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<center>
<div class=headlevel1><h2><hr>&nbsp;Microscopy ListServer Archives
&nbsp;</h2><hr><b>File Requested = 9502.txt<br>Retrival Software
Version=NJZ07060908</b></center></div>
</center><br>
<div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Riitta Harjula
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; rharjula-at-cc.oulu.fi <hr> Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995
14:38:54 +0200 (EET) <br> </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Subscribe Riitta Harjula <br><br>Riitta.Harjula-at-
oulu.fi<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Marc Brande
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; brande-at-sdsc.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995
11:39:27 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Confocal Scope in San Diego
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br> Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,<br>
Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet} <br>Message-Id:
{Pine.3.05.1.9502011127.A7624-9100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu} <br>Mime-Version:
1.0<br>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII<br><br>I am in need of access to
a confocal scope in the San Diego area. Would<br>anyone know of a lab that has one
and who to contact? Thanks in advance<br>for your help.<br><br>Marc<br><br>Marc C.
Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging <br>San Diego 3D Imaging Group To
subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu<br>3840 Camino Lindo To
post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu<br>San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-
at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 01 Feb 1995 16:45:52 EST <br> Subject: RE: EM
Lab scheduling </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Jan Coetzee asks about electronic vs. "dog-eared diary" for
schedules.<br>Dear Jan,<br> We use a large desk calendar ourselves. It seems
easier, since there<br>are frequent changes, and everyone can check it instantly.
I'm sure that a<br>calendar page on a computer might do as well, but when a user
calls, we are<br>not always booted up, so it would take us more time than it does
with paper<br>and pencil. If your scopes are computer-controlled, it might save
some time<br>and/or effort to have schedules on the same computer--e.g. the
computer could<br>dial a user you need to contact re schedule changes--but we have
not thought<br>this to be worthwhile for us. Sometimes low-tech works very
well!<br> Yours,<br> Bill Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 01 Feb 1995 17:43:19 EST <br> Subject:
Peltier devices </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Jan Coetzee inquired about mfgrs of pltrs.<br>Dear Jan,<br>
Melcor makes them. Their address, phone & fax are<br> 1040
Spruce Street<br> Trenton NJ 08648-4587<br> United
States of America (our USA)<br> (609) 393-4178 (phone)<br>
(609) 393-9461 (fax)<br> One potential problem is that Peltiers have a
limited delta-T, and can<br>get very expensive. I asked Melcor about setting up a
cold stage for epitax-<br>ial deposition in a vacuum, and there was nothing which
would get cold enough.<br>Furthermore, if you wish to thermostat the device, you
need to use a cooler<br>which has a 100% duty cycle and output current
proportional to the difference<br>between target and actual temperatures. We
found this out when we installed<br>Peltiers in our darkroom as heaters/coolers to
maintain developer temperature.<br>The intermittant current put out by the usual
commercially available devices<br>blew the Peltiers out! Otherwise, Peltiers are
marvelous devices. Good luck.<br> Yours,<br>
Bill Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: WayneWNB-at-aol.com
<hr> Date: Wed, 1 Feb 1995 22:28:40 -0500 <br> Subject: Electron Microscope
Pictures </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {25020121201502-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}
<br><br>G'day Subscribers...<br><br>I've received this request for help on
locating micrographs<br>of bacteria. I could not help this individual. So is
there<br>anyone out there that can?<br><br>Cheers....Nestor Z.<br>Your Friendly
Neighborhood SysOp<br>=====================================<br><br>P.S.
<br><br>I'm working on concept of adding an Image Library to the
Software<br>Library. When it's ready for contributions I'll post <br>a message to
the
Listserver....<br><br><br>====================================<br><br><br><br>I
need an electron microscope picture of Methanosarcina barkeri
and<br>Methanobacterium wolfei. I called the University of California at
Berkeley<br>and they gave me your address. They said that they don't keep a file
of<br>their past work and would charge $300 per picture to do the work again.
I'm<br>fairly certain that the pictures already exist somewhere. I believe
that<br>NASA may have some of them but I don't know who to ask there . Thank you
for<br>any help in getting any pictures of the two
bacteria.<br><br>------------------<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: T.K. Wilson
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; WILSONTK-at-CASMAIL.MUOHIO.EDU <hr> Date: Thu, 2
Feb 1995 09:08:47 -500 <br> Subject: Position Openning </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>The following files have been delivered to you - please
use<br>the eXtract command in the browser to work with them:<br><br> MARSALL.ASC
(format:
Text)<br>----------------------------------------------------------------------
<br>Thomas K. Wilson wilsontk-at-MUohio.edu<br>Dept. of
Botany<br>Miami University ! Miami was a University when<br>Oxford OH
45056 ! Florida belonged to Spain !<br>USA<br>513.529.4210
office<br>513.529.4243 fax<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>--------------
Enclosure number 1 ----------------<br> The following is posted as a favor
to<br>Marshall University, and to any interested<br>applicants on the MSA-BBS.
Please distribute this<br>message to any and all interested people you
may<br>know.<br><br> I am not involved with this Supervisor search<br>in any
way whatsoever (Other than having promised<br>to post this ASAP). Please contact
Dr. W.B.<br>Rhoten directly at the address below (his E-mail<br>address is Rhoten-
at-musom01.mu.wvnet.edu)<br><br><br><br><br>POSSITION OPEN<br><br><br>SUPERVISOR
OF ELECTRON MICRSCOPY FACILITY<br><br><br> To supervise and perform day-to-
day<br>operations of the Electron Micrscopy Facility and<br>assist students,
research assistants, and<br>investigators. Participate in graduate level
EM<br>Course.<br><br> Bachelor's degree including courses in<br>biological and
physical sciences and at least 3<br>years experience in EM, or a Masters degree
and at<br>least 3 years of relevant experience, or a Ph.D.<br>degree.
Qualifications include comprehensive<br>knowledge of EM and ability to enhance
educational<br>and research activities. Experience in image<br>processing and
computers desired.<br><br> Qualified applicants should send a cover<br>letter,
resume, and list of at least 2 references<br>to:<br><br> Dr. W. B. Rhoten<br>
Dept. of Anatomy, Cell & Neurobiology<br> School of Medicine, Marshall
University<br> Huntington, WV 25704-9388<br><br><br> For full
consideration submit application by<br>March 1, 1995.<br><br> MARSHALL
UNIVERSITY IS AN AFFERMATIVE<br>ACTION/EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Richard Lee
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; richard_lee-at-qmgate.anl.gov <hr> Date: 2 Feb
1995 13:01:13 -0600 <br> Subject: subscibe </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {n1420392126.63194-at-qmgate.anl.gov} <br><br>
subscibe
2/2/95<br><br>subscribe, PLEASE!<br>
12:46 PM<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: richard.easingwood-at-
stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood) <hr> Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:56:44
+1100 <br> Subject: TEM:Staining glycogen in sections </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {199502022051.JAA12437-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
<br>X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz<br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-
Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"<br><br>One of EM Unit users is studying
developing Red deer. The samples we are<br>examining are skull and pedicle
(developing antler) taken from the deer at<br>set time intervals over atwo year
period. The samples are processed<br>routinely, ie glutaraldehyde
fixed,decalcified, OsO4 post fixed, uranyl<br>acetate bloc stain, dehydrated and
embedded in Agar 100 epoxy resin.<br><br>Our problem is that it now seems to be
that the glycogen content is of some<br>significance to the investigation.
Unfortunately the above process is not<br>ideal for showing the glycogen.<br>Some
recently processed samples using potassium ferrocyanide with the<br>osmium are
brilliant however we would like to enhance the glycogen in the<br>previous
blocks.<br>Does anyone out there know a method to enhance "unstainable" glycogen
in<br>ultrathin sections?<br>Thanks in anticipation.<br><br>Allan
Mitchell<br>South Campus EM Unit<br>allan.mitchell-at-
stonebow.otago.ac.nz<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: randy nessler
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; rnessler-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu <hr> Date: Thu,
2 Feb 1995 14:51:56 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: Site for JCPDS </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br> Does anyone know of a site that I can download files
from the JCPDS?<br>Randy Nessler<br>rnessler-at-
emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu<br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Doug Arrell
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ARRELL-at-jrc.nl <hr> Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995
08:31:16 GMT+0200 <br> Subject: Re: Convert PS files </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br>} I am looking for a way to convert my PostScript
files into "regular" image<br>} files. Does someone know of such siftwares on
either Mac or Unix platforms?<br>} Any information would be appreciated.<br>}
<br>Do you mean postscript or encapsulated postscript? If postscript then <br>one
of the postscript interpreters available should do it. I use one <br>an a PC
called GoScript that outputs to TIFF files as well as <br>printers. I am not sure,
but you should take a look at the GNU <br>Ghostscript interpreter that runs on
virtually anything - certainly <br>on unix systems. If you mean encapsulated
postscript (EPS) then just <br>import the files into a Mac word processor such as
WordPerfect on <br>Microsoft Word and then copy and paste to whereever you want
to. <br>+------------------------------------+<br>| Dr Douglas Arrell
|<br>| Mechanical Performance and Joining |<br>| Institute for Advanced Materials
|<br>| 1755 ZG Petten |<br>| Netherlands
|<br>| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL} |<br>| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287
|<br>| Fax (+31) 2246 1917 |
<br>+------------------------------------+<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: MicroToday-at-aol.com
<hr> Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 08:58:20 -0500 <br> Subject: Bacteria Micrographs
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Group -<br> Responding to an inquiry from Nestor, Custom
Medical Stock Photo is a<br>company which purchases micrographs and then sells
them to publications, etc.<br> They have a considerable inventory - in microscopy,
and a number "with"<br>bacteria.<br> Many readers may be interested in contacting
them and explore the sale of<br>their micrographs. I have, of course, no
financial interest in the company.<br><br>Custom Medical Storck Photo,
Inc.<br>3819 North Southport Ave<br>Chicago, IL 60613<br>Tel.: 312-248-
3200<br>Fax: 312-248-7427<br><br>Regards,<br>Don Grimes, Microscopy Today <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Kris_Kavanau-at-
dmcmail.ucsf.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST <br> Subject: Uranyl
Glass/FM Stds. </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {1995Feb03.100340.2874650620-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu}
<br>To: Microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov (M)<br><br> Subject:
Time: 9:45 AM<br> OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.
Date: 2/3/95<br>Dear Microscopists,<br>Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know
where it might be obtained? I<br>have been told that it is no longer manufactured
commercially. It might be<br>an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy
control.<br>Are there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence
standards<br>besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very
convenient, but<br>they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein,
and Texas Red<br>specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards Co.
no longer<br>makes pre-mounted standards.<br>I have been managing the UCSF core
flow and image cytometry facility ("Lab<br>for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I
had no real QC for our 2<br>occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I
need to establish QC<br>protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized
fluorescence (one<br>scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular
Cytogenetics<br>Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal
references)<br>seem to be available.<br>Any suggestions or comments would be
greatly appreciated. Thank you very<br>much. Kris
Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu<br><br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: John Kloetzel
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; kloetzel-at-umbc.edu (John Kloetzel) <hr> Date:
Fri, 3 Feb 1995 14:14:17 -0500 <br> Subject: EM network </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>subscribe microscopy kloetzel-at-umbc.edu<br><br>
** JAK
**<br><br>************************************************************************
****<br>John A. Kloetzel, Ph.D. {kloetzel-at-umbc.edu}
<br>Department of Biological Sciences
<br>University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC)<br>Catonsville, MD 21228-
5329 USA <br> Phone: (410) 455-2247 or
-3913 (Lab) <br> FAX: (410) 455-
3875<br>**************************************************************************
**<br><br> <br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Dr. William Dentler,
University of Kansas, Dept. of Cell Biology, <hr> Date: Fri, 3 Feb 1995 15:24:59
-0600 <br> Subject: fix pepper redux </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {m0raUmA-00011cC-at-pegasus.cc.ucf.edu} <br><br>A
few months ago a thread ran on fixation and embedding pepper contaminant
<br>artefact in biological ultrathin sections. A colleague of mine read the Pepper
<br>Summary I compiled and sent me the following fixation protocols that he has
used<br>successfully without pepper. Notice the first one in which glutaraldehyde,
<br>phosphate buffer AND OSMIUM are all mixed TOGETHER! <br><br>If anyone out
there wants a copy of my Pepper Summary, contact me off-line at my<br>e-mail and I
will zip a copy out to
you.<br><br>----------------------------------------------------------------------
--<br><br><br>"1. For fixing cilia in mammalian trachea, I have used an "instant
fixation" <br>method using a combination of osmium, phosphate buffer, and
glutaraldehyde - in <br>the cold - for many years and have never seen the pepper
described in the Pepper<br>Summary you sent to me. Right - all that stuff in the
same buffer dumped on the <br>tissue. Works great, but may extract a bit of actin.
<br><br>"The method I used was one described in a paper by Omnoto <br>and Kung in
the J. Cell Biol 87:33-46. I think it uses 50 mM NaPhosphate, <br>pH 7.2, 2% OsO4,
2% glutaraldehyde. Add the Osmium just before you add <br>the tissue and fix on
ice for 10 min. If you want, you can remove the <br>black fix after 10 min and add
another slug of fix for another 10 min but <br>that is optional.<br><br>"Omoto and
Kung used it to fix Paramecium and their cilia. I have used it to <br>fix
mammalian trachea (with their cilia). The advantage is that it seems <br>to
"freeze" cilia in position, as opposed to glutaraldehyde, in which cells
<br>actualy swim for a dab before either being fixed or dying (we fix cells,
<br>we don't kill them, do we?). The osmium does not penetrate for more than <br>a
few cell layers but, with epithelial tissue or single cells, it does <br>not make
much difference. <br><br>"I have never tried that fix method on Chlamydomonas or
Tetrahymena. Over the <br>last year I have done a lot of embedding of Chlamy and
have never seen pepper. <br>For those beasts, I find that cacodylate gives the
best preservation of the <br>cytoplasm, although others find that phosphate buffer
works fine too.<br>I do fix with glutaraldehyde in culture medium (pretty much
phosphate buffer), <br>overnight in glut in cacodylate, rinse a few times in
cacodylate, then <br>into 0.5-1% OsO4 in cacodylate for 30-60 min on ice, rinse
with a few <br>changes of water and into uranyl acetate for a few hours prior to
dehydrating in<br>acetone and embedding in epon.<br><br>"I've also tried another
method in which you fix with glut in phosphate buffer, <br>rinse, then incubate
overnight in uranyl acetate (in water) at 70 degrees <br>C. It works on Chlamy and
avoids osmium. It is supposed to eliminate the <br>need for poststaining of
sections, but I did not find this to be the <br>case. I believe that I once read
that the reason for staining sections is <br>to put a dab of stain on structures
at the last surface of the plastic <br>that the beam sees before blasting through
the objective lens. I don't <br>know, but, for Chlamy, I usually use the more old
fashioned method that I <br>gave you above. Pepper does not seem to be one of my
problems."<br>--------------------------------------------------------------------
----<br>Contributed to MICROSCOPY by:<br><br>--<br><br>Gib Ahlstrand, MMS
Newsletter Editor<br>Electron Optical Facility, University of Minnesota, Dept.
Plant Pathology<br>495 Borlaug Hall, St. Paul, MN 55108 (612)625-8249<br>612-625-
9728 FAX, giba-at-puccini.crl.umn.edu<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 03 Feb 1995 18:23:23 EST <br> Subject: Re:
TEM film </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Lucille,<br> I just got a number from Kodak for
technical questions, but they could<br>probably direct you to a distributer. It
is (800) 242-2424 x19. We usually<br>use a local vendor, National Graphics, but I
have not noticed a great range<br>of prices with other vendors. Good luck.<br>
Yours,<br> Bill Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Dr. Edmund Glaser
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; eglaser-at-umabnet.ab.umd.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 3
Feb 1995 22:12:08 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: TEM film </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>I am not aware that "cheap" is an a.k.a. for "reliable".
