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Night sky map March 2016 STAR BRIGHTNESS Zero or brighter STAR BRIGHTNESS 1 s t magnitude

Night sky map

March 2016

STAR BRIGHTNESS Zero or brighter STAR BRIGHTNESS 1 s t magnitude Zero or brighter 2 nd
STAR BRIGHTNESS
Zero or brighter
STAR BRIGHTNESS
1 s t magnitude
Zero or brighter
2 nd
Gemini (the Twins)
3 rd
1
s t magnitude
nd
th
2
4
rd
3
Leo (the Lion)
First Quarter
Moon on 16th
th
4
Jupiter
CANIS MINOR
STAR BRIGHTNESS
STAR BRIGHTNESS
STAR BRIGHTNESS
Zero or brighter
Zero or brighter
Zero or brighter
SEXTANS
ORION’S BELT
JUPITER
Orion (the Hunter)
s t
s t
P
HYDRA
Canis Major
1
1
1 s t magnitude
magnitude
magnitude
M42
(the Great Dog)
nd
nd
nd
2
2
2
Sirius
rd
rd
rd
3
3
3
th
th
th
4
4
4
CORVUS
FALSE CROSS
Canopus
Eta Carina
SOUTHERN CROSS
ERIDANUS
Gamma Crucis
Beta Crucis
POINTERS
CHART KEY
Bright star
Faint star
MOON PHASE
Ecliptic Milky Way
Last quarter
02nd
Celestial Equator
New Moon
09nd
P
Planet
First quarter
16th
LMC or Large Magellanic Cloud
Full Moon
23rd
SMC or Small Magellanic Cloud

THE CHART

The star chart shows the stars and constellations visible in

the night sky for Sydney, Melbourne, Canberra, Hobart and

Adelaide for March at about 9 pm (summer time) and at

about 8 pm (local standard time) for Perth and Brisbane. For

Darwin and similar locations the chart will still apply, but

some stars will be lost off the southern edge while extra stars

will be visible to the north. Stars down to a brightness or

magnitude limit of 4.5 are shown on the star chart. To use

this star chart, rotate the chart so that the direction you are

facing (north, south, east or west) is shown at the bottom.

The centre of the chart represents the point directly above

your head, called the zenith point, and the outer circular

edge represents the horizon.

HIGHLIGHTS IN MARCH 2016

The best time to view the Moon with a small

telescope or binoculars is a few days either

side of the first quarter Moon on the 16th.

Jupiter, the largest of the planets in our solar

system, can be seen in the eastern sky. The

autumnal equinox falls on the 20th of March,

when the sun crosses from the southern to the

northern part of the sky. Prominent in the sky

this month, are the constellations of Canis

Major (the Great Dog), Orion (the Hunter),

Gemini (the Twins) and Leo (the Lion). Crux

(the Southern Cross) is low in the south

eastern sky.

Sydney Observatory is part of the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences. The Sydney Observatory night sky map was created by Dr M. Anderson using the TheSky software. This month’s edition was prepared by B.Dew & Dr R Chhetri. © 2016 Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences, Sydney.