EDGE DONS

DEBATE BRAWL KNIGHTS
IN PLAYOFF OPENER

HOLLYWOOD’S
SELF-PORTRAIT

RUBIO AND CRUZ GO HARD AFTER TRUMP

WEEKEND JOURNAL PAGE 18

NATION PAGE 5

SPORTS PAGE 11

Leading local news coverage on the Peninsula
www.smdailyjournal.com

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016 • XVI, Edition 166

Broadway work nearly done
Burlingame officials hopeful project will ease traffic congestion
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The new Broadway overpass in
Burlingame is set to open soon, as
workers will begin a third phase of
construction aiming to improve traffic
connections to the Highway 101
access point.
Construction crews will begin work
late Friday, March 4, and continue
through Sunday, March 6, to switch traffic to the new overcrossing. Work will
take place between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m.

The new design is
expected to clear
traffic congestion
throughout the area
which has suffered
logjams during the
extensive construction project.
Burlingame City
Lisa Goldman Manager
Lisa
Goldman said she is
hopeful the new overcrossing will
improve transportation throughout
the area near Broadway.

“The city is looking forward to the
next phase of construction, which
includes switching traffic to the new
Broadway overcrossing,” she said in
an email. “This should help ease congestion in the area and marks a significant milestone in the progress of this
project.”
John Kevranian, head of the
Broadway Business Improvement
District, echoed those sentiments.
“With the interchange opening up,
we are excited about that and looking

See BROADWAY, Page 23

NICK ROSE/DAILY JOURNAL

Construction workers are putting the final touches on the
Broadway overpass in Burlingame.

Tourism growth
drives South City
City budget fills with record
amount of hotel tax revenue
By Austin Walsh
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

South San Francisco’s city budget continued reaping the
benefits of travelers accessing the Peninsula’s thriving
economy through the gateway of San Francisco
International Airport, according to a recent report.
Tax revenue increases fueled by growth in the tourism
industry helped push the city’s general fund end balance to
$21.4 million, up 3.7 percent from the previous fiscal year,
according to a comprehensive annual financial report presented Wednesday, Feb. 25, to the City Council.
The report, which detailed the fiscal year ending June 30,
2015, credited last year’s economic success largely to visitors filling South San Francisco hotel rooms, resulting in
an influx of transient occupancy tax revenue to the city.
Just short of $13 million worth of transient occupancy,

See SOUTH CITY, Page 31
BILL SILVERFARB/DAILY JOURNAL

Reiko Ferry and Satomi Ishida view the memorial at the San Bruno Bay Area Rapid Transit station dedicated to a time when
the Tanforan race track became an assembly center for Japanese-Americans during World War II.

Memories of a darker time

Keep an eye out for phishy
emails during tax season

Experts warn hackers out to steal
Women recall families being forced information to file false tax returns
from homes during World War II By Bree Fowler
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

By Bill Silverfarb
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Reiko Ferry and Satomi Ishida have been members of the
Rhythm Tappers for 25 years. It’s a group of dancers that
once actively performed at senior centers and convalescent
homes in the area.
They wear matching costumes and put on lively shows. It
keeps them healthy but mostly they do it for fun.
The group has dwindled, however, but Ferry, 87, and

NEW YORK — It’s tax time, so you’d better think twice
before clicking on that link in your email inbox.
What may look like a legitimate communication from
your bank, human resources department or email provider
may actually be part of a scheme designed to steal the confidential information stored in your computer, or to gain
access to the network it’s attached to.
Experts warn that tax season is a prime time for this brand

See MEMORIES, Page 31

See SCAM, Page 23

2

FOR THE RECORD

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Thought for the Day
“If you have it and you know you have it,
then you have it. If you have it and don’t know
you have it, you don’t have it. If you don’t have it
but you think you have it, then you have it.”
— Jackie Gleason

This Day in History

1916

Actor-comedian Jackie Gleason was
born in Brooklyn, New York.

In 1 6 1 6 , astronomer Galileo Galilei met with a Roman
Inquisition official, Cardinal Robert Bellarmine, who
ordered him to abandon the “heretical” concept of heliocentrism, which held that the earth revolved around the sun,
instead of the other way around.
In 1 8 1 5 , Napoleon Bonaparte escaped from exile on the
Island of Elba and headed back to France in a bid to regain
power.
In 1 9 0 4 , the United States and Panama proclaimed a treaty
under which the U.S. agreed to undertake efforts to build a
ship canal across the Panama isthmus.
In 1 9 1 9 , President Woodrow Wilson signed a congressional act establishing Grand Canyon National Park in
Arizona.
REUTERS
In 1 9 2 9 , President Calvin Coolidge signed a measure
Partially
demolished
houses
are
pictured
in
the
Vila
Autodromo
slum
with
the
Rio
2016
Olympic
Park
in
background
in Rio
establishing Grand Teton National Park in Wyoming.
de Janeiro, Brazil.
In 1 9 4 5 , authorities ordered a midnight curfew at nightclubs, bars and other places of entertainment across the
nation.
In 1 9 5 2 , Prime Minister Winston Churchill announced
She’s studying the effect of climate D’Iberville and took a large amount of
Cops: Honors student
that Britain had developed its own atomic bomb.
change scenarios on larval lobsters. money to Los Angeles to have several
In 1 9 6 6 , South Korean troops sent to fight in the Vietnam was 23-year-old Ukrainian
Lobster represents the most valuable pounds of the drug hidden in vacuumWar massacred at least 380 civilians in Go Dai hamlet.
sealed bags in the side walls of coolers,
HARRISBURG, Pa. — Police say a fishery in Maine.
In 1 9 7 0 , National Public Radio was incorporated.
Waller’s photo of a 3-week-old baby according to an affidavit.
central Pennsylvania high school honInvestigators said they obtained phoors student was actually a 23-year-old lobster was one of thousands she has
tos of Robinson with Moran and of
Ukrainian national using a false identi- taken as part of her research.
ty after his visa expired.
It won a National Science Foundation Robinson holding coolers and meth he
Artur Samarin was arrested and visual media award and appears in the obtained in California. It’s unclear if a
charged Tuesday by the Harrisburg latest issue of the magazine Popular Los Angeles supplier has been arrested.
Moran has already accepted a plea
Science. The award was selected by
police.
Police say he pretended to be Popular Science readers in the photog- deal. Each man is serving time for interHarrisburg High School student Asher raphy category of the annual Vizzies state travel in aid of drug racketeering
Potts, who had a 4.16 grade-point aver- contest honoring visual media that enterprises.
The charge against Robinson carries
age and was in the National Honor conveys scientific research.
maximum penalties of 20 years in
Society. Samarin was actively involved
prison, a $1 million fine and three
at the school, working with a student Meth in ice chest linings, man
years’ probation. His sentencing hearadvisory
group
on
a
food
bank,
and
a
Actress Jennifer
admits delivering 10 pounds
Singer Fats
Singer Michael
ing is scheduled for May 24.
member of the school’s ROTC and
Grant is 50.
Domino is 88.
Bolton is 63.
GULFPORT, Miss. — A man has
Naval Sea Cadet programs.
Game show host Tom Kennedy is 89. Country-rock musiPolice say he had a Pennsylvania dri- pleaded guilty to trying to deliver crys- Police scratching heads over
cian Paul Cotton (Poco) is 73. Actor-director Bill Duke is 73. ver’s license in Potts’ name when he tal meth from Los Angeles to
Singer Mitch Ryder is 71. Actress Marta Kristen (TV: “Lost in was arrested.
Mississippi after the drug was discov- bald man who’s stealing Rogaine
Space”) is 71. Rock musician Jonathan Cain (Journey) is 66.
MOUNT HEALTHY, Ohio — Police in
Online court records don’t list an ered hidden in ice chest linings, authorThe president of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdogan, is 62. Actor attorney for Samarin, who remained in ities said.
suburban Cincinnati are on the lookout
James Robinson, 35, pleaded guilty for a bald man they say has been stealGreg Germann is 58. Sen. Tim Kaine, D-Va., is 58. Bandleader the Dauphin County jail Thursday on
John McDaniel is 55. Actor-martial artist Mark Dacascos is charges including identity theft and in federal court Monday to a conspiracy ing hair growth and memory aid prodcharge involving the trafficking of ucts from stores.
52. Rock musician Tim Commerford (Audioslave) is 48. tampering with public records.
more than 10 pounds of meth, The Sun
Mount Healthy police have issued an
Singer Erykah Badu is 45. Rhythm-and-blues singer Rico
Herald reported.
alert for “a serial thief” they say recentWade (Society of Soul) is 44. Olympic gold medal swimmer Colorful baby lobster photo
Robinson’s arrest was part of a Drug ly took $847 worth of Rogaine and
Jenny Thompson is 43.
wins award for Maine biologist
Enforcement Administration investiga- Prevagen products from a Walgreens
THAT SCRAMBLED WORD GAME
ORONO, Maine — A University of tion that began in Gulfport with help store in the city just north of
by David L. Hoyt and Jeff Knurek
Maine graduate student’s picture of a from the Mississippi Bureau of Cincinnati. Police say he is linked to
Unscramble these four Jumbles,
colorful tiny larval lobster has won a Narcotics and led to related federal similar thefts from retailers in nearby
one letter to each square,
indictments.
suburbs.
National Science Foundation award.
to form four ordinary words.
An associate of Robinson, 38-yearPolice say the man is believed to
Jesica Waller is in her second year of
OHCOP
a master’s program in marine biology. old Joseph W. Moran Jr., rented a van in drive a white Jeep.

In other news ...

©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC
All Rights Reserved.

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The San Mateo Daily Journal
1900 Alameda de las Pulgas, Suite 112, San Mateo, CA 94403
Publisher: Jerry Lee
Editor in Chief: Jon Mays
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Wednes day : Sunny. Highs around 70.
Northeast winds 5 to 10 mph...Becoming
northwest in the afternoon.
Wednes day ni g ht: Mostly clear in the
evening then becoming partly cloudy.
Lows in the lower 50s. North winds around
5 mph.
Thurs day : Sunny in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. Highs around 70. Northeast winds
5 to 10 mph.
Thurs day ni g ht: Mostly clear. Lows in the lower 50s.
Fri day : Partly cloudy. Highs in the mid 60s.
Fri day ni g ht thro ug h Sunday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy.
Lows around 50. Highs in the mid 60s.
Mo nday : Partly cloudy. Highs in the 60s.
Mo nday ni g ht: Mostly cloudy. Lows around 50.
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As a public service, the Daily Journal prints obituaries of approximately 200 words or less with a photo one time on the date of the family’s choosing. To submit obituaries, email
information along with a jpeg photo to news@smdailyjournal.com. Free obituaries are edited for style, clarity, length and grammar. If you would like to have an obituary printed
more than once, longer than 200 words or without editing, please submit an inquiry to our advertising department at ads@smdailyjournal.com.

LOCAL/STATE

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Californians fall short in water cutbacks
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

SAN FRANCISCO — Californians are
starting to fall behind the state’s mandatory 25-percent water conservation target
even though the state remains in drought,
state officials said Thursday.
As of January, water users in
California’s cities and towns have managed to use 24. 8 percent less water since
mandatory conservation began last year,
the State Water Resources Control Board
said.
That just misses the level Gov. Jerry
Brown had ordered in what is now the
state’s fifth year of drought.
“Our numbers have slipped rather than

Caltrain to have bus
bridge for construction project

Comment on
or share this story at
www.smdailyjournal.com
plummeted, ” water board chairwoman
Felicia Marcus said. “Let’s just keep it up”
on conservation.
The latest numbers mark the first time
since June that urban Californians have
missed the overall mandatory water-conservation target.
Water officials blamed warmer weather
in January for urban users’ slipping in
conservation efforts, which have included
cutting back on watering lawns and

Local briefs

Caltrain will again operate a bus bridge
Saturday, Feb. 27, between the Burlingame
Caltrain Station and Hayward Park Caltrain
Station as part of the San Mateo Bridges
Replacement project. 
SamTrams buses will shuttle passengers
between the Burlingame Caltrain Station and
Hayward Park Caltrain Station. Caltrain will
have ambassadors at the impacted stations
to assist and direct customers to the bus
bridge. Caltrain, in cooperation with the
city of San Mateo, is replacing the four century-old rail bridges located at Tilton, Monte
Diablo, Santa Inez and Poplar avenues,
which no longer meet current seismic safety
standards.
This weekend’s project is to replace the
112-year-old Santa Inez Avenue rail bridge
and will require the complete shutdown of
Santa Inez Avenue and several surrounding
streets with continuous weekend track work
beginning at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 26, through
5 a.m. Monday, Feb. 29. Construction activity includes removing the old bridge structure
and rolling in the new bridge.
Caltrain anticipates undertaking the same

process in mid-April 2016. For more information visit Caltrain’s website at www.caltrain.com/busbridge.

Alleged gangmember
arrested in Millbrae
The San Mateo County Sheriff’s Office
announced the arrest of a validated gangmember out of Redwood City in Millbrae
Wednesday afternoon.
At approximately 3:30
p.m., Samuel Mendez
Lopez, 20, was stopped
by a sheriff’s deputy for a
vehicle code violation
near the area of Larkspur
Drive and Pinehurst
Court. He was also found
to have drugs and a conSamuel Lopez cealed loaded firearm,
according to the Sheriff’s
Office.
Anyone with information about this crime
is encouraged to call the San Mateo County
Sheriff’s Office Millbrae Bureau at (650)
259-2300.

Obituary

MARY ELLEN WELDON
SAN MATEO and BANGOR, ME - Mary Ellen (Chalmers)
Weldon, 85, passed away peacefully at home in Bangor,
Maine, on February 24, 2016. She was born July 18, 1930, in
Bangor, the daughter of Philip and Mary (Stowe) Chalmers.
        

Mary Ellen (or “Mel” to family and friends) was a graduate
of Bangor High School and of the University of Maine, Class
of 1952. She was married for nearly fifty years (until his
death) to Scott Weldon, whose career in the paper industry
brought them and their growing family to various parts
of the country, including Swarthmore, PA, Detroit, MI, Haddonfield, NJ, Millinocket,
ME, Ho-Ho-Kus, NJ, and lastly San Mateo, CA, where they lived for twenty-five years.
Throughout, Mel remained a good-humored and supportive helpmate to her husband, a
loving, devoted, and fiercely loyal mother to her three children, a proud and generous
grandmother, and delightful company to her friends. She was also a skilled cook and
candy-maker, had a special talent for needlework and doll-making, and was a gracious
hostess. In recent years, she shared her daughter’s home, which was also her own
childhood home, in Bangor.
Mary Ellen is survived, and will be sadly missed, by daughter Ann (Weldon) Blanke and
husband Richard of Bangor; by son Mark Weldon and wife Judy of Liverpool, NY; by
grandchildren Marie (Blanke) Andrawes and husband Michael of Newton, MA; Emily
(Weldon) Davcev and husband Tim of Rochester, NY; Claire (Blanke) Enkosky and
husband John of Syracuse, NY; Kate (Weldon) Chan and husband Brian of Woodbridge,
ON, Canada; Scott G. Weldon of Liverpool, NY; Samantha Weldon of Weatherford, TX;
Friedrich Blanke and wife Sheryl of Glenburn, ME; granddaughter-in-law Gina Platt of
Seal Harbor, ME; and by eight great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by husband
Scott Weldon, son Matthew Weldon, and grandson Roman Blanke.
The family wishes to give special thanks to the care-givers from the Aging Excellence
agency who cared so conscientiously for Mary Ellen during her declining years - in
particular, Jennifer La Taille, Jackie Taylor, Suzanne Folsom,   Lauren Colson, and
especially Valerie Dyer, whose affectionate care and devoted labor went well beyond
the call of duty. The family would also like to thank Sheryl Blanke and the other
Eastern Maine Visiting Nurses who tended to Mel during her final months.
Interment will be in Oak Grove Cemetery, Bangor. The family will hold a memorial
service for Mel at a later date, to be announced. Those who wish to remember her
in a special way may make gifts in her memory to the Scott and Mary Ellen Weldon
Memorial Scholarship Fund, care of the University of Maine Foundation, 2 Alumni
Place, Orono, ME 04469-5972. Condolences to the family may be expressed at www.
BrookingsSmith.com. A service of Brookings-Smith, Bangor.

stricter enforcement for wasteful users.
For the month of January, the conservation rate was 17. 1 percent less when compared to the same period in 2013. That’s
down from December’s savings rate.
A strong El Nino weather pattern this
year has brought parts of the state up to
normal levels of rain and snow, but fallen
short of the big storms that state officials
say would be needed to bring California
out of drought.
California cities and towns overall have
saved 1. 1 million acre feet of water since
January, putting them at 96 percent of
another state conservation goal. That’s
enough to supply water to between 1 million and 2 million households for a year.

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

3

Police reports
Game over
A woman refused to return a soccer ball
after it went into her yard on Iris Street
in South San Francisco before 6:05
p.m. Saturday, Feb. 20.

REDWOOD CITY

Sus pi ci o us pers o n. A man was seen asking people if they wanted to buy drugs on
James Avenue before 11:07 p.m. Tuesday,
Feb. 23.
Di s o rderl y co nduct. Two people were
seen drinking beer in front of a business and
yelling on Broadway before 9:57 p. m.
Tuesday, Feb. 23.
Di s turbance. A woman was seen walking
in and out of traffic on El Camino Real
before 4:35 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 23.
Hi t-and-run. A delivery truck was seen
damaging a vehicle’s mirror on Middlefield
Suspect arrested in
Road before 2:51 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 23.
domestic violence incident
Di s turbance. A man was seen kicking a
A San Bruno man was arrested Tuesday puppy on Hudson Street before 2:02 p.m.
night in connection with a domestic vio- Tuesday, Feb. 23.
lence incident.
Jorge Beltran, 41, was arrested on suspi- SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO
cion of domestic violence, child abuse,
making criminal threats, brandishing a Sus pi ci o us ci rcums tance. A resident saw
weapon and resisting arrest, San Bruno passengers in a maroon Saturn walking up
driveways and appeared to be casing homes
police said.
Officers responded at about 9:15 p.m. on Rockwood Drive before 2:11 p. m.
Tuesday to a residence in the 700 block of Monday, Feb. 22.
Di s turbance. An unknown man was heard
Mills Avenue on a report of a disturbance.
Responding officers were informed yelling loudly near the bushes in the dark on
Beltran was armed with a large machete Franklin Avenue before 2:28 a.m. Sunday,
while he was involved in an altercation with Feb. 21.
a woman, police said.
Arres ts . Two men were arrested for physiHe was located hiding in a garage and was cally fighting security at the Residence Inn
taken into custody without incident, accord- on Veterans Boulevard before 3:45 a.m.
ing to police.
Sunday, Feb. 21.

4

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

STATE/NATION

Husband of Brittany Maynard
lobbies for N.Y. right-to-die bill
By David Klepper
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ALBANY, N.Y. — Dan Diaz has lobbied
lawmakers across the country and gone on
Oprah, all to fulfill a promise to his late
wife, Brittany Maynard, who put a face on
the debate over allowing terminally ill
patients to seek life-ending drugs.
On Thursday, Diaz was in Albany to tell
Maynard’s story again, this time to New
York lawmakers considering a right-to-die
bill. Maynard attracted national attention
in 2014 when, at age 29, she moved to
Oregon to legally end her life after she
was diagnosed with a brain tumor and
given six months to live. She died later
that year.
“Last year, 24 states introduced legislation, and in almost all of them, they men-

tioned Brittany,” he told
the Associated Press.
“The impact she had ...
she was the star. I’m just
doing what I can.”
The New York legislation would allow terminally ill people to
request life-ending drugs
from a physician. Two
Dan Diaz
doctors would have to
certify that the patient is competent to make
the decision, and physicians could refuse to
participate for any reason. Two witnesses
would be required to be present when
patients complete their formal, written
request.
Following Maynard’s death, lawmakers in
her home state of California voted to make
their state the fifth to allow end-of-life
assistance.

