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International Student Guidebook

Sciences Po 2014
a project of
International Student Council

International Student Guidebook


Sciences Po 2014
Content: International Student Council
C o v e r p h o t o : w w w. w a l l p a p e r v o r t e x . c o m
Manual Design and Editorial: ISC Communications
Date of Publication: January 2014
Edition: First

TABLE OF CONTENTS

I.

OPENING REMARKS.......................................................... 4

II.

PREPARATION................................................................... 7

III. ACADEMIA........................................................................ 12
IV. HOUSING.......................................................................... 28

V. FINANCE............................................................................ 43
VI. IMMIGRATION.................................................................. 53
VII. TRANSPORTATION AND TRAVEL....................................... 61
VIII. HEALTH AND WELLNESS................................................... 72
IX. CULTURE AND RECREATION.............................................. 78
X. CONTRIBUTORS................................................................ 91
XI. CREDITS............................................................................. 94
XII. SCIENCES PO CAMPUS MAP............................................... 98

Welcome to Sciences Po
MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT
Dear International Students,
This guide is just a little helping hand to get you
up and running for your exciting year in Paris.
While your friends are all home working, youll be
eating ptisserie and drinking hot wine (maybe
whilst doing a little work). It might sound
presumptuous to say youre going to love it here,
but lets face it, it is Paris and you will!

Jack GHALEB
President
jack.ghaleb@sciencespo.fr

Yes, theres French bureaucracy and you may


need a visa to order a drink (just joking, its not
that bad) but youll grow to love every little quirk
about it. Also, lets face it, when you do go home
nobody wants to hear about how easy it all was,
they want to hear about the time Google
translate messed up on directions and you ended
up just joining in a strangers party instead!
Theres a lot to do and a lot of fun to be had in
Paris, and dont forget lots of amazing people to
meet (like us at the ISC). We wont be able to
answer all your questions, but we will have a
drink with you and do our best so that you have
as much fun as possible.
See you all soon,
Jack GHALEB

Welcome to Sciences Po
MESSAGE FROM THE VP OF COMMUNICATIONS
On behalf of the ISC Executive board, I would like
to wish you a warm welcome to Sciences Po! You
have ultimately taken a huge step towards
discovering a whole new culture, attaining a higher
level of personal and academic development as
well as obtaining the opportunity to meet students
from around the globe. In the next couple of
months, you will soon set foot on the streets of
Paris where you will be exploring the twenty
different arrondissements all while mastering the
art and the beauty of the French language in the
City of Lights. This is an opportunity that is worth
each penny of your last summers internship or
part-time employment as you will be investing on
wonderful memories that will sure last a lifetime
the question is, are you ready?
Justine MALLOU
After five and a half months of preparation,
Vice President of Communications
sixteen contributors have volunteered their time in
justinemicheli.mallou@sciencespo.fr

order to produce the manual that you are reading


right now. It is with great pleasure to present to
you the published copy of first-hand student
experiences that will guide you throughout your
exchange program in France. I wish you nothing
but great success for the upcoming semester at
Sciences Po.
Bonne rentre et bienvenue Paris!
Justine MALLOU
5

International Student Council


Paris 2013 2014
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

Jack GHALEB
President

Justine MALLOU
VP Communications

Soukana KARRAKCHOU
VP Integration

Samanta AUBONE
Secretary

Dana MURESAN
Representative:
Americas

Jiyun JUNG
Representative: APAMO

Camlia VIALLET
Natalia CWIERZ
Representative: Masters Representative: Europe
Program

SECTION I

Preparation
\pre-p-r-shn\

P REPARATION
Justine MALLOU

RELOCATION CHECKLIST
In order to prepare for a one-year exchange program abroad, it is
important keep in mind that moving to a different country
requires constant planning and continuous research. The most
essential tool is to master the art of preparation it will definitely
contribute to a smoother transition to overcome the hidden perks
of the French bureaucracy during the first couple of weeks in
France.

Here is a sample draft on how to start a pre-departure checklist:


ADMINISTRATIVE DOCUMENTS

Renewed and valid passport

Student Visa and Immigration documents

Copy of acceptance letter from host and partner institutions

Extra passport-sized photos for carte de sjour, Navigo metro pass, student
identification

Birth certificate (especially students of multiple nationalities or double


citizenships)

Home institution acceptance and nomination letters

International Student Identity Card (ISIC)

International Drivers Licence (if you wish to drive in Europe)


PERSONAL FINANCES

Exchange currency to euro

Banking information and bank cards to access ATMs

Proof of Sufficient Funds

Power of Attorney

Familiarize yourself with wire-transfer process from home country to France


BUDGET FOR

Tuition payment to home university for each semester abroad

Local transportation in Paris for bus, mtro, tram (carte Imagine R)

Accommodation (monthly rent)

Personal expenses (entertainment, theatre, concerts, laundry)


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P REPARATION
Justine MALLOU

RELOCATION CHECKLIST

HEALTH

Basic health and dental insurance documents (insurance company, policy,


overseas contact number)

Travel and property insurance (insurance company, policy, overseas contact


number)

Copies of medical records, health certificates and immunizations

Prescriptions and eyewear


ACADEMIC PROGRAM

Books and supplies

Preliminary and backup course selection list

Exchange credit transfer documents to home university


TRANSPORTATION AND TRAVEL

Air ticket reservation and boarding passes

Travel insurance with company and policy details

Bus or train connection tickets

Guidebooks and maps

A journal to write about your experiences!


PERSONAL TIP
Make 3 duplications of all important documents: 1 copy for yourself, 1 copy to leave
at home for your parents/guardian, 1 copy to use for administrative purposes. By
doing so, you will always have one extra copy that you can then use in the future.

P REPARATION
Justine MALLOU

OVERCOMING CULTURE SHOCK

There is no doubt that the decision of embarking on a one-year exchange program surely
demonstrates a certain degree of self-confidence. It highlights the drive to attain
academic goals and measures the urge to discover the world. However, behind the
stereotypical adventure of climbing the Eiffel Tower for the first time, it is important to
keep in mind that the glamour of a tourist will never match the experiences of a resident
hence, as Benjamin Franklin would say, nothing ventured, nothing gained.
What is Culture Shock?
The initial reaction to a new
environment when expectations dont
match up with reality

Causes
Cultural difference or language barrier
Inefficiency of completing minor tasks
Distance from family and loved ones
Inability to adapt and make friends
Stages of Culture Shock
1) Honeymoon Period (Cheap wine at
the Eiffel Tower? I love Paris!):
heightened sense of enthusiasm
2)

3) Mid-sojourn
Discouragement
(Whenever I try to speak French, they
always respond in English!): sign of
homesickness, discouragement or
hostility; some minor health problems
4) Cultural Integration (I dont want to
come home.): adjustment to host
culture; change of personal values
5) Re-Entry Shock (No more cheap
flights?): Unmet expectations at
home

Early Frustration (Seriously, it takes


two whole weeks to get my bank
card?): sudden feeling of impatience
and disenchantment with both
cultural and academic differences

www.bve.ulaval.ca

10

P REPARATION
Andrea DEROCCO

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: CULTURAL TRANSITION


c I live outside Paris center, so it takes me up to 30 minutes to get into the center. The
situation I have come across is isolation and language barrier. When I first came here,
I had no guides to help me. Behind experience of resourcefulness, I researched
various ways to help me get what I needed. In terms of overcoming the isolation,
since I lived alone I would sit in my apartment for up to 24 hours not leaving. I tried
meet up groups, but eventually opted out of them. It takes effort and time to meet
people in a foreign setting, when you are not actively placed in a group. To overcome
my loneliness, I decided to make myself bust, utilize my gym membership, and
research museums or day trips to get out of my apartment. In terms of language
acquisition, I researched what was available to help me and also converse with my
French professor in order to get her advice. I basically, reached out to people and
posed questions. I took the initiative to get out of my funk.
Once I become more comfortable with the language, and after time had progressed, I
started feeling better. Another word of advice, if you are close with your family and
friends at home, set rules in which you talk to them every other day or so. With social
media and easy access via Internet to contact people, it makes it harder to enjoy your
immediate surroundings. Set limits, and get out. You dont want to create regrets,
like I did sitting in my apartment and then calling my friends at home having a selfpity party. You dont want to look back 10 years from now and say I wish I had
gotten out more.
I took initiative and approached various avenues to get me to what I needed to make
myself feel comfortable. If I came across a dead-end, I continued searching.
However, from time to time, nice surprises would show up such as markets or other
events. I stepped out of my comfort zone and faced change.

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SECTION II

Academia
/ kdimi /

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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

SCIENCES PO AND ITS 7 CAMPUSES


The main Sciences Po campus is located in
Paris and the classes deal with events and
topics that are not focusing on a particular
region of the world. There are however 7
other regionalized Sciences Po campuses in
which you can choose to study.
/!\ The regionalized campuses only teach
classes at the Bachelor (collge
universitaire) level. If you are an incoming
exchange student wishing to take classes
within a Masters program, the Paris
campus is the only one to offer them.
More
information
here:
http://college.sciences-po.fr

Paris: Euro-African Campus


In 2011, the Paris campus started the EuroAfrican program, delivering classes about
relations between Europe and Africa. Classes
are taught in French and English but
students also have to choose a specific
language among Swahili, Portuguese, Arabic
and other African languages.
For more information:
http://www.sciencespo.fr/programmeeurope-afrique/en/content/europe-africaprogramme

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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

SCIENCES PO AND ITS 7 CAMPUSES


Nancy : French-German campus
The focus here is mainly on France and Germany,
but also more generally on Europe. Courses are
taught in French, German, and English and the
campus welcomes approximately 300 students.
This is the oldest regionalized campus. For more
information:http://college.sciencespo.fr/sitenancy/en/content/accueil

Dijon: Central and Eastern European campus


This campus focuses mainly on Europe and
especially Central and Eastern Europe. The
European Union is therefore at the heart of their
course of study. Classes are taught in French
and/or in English. For more information:
http://college.sciences-po.fr/sitedijon/en/node/9

Reims : Euro-American campus


The Euro-American campus takes a special
interest in transatlantic relations and mainly
focuses on Canada, the United States, and the
European Union. Classes are taught in English
and in French. This is the most recent
regionalized campus, as it opened in 2010 with
~300 students. For more information:
http://college.sciences-po.fr/sitereims/
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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

SCIENCES PO AND ITS 7 CAMPUSES


Le Havre : Euro-Asian campus
In Le Havre, students study relationships between
Europe and Asia. Classes are taught in English and in
French but students also have to master one Asian
language (Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Hindi or
Indonesian) before the completion of their Bachelor.
For more information: http://college.sciencespo.fr/sitehavre/en/node/1
Menton : Middle-East and Mediterranean
campus
The campus of Menton is located in the southern
part of France, close to Nice and Monaco. The
classes deal with issues relevant to the MiddleEastern and Mediterranean regions and are
taught in French, English, and Arabic. For more
information:
http://college.sciencespo.fr/sitementon/en/welcome
Poitiers: The Latin-American campus

The Poitiers campus focuses on Latin America and


Spain. Welcoming approximately 200 students, it
also is one of the oldest regionalized campuses of
Sciences Po. Classes are taught in French, English,
Portuguese and Spanish. For more information:
http://college.sciencespo.fr/sitementon/en/welcome

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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET
Statistics
Sciences Po is one of the most prestigious
universities in Europe in the field of Social
Sciences. Welcoming 4000 students in the
Collge Universitaire (one third of them
studying in regionalized campuses), Sciences
Po gathers a melting pot of people, coming
from various horizons and having different
backgrounds, which makes it a fascinating
community to be part of. In total, Sciences Po
gathers 12 000 undergraduates and
graduates, 42% of whom being international
students
Collge universitaire, Master, Doctorat
Sciences Po has a particular internal
organization. A Bachelor of Arts in Social
Sciences is a 3-year program not 4. Two of
those three years are spent in one of the 7
campuses of Sciences Po and the third year is
spent abroad in one of our partner
universities. Finally, students can choose to
apply for a Ph.D. program to be completed in
3 or 5 years (depending on whether the
student followed a Ph.D. track during Masters
Program.
Library access
The library is usually open from 8am to 9:30pm from Monday to Friday and from 9am to
8pm on Saturdays. The two main libraries are located at the 27 and 30 rue Saint
Guillaume. Youll be able to find there a lot of textbooks and useful material in order to
research
for
your
exposs
and
other
works.
More
information:
http://www.sciencespo.fr/bibliotheque/

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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

STUDENT SERVICES
Campus nurse
The campus health center and its nurse are located at the 56, rue des Saints-Pres. As it is
not unusual for students, and especially international students, to face troubles such as
homesickness, unhappiness, or stress, a team of professional practitioners is available on
campus to talk with you during one on ones in several different languages. Rest rooms are
also available in several locations on campus if ever you dont feel well and need to lie
down.
If you need to make an appointment,
mariedominique.danchald@sciencespo.fr

please

send

an

email

to:

Students with disabilities


The campus is very accessible for students with disabilities and a lot of services are made
available. The Welcome Programme follows the same guidelines. You can find a list of the
services for students with disabilities at the following link: http://www.sciencespo.fr/vieetudiante/en/content/disability-support-services-accessibility
All students with any disability should feel free to contact Claire Second:
claire.seconde@sciencespo.fr or call her at +33 (0)1 45 49 51 19.
Academic Calendar
The academic calendar for 2013 2014 can be found at the following address:
http://formation.sciences-po.fr/sites/default/files/calendrier_universitaire_en.pdf
How to address professors (M., Mme.)
French professors are very traditional in the sense that they will demand to be addressed
with a strong sense of respect. This is why you should always address them as Pr. X or M. X
or Mrs. X. Also, the vouvoiement is key here: always use the personal pronoun vous to
talk to them.