Please be kind <br>to the English language.<br><br>On Fri, 3 Feb 1995, Lucille A.
Giannuzzi wrote:<br><br>} Can anyone recommend a reliable (a.k.a. cheap) U.S.
vendor for TEM film?<br>} <br>} Thanks in advance,<br>} Lucille Giannuzzi<br>}
<br>} <br>}
*************************************************************************<br>}
Lucille A. Giannuzzi, Ph.D.<br>} <br>} Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Eng.
phone (407) 823-5770<br>} University of Central Florida fax
(407) 823-0208<br>} 4000 Central Florida Blvd. email lag-at-
pegasus.cc.ucf.edu<br>} Orlando, FL 32816-2450 USA<br>}
*************************************************************************<br>}
<br>} <br>} <br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Karpura V Kommineni
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; komminen-at-student.msu.edu <hr> Date: Sun, 5 Feb
1995 12:32:08 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: immunolabeling of wood
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {9502051732.AA72211-at-student1.cl.msu.edu}
<br><br>DDoes anyone know about work done on immunolabelling of wood tissue of
fruit<br>trees. I'm interested in any kind of information I can get on
fixation,<br>embedding and the labelling procedure. I plan to be using ProteinA-
colloidal<br>gold to tag the antibody.I'll be using a confocal microscope for this
study.If<br>anyone knows any work done in this area could you please send me
the<br>references. Thank you in advance.<br>my email address: komminen-at-
student.msu.edu<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Ian Hall
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; hall-at-me.udel.edu <hr> Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995
08:31:26 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: WDS Software </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br>Dear Fellow Microscopists,<br> We have recently
acquired a scanning electron microscope with a<br>four crystal Wavelength
Dispersive Spectrometer but the associated<br>computer system is rather old and
probably not worth re-activating. <br> I know that there is software for the
Macintosh, such as<br>"D.T.S.A." and "Flame", for ENERGY Dispersive Spectroscopy
but my question<br>is "Is there any (Mac) software out there which can handle
W(AVELENGTH)DS<br>spectral acquisition and processing?".<br> Any leads would be
very much appreciated. Thanks.<br><br> Rick Hall<br> Materials Science
Program<br> University of Delaware<br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Not Specified
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Kris_Kavanau-at-dmcmail.ucsf.edu <hr> Date: Fri,
03 Feb 1995 10:03:40 PST <br> Subject: Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br> Reply to: RE} Uranyl Glass/FM Stds.<br>Hi
Kris,<br> Uranium glass slides can be purchased from:<br><br>Newport Industrial
Glass, Inc.<br>1631 Monrovia Ave.<br>Costa Mesa, CA 92627<br>Tel: 714-642-
9980<br>Fax: 714-645-6800<br>Contact person: Bill Larsen (you can tell him I sent
you).<br>Sold as a 6.5x6.5" sheet (you can specify 1 mm height), so you may want
to form<br>a "consortium" to have Newport pre-cut a sheet to slide size (nominal
extra<br>cost, but your lab only needs one or two slides). If there is a lot
of<br>interest, my company may start selling single slides.<br><br>As for
references and the Shading Correction equation: please see my article in<br>the
11/94 issue of Journal of NIH Research 6(11): 80 (usual Internet<br>disclaimer:
yes, that is an ad from my company on the facing page). Also look<br>at Jericevic
et al (1989) Methods in Cell Biology 30:47-83.<br><br>MutliSpeck beads: The
Molecular Probes pre-mounted slide kits should be ideal<br>for DAPI and
Fluorescein. I believe they were optimized for Rhodamine, but<br>should still work
ok for Texas Red. If your problem is with mounting, Mol.<br>Probes now sells the
beads in solution, so you can 'sprinkle' some on your<br>specimens. If you have a
different problem with the current MultiSpeck's, Mol.<br>Probes may be able to
work something out for you.<br><br>Sorry, but I usually buy my reference material
from Mol. Probes and don't keep<br>close track of other slide
manufacturers.<br><br>Sincerely,<br><br>Dr. George McNamara<br>Universal Imaging
Corporation<br>George_M-at-Image1.com<br>--------------------------------------
<br><br> Subject: Time: 9:45
AM<br> OFFICE MEMO Uranyl Glass/FM Stds. Date:
2/3/95<br>Dear Microscopists,<br>Does anyone have any uranyl glass, or know where
it might be obtained? I<br>have been told that it is no longer manufactured
commercially. It might be<br>an excellent "generic" fluorescence microscopy
control.<br>Are there any commercially available, pre-mounted fluorescence
standards<br>besides "MultiSpeck" from Molecular Probes? They are very
convenient, but<br>they are not ideal for our applications as DAPI, fluorescein,
and Texas Red<br>specific controls. Unfortunately, Flow Cytometry Standards Co.
no longer<br>makes pre-mounted standards.<br>I have been managing the UCSF core
flow and image cytometry facility ("Lab<br>for Cell Analysis") for 2 years, but I
had no real QC for our 2<br>occasionally used fluorescence microscopes. Now I
need to establish QC<br>protocols for 6 additional multi-user, computerized
fluorescence (one<br>scanning confocal) microscopes in the "National Molecular
Cytogenetics<br>Resource." I was surprised that so few standards (and journal
references)<br>seem to be available.<br>Any suggestions or comments would be
greatly appreciated. Thank you very<br>much. Kris
Kavanau; kavanau-at-dmc.ucsf.edu<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: SiSTek-at-aol.com <hr>
Date: Mon, 6 Feb 1995 13:53:07 -0500 <br> Subject: subscribe </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Subscribe, please.<br><br>Thanks,<br><br>Mark Anderson,
SiSTek<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Deborah Holmberg
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; dlholmberg-at-ucdavis.edu <hr> Date: Mon, 6 Feb
1995 11:01:33 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Scanning 95 meeting </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>The organizers of the 28-31 March 1995 Scanning 95 meeting
want about 25 <br>student volunteers to run the slide projectors for the sessions
in <br>exchange for full meeting registration ($275). Please contact: <br>Mary K.
Sullivan <br>FAMS, Inc<br>P.O. Box 832<br>Mahwah, New Jersy<br>07430,0832
<br><br>or leave me a message.<br>Debe Holmberg e-mail {dlholmberg-at-
peseta.ucdavis.edu} <br>Lab 916-752-9021 <br>FAX 916-752-4604<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: David Leaffer
(415)852-1828 :&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com <hr>
Date: 06 Feb 1995 11:56:02 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: TEM Calibration
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br>Return-receipt-to: David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com<br>Registered-
mail-reply-requested-by: David.Leaffer-at-syntex.com<br><br>I am going to be
working on an TEM project that will be under "GLP" . GLP are <br>guidlines for
doing certain experiments for the FDA (I think the equivalent in<br>Europe is ISO
9000). I was wondering if anyone out there is doing TEM under<br>these guidlines?
And if so what are they using for magnification calibration. <br>I do not believe
that there are any vendors who can supply a certified<br>magnification standard
for TEM, which, I think is required for GLP.<br><br>Thanks,<br>David
Leaffer<br>Syntex Research<br>david.leaffer-at-syntex.com<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Deborah Holmberg
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; dlholmberg-at-ucdavis.edu <hr> Date: Mon, 6 Feb
1995 16:38:54 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Scanning 95 meeting </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>The organizers of the 28-31 March 1995 Scanning 95 meeting
want about 25 <br>student volunteers to run the slide projectors for the sessions
in <br>exchange for full meeting registration ($275). Please contact:<br>Mrs.
Mary K. Sullivan<br>FAMS. Inc.<br>P.O. Box 832<br>Mahwah, NJ 07430-0832<br><br>
<br>or leave me a message.<br>Debe Holmberg<br>Lab 916-752-9021<br>Fax 916-752-
4604<br>dlholmberg-at-peseta.ucdavis.edu<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: richard.easingwood-at-
stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood) <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 13:50:28
+1100 <br> Subject: Academic role </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear All,<br>We are are multi-user electron microscope
facility which has an extensive<br>range of equipment and uses a wide range of
techniques.<br>Five technical staff from three contributing University departments
are<br>employed full-time to undertake for work coming from both inside
and<br>outside the University.<br><br>The role of the 'academic in charge' of the
facility is shortly to come up<br>for reassessment and so it is a pertinent time
for us to reconsider what<br>that role should entail.<br>We are looking for
feedback from other individuals as to what they see the<br>contribution of an
academic in this environment should be.<br>Any opinions/suggestions?<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Nestor J. Zaluzec-
Argonne Nat. Lab. :&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ZALUZEC-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV
<hr> Date: Tue, 7 Feb 1995 21:59:52 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: Post Doc In
Tribology </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
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<font size=-1> <br><br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: wabutter-at-
ix.netcom.com (Wayne A. Buttermore) <hr> Date: Tue, 7 Feb 1995 20:03:15 -0800 <br>
Subject: subscribe </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {9502071626.AA16923-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil}
<br><br>Subscribe<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Peter Goodhew
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; goodhew-at-liverpool.ac.uk <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb
1995 08:43:25 GMT <br> Subject: Re: Academic role </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br><br>} The role of the 'academic in charge' of the
facility is shortly to come up<br>} for reassessment and so it is a pertinent
time for us to reconsider what<br>} that role should entail.<br>} We are looking
for feedback from other individuals as to what they see the<br>} contribution of
an academic in this environment should be.<br>Easy -<br>1. Keep abreast of all
techniques which a) you have, b) exist, and c) potentially exist.<br>2. Be an
expert practionioner of two or more of these. Publish a lot in your own
name.<br>3. Give advice on the application of all techniques and on the high-level
interpretation of all results. Publish <br>jointly with others.<br>4. Raise funds
to replace equipment and to buy new techniques as they become applicable.<br>5.
Make sure all users publish, and tell you about it!<br>6. Establish a reputation
as a scientist in some major subject area, not just as a microscopist. Publish a
lot.<br>7. Keep friendly with the heads (or budget controllers) of all potential
user departments.<br>8. Get to know lots of people in your institution by playing
sport/drinking/etc with them.<br>9. In your spare time, publish some
more.<br><br>I offer this advice after 20 years of running such a
facility!<br><br>Peter
Goodhew<br><br><br><br>-----------------------------------------------------------
-----------------------------------------------<br>Professor Peter J Goodhew,
Department of Materials Science & Engineering<br>University of Liverpool
<br>LIVERPOOL Fax (44) (0)51 794 4675<br>L69 3BX, UK
Tel (44) (0)51 794 4665 (secretary
Debra)<br>------------------------------------------------------------------------
----------------------------------<br>inter alia: Director of the MATTER project
for educational
software<br>----------------------------------------------------------------------
------------------------------------<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Philip.P.Edge-at-
ioppl.co.uk (Tel 0272 297481) <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:11:01 +0000 <br>
Subject: Subscribe </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
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<font size=-1> <br>X400-Received: by /PRMD=pipex/ADMD=pipex/C=gb/; Relayed; Wed, 8
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</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Philip.P.Edge-at-
ioppl.co.uk (Tel 0272 297481) <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:14:29 +0000 <br>
Subject: Bioimaging </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
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<font size=-1> <br>X400-Received: by /PRMD=pipex/ADMD=pipex/C=gb/; Relayed; Wed, 8
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1995 11:14:29 +0000<br><br>Institute of Physics Publishing
<br>Techno House Tel: +44 272 297481<br>Redcliffe
Way Fax: +44 272 294318<br>Bristol
<br>BS1 6NX England Telex: 449149 INSTP
G<br><br><br>E-mail Contact Details<br>----------------------<br>Internet :
{mailbox} -at-ioppublishing.co.uk<br>Janet : {mailbox} -at-
uk.co.ioppublishing<br>X400 : /s= {mailbox}
/o=ioppl/prmd=iopp/admd=0/c=gb/<br><br>IOPP Internet
services<br>----------------------<br>Gopher : gopher.ioppublishing.com<br>WWW
Url : http://www.ioppublishing.com<br><br>Dear Moderator<br><br>I am the
Publisher of the journal Bioimaging which I hope you have heard<br>of. I would
like to place information about the journal, including tables<br>of contents, on
your bulletin board. Will this be possible and how should I<br>do it?<br><br>Best
wishes, Philip Edge.<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: jester-at-
crnjjsgi.swmed.edu (James V. Jester) <hr> Date: Wed, 08 Feb 1995 12:10:01 -0600
<br> Subject: Lab Design </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br><br> Several years ago there appeared an article in
Science discussing <br>laboratory space design and a recent "New" model being
implemented in <br>England. Does anyone remember this article, and what has
happened <br>to the English experiment?<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Marc Brande
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; brande-at-sdsc.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995
10:04:15 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Timelapse Cell Culture Movies
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br> Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,<br>
Functional Neuroimaging List {lat-at-po.cwru.edu} ,<br> Confocal
Microscopy List {confocal-at-ubvm.bitnet} ,<br> Cell Bio List {cellbiol-
at-net.bio.net} <br>Message-Id: {Pine.3.05.1.9502081015.B14211-a100000-at-
pauline.sdsc.edu} <br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-
ASCII<br><br>Can Anyone point me to sources (free to minimal cost) of analog (VCR
tape)<br>or digital timelapse movies of cells in culture? This is not
for<br>commercial use, only presentation demonstration. Of course I would
credit<br>each source in the presentation. Thanks in advance for any help you can
give.<br><br>Marc<br><br>Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging
<br>San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-
bobcat.etsu.edu<br>3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-
bobcat.etsu.edu<br>San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU
Voice:619-587-4830<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: evansnd-at-ornl.gov
(Neal D. Evans) <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 13:17:21 -0500 <br> Subject: Subscribe
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Subscribe Microscopy evansnd-at-ornl.gov<br><br>Dr. Neal
D. Evans<br>Shared Research Equipment Program<br>Oak Ridge National
Laboratory<br>Building 5500, MS 6376, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6376 <br>voice(615-576-
4427) fax(615-574-0641) email(evansnd-at-ornl.gov<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: stuw-at-lanl.gov
(Stuart Wright) <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb 1995 11:22:29 -0700 <br> Subject:
Reconditioned #SEMs </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {9502081818.AA09732-at-mustang.mst6.lanl.gov}
<br>X-Sender: stuw-at-mustang.mst6.lanl.gov<br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-Type:
text/plain; charset="us-ascii"<br><br>Is anyone aware of a company that sells
reconditioned
SEMs?<br><br><br>+---------------------------------------------------------+<br>|
Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
<br>|.........................................................|<br>| Mail Stop
G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |<br>| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax:
(505) 667-5268 |
<br>+---------------------------------------------------------+<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Daniel E. Sampson
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; des-at-rupture.ucsc.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb
1995 11:22:29 -0700 <br> Subject: Reconditioned SEMs </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Is anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned
SEMs?<br><br><br>+---------------------------------------------------------+<br>|
Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
<br>|.........................................................|<br>| Mail Stop
G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |<br>| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax:
(505) 667-5268 |
<br>+---------------------------------------------------------
+<br><br><br><br><br>------ Forwarded message ends here ------
<br><br><br>*******************************************************************<br
>Daniel E. Sampson dsampson-at-
earthsci.ucsc.edu<br>Instrumentation Specialist Phone: (408) 459-
4992<br>Earth Sciences FAX: (408) 459-
3074<br>University of California<br>Santa Cruz, CA
95064<br>*******************************************************************<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Elinor Solit
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; cambrex-at-world.std.com <hr> Date: Wed, 8 Feb
1995 17:34:11 +0001 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: Reconditioned #SEMs
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Stuart,<br>Have you tried contacting the instrument
manufacturers themslves? I <br>believe that JEOL and Hitachi, for instance, may
sell the <br>reconditioned SEMs that comes in on trade-ins. Failing that, give
<br>us a call, we'll try to direct you to more sources.<br><br>Ellie Solit,
<br>Publisher of MICROSCOPE TECHNOLOGY & NEWS AND <br>THE MICROSCOPE
BOOK<br><br><br>On Wed, 8 Feb 1995, Stuart Wright wrote:<br><br>} Is anyone aware
of a company that sells reconditioned SEMs?<br>} <br>} <br>}
+---------------------------------------------------------+<br>} | Stuart Wright
Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |<br>}
|.........................................................|<br>} | Mail Stop G770
phone: (505) 665-3647 |<br>} | Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505)
667-5268 |<br>}
+---------------------------------------------------------+<br>} <br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: richard.easingwood-at-
stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood) <hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 16:43:19
+1100 <br> Subject: Academic role </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {199502090437.RAA16024-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
<br>X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz<br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-
Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"<br><br>Dear All,<br>Further to my message of
8.2.95, thank you very much to those who have<br>responded so candidly to my
request for people's feelings and experiences<br>on this topic. I appreciate that
it can be a sensitive issue, not helped<br>when one is replying to someone who
doesn't even identify themselves<br>properly.<br>As I neglected to state who I am
and where I work (I changed computers days<br>ago and forgot to put the automatic
signature on - the ramifications of<br>this I am just becoming aware of...) that
info now follows.<br>Maybe now I'll get some more replies...<br><br>Richard
Easingwood<br>South Campus Electron Microscope Unit<br>Otago Medical School<br>PO
Box 913<br>Dunedin<br>NEW ZEALAND<br><br>Telephone: 64-03-479 7301<br>Facsimile:
64-03-479 7254<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Kathy Walters
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; kwalters-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu <hr> Date: Thu,
9 Feb 1995 07:17:27 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: Neg stain of lipids
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Fellow Microscopists,<br><br>I have been asked to do
particle sizing of a 10% fat immulsion (pH 8.0)<br>and had hoped to be able to do
a very quick negative staining procedure as<br>this may need to be run frequently.
