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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
Last week, during the part of the day that I was out, I had the cooperating teacher find out
what students knew, wanted to know, and wanted to learn about frogs. Before I read Frogs, by
Gail Gibbons, we reviewed that information. As I read the book, I pointed out certain
information that I wanted the students to know. During the story, students were given an
opportunity to ask questions and make comments. I was able to find out if the students could
make any connections relating to frogs. We worked on standard W.K.2. Use a combination of
drawing, dictating, and writing to compose information/explanatory texts in which they name
what they are writing about and supply some information about the topic. For writing, I
displayed the stages of the life cycle of the frog randomly on the Promethean Board and students
had to write them in order. After students listed the stages of the frog they put together their Frog
Life Cycle Wheel.
Looking back over this part of the day, instead of reading all of the information of the
pages I covered, I wondered if I should have only read the information I needed the students to
focus on. Reading all of the information may have been too much for kindergarteners. As
students began to work on listing the stages of a frog, several students said they did not know
what to do. I worked with those students who did not understand in a small group. I explained to
them that beside the number one, they were to put the first stage of the frog and I asked them to
tell me what the first stage was. Immediately they all said, “eggs,” and I told them that, that was
what they needed to put beside the number one. We repeated this process for numbers two
through four and the students went back to their seats and completed the activity without any
other questions. I experienced firsthand that some students will get it the first time you say it
while others may need to have it repeated one-on-one or in small groups.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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The science and social studies lesson for the day was pushed back due to preparations for
the kindergarten play that was to be performed the next day. I have learned that flexibility is an
essential characteristic that teachers need.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection

Today after we did calendar, we had to get our costumes on for the kindergarten play to perform
for the school. Although teachers have a need to go on with instruction, being flexible helps
things to run smoothly. The cooperating teacher mentioned that with all of the excitement from
the play, it would be hard to give some solid instruction. Therefore, once students completed
their performance and came back to the room, I had them to paint a small white paper plate green
or brown for a frog or a toad to go along with the unit. I had two students at a time to come to the
art table and paint while the rest of the class cut out paper eyes for the frogs and read a book at
their table until it was their turn. Students were to perform again that night so the cooperating
teacher suggested that I rehearse with them during the last part of the day after recess.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
Today I read Frogs on a Log for the reading/Imagine It portion of the day. After I read
the first page, I asked the students did they notice anything about the words. The students looked
and did not give a response so I said, “I’m going to keep reading and if you notice anything
about the words raise your hand.” Midway through the book I saw hands go up and heard a voice
blurt out “that rhymes.” I Cold Called a student and asked them what they noticed and the
student did not give me a response. Therefore, I called on a student who had their hand raised
and they replied “the words rhyme.” I asked the question again to the student I had Cold Called
and they said “the words rhyme.” After circle time, students exercised before they transitioned
into writing. We continued to work on standard W.K.2. Use a combination of drawing, dictating,
and writing to compose information/explanatory texts in which they name what they are writing
about and supply some information about the topic.
During science, I showed the class two pictures of seven types of environments;
rainforest, lakes, ponds, mountains, arctic, Antarctica, and the desert. After the students viewed
the pictures, they had to decide which type environment a frog might live in. On a graph with the
seven environments, the students wrote their names in the box above the location they believed
frogs live. When students began to tell me that certain parts of the graph were full; I asked them
to choose a different area because if I changed the graph to allow more space for a one
environment, the majority of the class would have chosen that setting. I informed them that
tomorrow we were going to tally and see where students thought frogs were going to live the
most and the least.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
The speech pathologist came in today with a lesson during the reading block. Students
transitioned from speech by having some exercise time. Following the exercise time, students
went back to their seats and were given a page to make My Itsy Bitsy Frog Book. After students
colored the pictures, I helped the students put their books together. We read the book together as
a class and discussed ways frogs move. In standard K.P.1.2 Give examples of different ways
objects and organisms move (to include falling to the ground when dropped): (Straight, Zigzag,
Round, and round, Back and forth, Fast and slow) is the standard we focused on. Students
compared their movement of jumping, eating, climbing, and swimming with the frogs’
movement. During math time, the students tallied the places where they thought frogs live.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
After reading Franklin’s Library Book and Franklin Loses a Book, I introduced the Venn
diagram to compare the setting in both stories. The students named different places the story took
place and I recorded the information on the Venn diagram. Next, the students did a board equals
paper activity where they copied the information of the Venn diagram onto their paper. The
activity was engaging and the students worked on their writing skills to meet standard L.K.2.
Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and
spelling when writing.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections
Reflection

To practice argumentative/opinion writing, I used the O.R.E.O (Opinion, Reason, Example,
Opinion) model for writing. After the class read the poem Little Boy Blue, we discussed if we
should or should not wake him and why. Ann’s writing has really improved, Elizabeth’s
handwriting has been better, and Henry still has to be encouraged to get his work complete. He
tries to do the bare minimum but I encourage him by telling him that he can do it and all he has
to do is try his best.