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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS
80 student associations are currently recognized at Sciences Po. For more information:
http://www.sciencespo.fr/vie-etudiante/fr/content/associations-reconnues
Here are the five main associations:
Bureau des Eleves
(BDE)

Bureau des Arts


(BdA)

Association Sportive
(AS)

The BDE organizes a lot of


events: parties, week-ends,
conferences,
but
also
gathers some job offers for
you and is in charge of the
Buddy Programme!

The BDA organizes the


Sciences Po Musical, the
Arts week, the cafconcerts,
photography
contests, and offers a lot of
competitive prices to visit
the trendiest exhibitions
and cultural events in Paris.

The AS organizes sports


events, parties, and a
famous ski week. They also
organize
sports
competitions with various
other universities in Paris,
but also in France, and even
in Europe (Eurocup).

Contact
information: Contact
information: Contact
information:
contact.bdescpo@gmail.co contact@bdarts.org
associationm
sportive@sciences-po.fr
Tl: - 01 45 49 51 96

Tl - 01 45 49 59 02

Tl - 01 45 49 54 38

Sciences Po
Environnement

Junior Consulting

Sciences Po Environnement aims at raising


awareness about green issues. They
organize a lot of conferences, debates, the
sustainable development week; they lead
various actions at school and in the city.

The Sciences Po JC association aims at


helping
various companies, public
organisms, or NGOs.. Everybody can take
part into a mission and thus gain precious
professional experience.

Contact information:
environnement@sciencespo.fr

Contact information: info@juniorconsulting.com

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A CADEMIA
Justine MALLOU

STUDENT ASSOCIATIONS

The International Student Council (ISC)


Mission Statement: To assist in the holistic formation of foreign students in and
outside of the Sciences Po campus, promote their full integration into the long-stay
students community and provide avenues for proper introduction into the true French
culture.

The International Student Council was founded in October 2012 by Eric Lucrezia. As of
September 2013, 5891 students participated during the online voting for the formal
recognition of 80 student associations. This is the first time that the ISC is recognized
as an official association in Sciences Po.
During the Fall and Spring semesters of 2013 2014, the ISC executive committee is
led by President Jack Ghaleb, along with seven executive members. The meetings are
held on a weekly basis where future projects and social events are planned and
organized in order to help international students integrate within the local community.

If you wish to learn more about getting involved in the ISC, or to receive our weekly
newsletter, dont hesitate to contact us by e-mail: isc.scpo@gmail.com
You can also like us on Facebook to receive our latest news:

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/isc.scpo

A CADEMIA
Imaan SANDHU

SCIENCES PO STUDENT CARD

How to receive your Sciences Po Student card?


In order to receive the Sciences Po student card, you must have completed the
administrative registration online and mailed the necessary documents to Sciences Po.
If you are registered in the Welcome Program, your orientation leader will give you your
student card. Otherwise, the student card will be available to be picked up at 9 rue de
la Chaise.

Advantages of card
30 Euros worth of printing and photocopying;
Free admission in certain museums and student discounts at various
sites and shops
Access to Sciences Po computers
Borrowing from Sciences Po library
Replacement for a damaged card is 18 Euros. Contact the administration if your card is
stolen/lost.
Tip
Always bring your student card. From time to time, security will block the campus
entrance to check if your are indeed a valid Sciences Po student.
To learn more about the benefits of your card: http://formation.sciences-

po.fr/en/contenu/student-card

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A CADEMIA
Imaan SANDHU

INSCRIPTIONS PDAGOGIQUES
To better understand the process of course registration, heres a simple Youtube video
that shows exactly how Sciences Po students feel right before logging in for enrolment:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yt0zSt0NWZ8&list=PLPYiUMtxa22SMytQ_BIZtYz
xvjhFZJY1I
Tips

Login before the registration time and be ready to pick your courses
Prepare at least 2 back-up lists of courses, because you wont get all your
first-choices
If you need to make a change to your courses contact the registration
immediately by emailing them a form or going to speak to them in person

You can find more information at this


po.fr/category/faq/faq-inscriptions-pedagogiques

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address:

http://formation.sciences-

A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

TYPES OF COURSES
I.

Cours magistral is the equivalent of a lecture, given by a professor to a large


number of students, usually in an amphitheater. This course is also equipped with a
tutorial course led by a matre de confrence in smaller groups of 20 students

II.

Confrence de Mthode comes as a complement to the cours magistral and is


taught by another professor. During the conference de mthode, the whole class is
split into smaller groups in order to encourage class discussions on the readings and
what has been said during the cours magistral of the week. This is also your
conference de mthode teacher who will give you assignments such as exposs,
fiches de lecture, or papers

III.

Cours sminaire or cours lectif is a course that is taught to a class of ~ 20 students


and works on the same basis as a confrence de mthode, except it does not come
as a complement of a lecture. Generally, the topics and subjects of the cours lectifs
are more specific than the cours magistraux

IV. Ateliers de pratique artistique or Workshops is an added course that you can take
on top of your course load dedicated to learn and practice a specialized field of
study. This course is taught to a class of less than 18 students. Each artistic or sport
course count for 2 ECTS
A full course load consists of taking the following courses: 1 Lecture course (10 ECTS), 3
Seminar or Elective course (5 ECTS), 1 Seminar, elective, artistic or language course (5
ECTS), which sums up to 5 courses per semester.
3 absences rule
It is extremely important to know that at Sciences Po, there is a very strict rule about
absenteeism. Attendance to classes is mandatory. You can only miss a class twice
throughout the whole semester. If you miss a third time, you will simply be failed in this
class. You must attend all of your classes since attendance counts for your final grade.
To

learn

more

about

the

Sciences

po.fr/siteparis/curricula
22

Po

curricula:

http://college.sciences-

A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

COURSE METHODOLOGY
The two main exercises that your teachers will ask you to complete are the oral
presentations (exposs) and the dissertation. For both a specific method and
structure has to be used:

INTRODUCTION

Catch-phrase
Introduction of the subject
Problmatique
Outline

FIRST PART

Needs to argue one side of the subject (for instance, an answer


to your problmatique Yes or No)

TRANSITION

Link between your first and second part (very short)

SECOND PART

Nuance the first part of your argument (As the first part of your
essay/expos argued Yes or No, you now need to argue BUT)

CONCLUSION

Sum up
Answer to your problmatique
Opening of the subject

Method of evaluation

The method of evaluation depends on the course, but also on the teacher. Very often,
you will have to do throughout the semester an expos, a paper, a midterm exam and a
final exam. Some teachers will also want to take into account the class participation and
attendance. The final exam usually accounts for 25% to 40% of the total grade.
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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

HOW TO WRITE AN E-MAIL TO A PROFESSOR

It is important to know how to talk to and address your professor or teaching


assistant. For instance, when writing an email, you could phrase it like this
Cher M/Chre Mme. X,
Serait-il possible de prendre rendez-vous avec vous cette semaine afin de nous
entretenir de mon plan de dissertation, sil vous plait?
Si cela est en effet possible, je joins mes disponibilits cet email:
Mercredi avant 17h
Jeudi avant 17h
Vendredi aprs 10h
Bien cordialement,
Name/Surname

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A CADEMIA
Camlia VIALLET

HOW TO MEET PEOPLE?!


The first couple of weeks in Paris will be one of the most challenging, yet rewarding
time of your exchange experience. This is when you are slowly discovering your
neighbourhood, getting to know the French cultural lifestyle, and probably the very first
time that you will be interacting with the French students in Sciences Po. To make your
adjustment go smoothly, here are some ways in which you can make the best out of
your experience by meeting other people:

I.

Orientation Program

The Welcome Programme is a wonderful opportunity for you to meet other


international students facing the same challenges as you. You will be part of a group for
1 week where you will benefit from methodology classes, social events, and cultural
activities.
II.

Attend events and activities

Each week, 5 or 6 conferences are organized in different fields so there is something


for everyone! Parties are organized by the BDE on a regular basis and are a good way to
meet Sciences Po students, especially French students whom you might find hard to
approach in an academic context.
III. Join a student association or peer program
French students are very involved in the associative life of the Sciences Po campus so do
not hesitate to approach them at the beginning of the semester They are always
pleased to welcome new members to help them get their projects going!
IV. Sports or artistic course
Signing up for a Sport or an Art class is also a great opportunity, both to learn something
more and to meet other students in a more relaxed atmosphere than the one you can
be faced with during your regular classes.

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A CADEMIA
Soukana KARRAKCHOU

WELCOME PROGRAMME REGISTRATION


What :

One-week orientation that aims to familiarize international students with


the methodological structure of the French educational system as well as to
help students discover the services that Sciences Po has to offer

When :

Spring semester - 10th to 17th of January 2014

Cost :

250 euros

How to register?
1) You can register for the welcome program through your Sciences Po Space with
your login and your password : https://scolarite.sciences-po.fr
2) Click on the link Espace tudiant Inscriptions pdagogiques . Then, select the
semester Inscriptions spcifiques 13/14 and click on Submit .

3) Click on the link Welcome Program, then on Register .

Payment
To return to menu principal in your Sciences Po Space, click on Retour au menu
then on Paiement en ligne . The amount that you have to pay will appear
automatically. Click on Pay .
Reminder
The number of places is limited. The registration is based on the principle of first come,
first served. If you have questions, contact : candidature.echange@sciencespo.fr

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A CADEMIA
Soukana KARRAKCHOU

SUMMER SCHOOL 2014


Where : Sciences Po Paris campus
When : July 4th August 1st, 2014
What : Enroll yourself in an intensive course of French applied to Social sciences !
Attend some French language classes, from beginner level to advanced, enjoy some
social sciences courses, take part to some theatre workshops and cultural events
Cost : 2,100 (including the cultural visits),non-refundable
Registration: from January 15th to April 15th, 2014
Documents to submit:

cover letter in English or French, a resume in English or French

certificate of enrollment for 2013-2014 in a higher education institution

French level test dating from less than two years

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SECTION III

Housing
/haz /

28

H OUSING
Natalia CWIERZ

THE PARISIAN ARRONDISSEMENTS

1ire arrondissement - Louvre, Palais Royale


This is the geographical center of Paris and a haven for tourists. The
Louvre, Les Halles and the Palais Royal are all here.

2ime arrondissement - Bourse


A primarily business district. The Paris Stock Market (the Bourse) is
located here and the Palace des Victoires is a favorite destination for
hopping in trendy boutiques.
3ime arrondissement - Marais, Picasson Museum
Along with the 4ime arrondissement, this neighborhood makes up the Marais, one of
the oldest neighborhoods in paris. The Picasso Museum is found here, and many 17th
century mansions that once housed the noblest families in paris are still to be seen in
this quiet and ungentrified neighborhood.

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H OUSING
Natalia CWIERZ

THE PARISIAN ARRONDISSEMENTS


4ime arrondissement - Marais, Htel de Ville
The heart of the Marais is a lively neighborhood
with trendy bars and restaurants and it's also
known as the center of Gay nightlife. The rue
des Rosiers is a centerpiece of Jewish lifestyle .
The Ile St. Louis and the Ile de la Cit are the
oldest parts of Paris.
5ime arrondissement - Latin Quarter
This fabled neighborhood takes its name from the Sorbonne, where latin was the
common tongue for all students during the Middle Ages. The neighborhood has the feel
of a small village and students mix freely with professionals in its winding streets. The
rue Mouffetard is a primary artery where shops, international restaurants and student
bars and cafs are found.
6ime arrondissement - Saint Germain
Once the hangout for behamians and intellectuals, this district has undergone
gentrification and is now one of the most of expensive neighborhoods in Paris. Trendy
boutiques, art galleries, and restaurants can be found throughout this district.
7ime arrondissement - Eiffel Tower
The Eiffel Tower, the Muse d'Orsay, the Rodin Museum and the market street, Rue Cler
are found here. This wealthy district is also known for being the home for foreign
embassies and many international residents.
8ime arrondissement - Champs-Elyses
This upscale neighborhood is in fact quite
diverse. The area around the famous Avenue des
Champs-Elyses has lots of shopping and lots of
tourists, while in the area to the East, between
the Champs-Elyses and Place de la Madeleine,
you'll find a mixture of 19th century buildings
intermingled with businesses.