California resolves long-running
lawsuit over youth prisons
SACRAMENTO — California on Thursday
resolved a long-running lawsuit over poor
care at juvenile prisons, and both sides said
conditions have greatly improved.
An Alameda County judge approved an
agreement between the parties to dismiss a
2003 lawsuit against what was then called
the California Youth Authority.
The system was known then for imposing
long periods of solitary confinement and
employees’ frequent use of pepper spray
against youthful offenders.
California has since dramatically reduced
the population of what is now known as the
Division of Juvenile Justice, from about
10,000 youth nine years ago to about 700
now.
“They’ve come a very long way, and
they’ve made some remarkable transformations,” said Sara Norman, an attorney with
the nonprofit Prison Law Office that filed
the lawsuit. “We do have some concerns
about some ongoing problems, but we are
confident that they have the tools they need
to continue to improve.”

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Around the state
Reckoning ahead
for some incumbents
at Democratic convention
SACRAMENTO — California Democrats
are meeting this weekend to strategize, hear
from top party officials and a few will be
jockeying for the party’s critical endorsement ahead of this year’s elections.
A handful of incumbents face a reckoning
from fellow Democrats who are upset with
positions they have taken.
Among them is Assemblywoman Cheryl
Brown of San Bernardino.
She faces an unexpected challenge from
the left this year as political fallout for her
moderate votes. Environmentalists, labor
organizations and advocates of stricter gun
laws are teaming up to try to unseat her.
Congressmen Mike Honda of San Jose and
Ami Bera of Elk Grove also are still seeking
their party’s endorsements.
Bera is answering to union interests for
his support of President Barack Obama’s
overseas trade deal.

NATION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

5

Around the nation
In Chicago, Sanders found
his place in civil rights movement

REUTERS

From left, Sen. Marco Rubio, Donald Trump and Sen. Ted Cruz speak at the debate sponsored by CNN.

Rubio and Cruz go hard after Trump
By Nancy Benac
and Jullie Bykowicz
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HOUSTON — Brawling from the getgo, a fiery Marco Rubio went hard after
Donald Trump in Thursday night’s
Republican debate, lacerating the
front-runner’s position on immigration, his privileged background, his
speaking style and more.
Ted Cruz piled on, too, questioning
the front-runner’s conservative credentials, as the two senators tag-teamed
Trump in a debate that reflected the
increasing urgency of their effort to
take down the billionaire businessman
before he becomes unstoppable. It was
a rare night where the bombastic
Trump found himself on the defensive.
The two-hours-plus debate played
out as a raucous night of tit-for-tat
insults, with candidates shouting over
one another so much that it was hard to
follow at times. The showdown came

just days before the Super Tuesday 11state round of mega-voting that could
all but lock up the nomination.
When Trump faulted Rubio on a deal
to buy a $179,000 house, the Florida
senator shot back that if Trump “hadn’t
inherited $200 million, you know
where Donald Trump would be right
now? Selling watches in Manhattan.”
In another rough exchange, Rubio
accused Trump of shifting his position
on deportation, hiring people from
other countries to take jobs from
Americans and being fined for worker
violations. Joining in, Cruz criticized
Trump for suggesting he alone had
“discovered the issue of illegal immigration.”
Trump shot back at Rubio: “I hired
tens of thousands of people. You’ve
hired nobody.”
As for Cruz, Trump took a more personal tack, touting his own ability to
get along with others and adding:
“You get along with nobody. ... You

should be ashamed of yourself.”
Both Rubio and Cruz said that Trump
had had to pay a $1 million fine for
illegal immigration hiring.
The candidates were pressed on why
they haven’t released their tax returns
as promised. The GOP’s 2012 nominee, Mitt Romney, suggested this
week that Trump was holding back
because there was a “bombshell” that
would be revealed.
Trump said he’s been audited by the
IRS every year and can’t release his
returns while that’s going on.
Rubio and Cruz both promised to
release more of theirs in the next two
days.
Rubio was the principal aggressor of
the night, and he held nothing back.
Taking on Trump’s declaration that
he’d build a wall on the Mexican border, Rubio declared: “If he builds a wall
the way he built Trump Tower he’ll be
using illegal immigrant labor to do
it.”

CHICAGO — Bernie Sanders was in his first year at the
University of Chicago, 20 and with a thick New York
accent, when he took to the steps of the
administration building to rail against a
university policy of racially segregated
housing.
“We feel it is an intolerable situation,
when Negro and white students of the
university cannot live together in university-owned apartments,” Sanders told
a crowd of about 200 students that afterBernie Sanders noon in January 1962. Then he and a few
dozen students headed to the fifth floor,
where they began a 15-day sit-in outside the university
president’s office, passing their time reading and eating
dinners of donated cheese and salami sandwiches.
As Sanders and fellow Democratic presidential candidate
Hillary Clinton jockey for support from black and Latino
voters ahead of Saturday’s South Carolina primary, much of
the debate has centered around which candidate has a
stronger record of fighting for minorities.

A self-described unifier,
Kasich not always Mr. Nice in Ohio
COLUMBUS, Ohio — In the Republican presidential
campaign, Ohio Gov. John Kasich is the hug-addicted
happy warrior, a Mr. Nice Guy swimming
in a tank of sharks.
That’s not quite the governor Ohioans
know.
After his election in 2010, Kasich
butted heads with unions and tea party
activists alike. He barreled into
Columbus with a tone that was anything
but patient, warning Statehouse lobbyJohn Kasich ists “if you’re not on the bus, we will run
over you with the bus.” By his own admission —actually, a
boast — he “shook everything from top to bottom.”
Kasich preaches a similar line against the status quo in
his White House bid, but his manner sets him apart from the
slash-and-burn tone of a race with the hard-charging, bombastic billionaire Donald Trump and Texas Sen. Ted Cruz at
the top.

6

LOCAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

Cora Wiegand
Cora Wiegand died peacefully in her
home on the afternoon of Feb. 24, 2016,
surrounded by family and
friends.
She was born July 29,
1934, in North Dakota,
but lived most of her life
in California, making
her home on
the
Peninsula for nearly 40
years. Mother of four
daughters;
Johanna
Harrison, Jean Wiegand, Susan Wiegand
and Jennifer Edwards. She has nine grandchildren. Cora is survived by her four siblings and her beloved Ron Silzer.
“Cora was a dazzling member of her community. She was known for her style and
beauty, her kindness and generosity, positive energy and sense of fun, her interested
conversation and steadfast dependability.”
In recent decades she was very active with
The Peninsula Volunteers, and especially
Little House, where every Tuesday for 14
years she checked in guests as they arrived
for events, brightening everyone’s day in
the process. Until struck by cancer, she was
inexhaustible.
“A devoted friend, always where she needed to be, the first and often the last to bring
compassion and presence to others. She
will be sorely missed.”
Services are 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 28, at
Valley Presbyterian Church, 945 Portola
Road, Portola Valley.

Charles ‘Chuck’ D. Oliver
Charles “Chuck” D. Oliver, born Jan. 15,

Obituaries
1968, died suddenly
Nov. 24, 2015, of a massive brain hemorrhage.
He was 47.
A resident of Portland,
Oregon, he was a 1986
graduate of Sequoia High
School in Redwood
City, California, and
earned a bachelor’s of
science in architecture from the University
of Oregon in 1992. 
For over 10 years as an associate at
Tiland & Schmidt Architects, Portland, he
designed many local shopping centers. He
was an avid Lego fan, enjoyed Monty
Python and played the video game Fallout.
He is survived by his parents Douglas and
Nancy Oliver, San Carlos, California, and
sister, Elaine Oliver, San Leandro,
California.
A Celebration of Life will be 2 p.m.
Saturday, Feb. 27, in the Parish Hall at St.
Peter’s Episcopal Church, 178 Clinton St.,
Redwood City. Find more details at zellerchapeloftheroses.com.
In lieu of flowers, contributions are welcomed at the American Stroke Association
or American Heart Association, Western
States Affiliate, P.O. Box 742030, Los
Angeles, CA 90074-2030.

Manuel Nunez
Manuel Nunez, born July 17, 1936, died
Feb. 18, 2016, surrounded by his family at
home, age 79.
Manny’s spirit is carried on by his wife
Bobbi Nunez, his two children Mark and

Mike, daughter-in-law Tracey, two grandchildren Mykey and Ally, and his extended
family and friends.
Manny took special care of his 16 cars,
and loved the game of golf with a passion.
“He never pressured his children to be
something they weren’t and always loved
and supported them for who they were.
When asked how he wanted to be remembered he said, ‘As a good guy!’ The Nunez
family asks that in honor of Manuel Nunez
we all love ourselves and each other, smile
big and smile often.”
Services will be Saturday, Feb. 27.
Visitation will begin at 12:30 p.m. with a
1:30 p.m. chapel service at Crippen &
Flynn Woodside Chapel. For full obituary
and directions visit crippenflynn.com.

JoAnn Cecilia Lockwood
JoAnn Cecilia Lockwood, age 84, of San
Bruno, died at home Feb. 24, 2016. 
She was the wife of
Robert L. Lockwood for
65 years. She is also survived by her son
Kenneth Lockwood (his
wife Carin) and their
grandchildren, Kimberly
Lockwood and Leilani
Lockwood.
She was a native of
San Francisco, and a graduate of Balboa
High School, class of ’48. She was a proud
member and former president of the
Brickett’s Club.
Family and friends are invited to attend
the funeral mass 10:30 a. m. Tuesday,
March 1, at St. Robert’s Church, 1380
Crystal Springs Road in San Bruno.

THE DAILY JOURNAL
Committal will follow at Holy Cross
Cemetery in Colma.
In lieu of flowers, the family prefers
memorial contributions be made to St.
Jude’s Childrens’ Research Hospital, 501
St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105.

Donald L. Oswald
Donald L. Oswald of Belmont,
California, died Feb. 24, 2016. 
He was 87.
He is survived by his
wife of 59 years, Gloria
nee Pasquesi, and his
children
Celeste,
Madonna, Veronica and
Monique; his eight
grandchildren and seven
great-grandchildren. He
is preceded in death by
his son Thomas and great-granddaughter
Samantha.
Friends are invited to attend a funeral
mass 10 a. m. Saturday, March 5, at
Immaculate Heart of Mary Church, 1040
Alameda de las Pulgas in Belmont. Sign the
guestbook at crippenflynn.com.
As a public serv ice, the Daily Journal
prints obituaries of approx imately 200
words or less with a photo one time on a
space av ailable basis. To submit obituaries, email information along with a jpeg
photo to news@smdaily journal.com. Free
obituaries are edited for sty le, clarity,
length and grammar. If y ou would lik e to
hav e an obituary printed more than once,
longer than 200 words or without editing,
please submit an inquiry to our adv ertising
department at ads@smdaily journal.com.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

7

8

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

LOCAL/NATION

Nevada Gov. Sandoval withdraws his
name from high court consideration
By Michelle Rindels
and Mary Clare Jalonick
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LAS VEGAS — Nevada Gov. Brian
Sandoval said Thursday he is not interested
in being considered for the Supreme Court
vacancy — a decision that foils one route
President Barack Obama might have had to
breach Senate Republicans’ planned blockade of any election-year confirmation.
Sandoval, a Republican and the state’s
first Hispanic governor, issued a statement
the day after news broke that the White
House was considering him as a potential
replacement for the late Justice Antonin
Scalia.
“Earlier today, I notified the White House
that I do not wish to be considered at this
time for possible nomination to the
Supreme Court of the United States,” wrote
Sandoval, an abortion rights supporter and
former federal judge. “The notion of being

Sheriff: Gunman, three others
dead after shootings in Kansas
HESSTON, Kan. — A sheriff in south-central Kansas said Thursday that four people,
including a gunman, are dead after a series of
shootings at a business, its parking lot and
two streets nearby. Harvey County Sheriff T.
Walton said at a news conference that all the
dead were shot inside Excel Industries, a plant
in Hesston that makes lawn mower products.
He said 14 were injured in the shootings.
Law enforcement officers killed the gunman, who worked at the plant, after he
began shooting at them, Walton said.
Before driving to the plant, the man fired
from his vehicle, the sheriff said.
The shooting comes less than a week after
authorities say a man opened fire at several
locations in Kalamazoo, Michigan, leaving
six people dead and two severely wounded.

considered for a seat on
the highest court in the
land is beyond humbling, and I am incredibly grateful to have been
mentioned.”
He offered no reason
for his decision but said
he also expressed his
Brian Sandoval position to senators
Harry Reid, Dean Heller
and Mitch McConnell.
White House spokesman Josh Earnest
declined to comment, saying he would not
offer detailed updates on the president’s
short list.
The Senate’s vetting process for any nominee is expected to be viciously political, if
hearings take place at all. Regardless of
which nominee Obama settles on, “this
nomination will be determined by whoever
wins the presidency in the fall,” said Senate
Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.

Around the nation
Carter: No Guantanamo
talk during Obama’s Cuba trip
WASHINGTON — President Barack
Obama doesn’t plan to make an announcement about the future of the U.S.-controlled
naval station and detention center at
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, when he travels to
the island next month, Defense Secretary
Ash Carter assured members of Congress on
Thursday.
Carter’s remarks followed concern
expressed by the Republican chairman of a
House panel that Obama might use the visit
to unveil a shift at Guantanamo, a sprawling
installation that houses the prison and also
serves as a U.S. outpost for security in the
Caribbean.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Reporters’ notebook

T

he San Mateo Co unty Li brary
was named by the Ins ti tute o f
Mus eum and Li brary Serv i ces
as one of 30 finalists for the 2 0 1 6
Nati o nal Medal fo r Mus eum and
Li brary Serv i ce. The Nati o nal Medal
is the nation’s highest honor given to
museums and libraries for service to the
community.
The Institute of Museum and Library
Services is encouraging the public to share
stories about the finalists on the IMLS
Facebook page. To share your San Mateo
County Library story visit
facebook.com/USIMLS. The National
Medal winners will be named later this
spring, and representatives from winning
institutions will travel to Washington,
D.C., to be honored in a White House ceremony. To see a full list of finalists and learn
more about the National Medal visit
www.imls.gov/2016-medals.
***
At an award ceremony at Pal o Al to
Ci ty Hal l , U. S. Rep. Anna G.
Es ho o , D-Pal o Al to , announced that
Cas ti l l eja Scho o l ’s Heejung Chung ,
Cl ai re Huang and Ai mee An were chosen the first place winners of the 2 0 1 6
Co ng res s i o nal App Chal l eng e fo r
the 1 8 th Co ng res s i o nal Di s tri ct.
Their winning app Mezzo , according to its
creators, “reduces food waste by giving
food businesses a quick and easy way to discover local food pantries and donate their
surplus.” Mezzo will be on display in the
U.S. Capitol and be featured on the U. S.
Ho us e o f Repres entati v es website.
***
The San Franci s co Publ i c Uti l i ti es
Co mmi s s i o n announced this week that
construction has been completed on two
major regional water pipeline projects that
are part of the $4.8 billion Hetch Hetchy
Water Sy s tem Impro v ement
Pro g ram. One is in the East Bay, the other
is in northern San Mateo County. That one
is a $42 million Peni ns ul a Pi pel i ne
Sei s mi c Upg rade Pro ject that repaired,
replaced and seismically retrofitted vulnera-

ble sections of three different regional
water delivery pipelines at six different
locations to ensure these critical pipelines
can withstand a major earthquake, according
to the SFPUC.
***
This week, San Mateo County launched
Pul s ePo i nt — a free mobile app that
alerts registered CPR-trained users of a heart
attack victim in a public place in their
immediate vicinity. Users can then start
CPR in the critical minutes before emergency teams arrive.
CPR- and hands-only CPR trained residents who download the PulsePoint app can
choose to be notified of nearby cardiac
emergencies so they can start CPR right
away. The PulsePoint app also includes
information on the closest automated external defibrillator (AED), an easy-to-use
machine that shocks a victim’s heart if
needed. PulsePoint is connected to local
emergency response systems, so by the
time the app notifies nearby bystanders, an
ambulance is already on the way.
***
The So uth San Franci s co Po l i ce
Department promoted three officers and
added three others — one of which has an
extensive history among the local law
enforcement ranks.
Officers Bri an Gri g g , Vi v i ann
Ng uy en and Mark Saunders were all
sworn in during a ceremony held Tuesday,
Feb. 23.
The new members took different paths to
the ceremony, as Grigg graduated from
Chi co State Uni v ers i ty , Nguyen
attended the Uni v ers i ty o f Cal i fo rni a
at Irv i ne, and Saunders rejoined the
department after having served for 28 years
and retiring in 2012.
Cpl . Mi ke Garci a was promoted to sergeant, and officers Matt O’Co nner and
Amy Sari o tti were promoted to corporal.
The Reporters’ Notebook is a weekly collection
of facts culled from the notebooks of the Daily
Journal staff. It appears in the Friday edition.

OPINION

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

An eye-opening study trip
By Sam Hindi

F

ourteen days, three countries,
eight elected Arab-American
public servants, 25 meetings
with broad and diverse spectrum of
ambassadors, policy makers, business people, non-governmental
organizations, strategic studies institutes, American universities and visits
to three refugee camps summarize my
trip to the United Arab Emirates,
Egypt and Lebanon as a member of
the Arab American Institute’s
Leadership Council. The purpose of
the trip was to gain better understanding of the region’s culture, challenges, opportunities and bilateral
relationships with the United States.
There is so much more to share than
this allotted space so I will emphasize
on what impressed me the most in
each country and how it relates to us
in our community and the country.
We’ve all heard and probably seen
some of the United Arab Emirates’
construction and development especially in Dubai, home to the tallest
building in the world, the Burj Kalifa.
U.S. Ambassador Barbara Leaf and her
team of political and economic advisors briefed our delegation and taught
us that not only is the UAE an important U.S. ally but it is our largest trading partner in the region. Meeting
with HE Dr. Amal Al Qubaisi, Speaker
of the Federal National Council, and
other Emirati officials we learned how
the UAE is implementing an ambitious strategic initiative to diversify
its revenue and be independent of oil
revenue by the year 2030. Although it
pales in scale, diversifying our revenue and being highly dependent on
property taxes is one of the priorities
I will be working on tirelessly this
year. Have you heard of Masdar City?
It’s the UAE’s sustainable community
using renewable energy and built
exclusively from recycled materials.
Interestingly, they use the same slogan as Foster City; “live, work and
play.” Dr. Al Qubaisi was just one of
the female leaders I met in the UAE, a
country leading the region in its
efforts to empower Emirati women
leaders in government, business and
all sectors of the society. Based on

my observation,
the women in the
UAE are doing an
excellent job.
While the UAE is
a young country,
Egypt is very rich
in its history, culture and contribution to civilization. Egypt and its
stability are extremely important to
international trade and U.S. interest
vis-a-vis the Suez Canal and the fact it
has the largest population in the Arab
world, as we learned during our meeting with Steven Beecroft, U.S.
ambassador to Egypt. The country is
currently going through a very sensitive period. The threat of terrorism in
Egypt is real but it is unfortunate it
seems the population is being asked
to choose between security and civil
rights and freedom. I hope we will
never entertain that in the United
States and I’m thankful and appreciative for the security and freedom we
take for granted. What’s more worrisome is that more than 45 percent of
the population is under 35 and they
are not being heard or given the
opportunity to play a role in determining the country’s future. That is a
recipe for disaster.
The third country we visited was
Lebanon, where I was born and raised
prior to immigrating to the United
States. Being away from Lebanon for
some years, I was excited and this trip
gave me a different perspective.
Lebanon never ceases to amaze me
with its resiliency; decades of civil
war and now hosting more than 1.5
million Syrian refugees for a country
with a population of 4.5 million. To
put it in perspective, these numbers
equate to the United States hosting
106 million refugees. Yet somehow
Lebanon survives on insufficient
assistance from the underfunded
United Nations Relief and Works
Agency and the international community. The highlights of this trip were
the visits to the refugee camps; they
were also the most heartbreaking
experiences. We visited the Shatila
and Burj El Barajneh refugee camps in
Beirut. The inhabitants of Burj El
Barajneh are mostly Palestinian

Elephants in the room
Guest
perspective
refugees from 1948, and it was disheartening to witness the conditions
of the camps and to see that the situation has deteriorated since my last
visit in 1980 from terrible to horrendous. The population of the camp has
doubled since 2011 and the beginning
of the Syrian war. It is estimated that
between 20,000 to 40,000 Syrians
have come to Shatila camp, an area of
1 square kilometer.
Although I’ve been following the
human suffering of the Syrian war for
the past five years, I was not prepared
for what I saw during our visit to
Barelias Syrian refugee camp in the
Bekaa Valley. The blue tents supplied
by the United Nations High
Commission for Refugees make the
difference between the Palestinian
camps we visited in Beirut and the
new Syrian camps very evident. The
living conditions in Barelias camp
are appalling, and the refugees lack
access to their basic needs and medical care. Hearing the stories of the
children and their parents firsthand
brought tears to our eyes.
This trip has impacted me on a personal, professional and human level.
Sometimes we tend to forget how
great our country is regardless of the
challenges we have. Here in Foster
City or the Peninsula in general, it’s
important to recognize that no matter
what we believe our growing pains
are, they pale in comparison to so
many. Tolerance, community and
diversity are the foundation for the
strength of character of a people and
the quality of their place.
I would be remiss if I did not thank
the Arab American Institute for inviting me to be part of the Arab
American Leadership Council and my
colleagues in the delegation for their
friendship and for making this trip an
exceptional experience.
Sam Hindi is a member of the Foster
City Council.

