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09/02/2016

SUSPENDED FLOOR FROM RIGID CORE

Prepared BY:-Jaymin Shah


GUIDE BY:-NIKUNJ DAVE

INTRODUCTION TO
SUSPENDED SYSTEM

VERTICAL

Vertical systems, suspended, also


referred to as suspended highrise
structures,
different
from
suspension structures like suspension
bridges, which are draped from two
suspension points;

Facilitates top down future expansion


with less operation interference

Small hangers instead of large columns


improve flexibility and view
Structural Advantage
Eliminates
buckling
in
hangers,
replacing compression with tension

Suspended high-rise structures hang


usually about vertically from top. A
rational
for
suspended
high-rise
structures is to free the ground floor
from obstructions.

High-strength hangers
compression columns

Regarding Lateral load, the challenge of


suspended high-rises usually a narrow
footprint and slender aspect ratio. Thus
their behavior is comparable to a tree,

Concentration of compression to a few


large columns minimizes buckling

Where the drunk resists load primarily


in bending and large roots are required
to resist overturning. Properly designed,
the narrow aspect ratio can enhance
ductility to make the structure behave
like a flower in the wind to reduce
seismic forces.

Multiple towers with joint footing to


improve overturning resistance

IMPLIMATING
STRUCTURAL
FEASIBLE?

SUCH
SYSTEM

KIND
IS

replace

Floors may be built on ground and


raised after completion

Design options

Multiple stacks
deflection

to

limit

Planning options

1. Single towers (one vertical support)


2. Multiple towers (many vertical supports)

1. Single tower / single stack

Challenges

2. Multi towers

Combined hanger / column deflection


yields large differential deflection

Architectural Advantage
Less columns at ground floor provides
planning flexibility and unobstructed
view

differential

Adjust hangers for DL and partial LL to


reduce deflection.

At first glance suspended high rise


structures seem not feasible
Given load-path detour gravity load
travels to the top and then down to the
foundation through center core.
There are advantage, both architectural
and structural, that justify this detour

Load path detour: load travels up to the


top, then down to foundation

large

3. Single stacks (one set of floors.


4. Multiple stacks (several sets of floors)
Options are described as follow

3. Twin stacks
4. Twin stacks / towers
5. Triple stacks
6. Triple stacks / twin towers

Figure-1

Figure-2

Limits

An important limit for suspended highrise structures are the limited number of
floors per stack.
More than ten floors per stack would
cause
unacceptable
differential
deflections.
Suspendedhigh-risestructures
are
subject to greater differential deflection
since hangers elongate but columns
shorten under gravity load. Without
buckling, the high tensile stress of
hangers causes greater strain which
further increases differential deflection.

Case study-1

West coast Transmission


Vancouver (1969)

Architect: Rhone and Iredale


Engineer: Bogue Babicki
The 12-storytower, initially designed
and built as Westcoast Transmission

Tower,

Headquarters,
has
become
an
architectural icon of Vancouver.
With support of the City of Vancouver,
the historically significant building was
converted in 2005 to 180 unique
residential suites in studio, one and two
bedroom configurations.
The suspension concept was selected to
provide an unobstructed view to the
beautiful bay of Vancouver. According to
the Bogue Babicki, the suspension
option was also more economical than a
conventional alternative they had
considered. The suspended structure,
stating 30 feet (9 m) above grade
provided unobstructed views at ground
level to the beautiful bay of Vancouver.
The tower is supported by a site-cast
concrete core, 36 feet (11 m) square.
The floors are suspended by 12 cables.
Each cable consists of two
73 mm diameter.
The sloping cables have two additional
64 mm diameter strands (the 45 degree
slope increased their vector force by
1.414 times).

Size:
Core size:
Height

108x108 feet (33 x33 m)


36x 36 feet (11x11 m))
12 stories, 224 (68 m)

Typical story
height:
1
2
3

12 feet (3.65 m)
Section
Exploded axon
Floor framing

Figue-3

Figure-5
Case Study-2

BMW Headquarters Munich (1972)

Architect: Karl Schwanzer


Engineer: Helmut Bomhard

International design competition for the


BMW tower with his idea to represent
the automobile company in form of a
four-cylinder engine. Four cylinders are
suspended from an assembly of four
semi-cylindrical concrete cores by
means of hangers, suspended from a
concrete cores of stairs, elevators, etc.

The core extends as four cylinders on top


of the floor stacks. Each floor is
supported by a hanger at its center and
stabilized by the core. To keep
differential deflection within acceptable
limits, the tower is partitioned into two

stacks of eleven and seven office floors of


the lower and upper stacks, respectively.
Eight elevators, stairs and services are
located in the core.
Except for the four central hangers, the
office space around the core is free from
columns to provide highly flexible office
areas. Construction of the tower started
with the central core in conventional
method; but then proceeded from top
down.Post-tensioned
concrete
floor
plates, cast on the ground, where lifted
up by hydraulic means; starting with the
top floor, followed by successive floors
downward. Silver gladding exterior
conveys a sophisticated high-tech
image, true to the BMW philosophy.

Figure-7

References:-

Figure-6
Size:
Core size

52,30 m (172 feet ) diameter


24.4 m (80 feet)
18 suspended stories, 101 m
(331 feet)

Height:
Typical Story
height:
3.82 m (10.8 feet)

1)

http://www.studfiles.ru/preview/4592752/page:
20/

2)

http://devtome.com/doku.php?id=the_birth_of_s
kyscrapers

3)

http://www.daviddarling.info/childrens_encyclop
edia/structures_Chapter4.html