30

H OUSING
Natalia CWIERZ

THE PARISIAN ARRONDISSEMENTS


9ime arrondissement - Opra, Pigalle
A diverse residential area popular among an artistic crowd. This Southern portion has a
mix of residential and business buildings. The Paris Opra and Les Grands Magasins
(Galeries Lafayette and Printemps) are located here. Further North is Pigalle, home of
the famous Moulin Rouge and the fading Red Light district.
10ime arrondissement - Canal St. Martin
The two great train stations in Paris are here, the Gare de l'Est and the Gare du Nord.
This multi-cultural neighborhood also contains a bohemian element. The cafes and
restaurants along the Canal Saint-Martin make it a popular destination for both
Parisians and tourists.
11ime arrondissement - Bastille
Place de la Bastille and the New Opra are found here. This
is a primarily residential district popular among artists. It's
well known for its nightlife which is centered around the
Rue de la Roquette and Rue Oberkampf.
12ime arrondissement - Bercy
A residential neighborhood bordered on the east by the
Bois de Vincennes. The Promenade Plante, an elevated
greenbelt that stretches for almost 3 miles from Place de la
Bastille and the indoor arena, Palais Omnisports de Bercy
are also located here.
13ime arrondissment - Place d'Italie
A multi-cultural residential neighborhood which includes Paris' Chinatown and the
ultra-modern Bibliothque Franois Mitterand. The modernist Place d'Italie is the site
of one of the most ambitious French urban renewal projects and the Butte aux Cailles
neighborhood with its cobblestone streets and numerous restaurants.
14ime arrondissment - Montparnasse
Montparnasse and the Cit Universitaire are found in this residential disctrict
traditionally known for its lively ambiance around the Boulevard Montparnasse.
31

H OUSING
Natalia CWIERZ

THE PARISIAN ARRONDISSEMENTS


15ime arrondissement - Parc des Expositions
This large primarily residential neighborhood ranges from very upsacle in the area
bordering the 7th arrondissement and the Seine, to relatively safe and affordable in the
more outlying areas.
16ime arrondissement - Trocadro
Although it is not as exclusive as the 7th
arrondissement, the 16th is regarded as the
neighborhood for the wealthy. The areas
around rue de Passy and Place Victor Hugo
offer upscale shopping and the Place de
Trocadro offers a view of the Eiffel Tower.
17ime arrondissement - Palais de Congrs
This diverse district really contains more than one neighborhood, with the portion, in
the West, near the Arc de Triomphe and Parc Monceau, being very upscale.
18ime arrondissement - Montmartre
This artsy residential neighborhood situated at the top of a hill overlooking Paris has a
small village feel. The view across Paris from the Sacr Coeur church is breathtaking and
the nearby Place du Terte is a popular tourists destination.
19ime arrondissement - Parc de la Vilette
The Parc des Buttes Chaumont. A residential neighborhood with many ethnic
restaurants and shops. Parc de la Vilette is located here with its Cit des Sciences et de
l'Industrie museum and cultural center.
20ime arrondissement - Belleville, Pre Lachaise
Belleville, Mnilmontant and the Pre-Lachaise cemetery. Although traditionally
working class, this outlying residential area is slowly becoming modernized due to its
affordable prices and its popularity among artists and creative types.
For more informaation: http://www.parisnet.com/parismap.html

32

H OUSING
Justine MALLOU

CHOOSING WHERE TO LIVE

The city of Paris offers a multitude of different lifestyles this often is more seen vividly
depending on your chosen arrondissement. One of the biggest decisions to make before
coming to Paris is figuring out where to live for one year abroad. This step requires
weeks or even months to secure a affordable and livable accommodation.
STUDIO

Pros
Flexibility and liberty to invite
family and friends at any time
Some apartments come fullyfurnished
Independence and freedom

Cons
Parisian rental prices can be expensive, so be
prepared to pay for hidden and service fees,
especially when renting through an agency
Loneliness or homesickness when living alone
Single-person studios can often be cramped

Where to find studios?


www.lodgis.com/fr
www.leboncoin.fr
www.parisattitude.com
www.century21.fr

33

H OUSING
Justine MALLOU

CHOOSING WHERE TO LIVE (CONTD)


COLOCATION
Pros

Cons

Opportunity to have some company, to


make friends and to discover a new
culture if you choose to live with a French
coloc
The rental price will be more affordable

Not all rooms will have the same space,


so be sure that you are paying for how
much space you are getting
Personal habits of a roommate that is
contrary to yours learn to compromise!

Where to find roommates?


www.easycoloc.com
www.appartager.com
www.colocationfrance.fr
www.colocation.fr
STUDENT RESIDENCES
Pros

Cons

Student-central environment with


accessible facilities and services
Residences are usually centrally located
nearby grocery stores and metro lines
In some residences, there is usually a
cleaner that comes once a week to
change bed sheets
Opportunity to meet other students in
the same situation as you
Affordable prices for monthly rental

Some residences have curfews to avoid


security concerns
Strict rules pertaining to visitors, there
is usually a fee to pay to allow visitors to
stay. Make sure to check the rules.
Due to the affordable rent, room
spaces are usually limited

Where to find residences?


www.ciup.fr/
www.crous-paris.fr/
www.leclubetudiant.com
34

H OUSING
Justine MALLOU

CHOOSING WHERE TO LIVE (CONTD)


HOME-STAY FAMILY
Pros

Cons

Classic cultural experience that will allow you to be


exposed to the French traditional lifestyle
Excellent way to improve and practice the French
language not only at school, but also at home
This opportunity is also helpful to prepare for an oral
presentation. Never hesitate to ask a native
Francophone speaker for help
Home-stay families usually offer an affordable
monthly rental price to students

Lack of communication
with other students,
however this usually is easily
resolvable by meeting some
friends at Sciences Po!
Habits that may be
contrary to what you are
used to at home

Where to find home-stay families?


www.leparisolidaire.com
www.aidologement.com
www.concordalogis.com
Other ways of finding accommodation

The American Church of Paris (http://www.acparis.org/) posts listings for


accommodation every day located at the two bulletin boards at the church. It is
highly recommended to arrive early in the morning to get the best offers

Sciences Po Housing: http://logements.sciencespo.fr/

FUSAC (www.fusac.fr) is a bi-weekly magazine for English-speakers in Paris

Other online options: www.pap.fr, www.seloger.fr, www.laforet.com,

For more information: http://www.parisyearabroad.com/student-accommodationparis/, http://www.pret-a-voyager.com/2010/12/unglamorous-paris-finding-anapartment/

35

H OUSING
Ruksona USMANOVA

FINDING ACCOMMODATION

Determining your needs and priorities


You must first determine your needs, set your criteria and create a budget. As a general
rule, do not limit your search only to Paris. Nearby suburbs are often easily accessible via
the metro and rental rates are substantially lower than within Paris. From my personal
experience, I would say the average price in Paris is about 600 for a shared apartment
or a small studio but prices rise the closer you get to the center.
Key terms on listing ads:

Loyer CC ou TCC: rent (service charges included)

Hono/H + : letting agency fees

T1: the number that follows the "T" corresponds to the number of rooms

The floor area is always indicated in square meters

PK/GAR: parking or garage

ET: floor or story

ASC: lift access

INT/DIG: intercom/digital code entry

SDB: bathroom (may include a bathtub, but not always the case)

DCH: shower

KITCH: kitchenette located in the main room and at the very least equipped
with a sink, hot plates and a refrigerator.
Contacting the landlord
If you don't speak French, request help from a French student. Some landlords don't
speak English at all. Be clear about what you want to know and ask questions. Ads that
claim "10 minutes from the metro station" or "ideal for student" are not always accurate.
Ask about the bus/metro routes or If necessary, take it upon yourself to verify.
36

H OUSING
Ruksona USMANOVA

FINDING ACCOMMODATION
The viewing
Before you begin, prepare all the supporting documents required for entering into a
tenancy agreement:

Front and back photocopy of identification document


Photocopy of the last three pay stubs for you and/or your guarantor (if you
do not have any, those of your guarantor will suffice);
Photocopy of the last income tax return for you and/or your guarantor;
Proof of residence for your guarantor (latest receipt of rent payment, last
utility or telephone bill);
Bank details or RIB (for a commercial, savings or postal bank account) for
both you and your guarantor;
Affidavit completed by your employer, if you are employed

What to verify:

The overall state of the accommodation and that all installations are in good
working order
Plumbing turn the water faucets all the way on and flush the toilets
Sanitary facilities, the electrical installations (fittings and fixtures) and the
heating installations (even in the middle of the summer).
Count the number of electrical outlets and verify the radiators
Check for the availability of a telephone socket, a TV antenna/areal socket
and the possibility for Internet connection
Verify the condition of the paint and wallpapers, doorways and openings
and flooring
If on the top floor, verify the thermal insulation properties of the roofing
system to avoid having to endure freezing winters and stuffy summers
The building: Is there a caretaker? Are the stairways kept clean? What
condition are the letterboxes in? Where are the rubbish bins located? Is it
possible to bring your bicycle indoors? Do other students reside in the
building? What are the security features of the building (digital code entry or
intercom)? Ask the neighbors about the pros and cons of residing in the
building and in the neighborhood
37

H OUSING
Ruksona USMANOVA

RENT AND ASSOCIATED COSTS


Rent
Generally, you pay one-month rent and the amount must be written into the tenancy
agreement separately from the service charges.
Service charges
These include the costs for maintaining the common areas in the building and for one or
more utilities. Charges are paid to the landlord who in turn arranges provision of the
services. Be sure to ask which service charge items may or may not be included in your
monthly rent.
Other charges
Electricity, telephone, and Internet are separate from the rent. You must apply for these
services separately and ensure to terminate the contracts at the end of the tenancy.
The deposit at the start of the tenancy:
Within two months after your departure, the owner is legally obliged to refund your
deposit, minus the expenses incurred to repair the damages made during your stay.
The inventory of the premises (tats des lieux)
A first inventory is done at the start of the tenancy which states the condition of the
property and lists its content. The second inventory takes place at the end of the tenancy
period. Both must be as precise as possible, with detailed observations, in order to avoid
any dispute at the end of the tenancy.
Home insurance
You are obligated to subscribe an insurance coverage through an agency of your choice
(between 30 to 60 depending on the size of your accommodation)
The guarantor
A guarantor is often required for student tenants
The housing tax
A local property tax payable each year in autumn. Verify with your landlord the amount
and who is responsible for paying this tax.
38

H OUSING
Dana MURESAN

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: FINDING ACCOMODATION


When booking through an agency, the fee will usually come to about a months worth
of rent. However, it is useful in narrowing down options according to your criteria,
including price, location, type of apartment, number of rooms, etc. Some examples of
agencies include: www.lodgis.com, www.seloger.com, www.airbnb.com
Another option for finding apartments is particulier--particuler, where you can
directly contact an owner and avoid paying the agency fees. However, this can be a less
reliable source and you should be cautious about who you are renting from.

