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UNIT PLAN TEMPLATE

LOGISTICS
Teacher: Elisa Rainey
Grade(s) Level(s): Kindergarten/Science
Title of Unit: All About Frogs
Length of Unit: 5 days
STATEMENT OF PURPOSE AND RATIONALE





Students will be able to describe how frogs change as they grow.
Students will be able to classify frogs and toads according to their body structure.
Students will be able to identify movements of frogs.
Students will be able to compare basic needs of frogs and humans.
Students will be able to identify frogs and categorize them.
Students will be able to recognize the similarities and differences between frogs.

According to research, young students work well in cooperative learning environments. Students will be
actively involved in exploring facts about frogs. Students will learn simple skills like: observation, compare and
contrast, sort, sequence, and graph and extend their curiosity about frogs. Through this science lesson, students
will broaden their concepts of living things as they learn about the development of frogs. Students will learn
about the life cycle of the frog, where they live, and the kind of foods they eat. Students will apply what they
have learned about frogs by asking questions and seeking answers when they arise. Furthermore, the students
will be able to continue making new observations about different animals using these simple skills.
NC Essential Standards K.L.1 Compare characteristics of animals that make them alike and different
from other animals and nonliving things.
Clarifying Objectives:
K.L.1.1 Compare different types of the same animal (i.e. frogs/toads etc.) to
determine individual differences within a particular type of animal.
K.L.1.2 Compare characteristics of living and nonliving things in terms of their:
 Structure
 Growth
 Changes
 Movement
 Basic needs
ESSENTIAL QUESTION(S)

How can I compare the frogs and toads to see how they are alike and different?

UNIT OVERVIEW
Plan for integration (graphic organizer as a digital image)

Prerequisite teacher content knowledge (may be bullet points; include essential vocabulary)



Knowledge of different types of frogs. Draw from experience with frog.
Details and facts about different types of frogs, where they live, and what is unique about them (how
they protect themselves from predators).
Know community pet stores to contact to bring in different types of frogs. Students that have frogs as
pets are invited to bring them into to class.
Essential vocabulary includes: similarities, differences, living, non-living, metamorphosis, life cycle,
record, data, observation, amphibian, and hibernate, croak, gills, habitat, poison, tadpole, froglet, .

CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT THE LEARNERS
Prior knowledge
 Students know living and nonliving things are made of parts and people give names to the parts that are
different from the name of the whole object, plant or animal. Students know that the parts of living and
nonliving things work best as a whole and some objects can easily be taken apart and put back together
again while other objects cannot be taken apart without damaging them (e.g., books, pencils, plants, and
animals). Students know that some of the characteristics that all animals share that can be used to
compare living and nonliving things. At this grade level, it is appropriate to define living things as
anything that is alive or has ever been alive and nonliving things as anything that is not now or has ever
been alive.
Unique Learner Characteristics (accommodations and differentiation)

For students that have learning disabilities such as dyslexia, ADHD, etc., the teacher will incorporate
differentiated learning. (Ex. If a student is having difficulty in writing, the students can tell the teacher


orally what is to be written and student then copies what the teacher wrote which is actually the
students’ thoughts.)
For hearing impaired students, teacher (or presenters) use sign language and/or wear FM device if
required to allow for direct input.
For low achieving students, extra time is given for them to complete assignments. Students that finish
early can peer tutor low achieving student.

CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT THE LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
Physical space:
The four tables will allow four groups of five to six students to share, discuss, and peer review while working
on projects. Students will gather on large carpet area for presentations. Teacher will have a separate area for
viewing frogs brought in. Various materials about frogs will be placed throughout the room in the centers that
students use. Items will also be placed on walls for display.
Temporal resources:
The unit design is for 30 minutes per day for five days and will be integrated with other subject areas. It will be
effective and enjoyable to incorporate animals into dramatic play areas, social studies, math, literature, and
writing to expand upon and further understand the unique characteristics of different types of frogs.
Learning materials:





National Geographic Kids Frogs by Elizabeth Carney
Frogs by Gail Gibbons
Jog, Frog, Jog by Barbara Gregorich
Frog on a Log by Phil Roxbee Cox
Froggy Loves Books, Froggy Goes to School, Froggy’s Baby Sister, and Froggy’s Babysitter by
Jonathan London
Frog and Toad are Friends by Arnold Lobel

Personnel resources:
I will contact a person from a pet store to bring in frogs to show the differences and similarities.
Technological resources:
Computers with web access will be used as well as the projector and CD player.
Websites for teacher reference
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_domesticated_animals List of domesticated animals
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Exotic_pet Exotic pet
 http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?player=12&ID=150199&fid=3166985&type=Playlist&ugid
=-1&pid=776861 The Life Cycle of Frogs
 http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?player=12&ID=150198&fid=3166985&type=Playlist&ugid
=-1&pid=776861 Frog or Toad: How do you know?
 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_dog_breeds List of dog breed
 http://www.pca.state.mn.us/index.php/living-green/living-green-citizen/for-kids/frogs-for-kids.html
Frogs for Kids
 http://www.petsmartvirtualfieldtrip.com/ Classroom Pets Virtual Field-Trip

UNIT TIMELINE (choose either format)
Day 1
Day 2
Specific expectations
(goals/objectives)

Students will be
able to describe
how frogs
change as they
grow.

Students will be
able to classify
frogs and toads
according to
their body
structure.

Day 3
Students will be
able to identify
movements of
frogs.

Day 4
Students
will be able
to compare
basic needs
of frogs
and
humans.

Day 5
Students will
be able to
identify frogs
and categorize
them.
Students will
be able to
recognize the
similarities and
differences
between frogs.
Students will
understand that
toads are a
type of frog.

Teaching and
learning strategies (in
brief)

Think-pair-share,
3 column chart,
Video

Cold Call,
3 column chart,
writing prompt

Cold call,
Think-pair-share

Whiteboard
splash,
Think-pairshare

Hold-ups,
categorizing, Venn
diagram

Formative or
summative
assessment typestrategy-tool

Teacher will preassess students as
they respond during
the introductory
strategy. Teacher
will observe
students as they
place pictures on the
help me grow/help
me and frogs
grow/help frogs
grow chart.
Formative
assessment is done
as teacher circulates
the class as students
sequence and put
the frog life cycle
wheel and book
together.

Teacher will preassess to see if
students can identify
with the
characteristics of
humans and frogs.
Teacher will also
use formative
assessment through
observation of
students during the
lesson. The journal
entry will allow
teacher to determine
if students’ can
identify
characteristics that
are unique to frogs.

Teacher will preassess as students
give answers as to
how a dog, bunny,
person, cat, fish, and
groundhog move.
Formative assessment
is done through
observation and
circulation
throughout the class
as students match
frog feet to frog
movement and place
frog pictures under
the correct label of
movement.

Teacher will
pre-assess as
students do a
whiteboard
splash of things
humans and
frogs need to
survive.
Formative
assessment is
done as teacher
records student
answers on
chart. Teacher
will do a
summative
assessment as
groups do
presentations.

Teacher will preassess as students
report what they
learned from the
video. Formative
assessment is done
during hold-ups.
Teacher will see if
students understand
the difference
between frogs and
toads.

Learner
considerations

Student with
learning disability:
Teacher will pair
this student with a
buddy.

Student with
learning disability:
Teacher will work
with this student
allowing him/her to
dictate what they
want to write.
Teacher will write it

Student with learning
disability: When
labeling the paper
that was divided into
fourths, the student
will label it by using
the first letter in each
word.

Student with
learning
disability will
have a role in
the group where
he/she is strong.

Student with
learning disability
will do a
board=paper
activity as teacher
records similarities
and differences
between frogs and
toads.

Hearing impaired
student: Teacher
will wear FM
device. Student will

Hearing
impaired
student:

sit up front during
group time. Close
captions will be
used if needed for
video.
Low achieving
student: Teacher
will allow extra time
for student to finish
work. A student that
finishes early can be
a support buddy for
this student.