I toyed with the idea of freeze<br>fracture, but the time involved is not
convenient for lots of runs. Has<br>anyone tried this? What stains would you
suggest? Is Osmium<br>vaper fixation nessecary?<br><br>Thanks for any
help!<br>Kathy Walters<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: stuw-at-lanl.gov
(Stuart Wright) <hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 09:06:22 -0700 <br> Subject:
reconditioned SEMs </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {199502091342.AA01519-at-mail.mmmg.com} <br><br>Is
anyone aware of a company that sells reconditioned
SEMs?<br><br><br><br>+---------------------------------------------------------
+<br>| Stuart Wright Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |
<br>|.........................................................|<br>| Mail Stop
G770 phone: (505) 665-3647 |<br>| Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax:
(505) 667-5268 |
<br>+---------------------------------------------------------+<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Jay Jerome
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu <hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb
1995 11:10:54 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: Neg stain of lipids
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>We have considerable experience with negative stain of
phospholipid <br>vesicles, lipoproteins, and triacylglyceride emulsions. In these
<br>circumstances fixation is not critical, and in fact can produce <br>artefacts.
PTA stain seems to work best. We concentrate our sample on <br>grid by drying
multiple drops under gentle nitrogen gas stream prior to <br>negative stain. This
avoids clumping in the suspension. Some sizing <br>artefacts can occur as dryed
particles of large size can deform slightly. <br>See Ganz et al, 1991, J Lipid Res
31:163 for nice discussion of this.<br>Good luck-<br><br><br>Jay
Jerome<br>**************************************************************<br>* aka:
W. Gray Jerome *<br>* Dept. of Pathology
*<br>* Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest University *<br>* Medical
Center Blvd *<br>* Winston-Salem, NC 27157-
1092 *<br>* 910-716-4972
*<br>* jjerome-at-isnet.is.wfu.edu
*<br>**************************************************************<br><br>On Thu,
9 Feb 1995, Kathy Walters wrote:<br><br>} Dear Fellow Microscopists,<br>} <br>}
I have been asked to do particle sizing of a 10% fat immulsion (pH 8.0)<br>} and
had hoped to be able to do a very quick negative staining procedure as<br>} this
may need to be run frequently. I toyed with the idea of freeze<br>} fracture,
but the time involved is not convenient for lots of runs. Has<br>} anyone tried
this? What stains would you suggest? Is Osmium<br>} vaper fixation
nessecary?<br>} <br>} Thanks for any help!<br>} Kathy Walters<br>} <br>}
<br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Thu, 09 Feb 1995 12:06:33 EST <br> Subject: Re:
Neg stain of lipids </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Kathy,<br> Staining is not really my field, but I'd
suggest a water-soluble heavy<br>metal and NO osmium. The Os would only dissolve
in the lipid and reduce con-<br>trast. If possible, looking at a frozen, hydrated
(or lyophyllized in-situ)<br>specimen would be best. You don't specify either the
matrix of the emulsion<br>(I assume aqueous) nor the technique to be used (I
assume TEM), but a possible<br>protocol would be to add the stain to the emulsion
and rapidly freeze, then<br>cryo-section, examine on a Friday, raise the temp to
~-90C, come in Saturday<br>and raise the temp to -80C, Sunday to -70C, and look at
the freeze-dried spec-<br>imen Monday. If you can do the particle sizing from the
frozen-hydrated spec-<br>imen, the last steps can be omitted. Keeping the stain
strictly in the aqueous<br>phase should prevent size changes, etc. in the lipid
drops. Good luck.<br> Yours,<br> Bill
Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: jacobb-at-ux5.lbl.gov
<hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:50:06 -0800 <br> Subject: Re: Reconditioned SEMs
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Stuart,<br><br>E.J. Fjeld Co,<br>3 Executive Park
Drive<br>North Billerica MA 01862<br>Phone 508-667-1416<br><br>Provides
reconditioned AMRAY microscopes. They also make special stages and<br>accessories.
They've been around for a long time and are reliable.<br><br>Jacob Bastacky,
MD<br>1-116<br>Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory EMail: sjbastacky-at-
lbl.gov<br>University of California Phone: (510) 486-
4606<br>Berkeley, California 94720 Fax: (510) 486-4750<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Elinor Solit
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; cambrex-at-world.std.com <hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb
1995 15:20:13 +0001 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: reconditioned SEMs
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Stuart, my attempts to reply to your question by email have
resulted in 6 <br>notices of undelivered mail. I left a voice message on your
phone this <br>morning. I think we can help you in your
search.<br><br>Regards,<br>Ellie Solit, Publisher/Executive Editor of Microscope
Technology & News <br>and The Microscope Book, a Smart catalog.<br><br><br>On Thu,
9 Feb 1995, Stuart Wright wrote:<br><br>} Is anyone aware of a company that sells
reconditioned SEMs?<br>} <br>} <br>} <br>}
+---------------------------------------------------------+<br>} | Stuart Wright
Los Alamos National Lab, MST-6 |<br>}
|.........................................................|<br>} | Mail Stop G770
phone: (505) 665-3647 |<br>} | Los Alamos, NM 87545 fax: (505)
667-5268 |<br>}
+---------------------------------------------------------+<br>} <br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Jean Armour Polly
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; jpolly-at-nysernet.ORG <hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995
13:00:28 -0500 <br> Subject: Apple QuickTime Conferencing </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-ID: {95020916094142E.RQDA-at-USCN.USCN.UGA.EDU}
(UMass-Mailer 4.04)<br> Neuroscience List {neur-sci-at-net.bio.net} ,<br>
Microscopy List {microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov} ,<br> Digital Video List
{digvid-l-at-ucdavis.edu} ,<br> Confocal Microscopy List {confocal-at-
ubvm.bitnet} ,<br> Cell Bio List {cellbiol-at-net.bio.net} <br>Message-Id:
{Pine.3.05.1.9502091131.A22203-e100000-at-pauline.sdsc.edu} <br>Mime-Version:
1.0<br>Content-Type: TEXT/PLAIN; charset=US-ASCII<br><br>I thought this post
should be quickly disseminated.<br><br>Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email
List:3D Imaging <br>San Diego 3D Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-
at-bobcat.etsu.edu<br>3840 Camino Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-
bobcat.etsu.edu<br>San Diego, CA 92122 Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU
Voice:619-587-4830<br><br>---------- Forwarded message ----------<br><br><br>THE
FOLLOWING RELEASE MOVED OVER PR NEWSWIRE ON TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1995 AT<br>11:42
AM, PST.<br><br><br>Contact:<br>Julie Karbo<br>Stirling & Cohan<br>(415) 513-
0974<br>e-mail: jkarbo-at-applelink.apple.com<br><br>Brooke Cohan<br>Stirling &
Cohan<br>(415) 513-0973<br>e-mail:cohan-at-applelink.apple.com<br><br>Apple
Announces QuickTime Conferencing<br>Open, Cross Platform Conferencing,
Collaboration and Multimedia<br>Communications Technology<br><br>SAN FRANCISCO,
California--February 7, 1995--Apple Computer today<br>announced a cross platform
conferencing, collaboration and<br>multimedia communications technology that
allows personal computer<br>users to share real-time information, images and sound
anywhere in<br>the world. Apple is currently making the technology,
called<br>QuickTime Conferencing, available to corporate allies who plan
to<br>create or have announced they are creating end user applications<br>based on
the technology. QuickTime Conferencing is a standards-<br>based architecture that
allows users to:<br><br>-- video conference and collaborate--to share and annotate
text,<br>images, screen capture, sound, video and virtual scenes real-
time<br>among fellow conference participants in a variety of
locations<br>worldwide. QuickTime Conferencing allows users to
record<br>conversations and transform those conversations into
QuickTime<br>movies. All of this can be done on a variety of networks such
as<br>an Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN), the worldwide<br>internet,
local area and wide area networks and Asynchronous<br>Transfer Mode (ATM)
networks. QuickTime Conferencing can be used<br>by a number of simultaneous
users, the total number being only by<br>available network bandwidth.<br><br>--
conduct cross platform video conferencing connectivity<br>between Macintosh
computers, PCs, UNIX systems and room-based<br>conferencing systems through the
use of the H.320 worldwide<br>teleconferencing standard.<br><br>-- broadcast and
view multimedia content--digital audio, music<br>and video on a local or wide area
network.<br><br>Through alliances QuickTime Conferencing technology is expected
to<br>yield product bundles such as:<br>-- Apple Media Conference Kit--Consisting
of the QuickTime<br>Conferencing system extension, the Apple Media
Conference<br>application and a high quality, color video camera.<br>-- Apple
Media Conference Pro Kit--Consisting of the QuickTime<br>Conferencing system
extension, the Apple Media Conference<br>application, a color video camera and an
H.320 codec/ISDN adapter<br>board. Being developed by Sagem/SAT, a leading
international<br>communications product company, the board is designed to
allow<br>interoperability between platforms (Power Macintosh to Macintosh,<br>PC,
UNIX and room systems) and full-screen image sharing.<br>--Complete Media
Conference System--Consisting of an Apple Media<br>Conference Kit, a Power
Macintosh 7100 AV, a 17 inch color<br>monitor, external speakers and a
keyboard.<br><br>Because QuickTime Conferencing is software-based, it is
easily<br>incorporated into new and existing third party products. As
such,<br>Apple believes that QuickTime-compatible products could
yield<br>extremely affordable prices:<br>-- Apple Media Conference Kit--under
$200<br>-- Apple Media Conference Pro Kit--under $1,750<br>-- Complete Media
Conferencing System--under $6,000<br><br>Apple is working with a wide range of
companies including telcos,<br>network, software and hardware providers and
developers to provide<br>a range of solutions that take advantage of the benefits
of<br>QuickTime Conferencing (see associated releases). These allies<br>have
announced that they expect to make products available in the<br>second quarter of
1995.<br> From the home office to university campuses to the
multinational<br>enterprise network, QuickTime Conferencing will allow users
to<br>communicate with people across the country or across the world.<br>Users
won't have to worry about whether their hardware equipment,<br>networking
equipment and applications are compatible with the<br>solutions being used on the
other end of the network line.<br>QuickTime Conferencing is designed to be fully
operational with<br>H.320 standards-based systems.<br> "The introduction of
QuickTime Conferencing will not only extend<br>Apple's leadership in multimedia,
but will make an important<br>difference in the video conferencing and
collaboration market,"<br>said Rick Shriner, vice president of Apple's Core
Technologies<br>Group. "Our goal in designing QuickTime Conferencing was
to<br>develop a solution that allowed people the opportunity to<br>communicate and
collaborate. By making it open in every sense of<br>the word, our users can
metaphorically break down the walls of<br>their homes, schools and offices and
expand the boundaries of<br>their lives."<br> QuickTime Conferencing users can
have access to people,<br>information, sights and sounds that could never be
combined<br>before. For example:<br>-- An author in Tokyo, Japan and her
publisher in San Francisco,<br>California can view and discuss cover art for a new
novel. They<br>can each view the design at several different angles,
change<br>the visual perspective of the artwork, and annotate the image
and<br>accompanying text for the other to see.<br>-- A sixth grade class in
Dallas, Texas can discuss and view the<br>effects of global warming with an
environmental scientist at U.C.<br>Berkeley's Lawrence Labs in California by using
QuickTime<br>Conferencing over the internet.<br>-- A special effects producer in
Hollywood, California can take a<br>movie director on the East Coast through a
virtual tour of a<br>proposed set design. While the producer records their
discussion<br>as a QuickTime movie, the director can pan around the scene,
zoom<br>in to look at props and view the set design from a variety
of<br>angles.<br>-- A breast cancer patient and her doctor in Fargo, North
Dakota<br>can consult with a leading oncologist in Boston, Massachusetts on<br>her
prognosis and course of treatment. The Boston physician can<br>view her
mammograms and annotate her medical chart as they<br>converse.<br>-- A CEO's
company-wide address can be broadcast for easy viewing<br>by all employees at
their personal desktop.<br><br>Because QuickTime Conferencing allows for sharing
of multimedia<br>data and reduces the time and expense of travel, it allows
people<br>to be more productive than ever before.<br> "In the past people found
video conferencing easy to resist<br>because prices were high and the number of
people they could<br>communicate with was extremely limited," said Rick
LeFaivre,<br>senior vice president of the Apple Technology Group. "Now
for<br>what we expect to be very aggressive prices, people can conduct a<br>media
conference with virtually anyone, anywhere in the world. A<br>Power Macintosh
QuickTime Conferencing user can share QuickTime VR<br>(virtual reality) images,
annotate text documents and share digital<br>music over networks from basic rate
ISDN to the internet to ATM."<br> Because QuickTime Conferencing is a software-
based architecture,<br>application developers, communications providers and
hardware<br>vendors can easily develop compatible solutions. For
example,<br>Crosswise Corporation, the maker of Face to Face, a cross-
platform<br>document conferencing application, developed a
QuickTime<br>Conferencing-compatible version of their software in just
one<br>month. A QuickTime Conferencing compatible application shares
the<br>interface of other QuickTime Conferencing-enabled third
party<br>applications, so customers can begin using applications quickly<br>and
easily.<br> QuickTime Conferencing is based on Apple's award winning
QuickTime<br>technology. It is a conferencing architecture which
allows<br>support for both industry standards such as H.320, as well
as<br>proprietary architectures, and codecs such as Indeo by Intel<br>Corporation.