Letter to the editor
Apple versus the government
Editor,
Categorically, Apple should never
agree to creating a special accessible
version of their products. This is just
a ploy from government agencies to
get companies to install a backdoor.
Let’s assume for a minute that the
North Korea leadership wants access
to an iPhone that they have. Why

Jerry Lee, Publisher
Jon Mays, Editor in Chief
Nathan Mollat, Sports Editor
Erik Oeverndiek, Copy Editor/Page Designer
Nicola Zeuzem, Production Manager
Kerry McArdle, Marketing & Events
REPORTERS:
Terry Bernal, Bill Silverfarb, Austin Walsh, Samantha
Weigel
Susan E. Cohn, Senior Correspondent: Events

would that government not be able to
get the same rights and accommodation should they ask for it? What
about Iran, Syria and all the other
folks that are on our “ bad boy” list?
Next question, why does the NSA,
which collects all the data using different means, not provide the data?
They have all of it, anything that got
sent or received they have captured.

BUSINESS STAFF:
Charlotte Andersen
Charles Gould
Paul Moisio

Irving Chen
Karin Litcher
Joe Rudino

INTERNS, CORRESPONDENTS, CONTRACTORS:
Robert Armstrong
Jim Clifford
Caroline Denney
William Epstein
Tom Jung
Jeanita Lyman
Jhoeanna Mariano
Karan Nevatia
Nick Rose
Jordan Ross
Andrew Scheiner
Emily Shen
Kelly Song
Gary Whitman
Cindy Zhang

Letters to the Editor
Should be no longer than 250 words.
Perspective Columns
Should be no longer than 600 words.
• Illegibly handwritten letters and anonymous letters
will not be accepted.
• Please include a city of residence and phone
number where we can reach you.

So why not ask them? Bottom line,
this is a political scam from an
agency that, after six months investigation, still has not collected sufficient facts or proof to indict Hillary
Clinton for mishandling our secrets.

Harry Roussard
Foster City

OUR MISSION:
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those who live, work or play on the MidPeninsula.
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9

Correction Policy

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Editorials represent the viewpoint of the Daily Journal
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I

t was quite a turnout at Monday’s town hall meeting
organized by U.S. Rep. Jackie Speier, D-San Mateo,
at St. Bartholomew’s Church in San Mateo. Shared
were stories about displacement caused by ever-rising
rents and calls from property owner groups to make sure
proposals like rent control do not move forward. The two
sides are a bit trenched and what has become clear is that
there aren’t any easy solutions to the jobs/housing imbalance in this area.
Daily Journal readers are familiar with the stories of
families and individuals facing enormous rent increases in
recent years and even evictions caused by building sales.
Speier too has heard those stories, which prompted her to
call the meeting.
“The situation in San Mateo County is dire. It requires
the community as a whole, including city councilmembers, Realtors, landlords, state legislators and federal legislator to develop solutions,” she said.
One idea Speier had was similar to LifeLine for discounted phone service to eligible households. A case could be
made for caps on rents for seniors or the disabled and
Speier said she is willing to work on it with local officials.
“It has to be their idea, but
certainly we can sow the
seed,” she said.
San Mateo County
Supervisor Dave Pine, who
attended the meeting, said he
appreciated the new ideas that
were brought forward but said
there hasn’t been one single
solution, which he described
as “perplexing.”
The county has formed the
Closing the Jobs/Housing
Gap Task Force to address the
situation, but Pine said the
emphasis is more on increasing housing supply rather than widespread changes to tenant protection measures.
So it’s an argument between rent control and the free
market and even ideas like just cause eviction requirements draw concern by property owner groups.
“There’s very little discussion about something in
between,” said Pine, adding it’s always the elephant in the
room at these meetings.
So while the conversation is becoming more open, it
doesn’t seem as if there is any growing traction on measures like rent control or rent stabilization, unless, of
course, it comes from the electorate. And even so, increasing housing supply usually means increasing density, and
that’s a whole other elephant in the room.
***
This year’s Tour de Peninsula will not take place, and
that’s OK.
The perennial bicycling event that began in 1991 has,
as its “godfather” (my phrase) Mark Simon put it, a
serendipitous and peripatetic history. It was spawned from
Simon’s newspaper column at the now defunct Peninsula
Times-Tribune in which he “milked” a few missives out of
a faux Tour de Peninsula which he envisioned as our local
version of the Tour de France, which American cyclist
Greg LeMond had just won. Turns out a friend of Simon’s,
Rick Sutton, grew tired of his columns and told him to put
the rubber on the road. The first event was a loop around
Stanford University attended by about 150 people. It grew
once Simon landed a job at the San Francisco Chronicle
and, in recent years, has been organized by the San Mateo
County Parks Foundation as a fundraiser.
Putting it on has become quite an undertaking, and new
Executive Director Michele Beasley said the foundation
board decided to take a year off and reassess it to allow her
to focus on her new responsibilities. That includes focusing more on particular projects designed to bring more
people into the county’s parks like a shuttle service and
mini cabins for some overnight stays.
For Beasley, it’s a refresh button.
“The board recognized the tour is a very popular event,
well-loved and well-attended and that it’s a big disappointment that it won’t be happening this year. But we will be
bringing people together to reassess how things could
work in 2017,” she said. “So we are hitting a refresh button. It’s an opportunity to take a step back and think
strategically about this event’s success in the future.”
It’s not the first break for the event, known more for its
fun than its competition. Simon said it took some time
off in between its different incarnations and the fact that
it’s lasted this long is “astonishing.”
“It’s entirely understandable,” he said. “Their rationale
is logical and legitimate.”
And, by the way, for those unfamiliar with Simon’s
robust lexicon, peripatetic means traveling from place to
place, especially working or based in various places for
relatively short periods.
Jon May s is the editor in chief of the Daily Journal. He can
be reached at jon@smdaily journal.com. Follow Jon on
Twitter @jonmay s.

10

BUSINESS

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Stocks post solid gain on rising oil prices
By Ken Sweet

DOW JONES INDUSTRIALS

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — A late-day surge
pushed U.S. stocks sharply higher
Thursday, propelled by a recovery
in energy companies and bank
stocks, which have been hit hard
this year.
Investors were also encouraged
by positive economic data,
including improved orders for
long-lasting goods that served as
a sign that businesses were buying
equipment and investing in their
operations.
The Dow Jones industrial average rose 212.30 points, or 1.3
percent, to close at 16,697.29.
The Standard & Poor’s 500 index
rose 21.90 points, or 1.1 percent,
to close at 1, 951. 70 and the
Nasdaq composite rose 39. 60
points, or 0.9 percent, to close at
4,582.20.
Stocks had been flat to slightly
higher most of the day but added to
their gains in the last hour of trading. The market — as it has done
for weeks now — largely tracked
the price of oil. U.S. crude oil
closed up 92 cents, or nearly 3
percent, to $33.07 a barrel while
Brent crude, the global bench-

High: 16,697.98
Low: 16,458.42
Close: 16,697.29
Change: +212.30

OTHER INDEXES

mark, rose 88 cents, or 2.6 percent, to $35.29 a barrel.
“Oil and the stock market are
going to keep moving in tandem
like this until oil prices stabilize, ” said Jeremy Zirin, chief
equity strategist at UBS Wealth
Management.
Bank stocks got a reprieve
Thursday after several weeks of
downward pressure. The financials
sector was the biggest gainer in
the S&P 500. Morgan Stanley
rose 4 percent, Goldman Sachs
rose 2 percent, while the big retail

S&P 500:
NYSE Index:
Nasdaq:
NYSE MKT:
Russell 2000:
Wilshire 5000:

1951.70
9,625.28
4582.21
2103.32
1031.58
19,998.52

+21.90
+119.21
+39.60
+24.07
+9.50
+219.13

10-Yr Bond:
Oil (per barrel):
Gold :

1.70

-0.05

33.00
1,234.00

banks Bank of America, U. S.
Bancorp and Citigroup were up
more than 1 percent each.
Bank stocks have been hit hard
this year on expectations that the
Federal Reserve will now be reluctant to raise interest rates, which
boost bank profits, and that low
oil prices will continue to cause
banks to write off energy loans.
“The fears about the banks are
entirely about profitability.
Investors were expecting the Fed
to raise rates three to four times
this year, now we are looking at

maybe one interest rate hike,”
Zirin said.
Orders to U.S. companies for
long-lasting manufactured goods
rose in January at the strongest
pace in 10 months, the government said Thursday. A key category that tracks business investment
surged by the largest amount in 19
months. The bigger-than-expected gains could be a sign of better
days ahead for the nation’s beleaguered manufacturers.
The biggest gainer in the S&P
500
Thursday
was

Salesforce. com, which jumped
$6.90, or 11 percent, to $69.42
after the company issued an
upbeat outlook for the year.
Investors had been worried about
the results of Salesforce after a
competitor, Tableau, issued a dismal outlook earlier this month
that caused its shares to drop nearly 50 percent, dragging down its
competitors.
Both U.S. and European markets
fared well despite a sharp drop in
Chinese stocks overnight. The
Shanghai composite fell 6.4 percent on renewed concerns about
the country’s manufacturing sector
and market liquidity.
Bond prices rose, with the yield
on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note
falling to 1.71 percent from 1.75
percent on Wednesday.
In other energy trading, heating
oil rose 1 cent, or 1 percent, to
$1.07 a gallon, wholesale gasoline rose 4.6 cents, or 4.5 percent,
to $1.056 a gallon and natural gas
fell 6.7 cents, or 4 percent, to
$1.711 per 1,000 cubic feet.
In metals, gold fell 30 cents to
$1,238.80 an ounce and silver fell
13 cents to $15. 20 an ounce.
High-quality copper fell 2.8 cents
to $2.073 a pound.

Apple: FBI seeks ‘dangerous power’ in fight over phone
By Eric Tucker
and Tami Abdollah
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — Apple Inc.
on Thursday asked a federal magistrate to reverse her order that
the company help the FBI hack
into a locked iPhone, accusing
the federal government of seeking “dangerous power” through
the courts and of trampling on its
constitutional rights.
The filing represents Apple’s
first official response since the
judge’s order last week and builds
upon arguments voiced by the
company’s chief executive and
supporters. It marks the latest
salvo in a court fight that could
create meaningful precedent and
establish new legal boundaries in

James Comey

the policy battle
between
national security and digital
privacy — a
clash
FBI
Director James
Comey says is
the
“hardest
question I’ve
seen in gov-

ernment.”
“No court has ever authorized
what the government now seeks,
no law supports such unlimited
and sweeping use of the judicial
process, and the Constitution
forbids it,” Apple said.
The Justice Department is proposing a “boundless interpretation” of the law that, if left
unchecked, could bring disas-

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trous repercussions, the company warned in a memo submitted
to Magistrate Sheri Pym that
aggressively challenges policy
justifications put forward by the
Obama administration in the last
several days.
“The government says: ‘Just
this once’ and ‘Just this phone.’
But the government knows those
statements are not true,” lawyers
for Apple wrote.
If Apple were required to build
the software the FBI wants, the
lawyers argued, “criminals, terrorists and hackers will no doubt
view the code as a major prize and
can be expected to go to considerable lengths to steal it.”
Justice Department lawyers
were reviewing Apple’s brief and
will respond, said spokeswoman

Melanie Newman. She said Apple
had reversed “its long-standing”
cooperation with government
requests, and that when Justice
Department officials want to
search a phone or another electronic device, “we narrowly target our request to apply to the
individual device” and get a
judge’s approval.
A hearing is scheduled for next
month. A judge in Brooklyn has
yet to rule in a similar but separate case.
The tech industry is slowly rallying to Apple’s side. Google,
one of Apple’s main rivals, now
plans to file a “friend of the
court” brief on Apple’s behalf
within the next week, a person
familiar with the situation said.
The person asked not to be iden-

Judge to VW: Find a fix quick for dirty cars
By Michael Biesecker
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

WASHINGTON — A federal judge
overseeing hundreds of class-action
lawsuits against Volkswagen says he
wants a firm answer within a month
about how the German automaker
plans to bring nearly 600,000 diesel
cars into compliance with clean air
laws.
U.S. District Court Judge Charles R.
Breyer told Volkswagen’s lawyers at a
hearing in California on Thursday that
he expects them to report back by
March 24. The judge said that by then,

he wants to know from the company
about the available technical solutions to fix the cars and the status of
negotiations on a potential settlement
with affected owners.
Volkswagen admitted to U.S. regulators in September it had used illegal
software installed in its so-called
“Clean Diesel” engines. The cheating
allowed cars to pass laboratory emissions tests while spewing levels of
harmful nitrogen oxide at up to 40
times the level allowed when operating on real roads.
Breyer said six months is long
enough for VW to find a fix.

SeaWorld admits planting worker in animal rights group
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

ORLANDO, Fla. — SeaWorld
acknowledged that it sent its own
workers to infiltrate an animal rights
group which opposed the practices of
the theme park.
The development comes months
after People for the Ethical Treatment
of Animals accused a SeaWorld
employee of trying to incite violence
while posing as a fellow animal rights
activist.
SeaWorld Entertainment CEO Joel

Manby vowed Thursday to end the
practice, but said that it had sent its
employees to protect the safety of its
employees and customers.
“We recognize the need to ensure that
all of our security and other activities
align with our core values and ethical
standards,” Manby said.
However, the company refused to say
who had authorized the infiltration,
how long it had been going on, or how
many workers were used to infiltrate
animal rights groups or other opponents.

tified because Google is still
drafting the document.
Apple had until Friday to file
its formal objection, but in submitting its brief on Thursday, the
company got ahead of a scheduled shareholders meeting and
took attention away from
Comey, who defended the Justice
Department’s stance in two separate
appearances
before
Congress.
The dispute broke into public
view last Tuesday when Pym
directed Apple to help the FBI
gain access to a phone used by
one of the assailants in the San
Bernardino, California, attacks.
Federal agents haven’t been
able to open the phone of Syed
Farook because they don’t know
the passcode.

Business brief
Salesforce.com’s stock
jumps on upbeat outlook
SAN FRANCISCO — Salesforce.com
Inc. shares jumped in extended trading
Wednesday after it issued an upbeat outlook for the year.
The customer-management software
developer reported a loss of $25.5 million, or 4 cents per share, in its fiscal
fourth quarter. Earnings, adjusted for
stock option expense and amortization
costs, came to 19 cents per share,
matching market forecasts. Its revenue
of $1.81 billion topped analyst expectations of $1.79 billion, according to
Zacks Investment Research.
For the year, the company reported
that its loss narrowed to $47.4 million,
or 7 cents per share, on revenue of
$6.67 billion.
Salesforce.com said it expects to earn
between 23 cents to 24 cents on an
adjusted basis for the current quarter on
revenue between $1.89 billion to $1.9
billion. Analysts surveyed by FactSet
had expected earnings of 21 cents a
share on revenue of $1.86 billion.
It forecast full-year adjusted earnings
in the range of 99 cents to $1.01 per
share, with revenue expectations
between $8.08 billion to $8.12 billion.

LOCAL ROUNDUP: PAL BASKETBALL TEAMS STRUGGLE IN SECOND ROUND OF CCS >> PAGE 13

<<< Page 12, Curry goes for 51 and sets
new 3-point record in win over Magic
Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

Knights knock off Dons

El Camino wins
baseball opener

By Nathan Mollat

By Terry Bernal

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

The Hillsdale boys’ basketball team beat
rival Aragon only once in three meetings
this season.
But that one win could not have been any
bigger. Facing the Dons in the second
round of the Central Coast Section Division
III tournament, the Knights grinded out a
44-40 victory.
“The first time (we played) they handled
us on our floor. The second time … we just
didn’t close out the game,” said Hillsdale
coach Brett Stevenson. “Tonight, we closed
out.”
Hillsdale (14-12) advances to the
Division III quarterfinals where it will face
No. 2 Sacred Heart Cathedral (9-13) at a
time to be determined Saturday at Aragon.
The game was not going to win any style
points. Both teams focused on defense and
working the shot clock to limit possessions and potential fast-break opportunities. In the end, Hillsdale made a couple
more shots.
“To beat a team three times (in one season) is very difficult,” said Aragon coach
Sam Manu. “These games, we usually pull
away in the fourth quarter. We wanted it to
be low scoring and wait for our shooting to
kick in and it never did.”
The game was nip-and-tuck the entire
way, with the biggest lead being a 9-3
Aragon advantage in the first quarter.
Besides that, neither team led by more a
couple points the rest of the way. Every
time either team threatened to put together a
run, the other responded with a clutch basket.
In the fourth quarter alone, there were four
lead changes, but there were only two
points scored — a pair of Taiga Schwarz free
throws — over the final 3:34 of the game.
Those two free throws, however, iced the
game for the Knights.
It appeared Aragon (12-15) might steal
the game in the final minute. Trailing 4240, the Dons had a couple cracks at tying
the score, but during a scramble for a loose
ball, the Knights forced a jump ball and the
possession arrow pointed their way. They

NATHAN MOLLAT/DAILY JOURNAL

It was a strange school day at El Camino
High School, but Thursday’s opening day of
baseball went off without a hitch.
Wednesday, the South San Francisco
Unified School District got a scare when it
received an anonymous letter expressing
concern about possible threats to the South
San Francisco and El Camino high school
campuses. With Thursday attendance
optional, most of the El Camino baseball
players didn’t attend classes, but, due to the
unique circumstances, were allowed to play
later that afternoon, despite a school rule
that generally prohibits
absent students from participating in schoolaffiliated sports the day
of said absence.
The Colts’ opening day
turned out to be a perfect
afternoon for baseball. El
Camino's new manager
Davidson
Chris Davidson Chris
embarked on his varsity
coaching career with a 3-2 home win over
Washington-SF under bright, blue skies.
“Awesome,” Davidson said of his first
win. “This is my first year here. We’re still
getting to know each other and all I did was
ask them to come out and compete, and they
responded.”
With the program tasked with replacing
beloved longtime manager Carlos Roman
following his retirement in 2012, Davidson
is El Camino’s third varsity manager in four
years. But he has brought a noticeable flair
to the position. A throwback to the days of
legendary El Camino manger Lou Zuardo,
his inclusive brand of old-school coaching
keeps players engaged with constant chatter.
“He’s just like — we have to be together,”
Colts starting pitcher Jesser Hernandez
said. “We have to be more like a team and be
together ... and keep always working hard.”
Hard work seems to be right up the
Hernandez boys’ alley. Senior right-hander
Jesser Hernandez earned the win with 4 1/3
innings of work, then his younger cousin

See KNIGHTS, Page 14

Hillsdale’s Taiga Schwarz, center, splits a pair of Aragon defenders on his way to the basket during the Knights’ 44-40 CCS Division III win.