Environmental
considerations

Material
resources

Other resources

Students will be
seated on carpet
facing screen during
video, at seats for
writing or paper
activity
Chart paper,
Marker,
Various magnetic
pictures of things
that make humans
and frogs grow,
Frog life cycle
sequence cards,
Construction paper ,
Pencils,
Glue sticks,
Frog life cycle
wheel,
Paper brads,
Life Cycle of a Frog
printable book,
Stapler
Computer with
internet access,
projector

and the student will
have to copy it.
Hearing impaired
student will sit up
front during group
time. Teacher wears
FM device and
checks with the
student regularly to
see if they have any
questions.

Hearing impaired
student: Teacher will
wear FM device and
have student sit up
front during group
time.

Teacher will
assist to make
sure the student
understands and
give further
explanation if
needed.

Hearing impaired
student: Teacher
will wear FM
device, student will
sit in the front
during group time,
and Closed
Captions will be
used as needed.

Low achieving
student: Teacher will
give student extra
time and allow a
student that finishes
early to be a support
buddy.

Low achieving
student will
have a role in
the group where
he/she is strong.

Same

Same

Same

Same

Chart paper,
Markers,
The book Frogs by
Elizabeth Carney,
Writing journal,
Pencils

Magnetic picture of
dog, bird, bunny,
person, cat, fish, and
groundhog,
Whiteboard,
Dry erase marker,
Paper,
Glue sticks,
Pencils

Whiteboard,
Sticky notes,
Pencils,
Chart paper,
Venn diagram,
5 poster boards,
Paper,
Glue sticks

Chart paper,
Marker,
Hold-up frog and
toad picture cards,
3 column paper,
Scissors,
Glue stick,
Venn diagram
labels,
Book Frogs by
Elizabeth Carney,
Book Frogs by
Gail Gibbons

Low achieving
student: Teacher
will allow student to
have extra time to
complete journal
entry.

Computer with
internet access,
projector

Low achieving
student will be
allowed extra time
to complete
assignment.

Computer with
internet access,
Projector,
Student assessment
log

LESSON PLANS
 Individual lesson plans should be inserted as separate subsequent pages—insert page breaks
between each lesson plan
 Remember to include artifacts for each lesson

Salem Lesson Plan Format
GRADE/CLASS:

Day: 1 (30-45 minute class)

Kindergarten/Science
UNIT TOPIC:
All About Frogs
Desired learning outcome(s):
Students will be able to describe how frogs change as they grow.
Essential question(s) from learning objective(s):
How do frogs change as they grow?
Common Core/NC Essential Standard(s):
NC Essential Standards K.L.1 Compare characteristics of animals that make them alike and different
from other animals and nonliving things.
Clarifying Objectives:
K.L.1.1 Compare different types of the same animal (i.e. different types of dogs, different types of cats, etc.) to
determine individual differences within a particular type of animal.
K.L.1.2 Compare characteristics of living and nonliving things in terms of their changes and growth.
Learner prior knowledge/learner background experiences:
Students know that animals (including humans) are living things that grow and develop but nonliving things do
not. Students know that animals change as they grow.
Materials and resources needed:

Chart paper

Marker

Various magnetic pictures of things that make humans and frogs grow

Computer with internet access

Projector

Frog life cycle sequence cards

Construction paper

Pencils

Glue sticks

Frog life cycle wheel

Paper brads

Life Cycle of a Frog printable book

Stapler

Book See Me Grow by Penelope Arlon and Tory Gordon-Harris

Teaching strategies:
Differentiation strategies should be infused throughout. Differentiate for content, product, and process.

Introductory strategies

Were you born the size you are right now? Students will think-pair-share with their partner how they got to be
the size they are now? Students will share with the rest of the class and the teacher will record their responses
on chart paper. Teacher will read See Me Grow by Penelope Arlon and Tory Gordon-Harris. We will discuss the
stages of growth.