QuickTime Conferencing is transport, compression and<br>media-device independent.
Apple's built-in AV capabilities<br>combined with the performance of the PowerPC
RISC architecture,<br>make it easy for users to make multimedia connections with
others<br>on the information superhighway almost as soon as they pull<br>QuickTime
Conferencing out of the box.<br> "Having QuickTime Conferencing available in my
home, office, and<br>studio literally allows me to be in multiple locations at
one<br>time--it's the next best thing to having a Star Trek transporter,"<br>said
Los Angeles-based screenwriter and multimedia special effects<br>consultant
Michael Backes, co-author of the screenplay for<br>Jurassic Park and other motion
pictures. "Within the next few<br>months, I'll be counting on QuickTime
Conferencing as the backbone<br>for my business."<br> "The short and sweet of
QuickTime Conferencing is that it requires<br>less network bandwidth and uses
innovative technology," says Matt<br>Ghourdjian, National Director of Technology
at Howrey & Simon, a<br>300-lawyer law firm serving Fortune 50 clients. Howrey &
Simon<br>intends to use the product to send QuickTime movies of depositions<br>and
re-enactments for lawyers to use in court; for live document sharing;<br>for
consultation between partners; and to conduct tours of the firm's<br>Washington,
DC office from Los Angeles. "It's simply outstanding," says<br>Chris Masten,
Howrey & Simon's Technical Litigation Support Manager.<br> To use the Apple
Media Conference Kit on the Macintosh, users need<br>at least 16 Megabytes of RAM,
a 68040 or PowerPC-based Macintosh,<br>System 7.5, a network interface such as
Ethernet, ISDN, Token<br>Ring, and optionally the ability to digitize audio and
video using<br>the built-in AV subsystem or a third party digitizer card. To
use<br>the Apple Media Conference Pro Kit on Macintosh, users need at<br>least 16
Megabytes of RAM, an AV PowerPC-based Macintosh and an<br>ISDN connection. To
communicate with QuickTime Conferencing users<br>from the PC and other platforms,
users will need an H.320<br>compatible codec on their machine, available from a
variety of<br>vendors. QuickTime Conferencing technology is currently
under<br>development and products using the technology have not yet
been<br>completed. Apple will provide pricing and availability<br>information
when products are completed and ready for release.<br> Apple Computer, Inc., a
recognized pioneer and innovator in the<br>information industry, creates powerful
solutions based on easy to<br>use personal computers, servers, peripherals,
software, online<br>services, and personal digital assistants. Headquartered
in<br>Cupertino, California, Apple (NASDAQ:AAPL) develops,
manufactures,<br>licenses and markets products, technologies and services for
the<br>business, education, consumer, scientific & engineering and<br>government
markets in over 140 countries.<br><br><br>-30-<br><br>Apple, the Apple logo,
QuickTime and Macintosh are registered<br>trademarks and Power Macintosh is a
trademark of Apple Computer,<br>Inc. Additional company and product names may be
trademarks or<br>registered trademarks of the individual companies and
are<br>respectfully acknowledged.<br><br>END<br><br>Applelink pathway:<br>News
Break<br>Apple & Industry News<br>PR Express<br>Apple Press
Releases<br>2/7/95<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Dascorr-at-aol.com <hr>
Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 10:38:26 -0500 <br> Subject: Reconditioned SEMs
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>I know of a company that reconditions old AMRAY SEMs. The
owner used to work<br>at AMRAY before starting his own company. Company is E.J.
Feld located in<br>Massachusetts. I can give you the phone on Monday, 2/13 when I
return to<br>work. <br>Dr. David A. Shifler<br>Powell Labs Ltd.<br>Baltimore, MD
31231<br>(410) 327-3500<br>(410) 327-7506 (FAX)<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Liang, Long
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; LLIANG-at-is.Arco.COM <hr> Date: 10 Feb 1995
11:07:11 CST <br> Subject: Books-- EM & Geology ? </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {MACMS.LLIANG.061405110095041FMACMS-at-
IS.ARCO.COM} <br><br><br>Dear Microscopists,<br><br>Does anyone know if there is
any recent books about applications of<br>microbeam techniques to mineralogy and
petrology?<br><br>The one I have was published by Mineralogical Association of
Canada<br>(Short Course in Microbeam Techniques) in May 1976.<br><br>Thanks in
advance.<br><br>Long LIang<br>ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab<br>PLano, TX<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: JoRita Jordan
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; jjordan-at-world.std.com <hr> Date: Fri, 10 Feb
1995 13:27:19 +0001 (EST) <br> Subject: TEM comments sought </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>TEM users:<br><br>Thanks to all the replies to my recent
TEM survey, I am well on my way to<br>preparing the survey for publication. I need
some information -- I'm a<br>chemist, not a microscopist -- What do TEM users see
as important trends in<br>TEM? New technology? Important applications? Is there
other technology that<br>is replacing TEM in any way. How important are
accessories like EDS and<br>EELS? For what uses?<br><br>Any comments on today's
TEM would be greatly appreciated -- I'll send a copy<br>of the survey to any
contributor.<br><br>Jo Rita Jordan<br>Analytical Consumer<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: DCROMEY-at-
CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU <hr> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 13:50:01 -0700 (MST) <br> Subject:
Phone # for Presetation Technol. needed </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Does anyone in the group have the phone number for
PRESENTATION <br>TECHNOLOGY? We are in the information gathering stage for the
purchase <br>of a 35mm slide maker and the phone number we have (408-774-3733) is
not <br>correct.<br><br>Thanks for your help.<br><br>Doug<br><br><br> Douglas W.
Cromey, M.S.<br> Cell Biology and Anatomy<br> Arizona Health Sciences Center<br>
1501 N. Campbell Ave.<br> Tucson, AZ 85724<br> (602)626-2824
dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu
<br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Peter D. Barnett
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; pbarnett-at-crl.com <hr> Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995
22:41:51 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Phone # for Presetation Technol. needed
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>help<br><br>Peter D. Barnett - Forensic Science Associates
- Richmond CA<br> pbarnett-at-crl.com VOICE: 510-222-8883 FAX: 510-222-
8887<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl
(Timon Fliervoet) <hr> Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 08:24:35 +0100 <br> Subject: Re:
Books-- EM & Geology ? </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {n1419587852.54350-at-qmgate.anl.gov} <br><br>}
Dear Microscopists,<br>} <br>} Does anyone know if there is any recent books about
applications of<br>} microbeam techniques to mineralogy and petrology?<br>} <br>}
The one I have was published by Mineralogical Association of Canada<br>} (Short
Course in Microbeam Techniques) in May 1976.<br>} <br>} Thanks in advance.<br>}
<br>} Long LIang<br>} ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab<br>} PLano, TX<br><br><br>Try:<br>McLaren,
A.C., 1991, TEM of minerals and rocks, Cambridge University
Press,<br>Cambridge<br><br>Boland, J.N. & FitzGerald, J.D. (eds), 1993, Defects
and processes in the<br>solid state: geoscience applications, Developments in
Petrology, Vol 14,<br>Elsevier, Amsterdam<br><br>Buseck, P.R. (ed), 1992, Minerals
and reactions at the atomic scale: TEM,<br>Mineralogical Society of America,
Reviews in Mineralogy, vol 27.<br><br>Cheers
Timon<br><br>------------------------------------------------<br>Timon Fliervoet,
Timonf-at-earth.ruu.nl, Faculty of Earth Sciences, Department<br>of Geology,
Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.021 3508 TA Utrecht, the<br>Netherlands.<br>tel:
++31 30 - 535054, fax: ++31 30 - 537725<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: SiSTek-at-aol.com <hr>
Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 09:29:32 -0500 <br> Subject: Need TEM analysis
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Help please!! SiSTek is looking for TEM analytical services
in the<br>southwestern US, preferably in the Phoenix metropolitan area where we
are<br>located. We are a company that provides consultant services to a number
of<br>manufacturers of Si-related deposition systems and need *local*
(turnaround<br>time and iterative analysis is important for our clients) TEM
support. We<br>believe there is a company in the Phoenix area offering TEM
services, but<br>can't find the name. Does anyone know the
name/contact?<br><br>Many thanks,<br><br>Mark Anderson, SiSTek<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: ckblack-at-dow.com
(U096585) <hr> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 11:03:19 -0500 <br> Subject: mycoplasm in
cell culture </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Hello folks.....<br><br>This may not be the correct forum
for the <br>following query, however, any info out there would <br>be greatly
appreciated.<br><br>We are interested in microscopy techniques, <br>testing
procedures, staining , etc., for detection <br>of mycoplasm in cell
cultures.<br><br>Thankyou in advance.<br><br>Cary Black (ckblack-at-
dow.com)<br>Dave Williams<br><br>The Dow Chemical Company<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Doug Davis
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu <hr> Date: 14
Feb 1995 09:05:10 -0800 <br> Subject: Ecomet Polisher for sale
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-ID: {n1419369693.44281-at-maillink.berkeley.edu}
<br><br> Subject: Time: 9:13
AM<br> OFFICE MEMO Ecomet Polisher for sale Date:
2/14/95<br><br>FOR SALE: ECOMET 1 8" Polisher/grinder, complete with various
polishing<br>discs, alumina and lapping oil. 115 volt, 5 amp, new price in 1988
=<br>$1250.00<br>Best offer. <br>Call Doug Davis of EM Lab at UC Berkeley at
(510) 642-2085<br>or e-mail: doug_davis-at-maillink.berkeley.edu<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: jad1-at-cec.wustl.edu
(Joe DeMaro) <hr> Date: Tue, 14 Feb 1995 12:02:43 -0600 <br> Subject: SEM well
plates </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved
from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Any tips on cutting wells out of 24 well cell culture
plates would be<br>greatly appreciated.<br><br>Joe<br>Joseph A.
DeMaro<br>Washington University Medical School <br>Department of Neurology<br>660
S. Euclid<br>Rm 212 Biotech <br>St. Louis, MO 63110<br>jad1-at-
cec.wustl.edu<br>314-362-9448<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Self
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; SALES/GREGB <hr> Date: Thu, 9 Feb 1995 13:25:54
<br> Subject: Re: printers for gray scale prints </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Forwarded message:<br><br>All, <br><br> LaserMaster
Corporation - Imaging Division is the ONLY company<br>that manufactures a 1800 dpi
plain paper laser printers. I work for<br>LaserMaster and have just completed
printing the 100/300 dpi Round<br>Robin Greyscale Test images. If you are
interested in obtaining<br>them, you may e:mail me at Gregb-at-Sales.LMT.com and I
will mail you a<br>printout of the test images from the LaserMaster printer. I can
be<br>reached at 1-800-950-6363 Ext: 3207 if you have questions about
your<br>specific situation and resolution needs.<br><br>Thank You all,<br>Greg
Begin - LaserMaster Corp.<br>Scientific/Medical Imaging Div.
<br>/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/\/<br><br>
} Date sent: Thu, 09 Feb 95 07:42:30 -600<br>} From:
Supratik_Guha-at-mail.mmmg.com (SG)<br>} To: microscopy-at-
aaem.amc.anl.gov<br>} Subject: printers for gray scale prints<br><br>} I
am looking around for a gray scale printer to attach with our Gatan <br>} slow
scan CCD image aquisition system and would appreciate any <br>} suggestions. We
would prefer not to get a dye-sub printer due to the <br>} high costs of
printing. I understand that there are 1800 dpi laser <br>} printers available,
could someone point out manufacturers for these <br>} machines?<br>} <br>}
Supratik Guha<br>} Senior Materials Scientist<br>} 3M Corporate Research
Labs.<br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: NANCY SMITH
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; NSMITH-at-darwin.sci.csuhayward.edu <hr> Date:
Tue, 14 Feb 1995 13:51:37 PSD8PDT <br> Subject: sem culture well
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Hello Joe:<br><br>When I want to process cells for SEM from
24 well culture dishes I <br>use a Bunsen burner and a scoopula (the curved metal
device for <br>scooping out dry chemicals). First, the cells are fixed as usual
with <br>glutaraldehyde then washed in buffer and distilled water. Then,
<br>working within a fume hood and wearing a heatproof glove, the scoopula <br>is
heated until red then touched to the underside of the culture dish. <br>The curved
metal is about the right size for the 24 well dishes. It <br>takes 2 or 3 times to
heat and cut until the whole bottom is <br>released. Once the initial cut is made
you need to keep the cells wet <br>and this is easily done using a squirt bottle
of distilled water. <br>This technique does not appear to cause damage to the
cells but we <br>normally look at the more centrally positioned cells to avoid any
<br>artefacts. Hope this helps.<br><br>Nancy Smith<br>Cal State Hayward<br>nsmith-
at-csuhayward.edu<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Eric Wang
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ewang-at-u.washington.edu <hr> Date: Tue, 14 Feb
1995 15:07:16 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Electron mean free path
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br>X-Sender: ewang-at-hardy.u.washington.edu<br><br>Hello,
everyone:<br> Does anyone know where I can find some reference on measurement
<br>of electron mean free path of different materials? The mean free path I
<br>mean here is the mean free path for measuring the thickness when doing
<br>EELS, so this includes electrons of all the energy losses rather than one
<br>particular energy loss. We are particularly interested in getting the
<br>right electron mean free path for Chrome Oxide and evaporated Carbon. <br>
Thanks a lot.<br><br>Eric Wang<br>FB-10 Roberts Hall<br>Univ. of
Washington<br>Seattle. Wa 98195<br>(206) 543-1514<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: richard.easingwood-at-
stonebow.otago.ac.nz (Richard Easingwood) <hr> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 16:49:15
+1100 <br> Subject: SEM well plates </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {199502150442.RAA12340-at-arwen.otago.ac.nz}
<br>X-Sender: st004718-at-brandywine.otago.ac.nz<br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-
Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"<br><br>)Joe,<br>} Subject: SEM well
plates<br><br>} Any tips on cutting wells out of 24 well cell culture plates would
be greatly<br>} } appreciated.<br>} Joe<br>} Joseph A. DeMaro<br><br>Depending on
what exactly it is you are doing, how about using Thermanox<br>(Thermonox?)
plastic slides on the bottom of the wells - they make them<br>specially to fit
into the wells of 12 well plates and possibly the 24 well<br>ones too. They come
sterilised and you just pop them into the well before<br>you add medium and cells
and remove later, fix, dry etc and mount on a<br>stub. The slide surface
properties are supposed to duplicate the ordinary<br>well bottoms.<br>Its easier
than cutting wells out of the bottom of the trays.<br>Regards R
Easingwood<br><br>Richard Easingwood<br>South Campus Electron Microscope
Unit<br>Otago Medical School<br>PO Box 913<br>Dunedin<br>NEW
ZEALAND<br><br>Telephone: 64-03-479 7301<br>Facsimile: 64-03-479 7254<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
<hr> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 01:11:08 -0500 <br> Subject: Subscribe
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Please Subscribe<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Rich2442-at-aol.com
<hr> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 02:45:32 -0500 <br> Subject: Request to join mailing
list </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved
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<font size=-1> <br><br>I work for an OEM of scanning electron microscopes and am
interested in<br>keeping up with the latest technology and issues. I would like
to subscribe<br>to the mailing list. Could you please let me know what I need to
do.<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: W.L. Steffens
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 15
Feb 1995 08:41:37 EST <br> Subject: Cell culture plates </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br><br>We process a considerable number of cell cultures for both
SEM and TEM, <br>and have found what we consider to be the ideal system. For this
purpose, <br>we have our investigators culture their cells in Leighton
tubes...these <br>are cell culture tubes with a flat bottom which holds a long,
narrow <br>plastic coverslip. Once the cells are attached, the medium is replaced
<br>with fixative, then the coverslip (which is attached to a nifty little
<br>handle) is removed. The plastic on the coverslip is impervious to all
<br>solvents used in microscopy, and can be embedded and sectioned for
TEM.<br><br>I wouldn't think of doing it any other way.<br><br> -=W.L.