See COLTS, Page 16

Mills makes quick work of North Monterey
By Terry Bernal
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Having played together for three years,
the synchronicity between Mills’ Julia
Gibbs and Aubrie Businger has never been
better.
The superstar post tandem took four minutes to get the Vikings (17-9) on the board
Thursday night, but then the landslide commenced as No. 7-seed Mills marched to a 6934 victory on its home court over No. 10
North Monterey County (12-12) in the

Central Coast Section Division III girls’
basketball playoff opener.
After Mills’ stone-cold start, Gibbs produced the Vikings’ first points on one of her
patented offensive rebounds for a put-back
with 3:42 remaining in the first quarter. It
was the start of a big night for the senior
center, as Gibbs scored a game-high 22
points.
“I want us to go as far as we can,” Gibbs
said of the start of Mills’ playoff run.
“Anything that happens from here on out,
it’s my last time playing. I want to keep the
people going after I leave. So, when I do

leave, Aubrie is still here to carry on for
me.”
Gibbs and Businger — now a senior and
junior, respectively — played together as
early as their time together at Taylor Middle
School. But they soon embarked on a legendary career together at Mills, when
Businger made the varsity team as a freshman. While they had some growing pains
that first season, it wasn’t long before the
chemistry between the two became second
nature.
“Once, in the beginning, [the chemistry]
had to develop,” Businger said. “Now, it’s

just easy — a slice of cake.”
The two also balance each other out.
While Gibbs was busy producing on
offense, she grabbed just five rebounds.
Businger, however, took over the post,
notching a double-double with 14 points
and 11 rebounds as Mills owned the boards.
The Vikings outrebounded North Monterey
53-27.
“I like playing with her,” Gibbs said.
“She plays hard and she’s aggressive. So,
we can play off each other.”

See MILLS, Page 14

12

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

CSM throwers poised for another big year
DAILY JOURNAL STAFF

Freshman Erica Vong could be breakout swim star for Bulldogs

If there is one constant in the College of
San Mateo track and field team, it is the consistency at which its throwing programs
perform.
Year in and year out, the Bulldogs’ discus,
hammer and javelin throwers, in addition to
their shot putters, are among the best not
only in the Coast Conference, but all of
Northern California — and even the state.
But there is a long way to go from to the
end of the season before talk can begin
about who is the best. It’s early, but CSM
names already litter the top Coast
Conference throwers list.
“We’re just beginning to get a good feeling of the direction we’re going,” said Mike
Lewis, CSM’s longtime throws coach.
If there is anyone who can help mold a raw
thrower into a championship contender, it’s
Lewis. In more than 40 years of coaching
the throws (the last 30 at CSM), he has
developed an eye for the details. A change of
position here, shifting the elbow there,
Lewis knows all the tricks in the book to
get maximum efficiency out of a thrower.
Obviously the talent needs to be there in

the athlete and, if it is, Lewis is the best
man to pull it all out.
“The trick in throws is finding balance
and rhythm. Then, look at strength,” Lewis
said. “[The athletes] are making a choice of
putting the work in. I’m just trying to
sculpt what they’re trying to do.”
Lewis said the goal of any season is gradually get better as the season goes along,
with the hope of making the biggest throws
on the biggest stages at the end of the year.
You can’t expect to go from A to Z in only
a couple of weeks, so it’s important the
throwers are making strides to reach those
postseason goals.
“I like to go to these (early-season) meets
so they can some numbers. … (I want them
to) start getting used to competing,” Lewis
said. “There are a lot of practice throwers
who are great. What we want to do is transfer some of our practice throws into meets.”
While CSM throwers may be the cream of
the Coast Conference crop, Lewis knows
there are better throw programs around the
state and it is those against which Lewis
judges his athletes.
“Nor Cal is always strong (in the throws).

This is going to be a strong year all over
California,” Lewis said. “It’s going to be
tough … to make it into state.”

hoping to prevent a repeat of the takeout by
the Los Angeles Dodgers’ Chase Utley that
broke a leg of New York Mets shortstop
Ruben Tejada in last year’s playoffs.

with a hand or foot and to remain on it, and
sliding within reach of the base without
changing his path to initiate contact with a
fielder.
An umpire can call both the runner and batter out for a violation.
In addition, takeout slides and neighborhood plays will be subject to video review. In

By Nathan Mollat

Baseball brief
MLB, union ban rolling
blocks by baserunners
NEW YORK — Major League Baseball and
the players’ union have banned rolling block
slides to break up potential double plays,

Under the rules change announced Thursday,
a runner must make a “bona fide slide,” defined
as making contact with the ground ahead of
the base, being in position to reach the base

More

A stroke of luck
Community college coaches are always
on the hustle to recruit players. Unlike their
four-year counterparts, athletes do not officially “commit” to a community college
program. As any JC coach will tell you,
they don’t know for sure who is on the team
until the first day of official practice.
But every now and then, the sports gods
will smile upon a JC coach and drop a statecaliber athlete right in their lap.
Such was the case for the CSM women’s
swim team and coach Randy Wright. He
already had a returning All American in
Morgan Smith, a sophomore out of El
Camino, and now he expects to have another by the end of the season in Erica Vong
— a freshman by way of Macau, China.
She was originally slated to swim for a
college on the East Coast, but because her
high school credits from Macau did not
transfer to the American school, she was

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advised to attend community college to
become eligible to transfer.
“They told her to go to community college and her uncle lives in Pacifica,” Wright
explained. “We lucked out.”
When Wright received an email from Vong
and told him what kind of times she posted
in high school, he immediately got excited.
He knew right away what kind of talent with
whom he was dealing.
She has done nothing to convince him
otherwise since then.
“The first time I saw her (swim), I knew
she was the real deal,” Wright said. “She is
already posting some of the fastest times in
the state.”
And Vong is far from just dominant in one
stroke. Wright can envision her swimming
in upwards of eight events: the 50 and 100
free, the 100 and 200 back, “the 200 IM
(individual medley) would be a good one (for
her),” Wright said.
Then there are three relays: the medley
relay and a pair of free events.
“She is a great all-around swimmer, but
she’s dynamite in the sprints,” Wright said.
“She’s fun to watch.”
the past, the neighborhood play wasn’t subject to review.
Baseball and the union also agreed to limit
mound visits by managers and pitching
coaches to 30 seconds and to cut the countdown clock for between-innings breaks by 20
seconds, to 2:05 for most games and 2:25 for
nationally televised matchups.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Local sports roundup
Girls’ basketball
Cupertino 48, Carlmont 27
The Pioneers used a stifling press to create several turnover and easy baskets and
the Scots could not recover in a Central
Coast Section Division I second-round
game in Cupertino.
Cupertino (17-8), the No. 8 seed, led 3113 at halftime.
Carlmont (15-11) struggled to score all
game long. The Scots were led by Hannah
Wright, who finished with nine points.

Leigh 56, San Mateo 43
The Bearcats were outscored 16-5 in the
second quarter and trailed 31-15 at halftime
and could never quite get back in the game
against the Longhorns in a CCS Division II
second-round game.
Alyssa Cho scored a team-high 20 points
for San Mateo (13-13).

Hillsdale 49, Pajaro Valley 19
The fifth-seeded Knights advanced to the
CCS quarterfinals for the second year in a
row with a lopsided win in the second round
of Division III bracket.
Hillsdale (16-11) will take on No. 4 Aptos
(16-10) at a time to be determined Saturday
at Mills.

Half Moon Bay 42, King’s Academy 25
Addison Wallling scored 15 points to lead
the Cougars to the win over the Knights in
a Division IV game.
Half Moon Bay (18-8), the No. 6 seed,
will take on No. 3 Monte Vista Christian
(21-3) Saturday at Menlo School.

Other scores
In one of the biggest upsets of the night,
11th-seeded Capuchino knocked off No. 6
Gunderson, 62-58. The Mustangs (9-16)
will take on No. 3 South City (16-9)
Saturday at Mills at a time still to be determined.
In a Division IV game, Terra Nova
advanced to the quarterfinals behind 16
points from Numi Saini as the Tigers
knocked off No. 7 Mercy-SF 49-28. The
Tigers (12-14) will face No. 2 Sacred Heart
Prep (17-6) Saturday at Menlo School.
Crystal Springs’ season came to halt as
the Gryphons were no match for Notre
Dame-Salinas in the first round of the
Division V tournament. Crystal Springs (6-

17) was held scoreless in the first and fourth
quarters as the Spirit won going away, 49-6.
In Division II action, No. 10 Westmoor’s
season was ended 54-39 by No. 7 Gunn.
Westmoor finishes the season with an 1111 record.

Boys’ basketball
In one of the more exciting games of the
night, Alma Heights-Pacifica held on for a
33-32 victory over visiting Crystal
Springs in a Division V second-round game.
Alma Heights (22-5) advances to the quarterfinals Saturday where the fifth-seeded
Warriors will face No. 4 Eastside College
Prep (13-11) at St. Francis-Watsonville.
Crystal Springs finishes the season with
a record of 8-18.
In Division IV play, eighth-seeded Menlo
School held off No. 9 Terra Nova, 60-50.
The Knights (11-14) will now face rival and
No. 1 seed Sacred Heart Prep (14-10) in a
quarterfinal matchup Saturday at Kaiser
Arena in Santa Cruz.
In another Division IV game, No. 5
Carmel beat unseeded Oceana, 66-41. The
Sharks finish the year at 8-16.
Jefferson put up 75 points in a Division
III game against Valley Christian, but it
wasn’t enough as the Warriors pulled out an
84-75 win, ending the Grizzlies’ season
with a 19-8 record.
Ninth-seeded Capuchino fell to No. 8
Monterey in another Division III game, 6945. The Mustangs finish the season with a
13-13 record, while Monterey (13-12) will
face No. 1-seed Burlingame (18-8) Saturday
at Aragon.
In Division II action, San Mateo’s season
ended with a 53-62 loss to No. 6 Mountain
View. The Bearcats end the year with a record
of 11-15.
Woodside also saw its season come to a
close with a 69-66 loss to no. 8
Christopher (13-12). Woodside final record
is 11-11.
In Division I, No. 8 Sequoia advanced to
the quarterfinals with an overtime win over
No. 9 Alisal. The Cherokees (13-13) will be
at No. 1 Piedmont Hills (18-6) at 2:45 p.m.
Saturday.

Boys’ tennis
Aragon 7, Hillsdale 0
The Dons won their Bay Division opener,
cruising to the win over the Knights.
Other than a three-set struggle for Landers
Ngirchemat at No. 1 singles, Aragon (1-0
PAL Bay, 1-1 overall) won its other six

matches in straight sets.

Woodside 4, Burlingame 3
The Wildcats kicked off PAL Bay
Division play with a victory over the
Panthers.
Woodside (1-0 PAL Bay) won the Nos. 1,
2 and 4 singles matches and pulled out the
team win with a victory at No. 3 doubles.
Menlo-Atherton 7, Half Moon Bay 0
The Bears began its defense of the PAL
Bay Division title with a convincing win
over the Cougars.
Only five matches were played as the
Cougars did not have enough players to fill
out a lineup, but there is little doubt anything would have changed.
Menlo-Atherton dropped only one game
in 10 sets.

Baseball — Wednesday
Aragon 16, Sacred Heart Prep 6, 6 innings
The Dons banged out 16 runs on 14 hits
and scored in five of the six innings to rout
the Gators in the season opener for both in
Atherton.
Aragon (1-0 overall) had eight players
drive in a run, with Alex Athanacio, Elliot
Biagini and Jordan Tong all driving in a
pair. Athanacio also scored six runs from
the leadoff spot for Aragon.
SHP (0-1) was led offensively by John
McGrory, who was 2 for 3 with two runs
driven in.

Sequoia 10, Lynbrook 6
Despite committing five errors, the
Cherokees erupted for six runs in the bottom of the sixth to turn a 6-4 deficit into a
win in Redwood City.
The game was called because of darkness
after six innings were completed.
Matt Smith scooped up the win on the
mound, recording the final out of the top of
the sixth before stroking a two-run double
to tie the score at 6 in the bottom of the
frame. Thomas Kervick was hit by a pitch
with the bases loaded to drive in the goahead run and Blake Carbonneau gave them
some breathing room with a two-run single.

Half Moon Bay 3, Los Altos 2
The Cougars scored three runs in the top
of the first inning and made them stand as
they held off the Eagles in their season
opener.
AJ Morrell, Danny Mack and Phillip
Anderson each had an RBI for Half Moon

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

13

Bay (1-0 overall), while five pitchers
— Morell, Dawson Campbell, Alex Smith,
Sam Terraszas and Ian Goldbach —  combined to limit Los Altos to two runs on
seven hits.

Boys’ golf — Wednesday
Burlingame 201, San Mateo 208
Shawn Chang fired an even-par 35 to pace
the Panthers to the win at Poplar Creek.
Jacob Katansky fired a 38 and Eddie Sun
finished with a 39 to lead the Bearcats.

Boys’ lacrosse — Wednesday
St. Francis 4, Menlo-Atherton 3, OT
The Bears opened the season with a tough
overtime loss to the Lancers in a non-league
match.
M-A (0-1 overall) trailed 3-1 entering the
fourth quarter, tying the score with under a
minute to play before falling in extra time.
Andrew Ojeda, Tyrstan Uphoff and Robert
Lane each scored for the Bears, while goaltender Cooper Waymire finished with 12
saves.

Boys’ tennis — Wednesday
San Mateo 7, Sacred Heart Cathedral 0
The Bearcats blanked the Irish in a nonleague matchup, but it wasn’t easy.
San Mateo’s top three singles players
—  Bishal Ghosh, Phalgun Krishna and
Mayur Ejjalaghatta — all needed three sets
to pull out their matches.
The remaining four matches were fairly
uneventful as San Mateo won those in
straight sets: Matt Huang at No. 4 singles
and the three doubles teams of Kevin Fang
and Luka Tomasevic, Daniel Basman and
Nicholas Chu, and Prasanth Rajan and Desh
Padmaker.

Softball — Wednesday
San Mateo 11, Notre Dame-SJ 0, 5 innings
Isabelle Borges and Kylie Galea combined
to limit the Regents to just two hits in the
Bearcats’ season-opening win.
Taylor Doi paced the offense for San
Mateo (1-0 overall) driving in three runs on
three hits while also scoring twice. Borges
and Galea also had strong days at the plate
as each had two RBIs. Jalyce Roman and
Paige Stoveland each drove in a run as well.

14

SPORTS

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

KNIGHTS
Continued from page 11
eventually moved the ball into the frontcourt and Schwarz took an inbound pass in
the corner, waiting for the Dons to foul.
Instead, Aragon’s Devin Grant forced a
jump ball with 20 seconds to play to give
the Dons one last chance. DeAndre Sanders’
bid to tie the game went long and Schwarz
was fouled with under 10 seconds to play. He
made both ends of a 1-and-1 and the Knights
held on for the win.
“That’s our team,” Stevenson said. “It’s
not pretty.”
As has been the case throughout the season, someone else stepped up for Hillsdale.

MILLS
Continued from page 11
Mills took the lead with 2:55 remaining
in the first quarter on a short jumper by
Gibbs and never looked back. Leading 14-8
after the opening quarter, Mills opened the
second with a 16-2 run.
Things were going so well for Mills in the
first half, Businger even managed a peculiar
statistic in going 2 of 4 from the free throw
line in the quarter. Both of her misses came

THE DAILY JOURNAL

The Knights have struggled to find consistent scoring from someone and while that
search is still ongoing, they still had
enough to fend off the Dons. Schwarz finished with 13 points, but it was Ryan
Doherty who kept Hillsdale in the game by
scoring a game-high 15 points, hitting
three 3-pointers.
“We’ve been trying to get balanced scoring and it’s been a struggle. We haven’t had
that second scorer,” Stevenson said. “Ryan
had a strong preseason. In the middle of the
season, he struggled a little bit, but he stuck
with it.”
Aragon was led by Nevan Samadhana,
who finished with 12 points on four 3pointers. Three of those 3s came in the third
quarter, to keep the Dons in the game.
“He’s the heart and soul of our team,”
Manu said. “He’s not even our best shooter.

He wills the ball in.”
Kimon Economou added 11 for the Dons
while also pulling down 10 rebounds.
Down 3-2 early, the Dons put together a
7-0 run in the first quarter, with Economou
scoring three straight buckets to give
Aragon a 9-3 lead.
Hillsdale, however, finished the quarter
with a 7-3 run to close to 12-10 after the
first period.
The game bogged down in the second
quarter as the teams combined to score 14
points, but the Knights did enough to take a
19-17 lead at halftime.
The third quarter saw both teams get out in
transition and the period turned into the
best one of the game. After Aragon tied the
score at 19 on a Aaron Balotro jumper to
open the second half, Hillsdale got a bucket
from Doherty and a layup from center Isaiah

Cozzolino for a 23-19 Hillsdale advantage.

on the second shot, and she grabbed her
own offensive rebound both times.
Meanwhile, Mills head coach Dave Matsu
used the double-digit lead to get his bench
players minutes. Junior forward Jasmine
Dong also had a big night in the post, totaling seven points and 10 rebounds. Junior
guard Zelie Zshornack scored nine points,
and her younger sister Debbie Zshornack
made her varsity debut with five points.
“(The team played) super well,” Gibbs
said. “Everyone was looking for the passes
and everyone had good team chemistry. So,
it went well.”
Gibbs will be attending West Point next

season as an inductee into the U.S. Army,
and is slated to play for the Army women’s
basketball team next season. It will be
strange to see Businger on the court without
her longtime post counterpart next season.
On the other hand, Gibbs is one of just two
outgoing seniors this season.
“It’s going to be different,” Businger said.
“But we have a good group of girls coming
up.”
The future was on display in the second
half Thursday. In addition to Debbie
Zshornack’s five-point output, Olivia
Williams grabbed five rebounds in her varsity debut. Both are call-ups from the jun-

ior-varsity squad who joined the team for
the CCS playoff opener.

But Samadhana buried back-to-back 3s to
give the Dons a 25-23 lead. Doherty
responded with a 3 of his own to put the
Knights up 26-25 with 4:06 to play in the
third. Aragon’s Davion Cox’s jumper gave
the lead back to the Dons, 27-26, but
Schwarz responded with a layup to put the
Knights back on top. Doherty followed
with a 3 to give Hillsdale a 31-27 advantage, but Samadhana’s third 3 of the quarter
closed Aragon’s deficit to 31-30. Doherty
slashed to the basket for a 33-30 Hillsdale
lead and a floater from Cox made it a onepoint Aragon deficit going into the final
eight minutes.
“If we played patiently … make (Aragon)
grind, make them work … then we had a
chance to beat Aragon,” Stevenson said.

So, will Businger feel more responsibility next season, without Gibbs, as a senior?
“For sure,” Businger said. “More scoring.
Definitely more of a role model for everybody.”
With the win, Mills advances to
Saturday’s quarterfinals to face a tough test
in No. 2 Soquel. The game, however, will be
played at Mills at a time to be determined, as
Mills was a predetermined “neutral” CCS
playoff site.