Main instructional strategies

Teacher will give students magnetic pictures of various objects. Students will think-pair-share with their partner
if the items help them grow or frogs grow. There will be three columns on the board, labeled, help me to
grow/helps me and frogs grow/ help frogs to grow. Each group will come up to the board and put their picture
where they think it belongs. The group will then tell the class why they think it helps them, frogs and them, or
frogs to grow. Class will give feedback to each item. Teacher will show video of the frog life cycle which will
discuss the stages of frogs’ life. Teacher will ask the students will you stay this size forever. What do you think
the stages are for humans? Teacher will use cold calls and will have discussion with the class.
The Life Cycle of Frogs:
http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?player=12&ID=150199&fid=3166985&type=Playlist&ugid=1&pid=776861

Concluding strategies

Students will sequence pictures of frogs in order by how they grow and change. They will glue the pictures to
construction paper and number the pictures. Students will put together frog life cycle wheel and book.
Assessment (utilize a blend of traditional and performance assessments):
Teacher will pre-assess students as they respond during the introductory strategy. Teacher will observe students
as they place pictures on the help me grow/help me and frogs grow/help frogs grow chart. Formative assessment
is done as teacher circulates the class as students sequence and put the frog life cycle wheel and book together.
EC Accommodations/modifications to strategies or assessments:
Student with learning disability: Teacher will pair this student with a buddy.
Hearing impaired student: Teacher will wear FM device. Student will sit up front during group time. Close
captions will be used if needed for video.

Low achieving student: Teacher will allow extra time for student to finish work. A student that finishes early
can be a support buddy for this student.

Salem Lesson Plan Format
GRADE/CLASS:

Day: 2 (30 minute class)

Kindergarten/Science
UNIT TOPIC:
All About Frogs
Desired learning outcome(s):
Students will be able to classify frogs and toads according to their body structure.
Essential question(s) from learning objective(s):
What are some similarities and differences between frogs and toads?
Common Core/NC Essential Standard(s):
NC Essential Standards K.L.1 Compare characteristics of animals that make them alike and different
from other animals and nonliving things.
Clarifying Objectives:
K.L.1.1 Compare different types of the same animal (i.e. different types of dogs, different types of cats,
etc.) to determine individual differences within a particular type of animal.
K.L.1.2
Compare characteristics of living and nonliving things in terms of their structure.
Learner prior knowledge/learner background experiences:
Students must know that the human body has distinct structures and that they serve different functions that is
similar in other animals. Students must know how to describe the structure of various animals, to include
humans, and tell how the structures are alike and different and how each structure is used in a similar or
different way.
Materials and resources needed:

Chart paper

Markers

The book Frogs by Elizabeth Carney

Writing journals

Pencils

Teaching strategies:
Differentiation strategies should be infused throughout. Differentiate for content, product, and process.

Introductory strategies

Do frogs and toads have teeth? Think about it for a moment and when I say go get with your assigned partner
and think-pair-share why or why you don’t think frogs and toads have teeth. Do frogs have long hind legs or
short legs? Is a toad a frog? Teacher use cold calls to have students answer question. Why do you think that?
I’m going to read a book titled Frogs by Elizabeth Carney which will talk about where frogs live, the size and
color of frogs, and gives a comparison of frogs and toads. I want you to listen for the answers to our questions.
Do frogs have teeth, do the frogs have long hind legs or short legs, and is a toad a frog?

Main instructional strategies

Is your tongue long and sticky? Students stick out their tongues trying to examine them. Feel the top of your
head. Students feel the top of their head. Are there two bulgy eyes like marbles up there? Are your eyes on the
top of your head? Are you a frog? Teacher reads Frogs by Elizabeth Carney. Splish, splash. What is that sound?
Students look around trying to hear what teacher is talking about. What is hopping and jumping around? Some
students will guess out loud, a frog. What loves to swim? What loves to eat bugs? It’s a frog! Can you hop like
a frog? What do frogs use to hop? Students reply “legs.” Students will explore and observe to answer the
questions. After each question teacher will stop and allow children to observe and answer.