Steffens=-<br>College of Veterinary Medicine<br> University of Georgia<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Fermin, Cesar
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Fermin.Cesar-at-tmc.tulane.edu <hr> Date: 15 Feb
1995 09:37:10 -0600 <br> Subject: Beseler Enlarger tune-up </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>ref.: Beseler enlarger tune-up.<br><br>We have two Beseler
enlarger needing adjustments. Any information<br>on available service person in
the south, please remit details <br>directly to me. Number I called was
disconnected!<br><br>************************************************************<
br>*Cesar D. Fermin, Ph.D \|*|/ Fax (504) 587-7389 *<br>*Tulane Medical
School /|*|\ Answ. Mach.(504) 584-2618 *<br>*Pathology/SL79 \|*|/
Secretary (504) 584-2436 *<br>*New Orleans, La 70 112 /|*|\ Lab (504) 5841
*<br>*Fermin-at-TMC.Tulane.edu -} Director of Morphological Services*
<br>************************************************************<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: dhoyle-at-tic.ab.ca
(David Hoyle) <hr> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 10:59:42 -0700 <br> Subject:
registration </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {25021509453900-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}
<br><br>Thank you for responding so quickly to my inquiry.<br>I look forward to
your news letters and hope to be able to<br>contribute any information I
can.<br><br> Subscribe Microscopy dhoyle.tic.ab.ca <br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Michael Cammer
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; cammer-at-aecom.yu.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 15 Feb
1995 11:24:52 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: Beseler Enlarger tune-up
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Back around '82 or '83 I found that I had a problem with my
Besseler's<br>constantly slipping focus just a tiny bit. So I put pipe clamps
(those<br>metal rings that can be tightened of loosened with the turn a a screw)
on<br>the metal guides for the focus which I would tighten when focusing
the<br>bellows particulalry tight. <br>-mc<br><br>On 15 Feb 1995, Fermin, Cesar
wrote:<br>} ref.: Beseler enlarger tune-up.<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: W.L. Steffens
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; STEFFENS.B-at-calc.vet.uga.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 15
Feb 1995 13:37:13 EST <br> Subject: Leighton Tubes </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>For those interested, Leighton tubes for cell culture are
manufactured by <br>Corning Costar and are available from Fisher Scientific (Cat.#
07-200-<br>367). They appear in the 95-96 catalog on page 721.<br><br> -=W.L.
Steffens=-<br>College of Veterinary Medicine<br> University of Georgia<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 15 Feb 1995 15:14:40 EST <br> Subject: Re:
Electron mean free path </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Eric,<br> If no expert in the field has a table of
the mfp's, I can fax you<br>tables of stopping powers for electrons in carbon,
oxygen, iron & titanium--<br>you have to interpolate for chromium and calculate
the mpf from dE/dx. Good<br>luck.<br> Yours,<br>
Bill Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: BARBARA.HARTMAN-at-
1773.220.SCHERING-PLOUGH.sprint.com <hr> Date: Thu, 16 Feb 1995 08:42:49 -0500
<br> Subject: FIXATION OF TESTES FOR HISTOLOGY </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br><br> <br>GREETINGS,<br> <br> DOES ANYONE KNOW OF A
BETTER FIXATIVE FOR TESTES THAN BOUINS FOR<br>LIGHT MICROSCOPY? WE ARE TRYING TO
AVOID THE LONG RINSING REQUIRED WITH<br>BOUINS.<br> <br>THANK YOU!<br> <br>BARBARA
HARTMAN<br>SCHERING-PLOUGH RESEARCH<br>LAFAYETTE, NJ<br>(201) 579-4343<br>(201)
570-4211 (FAX)<br> <br>E-MAIL:<br>MAIL/ADMD=TELEMAIL/PRMD=SCHERING-
PLOUGH/PN=BARBARA.HARTMAN/C=US/-at-SPRINT.COM<br> <br> <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: SiSTek-at-aol.com <hr>
Date: Thu, 16 Feb 1995 13:48:59 -0500 <br> Subject: Need TEM / Many thanks!!
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Many thanks to all who responded for my call for help with
locating TEM<br>service near us in the Phoenix metro area. As we thought, there is
an<br>established group in Phoenix who have been around for a few years and
who<br>provide TEM services.<br><br>For anyone else who might be interested, the
company is called NanoTEM, Inc,<br>7620 E. McKellips Rd., Suite 4109, Scottsdale,
Arizona 85257, phone 602 759<br>2808, fax 602 947 7615.<br><br>Again, many
thanks for all your help.<br><br>Mark Anderson, SiSTek<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: baskin-at-
biosci.mbp.missouri.edu (Tobias Baskin) <hr> Date: Fri, 17 Feb 1995 13:47:11 -0600
<br> Subject: TEM/formvar substitute/thin films </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Greetings,<br> Is there something out there that
will make a thin film that<br>isn't formvar? I have been using wire loops coated
with a film of 1.2%<br>formvar to support my small samples during rapid freezing
and substitution.<br>This works fine for acetone substitution but we would like to
try<br>Tetrahydrafuran (THF) as a substitution medium and, alas, THF eats
the<br>formvar.<br><br> We get a formvar film on the wire loop by casting
small rectangles<br>of formvar on water and then trasfering one to a loop.<br><br>
Are there other compounds that could be used to make a film across<br>the loop and
that might survive THF??<br><br> Thanks for any suggestions,<br><br>
Tobias Baskin<br><br>- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
- - - - -<br> ___ ____ ^ ____ _____ Tobias I.
Baskin<br> / \ / / \ / \ / University of
Missouri<br> / | / / \ / / Biological
Sciences<br> /___ / /__ /_____\ / /__ 109 Tucker Hall<br>
/ / / \ ( / Columbia, MO 65211 USA<br> /
/ / \ \ / voice: 314-882-0173<br> / /____ /
\ \____/ /_____ fax: 314-882-0123<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Liang, Long
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; LLIANG-at-is.Arco.COM <hr> Date: 17 Feb 1995
14:34:14 CST <br> Subject: Sample Prep--Steel </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {MACMS.LLIANG.644426140095048FMACMS-at-
IS.ARCO.COM} <br><br><br>Dear Microscopists,<br><br>I am trying to prepare
polished sections from steel samples for EPMA<br>analysis. Are there any
recommended abrasive/size for rough grinding,<br>fine grinding, rough polishing,
and final polishing?<br><br>Your help is high appreciated.<br><br>Long
Liang<br>ARCO EPMA/SEM Lab<br>Plano, TX<br>LLIANG-at-is.arco.com<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Doug Arrell
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; ARRELL-at-jrc.nl <hr> Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995
08:25:04 GMT+0200 <br> Subject: Re: Sample Prep--Steel </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950220082504.256-at-FS-IAM-
1.JRC.NL} <br><br>} <br>} I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel
samples for EPMA<br>} analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for
rough grinding,<br>} fine grinding, rough polishing, and final
polishing?<br><br>I have always stuck to the simple silicon carbide paper (in
steps <br>from 120 to 1200 grade) and then diamond (6,3,1um) route, and found
<br>no problems with
that.<br><br>Doug<br><br>+------------------------------------+<br>| Dr Douglas
Arrell |<br>| Mechanical Performance and Joining |<br>| Institute
for Advanced Materials |<br>| 1755 ZG Petten |<br>|
Netherlands |<br>| {ARRELL-at-JRC.NL}
|<br>| Tel. (+31) 2246 5287 |<br>| Fax (+31) 2246 1917
|<br>+------------------------------------+<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Joyce Craig
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; bafpjec-at-uxa.ecn.bgu.edu <hr> Date: Mon, 20 Feb
1995 11:10:51 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: student microscopy competition
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br> CALL FOR PAPERS<br>STUDENT COMPETITION<br>TO BE HELD
AT<br>THE UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN<br>WHITEWATER, WISCONSIN<br>Friday, March 24,
1994<br>AWARDS: <br>FIRST PLACE $100<br>SECOND PLACE $75<br>THIRD PLACE
$25<br>Abstracts will be published in Midwest Microscopy.<br>Microsgraphs from
first place winner will be on the cover of Midwest <br>Microscopy.<br>Students
will be judged on written abstract, presentation, and quality of <br>study.
<br>Student competition is open to undergraduate and graduate students and <br>may
involve any type of microscopy.<br>Student and sponsoring faculty member must be
members of MSEM.<br>Abstracts should be submitted before March 15 to :<br>Dr.
Lance Urven<br>University of Wisconsin- Whitewater<br>800 West Main,Whitewater, WI
53190<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: John Mansfield
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; John_Mansfield-at-mse.engin.umich.edu <hr> Date:
20 Feb 1995 12:02:20 -0400 <br> Subject: TEM: Metals,Electropolishing
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-ID: {n1418836731.26217-at-mse.engin.umich.edu}
<br><br>John Mansfield<br>North Campus Electron Microbeam Analysis
Laboratory<br>413 SRB, University of Michigan<br>2455 Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-
2143 <br>Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-3352<br>jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu
or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu Time:<br>11:59 AM<br>
<br>Date:2/20/95<br>URL: http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html NC
EMAL<br><br>I have some colleagues that want to electropolish some fairly
heavily<br>deformed steel. Composition is:<br>0.4% C<br>0.6-0.9%Si<br>22-
24%Cr<br>7-9%Ni<br>Trace N<br>Balance Fe.<br>Does anyone have a good starting
solution and condidtions for this alloy?<br>Many Thanks.<br>John
Mansfield.<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov
<hr> Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 13:23:06 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: Re: Sample Prep--
Steel </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved
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<font size=-1> <br><br>} I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel
samples for EPMA<br>} analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for
rough grinding,<br>} fine grinding, rough polishing, and final
polishing?<br><br>A step that may be advantageous is the final polish of the steel
by <br>use of a colloidal silica type solution [0.05 micron, with
9.8pH].<br>Dampen the cloth [such as a Buehler Mastertex] with distilled water;
<br>apply liberal amount of the solution [such as Buehler Mastermet] to the
<br>cloth, and apply firm pressure to soft pressure over a period of ~45
<br>seconds, rotating the sample quite abit. A final word of caution: <br>this
solution [Mastermet], besides having the high pH [rough on skin], <br>will
crystallize into small, -very hard- particles. Is therefore highly <br>advised to
filter the solution a few times into a smaller bottle before <br>each use. Have
found this stuff to be -very- effective tho'. LECO also <br>has a similar
solution, but have not used it enough to get comfortable <br>with it as the
Mastermet.<br><br>In the previous steps I have used the 120 to 800 grit SiC
papers, then <br>a 9, 6, 1, & sometimes 1/4 micron diamond paste, on Texmet for
the <br>rough polish (9 & 6), and then Mastertex for the 1/4u. All depends on
<br>the grade and condition of the steel tho'... [all these recommendations
<br>are based on me hand polishing individual samples, and 3-6 samples in a
<br>ring held in hand]<br><br>Hope this helps,<br>-Rob<br>PS: I have no ties with
Buehler, just a satisfied customer for +10
years.<br>,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,
,,<br>| Rob Tayloe | MSM Spelunkers Club /\v/\ |
<br>| Metallographic Lab. | Missouri Speleological Survey /\v/\ |
<br>| Rolla Research Center | Bat Conservation International /\v/\ |
<br>| U.S. Bureau of Mines | Missouri Cave & Karst Conservancy |
<br>| tayloe-at-rorc.usbm.gov | National Speleological Society #32993 /\v/\ |
<br>| (314) 364-3169 x247 | American Cave Conservation Association |
<br>''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''''<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: South Bay Technology
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 73531.1344-at-compuserve.com <hr> Date: 20 Feb 95
16:15:25 EST <br> Subject: Polishing Steel/Colloidal Silica </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>The techniques described by Rob Tayloe are certainly in
agreement with the<br>references I have for polishing steel and will work quite
well. The only note<br>I would make is that we do supply a Colloidal Silica which
DOES NOT CRYSTALLIZE.<br>This is an important feature as Rob has mentioned because
the crystallized<br>particles can be a real problem if you do not realize they are
there.<br><br>Our Non-Crystallizing Colloidal Silica is available as
follows:<br><br>Part No. Description Price<br>CS1-16
Non-Crystallizing Colloidal Silica 16 oz bottle$16.00<br>CS1-128 "
" " 1 gallon bottle 78.00<br><br>If you'd like more
information (MSDS etc) on this prodcut or any of our other<br>products, please let
me know.<br><br>Best regards-<br><br>David Henriks<br>South Bay Technology,
Inc.<br>1120 Via Callejon<br>San Clemente, CA 92673 USA<br><br>TEL: 800-728-
2233<br> 714-492-2600<br>FAX: 714-492-1499<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: sbarlow-at-
sunstroke.sdsu.edu (Steve Barlow) <hr> Date: Mon, 20 Feb 1995 15:01:32 -0800 <br>
Subject: Tem: insect heart </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>one of my users is looking at TEM of insect heart. Does
anyone have some good <br>references on insect heart ultrastructure? Some of the
cells associated with <br>the heart appear highly vesiculated at the cell
periphery. The morphology of <br>these cells looks good, so we don't feel these
stuctures are an artifact, but <br>we have so far been unable to identify what
kind of cell or cell type it might <br>be. Can anyone suggest a reference or an
investigator we could contact in <br>this
regard?<br><br>----------------------------------------------------------<br>Dr.
Steven Barlow<br>EM Facility/Biology Dept.<br>San Diego State University<br>San
Diego CA 92182-0057<br>phone: (619) 594-4523<br>fax: (619) 594-5676<br>email to
sbarlow-at-sunstroke.sdsu.edu<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: SUSAN R. SESACK
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; SESACK-at-brain.bns.pitt.edu <hr> Date: Tue, 21
Feb 1995 08:45:41 EDT <br> Subject: enrollment </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {25022013111522-at-vms2.macc.wisc.edu}
<br><br>Dear Colleagues,<br><br>Would someone please provide me with instructions
for enrolling in <br>the Internet bulletin board for histology and microscopy?