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SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

15

Semien makes big defensive strides at shortstop
By Janie McCauley
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

MESA, Ariz. — Ron Washington stood
side by side with shortstop Marcus Semien
in the batting cage within the depths of the
Oakland Coliseum last month, each smiling
as they worked together for a FanFest session.
These two have struck quite a bond in the
short time Washington has been back with
the Athletics as third base coach, a job he
had years ago while helping defensively
develop former stars such as six-time Gold
Glove third baseman Eric Chavez, first
baseman Jason Giambi and shortstop
Miguel Tejada.
Semien committed a majors-leading 35
errors in his first season with the A’s last
year, but the 25-year-old shortstop made
major strides with his glove over the second
half after Washington returned in May
before being promoted into his old thirdbase gig come August.
“The way we work, the way that I’ve
learned to work on defense with Wash, has
really made me more confident,” Semien
said. “Looking at the entire year as an experience, it’s only going to make me better.
There were more errors than I wanted to
have, but it’s going to make me a better
player. The second half, looking at the numbers, of course that’s good. But the whole
year itself is what’s going to make the difference for me moving forward.”
Oakland executive Billy Beane came calling last year when Washington needed
work, already with a major project in mind:
Semien. It’s been a perfect fit for

Washington’s
second
time around with the franchise following his
eight-year tenure as
Texas manager from
2007-14, which included
two AL pennants, before
some time out of the professional game.
After Semien’s 12Marcus Semien
error month of May,
which included nine in nine games during
one especially tough stretch, he began to
improve. He had six errors in June, five in
July and three each in August and
September.
“The numbers speak for themselves as far
as his defensive second half compared to the
first,” manager Bob Melvin said of Semien,
who batted .257 with 15 homers and 45
RBIs.
Now, Semien is ready to help anchor a
strong infield featuring third baseman
Danny Valencia, second baseman Jed Lowrie
back with the club after a stint with Houston
and new first baseman Yonder Alonso. Eric
Sogard will be in the mix as a utilityman.
Semien earned respect in the clubhouse
for how he handled himself through the
struggles and criticism.
“For him last year defensively he was
night and day better than he was starting,”
ace Sonny Gray said. “He’s one of those
guys, too, you see him out there literally
every single day working early. If something did go wrong during the game he was
the first one to stand up and hold his head
high and say he’ll get better at it. And he
really did. He’s going to be a big part of this

team. There’s no doubt in my mind he’s
going to continue to work and get better.”
The 63-year-old Washington arrived at
spring training last week and quickly
walked around Hohokam Stadium to survey
his workspace — the practice fields.
He plans regular infield meetings, to “discuss what is our purpose.” Oakland’s first
full-squad workout of spring training is
Friday, but his infielders were early arrivals.
“They all are here because they’re excited,
and I’m excited,” Washington said. “I’ve
got to get with those kids and develop a
relationship. A lot of them I know but not
all of them. ... I know I can help them be
what they want to be on the defensive end.”
Melvin appreciates all the attention to
detail at this stage for a team that finished
last in the AL West at 68-94 following three
straight playoff berths.
“He really wants to let each and every one
of these guys know what his expectations
of them are, whether it’s what their workload’s going to be, whether it’s early work,
the versatility we have with some guys
moving around to different positions. He
wants to make sure they’re clear with that.
He is on top of things as we saw last year.
He’s a great infield guy and very passionate
about it.”

Oakland sends RHP Brooks
to Cubs for OF Coghlan
MESA, Ariz. — The Chicago Cubs
acquired right-handed pitcher Aaron Brooks
from the Oakland Athletics for outfielder
Chris Coghlan on Thursday.
The 30-year-old Coghlan batted .250 with

25 doubles, 16 home runs and 41 RBIs in
148 games for the Cubs last season.
The 25-year-old Brooks is 3-5 with an
8.38 ERA in 58 innings during 15 big
league appearances, including 10 as a
starter, over the past two seasons with
Kansas City and Oakland. He made 20
appearances in Triple-A last season and
went 7-5 with a 3.56 ERA along with 103
strikeouts.

Matt Cain has cyst
removed from pitching arm
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. — San Francisco
Giants right-hander Matt Cain has undergone a procedure to have a cyst removed
from his upper right arm.
General manager Bobby Evans made the
announcement Thursday,
when Cain had the cyst
removed from his throwing arm by team orthopedist Dr. Ken Akizuki in
San Francisco. The
pitcher was scheduled to
return to the team’s
spring training facility
in Scottsdale to rehab
Matt Cain
and is expected to resume
throwing in approximately 10 days.
Cain, who had injury-shortened seasons
in 2014 and ’15 following elbow surgery
and arm issues, said at the start of spring
training he had corrective surgery on both
eyes during the offseason.
He is slated to be in San Francisco’s rotation but manager Bruce Bochy has depth and
the option of using Chris Heston if needed.

Curry sets 3-point mark, scores 51 in Warriors’ win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Warriors 130, Magic 114

ORLANDO, Fla. — Stephen Curry’s smile
gave way to laughter.
The reigning MVP received an inbounds pass
following a free throw, took a couple of dribbles past midcourt before launching a 44-foot
shot that banked in at the buzzer.
The crowd rose to its feet, Curry lifted his
arms and struck a pose before chuckling his
way to the Golden State bench.
“I was laughing, sure. That really isn’t supposed to happen,” Curry said Thursday night
after making 10 3-pointers and scoring 51
points in a 130-114 victory over the Orlando
Magic.
“I made a bunch of 3s in the third quarter and
then finished with that one,” he added. “It was
really funny to me, it just banked off the

glass.”
A night after scoring 42
in a six-point victory at
Miami, Curry made 20 of
27 shots, including 10 of
15
3-pointers.
The
Warriors pulled away in the
closing minutes of the
third quarter, with his bank
shot putting the defending
Steph Curry NBAchampions up 99-91.
“Are you guys surprised?” Magic guard Evan
Fournier asked reporters. “I’m not. It’s just
what he does.”
Curry topped 50 points for the third time this
season, the first player to do it that many times

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since LeBron James and Dwyane Wade in
2008-09.
That wasn’t his only highlight of the night.
Curry surpassed Kyle Korver’s mark of 127
straight games with a 3, which he tied while
making six 3s at Miami on Wednesday night.
“I don’t know that the record is that significant because it’s so simple for him. His 3-point
shot is like a 2-point shot. It’s what he does,”
Golden State coach Steve Kerr said. “It’s to the
point where we expect a half-court shot. ... It’s
a rhythm shot, and it just went in.”
Including the postseason, Curry has made 3s
in 149 straight games, also a record.
“I have a hard time seeing how that streak is
ever going to end. It would have to be kind of a
fluke night,” Orlando coach Scott Skiles said.
“The way he makes them is totally different

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from Kyle,” Skiles added. “Kyle is sprinting
off screens and it’s possible you could switch
out and maybe take some away from him,
whereas Steph, there are so many of them off
the dribble and from 30 feet and fading away. ...
He’d just have to be off that night, and that certainly doesn’t happen very often.”
The Warriors improved to 52-5, the best 57game start in league history. The 1995-96
Chicago Bulls won 51 of their first 57 on the
way to finishing 72-10.
Curry scored 24 in the third quarter. He sat out
the first six minutes of the fourth, added a 3 and
a layup down the stretch and also finished with
eight assists and seven rebounds as the
Warriors weathered a quiet night from backcourt mate Klay Thompson, who had nine
points on 4-of-10 shooting.

16

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

COLTS
Continued from page 11
Bismark Hernandez took over to earn the
save with 1 2/3 innings of shutout baseball.
Bismark Hernandez also provided a clutch
swing of the bat in a key third-inning comeback rally. After Washington jumped out to
a 1-0 lead in the top of the frame, El Camino
came surging right back. No. 9 hitter
Johnny Vazquez — who went 2 for 2 with an
RBI and one run scored — sparked the rally
with a bunt single to lead
off the inning. After
Vazquez stole second,
Bismark
Hernandez
smoked an RBI double up
the gap in left-center, and
advanced to third on a
throwing error.
“Johnny Vazquez had a
great leadoff at-bat —
Jesser
got on and stole a base
Hernandez
... and then I got to 0-2,
got my pitch and just hit
it,” Bizmark Hernandez
said.
Bismark
Hernandez
then plated the go-ahead
run on an RBI groundout
by Armin Webb. El
Camino then added an
insurance run with a twoout rally in the fourth.
Bismark
Slugging first baseman
Hernandez
Matt George banged a
long double off the fence in left-center.
Then Vazquez floated an RBI single to left,
giving the Colts a 3-1 lead.
The insurance run benefitted Jesser
Hernandez, who departed in the fifth after
surrendering his second run of the day. Still,
the senior’s first opening-day start was all

SPORTS
about composure, according to Davidson.
“He did a great job, ” Davidson said.
“Jesser is a guy who gets really fired up.
He’s animated out there. ... For him to go
out there and get us to where we needed to
go, that was great.”
Bismark Hernandez then emerged to keep
the lead in tact. Against his older cousin,
Washington had three straight batters reach
with one out. Declan Lloyd had the RBI single to plate David Scolari — who was 3 for
3 with both Washington runs — and knock
Jesser Hernandez out of the game.
The right-handed Bismark Hernandez
punched out the first batter he faced. Then
after a walk to load the bases, he bounced
back with another strikeout. The junior
totaled four strikeouts on the day, including
the final out as he retired the side in order in
the seventh.
The Colts also flashed some leather in the
outfield. Vazquez — a returning varsity junior — made a critical running catch in the
third, causing Washington to strand a runner at third. Vazquez was shading towards
right-center when Jacob Villarosa hit a
smash to the left-center gap; but Vazquez
got a great first step to make an all-out running catch breaking back on the long liner.
While clutch hitting was at a premium,
the Colts produced nine hits in the game,
and had a knock in every inning.
“We’ve got a lot of work to do ... but I do
think by the end of the year, this will be a
really good hitting team,” Davidson said.
El Camino is Davidson’s first varsity
managerial post. He served as the head
coach of the Carlmont junior-varsity team
from 2012-15. He started his coaching
career the previous season at his alma mater
Cañada College. First-base coach Matt
Arbunich —  an Aragon graduate —  also
makes the jump to El Camino after serving
on Davidson’s staff at Carlmont for three
seasons.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Cal rolls to sixth straight win
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

BERKELEY — With Jabari Bird hitting his
outside shots, California is playing its best
basketball heading down the stretch.
Bird made five 3-pointers and scored 20
points to help the Golden Bears win their
sixth straight game and maintain their perfect home record with a 75-63 victory over
UCLA on Thursday night.
“I think we’re just coming together as a
team,” Bird said. “We’re growing, we’re
learning, We’re getting used to where guys
are on the court. We’re starting to hit our
stride going into March.”
Jaylen Brown added 16 and Tyrone Wallace
scored 14 to help the Golden Bears (20-8,

Colts fall to powerhouse Santa Rosa
Cañada starting pitcher Elijah Saunders
went the distance in a losing effort Thursday as
the Colts (2-9 overall) fell 3-2 at home against
Santa Rosa Junior College in the first of a twogame series.
Santa Rosa (11-1) has been one tough customer this season, losing
just once through 12 nonconference games. But
Cañada jumped out to an
early 2-1 lead when sophomore Dominic Giuliani (El
Camino) delivered a tworun home run in the top of
the fourth.
Elijah Saunders The Bear Cubs quickly
regained their footing,
though, with a run in the fifth to tie it before
taking the lead in the sixth on an RBI double
by designated hitter Matt Bone.
Saunders held Santa Rosa — ranked ninth in
the state in hitting — to just six hits on the
day, marking just the second time this season
the Bear Cubs haven’t totaled double-digit
hits. Giuliani and designated hitter Chris
Edwards had two hits apiece for Cañada.
The Colts travel to Santa Rosa Saturday for
a 1 p.m. first pitch.

Trojans squander lead at Los Medanos
Skyline (6-5) jumped out to a four-run lead in
the fourth, but could not hold on with an 8-4
loss Thursday at Los Medanos (5-6).
Trojans starting pitcher Daniel Madigan
(Carlmont) departed after five innings of work
with a one-run lead, but the Skyline bullpen
yielded five runs over the next three frames.
Freshman right-hander Austin Conour took
the loss. His record falls to 0-1. Los Medanos
catcher Ethan Utler had the go-ahead knock in
the sixth with an RBI single to give the
Mustangs a 5-4 lead.

10-5 Pac-12) move within a game of conference leader Oregon with three games left in
the regular season and remain in position for
a first-round bye in the conference tournament.
Bryce Alford and Tony Parker scored 15
apiece and Isaac Hamilton added 12 points
for the Bruins (15-13, 6-9 Pac-12), who have
lost four of six games in February to fall into
the bottom half of the Pac-12 standings.
The Bears started the second half on a 9-2
run and took their biggest lead at that point
when Bird’s 3-pointer made it 42-27. But
they could not pull away as UCLA fought
back to cut the deficit to 59-55 on back-toback baskets by Parker and Jonah Bolden
with about six minutes to play.

JUCO baseball
Los Medanos banged out
a season-high 15 hits.
Utler and first baseman
Jason Kreske had three
hits apiece for the
Mustangs. Skyline’s Neil
Sterling (Serra) was 3 for 5
with two runs scored. He is
currently hitting .333
Neil Sterling with a team-best 16 hits.
Skyline concludes a
five-game road trip Friday with a 1 p.m. start
at City College of San Francisco, before concluding a two-game series with Los Medanos
Saturday at Trojan Diamond at 1 p.m.

Marin evens series against CSM
College of San Mateo (8-2) couldn’t summon the comeback magic on the road
Thursday, dropping the second game of a
three-game series to College of Marin 9-5.
Marin (6-5) banged out 18 hits to score in
six of the first seven innings. Tied 1-1 in the
second, Marin’s Paul Kennedy produced an
RBI single that proved to be the game-winner.
Bulldogs starting pitcher Dalton Gomez lasted 2
1/3 innings to take the
loss. CSM totaled just six
hits, with first baseman RJ
Prince and shortstop
Anders Green tabbing two
apiece.
Prince, a freshman, has
been a nice addition to the
RJ Prince
Bulldogs’ batting order
this season. He is currently hitting .325 (13 for 40), ranking fourth on
the team. Freshman outfielder Brandon
Hernandez is tops with a .445 average.
The three-game series concludes Saturday at
Bulldog Stadium with a 1 p.m. first pitch.

SPORTS

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

17

60-foot waves highlight Hawaii’s ‘Eddie’
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

HALIEWA, Hawaii — There are two sayings that come along with the Eddie Aikau
big-wave surfing invitational: “The bay
calls the day” and “Eddie would go.”
For the first time in six years, the bay —
and event organizers — gave the nod
Thursday as a powerful and sustained swell
produced huge surf on Oahu’s North Shore.
Eddie, a famed lifeguard and big-wave surfer
who once protected these shores, most certainly would have gone.
Before the sun came up over the horseshoe-shaped Waimea Bay, organizers huddled together to make the final call on the
event, which has only run nine times in its

31-year history.
Eddie Aikua’s brother, Clyde, announced to
a large crowd early Thursday morning that his
brother’s namesake surfing contest was on.
“I’ve been riding Waimea Bay for over 40
years, and today has to be one of the best days
I’ve ever seen,” Aikau said. “It is a go!” he
added as the crowd came alive with whistles,
cheers and applause.
They got what they hoped for as huge sets of
monster waves crashed onto the outer reef of
the bay, producing some waves that organizers estimate were 60 feet tall.
Local Hawaii surfer John John Florence
won Thursday’s event, catching four massive
waves for a total score of over 300 points.
Australia’s Ross Clarke-Jones took second,

Garcia shares first-round
lead at the Honda Classic
By Doug Ferguson
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

PALM BEACH GARDENS, Fla.
— Sergio Garcia made an eagle,
avoided an alligator and wound up
in a share of the lead Thursday in
the Honda Classic.
Garcia holed out with an 8-iron
from 142 yards into the wind on
the second hole
for an eagle,
and he narrowly
missed an eagle
putt on the 18th
hole at PGA
National. The
Spaniard shot
5-under 65 and
shared the lead
Sergio Garcia with Michael
Thompson, the
2013 Honda Classic winner, who
also birdied the last hole.
They were one shot ahead of
Rickie Fowler and William
McGirt.
The biggest excitement for
Garcia was on the par-4 sixth hole,
where he made his lone bogey.
His tee shot found the water left
of the fairway, shallow enough for
him to roll up his pants and try to
play it out to the fairway. That part
was easy. He looked over his
shoulder because of an alligator on

the island, making sure it wasn’t
going anywhere soon.
“I was more worried about the
alligator that was on the other side
of the island than getting out of
the water,” Garcia said. “The ball, I
could see probably half of it, so I
knew that I could get it out. Almost
made 4, which would have been a
great 4. I’m not going to lie, I was
happy with a 5.”
And he was happy with other 60
strokes he took on a typical windy
day at PGA National.
Garcia missed the cut last week
at Riviera, two days in which he
said he did nothing well. Hardly
anything went wrong for him in
the Honda Classic, and even when
it did, he managed to avoid trouble. Garcia had to play a 40-yard
hook from the rough left of the
10th fairway to just short of the
green for a simple par.
Fowler had the only bogey-free
round, which included a chip-in for
par on the 10th hole. McGirt was
more on the wild side by making
seven birdies.
“Anything in the red is good
around this place,” McGirt said.
“At 4 under, I would say it was bordering on great. This place is
never easy, even when it’s calm.
You can’t fall asleep on any shot
out here.”

and Hawaii’s Shane Dorian finished third.
One competitor, Ramon Navarro, the son of
a fisherman from south Chile, embodies
Eddie’s spirit, said event spokeswoman and
longtime Aikau family friend Jodi Wilmott.
Navarro is a “very unassuming, a very humble character,” Wilmott said. “He has a higher
vision.”
In 2009, when Navarro was invited to his
first Eddie competition, he awed the crowd
when he rode the biggest wave of the day,
scoring a perfect 100 on the monster breaker
that towered over him.
“Eddie was a higher-vision guy, too,”
Wilmott said. “He had loftier goals for
humanity, and he understood the power of
relationships. That is just the spirit Ramon

NHL GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
GP W
Florida
60 35
Tampa Bay
60 34
Boston
61 33
Detroit
61 30
Ottawa
62 29
Montreal
61 29
Buffalo
61 24
Toronto
59 21
Metropolitan Division
Washington
59 44
N.Y. Rangers
61 35
N.Y. Islanders 59 33
Pittsburgh
59 30
New Jersey
62 30
Carolina
62 28
Philadelphia
60 27
Columbus
62 25

L OT Pts
18 7 77
22 4 72
22 6 72
20 11 71
27 6 64
27 5 63
30 7 55
28 10 52

GF GA
167 139
165 149
190 170
153 158
179 192
167 168
144 167
145 176

11 4
20 6
19 7
21 8
25 7
24 10
22 11
29 8

197 137
175 156
170 146
155 156
139 149
152 164
148 163
162 191

92
76
73
68
67
66
65
58

WESTERN CONFERENCE
Central Division
GP W L OT Pts
Dallas
62 38 18 6 82
Chicago
63 38 20 5 81
St. Louis
63 35 19 9 79
Nashville
62 30 21 11 71
Colorado
63 32 27 4 68
Minnesota
61 27 24 10 64
Winnipeg
60 26 30 4 56
Pacific Division
Los Angeles
60 36 20 4 76
Anaheim
59 32 19 8 72
Sharks
59 32 21 6 70
Vancouver
60 24 24 12 60
Arizona
61 27 28 6 60
Calgary
60 26 30 4 56
Edmonton
62 22 34 6 50
Thursday’s Games
Philadelphia 3, Minnesota 2
Columbus 6, New Jersey 1
Toronto 3, Carolina 1
Florida 3, Arizona 2
N.Y. Rangers 2, St. Louis 1
Nashville 3, Chicago 1
Winnipeg 6, Dallas 3
N.Y. Islanders 2, Calgary 1, OT
Vancouver 5, Ottawa 3
Los Angeles 2, Edmonton 1
Friday’s Games
Tampa Bay at New Jersey, 4 p.m.
Minnesota at Washington, 4 p.m.
Boston at Carolina, 4 p.m.
Edmonton at Anaheim, 7 p.m.
Buffalo at San Jose, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Arizona at Philadelphia, 10 a.m.