Ruksona USMANSOVA
From personal experience, I would suggest living in the 10-11th neighborhood because
they are easy accessible to all fun activities and well connected (metro lines) to the
entire city, including Sciences Po campus but yet, not too expensive comparing to 1-7th
neighborhoods. However, it does not mean that other neighborhoods are not livable.
Currently, I live in the 15th neighborhood and enjoy it very much.
I found my apartment through a Facebook group Paris Sans Agence and it is a great
experience. I believe more and more landlords, students, tenants look towards Facebook
for their housing options it is quick and you can contact the offer right away unlike
many online websites when sometimes you have to wait for the e-mail for a few days or
landlords put specific time to call them. When you come for viewing, ask every detail as
mentioned earlier in this article, if the price includes electricity, Wi-Fi, and etc. So far, I
am having a great experience with two of my flatmates and my life in Paris, and I hope
you do too!
39

H OUSING
Natalia CWIERZ

CAISSE DALLOCATION FAMILIALE (CAF)

What is CAF? Its a sum of money that is allocated to students by


the French government to help pay for your student
accommodation.
You should be able to receive CAF living in any type of
accommodation (e.g. a house share, student halls or a private
residence) as long as you are the contracted tenant.
Applying for caf
The "Centre Social, an office provides all necessary application forms but doesn't
process any CAF requests the application together with the rent contract and
certificate of enrolment must be sent directly to the CAF office: 101 rue National, Paris
You can also download the form on this website: http://wwwd.caf.fr/pdfj/al0.pdf
To begin the application you will need to start gathering together several documents:

a photocopy of your passport


a professional translation of your birth certificate
French bank account details (payment only be made to a French account)
Housing jusfitication

Note: You can only receive CAF from the second month of your stay (i.e. if you move in
on September 1st, you are only eligible from October 1st).
For more information: www.caf.fr
To find out more about the process of application:
http://www.thirdyearabroad.com/before-you-go/accommodation/item/1184.html
40

H OUSING
Peter SCHUBERT

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: APPLYING FOR CAF

Applying for housing allowance at the CAF nicely reflects the nature of the French
administration it is very bureaucratic! Given the high rents and considerable amount of
benefits granted by the CAF, it is definitely worth going through the process of applying.
Dealing with French bureaucracy is by all means part of the whole cultural experience.
I went to the local CAF office immediately when I arrived in Paris. You should check on
their website which office is in charge of your arrondissement. At my office, I got a bunch
of documents to fill in as well as one sheet of paper that was to be filled in by the
landlord. As I lived in a small student residence, the groundskeeper was kind enough to
quickly fill it out. These papers I had to return along with a proof of identification,
student ID (if you dont have it Sciences Po allows you to download a study confirmation
on the Espace Etudiant) and a RIB (from your French bank account). I was asked to hand
in a birth certificate which had to be translated into French. This was the annoying part
because they didnt accept the certificate in its original language. So I got in touch with
the relevant office at my home country and they issued me an international birth
certificate, which includes a French version. The other way is to get it translated in
France by a certified translator. You are likely to find these translators through your
embassy. However, some people I know did not have to submit a birth certificate in the
first place. This is something you should try to find out upon your first CAF office visit.
If you are quick with your application, you will get housing benefits from the second
month onwards. Due to the delay with the birth certificate I had to wait for another
month but then got monthly benefits of 210 for my rent of about 550. So it is really
worth going through the sometimes painful application process. Good luck with your
application!
41

H OUSING
Jessica LI

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: APPLYING FOR CAF

When I first heard about CAF, I thought it seemed too good to be true. After all, we
are all students on exchange for a term or a year, not actual French residents. I filled
out the online application as soon as I arrived in Paris. It was straightforward enough,
asking the basic personal information and taxable income for the last two years. You
then needed to download the forms that CAF provides at the end of the application,
which include the paper version of the completed online application and a form to be
signed by the landlord. Make sure you save these forms right away, as you wont be
able to access them again without starting a new application! I sent these forms to
the CAF office closest to my house, along with the other required documents of a
translated birth certificate and bank account information.
Around two weeks later, I received my online CAF account and my monthly
reimbursement details. The one catch is that CAF cannot distribute the direct deposits
to your bank account if they dont have a copy of your titre de sjour, so make sure to
drop by the CAF office once you obtain that card!
CAF also has another sneaky trick: they only start the monthly reimbursements after
the first month of rent, so it is best to put the 30th or the 31st of a month as your
starting date. That way, you only pay a days worth of rent before the second month
kicks in and CAF reimbursements can happen!

42

SECTION IV

Finance
/fanns/

43

F INANCE
Natalia CWIERZ

CURRENCY
The local money in France is Euro (). The French Euro ist managed by the European
Central Bank. The euro is the official currency in France and 16 other European countries.
Euro notes are availble in denominations of 5, 10, 20, 50, 100, 500. There are eight types
of coins: 2, 1, 50, 20, 10, 5, 2, 1. The foreign currency rates are*:
EUR

AUD

AED

ARS

BRL

CAD

CHF

CLP

1,00

1,42

4,91

7,96

3,10

1,40

1,23

693,9

HUF

INR

ILS

JPY

IDR

296,52 84,71 15,251.50

4,73

KRW

132,35 1,420,40

CNY

CZK

8,14 26,98

DKK

DOP

EGP

HKD

7,46

56,91

9,21

10,36

MYR

MXN

NZD

NOK

PKR

PLN

4,25

17,61

1,62

8,20

143,55

4,18

RUB

SEK

SGD

TWN

THB

TRY

USD

43,67

8,81

1,67

39,44

42,09

2,72

1,34

* the currency rates are constantly changing slightly. To check the current exchange rates,
visit: http://www.x-rates.com/

44

F INANCE
Natalia CWIERZ

GENERAL BANKING HOURS


Most of the bank offices are closely located to Sciences Po. Their banking hours are as
following:

Monday

Banque populaire
260 Bd. Saint Germain
75006 Paris
9:00 am - 12:30 pm / 1:30 pm - 5:45 pm

BNP Paribas
15 Rue du Bac
75007 Paris
Closed

Tuesday

9:00 am - 12:30 pm / 1:30 pm - 5:45 pm

9:00 am - 5:15 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 12:30 pm / 1:30 pm - 5:45 pm

9:00 am - 5:15 pm

Thursday

9:00 am - 12:30 pm / 1:30 pm - 5:45 pm

9:00 am - 5:15 pm

Friday

9:00 am - 12:30 pm / 1:30 pm - 5:45 pm

9:00 am - 5:15 pm

Saturday
Sunday

Closed
Closed

9:00 am - 4:00 pm
Closed

Monday

CIC Paris
57 & 75 Rue de Rennes
75006 Paris
9:00 am - 5:00 pm

LCL Bank
66 Rue de Rennes
75006 Paris
closed

Tuesday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

9:00 am - 1:00 pm / 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Wednesday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

9:00 am - 1:00 pm / 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Thursday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

9:00 am - 1:00 pm / 3:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Friday

9:00 am - 5:00 pm

9:00 am - 1:00 pm / 2:00 pm - 5:30 pm

Saturday

Closed

9:00 am - 1:00 pm

Sunday

Closed

Closed

45

F INANCE
Natalia CWIERZ

GENERAL BANKING HOURS


The opening hours differ from office to office, even if it is the same bank. On the
website http://www.cbanque.com/pratique/agences/ the opening hours for all bank
offices are registered.

Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday

Socit General
154 Bd. Saint-Germain
75006 Paris
closed
9:00 am - 12:50 pm / 2:15 pm - 5:30 pm
9:00 am - 12:50 pm / 2:15 pm - 5:30 pm
9:00 am - 1:00 pm / 2:15 pm - 5:15 pm
9:00 am - 12:50 pm / 2:15 pm - 5:30 pm
8:45 am - 1:45 pm
closed

ESTIMATED COSTS OF LIVING


According to British financial magazine The Economist, Paris is the 8th world's most
expensive city in the world (as at 2013). However you can profit from being a student, as
you get discounts for the mtro card (carte Imagine'R), the movie theaters (approx. 6,50
/ticket) and even a free burger at Quick Restaurant when ordering a menu. Add
individual costs for going out at night and for cultural activities (all museums in Paris are
free for students under 26). We did a rough calculation of the expenses you have to
expect per month while living in Paris:
Expense
Rent
Groceries & eating out
Cell phone

Cost
650 (approx.)
200 (approx.)
19,99 (p.e. with free)

imagin'R mtro card


Total (approx.):

46

35,00 (zone 1+2)


904,99

F INANCE
Natalia CWIERZ

WHERE TO SHOP IN PARIS?

The general store hours of supermarkets are from Monday - Saturday from 9:00am 9:30/10:00pm, Sundays closed.
Supermarkets: Carrefour, Supermarch Casino, Dia, Franprix, Monoprix
Flea markets (all free entry):
1.

MARCH ST OUEN/PORTE DE CLINGANCOURT


between 18th arrondissement and the suburb of St. Ouen
Mtro: Ligne 4 - Porte de Clingancourt
Hours: Saturday 9am to 6pm, Sunday 10am to 6pm, Monday
11am to 5pm

2.

MARCH AUX PUCES DE LA PORTE DE VANCES


Avenue Georges Lafenestre and Avenue Marc Sangnier (14th)
Mtro: Ligne 13 - Porte de Vances
Hours: Every weekend, 7am to 7pm

3.

MARCH DU LIVRE ANCIEN ET D'OCCASION (BOOK MARKET)


101 Rue Brancsion, Parc Georges Brassens (under the Pavilion
Baltard, 15th arrondissm.)
Mtro: Ligne 12 - Convention, Ligne 13 - Porte de Vanves
Hours: Every weekend, 9am to 6pm

4.

MARCH AUX PUCES DE MONTREUIL


Avenue de la Porte de Montreuil
Mtro: Ligne 9 - Porte de Montreuil
Hours: Saturday to Monday, 7am to 7:30pm
47

F INANCE
Dana MURESAN

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: BANKING WITH LCL

I also opened an account with LCL at the Rue du Bac- St. Germain location. The staff
were very friendly, and helped to the best of their ability. However, expect the process
of opening up a bank account to take around 2-3 weeks. After having submitted the
documents I had originally been asked to provide, I was asked for one more, which
took me a few days to obtain. After finally submitting everything, It took another 1-2
weeks to have all my bank information and my card. I know that some people receive
the cards by mail, however I picked mine up at the bank- so make sure to confirm
with your LCL employee on what the procedure is. All in all, my experience with LCL
has been great. The bank is reliable and there are many locations in Paris that can
easily be accessed.
Money transfer
In order to perform any automated withdrawals (such as for you Imagine-R) or
money transfers, you need your code RIB, and in some cases your IBAN. This
information can be obtained from your branch. For example, LCL provided me with
several copies of my bank information, which can be used to authorize money to
come into your account (as in money transfers from your home country) and money
to be withdrawn (as in the Imagine-R, phone bill, etc.). For money transfers,
remember to inquire with your bank as well as the bank from which you are receiving
money in order to find out how much the transfer will cost you.

48

F INANCE
Natalia CWIERZ

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: BANKING WITH LCL

I decided to open a bank account during the first week of university as I found it
convienient to be able to meet the bank employees right away at their information
desks that were set up in the foyer of 28 Rue Saint-Guillaume during the welcome
week. The required documents were my ID, my proof of residence in Paris and my
certificate of enrollment at Sciences Po. At the stand I had to sign only a few
documents and was told to be able to pick up my credit and debit card in two weeks
but when I went to the bank branch I was asked to do some more paper work, which
meant that processing my application took about three weeks in total. The delaying
could be explained by the big amounts of application files that had to be brought to
the bank branch and recorded in the computer first. If you have any issues with your
bank account, you must always contact the bank branch the employee at the
information desk came from, which was in my case the LCL bank branch at Boulevard
Saint-Germain, not far away from Sciences Po. If I knew how long the processing
would take, I would have made an appointment at a bank branch close to my
apartment, as I think it would be faster and easier to contact when having problems.
As most of the largest banks don't charge for opening a bank account and even give
you a one-time bonus of approx. 100 , to me it doesn't really matter which bank you
open your account with.

49

F INANCE
Ximena Caldern Rojas

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: BANKING WITH LCL

Opening a French bank account is compulsory while you live in Paris. You can literally
do nothing without one (for instance you cannot obtain a Carte Imaginr without one).
I chose LCL, because at the beginning of the semester they had some representatives
in Sciences Po near the hall where you could ask them questions directly. They even
help you filling the form and prepare your papers to open your bank account. The
only documents they asked me were my passport (which they even photocopied for
me) and proof of housing (which they also photocopied). I did not do much research
of what was the best option, but friends (also exchange students) in Paris also had a
bank account on LCL and everything went extremely well. Once you fill in the forms
and delivered the documents, you will have to wait two weeks until they give you
your card. Also, before they give you your card, you will receive an envelope at home
with your password and then another one with a code you will use to access your
account online.
Finally, you can also use this card to pay your tickets or hostels online. The site will
require you to give your cellphone number, your French cellphone, so that every time
you wish to do a payment you confirm it by introducing the numbers you receive as
message in your cellphone. It is pretty easy and practical.
I know French, still I got my bank account during my first days in Paris, oral French is
not the same as what they taught you in high school or language institution, so I did
not risk it so asked them to speak in English, they are nice because they know you are
a student. Also, I made lots of questions, still I feel I could have done more, but do as
much questions as you feel like it, if not you wont feel comfortable with your bank
account and you will use it during your whole stay in Paris. Good luck!

