, 174.031.
31. (46) Michael Annett, Chevrolet,173.873.
32. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, 173.772.
33. (6) Trevor Bayne, Ford, 173.695.
34. (7) Alex Bowman, Chevrolet, 173.41.
35. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, 172.467.
36. (34) Brett Moffitt, Ford, 172.437.
37. (23) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, Owner Points.
38. (98) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points.
39. (35) Cole Whitt, Ford, Ow