GF GA
202 178
177 151
157 152
162 158
169 176
159 155
158 179
161 139
147 141
177 161
147 171
166 188
162 184
152 190

has tapped into.”
Navarro came to the North Shore and worked
his way into the surfing community by building mud brick ovens and selling empanadas to
beachgoers, Wilmott said.
Navarro surfed in the first heat of the morning on Thursday, and despite only catching
one wave out of a possible four, earning him a
mere 5 points out of 100, Navarro said he was
just happy to be involved in the event.
“This is my dream,” Navarro said after drying off from his hour-long session. “I can die
happy now.”
Looking forward to his second heat of the
day, Navarro said he hoped that Eddie would
“look at (him) and send (him) some good
waves.”

WHAT’S ON TAP

NBA GLANCE
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic Division
W
Toronto
38
Boston
34
New York
24
Brooklyn
16
Philadelphia
8
Southeast Division
Miami
32
Atlanta
31
Charlotte
29
Washington
26
Orlando
25
Central Division
Cleveland
41
Indiana
31
Chicago
30
Detroit
29
Milwaukee
24
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest Division
San Antonio
49
Memphis
33
Dallas
30
Houston
29
New Orleans
23
Northwest Division
Oklahoma City
41
Portland
30
Utah
28
Denver
23
Minnesota
18
Pacific Division
Warriors
52
L.A. Clippers
37
Sacramento
24
Phoenix
14
L.A. Lakers
11

L
18
25
35
42
49

Pct
.679
.576
.407
.276
.140

GB

5 1/2
15 1/2
23
30 1/2

25
27
27
30
31

.561
.534
.518
.464
.446


1 1/2
2 1/2
5 1/2
6 1/2

15
26
26
29
34

.732
.544
.536
.500
.414


10 1/2
11
13
18

9
23
28
29
34

.845
.589
.517
.500
.404


15
19
20
25 1/2

17
28
29
35
40

.707
.517
.491
.397
.310


11
12 1/2
18
23

5
20
32
44
48

.912
.649
.429
.241
.186


15
27 1/2
38 1/2
42

Thursday’s Games
Golden State 130, Orlando 114
Boston 112, Milwaukee 107
New Orleans 123, Oklahoma City 119
Brooklyn 116, Phoenix 106
Houston 119, Portland 105
San Antonio 96, Utah 78
Friday’s Games
Charlotte at Indiana, 4 p.m.
Washington at Philadelphia, 4 p.m.
Cleveland at Toronto, 4:30 p.m.
Orlando at New York, 4:30 p.m.
Chicago at Atlanta, 5 p.m.
Denver at Dallas, 5:30 p.m.
L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 7 p.m.
Memphis at L.A. Lakers, 7:30 p.m.
Saturday’s Games
Miami at Boston, noon
Minnesota at New Orleans, 4 p.m.

FRIDAY
Boys' basketball
Open Division
No. 2 Serra (20-4) vs. No. 7 Palma (22-2) at Santa
Clara, 5:30 p.m.
No. 6 Half Moon Bay (25-2) vs. No. 3 Bellarmine
at Santa Clara, 7:30 p.m.
No. 4 Menlo-Atherton (22-2) vs. No. 5 Mitty (1311) at Piedmont Hills, 7:30 p.m.
Girls' basketball
No. 6 Menlo School (19-5) vs. No. 3 Sacred Heart
Cathedral (15-8) at Gunn High School, 5:30 p.m.
No. 5 Menlo-Atherton (25-2) vs. No. 4 Valley Christian (17-7) at Wilcox High School, 5:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Boys' basketball
Division III
TBD vs. No. 1 Burlingame (18-8), TBA
Division IV
TBD vs. No. Sacred Heart Prep (14-10), TBA
Girls' basketball
Division III
Capuchino/Gunderson winner vs. No. 3 South
City (16-9), TBA
Division IV
TBD vs. No. Sacred Heart Prep (17-6), TBA
Division V
No. 5 Alma Heights-Pacifica (20-6) vs. No. 4
Stevenson (20-3), TBA
Boys' soccer
Open Division
No. 6 Homestead (11-2-7) at No. 3 Menlo-Atherton (14-34-2), 7 p.m.
Division I
No. 13 Yerba Buena (15-3-1) at No. 5 Sequoia (96-5), 7 p.m.
Division II
No. 16 Menlo School (13-4-2) at No. 9 South City
(11-5-4), 1 p.m.
No. 6 Aragon (13-5-2) vs. No. 3 Sacred Heart
Cathedral (11-3-6) at Kezar Stadium, 1 p.m.
Girls' soccer
Open Division
No. 6 Santa Teresa (13-6-1) at No. 3 Woodside
(14-1-3), 7 p.m.
Division I
No. 8 Piedmont Hills (8-6-7) at No. 1 Menlo-Atherton (13-4-2), 4:30 p.m.
Division II
No. 9 Scotts Valley (10-6-3) at No. 1 Menlo School
(11-2-6), 3:30 p.m.
No. 11 Crystal Springs (14-4-1) at No. 3
Burlingame (14-4-3), 7 p.m.
No. 7 Sacred Heart Prep (13-5-2) at No. 2 Soledad
(18-2-1), 7 p.m.

Hollywood’s
idealized
self-portrait
Academy Awards hooked on ‘Oscar bait’
By Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

NEW YORK — In the Coen brothers’ recent 1950s Hollywood
satire, “Hail, Caesar!” Ralph Fiennes’ ascot-wearing British director
Laurence Laurentz is helming a stuffy drawing room drama full of
tuxedoed men and ballroom-gowned women.
Inside
The movie, “Merrily We Dance,” Laurentz declares is
a “prestige picture.” But it’s clear that the Coens think
so-called “prestige pictures” can be just as much a joke
as any other type of movie. In its day, “Merrily We
Dance” would have been destined for Oscars.
Lately, the narrow parameters of movies celebrated
by the Academy Awards in the best picture category • Gaga: Assault won’t define
haven’t been quite so funny. Self-serious prestige films her after Oscar performance
See page 22
have long found a ready seat at the Oscars, while films • Diversity must play
a role in
starring or directed by minorities have struggled to. Oscar show, but not the lead
See page 21
There are many factors behind what’s led to two
straight years of all-white acting nominees, but one is
the stifling limitation of what gets considered an “Oscar movie.”
What frequently guides a movie toward a best picture nomination or a
star toward an acting nod is a confluence of factors that frequently have
only so much to do with quality. Influential is how a movie is released (a
prominent festival rollout can pay big dividends), how much support a
movie has from its distributor (the parties and advertisements that go into
See OSCARS, Page 22

Oscar predictions: What will
win and what should win
By Lindesy Bahr and Jake Coyle
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
LOS ANGELES — Ahead of Sunday’s 88th Academy Awards,
Associated Press film writers Lindsey Bahr and Jake Coyle share their
predictions for a ceremony that has everyone guessing:

BEST PICTURE
The Nominees: “The Big Short,” “Bridge of Spies,” “Brooklyn,”
“Mad Max: Fury Road,” “The Martian,” “The Revenant,” “Room,”
“Spotlight.”
BAHR:
Will Win: “The Revenant’s” bravado will match its awards tally.
Should Win: “Mad Max: Fury Road” is a visionary filmmaking
coup of a different kind, and, unlike “The Revenant,” Miller’s
raging road opera is the definite classic of the bunch.
Should Have Been a Contender: It still boggles the mind
why Todd Haynes’ period romance “Carol” was overSee PREDICTIONS, Page 20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

19

MUSEUM GOTTA SEE ‘UM
By Susan Cohn
DAILY JOURNAL SENIOR CORRESPONDENT

BETTY FRIEDMAN — PRINTS AND
ALBERT DICRUTTALO — SCULPTURES AT THE PENINSULA MUSEUM
OF ART IN BURLINGAME THROUGH
MAY 1 5 . The Peninsula Museum of Art
invites the public to the Sunday, Feb.28,
opening of its latest exhibit, which brings
together the prints of Betty Friedman and the
sculptures of Albert Dicruttalo. The reception,2 p.m. to 4 p.m., affords the opportunity to meet the artists.
PRINTING WITHOUT A PROOF
KEEPS THE PROCESS FRESH. Betty
Friedman uses the skills and demands of
papermaking and printmaking to produce
abstract large-scale monoprints. The unusually large size of her monoprints — compared
to more conventional intimate smaller
intaglio prints — change the viewer’s relationship to them as they are ‘life size.’ A large
print is also more difficult to create, as errors
appear larger, more visible and more unforgiving. Friedman uses paper fiber (cotton,
flax, abaca and kozo), powdered pigments,
natural dyes, Jin Shofu (Japanese wheat
paste) and etching ink. Friedman, a professor
of art and chair of the art department at Notre
Dame de Namur University in Belmont, said:
“In this group of prints some older prints are
used. It is satisfying to tear up unsuccessful
prints and reuse the passages that are interesting in new compositions. Printing without
the ability to make a proof — having only
one chance to get it right — keeps this
process fresh.” Friedman’s work has appeared
in collections at the Oakland Museum of
California,
Adobe
Systems,
Apple
Computers, Dole Food Company, Kaiser
Permanente and the Fairmont Hotels. The

majority of the prints shown in this exhibition were produced as a project during a sabbatical from her teaching.
CURVES AND INTERSECTIONS.
Albert Dicruttalo, a sculptor who works primarily with steel, stainless steel and bronze,
said: “I am drawn to its toughness and the
challenge of forming it. I find many of the
shapes that inspire me in nature. The resulting sculptures are completely formal, often
comprised of compound curves that create
complex intersections and compelling linear
and volumetric elements.” Dicruttalo’s
process is sometimes planned out in advance
with drawings, maquettes, or computer aided
design. Other times, it is intuitive and immediate, and often a combination of the two, in
which he begins with a deliberate idea that
changes organically through the process of
forming, fabricating and casting. He usually
creates several sculptures based on a single
theme — each piece developing from the previous one —  until he feels the formal elements have been thoroughly investigated and
realized in a way that he responds to emotionally.
MUSEUM PARTICULARS. Established
in 2004 and free to the public, the Peninsula
Museum of Art is a nonprofit visual arts
organization housing four exhibit galleries, a
library resource center and a gift shop. PMA
also contains working artist studios, the
Peninsula Art Institute, where 29 visual
artists work and exhibit their creations in
painting, sculpture, photography, jewelry
and fiber art. Museum hours are 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Wednesday through Sunday. 1777
California Drive in Burlingame. For more
information visit peninsulamuseum.org or
call 692-2101. Betty Friedman – Prints and
Albert Dicruttalo – Sculpture runs through
May 15.

formerly Hogan’s Cafe

Several February Specials
$8.95 ea

Monday - Friday
125 Terminal Court #44
inside Produce Market

South San Francisco, CA 94080
www.producealley.com
Monday - Friday 6 a.m. - 2 p.m.

650-583-2293

BAR OPEN @ 6:00 AM

Sculptor Albert Dicruttalo’s works of steel, stainless steel and bronze are on display at the
Peninsula Museum of Art in Burlingame through May 15.
***
IT’S A BIRD, IT’S A PLANE, IT’S A
FLYING LEPRECHAUN, AT HILLER
AVIATION MUSEUM IN SAN CARLOS
ON SATURDAY, MARCH 1 2 . The luck of
the Irish meets the Hiller Aviation Museum
for a special aerial celebration on Saturday,
March 12, in honor of St. Patrick himself.
Join the festivities, including face painting
and a jump house. Scour the Museum’s
Gallery for hidden leprechauns and earn a treat
from his pot ‘o’ gold. At 11 a.m., watch a bit
of leprechaun magic and aeronautical skill as
the museum’s own leprechaun leaps from a
helicopter high overhead and descends to San
Carlos Airport via parachute. Children wearing green receive a special parachute toy to
commemorate the occasion. 601 Skyway
Road in San Carlos. For information about
Hiller Museum hours of operation and admission prices call 654-0200 or visit

www.hiller.org.
***
THE SOCIETY OF WESTERN
ARTISTS IN SAN BRUNO HELPS YOU
GAIN PERSPECTIVE. The Society of
Western Artists Fine Art Center presents a free
demonstration on perspective by Jim Smythe
1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, March 19. Smythe,
an adjunct professor of drawing at the College
of San Mateo, will demonstrate everything
you need to know about perspective. Learn
how to “see” perspective, how to place figures in a landscape, and how to correct perspective distortions in photos so they look
real. The Society of Western Artists Fine Art
Center is located at 527 San Mateo Ave. in
San Bruno. For more information visit
www.societyofwesternartists.com or contact
Judith Puccini, Society of Western Artists
public relations committee chairperson, at
737-6084.

20

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

PREDICTIONS
Continued from page 18
looked. It is filmmaking at its best.
COYLE:
Will Win: No one really knows. “The
Revenant” has the momentum, but consensus is elusive. Panicked voices everywhere
can be heard exclaiming “The guilds are all
over the map!” In the end, I go with “The
Big Short” because the Producers Guild has
been the best forecaster in recent years.
Should Win: It may lack some cinematic
punch, but the sturdy “Spotlight” is the
closest thing we have to a new Sydney
Lumet classic.
Should Have Been a Contender: “Carol”
and “Creed. ” The absence here of Todd
Haynes’ majestic ‘50s dream is a glaring
oversight. And it took too long for people
to realize just how good Ryan Coogler’s
“Rocky” sequel is.

BEST ACTOR
The Nominees: Bryan Cranston,
“Trumbo”; Matt Damon, “The Martian”;
Leonardo DiCaprio, “The Revenant”;
Michael Fassbender, “Steve Jobs”; Eddie
Redmayne, “The Danish Girl.”
BAHR:
Will Win: DiCaprio. He had us at “raw
bison.”
Should Win: DiCaprio’s inevitable win
can be both boring and merited. If only we
could guarantee that the Academy was
choosing him for his actual performance
and not the behind-the-scenes suffering.
Should Have Been a Contender: When did
we start taking the greatness of the
Tarantino/Samuel L. Jackson pairing for
granted? Jackson’s speechifying, Lincolnletter carrying Union soldier in “The
Hateful Eight” is a performance that will
live long beyond DiCaprio’s tussle with
that bear.
COYLE:

Will Win: DiCaprio. It’s “his year,” as
they say. But I would love to see what
lengths his Oscar crusade would go to if he
didn’t win. What would he eat in his next
film? What animal carcass would he sleep
in?
Should Win: It’s a weak year for the men.
Can I pass?
Should Have Been a Contender: Michael
B. Jordan of “Creed” and 2013’s “Fruitvale
Station” has twice been unfairly overlooked here. But what about Al Pacino as an
aged rock star in “Danny Collins”? It was
one of the year’s most underrated films.
(And that surprised me, too.)

BEST ACTRESS
The Nominees: Cate Blanchett, “Carol”;
Brie Larson, “Room”; Jennifer Lawrence,
“Joy”; Charlotte Rampling, “45 Years”;
Saoirse Ronan, “Brooklyn.”
BAHR:
Will Win: Brie Larson. She gives about
10 incredible performances in a single film
and has won everything so far.
Should Win: Obvious grit trumps nuance
at the Oscars, but Charlotte Rampling tore
out many a heartstring as a jealous woman
in “45 Years.”
Should Have Been a Contender: Bel
Powley made the sexual awakening of a
teenager (with her mom’s adult boyfriend
no less) seem neither too exploitative nor
celebratory in the criminally underseen
“The Diary of a Teenage Girl.”
COYLE:
Will Win: Brie Larson has this in the bag.
She’s a terrifically natural performer and a
real talent. But, for me, she was better in
“Short Term 12” than in the mawkishly
manipulative “Room.”
Should Win: In a strong field, Cate
Blanchett slips by because of the regularity
of her quality. In “Carol,” she’s both devastating and exhilarating.
Should Have Been a Contender: Bel
Powley’s hip-swinging ’70s San Francisco
teenager in “Diary of a Teenage Girl” was a
sensational breakthrough.

BEST SUPPORING ACTOR
The Nominees: Christian Bale, “The Big
Short”; Tom Hardy, “The Revenant”; Mark
Ruffalo, “Spotlight”; Mark Rylance,
“Bridge of Spies”; Sylvester Stallone,
“Creed.”
BAHR:
Will Win: Sylvester Stallone, but it’ll be
more about his legacy than “Creed.”
Should Win: Mark Rylance made his subtlety affecting Soviet spy more lovable
than Tom Hanks in “Bridge of Spies.”
Should Have Been a Contender: Nicholas
Hoult. It takes quite a performance to
upstage the bellowing visuals of “Mad Max:
Fury Road.”
COYLE:
Will Win: There’s potential intrigue here,
but the swell around Stallone is a fitting
honor for the actor who’s spent three mythmaking decades as Rocky Balboa.
Should Win: Mark Rylance gives “Bridge
of Spies” a serene glow. The combination of
him and Tom Hanks is riveting: one of the
theater’s greats meets one of the movies’.
Should Have Been a Contender: The thundering Idris Elba is the obvious answer for
his rebel commander in “Beast of No
Nation.” But Michael Shannon in most
things is a good answer, too, and he was in
grand, imposing form in Ramin Bahrani’s
“99 Homes.”

BEST SUPPORING ACTRESS
The Nominees: Jennifer Jason Leigh,
“The Hateful Eight”; Rooney Mara,
“Carol”; Rachel McAdams, “Spotlight”;
Alicia Vikander, “The Danish Girl”; Kate
Winslet, “Steve Jobs.”
BAHR:
Will Win: Alicia Vikander, for giving a
soul to “The Danish Girl.”
Should Win: Alicia Vikander, for “The
Danish Girl,” sure, but also as a secret nod
to the scope of her work this year in both
“Ex Machina” and “Testament of Youth.”
Should Have Been a Contender: There are
few performances that have moved, entertained, and stayed with me as much as Mya
Taylor’s sultry transgender lounge-singing

THE DAILY JOURNAL
stunner did in “Tangerine.”
COYLE:
Will Win: Alicia Vikander will win for
“The Danish Girl,” as voters honor not only
her intelligent performance in that film, but
a year full of standout work.
Should Win: Vikander, but for her slinky
artificial intelligence in “Ex Machina.”
Should Have Been a Contender: Cobie
Smulders, best known for “How I Met Your
Mother,” ran away with Andrew Bujalski’s
“Results” as a comically intense personal
trainer.

BEST DIRECTOR
The Nominees: “The Big Short,” Adam
McKay; “Mad Max: Fury Road,” George
Miller; “The Revenant, ” Alejandro G.
Inarritu; “Room, ” Lenny Abrahamson;
“Spotlight,” Tom McCarthy.
BAHR:
Will Win: Alejandro Inarritu, and it’ll be
deserved and an incredible achievement.
Should Win: George Miller, and it will
also be deserved.
Should Have Been a Contender: There are
so many this year — Ridley Scott (“The
Martian”) and Todd Haynes (“Carol”) among
them — but I would like to have seen Sean
Baker in here for his incredibly inventive
and utterly engaging “Tangerine.”
COYLE:
Will Win: The Inarritu repeat seems to be
in effect. “The Revenant” isn’t shy about its
filmmaking, but Inarritu’s audacious long
shots and ravishing frontier wilderness
offer a quality hard to come by: the awe of
something not seen before.
Should Win: George Miller’s “Mad Max:
Fury Road” is a crazy puzzle of a movie trying to stretch the language of film just like
“The Revenant,” but in opposite directions:
with rapid cutting and feverish surrealism.
Should Have Been a Contender: Andrew
Haigh’s “45 Years” earned a nod for
Charlotte Rampling and acclaim for her costar, Tom Courtenay. But neither would have
been possible without the acutely observant eye of Haigh.