50

F INANCE
Lucas DIXON

BANKING WITH BNP PARIBAS


There are two BNP Paribas locations on the boulevard Saint-Germain that are close to
Sciences Po; I opened my account at the one on the corner of rue du Four, but either one
will work. It was a fairly painless experience, minus the hand cramps from having to sign a
Matterhorn of paperwork. I showed up without any sort of appointment and just asked to
open an account. I met with one of the bank employees, and everything went smoothly.
The information they needed was fairly standard: a copy of my lease, a copy of my
apartment insurance, my student card, my phone number, my e-mail address, my physical
address, and my passport. Once the account was set up, I was told that I would be emailed when my card was available for pick up. That took about a week. The PIN for the
card was sent by mail to my apartment, along with online banking information. Because
the card is sent to the branch but the PIN to your home address, there was a delay of a
few days when I had my card but couldnt use it until the PIN came. As a student, they
gave me a Visa debit card, and I got about 90 in my account about a month later. I
havent had any problems with BNP, and there are many locations throughout the city and
throughout France, so I would definitely recommend it.
Batoul CHEAIB

BANKING WITH SOCIT GNRALE

I opened my account at the beginning of September at bank Socit gnral, It was so


easy, it only took 30 min then it was all done. I had to bring my passport and 150 . A
week later, I got my Visa card as premium client (ma carte bleu) , as a student at Sciences
Po and I also got a gift of 100 from the bank but I spent them all the same day !! I have
a Private Banker who worked with me to complete a multi-step of the liquidity, he was
able to create and implement a customized wealth management plan for me. Later I
asked for the cheque-books, however they were not able send it at my place so I brought
it from the bank after 10 days. I have some good offers too when Im abroad. Socit
gnral sends me the balance of my account at my place every month and there is an
application for smartphones so you can check it online with your secret code for
internet. At the end, I really like the facilities that I received and nothing was complicated!
51

F INANCE
Justine MALLOU

COMMUNICATIONS AND TECHNOLOGY

Communicating with family members and friends in your home country is one of the
most important responsibilities that you will have to maintain that said, if you still
havent contacted your parents after arriving to Paris, get to it!
Calling into and out of France
International code (00) + country code (33) + phone number (06 12 34 56 78)
To dial, drop the first zero of the phone number 00 33 6 12 34 56 78
Cell phone service providers
The Global System of Mobile Communications (GSM) is the most predominant cellular
system in France. Most companies use 900 and 1800 MHz. Before leaving, make sure to
check that your cell phone matches the offer of most French service frequencies. If it
does, you can unlock your cell phone in order to use it abroad. In this case, you will only
have to purchase a French SIM card.
French carrier

900 MHz

1800 MHz

Bouygues Telecom
(www.bouyguestelecom.fr/)

Orange
(www.orange.fr)

SFR
(www.sfr.fr)

http://support.chinavasion.com/index.php?_a=viewarticle&_m=knowledgebase&kbarticleid=227

Other service providers include: La Poste, Free mobile, Virgin mobile


52

SECTION V

Immigration
/mre()n/

53

I MMIGRATION
Jiyun JUNG

APPLYING FOR A FRENCH VISA

A French visa is a mandatory administrative document for non-European citizens. It is


highly recommended to apply for a French Visa before starting your semester abroad
as it would usually take one month and a half months to receive it.
EU citizen

No Visa needed

Non-EU citizen staying for less than 3 months

No Visa needed

Non-EU citizen staying for more than 3 months

Visa needed

Difference: Long-stay versus Short-stay visa


Short-stay visa (Visa C) allows you to stay up to 90 days in France and free movement
with Schengen states.
If you are staying for more than 90 days (2 semesters at Sciences Po), it is necessary to
apply for long-stay visa (Visa D).

What is 2-B French visa?


Is a special type of visa used for Canadian students coming to France for exchange. If
you hold Canadian citizenship and plan to come for 1-year exchange in France, you
can apply under the 2-B category from your French Consulate/Embassy in Canada.
For more
exchange

information:

http://www.ambafrance-ca.org/France-Canada-youth-

54

I MMIGRATION
Ruky OKOTCHA

FRENCH VISA APPLICATION PROCEDURE


To apply for a long-stayed (6-month plus) visa, it is recommended to apply to your home
country.
There are two different cases:

1.

If your country of residence has a Campus France office, you should follow
instruction on their website and apply for your visa via Campus France. Your
application procedure would comprise of 2 stages:
A. Firstly, Campus France will validate all you diplomas, transcripts and
statement of intents, as well as your admission to Sciences Po for your
program. You will be scheduled an interview to submit all these documents
with Campus France. You may be required to take a French language test, but
this depends on your country, so always check with your local Campus
France.
B.

2.

After this first step is validated, you will at the same time book an
appointment with your local Consulate/Embassy to submit your visa
application.

If your country of residence does not have Campus France office, you should apply
to French Embassy/Consulate directly.
For more information, please refer to Campus France and Sciences Po Welcome
page along with your local Campus France and French consulate.

Here are some helpful links:


http://www.usa.campusfrance.org/en/page/applying-a-student-visa-%E2%80%93-stepstep
http://www.sciencespo.fr/welcome/fr/content/immigration

55

I MMIGRATION
Ruky OKOTCHA

CARTE DE SJOUR

What is OFII?
The Office Franais de L'immigration et de L'intgration is an organisation that
supports foreigners after moving to France. If you entered France with a student visa,
the carte de sejour is necessary to validate your visa and your stay in Paris.
To obtain your Carte de sjour (Titre de sjour), here are a couple of options:
Send by mail to the OFII office in your region. It can take a while to receive a
response from the office, and sometimes the documents can be somehow lost (So
make copies before sending important documents). Find your OFII address in the
OFII web page or in one page long table in the document that you received along
with your student visa in your home country.
Visit service d'accueil des tudiants trangers, which takes place in Maison
Internationale of Cit Universitaire Paris. Usually you have to wait in the line for a
while, even when you get there early. However, the upside is you dont wait
anxiously for the response from the OFII since you can receive the medical
appointment on the spot.
Sciences Po offers a liaison service between students and the Police Prefecture.
The office is located at 28 rue de Saints-Pres (B003). Opening hours: Tuesday and
Thursday from 9:30am 12:00pm and 2:30pm to 5:00pm
For more information:
http://www.sciencespo.fr/welcome/en/content/immigration

56

I MMIGRATION
Ruky OKOTCHA

CARTE DE SJOUR (CONTD)


Purchasing the stamp (timbre)
There are two methods of purchasing the stamp:
1.

Buy online at https://www.timbresofii.fr/. This is very simple. But make sure to


print out the receipt.

2.

Go to any tabac and buy the timbre of asked amount. More information at the
OFII website. The nearest tabac is located in 45 Rue Bonaparte, called Le
Quebec, in front of Monoprix in Saint-Germain-des-Prs.

The Medical Exam

The medical appointment will be given once you have submitted your Carte de
sjour documents. The medical exam is free and it is treated by a doctor in one
of the OFII branches in Paris. The address will also be stated in your rcpiss
(sometimes called Convocation) refers to a paper confirmation that states your
OFII record as well as your Medical examination date.

For more information:


http://www.ofii.fr/venir_en_france_obtenir_son_titre_de_sejour_vls_ts_193/visa_d
e_long_sejour_titre_de_sejour_pour_les_etudiants_955.html
Tip: Apply for a carte de sjour upon arrival to France as the bureaucratic process
takes months to process a demand. If you are planning to travel outside of France, it
is highly recommended that you obtain your card. You are not permitted to travel
outside of France after 3 months if you dont have your carte de sjour.

57

I MMIGRATION
Jessica LI

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: CARTE DE SJOUR


As a Canadian citizen, I was told by the French Consulate in Vancouver that I had to
bring my visa application package to the prefecture in my arrondissement in Paris.
This supposedly simple task turned into a trek all over Paris, involving three different
prefectures and not one agent willing to accept my titre de sjour application. In the
end, I decided to submit my file through Sciences Pos OFII office, located on the
right-hand side of 28 rue de Saint Pres. The office is open on Tuesdays and
Thursdays and is staffed by two extremely helpful ladies. I dropped by the office on a
Thursday and was given a list of documents and photo requirements, similar to those
of my original visa application. Within a week of submitting my file, I received an
appointment for my biometrics meeting at the prefecture in the 18th
arrondissement. This was a short and simple appointment where I picked up my
temporary titre de sjour and had my fingerprints and photos taken by the visa
officer. I was also given a date for my medical exam, which involves a general
examination of eyesight and weight, a chest x-ray, and a follow-up discussion about
medical history and vaccinations. There is a prefecture office situated right outside
the examination area, so I was able to hand in my medical exam record immediately
after my appointment and receive my titre de sjour that very same day.
The whole process, from submitting my file to the Sciences Po OFII office to the
medical exam, took approximately one month. Sciences Po was an extremely helpful
resource and liaison, as they handled all communications with the OFII office and the
submission of the file. The most important thing to keep in mind is to have all your
documents ready for submission and for the medical exam. Bring all the required
documents to the medical exam, as you will have the chance to obtain your titre de
sjour the same day if your file is complete. Sciences Pos service is free of charge,
while the titre de sjour itself cost 77, payable with fiscal stamps whose values add
up to 77.
Get started on your titre de sjour early, just in case you run into bureaucratic
troubles and receive a late appointment date for your medical exam!

58

I MMIGRATION
Ruky OKOTCHA

WORKING IN FRANCE
As an international student, you have the right to work in France. If you are not a
national of EU member countries, you must hold a valid residence permit. It is
essential that you ensure that your institution participates in the national studenthealth care plan. The French law allows students to work 964 hours in a year, which is
equal to 60% of full-time employment for the year. France has a national minimum
wage [SMIC - Salaire minimum interprofessionnel de croissance] at 9, 40 /hr.
International students are eligible for jobs in Paris and student jobs at universities and
public institutions. Student employment contracts at a university or public institution do
not exceed 12 months [1 year] and will usually run from the beginning of the semester,
September 1 to the end, June 30. Students may work a total of 670 hours within that
time period and 300 hours from July 1 to August 31.
Note: The time that students spend at an internship connected with an academic
program [and covered by a written internship agreement] are not counted towards the
maximum allowable working hours, even if the student is compensated during the
internship.
What type of Visa do I need?
You will need a valid residence permit to work in Paris. The right to work applies to all
students exchange students, enrolled in a full program or enrolled full-time in a
language school.
Working in France after graduation?
Students who have earned a masters degree or its equivalent are encouraged to apply
for a temporary residence authorization [APS or autorisation provisoire de sejour] valid
for 6 months after the date of expiration of the students residence permit. The
authorization is not renewable and allows the graduate to work for up to 60% of the
legal working week.

59

I MMIGRATION
Ruky OKOTCHA

PERSONAL EXPERIENCES: OFII


I would recommend student to apply to OFFI as soon as possible. Fom my experience, I
understand that this is not always the case. I stayed at Maison du Portugal at Cit
Universitaire and thankfully, in September, both CAF and OFFI set up a base/liaison
office here for 4 weeks and I was able to walk in, ask questions, submit my application
and pick a date that suited my class schedule immediately. If you are at Cit, this is a
very good option.
It takes a month after submitting your documents to OFII to receive your medical
appointment. Therefore, Id recommend applying at your earliest possible date after
your arrival in France. I sent my documents to Paris OFII three days after I got to Paris. It
took about two weeks for me to get their response. The medical appointment date they
gave me clashed my school schedule.
Tip: photocopy passport and Visa before leaving
You should keep plenty (maybe 5-10) copies of your passport and visa page. The
advantage is 2-fold: firstly, you may need these when doing subsequent paper work in
France; secondly, in case of loosing your passport, these are essentials to get your new
one.
Also, to apply for CAF, it can also be useful to get one or two copies of birth certificate
and to get apostille for them from your home countries. Some even recommend official
French translation (consult the French embassy in your home country), but sometimes
the French CAF office does not accept translations from foreign countries.
I missed the class and went to the appointment. It look a little over 1 month for me to
get the sticker.

60

SECTION VI

Transportation
/trnspten /

61

T RANSPORTATION
Ximena Caldern ROJAS

GETTING AROUND PARIS

There are several ways of transportation in Paris, the ones I found the more common
are: the metro (RATP), RER, buses and tram (more information on this site http://
www.transilien.com):
1) Metro (RATP): There are 14 metro stations, each of which has its own color in the
map. Personally I do not find it easy to memorize all the colors, so I choose to know
them by number, memorizing both could become quite confusing. The metro
works from 5:30 am to 12:30 am. On Saturday nights it goes until 02:00 am. Three
metro stations surround Sciences Po:

Saint-Germain-des-Prs (Mtro Line 4, my daily station)


Svres-Babylone (Metro Line 10 and 12)
Rue du Bac (Metro Line 12).

2) RER: It crosses Paris from north to south or east to west, depending on which line
youre taking. Basically, it connects Paris to its suburbs so it is a bigger line. It also
works from 05:30 to 00:30, though it has only 5 lines (A, B, C, D and E).
3) Buses: I have not use busses at all while living in Paris, but some people find them
useful. There are 60 bus lines working from 06:30 am to 08:30 pm. It is very
important to check in advance at what time the last bus arrives. Each bus station
has the lines that stop there signalized and an screen inside the station shows you
at what time the next bus comes. It is extremely important that you press the red
button once inside the bus if your stop is the next one, because the bus sometimes
does not stop in all its stations.
4) Trams: I have used it only once in my life, but it is also very useful. It has three lines
(T1, T2 and T3). It stops in every of its stations and it is quite rapid.
62

T RANSPORTATION
Ximena Caldern ROJAS

GETTING AROUND PARIS

5) Noctilien: This night bus runs once the other modes of transportation stop working
(between 01:00 am and 05:00 am). There are 45 lines of Noctilien buses, I
recommend you learn the bus that stops near your home and identify the closest
station to your party. I suggest, if you get lost, to go to the bus station that has a lot
of connections, one will take you to the Noctilien station you are looking for. The
other advise is to ask the bus driver, they have been nice to me whenever I was in
trouble (which has been lots of times). You can check all the information you need
on this site http://www.noctilien.fr/Noctilien/pages/fr/contexte.html
You can download the app of the RER and metro lines to your smartphone If you do
not have a smartphone, ask for a Paris Poche in any information post, which is a
free compact map which you can carry on your wallet, it is my daily loyal
companion, if I have never gotten lost it has been thanks to it.
How to pay?
There are several options:

Tickets: Individual tickets are sold on several metro stations for 1, 70. They are
sold through a machine, but not all the machines allow you to pay by cash; some of
them only let you use your card or coins, so be sure to identify that too.