Much <br>obliged.<br><br>S.<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: R_HOLLAND_CHENG
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; RHC-at-justem.bio.purdue.edu <hr> Date: Tue, 21
Feb 1995 9:41:45 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: RE: enrollment </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>} SUSAN R. SESACK wrote:<br>} <br>} Would someone please
provide me with instructions for enrolling in <br>} the Internet bulletin board
for histology and microscopy? Much <br>} obliged.<br><br><br>To subscribe, please
send a mail to "Listserver-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV"<br>with "Subscribe Microscopy
your_id-at-e-mail" in the body. Enjoy it.<br><br>Holland
Cheng<br>--------------------<br>Structural Biology<br>Department of Biological
Sciences<br>Purdue University<br>W. Lafayette, IN 47907-1101<br><br>InterNet:
rhc-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: R_HOLLAND_CHENG
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; RHC-at-justem.bio.purdue.edu <hr> Date: Tue, 21
Feb 1995 10:03:59 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: RE: enrollment </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br><br>} SUSAN R. SESACK wrote:<br>} <br>} Would someone
please provide me with instructions for enrolling in <br>} the Internet bulletin
board for histology and microscopy? Much <br>} obliged.<br><br><br>To subscribe,
please send a mail to "Listserver-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV"<br>with "Subscribe
Microscopy your_id-at-e-mail" in the body. Enjoy it.<br><br><br>Btw, can someone
in the server fix the returning route so that <br>the reply can a global one? I
would like to be on a list that <br>I can see discussions (questions and answers)
rather than a <br>collection of of questions. Thanks in
advance!<br><br><br>Holland Cheng<br>--------------------<br>Structural
Biology<br>Department of Biological Sciences<br>Purdue University<br>W. Lafayette,
IN 47907-1101<br><br>InterNet: rhc-at-bragg.bio.purdue.edu <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: cel1-at-Lehigh.EDU
(Charles Lyman) <hr> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 11:44:22 -0500 <br> Subject: Preparing
polished sections of steel samples for EPMA analysis </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1>
<br><br>++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
++<br>++++I would like to add a small point about polishing specimens
for<br>analysis in the electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA). I prefer to leave
the<br>scratches in from the 1/4micron diamond polishing step in order to have
an<br>image feature on which to focus with the light optics. Since
quantitative<br>x-ray microanalysis samples should be flat-polished but unetched,
it is<br>hard to find a suitable surface feature to use for focusing without
these<br>fine scratches. For some reading on this, try Chapter 11 of Goldstein
et<br>al., Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Microanalysis, 2nd
edition,<br>Plenum Press, 1992.<br><br>Good luck, Prof. C E Lyman<br><br>Electron
Optics Lab<br>Lehigh University<br>5 East Packer Avenue<br>Bethlehem, PA
18015<br>+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++
+++++++<br><br>} } I am trying to prepare polished sections from steel samples
for EPMA<br>} } analysis. Are there any recommended abrasive/size for rough
grinding,<br>} } fine grinding, rough polishing, and final polishing?<br>} <br>}
A step that may be advantageous is the final polish of the steel by<br>} use of a
colloidal silica type solution [0.05 micron, with 9.8pH].<br>} Dampen the cloth
[such as a Buehler Mastertex] with distilled water;<br>} apply liberal amount of
the solution [such as Buehler Mastermet] to the<br>} cloth, and apply firm
pressure to soft pressure over a period of ~45<br>} seconds, rotating the sample
quite abit. A final word of caution:<br>} this solution [Mastermet], besides
having the high pH [rough on skin],<br>} will crystallize into small, -very hard-
particles. Is therefore highly<br>} advised to filter the solution a few times
into a smaller bottle before<br>} each use. Have found this stuff to be -very-
effective tho'. LECO also<br>} has a similar solution, but have not used it
enough to get comfortable<br>} with it as the Mastermet.<br>} <br>} In the
previous steps I have used the 120 to 800 grit SiC papers, then<br>} a 9, 6, 1, &
sometimes 1/4 micron diamond paste, on Texmet for the<br>} rough polish (9 & 6),
and then Mastertex for the 1/4u. All depends on<br>} the grade and condition of
the steel tho'... [all these recommendations<br>} are based on me hand polishing
individual samples, and 3-6 samples in a<br>} ring held in hand]<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Tue, 21 Feb 1995 13:19:07 EST <br> Subject: Re:
TEM/formvar substitute/thin films </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Tobias,<br> A carbon film--evaporated onto freshly-
cleaved mica--should do the<br>trick. After evaporation, float the film onto
water and pick it up with the<br>loop. You may have to experiment with thickness
etc. to get the proper mech-<br>anical strength, but it should certainly survive
the THF. You may also want<br>to try a mesh grid instead of the loop if the
carbon film is not strong enough.<br>Good luck.<br> Yours,<br>
Bill Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: {tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu}:ddn:wpafb <hr> Date: 2-21-95 1:51pm <br> Subject: Re:
TEM/formvar substitute/thin films </b></fieldset></div> <div
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {9502212303.AA26486-at-riker.ml.wpafb.af.mil} <br>
To: WALCKSD:ml:wpafb, SCHELTFJ:ml:wpafb<br>Subj: Re: TEM/formvar substitute/thin
films<br>Orig-Author: {tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu}:ddn:wpafb<br>-----------------------------------------------
------------<br>Dear Tobias,<br> A carbon film--evaporated onto freshly-cleaved
mica--should do the<br>trick. After evaporation, float the film onto water and
pick it up with the<br>loop. You may have to experiment with thickness etc. to
get the proper mech-<br>anical strength, but it should certainly survive the THF.
You may also want<br>to try a mesh grid instead of the loop if the carbon film is
not strong enough.<br>Good luck.<br> Yours,<br>
Bill Tiv<br> <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Dave DeFily
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; defily-at-tam2000.tamu.edu <hr> Date: Wed, 22 Feb
1995 13:41:26 -0600 <br> Subject: graphs to data </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Matthias -<br><br>I've done this quickly with "Image" by
measuring the distance from the graph <br>axis (x or y) to the data points in
question. To calibrate (pixels to data <br>units), just measure the distance
between axis values.<br><br>-Dave defily-at-tamu.edu<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Elinor Solit
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; cambrex-at-world.std.com <hr> Date: Wed, 22 Feb
1995 15:45:00 +0001 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: New SEM any Suggestions??
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Mark,<br><br>We published an article last Fall on the
criteria and process for <br>purchasing an SEM. Readers tell us it is useful.
<br><br>Suggest you or your friend call for more information.<br><br>Ellie
Solit,<br>Executive Editor, Microscope Technology & News.<br>800-440-
0311<br><br><br>On Wed, 22 H<br>Feb 1995 Noonan_Eddie/perth-at-
perth.atd.cra.com.au wrote:<br><br>} I have been asked by a colleague of mine who
at present does not have <br>} access to the Microscopy Listserver and who
presently is sourcing a <br>} new SEM for his lab to put out the following
question.<br>} <br>} "In the next few weeks I shall be ordering a new analytical
SEM. We <br>} will use this SEM almost exclusively for EDS analysis. A
motorised <br>} stage will also be required for the SEM to accommodate overnight
runs. <br>} Therefore I require an ultra stable, reliable instrument. If any
one <br>} with experience in this area has any thoughts I would be grateful to
<br>} hear from you."<br>} <br>} Thanks in advance<br>} <br>} Mark
Stewart<br>} <br>} Replies to: ejn-at-perth.atd.cra.com.au<br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: m.dickson-at-
unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson) <hr> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 12:24:26 <br> Subject:
Re: Fixation of blood cells </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: m.dickson-at-
unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson) <hr> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 12:29:17 <br> Subject:
Re: Blood fixation </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>To: microscopy-at-AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV<br><br>Jan Coetzee and
Philip Oshel have posted about blood fixation but I havn't <br>seen any replies on
this topic. We have a project that will try to tie <br>distortion of red cells to
heat stress so fixation needs to be as artefact <br>free as we can get it. Please
Jan or Philip can you mail me with the best <br>method you can
recommend?<br><br>Mel Dickson, Univ. of NSW<br><br>m.dickson-at-unsw.edu.au<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Glenn Holm
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; KARUZIS-at-wccf.mit.edu <hr> Date: Thu, 23 Feb
1995 00:27:16 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: 3 questions </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>3 separate requests for information:<br><br>1) In the
February '95 Biotechniques, New Products section, there's<br>a blurb for a "Probe
Clip" single slide incubation chamber sold by<br>Grace Bio-Labs. Anyone have
experience with these and/or a contact<br>phone/fax # for Grace Bio-
Labs?<br><br>2) A grad student in our lab has been doing ImmunoGold Silver
(LM)<br>immunostaining followed by BrDU - HRP - DAB for a second antigen. <br>The
silver was originally present, but faded out in the second reaction. <br>Could
have resulted from a number of factors, but what we were wondering<br>is - is it
possible to stabilize the silver with a sodium thiosulfate<br>"fixer" step after
the IGSS to protect it in subsequent immunoreactions,<br>dehydrating and
coverslipping? Any practical suggestions would be appre-<br>ciated.<br><br>3) A
colleague in Australia wants to purchase an antiserum to met-<br>enkephalin. We
have been buying from Incstar and getting good results,<br>but the Australian
distributor for Incstar charges outrageous prices.<br>Does anyone know of an
alternate antibody supplier that may be less ex-<br>pensive for Australian
customers?<br><br>----------------------------------------------------------------
--<br>|Glenn Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |<br>|
M.I.T Dept. of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |<br>|Cambridge,
MA 02139 "Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |
<br>------------------------------------------------------------------<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: KAKER-at-ctklj.ctk.si
<hr> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 8:13:54 +0100 (WET) <br> Subject: Coster-Kronig
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Microscopists,<br><br>I am looking for Coster-Kronig
transition probabilities for M lines.<br><br>Henrik Kaker<br>SEM/EDS Lab<br>Metal
d.o.o.<br>62390 Ravne<br>Slovenia<br><br>Kaker-at-Ctklj.ctk.si<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Kathy Walters
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; kwalters-at-emiris.iaf.uiowa.edu <hr> Date: Thu,
23 Feb 1995 08:20:45 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: lipid sizing </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br>Recently I posted a request for methods for lipid
sizing. I have put<br>together a summary of that request. If anyone would like a
copy I will be<br>happy to send you one, but it is rather lengthy for the
listserver.<br><br>Thanks to all respondents,<br><br>Kathy Walters<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Marc Brande
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; brande-at-sdsc.edu <hr> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995
09:25:49 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Re: 3 questions </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>ProbeClip<br><br>GBL inc. 1-800-813-7339 810-332-
7100<br><br>Marc C. Brande, M.S. SD3D Email List:3D Imaging <br>San Diego 3D
Imaging Group To subscribe/unsubscribe:listserv-at-bobcat.etsu.edu<br>3840 Camino
Lindo To post a message:sd3d-at-bobcat.etsu.edu<br>San Diego, CA 92122
Email:BRANDE-at-SDSC.EDU Voice:619-587-4830<br><br><br>On Thu, 23 Feb 1995,
Glenn Holm wrote:<br><br>} 3 separate requests for information:<br>} <br>} 1)
In the February '95 Biotechniques, New Products section, there's<br>} a blurb for
a "Probe Clip" single slide incubation chamber sold by<br>} Grace Bio-Labs.
Anyone have experience with these and/or a contact<br>} phone/fax # for Grace
Bio-Labs?<br>} <br>} 2) A grad student in our lab has been doing ImmunoGold
Silver (LM)<br>} immunostaining followed by BrDU - HRP - DAB for a second
antigen. <br>} The silver was originally present, but faded out in the second
reaction. <br>} Could have resulted from a number of factors, but what we were
wondering<br>} is - is it possible to stabilize the silver with a sodium
thiosulfate<br>} "fixer" step after the IGSS to protect it in subsequent
immunoreactions,<br>} dehydrating and coverslipping? Any practical suggestions
would be appre-<br>} ciated.<br>} <br>} 3) A colleague in Australia wants to
purchase an antiserum to met-<br>} enkephalin. We have been buying from Incstar
and getting good results,<br>} but the Australian distributor for Incstar charges
outrageous prices.<br>} Does anyone know of an alternate antibody supplier that
may be less ex-<br>} pensive for Australian customers?<br>} <br>}
------------------------------------------------------------------<br>} |Glenn
Holm *mime mail ok* Internet:karuzis-at-wccf.mit.edu |<br>} |M.I.T Dept.
of Brain + Cog. Sci. This VAX doesn't do NeXTmail |<br>} |Cambridge, MA 02139
"Real Neuroscientists don't do gels!" |<br>}
------------------------------------------------------------------<br>}
<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Dave L Robinson
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; robin019-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu <hr> Date: Thu, 23
Feb 1995 13:20:49 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: How do I subscribe?
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br>How do I subscribe to this newsgroup?<br><br>Thank
you!<br><br>Dave Robinson<br>University of Minnesota<br><br>robin019-at-
maroon.tc.umn.edu<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: nee-at-beta.lanl.gov
(Norman Elliott) <hr> Date: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 14:09:10 -0700 <br> Subject: TEM
negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear list,<br><br> I believe this question was asked
on this list before, so I am<br>sorry if I am repeating. A colleague here is
having problems with<br>negatives being ruined by static discharge in a JEOL 2010
TEM. JEOL<br>suggests drying the negatives inside the TEM vacuum which works but
is<br>really not good and very inefficient. The problem began only recently
when<br>atmospheric humidity is increasing here. Does anyone know the cause of
the<br>static discharge problem and/or have a practical
solution.<br><br><br><br><br>Norman Elliott |
E-mail: nee-at-lanl.gov<br>Los Alamos National Lab |
Fax: 505-665-2104<br>MST-7 MS E549 |
Voice: 505-667-1587<br>Los Alamos, NM 87545 |<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: KJMcCarthy
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; KJMCCARTHY-at-bmg.bhs.uab.edu <hr> Date: Thu, 23
Feb 1995 15:08:07 CST+6CDT <br> Subject: Digital Imaging Microscopy/FTP site
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950223140219.480-at-
bmg.bhs.uab.edu} <br><br>I would like to announce the establishment of an FTP site
for the Macintosh/Power PC <br>based digital imaging microscopy software
IPLabspectrum from Signal Analytics <br>Corporation. There are several reasons
for development of this site:<br>1. To provide individuals interested in
developing a digital imaging microscopy system <br>a chance to access and download
demonstration versions of this particular <br>Macintosh/PowerPC based digital
imaging software for evaluation purposes.<br><br>2. To provide users of
IPLabspectrum software for a site to download and upload <br>user-generated
system extensions and scripts . <br><br>Although the software is from a
commercial source, the establishment of the FTP site <br>was a decision by made by
myself and other users of the Digital Imaging Microscopy <br>Facility here at the
University of Alabama at Birmingham as one way of promoting the <br>digital
imaging microscopy as a research tool. Signal Analytics Corporation, the
<br>developers of the software, has generously made available demonstration
versions of their <br>entire software line for FTP download purposes. If any
other developers of imaging <br>software wish to use this site as a repository for
demonstration versions of their software I <br>would be more than happy to
accomodate them.<br> <br>The demonstration versions of this software are
organized into several folders, and <br>separated into Macintosh and PowerPC
versions of that software. There are versions of the <br>software that support
specific imaging boards (e.g. Scion LG-3) in the demo folders. Also in <br>the
site are demo versions of calcium ratio (IPLab Ratio), Three Dimension
Reconstruction, <br>and Multiprobe (FISH) extensions. In addition is a separate
program for reading scanned <br>images of electrophoretic gels. (IP Lab Gel)
<br><br>There is a folder (directory) for Uploading of Scripts, Extensions,
Messages, ect. <br>provided-however the caveat there is that downloading the
extensions from that <br>directory is at your own risk, since this is a public
access directory. If you choose to <br>download from this directory, please take
the time to scan the files for viruses or other <br>nasties. Our aim is to
monitor the upload directory as the usage increases, test the material <br>in the
directory for problems (bugs, viruses, and other annoying creatures) and then
shift <br>those programs that we consider problem free to a specific download-only
directory. At <br>present this download-only directory for user-uploaded files
does not exist.<br><br>To access the site use the address FTP.BMG.UAB.EDU, logon
as ANONYMOUS to enter the <br>public directory. In the directory is a
subdirectory (folder) IP_Labspectrum. Within this <br>subdirectory are other
directories containing the various demos of the software. I also <br>included
the shareware programs FETCH and BinHex 5.0 in a directory named
<br>FTP_SITE_Utilities for individuals (like myself) who rather use FETCH as a
front end for <br>FTP browsing and transfer. <br><br>This site is still
undergoing development, so please forgive the style of organization. Any
<br>comments, suggestions, ect. about the site, digital imaging microscopy would
be greatly <br>appreciated. My e-mail address is KJMcCarthy-at-
CellBio.BMG.UAB.EDU<br><br>Best Regards <br>Kevin McCarthy <br>Assistant
Professor<br>Department of Cell Biology<br>University of Alabama at
Birmingham<br>Birmingham, Alabama 35294<br>Phone 205-934-9923/9924 <br>Fax 205-
934-7029############<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Leo D Frawley 03
5667464 :&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; FRAWLEY-at-a1.resmel.bhp.com.au <hr>
Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:44:58 +1100 <br> Subject: Extraction Replicas MnS ppts.