Concluding strategies

The class will make a list on chart paper comparing and contrasting humans to frogs using a 3 column chart.
Teacher will ask the children to determine if they are a frog or a human. In their journal, students will write a
response to the following question: why are you not a frog? Students may draw pictures and/or words to answer
the question.
Assessment (utilize a blend of traditional and performance assessments):
Teacher will pre-assess to see if students can identify with the characteristics of humans and frogs. Teacher will
also use formative assessment through observation of students during the lesson. The journal entry will allow
teacher to determine if students’ can identify characteristics that are unique to frogs.
EC Accommodations/modifications to strategies or assessments:
Student with learning disability: Teacher will work with this student allowing him/her to dictate what they want
to write. Teacher will write it and the student will have to copy it.
Hearing impaired student will sit up front during group time. Teacher wears FM device and checks with the
student regularly to see if they have any questions.
Low achieving student: Teacher will allow student to have extra time to complete journal entry.

Salem Lesson Plan Format
GRADE/CLASS:

Day: 3 (30 minute class)

Kindergarten/Science
UNIT TOPIC:
All About Frogs
Desired learning outcome(s):
Students will be able to identify movements of frogs.
Essential question(s) from learning objective(s):
What are 3 types of frog movements?
Common Core/NC Essential Standard(s):
NC Essential Standards K.L.1 Compare characteristics of animals that make them alike and different
from other animals and nonliving things.
Clarifying Objectives:
K.L.1.1 Compare different types of the same animal (i.e. different types of dogs, different types of cats,
etc.) to determine individual differences within a particular type of animal.
K.L.1.2 Compare characteristics of living and nonliving things in terms of their movement
Learner prior knowledge/learner background experiences:
Students know how various animals move noting similarities and differences.

Materials and resources needed:

Magnetic picture of dog, bird, bunny, person, cat, fish, and groundhog

Whiteboard

Dry erase marker

Computer with internet access

Projector

Paper

Glue sticks

Pencils

Teaching strategies:
Differentiation strategies should be infused throughout. Differentiate for content, product, and process.

Introductory strategies

Teacher will place a magnetic picture of a dog, bird, bunny, person, cat, fish, and groundhog on the whiteboard.
Pick one thing and tell me one way it moves? Teacher calls on students that have their hands raised and then
cold call other students. As students say how they move, teacher records the answers under the pictures.

Main instructional strategies

Teacher will show images of frogs jumping, swimming, burrowing, climbing, gliding, walking and running. As
the pictures are shown, the teacher cold calls asking what makes it possible for the frogs to be able to move that
way. Teacher will show pictures of frogs’ feet. Are their feet the same? How are they different? Students thinkpair-share and decide which frog movement the feet would match. Would sticky feet or webbed feet help the
frog swim? What would sticky feet help the frog do? Students give their answers and teacher makes any
clarifications if needed.

Concluding strategies

Students will fold a piece of paper into fourths. They will label each section with one of the headings: jumping,
swimming, walking, or gliding. Students will cut and paste pictures of frogs according to their movement.
Assessment (utilize a blend of traditional and performance assessments):
Teacher will pre-assess as students give answers as to how a dog, bunny, person, cat, fish, and groundhog move.
Formative assessment is done through observation and circulation throughout the class as students match frog
feet to frog movement and place frog pictures under the correct label of movement.
EC Accommodations/modifications to strategies or assessments:
Student with learning disability: When labeling the paper that was divided into fourths, the student will label it
by using the first letter in each word.
Hearing impaired student: Teacher will wear FM device and have student sit up front during group time.
Low achieving student: Teacher will give student extra time and allow a student that finishes early to be a
support buddy.

Salem Lesson Plan Format
GRADE/CLASS:

Day: 4 (30 minute class)

Kindergarten/Science
UNIT TOPIC:
All About Frogs
Desired learning outcome(s):
Students will be able to compare basic needs of frogs and humans.
Essential question(s) from learning objective(s):
How are frog and human basic needs alike and different?
Common Core/NC Essential Standard(s):
NC Essential Standards K.L.1 Compare characteristics of animals that make them alike and different
from other animals and nonliving things.
Clarifying Objectives:
K.L.1.1 Compare different types of the same animal (i.e. different types of dogs, different types of cats,
etc.) to determine individual differences within a particular type of animal.
K.L.1.2 Compare characteristics of living and nonliving things in terms of their basic needs
Learner prior knowledge/learner background experiences:
Students know that all animals are living things that have basic needs to stay alive. Animals need air, water,
food, and shelter for protection. If an organism does not get everything that it needs to stay alive, it will die. By
comparing these characteristics of several animals, students begin to classify things as living and nonliving
based on these characteristics.
Materials and resources needed:

Whiteboard

Sticky notes

Pencils

Chart paper

Venn diagram

5 poster boards

Paper

Glue sticks

Teaching strategies:
Differentiation strategies should be infused throughout. Differentiate for content, product, and process.

Introductory strategies

What do you think frogs need to survive? Student will write a descriptive word or draw a picture on a sticky
note and post it on a whiteboard splash. Teacher will guide students as they place their notes on the board to
create a chart. What do humans need to survive? Students will write a descriptive word or draw a picture of a
human need on a sticky note and post it on the whiteboard as well under the human side and teacher will guide
them as they post it to create a chart.

Main instructional strategies

What are things we need to survive? Teacher will use cold call to discuss with the class their answers of what
humans need to survive. Teacher will record answers on chart paper shaped as a person. You said we need air,
food, water, and shelter which are our basic needs. What do frogs need to survive? Students will think-pairshare and discuss with the class their answers of frogs needs. Teacher will record answers on chart paper shaped
as a frog. Teacher will record and compare similarities and differences on a Venn diagram.

Concluding strategies

Students will get into four groups of four and one group of five. Each group will have a group leader, recorder,
illustrator, and presenter. Teacher will assign group leaders and he/she will determine who will carry out other
roles for this activity. Teacher will make adjustments if needed. Students will have the shaped chart paper as a
reference to make a presentation on how basic needs of frogs and humans are alike and different.
Assessment (utilize a blend of traditional and performance assessments):
Teacher will pre-assess as students do a whiteboard splash of things humans and frogs need to survive.
Formative assessment is done as teacher records student answers on chart. Teacher will do a summative
assessment as groups do presentations.
EC Accommodations/modifications to strategies or assessments:
Student with learning disability will have a role in the group where he/she is strong.
Hearing impaired student: Teacher will assist to make sure the student understands and give further explanation
if needed.
Low achieving student will have a role in the group where he/she is strong.

Salem Lesson Plan Format
GRADE/CLASS:

Day: 5 (30 minute class)

Kindergarten/Science
UNIT TOPIC:
All About Frogs
Desired learning outcome(s):
Students will be able to identify frogs and categories them. Students will recognize the similarities and
differences between frogs.
Essential question(s) from learning objective(s):
Why would a toad be called a frog?
Common Core/NC Essential Standard(s):
NC Essential Standards K.L.1 Compare characteristics of animals that make them alike and different
from other animals and nonliving things.
Clarifying Objectives:
K.L.1.1 Compare different types of the same animal (i.e. different types of dogs, different types of cats,
etc.) to determine individual differences within a particular type of animal.
Learner prior knowledge/learner background experiences:
Students know that animals of the same type (i.e. dogs-spaniels/shepherds, cats- solids/tabby, birdshawk/sparrow, etc.) have individual differences.
Materials and resources needed:

Computer with internet access

Projector

Chart paper

Marker

Hold-up frog and toad picture cards

3 column paper

Scissors

Glue stick

Venn diagram labels

Book Frogs by Elizabeth Carney

Book Frogs by Gail Gibbons

Teaching strategies:
Differentiation strategies should be infused throughout. Differentiate for content, product, and process.

Introductory strategies

Teacher will show Learn 360 video Frog or Toad: How do you know?
http://www.learn360.com/ShowVideo.aspx?player=12&ID=150198&fid=3166985&type=Playlist&ugid=1&pid=776861

Main instructional strategies

What did you learn from the video? As students give answers, teacher records them on chart paper. Teacher
makes three columns for frogs, toads and similarities between frogs and toads. We will reference two books,
Frogs by Gail Gibbons and Frogs by Elizabeth Carney. What are some things Gail Gibbons mention about
frogs? Students look at the book and name things the arrows point to about frogs. Teacher record answers in
appropriate section on three column chart. What are some things Elizabeth Carney mentions about frogs?
Students look at her book and name things the arrows point to. Was there anything different? Teacher records
student responses. They will do the same thing for the toad.