WEEKEND JOURNAL

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

21

Diversity must play a role in
Oscar show, but not the lead
By Sandy Cohen
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

DAVID ALLEN

Amalia (Jessica Whittemore) finally realizes it’s Georg (Michael
Doppe) she loves in Foothill Music Theatre’s production of
‘She Loves Me.’

Much to love
about Foothill’s
‘She Loves Me’
By Judy Richter
DAILY JOURNAL CORRESPONDENT

Foothill Music Theatre’s production of “She Loves Me” is
charming all the way around.
Based on “Parfumerie” by Miklos Laszlo, Joe Masteroff’s
book tells the story of two lonely people who call each
other Dear Friend in the letters they exchange as anonymous pen pals.
Unbeknownst to them, though, they become acquainted
after the woman, Amalia Balash (Jessica Whittemore), gets
a job in the Budapest perfume/cosmetic shop, Maracek’s
Parfumerie, managed by the man, Georg Nowack (Michael
Doppe). Right away, their relationship is prickly and
antagonistic.
This state of affairs continues for several months until the
pen pals agree to meet in person. The nervous Georg sends
his friend and fellow employee, Ladislav Sipos (John
Rinaldi), into the restaurant ahead of him to see the woman
who awaits him.
When he learns that it’s Amalia, he sits with her but doesn’t reveal that he’s her anonymous correspondent. Instead
he annoys her. Eventually all works out for the best. This is
a love story, after all.
Director Milissa Carey fields an excellent cast of actors
who create believable, likable characters who sing well.
Even the two-timing Steven Kodaly (Nick Rodrigues),
another employee, is a charmer.
The other principals are Anthony Stephens as Arpad
Laszlo, the bicycle-riding shop delivery boy; Morgan
Dayley as Ilona Ritter, the shop’s cashier; and George
Mauro as Mr. Maracek, its owner.
The large ensemble also is noteworthy, with everyone
creating a realistic character. The appealing music is by
Jerry Bock with lyrics by Sheldon Harnick.
Musical direction is by Dolores Duran-Cefalu, who conducts the offstage six-member orchestra from the keyboard.
B. Modern has created the stylish 1934 costumes.
Running about two and a half hours with one intermission, “She Loves Me” is a sweet show that’s sure to please.

LOS ANGELES — Sunday’s Academy
Awards promise a three-way race for
best picture, performances by Lady
Gaga, Sam Smith and the Weeknd, and
the likelihood of first Oscar wins ever
for Leonardo DiCaprio and Sylvester
Stallone.
But no one is talking about it.
Oscar host Chris Rock and telecast
producers Reginald Hudlin and David
Hill — who would typically be promoting the show this week to inspire
tune-in — have gone silent. Academy
officials
are
staying
mum.
Hollywood’s diversity issue is dominating buzz, demanding airtime and
threatening to overwhelm the industry’s biggest night.
That leaves Hudlin and Hill with the
unenviable challenge of presenting a
show celebrating the best of the movie
business when its worst features have
been in focus. The producers declined
interview requests from the Associated
Press, as did Rock and film academy
representatives.
It’s fair to expect Rock — who called
Hollywood “a white industry” in a
2014 essay — to address the diversity
issue up front, and industry experts say
he’s perfectly suited for the job.
“That opening Chris Rock mono-

Movies with diverse
casts make more money
A UCLA study has found that films and
television shows whose casts roughly
reflect the nation’s racial and ethnic
diversity post the highest box office
and ratings numbers, on average. A
closer look at the numbers, based on
films distributed in 2014:
• Foreign audiences rule: Total box
office for the U.S. and Canada dropped
5 percent to $10.9 billion, but globally,
sales increased 1 percent to $36.4
billion.
• Minorities bought 46 percent of all
movie tickets in the U.S. despite
representing only 38 percent of the
population. A fourth of the people
who see at least once movie every
month are Latinos, who represent 18
percent of the U.S. population.
• The highest return on investment —
3.4 times the films’ budget — was
delivered by movies with four nonlogue is going to be key to how the
overall telecast is perceived, ” said
Dave Karger, chief correspondent for
Fandango.com. “He’s the kind of guy
who can treat all of this with the perfect amount of edge and humor.”
“This is not the year you want Ellen

white actors in the top eight roles.
• Films with non-white actors in lead
roles declined again, to 13 percent,
from 17 percent in 2013, even though
non-whites accounted for 38 percent
of the U.S. population.
• On television, white actors had 80
percent of the scripted roles broadcast
during the 2013-2014 season. Blacks
had 9 percent, Latinos 5 percent and
Asians 4 percent.
• Males had 59 percent of scripted roles
on broadcast television, and 59
percent of those on cable TV.
• At talent agencies — Hollywood’s
gatekeepers — 88 percent of the
executives, 91 percent of the agents
and 97 percent of the profit-sharing
partners were white. Women
represented 41 percent of the
executives, 32 percent of the agents
and 29 percent of the partners.
DeGeneres or Billy Crystal up there,”
said Steve Pond, awards editor for
TheWrap.com and author of “The Big
Show: High Times and Dirty Dealings
at the Academy Awards. “That would be
awkward.”

See DIVERSITY, Page 22

22

WEEKEND JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Gaga says assault won’t define her after Oscar performance
By Mesfin Fekadu

Dick.
The pop star said earning her first Oscar
nomination for a song about a serious and

heavy topic “makes it extra-special.”
“They really and truly nominated the
issue of sexual assault on campuses. ...
People all over the world that have suffered
with any kind of pain or trauma, (if) they are
having trouble being brave, this song is for
them,” she said.
Gaga also said she’s honored to be nominated with Warren, who earned her eighth
Oscar nomination with “Til It Happens to
You. ” Warren has never won the prize
despite earning nominations for No. 1 hits
like Aerosmith’s “I Don’t Want to Miss a
Thing” and Celine Dion’s “Because You
Loved Me.”

Warren said she took a risk calling Gaga
and asking her to work on the song.
“She publicly talked about being sexually
assaulted herself and I thought, ‘You know
what, I’m going to just take a chance and
call her and see if she’s open to this.’ And
you never know because someone can get
pissed off or something if it’s too personal,
but she really responded,” Warren said. “I
got on a plane and we went into the studio.”
Some drama clouded the good news of the
nomination when songwriter Linda Perry,
who has worked with Christina Aguilera,
Pink and others, insinuated on Twitter that
Gaga didn’t write “Til It Happens to You.”

ance, had the odds stacked against it. It’s a
seventh entry in a franchise and it wasn’t
much pushed by its studio, Warner Bros. Its
humanistic heartbeat is perhaps — like
Coogler’s previous “Fruitvale Station,” also
starring Michael B. Jordan — outside the
kind of films starring black actors that usually garner academy attention.
Few African-American actors have ever
won for a film by a black director. (A notable
exception is Denzel Washington for Antoine
Fuqua’s “Training Day.”) No black actress
has ever won for a film helmed by an African
American director.
The N.W.A biopic “Straight Outta
Compton” — which lacked a white protagonist or the historical sweep of “12 Years a
Slave” — also didn’t fit the usual criteria.
One academy member, the writer-director
Rod Lurie, says he heard numerous academy
voters dismiss even screening “Straight
Outta Compton.”
Taste plays a part, but the playing field is
uneven. If it wasn’t, Melissa McCarthy
would have an armful of Oscars by now.
Like many genres, comedy is all but forgotten come awards season. This year, the

trend reached a somewhat absurd endpoint
when David O. Russell’s somber “Joy” and
the nerdy space adventure “The Martian”
sneaked into the comedy category at the
Golden Globes.
It’s one reason why Leonardo DiCaprio
was passed over for his brilliantly outlandish performance in Martin Scorsese’s
“The Wolf of Wall Street,” but is likely to
win instead for crawling in mud and eating
bison liver in “The Revenant.” Only one of
the 20 acting nominees this year — Jennifer
Jason Leigh in “The Hateful Eight”— is
straightforwardly comic. And even she takes
a beating.
Films from outside English-speaking
countries and documentaries have virtually
no chance of gaining the same consideration
for best picture as a historical epic or a lavish costume drama. If they did, the Frenchproduced Turkish drama “Mustang,” the
tremendous debut by Deniz Gamze Erguven,
might be vying alongside “Spotlight.” Or
Joshua Oppenheimer’s documentary on
Indonesian genocide, “The Look of
Silence,” might be a rival to “Bridge of
Spies.”

The Oscars are less about rewarding the
best films than affirming Hollywood’s sense
of itself — which is why exclusion so outrages. They are, the New Yorker’s Richard
Brody has written, “Hollywood’s idealized
self-portrait.” That’s one reason why
Alejandro Inarritu’s “Birdman” — a film
about a Hollywood star striving for artistic
salvation outside of superhero films — won
best picture last year. It was a vote not just
for “Birdman,” but against Marvel domination.
Any award show is built on the consensus,
and thus can drain away daring candidates,
like Spike Lee’s bristling “Chi-Raq,” the
iPhone-shot “Tangerine” or the fresh coming-of-age tale “Diary of a Teenage Girl.”
Yet despite often rewarding mediocre films
that fit a narrow standard, the Oscars matter.
Outside of a Nobel or a Pulitzer, no award is
more affixed to a person’s legacy; “Oscar
winner” is a tag that lasts past death.
But it’s worth remembering: The lack of
one didn’t do much to dull the luster of Alfred
Hitchcock, Cary Grant, Barbara Stanwyck,
Akira Kurosawa, Ingmar Bergman, Fred
Astaire, Joseph Cotton or Marilyn Monroe.

John Legend and Common are also set to
appear.
Then there are the nominees, who’ve
been somewhat overshadowed this awards
season by the industry’s larger issues. “The
Revenant” leads with 12 nominations,
including best picture, and it’s locked in a
three-way battle with the investment dramedy “The Big Short” and the journalism tale
“Spotlight” for the night’s top prize. Other
contenders are “Bridge of Spies, ”
“Brooklyn,” “The Martian,” “Room” and
“Mad Max: Fury Road.”
The leading best-picture nominees split
the guild awards: “Spotlight” claimed the
Screen Actors Guild’s top prize, “The Big
Short” won with producers and “The
Revenant” brought Alejandro Inarritu a second consecutive Directors Guild of America

award. Many academy voters are also guild
members, which means Inarritu could also
take home his second directing Oscar.
He’s up against Adam McKay (“The Big
Short”), Tom McCarthy (“Spotlight”),
George Miller (“Mad Max: Fury Road”) and
Lenny Abrahamson (“Room”).
DiCaprio (“The Revenant”) and Brie
Larson (“Room”) have swept the acting
categories at other awards shows this season and are favored to win on Sunday.
DiCaprio faces Redmayne (“The Danish
Girl”), Bryan Cranston (“Trumbo”), Matt
Damon (“The Martian”) and Michael
Fassbender (“Steve Jobs”). Larson is nominated alongside Cate Blanchett (“Carol”),
Jennifer Lawrence (“Joy”), Charlotte
Rampling (“45 Years”) and Saoirse Ronan
(“Brooklyn”).

Regardless of what the Oscars’ host and
producer may add to the diversity conversation, they plan to present the traditional 24
awards and feature musical performances by
original song nominees Gaga, Smith and
Weeknd and a special appearance by Dave
Grohl.
“The show can’t solve the diversity problem in the academy, and the academy can’t
solve the diversity problem in the entertainment industry, which is really the bigger problem — not what gets nominated for
Oscars, but what gets made and who gets
hired,” Pond said. “The show can address
the issue, as I’m sure it will. Beyond that,
it’s not their job to convince the world that
the academy has changed its tune and will
have a diverse slate of acting nominees
next year.”

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

LOS ANGELES — Lady Gaga, a survivor
of sexual assault, says performing “Til It
Happens to You” — her song about sexual
abuse on college campuses — at Sunday’s
Academy Awards will feel liberating and
emancipating.
“It’s something in my life that’s always
really kind of defined me up until this
point. In a strange way I feel like it won’t
define me anymore after I sing it on TV at
the Oscars, if I can let it go maybe, ” Gaga
said in a recent interview with the

OSCARS
Continued from page 18
Oscar campaigns are expensive) and how
willing the talent is to promote themselves.
“It’s a racket,” says Viggo Mortensen,
who was nominated in 2008 for David
Cronenberg’s “Eastern Promises.”
“The nomination process is essentially
run by, dictated by money and public relations maneuvering,” Mortensen says. “And
so that’s why every year, there are only a
handful of, in my opinion, deserving and
enduring nominees of enduring quality.”
This year’s best picture nominees boast a
handful of films from outside the film academy’s traditional comfort zone, most notably
George Miller’s much-nominated post-apocalyptic chase film “Mad Max: Fury Road.”
But many of the films that could have put a
charge into this year’s awards didn’t fit the
limited confines of Oscar bait. Ryan
Coogler’s “Creed,” while it landed a nod for
Sylvester Stallone’s supporting perform-

DIVERSITY
Continued from page 21
Hollywood’s lack of diversity has taken
center stage since last month’s Oscar nominations revealed a second consecutive year
of all-white acting contenders.
Producers have assembled a diverse array
of presenters for Sunday’s show, including
Morgan Freeman, Sofia Vergara, Kevin
Hart, Whoopi Goldberg, Sarah Silverman,
Tina Fey, Kerry Washington, Quincy Jones
and “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” director J.J. Abrams and star Daisy Ridley. Last
year’s winners Eddie Redmayne, Patricia
Arquette, J.K. Simmons, Julianne Moore,

Lady Gaga

Associated Press.
Gaga, 29, was sexually
assaulted when she was
19. “Til It Happens to
You,” written with Diane
Warren and a nominee for
best original song,
appears in “The Hunting
Ground,” a documentary
about sexual assault on
college campuses that
was directed by Kirby

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Calendar
FRIDAY, FEB. 26
US Foreign Policy, the Past and the
Future. 7:30 a.m. 6650 Golf Course
Drive, Burlingame. Congresswoman
Loretta Sanchez will present.
Breakfast is included. Admission is
$15. For more information call 5155891.
New Leaf Community Market Half
Moon Bay: Affordable Health
Screenings. 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. 150
San Mateo Road, Half Moon Bay. Low
cost health screenings including
Cholesterol,
Glucose,
HbA1c,
Osteoporosis/Bone Density and
Body Composition. Bone density
testing begins at 10 a.m. Results are
ready within 10 minutes and no
appointment is necessary. For more
information
visit
www.westcoasthealthservices.com or call (800)
549-0431.
Daffodil Daydreams at Filoli. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Celebrate the flowering
of Filoli’s Garden through two days
of informative talks, walks, demonstrations and hands-on activities.
Free for current members. Tickets are
$20 for adult non-members, $17 for
senior adult non-members ages 65
and older, $10 for child non-members from five through 17 and free
for children ages four and under. For
more information call 364-8300 ext.
508.
Having a Voice in Your Child’s
Individualized
Education
Program. 9:30 a.m. to 11 a.m. 350
Twin Dolphins Drive, Redwood City.
Expert Martina Sholiton will discuss
the techniques and strategies on
how to plan your IEP and how to
handle disagreement. For more
information call (415) 377-7941.
Coloring and Coffee for Adults. 10
a.m. Belmont Library, 1110 Alameda
de las Pulgas, Belmont. Color a page
or two and enjoy some refreshments
and adult conversation. Coloring
sheets and materials will be provided, but feel free to bring your own
supplies. For more information contact belmont@smcl.org.

children ages four and under. For
more information call 364-8300 ext.
508.
Lunar Year Street Festival. 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m. 1 Library Ave., Millbrae. For
more information call 697-7324.
Lunar New Year Celebration. 11
a.m. to 4 p.m. San Mateo County
History Museum, 2200 Broadway,
Redwood City. Free. Featuring performances on Courthouse Square
and crafts inside. For more information visit historysmc.org.
Black History Month Film Series. 2
p.m. South San Francisco Main
Public Library, 840 W. Orange Ave.,
South San Francisco. ‘Straight Out of
Compton,’ directed by F. Gary Gray.
For more information email
valle@plsinfo.org.
Opening art exhibition: ‘Existence
and Gods.’ 2 p.m. to 8 p.m. La
Menagerie, 2707 El Camino Real,
Redwood City. Duo exhibition of two
emerging artists. For more information email nicopoms@gmail.com.
‘Stories’ Exhibit. 5 p.m. to 7 p.m.
1018 Main St. Redwood City.
Reception for the Orchard Valley
Ceramic Arts Guild exhibit. For more
information call 678-9503.
Empathetic
Art
Exchange
Performance. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 149
South Blvd., San Mateo. NewGround
Theatre Dance Company will be performing. For more information email
artsunitymovement@gmail.com.
San Francisco Wind Ensemble
Concert. 7:30 p.m. Aragon High
School Theater, 900 Alameda de las
Pulgas, San Mateo. San Francisco
Wind Ensemble, a professional wind
group comprised of the leading
musicians in the Bay Area, will be
performing side by side with the
Aragon High School Wind Ensemble.
Tickets are $10 in advance and $15
at the door. Free for students with ID.
To purchase tickets visit app.artspeople.com/index.php?ticketing=a
hsmb.

Blood Drive. 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The
Shops at Tanforan (near Barnes and
Noble), San Bruno. To celebrate
American Heart Month, the Shops at
Tanforan are partnering with the
Blood Centers of the Pacific in a
blood drive. All blood donors receive
free movie ticket and boneless
wings. To donate blood, donors must
be in good health (free of infection),
at least 15 years old (minors must
have parental consent) and weigh at
least 110 pounds. To prepare, stay
hydrated, wear comfortable clothing, have iron in your diet, bring ID
and a list of medications being
taken. For more information call
(415) 793-9261.

‘U.S. Drag.’ 8 p.m. 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. This black comedy by
Gina Gionfriddo follows two young
women in Manhattan who are trying
to figure out life after college. For
more information go to dragonproductions.net.

Lunar New Year Banquet. 5:30 p.m.
to 9 p.m. Zen Peninsula Restaurant,
1180 El Camino Real, Millbrae. This
popular communitywide event features a social hour and no-host bar,
appetizers, a traditional Chinese
banquet, free door prizes, a playing
card cash drawing and exciting
entertainment. Admission starts at
$60. For more informations and to
buy tickets, go to www.millbraerotary.org.

‘Company’ by Coastal Repertory
Theatre. 8 p.m. 1167 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. The award-winning
Coastal Repertory Theatre presents
the romantic comedy ‘Company’ in
time for Valentine’s Day. For tickets
or more information visit coastalrep.com or call 569-3266.

Films: ‘Much Ado About Nothing.’
7 p.m. Belmont Library, 1110
Alameda de las Pulgas, Belmont. Join
the library every month to watch a
film. Contact belmont@smcl.org for
more information.
Empathetic
Art
Exchange
Performance. 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. 149
South Blvd., San Mateo. NewGround
Theatre Dance Company will be performing. All are welcome. For more
information email artsunitymovement@gmail.com.

Gourmet Concert. 8 p.m. 2575
Flores St., San Mateo. Featuring
pianist Henry Dehlinger performing
selections from Albeniz’s ‘Iberia’ and
Granados’s ‘Goysecas.’ Reception
with gourmet refreshments after the
performance. $20 general admissions, $15 for seniors and students
16 and under. For more information
call 574-4633.