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Return-Receipt-To: FRAWLEY-at-
a1.resmel.bhp.com.au<br>Registered-Mail-Reply-Requested-By: FRAWLEY-at-
a1.resmel.bhp.com.au<br>Mr-Received: by mta VULCAN.MUAS; Relayed; Fri, 24 Feb 1995
11:44:58 +1100<br>Mr-Received: by mta VULCAN; Relayed; Fri, 24 Feb 1995 11:59:09
+1100<br>Disclose-Recipients: prohibited<br><br>I am interested in using an
extraction replica technique to determine MnS precipitate size distributions in a
<br>TEM.<br><br>The technique being considered is as follows:<br>
-Polish sample <br> -Etch to give some surface relief<br>
-Carbon coat<br> -Using blade cut 1mm size grid on surface<br>
-Release carbon film containing ppt's. from surface using etchant<br>
-Wash carbon replica in alcohol and water<br> -Position on TEM
grid.<br><br>My problem is finding an etchant that will not attack the very small
MnS ppts. It has been reported that some <br>etchants attack the Mn in these
ppt's.<br><br>Any suggestions on the technique or the etchant would be
appreciated.<br><br>Regards Leo D Frawley<br> frawley-at-
a1.resmel.bhp.com.au<br> <br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: peter smith
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; PS-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au <hr> Date: Fri, 24
Feb 1995 16:20:57 EST-10 <br> Subject: Re: TEM negatives </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>} Date sent: Thu, 23 Feb 1995 14:09:10 -0700<br>}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov<br>} From: nee-at-
beta.lanl.gov (Norman Elliott)<br>} Subject: TEM negatives<br><br>} Dear
list,<br>} <br>} I believe this question was asked on this list before,
so I am<br>} sorry if I am repeating. A colleague here is having problems
with<br>} negatives being ruined by static discharge in a JEOL 2010 TEM.
JEOL<br>} suggests drying the negatives inside the TEM vacuum which works but
is<br>} really not good and very inefficient. The problem began only recently
when<br>} atmospheric humidity is increasing here. Does anyone know the cause of
the<br>} static discharge problem and/or have a practical solution.<br>} <br>}
<br> We had this static discharge problem when first we bought our <br>2010. It
was solved when JEOL replaced the Teflon drive gear (large) <br>in the camera with
a conducting (metal) one. Coating the gear with a<br>conducting spray didn't work!
<br> We also installed a separate vacuum desiccator for the plates
<br>(diffusion pump and liquid nitrogen trap).<br><br> Peter Smith
ps-at-bunyip.ph.rmit.edu.au<br> RMIT App Physics Ph: (03) 660 3390
Office<br> GPO Box 2476V (03) 660 2205 Lab<br> Melbourne
Fax: (03) 660 3837<br> Vic 3001<br> AUSTRALIA<br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: NICK SCHRYVERS
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; nick_schryvers-at-ruca.ua.ac.be <hr> Date: 24 Feb
1995 10:27:10 +0100 <br> Subject: Re: TEM negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {n1418500529.67061-at-ematserv.ruca.ua.ac.be}
<br><br>REGARDING Re} TEM negatives<br><br>About your discharge
problem, we believe this is indeed strongly linked with<br>the vacuum. Therefore
we always use one or more desicators before the plates<br>enter the microscope.
This way also the vacuum in the microscope restores<br>faster. The problem also
depends on the plates: we had the experience that<br>Ilford plates always gave
discharge, while Kodak and Agfa did not in the same<br>environment. Also handling
of the plates can be important: sliding plates<br>over one another can cause
discharges before and after use in the microscope.<br>Hope this can be of
help,<br>Nick Schryvers<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Larry Hawkey
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 24 Feb
1995 08:50:07 -0500 <br> Subject: RE>EM negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br>I had some static discharge problems with my JEOL
1200exII<br>some time ago. Every 8th to 10th neg had streaks on<br>it. they were
thin and sharp with two or three finger<br>like projections coming fron the same
point. The service<br>tech. cleaned the camera (several times) and that cleared
the<br>problem up. It did take several tries and return trips to<br>get the dirt
(thought to be a metal fragment) cleaned up.<br><br>I hope this helps.<br>Larry
Hawkey<br>hawkey-at-neuro.duke.edu<br>919-641-6425<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: DCROMEY-at-
CCIT.ARIZONA.EDU <hr> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 07:48:30 -0700 (MST) <br> Subject:
Re: TEM negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Norman,<br>Although I am not familiar w/ this particular
model of JEOL, could it be <br>possible that the static discharge is occuring
before or (more likely) <br>after the film has gone into/come out of the scope?
We had an individual <br>in the lab I was in before who tended to wear synthetic
fabrics and on <br>particularly dry Arizona days they could really ZAP the film.
One <br>solution is to wear a wrist grounding strap when handling the film (like
<br>the kind that people are supposed to wear when working inside their
<br>computers). Hope this helps.<br>Doug <br><br><br> Douglas W. Cromey,
M.S.<br> Cell Biology and Anatomy<br> Arizona Health Sciences Center<br> 1501
N. Campbell Ave.<br> Tucson, AZ 85724<br> (602)626-2824
dcromey-at-ccit.arizona.edu <br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From:
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; Image-at-beelzebub.ucsf.EDU <hr> Date: Thu, 23
Feb 1995 22:36:29 -0800 (PST) <br> Subject: Re: TEM negatives
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br>subscribe<br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: tivol-at-
tethys.ph.albany.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 10:28:53 EST <br> Subject: Re:
TEM negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>Dear Norman,<br> We, too, have had occasional problems
with static discharges on our<br>films--especially with LoDose, which is very
sensitive to light. Our worst<br>problems occur when the humidity is low. You
must be very careful when sepa-<br>rating films from the stack and when removing
the stack from the package. You<br>might also check if your lab coats produce
static electricity--we just got new<br>polyester coats which are terrific
generators. If you are completely dark-ad-<br>apted and loading the folm in total
darkness, you can see the discharges as<br>they occur, so at least you will know
what is going on. [oops, I meant film]<br>If your desiccant is too efficient, the
discharge problem will be worse. Good<br>luck, sometimes the procedures necessary
to prevent these discharges are te-<br>dious. If all else fails, try using 4489
film--it's not nearly as sensitive<br>as SO163, but it is much finer grain and
gives excellent images. We've never<br>had discharge problems with it, probably
because discharges are not intense<br>enough to show up.<br>
Yours,<br> Bill Tivol<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: dlmedli-at-
california.sandia.gov (medlin douglas l) <hr> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 09:11:50
-0800 <br> Subject: Re: em negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>In the past we too have had problems with static discharge
ruining negatives<br>(the film was SO163 being used in a JEOL 4000EX). We found
that<br>the discharges were coming from our vinyl gloves; when we switched
to<br>cotton gloves the problem went away. Additionally, when loading<br>the
camera we never use pre-dessicated film, but instead load the<br>camera with film
that has been at atmosphere (and warmed up to room<br>temperature if it's been in
the refrigerator). We then dessicate the camera<br>box prior to putting it in the
microscope.<br><br>On a related topic, on occasion we've observed a fine network
of cracks in<br>the emulsion of our SO163 film. Under an optical microscope the
film<br>looks similar to a dried out mud flat with cracks spaced rougly<br>0.05 mm
apart. These cracks would appear regardless of whether<br>we dried the film at
room temperature overnight or in a heated film drier.<br>The cracking also
appeared with both new and old chemicals (D19 diluted<br>2:1 4 minutes; kodak
rapid fixer 5 minutes). Thinking we had a bad<br>batch of film we sent some of
the material to Kodak, but they were<br>unable to duplicate the effect. Finally,
it was suggested that we<br>reduce the concentration of hardener in the fixer to
half of what<br>Kodak recommends. This seems to have reduced the cracking quite a
bit, although<br>not entirely. Has anyone had similar problems?
<br><br>+---------------------------------------------+ <br>! Douglas L. Medlin
!<br>! Physical Properties of Materials Department !<br>! Mail Stop 9402
!<br>! Sandia National Laboratories !<br>! Livermore, California
94551 !<br>! !<br>!
(510) 294-2825 !<br>! dlmedli-at-
california.sandia.gov !
<br>+---------------------------------------------+<br>.\<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Glenn Poirier
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; GLENN_P-at-GEOSCI.Lan.McGill.CA <hr> Date: Fri,
24 Feb 1995 13:51:56 EST5EDT <br> Subject: anhydrous polishing
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {199502241853.NAA28700-at-sifon.CC.McGill.CA}
<br><br>Greetings Microscopists<br><br> Is there anyone out there who has any
tips/techniques on polishing hygroscopic <br>material for microanalysis.
Specifically, I need to polish some CaO <br>particles with CaC rinds. I could
probably polish them with silicone <br>oil, but how do I get the oil off the
samples before I put them in <br>the microprobe? Any comments or suggestions
would be appreciated.<br><br>Thanks in advance
<br><br>Glenn<br>*****************************************************************
*****<br>* Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca
*<br>* Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *<br>*
Earth and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *<br>* McGill
University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *<br>* Montreal,
Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH
*<br>**********************************************************************<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Po-Fu Huang
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; huang020-at-maroon.tc.umn.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 24
Feb 1995 13:14:06 -0600 (CST) <br> Subject: literature needed
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Greetings,<br><br>I am a graduate student currently working
on a project utilizing EDS to <br>get quantitative elemental information of
atmospheric particles. In past <br>few monthes, I have been trying to get hold of
a article cited below through <br>the interlibrary service and without any
success. It will be greatly <br>appreciated if anyone out there can direct me
where and how to get this <br>article. <br><br>Heinrich, K. F. J. (1987) "Mass
Absorption Coefficients for Electron Probe <br>Microanalysis." in <br>"Proc. 11th
Int. Cong. on X-ray Optics and Microanalysis." edited by J. <br>Brown and R.
Packwood, published by J. D. Brown, University of Western, <br>Ontario, pp67-
119.<br><br><br>Po-Fu Huang<br>Particle Technology Laboratory<br>Department of
Mechanical Engineering<br>University of Minnesota<br>(Office) (612) 626-
7227<br>(Lab) (612) 625-7307<br>(Fax) (612) 625-6069<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: hukee.margaret-at-
mayo.EDU (Marge Hukee) <hr> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:10:12 +0200 <br> Subject:
Re: TEM negatives </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {9502242007.AA12178-at-fermat.Mayo.EDU} <br>X-
Sender: hukem-at-fermat.mayo.edu<br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-Type: text/plain;
charset="us-ascii"<br><br>We pre-pump negatives in a separate vacuum chamber with
phosphorus<br>pentoxide powder placed in the bottom of chamber. This film is
loaded into<br>a spare cassette and has always been suitable for use after being
pumped<br>for 1-2 hours or left under vacuum. After about a week, the powder
absorbs<br>moisture and must be replaced. The old powder can be neutralized with
NaOH<br>pellets and when NaOH pellets have dissolved, can be discarded by
flushing<br>with water. <br><br>Marge Hukee<br>EM Core Facility
hukee.margaret-at-mayo.edu<br>Mayo Foundation
(507) 284-
3148<br>--------------------------------------------------------------------------
--<br>--<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: John F. Conroy
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 24
Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST) <br> Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br><br><br>Hello,<br><br>I am currently writing a grant
proposal, and I have been knocking my head <br>against the wall looking for some
sort of data on the optical transmission <br>properties of nervous tissue (the
brain). Does anyone have a good <br>reference, or, from a practical standpoint,
how thick do brain tissue <br>slices have to be to obtain good optical
transmission (esp. relative to <br>other fatty tissue slices like those from the
earlobe, whose transmission <br>characteristics I can find since people have been
doing pulse <br>oximetry.).<br><br>Thanks in advance,<br><br>John
Conroy<br>University of Utah<br>Dept. Bioengineering<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
<hr> Date: 24 Feb 1995 17:10:04 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: Re: EM negatives
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>We had some static discharge on our 35 mm film in the past.
It <br>occurred when pre-desiccated bulk was being rolled onto<br>cassettes. The
problem disappeared after bulk film was left in<br>atmosphere. We never had
problem with plates because we did not<br>pre-desiccate plates. One may try
leaving the exposed plates in a<br>humid chamber for a while before developing
them, if the problem<br>persisted.<br> <br>Ann Fook Yang<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: emlab-at-ucsco.ucsc.edu
(Jon Krupp) <hr> Date: Fri, 24 Feb 1995 14:28:17 -0800 <br> Subject: LKB Ultratome
III </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved
from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Greetings:<br><br>I have an LKB Ultratome III that is
surplus to our needs. Purchased in<br>1978, almost never used. If you might be
interested in making an offer or<br>know of a worthwhile place for a donation,
please let me know.<br><br>Thanks,<br><br><br>Jonathan Krupp<br>Microscopy and
Imaging Lab<br>University of California<br>Santa Cruz, CA 95060<br>emlab-at-
ucsco.ucsc.edu<br>(408) 459-2477<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Maggy Piranian
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; maggy-at-sparky2.esd.mun.ca <hr> Date: Fri, 24
Feb 1995 17:46:50 -0330 (NST) <br> Subject: Re: anhydrous polishing
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Glenn (and others)<br> I have polished B2O3 with the 3M
lapping film and no water. It <br>doesn't produce a great polish, but you can
usually find a few spots <br>where you can squeeze a beam in. If you don't use
the 3M film, let me <br>know and I'll tell you where you can get some or even send
you a scrap. <br>Maggy Piranian<br>M.U.N.<br><br>On Fri, 24 Feb 1995, Glenn
Poirier wrote:<br><br>} Greetings Microscopists<br>} <br>} Is there anyone
out there who has any tips/techniques on polishing hygroscopic <br>} material
for microanalysis. Specifically, I need to polish some CaO <br>} particles with
CaC rinds. I could probably polish them with silicone <br>} oil, but how do I get
the oil off the samples before I put them in <br>} the microprobe? Any comments
or suggestions would be appreciated.<br>} <br>} Thanks in advance <br>} <br>}
Glenn<br>}
**********************************************************************<br>} *
Glenn Poirier glenn_p-at-geosci.lan.mcgill.ca *<br>} *
Electron Microprobe Lab Phone: (514) 398 6774 *<br>} * Earth
and Planetary Sciences Fax: (514) 398 4680 *<br>} * McGill
University THERE ARE THREE SIDES TO EVERY STORY; *<br>} * Montreal,
Quebec YOUR SIDE MY SIDE AND THE TRUTH *<br>}
**********************************************************************<br>} <br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Miguel Avalos B.