Concluding strategies

Teacher will give students hold-up picture cards of frogs and toads, she will name a characteristic of a frog or a
toad and the students will hold up the frog card if the statement is about the frog or the toad card if the statement
is about the toad.
Students will cut out and paste characteristics of frogs and toads on a three column Venn diagram.
Students will summarize what they have learned in three sentences or less.
Assessment (utilize a blend of traditional and performance assessments):
Teacher will pre-assess as students report what they learned from the video. Formative assessment is done
during hold-ups. Teacher will see if students understand the difference between frogs and toads.
EC Accommodations/modifications to strategies or assessments:
Student with learning disability will do a board=paper activity as teacher records similarities and differences
between frogs and toads.
Hearing impaired student: Teacher will wear FM device, student will sit in the front during group time, and
Closed Captions will be used as needed.
Low achieving student will be allowed extra time to complete assignment.

References
Himmele, P. & Himmele, W. (2011). Total participation techniques. Alexandria, Va.: ASCD.
Lemov, D. (2010). Teach like a champion. San Francisco, CA.: Jossey-Bass.

Summative Assessment
Students will create a scene with the stages of growth of the frog. Scene will include basic needs of a frog, how
frogs move, and how toads are different from the frogs.

Learning Goals
Students will be able to:





Describe how frogs change as they grow.
Classify frogs and toads according to their body structure.
Identify movements of frogs.
Compare basic needs of frogs and humans.
Identify frogs and categorize them.
Recognize the similarities and differences between frogs.
Criteria
Students will
be able to
describe how
frogs change as
they grow.

Level 4
Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 4 stages of
the frog growth.

Level 3
Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 3 stages of
the frog growth.

Level 2
Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 2 stages of
the frog growth.

Level 1
Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 0-1 stage of
the frog growth.

Students will
be able to
classify frogs
and toads
according to
their body
structure.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 4
differences between
a frog and a toad.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 3
differences between
a frog and a toad.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 2
differences between
a frog and a toad.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 1 difference
between a frog and
a toad.

Identify
movements of
frogs.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 4
movements of
frogs.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 3
movements of
frogs.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 2
movements of
frogs.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 1
movement of frogs.

Compare basic
needs of frogs
and humans.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 4 basic
needs of the frog.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 3 basic
needs of the frog.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 2 basic
needs of the frog.

Students will be
able to name, draw
or label 0-1 basic
need of the frog.

Name:_________________________________
Enchanted Learning

Frog Life Cycle
Sequencing Cards
Print the page and then cut the cards out. The student then puts the cards
in order.

Copyright ©2003-2010 EnchantedLearning.com

EnchantedLearning.com

Frogs and Toads Venn Diagram

Copyright ©2003-2010 EnchantedLearning.com

Name:_________________________________

Spring Books

Life Cycle of a Frog

Frog Activities

A Printable Book for Early Readers
Print out the following pages to make the Life Cycle of a Frog shape book, an early reader book for
young readers.
There one book page on each printed page. You either cut out each page along the thick lily pad
outline or not (then you will have a rectangular-shaped book). Staple the pages together at the left
of the page, then read the book, color the pictures, and copy the sentences.
To get back to this page from a printout, just click on the picture.
Skills practiced: reading, writing, frog life cycle.

Cover Page

Eggs

Tadpole

Cover page.

The female frog lays clusters of
eggs in or near the water.

Tiny tadpoles hatch from the
eggs. Tadpoles swim in fresh
water and breathe with gills.

Growing Tadpole

Froglet

Adult

As a tadpole grows, it
develops legs.

The tadpole becomes a froglet; it
has 4 legs, breathes with lungs,
and loses its tail.

The adult frog lives on land,
breathes with lungs, has 4 legs,
and has no tail.

Write some of the things you have learned about frogs below.