T+ ticket allows you to travel in all the ways of transportation around Paris as
long as you do not leave the metro station. Be sure to have more than one, they are
sell by dozen which is cheaper than buying each one individually. Be sure to have
the right ticket too, there are inspectors in some metro stations (for example I have
identify they usually go to Bir- Hakeim in line M6), if you do not show them a valid
ticket you will get a fine and will have to pay more than 30 .
63

T RANSPORTATION
Ximena Caldern ROJAS

CARTE IMAGINE-R

Carte Imagine R that offers students, under the age of 26, affordable transportation
fees for one year. This package is cheaper than taking individual tickets during your stay
in Paris.
How to obtain your Carte Imagine-R?

Go to an information booth located on any station


Ask for Dossier imagine R, which contains the solicitude and the instructions to
deliver your documents on any post
Fill out all the necessary forms, provide photocopies of all required documents, attach a
picture. If you dont have a photo in the format solicited (35x41 cm), you can take your
picture for 5 on any Photomaton located in most metro stations.
Necessary documents include: Sciences Po acceptance letter, French bank account
justification called Relev de compte
Once you fulfill this steps you introduce the close envelope to any post office (there is
one near Sciences Po, close to the Rue du Bac station)
Delivery of the Imagine-R normally takes at least one month

64

T RANSPORTATION
Ruksona USMANOVA

PASSES AND REDUCTIONS

There are a variety of different passes and reductions, there is the book of 10 tickets
(carnet), giving you 10 trips at a reduced rate, several travel cards allow you unlimited
travel for 1 or more days, a week, a month or even a year, over the whole public
transport network (metro, RER, bus, tram, suburban train, Montmartre funicular),
corresponding to the different fare zones.
Be careful: travel pass coupons must be inserted in the automatic barriers in the
metro and RER, but must not be punched in the machines on the buses. Just show your
card to the driver as you get on the bus.
These travel passes can be purchased in main metro and RER stations, in SNCF train
stations in Ile-de-France and in Paris airports. Certain passes are also available at the
Paris Convention and Visitors Bureau.
Mobilis
A 1-day pass covering (except airport services) zones 1 & 2, 1 to 3, 1 to 4, 1 to 5 or 1 to
6. This card is valid for one full day and not for 24 consecutive hours, meaning the whole
day would be counted even if you only start to use the pass at 8 in the evening, so it is
far better start first thing in the morning!
Paris Visite
This pass is valid for 1, 2, 3 or 5 consecutive days in zones 1 to 3 or 1 to 6. The coupon
slides into a card specifying your name, a photo is not required. The coupon can be
purchased in advance and you should fill in the date you decide to use it and the
number of the card.
65

T RANSPORTATION
Ruksona USMANOVA

PASSES AND REDUCTIONS


Weekly or monthly Navigo pass
A weekly or monthly pass valid for zones 1 & 2, 1 to 3, 1 to 4, 1 to 5 or 1 to 6. This card
is non-transferable and you should affix a passport-sized photo to it and place it and the
travel coupon into the cover provided. Dont forget to copy the card number on to the
travel coupon.
Weekly pass (carte hebdomadaire) : Valid from Monday through to Sunday only, it
can be purchased until Wednesday for the current week and from Friday onwards for
the following week.
Monthly pass (carte mensuelle) : Valid for a calendar month, it can be purchased
from the 20th of the preceding month and up to 19th of the current month.
Yearly Navigo pass
Yearly card valid for zones 1 & 2, 1 to 3, 1 to 4, 1 to 5 or 1 to 6. To obtain one, you will
need to draw up a personal file at one of the RATP sales offices. This is a magnetic
'smart card' so you dont need to punch it, all you have to do is pass it over the
automatic barriers at the required spot. Buses are also equipped with special terminals.
Better value than the monthly Carte Orange, this pass can begin at any moment
during the year.
By Vlib
Vlib is a self-service bike system available 24 hours a day, all year round. To access the
service, buy a 1-day or a 7-day ticket online or at any Vlib station or sign-up for a longterm subscription! For more information: http://en.velib.paris.fr/How-it-works
Velib is one of the best options during warm (or not only) months to travel around Paris.
At the beginning, it might seem a bit complicated but you will see after a few times you
will master this mode of transportation.
By Taxi
There will be days when you will probably need a taxi, it is an expensive option unless
you live close by. Also, taxi will not take you unless you will pay a minimum of 7
anywhere at night.
66

T RANSPORTATION
Jessica LI

WHILE WAITING FOR YOUR CARTE IMAGINE-R

In the meantime, you can buy a Navigo pass and charge it up for the first month. The
card itself will cost a few euros, plus the monthly pass fee, which will come to around
70 . If you dont want to commit to a months worth of fee, you can buy individual
tickets for 1.70 each, packs of ten tickets for around 13 , or a weekly pass which will
require a Navigo card as well.
For more information, check out the Imagine R website at http://www.imagine-r.com/
When you buy either fare tickets or Navigo/Imagine R passes, choose zone 1-2 or zone
1-3. This covers the city of Paris and excludes suburbs (banlieue). You probably wont
travel to the suburbs during the week (unless you live there), and all zones are
equivalent on weekends, so your zone 1-3 pass will allow you to travel all the way out to
zone 5 for free on weekends. A notable destination outside of Paris is the castle and
palace of Versailles, which makes for a great weekend trip without extra fare!

http://www.transilien.com/
67

T RANSPORTATION
Jessica LI

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: TRAVEL TIPS

Download the RATP app for free on your smartphone before arriving to
Paris. It will have an interactive map of the metro system, which doesnt
need wifi. On weekdays, the first metro is around 5:30 am and the last train
is around 12:30 pm, depending on the line and direction. The metro is
extended for an extra hour on weekends and holidays

Bookmark the website for the France train system, www.sncf.com. It will
prove to be very handy when planning your weekend and spring break trips

A useful tip is to also Like the SNCF page on Facebook, where you will find
the most update-to-date information on promotions and destinations. SNCF
prices tend to increase the closer you get to your travel date, so it is
recommended to plan your trips ahead of time and buy your tickets early

If you are buying multiple tickets with friends, buy the tickets all
together to ensure that you will all be seated together

If you will be doing most of your traveling by train, it is best to invest in a


Carte Jeune for those less than 26 years old. The card will be 40 in price

When buying tickets, you may choose to pick up the tickets at a SNCF
boutique or a SNCF kiosk at the train station, print your own e-tickets, or
have the tickets sent to your address for free.

If you use Passbook on your phone, you may choose the option of m-tickets
and download the barcode directly onto your phone, which precludes the
possibility of losing paper tickets

68

T RANSPORTATION
Ximena Caldern ROJAS

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: TRAVEL TIPS


My trips outside Paris can be summarized in one site: www.skyscanner.com
I always try to spend the less money possible, so what I do is choose the date I plan to
travel, put Paris as my departure city and put Everywhere on the arrival city. Once
you have this, a lot of option will appear on your screen, from the cheapest to the
more expensive so that you can choose, at least for me how much money I spend in
the ticket is one of the elements that help me choose my destination. I have bought all
my travel tickets through this webpage and so far I have never found any troubles. You
can also choose the language you desire on this site.
For hostels try this site: www.hostelworld.com, which I have also used without any
trouble, be sure to check the comments and ratings. If you have any doubts of the
enterprise you are buying a ticket or reserving a hostel from, Google it! Never stay with
doubts, you could regret it later, I have done it many times since I have never trust
internet payments, but away from home they become necessary.

69

T RANSPORTATION
Justine MALLOU

AROPORTS DE PARIS
Whether you are preparing to travel
from your home country to France, or
planning
your
European
travel
itineraries, it is important to know that
Paris is served by two major airports:

1) Aroport de Roissy-Charles de
Gaulle (CDG) is located in the north
of Paris (Zone 5). CDG has three
main terminals:
Terminal 1: Foreign airlines
Terminal 2 (2A 2F): Air France
Terminal 3: Charter and IntraEuropean flights (aka the most
affordable)
http://www.nyceparis.com/
From Paris to Roissy-Charles de Gaulle
Train:
RER B3 destination Aroport Charles de Gaulle I (Terminals 1 & 3) or
destination Aroport Charles de Gaulle 2-TGV (Terminals 2A 2F)
Cost:
9, 50 (Pass Navigo Zones 1-5 accepted)
Duration: 45 minutes

2) Aroport dOrly (ORY) is located in the south of Paris (Zone 4). ORY has two main
terminals:
Orly Ouest: domestic flights
Orly Sud: short international and charter flights
From Paris to Orly
Train:
RER C (trains ROMI or MONA) destination tp Pont de Rungis, Aroport dOrly.
Take the shuttle bus from Pont de Rungis to Orly terminals
Cost:
9, 50 (Pass Navigo Zones 1-5 accepted)
Duration: 35 minutes
For more information: http://www.aeroportsdeparis.fr/
70

T RANSPORTATION
Ximena Caldern ROJAS

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION

I did not find transportation easy, specially during the night, some Noctilien buses
are not frequent and you find yourselves waiting in the station freezing cold. Do not
commit the error of entering the metro station without buying a ticket (which a lot of
people do, you will see them as they would effortlessly follow you right after you scan
your metro card) because it could get you in trouble and pass through a very
uncomfortable situation (a friend of mine had to pay around 30 euros for that
mistake).
Also, do not hesitate to ask on the information post located on the stations, they are
really helpful. Another tip: use Google Maps, I always use it before leaving, which will
save you hardships.
When getting your Navigo pass, I recommend that you go to Odon metro station
(M4). What you need to do is show your passport and housing justification. They will
take a picture of you (be sure to be prepared for it, I was not and so I am forced to
hide it) and after filling your personal information, they will immediately give you the
Navigo pass for free.

71

SECTION VII

Health & Wellness


/hel/ nd /welns/

72

H EALTH &W ELLNESS


Andrea DEROCCO

EMERGENCY INFORMATION & MEDICAL CERTIFICATE

Service

Telephone Number

Medical Help / SAMU

15

Police / Gendarmerie

17

Fire & Accident / Sapeurs pompiers

18

SOS All services

112

SOS Hearing assisted

114

Emergency shelter

115

http://paris.angloinfo.com/information/healthcare/emergencies/
You must be able to provide the following details:
Location where assistance is needed
Name and telephone number
Describe the situation
Number of people involved
Weapons used
Medecin Traitant (MT) is a primary health care physician. To find a doctor in France:
http://www.sciencespo.fr/welcome/en/content/finding-doctor
A medical certificate is a requirement for sports courses. To obtain one, visit a medical
doctor at Paris V Descartes (45 rue des Saints-Pres) for an appointment. It is highly
recommended to obtain this certificate during the first month of the semester.