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; miguel-at-ifuname.ifisicaen.unam.mx <hr> Date:
Fri, 24 Feb 1995 19:51:33 -0800 <br> Subject: Re: LKB Ultratome III
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: smithj-at-
acad.winthrop.edu <hr> Date: Sat, 25 Feb 1995 20:55:59 -0500 <br> Subject:
Problems with 35mm T-max in TEM </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>EM folk:<br>I'm trying to use T-max 100 in the 35mm camera
on <br>my Zeiss EM 10C. Everything works well (you get nice<br>short exposures,
and this particular camera can be<br>handled in the light, so there's no problem
with using<br>a panchromatic film). <br>But the film gets *BRITTLE* in high
vacuum. I have <br>snapped the film in half simply by bending it as I<br>unloaded
the camera. Any hints, or do I just need to<br>switch to one of the
orthochromatic films? If so, which<br>one(s) have you tried and liked?<br>Julian
Smith III<br>Biology<br>Winthrop University<br>Rock Hill, SC<br>803-323-2111
(vox)<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Dirk Knoesen, UWC, SA
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; DIRK-at-physics.uwc.ac.za <hr> Date: 27 Feb 95
08:45:52 GMT+0200 <br> Subject: Re: TEM film </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-ID: {MAILQUEUE-101.950227084552.256-at-
physics.uwc.ac.za} <br>To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov<br><br>Douglas
Medlin wrote about fine cracks appearing on some of their TEM<br>negatives. I
believe you are experiencing what photographers called<br>:crazing:. This is an
effect that occurs when the temperature of the<br>developer and fixer is not the
same, or at least the difference is<br>not small enough. It is exactly as you
describe it, a fine line<br>structure on the film that looks that mud
cracks.<br><br>Dirk Knoesen<br>Department of Physics, University Western Cape,
Bellville, 7530<br>South Africa<br>e-mail: dirk-at-physics.uwc.ac.za<br>Phone:
(+21) 959 2236 Fax: (+21) 959 3474<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: YANGA-at-NCCCOT.AGR.CA
<hr> Date: 27 Feb 1995 09:30:43 -0500 (EST) <br> Subject: RE:35mm film in TEM
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>We use Eastman motion picture film (5302 fine grain
release<br>positive film) in Philips EM300 in the past and currently in<br>Zeiss
EM902 without any problem.<br><br>Ann Fook Yang<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: South Bay Technology
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 73531.1344-at-compuserve.com <hr> Date: 27 Feb 95
12:12:22 EST <br> Subject: anhydrous polishing/Abrasive Films
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>One suggestion I would make would be polishing with
abrasive lapping films.<br>These are abrasive particles which are bonded to a
polyester film. It is a<br>higher grade of traditional SiC grinding paper and it
comes in micronized<br>particle sizes. The material is designed to be used either
with or without a<br>lubricant which should take care of your
problem.<br><br>While it is always preferable to polish with some sort of
lubricant, this is a<br>viable alternative for anhydrous materials. I must also
add that the lapping<br>film is one of our products so I do have a vested interest
in this suggestion.<br>If you would like a sample to try out, please contact me.
It is avaialable in<br>Aluminum oxide down to .05 micron and in Diamond down to
0.1 micron. Typical<br>price for Al2O3 film is about $1.39 per 8" PSA Disc and
for Diamond about $24<br>per 8" PSA disc. 8" Plain Back Diamond Film is more
typically used and is<br>priced at about $20 per 8" Disc. Prices, of course, will
decrease in quantity.<br>The diamond plain back films are used extensively in
Tripo Polishing for SEM and<br>TEM applications.<br><br>Best regards-<br><br>David
Henriks<br>South Bay Technology, Inc.<br>1120 Via Callejon<br>San Clemente, CA
92673<br><br>TEL: 800-728-2233<br>FAX: 714-492-1499<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: m.dickson-at-
unsw.edu.au (Melvyn R. Dickson) <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:50:49 <br> Subject:
Re: RE:35mm film in TEM </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center>
Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov<br><br><br>I have used Kodak
Fine Grain Release Positive (5302) in Philips microscopes <br>for 30 years. Never
gave a problem with cracking with the unperforated (no <br>longer available) or
perforated stock. Gave some problems with "lightning <br>strikes" on the final 4-
5 frames out of 40. Philips have special cameras with <br>large diameter hubs so
the film is never bent much and used unperforated film <br>so there was no
tendency to crack at perforations. A 35 mm camera in our <br>Hitachi H-7000 gives
very fine cracking across the film between the edges of <br>the perforations even
when using the film Hitachi recommends. This can only <br>be avoided by using
film which is only JUST dry enough, shooting the whole <br>roll and processing it
in about 4 hours. <br><br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com
<hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 02:24:41 -0500 <br> Subject: Materials Microscopy
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>For your information, Materials Microscopy is a new
newsletter dedicated to<br>the professional interests of the working materials
microscopist. Those who<br>wish to receive a free subscription should provide us
with their full mailing<br>address via FAX -at- (602) 947-7615 or E-mail:
MatlsMicrs-at-aol.com. Contributed<br>articles should be mailed to:<br>Materials
Microscopy<br>P.O. Box 2014<br>Scottsdale, AZ 85252<br>Please contact me if you
need any further information. Thank you.<br><br>Rene E. Nicholas<br>Circulation
Manager<br>Materials Microscopy<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be
(Desclin Jean) <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 08:25:56 +0100 (MET) <br> Subject: for
Barbara Hartmann </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br><br> <br>Hi Barbara!<br> I tried to no avail to send you
the present message at your email<br> address: it stubbornly bounced back, so I
eventually post it to the <br> microscopy list.<br> I apologize to the members
of this list if they should feel this is<br> wasting bandwidth: just delete and
go on to the next message ;-)<br> <br>Barbara! <br> I am afraid I did not make
my question clear enough ;-)<br> What I wanted to know was:<br>1) the testes you
wish to fix are from what species ?<br><br>2) for what kind of microscopy are they
to be processed ? I.e.<br> T.E.M., S.E.M., or light microscopy ?<br><br>3)
What's the embedding medium?<br><br>4) in the case of light microscopy, do you
contemplate using some special <br> technique (besides for recognizing the
different stages of the<br> seminiferous epithelium) which would require that
some specific<br> chemical would be either required or, on the contrary,
avoided?<br><br>In my personal experience with rat testes and light microscopy
(this<br>is rather very long ago: more than 30 years! :-( ), Bouin and
other<br>picric acid containing variations thereof are not optimal
fixatives<br>for preservation of the acrosomial apparatus of spermatids, which
is<br>one of the features used by most classification methods (Clermont's<br>among
others...).<br>The best fixatives for light microscopy of paraffin embedded
tissue<br>are those containing potassium dichromate such as, for
example,<br>Helly's fluid (Zenker + formaldehyde), but they also are followed,
after<br>rinsing and dehydration, by shrinkage which is still more important
than<br>that observed after Bouin's or Bouin-Hollande's (somewhat better)
fluids.<br><br>BTW, what's wrong with picric acid? It is always shipped in
'moist<br>condition' in order to minimize hazards. I work in our lab since
1953,<br>with Bouin, Bouin-Allen, Bouin-Hollande, Dubosq-Brazil etc., every
day,<br>and we never experienced any problem. We store the picric acid for
our<br>needs in the form of a saturated aqueous solution which keeps for as
long<br>as you will. This stock solution is then used for preparing all
picric<br>acid containing fixatives.<br><br>There is no point in trying to
eliminate the picric acid from the fixed<br>pieces of tissue before sectioning. If
the presence of picric acid in the<br>slides should hamper subsequent staining (a
rare occurrence, btw), then<br>the easiest and expeditious way to get rid of it is
to pretend your tissue<br>was fixed with a sublimate containing fluid: at the
rehydration step, your<br>slides should undergo treatment by alcoholic iodine (or
lugol solution) and<br>sodium thiosulfate in the usual way and 'voila': no more
picric acid on the<br>slides within 2 minutes!<br>Under no circumstances should
the pieces of tissue fixed with a picric<br>acid containing fixative undergo
rinsing in water! This is sheer heresy ;-)<br>because it induces a lot of swelling
in the tissue before shrinking even<br>more during dehydration (I never found out
which histologist ever advocated<br>such method, but I know quite a number of
renowned ones who firmly condemned<br>it, and with good reason). If you insist on
rinsing the pieces of testes after<br>fixation, then merely increasing the number
of steps through 90x alcohol should <br>do the trick; you may even add a thin
layer (1-2 mm thick) of lithium<br>carbonate on the bottom of the alcohol
containing flasks: this helps<br>dissolving part of the picric acid
away.<br><br>Possibly the method which should yield the best pictures has been
documented<br>in a book entitled 'Histological and histopathological Evaluation of
the<br>Testis', by Russell,Ettlin, Sinha Hikim and Clegg: Cache River Press
1990,<br>(15777 Bolesta, Box 129, Clearwater, Fl 34620): ISBN 09627422-0-
1.<br><br>At the end of the book, there is an appendix about the materials and
methods<br>which you might find useful (although perfusion fixation of rat testes
is<br>among the most frustrating experiences I ever had, even with a lot
of<br>heparin ). This would also require embedding in epoxy resin and making
large<br>semi-thin sections, which I don't know whether you are prepared to do
;).<br>Glutaraldehyde certainly seems to me the best choice, but then
paraffin<br>embedding would be ruled out (too hard and too brittle after
paraffin<br>embedding).<br>HTH, and good luck.<br>Let me know about the outcome
(good, I hope)<br>John<br>(correction: alcohol above should read 90 percent in
volume)<br><br><br><br>
***********************************************************<br> * Jean C.
Desclin (John), Associate Prof. of Histology *<br> * Laboratory of Histology -
Faculty of Medicine *<br> * Brussels Free University (U.L.B.)
*<br> * e-mail: desclinj-at-ulb.ac.be (internet) *<br> * snail
mail: route de Lennik 808 *<br> * B - 1070 Brussels
Belgium *<br>
***********************************************************<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Ker{nen Jaakko-Tuomas
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; jaakko-at-butler.cc.tut.fi <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb
1995 12:14:33 +0200 <br> Subject: Re: Materials Microscopy </b></fieldset></div>
<div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
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<font size=-1> <br><br>Yes, I want more information about the Materials
Microscopy. Please<br>send me a free subscription.<br><br>Jaakko Keranen<br>Centre
for electron microscopy<br>Tampere Univ. of technology<br>P.O.Box. 589<br>FIN-
33101 Tampere<br>FINLAND<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: delannoy-at-
welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy) <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:38:53
-0500 <br> Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br><br>To whomever,<br> Would someone please repost the
recent info on lipid sizing (K.Walters?)<br>and the three responses on lipid
negative staining. I had another crash and<br>lost<br>these responses.<br>
Thanks<br> Mike D.<br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: John F. Conroy
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; John.Conroy-at-m.cc.utah.edu <hr> Date: Fri, 24
Feb 1995 14:23:58 -0700 (MST) <br> Subject: Optical Microscopy of Tissues
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
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/www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html</a><hr></center>
<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {MAILQUEUE-101.950228091038.320-at-ahabs.wisc.edu}
<br><br><br><br><br>Hello,<br><br>I am currently writing a grant proposal, and I
have been knocking my head <br>against the wall looking for some sort of data on
the optical transmission <br>properties of nervous tissue (the brain). Does anyone
have a good <br>reference, or, from a practical standpoint, how thick do brain
tissue <br>slices have to be to obtain good optical transmission (esp. relative to
<br>other fatty tissue slices like those from the earlobe, whose transmission
<br>characteristics I can find since people have been doing pulse
<br>oximetry.).<br><br>Thanks in advance,<br><br>John Conroy<br>University of
Utah<br>Dept. Bioengineering<br><br><br>Dear John,<br><br>It has been years since
I worked in this area, but I suggest you might <br>look at the literature for the
optical transmission properties of retina. <br>As a nervous tissue, its optical
properties should be quite similar to the <br>CNS as long as the measurements are
not made in the vicinity of the fovea. <br>And, of course, due the importance of
retinal transparency for vision, its <br>optical properties must be well known.
For a place to start I'd have a <br>look at the "Handbook of sensory physiology"
Springer-Verlag.<br><br>Just my two cents worth, Steven
<br>-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
<br>Steven L. Goodman, Ph.D.<br>Dept. Animal Health and Biomedical Sciences
608-262-0816 (office)<br>University of
Wisconsin

608-262-7420 (FAX)<br>1655 Linden Drive<br>Madison, WI 53706

SLG-at-
AHABS.WISC.EDU<br>----------------------------------------------------------------
----------<br><br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: delannoy-at-
welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (Michael Delannoy) <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 12:00:41
-0500 <br> Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain </b></fieldset></div> <div
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Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>} Return-Path: {delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu} <br>}
Received: from AAEM.AMC.ANL.GOV by welchlink.welch.jhu.edu (5.0/SMI-SVR4)<br>}
id AA04845; Tue, 28 Feb 1995 09:52:41 -0500<br>} Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995
09:38:53 -0500<br>} Message-Id: {9502281438.AA02618-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu}
<br>} X-Sender: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu<br>} Mime-Version: 1.0<br>}
To: microscopy-at-aaem.amc.anl.gov<br>} From: delannoy-at-welchlink.welch.jhu.edu
(Michael Delannoy)<br>} Subject: lipid sizing and neg. stain <br>} X-Mailer:
{Windows Eudora Version 1.4.2b16} <br>} Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-
ascii"<br>} <br>} To whomever,<br>} Would someone please repost the recent
info on lipid sizing<br>(K.Walters?)<br>} and the three responses on lipid
negative staining. I had another crash and<br>} lost<br>} these responses.<br>}
Thanks<br>} Mike D.<br>} <br>} <br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Miguel Avalos B.
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; miguel-at-ifuname.ifisicaen.unam.mx <hr> Date:
Tue, 28 Feb 1995 10:37:19 -0800 <br> Subject: Re: Materials Microscopy
</b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from
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<font size=-1> <br><br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: Damon Heer
:&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; DLH-at-fei2.feico.com <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995
16:07:22 -0800 <br> Subject: Used SEM for sale </b></fieldset></div> <div
class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver
Archives<br> <a
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<font size=-1> <br><br>NANOMETRICS QWIKSCAN II<br>FESEM<br><br>$4,900<br><br>If
interested, please contact Paxton Hong<br>InnfoGraphics<br>503 235-
0227<br><br>Best regards,<br>Damon Heer<br><br>FEI Company<br>7451 N.E. Evergreen
Parkway<br>Hillsboro, OR 97124-5830<br><br>Phone (503) 640-7582<br>fax (503)
640-7509<br>email dlh-at-feico.com<br>
<br> </font>
</div><br><br><br><div class=headlevel2><fieldset><b>From: jfmjfm-at-umich.edu
(John F. Mansfield) <hr> Date: Tue, 28 Feb 1995 22:42:01 -0500 <br> Subject: No
link to Newsgroup </b></fieldset></div> <div class=textfont2><hr><center> Contents
Retrieved from Microscopy Listserver Archives<br> <a
href=http://www.microscopy.com/MicroscopyListserver/MicroscopyArchives.html>http:/
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<font size=-1> <br>Message-Id: {199503010340.WAA29098-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu}
<br>X-Sender: jfmjfm-at-srvr5.engin.umich.edu<br>Mime-Version: 1.0<br>Content-
Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"<br><br>Just a note to let you guys know that
our link from this mailing list to<br>the Usenet newsgroup
sci.techniques.microscopy has been broken. The<br>gateway
at<br>sci.techniques.microscopy.usenet-at-decwrl.dec.com has been closed down.
Dec<br>no longer support it.<br>If you want as much coverage for you questions and
posts as possible I<br>encourage you to post both to this list and also to the
Newssgroup.<br><br>If anyone knows how to set up a mail gateway to the Newsgroup,
and also<br>from the Newsgroup to the mailing list, I would be very interested to
hear<br>how to do it so we could reestablish the link and possibly make it<br>bi-
directional this time!<br><br>Many
thanks<br>Jfm.<br><br><br>______________<br>John Mansfield<br>North Campus
Electron Microbeam Analysis Laboratory<br>413 SRB, University of Michigan<br>2455
Hayward, Ann Arbor MI 48109-2143<br>Phone: (313)936-3352 FAX (313)936-
3352<br>jfmjfm-at-engin.umich.edu or John.F.Mansfield-at-umich.edu<br>URL:
http://www.engin.umich.edu/~jfmjfm/jfmjfm.html<br><br><br> </font>
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