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

Ann’s Work

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

Elizabeth’s Work

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

Henry’s Work

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
This lesson did not go as I had planned. I had planned for students to sort the shapes by color but
as they began to move the shapes to their category, there was another shape below it. Students
were confused about what to do and I had to modify the activity by having the students come up
one at a time to sort a shape by color.

This slide gave me the same problem as the one above and had to be modified. Here we were
sorting by the number of sides the shapes had.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
When preparing for this lesson, I planned on implementing it in one way but later discovered that
there were multiple ways this format could be used. Originally, I had planned for the students to
name a color to fill in the blank and complete the chart. Since the shapes are multiple, I decided
that the students put eight shapes in the left box. They had to make three shapes one color and
the rest a different color. The three shapes that they made the one color went into the second box
and the remaining different color went into the last box.

We continued to practice this concept with the slide below.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
To engage the students, I gave each student a 2-D shape and they were then instructed to find
other students with the same shape to make a group. Once students got into their groups, I asked
each group what shape they had and how many sides, corners, and vertices the shape had. I
labeled each shape with sides, corners, and vertices and wrote the numbers next to its category.
Twenty-one students were present out of the twenty-two in the class and two students out of
twenty-one had some difficulty with this activity. Therefore, I the student who was at the board
get a friend to help them out. After the friend helped get the answer, I asked the student that was
having difficulty the question again so they could tell me on their own what the answer was.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
I gave out 3-D objects and the students grouped themselves according to the shape they had. The
3-D objects were on the left side of the Promethean Board and six boxes with descriptors on the
right side of the board. For each group of shapes I drew lines along the lines as we counted to see
how many sides the shape had. Numbers were placed on the faces of the shape if there were any
and dots were drawn on the corners and counted. After we checked each shape to see if it had the
descriptors, we put a check mark next to that description. Once all items were checked in the
box, I slide the shape to its description. As an assessment tool, the students sorted 3-D objects.
The use of technology, manipulatives, and paper and pencil are methods that could be used to
modify the assessment. I have learned that teachers have to learn how to adapt lessons according
to each child’s capability.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
After modeling different ways to show less than and greater than 18 out of 22 students were able
to grasp the concept. The other four students started to catch on when I set up math stations with
dominoes, counting bears, and other math manipulatives. I learned from this math lesson that
most of the students enjoyed working in small group and peer teaching each other. I also learned
that math should be model and have many objects so that the students are able to explore
different ways to show their work. Earlier during the lesson some of the students were unable to
understand the math concept on less than and greater than now all twenty-two students
understand. I am very pleased with the end results of this lesson.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
Before introducing math story problems, students used manipulatives to represent numbers and
solve simple addition problems. Since I had already introduced the concept of shapes I thought it
would be great to use the shapes in a math story. When I used the shapes 17 out of 22 students
were able to remember from the 2-D and 3-D shape lesson. I passed out a container of shapes
and I asked each child to take 10 shapes out. Then I asked them to show me how they could add
or subtract their shapes. I was amazed what they did with their shapes. I saw that the 17 out of 22
students were able to do well in composing their math equation using the shapes I had provided.
However when I asked them to decomposed only 15 out of 22 were able to grasp the
decomposing concept so I had to model several times with my shapes. Then 15 out of 22
students were able to grasp the decomposing concept. Towards the end of the lessons I was very
pleased with the outcome that 20 out of 22 students were able to compose and 18 out of 22 were
able to decompose.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
In order to enhance students decomposing skills, I created sixteen slides to practice decomposing
the number eight. On each slide, students would make one more red dot until there were eight
red dots. After all the dots are red, the students would then make one less red dot to make a
combination of eight.

Rainey, Elisa

Student Teaching Reflections

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Reflection
Students were given manipulatives and I used the count the dot and add them sheet as a guide for
giving math story problems. As I gave the story problem, the students would manipulate their
objects to match the given problem. For example, four birds were flying in the sky. Three more
birds started to flying with them. How many birds are flying? I circulated the room to make sure
students were on task and grasping the concept. After we did several problems together, I had
them to come up with a math story problem. The class did an awesome job with this concept.