73

H EALTH &W ELLNESS


Justine MALLOU

SCURIT SOCIALE

Carte Vitale
In France , a Carte Vitale functions as your French health insurance card which contains
the social security number (numro didentit nationale) and other administrative
information. The Carte Vitale indicates the complete details of health coverage and the
location of the chosen insurance office.
Scurit sociale: LMDE & SMEREP
As an exchange student, it is compulsory to have a scurit sociale to in order to
complete your administration registration. Students who are over 28 years old are
ineligible for the insurance so it is necessary to find to their own insurance from their
home country.
EU health card must be affiliated with the scurit sociale system and must also choose a
payment centre. The two medical insurances offered in Sciences Po are with LMDE
(http://www.lmde.com/) or SMEREP (http://www.smerep.fr/). In addition, they also
offer mutuelles a supplementary insurance. In this case, a mutuelle instantly becomes a
personal choice this isnt mandatory for Sciences Po administrative registration.
Payment procedures
The insurance costs 211. Paying for a medical insurance happens during Pre-inscription
administrative, where students are able to select their insurance choice and pay for it via
Espace tudiant. Otherwise, if a student happens to miss this step, it is still possible to
pay for it via wire transfer from your personal bank to the Sciences Po account. However,
take note that international transfers usually includes banking fees, it is important to be
aware of this. It is also possible to contact Accueil administratif
(accueil.administratif@sciences-po.fr) to get access to Sciences Pos bank account
information for international wire transfer.
74

H EALTH &W ELLNESS


Andrea DEROCCO

PERSONAL EXPERIENCE: SPORTS AND WELLNESS

In terms of staying healthy, and to save money from eating out all the time. I generally
cook most of my meals. I bring healthier choice of snacks, sandwich bags with carrot
sticks or bananas or apples with me to school. Bringing snacks to school helps me stay
alert and energized throughout the day.
To get good grades, You need a balance of enjoying the city and also focusing on your
studies. Get to a library where you are able to concentrate. Sitting in my apartment, I
tend to surf the Internet or start cooking, ignoring my chapters I have to read. If the
assignment is substantial, plan to do a little for a couple days, instead of all at once. You
wont be as tired and you will have more effort and willingness to complete the
assignment.
For gym memberships:
http://www.paris.fr/pratique/pratiquer-un-sport/ou-faire-du-sport/p151
(France
website for sports offerings)
http://paris.angloinfo.com/af/285/paris-&-ile-de-france-gyms-fitness-classes-andpersonal-trainers.html (list of gyms, fitness classes & Personal Trainers)
Where to play sports:
http://www.joggingroutes.org/2011/04/seine-loop-paris-running-route.html
(Optimal running routes blog)
You can also check out Sciences Pos Association Sportive: http://www.le27.net/

75

H EALTH &W ELLNESS


Andrea DEROCCO

FAITH AND RELIGIOUS CENTERS


Anglican

glise anglicane Saint George


7 Rue Auguste Vacquerie, 75016 Paris (Tl. : 01 47 20 22 51)
Cathdrale amricaine de Paris
23 Avenue George V, 75008 Paris (Tl. : 01 53 23 84 00)

Baptist

Fdration des glises vangliques Baptistes de France


47 rue de Clichy, 75311 Paris (Tl. : 01 53 20 15 40)
glise vanglique Baptiste
48 rue de Lille, 75007 Paris (Tl. : 01 42 61 45 10)

Jewish

Synagogue de la Victoire
44 rue de la Victoire, 75009 Paris (Tl. : 01 40 82 26 26)
Synagogue de Nazareth
15 rue Notre Dame de Nazareth, 75003 Paris (Tl. : 01 42 78 00 30)

Lutheran

glise Luthriennes de Paris


16 rue Chauchat, 75009 Paris (Tl. : 01 44 79 04 73)
glise Saint Paul
90 Boulevard Barbs, 75018 Paris (Tl. : 01 46 06 91 18)

Orthodox
Christian

Paroisse Cathdrale Saint-Irne


96 bd Auguste Blanqui, 75013 Paris (Tl. : 01 43 36 83 45)
Cathdrale Saint-Alexandre-Nevsky de Paris
12 Rue Daru, 75008 Paris (Tl. : 01 42 27 37 34)

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Andrea DEROCCO

FAITH AND RELIGIOUS CENTERS


Pentecostal

glise vanglique de Pentecte


10 Rue Sentier, 75002 Paris (Tl. : 01 42 36 10 45)
Paris Bastille
44 rue de la Roquette, 75011 Paris (Tl. : 01 47 00 55 96)

Muslim

Grande Mosque de Paris


2bis Place du Puits de l'Ermite, 75005 Paris(Tl.: 01 45 35 97 33)
Mosque Abou Bakr As Saddiq
39, boulevard Belleville, 75011 Paris (Tl.: 01.48.06.08.46)

Roman Catholic

glise Saint-Gervais
13 Rue des Barres, 75004 Paris (Tl. : 01 48 87 32 02)
Paroisse Saint-Franois d'Assise
9 Rue de Mouzaa, 75019 Paris (Tl. : 01 42 39 64 58)

Buddhism

Centre bouddhiste Diamond Way


36 rue Traversire, 75012 Paris (Tl. : 33 09 50 20 31 24)
Centre Bouddhiste Paris
25 Rue Condorcet, 75009 Paris (Tl. : 01 44 53 07 31)

Nondenominational

glise Amricaine Paris


65 Quai d'Orsay, 75007 Paris (Tl. : 01 40 62 05 00)
Trinity International Church of Paris
15 Rue des Lavandires Sainte-Opportune, 75001 Paris
(Tl. : 09 50 39 44 21)

77

SECTION VIII

Culture & Recreation


/klt /nd/rekrie()n/

78

C ULTURE &R ECREATION


Jack GHALEB

STUDENT LIFE IN PARIS


c

Grocery shopping
French cuisine doesnt have to be that much more expensive. Good fruit and vegetables
are often more affordable at markets than at your local supermarkets. A quick Google
maps search and walk around your local area is usually the best way to see whats on
offer. There are some major names that have stores dotted around Paris. If you cant be
bothered to cook or want a delicious snack, boulangerie and ptisserie may be just what
youre looking for.

Eating out
Whilst good, relatively inexpensive restaurants can be found on Paris, it is heavily
dependent on where you are staying. The area around Chtelet is packed with
restaurants at a variety of prices, and as almost all menus are displayed outside, you can
have a look beforehand. If youre looking for value, crpes are hard to beat!
Being in such a lovely part of Paris is incredible, but it does mean the food is slightly
more expensive. That said, there are plenty of options.
Sciences Po Cyber-Caf is very reasonable, at 2 for a baguette its hard to beat.
Resto Universitaire (Resto U) at rue Mabillon is just a 5 minute walk from Sciences Po
that serves hot meals with dessert for just over 3.
For a list of great pubs and bars: http://www.timeout.com/paris/en/bars-pubs/the100-best-bars-in-paris
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Justine MALLOU

STUDENT LIFE IN PARIS

Moving to a different country for a long period of time represents change. This change
can often be associated with adapting to a new routine. For instance, grocery shopping
can be challenging in a new cultural environment particularly without any prior
experience. In Paris, there are several relatively familiar supermarkets such as: Atac,
Auchan, Carrefour, Ed, Leclerc, Franprix, Leader Price and Monoprix .
Be aware of the following tips when going to a grocery store:
Grocery bags: Since France is slowly becoming a more environmentally-friendly, most
stores will charge customers for a grocery bags. Therefore, it is recommended that you
bring your own reusable bag when shopping for groceries. What better way to be
resourceful!
Weighing produce: When buying produce, especially from Monoprix, it is important
to know that your fresh produce must be weighed before going to the cash counter.
Otherwise, you will have the trouble of having to go back and line up at the cash counter
for the second time. This becomes more frustrating when there is a very long queue
and yes, it happens a lot.
For healthier choices, here are a few organic markets in Paris:
Boulevard Raspaill, 6th (Mtro: Rennes, Svres-Babylone or St. Placide.
Open Sunday mornings)
Boulevard des Batignolles, 17th (Mtro: Rome. Open Saturday mornings
between Mtro Rome and Place Clichy)
80

C ULTURE &R ECREATION


Justine MALLOU

FROMAGE

According to former President Charles de Gaulle, a country that produces 325


varieties of cheese cannot be governed. To highlight the importance of cheese even
more, Jean Antheleme Brillat-Savarin noted this comment: un repas sans fromage
est une belle qui il manque un il ("A meal without cheese is a beautiful woman
without an eye").
Some basic types of cheese include:
Hard (semi-hard) Cheese: Mild but its flavour intensifies with age
Example: Comt, Cantal, Tomme de Savoir
Soft Cheese: Cheese with powdery white or orange rind
Example: Camembert, Brie, Munster, Livarot, Pont lEvque
Goat (Chvre) Cheese: Laboriously produced following age-old traditions
Example: St. Maure de Touraine, Crottin de Chavignol
Blue Cheese: an affronting category due to its odour
Example: Bleu dAuvergne, Saint Aygulf, Fourme dAmbert
Tip: When offered to cut cheese, cut it in a way that maintains its original shape pie
wedge from a round shape, or wedge slice from a wedge.

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Lucas DIXON

CULTURAL ACTIVITES

Paris has so many museums and cultural points of interest that youll never run out of
places to go. Youll find descriptions of the major ones below, but this is really only a
small sample of the cultural activities available in this city. Where possible, Ive
included prices and indicated which days the places are closed, but the information is
bound to change because these museum types are a capricious bunch, so its best to
check online before heading off to any of them.
MUSE DU LOUVRE Easily the most famous museum in Paris,
the Muse du Louvre houses every kind of art from around the
world, including works like the Mona Lisa and the Venus de Milo.
The Louvre is huge; so big, in fact, that if you want to see
everything it has to offer, youll need to show up a few different
times. Ive seen everything (yeah, Im that guy) and it took,
cumulatively, about 15 hours.
Hours: Closed on Tuesdays, and is open late on Thursday nights.
Not to miss: Greek sculptures, Napoleon III apartments, medieval Louvre
foundations, paintings on the first floor of the Denon wing (including the Mona Lisa and
the Coronation of Napoleon), and my personal favourite, Rubens Marie de Medici Cycle
on the second floor of the Richelieu wing.
Tip: The trick with the Louvre is timing. Certain areas of the museum particularly
the Denon wing get very crowded as the day goes on. The best thing to do is get in
line for the museum half an hour before it opens, and then visit the popular areas right
when you get in
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CULTURAL ACTIVITES
MUSE DORSAY Housed in a gorgeous old train
station, the Muse dOrsay showcases art from the
mid-nineteenth century up to World War I. Its mainly
full of arts by impressionists and post-impressionists.
Admission is free with your Sciences Po student card;
use it as you would a ticket to enter the gallery, no
waiting in line necessary.
Hours: Open late on Thursday nights, and is closed on Mondays
Not to miss: the Opra Garnier mockup, the Van Gogh rooms, Renoirs stunning Bal
du moulin, Whistlers Mother, and my favourite, the Orientalist room.

MUSE DE LORANGERIE Nestled away in a corner of the Jardins des Tuileries, the
Orangerie is basically an extension of the Muse dOrsay. It houses a lot of minor works
by impressionists (and those pesky post-impressionists). Entrance for Sciences Po
students is free, but you cant use your student card as a ticket here; youll have to get in
line with everyone else (quel horreur!), and then show your student card to get your free
ticket. The museum gets busy on the weekends, particularly if the weather isnt so nice,
so its best to go to this one on a weekday. The museum is fairly tiny; you can see
everything in about an hour and a half.
Hours: Closed Tuesdays
Not to miss: Nymphas (Monets Water Lillies)

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Lucas DIXON

CULTURAL ACTIVITES
CENTRE GEORGES POMPIDOU Paris biggest
modern art museum. The main museum is free for
Sciences Po students with a student card, but the
special exhibits will cost you anywhere from 5-10
depending on the exhibition. You can likely spend a
full day the Centre Pompidou to see everything,
especially if you are particularly enthralled by
modern art..
Hours: Closed Tuesdays, opens late usually until 10pm, though admissions stop
being sold around 8pm
Not to miss: Stravinsky Fountain
ARC DE TRIOMPHE Situated at the end of the Champs-Elyse,
this is the massive arch that Napoleon had constructed because
he was pretty pumped that the French beat the Russians at the
Battle of Austerlitz. (It was rechristened as a general war
memorial after Napoleon suffered a few setbacks, which is its
purpose today.) Admission is free for Sciences Po students
just show your student card and youll get a ticket. If youre not
in to climbing stairs, avoid the Arc. It will take you forty minutes
to experience the Arc, more if there are significant lines.
Hours: Opens daily until 11:00 pm
Tip: Make sure you visit the Arc at night not only is it way less busy, but the view of
Paris at night from the top in unrivalled. (Yeah, the Eiffel Towers view is fine at night,
but not quite as fine.)
BOIS DE VINCENNES & BOIS DE BOULOGNE Paris has two major wooded parks
which are both great if youre in to nature or picnics. Both are massive, and offer a
wide range of different activities; from hiking to zoo visits. Entry is free for everyone;
make sure you download and print a map before you go, or you could find yourself
lost in a space three times as large as Central Park in New York City!
84

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Lucas DIXON

CULTURAL ACTIVITES

MUSE CARNAVALET Located in the Marais, the Muse Carnavalet plots the history
for Paris from its days as a backwater village the Romans called Lutetia up to the
present: spoiler alert, the village turned in to a city called Paris thats not so much a
backwater anymore. The museum is free for Sciences Po students. Its a great way to
spend a day in the Marais.
Hours: Closed Mondays

Not to miss: graphic arts gallery, full of fascinating, novel posters advertising shows
like the Folies Bergre from the turn of the century
MUSE GRVIN Believe it or not, but
Madame Tussaud -- a French wax sculptor
never opened one of her eponymous
museums in her native Paris. Instead we have
the Muse Grvin, a museum dedicated to
wax figures of everyone from Napoleon to his
spiritual successor, Cline Dion.
Its really not a great place, but if wax celebrities are your thing, youll only pay about
20 for the privilege of getting to meet waxy Michael Jackson. A total bargain.
Hours: Open daily

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CULTURAL ACTIVITES

GRAND & PETIT PALAIS Art museums built for the World Expo of 1900, will take you
about a full day to conquer. The Grand Palais hosts temporary exhibits, so its best to go
online to see whats on offer many of the exhibits are free, or very reasonably priced.
The Petit Palais, across the way, houses the Museum of Fine Arts, a fascinating
collection of traditional art and functional pieces from a wide range of time periods.
The permanent collections are free for everyone.
Hours: Closed Mondays
OPRA If you like opera or ballet or orchestral music,
youll want to check out the Opra nationale du Pariss,
where you can buy tickets to world-class performances
of high art pieces. Buy early enough, and you can score
good deals; there are also student deals to be had
tickets can be as little as 5 .
The Opra runs at two different buildings. The Opra Bastille is a modern building
where most of the works are performed, but otherwise not very noteworthy. The
other place where the Opra puts on work is the luxurious Palais Garnier, built in the
18th century to host the citys cultural elites on a night out. You can visit the Palais
Garnier in the day as a tourist it is, after all, the actual Opera in Phantom of the
Opera. Its 6 for those under 25 for an unguided visit, and 14 for a 90 minute
guided tour in French or English.
Hours: Open daily
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Lucas DIXON

CULTURAL ACTIVITES
CIMETIRE PRE-LACHAISE Likely the most famous cemetery in the world, this
massive complex of interred Frenchmen and Frenchwomen from the 19th century
onwards is fascinating. Some of Frances brightest luminaries are buried here, as well
as foreign notables like Oscar Wilde, Gertrude Stein, and Jim Morrison. Perfect for a
Sunday morning walk, make sure you take a map with you before heading to the
cemetery otherwise, its hard to find the graves youd like to see. Keep your eye out
for eccentric burial places, like the massive pyramid crypt or the stone coffin sculpted
to look broken with a hand stick out hoping to escape.
Hours: Closed on weekends

CATACOMBES DE PARIS You might not know it, but underneath Paris is a sprawling
network of tunnels. Youre not supposed to explore most of them theres actually an
entire community of cataphiles who illegally explore the tunnels closed to the public,
and even host parties in them but there is one small section that you can visit legally.
And if you dare to go, you arent just treated to exploring 2km of tunnels but also a
massive ossuary: halls and halls of actual human bones exhumed from old cemeteries
and reburied to save space in the city in the 19th century. It can be a bit unsettling, but
its a fascinating experience.
The price is 4 for those under 26. The wait can be quite a while since they only allow
about 250 people inside at a time; the whole adventure will probably take about 3
hours to complete. This is a good option for a less-than-optimal day weatherwise, since
you spend most of your time underground.
Hours: Closed Mondays

87

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Lucas DIXON

CULTURAL ACTIVITES
TOUR EIFFEL Some people prefer to visit the Eiffel
Tower at night, but youll get a better night view of the
Arc de Triomph, so save the Eiffel Tower for a morning
when its less busy. You can stairs to walk up the tower,
but most people take the elevator. The price of a visit
depends on how high you want to go: a trip to the very
top will cost 13 , while its only 7
LES INVALIDES A complex of buildings that hosts a
number of military-themed museums, including the
Muse de lArme. From paintings to guns to the tomb
of Napoleon, theres a ton of interesting material to see.
Les Invalides is open almost every day, except for major
holidays. As a Sciences Po student, youre entitled to a
free admission.
Hours: Open daily
PANTHON A beautiful domed building, the Panthon
houses the graves of some of the most notable French
citizens, including Marie Curie and Victor Hugo. The
architecture, though, is the real story at the Panthon
its classic Greek columns and beautiful dome are
mesmerizing. Its free for Sciences Po students.
Hours: open daily
CIT DES SCIENCES ET DE L'INDUSTRIE The largest
science museum in Europe. Its so large, in fact, that
youll want to spend most of your day here. This
museum isnt just for kids, its for anyone who likes
science: there are exhibits on genes, math, and sound.
But in a cool way, I promise. The cost is 6
Hours: Closed Mondays
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Lucas DIXON

CULTURAL ACTIVITES

SAINTE-CHAPELLE The most beautiful stained glass in the world on an ancient church
built to house relics captured during the Crusades. The stunning stained glass windows
tell the story of the Bible; you can read the glass using the free explanatory cards of
what is in each window. Go when the sun is shining the brightest the way the rays hit
the coloured glass is unforgettable. Its also free with your student card.
Hours: Opens daily
CONCIEGERIE If youre on the Ile-de-la-Cite, you can kill an hour and a half at the
Conciegerie, a medieval palace turned prison during the French Revolution. On display
are old jail cells, instruments of torture, and even the place where Marie Antoinette
was imprisoned before her execution. Its free with your student card.
Hours: Opens daily

CATHDRALE NOTRE-DAME DE PARIS


Begin by exploring the inside of this
famous church; you can walk around its
stunning interior for free. Free with your
student card, once you walk up the 300+
steps its a long walk, so dont attempt
it if youre severely pregnant or severely
lazy youre greeted with an amazing
view of the city. Plus you get to see the
gargoyles and the chimeras up close.
Hours: Opens daily
89

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CULTURAL ACTIVITES
MUSE RODIN An estate in the middle of the city
comprised of gardens and an estate house, both of which
feature sculptures and other works by Rodin that he donated
to the French state in the early 20th century. Its free for
Sciences Po students.
Hours: Open daily
Not to miss: The Thinker, The Gates of Hell
CHTEAU DE VERSAILLES Entry to the
palace of Versailles is free for EU nationals
and residents under 26. However, Versailles
checks visas rather than student cards, so
make sure you have your passport with you.
Youll have to pay to access the gardens, but
its a small amount less than 10 euros.
Versailles is huge, so make sure you have a
game plan at the start of the day. Its best to
start in the Palace, and then have lunch at
one of the cafs inside before venturing out
in to the gardens. From the gardens, you
can visit the Grand and Petit Trianons,
lovely mini-palaces built for the King and his
mistresses to get away from the full court
madness of Versailles. Make sure you bring
lots of water and an umbrella, and wear
comfortable shoes.
Hours: Opens daily
Not to miss: La Galerie des Glaces
90

PONT ALEXANDRE III Paris has a great


many bridges that are worth exploring. A
must-cross is the Pont Alexandre III, built
in 1900 and named after the Russian
Alexandre III. You should also check out
the Pont des Arts, the bridge that
connects the Louvre to the Institut de
France. The bridge is famous for hosting
love locks: buy a small lock with a loved
one, write your names on it, lock it to
the bridge, and throw away the key in
the Seine.

SECTION IX

Contributors
/kntrbjt /

91

C ONTRIBUTORS
MEET THE CONTRIBUTORS

Ximena CALDERN ROJAS


Peru

Natalia CWIERZ
Germany

Lucas DIXON
Canada

Jack GHALEB
England

91

Batoul CHEAIB
Lebanon

Andrea DEROCCO
United States of America

Jiyun JUNG
South Korea

Soukana KARRAKCHOU
Morocco

C ONTRIBUTORS
MEET THE CONTRIBUTORS

Jessica LI
Canada

Imaan SANDHU
Canada

Justine MALLOU
Canada

Peter SCHUBERT
Germany

Dana MURESAN
Canada

Ruksona USMANOVA
Uzbekistan

93

Ruky OKOTCHA
Nigeria

Camlia VIALLET
France

SECTION X

Credits
/krdts/

94

C REDITS
SUBJECT

CREDIT

Section 1 Preparation Cover


Photo

http://www.hd-wallpaper.images-fonds.com/

Preparation Timeline

http://www.sfu.ca/content/dam/sfu/students/studyabroad/exchange/nominate
dresources/1213exchManualasof1131.pdf

Relocation checklist header

www.blog.travel-exploration.com

To-do list photo

www.http://www.gallaudet.edu/Images/ResLife/Residence%20Halls/ToDo%20List.png

Culture shock resource

http://www.sfu.ca/content/dam/sfu/students/studyabroad/exchange/nominate
dresources/1213exchManualasof1131.pdf
https://studyabroad.colorado.edu/_customtags/ct_FileRetrieve.cfm?File_ID=334
70

Culture shock header photo

www.firstpointusa.com

Stages of culture shock

www.bve.ulaval.ca

Cultural transition

www.ourhouseinaarhus.wordpress.com

Section 2 Academia Cover


Photo

http://udiscover.esgms.fr/Visite%20de%20l'Arc%20de%20Triomphe_e74787.htm
l

Sciences Po campuses Map


Paris
Nancy
Dijon
Reims
Le Havre
Menton
Poitiers

http://www.sciencespo.fr
www.meltycampus.fr
http://www.sciencespo.fr/welcome/content/campus-de-nancy
http://www.sciencespo.fr/en/node/2623
http://www.sciencespo.fr/welcome/content/campus-de-reims
http://www.sciencespo.fr/en/node/4892
http://college.sciences-po.fr/sitementon/
http://www.sciencespo.fr/node/117

Student association header


photo

http://www.digischool.fr/associations/nantes-distribution-panier-1euro-etudiant13226.php

Student card photo

http://formation.sciences-po.fr/en/contenu/student-card

Parisian arrondissements
Mona Lisa
Htel de Ville
Champs-Elysees
Bastille
Trocadro

www.montmartre-virt.paris-sorbonne.fr
www.rom1.fr
www.en.wikipedia.org
www.hotelpaluxeparis.com
www.parisambassador.wordpress.com
www.bestparisrentals.com

Section 3 Housing Cover Photo

www.cyril.almeras.free.fr

95

C REDITS
SUBJECT

CREDIT

Choosing where to live resource

http://www.parisyearabroad.com/student-accommodation-paris/

Finding Accommodation header

www.internations.org

Caisse dallocation familiale

http://www.apogeephoto.com/aug2011/rromano82011.shtml

CAF Logo

http://www.caf.fr

Applying for CAF header photo

http://wwww.paristravelr.com, www.paris-paris-paris.com

Section 4 Finance Cover Photo

http://www.pictify.com

LCL

http://www.lcl.fr

BNP Paribas logo

https://www.secure.bnpparibas.net/

Communications header photo

www.amgltd.co.uk

Communications References

http://www.bonjourparis.com/story/cell-phone-service-france/,
Grout, Marie. Bloom Where You're Planted. Paris: Public-service publication,
2012. Print.

Socit Gnrale logo

www.societegenerale.fr.

Section 5 Immigration Cover


Photo

www.notreaventure.com

French Visa

www.etudiantdeparis.fr/

OFII logo

www.ofii.fr

Immigration folder

http://www.crous-orleans-tours.fr/

Section 6 Transportation Cover


Photo

www.photo2ville.com

Getting around Paris Ligne 4

http://www.plandeparis.info/plans-de-metro/metro-ligne-4.gif

SNCF logo

www.voyages-sncf.com

Public Transportation
Metropolitain station

www.visibilitepro.com

96

C REDITS
SUBJECT

CREDIT

Airports of Paris

Photo: http://www.nyceparis.com/
Reference: Grout, Marie. Bloom Where You're Planted. Paris: Public-service
publication, 2012. Print.

Chart - Tarif Public Regional

http://www.transilien.com/

Skyscanner and Hostelworld


logo

www.skyscanner.fr, www.hostelworld.com

Section 7 Health and Wellness


Cover Photo

http://www.sachaleopold.com/

LMDE logo and SMEREP logo

www.forum-accueil-etudiant.unicaen.fr, www.smerep.fr

Wellness Header

www.northeast.edu/

Section 8 Culture and


Recreation Cover Photo

www.guideparisci.com/

Student Life in Paris photo

www.dailyphotoparis.blogspot.com, www.ambafrance-zm.org

Fromage header photo and


reference

www.ediblemadison.com, Grout, Marie. Bloom Where You're Planted. Paris:


Public-service publication, 2012. Print.

Cultural activities header photo


Muse du Louvre
Muse dOrsay
Muse de lOrangerie
Centre de Pompidou
Arc de Triomphe
Muse de Carnavalet
Muse Grevin
Grand et Petit Palais
Opra
Catacombes de Paris
Tour Eiffel
Sainte-Chapelle
Notre Dame de Paris
Muse Rodin
Chateu de Versailles

www.afzim.org
www.timoelliott.com
www.myparis.net
www.crillon.concorde-hotels.fr
www.blog.crdp-versailles.fr
www.fr.wikipedia.org
www.parismusees.paris.fr
www.paris-en-photos.fr
www.champselysees-paris.com
www.fcomau.com
www.veryworldtrip.com
www.jpletarte.deviantart.com
www.classictic.com
www.caplittoral.com
www.britishgirlinparis.wordpress.com
http://www.versailles-visit.com/chateau-de-versailles.html

Section 9 Contributors Cover


Photo

www.jeanclaudelafarge.fr

Section 10 Credits Cover Photo

www.arter.net

Sciences Po Campus Map

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L S T U D E N T C O U N C I L
Institut dtudes politiques de Paris
27 rue Saint-Guillaume
75337 Paris cedex 07 France
Email:
Phone:
+ 33 (0) 45 49 50 50

January 2014
isc.scpo@gmail.com