Tat Wong Kung Fu Academy Lion
Dancers. 2 p.m. San Mateo Public
Library, 55 W. Third Ave., San Mateo.
The Chinese Lion Dance and Dragon
Dance is a traditional part of kung fu
training. For more information call
522-7838.
SUNDAY, FEB. 28
Age Well/Drive Smart. 9 a.m. to 11
a.m. Veterans Memorial Senior
Center, 1455 Madison Ave., Redwood
City. Take control of your driving
future with this free class. Topics covered will include myths about older
drivers, compensating for age-related changes, nutrition and strength,
safe driving and more. For more
information call 363-4572.

‘U.S. Drag.’ 8 p.m. 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. This black comedy by
Gina Gionfriddo follows two young
women in Manhattan who are trying
to figure out life after college. For
more information go to dragonproductions.net.

Last Sunday Ballroom Tea Dance
with the Bob Gutierrez Band. 1
p.m. to 3:30 p.m. San Bruno Senior
Center, 1555 Crystal Springs Road.
$5. For more information call 6167150.

‘Company’ by Coastal Repertory
Theatre. 8 p.m. 1167 Main St., Half
Moon Bay. The award-winning
Coastal Repertory Theatre presents
the romantic comedy ‘Company.’ For
tickets or more information visit
coastalrep.com or call 569-3266.

In Sight; Inside; Insight art exhibit
by Linda Salter reception. 1 p.m. to
4 p.m. Peninsula Museum of Art,
1777 California Drive, Burlingame.
Presenting a collection of oil and
pastel portraits. Exhibit open until
March 20. For more information
email n3il.murphy@gmail.com.

SATURDAY, FEB. 27
San Bruno American Legion Post
No. 409 Breakfast. 8:30 a.m. to 11
a.m. 757 San Mateo Ave., San Bruno.
Featuring an omelet bar, pancakes,
French toast, bacon, juice, coffee and
more. $8 per person, $5 for each
child under 10.
Daffodil Daydreams at Filoli. 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. 86 Cañada Road,
Woodside. Celebrate the flowering
of Filoli’s Garden through two days
of informative talks, walks, demonstrations and hands-on activities.
Free for current members. Tickets are
$20 for adult non-members, $17 for
senior adult non-members ages 65
and older, $10 for child non-members from 5 through 17 and free for

Burlingame Jeopardy Game and
Burlingame Historical Society
Annual Meeting. 2 p.m. Lane
Community Room, Burlingame
Public Library, 480 Primrose Road,
Burlingame. Play Burlingame jeopardy with the Burlingame Historical
Society, win prizes and have fun. Free
and open to the public. For more
information, contact the Burlingame
Public Library at 558-7444.
‘U.S. Drag.’ 2 p.m. 2120 Broadway,
Redwood City. This black comedy by
Gina Gionfriddo follows two young
women in Manhattan who are trying
to figure out life after college. For
more information go to dragonproductions.net.

SCAM
Continued from page 1
of fraud known as “phishing,” with
hackers out to steal your information
in hopes of using it to file a false tax
return.
Phishing emails remain one of the
top causes of data breaches. While
people are more aware of their danger
than ever before, the lures continue to
evolve and increase in sophistication,
making it tough for the average person
to discern which emails are legitimate
and which ones aren’t.
Here are a few answers to common
questions about phishing:

WHY IS IT SO
BAD THIS TIME OF YEAR?
Phishing peaks during tax season,
partially because it’s a time of year
that many people are accustomed to
entering their most personal information — such as their Social Security
number or bank account information
— on websites, Satnam Narang, senior
security-response manager for security
software maker Symantec, says.
Hackers can use that information to
file false tax returns and steal a refund
This year is no exception. Earlier
this month, the IRS said that it
stopped an attack on the e-filing portion of its website. Hackers tried to use
a combination of malware and
464,000 Social Security numbers that

BROADWAY
Continued from page 1
forward to it,” he said.
As construction has continued,
Kevranian said commerce throughout
Broadway has suffered due the pileup of
cars attempting to enter and exit
Highway 101.
“The traffic congestion throughout
the area has been tremendous and it has
affected our businesses, ” he said.
“Customers don’t want to come to our
area.”
Though the project is entering a new
phase of work, construction is expected to continue for roughly another 10
months, depending on weather,
according to Caltrans.
Once traffic is switched to the new
overcrossing, the old existing structure will be demolished.
Over two consecutive weekends in
March, opposing lanes of Highway
101 will be shut down to allow for
crews to bring down the former overcrossing.
Southbound lanes will close between
1 a.m. and 7 a.m. Saturday, March 12,

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016
had been stolen elsewhere to generate
PIN numbers that could be used to file
fraudulent returns.
No taxpayer data was stolen from the
IRS computer systems as a result of the
hack.
Phishing also spikes around
Christmas, with attacks in the form of
fake delivery notifications. Thieves
also often tie phishing emails to
major sporting events, or natural disasters like overseas earthquakes, says
Raj Samani, chief technology officer
for Europe, the Middle East and Africa
at Intel Security.
“They’re very much up with the latest news and information,” Samani
says. “If they can spend a little more
time and get a 0.1 percent increase in
click-throughs, then their campaign
becomes hugely more profitable and
successful.”

23

this a lot easier. Thanks to Facebook
and Twitter, details including a person’s place of employment, where
they bank, like to shop and the names
and ages of their children are just a few
clicks away.

WHAT OTHER RED FLAGS SHOULD
I BE ON THE LOOKOUT FOR?

Narang likens phishing to a person
casually throwing a rod in a lake and
waiting for a bite. Phishing emails
don’t contain a lot of specifics, but are
quick and easy to send out in mass
quantities.
“Spear phishing” is much more targeted and personalized. The people
behind those attacks spend time
researching their targets in order to
create highly customized emails that
look much more legitimate and are
much more likely to be clicked on.
The rise of social media has made

In an effort to get more people to
click on a link before thinking about
the possible consequences, many
phishing emails will give an impression of scarcity, or include some kind
of time limit.
For example, an email made to
appear to be from a person’s bank or
email provider may state that if that
person doesn’t click on the enclosed
link within 24 hours, they will be
locked out of their account.
And while poor English and long,
complex web links were previously
sure signs of phishing, they’re not as
prevalent anymore. Many overseas
hackers are no longer using clunky
translation websites, because there are
fluent English speakers who specialize
in translating phishing emails for a
fee, Samani says.
Meanwhile, it’s become easier to
shorten the Web links that direct a
people to fake websites, he says.
Narang adds that people should be
wary of emails purported to be from
banks, or other companies they do
business with, but didn’t opt into
emails from. He also notes that banks
generally don’t include Web links in
emails.

and Sunday, March 13. Northbound
lanes will close between midnight and
6 a. m. Saturday, March 19, and
Sunday, March 20.
While construction is underway,
signs will be posted detouring traffic
onto city streets, according to
Caltrans. Lane and ramp closures will
be required as part of the project as
well.
The Broadway intersection, built in
1947, is the oldest along the
Peninsula. It was rebuilt in 1971, and
seismically retrofitted in the 1980s.
Nearly 225,000 cars are on the interchange daily.
Once completed, the new overpass
will offer a wider structure with more
lanes, reconfigured ramp connections,
new metering lights and retaining
walls, a reworked intersection at
Rollins Road and Broadway, along
with other improvements.
A majority of the money for the
existing project comes from Measure
A, the county’s half-cent sales tax
for transportation, which is responsible for about $51 million of the
construction cost. Another $23 million came courtesy of the state,
Burlingame contributed about $5
million and $3 million was offered

by the federal government.
Businesses and local residents can
expect more noise and construction
throughout the third phase, according
to Caltrans.
Despite the variety of hardships
some local businesses have suffered
throughout the project, Kevranian
said, Caltrans has been responsive to
addressing to concerns raised by local
merchants and residents.
“Caltrans has been very cooperative
in working with us,” he said.
Last year, heavy equipment operators at the construction site accidentally toppled power lines across Highway
101, snarling traffic for hours while
emergency response personnel safely
extracted drivers from their cars which
had live, downed lines draped across
them. No one was harmed in the incident, and a new tower has since been
installed to replace the damaged structure.
As Kevranian looks toward the project wrapping up over the coming
months, he is optimistic that life
along Broadway will soon return to
normalcy.
“We are happy the construction is
coming along and they are opening
the overpass soon,” he said.

WHAT’S THE
DIFFERENCE BETWEEN
PHISHING AND SPEAR FISHING?

24

COMICS/GAMES

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

DILBERT®

THE DAILY JOURNAL
CROSSWORD PUZZLE

HOLY MOLE®

PEARLS BEFORE SWINE®

ACROSS
1 Water source
4 Cave, perhaps
7 Theorem ender
10 Hurry along
11 Lamb’s pen name
13 Sapporo sport
14 Lemon cooler
15 Snow-boot liner
16 Peacock’s pride
17 Heat up (2 wds.)
19 Annoy
20 Famous Khan
21 Gondolier’s land
23 Not my —
26 Clink glasses
28 Old PC system
29 Dream phenom
30 Mr. Picasso
34 Grin
36 Washboard —
38 Kennel sound
39 Delight in
41 Faction
42 — nova

GET FUZZY®

44
46
47
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60

Hole in one
Dazzles
Salad ingredients
Woody’s son
Oklahoma town
El Dorado loot
Foot digits
Viking letter
Wrestler’s coup
Explosive letters
Army off.
Sun setting

DOWN
1 Defrost
2 Non-soap opera
3 Squint at
4 Clear the windshield
5 Raise
6 Aswan Dam site
7 Partridge cousin
8 Post, of etiquette
9 Mete out
12 Open-air lobbies
13 Geologic layers

18
22
23
24
25
27
29
31
32
33
35
37
40
41
42
43
45
46
48
49
50
51

Daisy — Scragg
Cookbook amts.
Six-pointers
— Kippur
Air-pump meas.
— Khayyam
Scarlet or crimson
Farewell
Varnish ingredient
Decide
Rodeo gear
Shining brightly
Western
Harden
Steel additive
Young screecher
Future officer
Power unit
Blame
Fumbler’s word
Mr. Satie
Walkman brand

2-26-16

PREVIOUS
SUDOKU
ANSWERS



FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2016
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) — Take a different
approach to handling your money, health or legal
matters and you will make headway. Get together
with someone from your past who can help you
revisit old dreams.
ARIES (March 21-April 19) — Participating in events
that mean something to you will give you the strength
to make personal changes. Put your plans in motion
and don’t look back. Romance is highlighted.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) — Initiate what you want
to see happen. Don’t be afraid to do things differently.
It’s your uniqueness that will attract attention and

KenKen® is a registered trademark of Nextoy, LLC. ©2016 KenKen Puzzle LLC. All rights reserved.
Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS, Inc. www.kenken.com

THURSDAY’S PUZZLE SOLVED

Each row and each column must contain the
numbers 1 through 6 without repeating.
The numbers within the heavily outlined boxes,
called cages, must combine using the given operation
(in any order) to produce the target numbers in the
top-left corners.
Freebies: Fill in single-box cages with the number in
the top-left corner.

help you get things done.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) — Live, love and laugh.
No matter what you do, make your presence felt and
your input meaningful. Walk away from negativity, bad
influences and unfair situations.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) — Put in extra hours
working toward something that will help you stand out
or beat any challenge or competition you face. Don’t
give in to emotional blackmail.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) — Make changes to your living
quarters or current housing situation. Voice your
thoughts, discuss your intentions and make a plea to a
loved one to help make your dreams come true.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) — Make affordable
plans. You can enjoy life without spending money

2-26-16
Want More Fun
and Games?
Jumble Page 2 • La Times Crossword Puzzle Classifieds
Tundra & Over the Hedge Comics Classifieds
Boggle Puzzle Everyday in DateBook

or getting involved in someone else’s risky affairs.
Expand your mind or take part in something that is
geared to your benefit.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) — Emotions will surface if
you let someone push you around. If you make plans
to do something with someone who’s supportive,
greater self-awareness and confidence will unfold.
Romance is in the stars.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) — Explore new interests
or give a unique spin to a project or pastime. A chance
to reconnect with someone you enjoyed working with
in the past will also contribute to your success.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) — You’ll face
opposition if you don’t live up to your promises. Have
an explanation ready and an alternative solution in

place. Protect your reputation and stick to the truth.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) — High energy
coupled with interesting ideas will capture others’
attention. An unexpected emotional response will
lead to a better plan. Don’t feel the need to act in
haste. Time is on your side.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) — Added discipline
will pay off. Don’t let someone who is disgruntled
or negative stand between you and victory. Put
yourself first and celebrate your success with
someone you love.
COPYRIGHT 2016 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

104 Training

110 Employment

TERMS & CONDITIONS
The San Mateo Daily Journal Classifieds will not be responsible for more
than one incorrect insertion, and its liability shall be limited to the price of one
insertion. No allowance will be made for
errors not materially affecting the value
of the ad. All error claims must be submitted within 30 days. For full advertising conditions, please ask for a Rate
Card.

CAREGIVERS WANTED to assist w/
personal care like bathing, dressing,
grooming, personal & oral hygiene,
meals,medications, & rec. activities.
8 hr/day 40 hr/wk no exp rqd, HS grad.
Opening for 2 caregivers to work together. Jobsite/interview. San Mateo, CA.
Send resume: Giusto Enterprises 7525
Mission Street, Daly City, CA 94014 or
Email: SFinns@aol.com

110 Employment

HOME CARE AIDES
Multiple shifts to meet your needs. Great
pay & benefits, Sign-on bonus, 1yr exp
required.
Matched Caregivers (650)839-2273,
(408)280-7039 or (888)340-2273

BAKERY/COFFEE /SANDWICH Shop
(San Mateo) P/T Kitchen help/Sandwich
Maker or Cashier, 5:30-9:30 a.m., 11:303:30 p.m. (Mon.- Fri.) Send resume
vco06@yahoo.com or call 650-5711552.

CAREGIVER -

Looking for compassionate team
member for Assisted Living in Burlingame. (650)771-1127.

CAREGIVERS NEEDED

Become a Home Care Professional
t/P&YQFSJFODF/FDFTTBSZ
t5SBJOJOH1SPWJEFE
t'515oFYDFMMFOU'5CFOFmUT
Evenings/weekends/vehicle/driving required

Call or come in TODAY!

(650) 458-2200
www.homebridgeca.org
1660 S. Amphlett Blvd. 115 San Mateo, CA 94402

CAREGIVERS
2 years experience
required.
Immediate placement
on all assignments.

Call
(650)777-9000
HOUSE CLEANERS NEEDED
$12.25 per hour. Company Car.
Call Molly Maid at (650)837-9788.
1700 S. Amphlett, #218, San Mateo.

JEWELER/
SETTERS
Setting + repair + Polish
Top Pay + ben +
bonus
650-367-6500
FX: 367-6400

jobs@jewelryexchange.com

KELLY SERVICES, INC.

3rd Shift
Medical Device
Assemblers Needed
in Redwood City, CA

$21.90/hr
Send Resume or call:
Email:
jenkist@kellyservices.com
562-774-2162
EOE – Never a Fee

110 Employment
NEWSPAPER INTERNS
JOURNALISM

The Daily Journal is looking for interns to do entry level reporting, research, updates of our ongoing features and interviews. Photo interns also welcome.
We expect a commitment of four to
eight hours a week for at least four
months. The internship is unpaid, but
intelligent, aggressive and talented interns have progressed in time into
paid correspondents and full-time reporters.

25

110 Employment
SALES/MARKETING
INTERNSHIPS
The San Mateo Daily Journal is looking
for ambitious interns who are eager to
jump into the business arena with both
feet and hands. Learn the ins and outs
of the newspaper and media industries.
This position will provide valuable
experience for your bright future.
Email resume
info@smdailyjournal.com

College students or recent graduates
are encouraged to apply. Newspaper
experience is preferred but not necessarily required.
Please send a cover letter describing
your interest in newspapers, a resume
and three recent clips. Before you apply, you should familiarize yourself
with our publication. Our Web site:
www.smdailyjournal.com.
Send your information via e-mail to
news@smdailyjournal.com or by regular mail to 1900 Alameda de las Pulgas #112, San Mateo CA 94403

RESTAURANT Lunch / Brunch Line Cook. San Carlos
Restaurant, 1696 Laurel Street. Call 650
592 7258 or Chef (541)848-0038 or Apply in person
SALES - Telemarketing and Inside Sales
Representative needed to sell newspaper print and web advertising and event
marketing solutions. To apply, pleasecall
650-344-5200 and send resume to
info@smdailyjournal.com
STATION FOR RENT IN

BURLINGAME!

Are you self-motivated and
Career Oriented?
Contact me for more details at:

1colorologist@gmail.com

GOT JOBS?
The best career seekers
read the Daily Journal.
We will help you recruit qualified, talented
individuals to join your company or organization.
The Daily Journal’s readership covers a wide
range of qualifications for all types of positions.
For the best value and the best results,
recruit from the Daily Journal...
Contact us for a free consultation

Call (650) 344-5200 or
Email: ads@smdailyjournal.com

124 Caregivers

EXPERIENCED
CAREGIVER

AVAILABLE FOR HIRE

Maria Lucia

•Will Assist with daily
activities including transportation “to and from”
• Grocery shopping • Light
meal prep •Laundry services
•Light housekeeping
•Available for AM/PM hours
•CPR/First Aid certified

References upon request

(650)741-8126

170 Opportunities
LIMO BUSINESS, On Time Limo Shuttle. Includes 2 Town Cars, customer and
client lists. $60,000. (650)342-6342

DRIVERS
WANTED

San Mateo Daily Journal

Newspaper Delivery Routes to businesses and newsracks,
and some apartment buildings. (No residential houses.)
CURRENT CONTRACT OPENINGS FOR:
PALO ALTO & MENLO PARK
Early mornings, six days per week, Monday through Saturday.
2 to 4 hour routes. Must have own vehicle, valid license and
insurance.
Pick up papers between 3:30 a.m. and 4:30 a.m.
Pay dependent on route size.
Call 650-344-5200
or email resume to info@smdailyjournal.com

203 Public Notices
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268078
The following person is doing business
as: JAMBTECH, 1000 Foster City Blvd
#3202, FOSTER CITY, CA 94404. Registered Owner: John Echeverri, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on N/A
/s/John Echeverri
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/09/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 267975
The following person is doing business
as: All Star Cleaners, 2499 S. El Camino
Real #C, SAN MATEO, CA 94403. Registered Owner: 1) Francis Liu, 1026 Indian Ave, SAN MATEO, CA 94401 2) Na
Zheng, 1026 Indian Ave, SAN MATEO,
CA 94401. The business is conducted by
a Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Francis/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/01/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/16, 02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16)
LIEN SALE 03/16/2016 @ 9am at 280 A
STREET, COLMA
2012 MERCEDES Lic# NOPLATE Vin#
WDDGJ4HB2CF756591

26

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016
203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

CASE# CIV 536547
ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR
CHANGE OF NAME
SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA,
COUNTY OF SAN MATEO,
400 COUNTY CENTER RD,
REDWOOD CITY CA 94063
PETITION OF
Julieta T. Rivera
TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS:
Petitioner: Julieta T. Rivera filed a petition with this court for a decree changing
name as follows:
Present name: Julieta T. Rivera
Proposed Name: Julieta H. Timbol
THE COURT ORDERS that all persons
interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated
below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be
granted. Any person objecting to the
name changes described above must file
a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court
days before the matter is scheduled to
be heard and must appear at the hearing
to show cause why the petition should
not be granted. If no written objection is
timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. A HEARING on
the petition shall be held on March 16,
2016 at 9 a.m., Dept. PJ, Room 2D, at
400 County Center, Redwood City, CA
94063. A copy of this Order to Show
Cause shall be published at least once
each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition in the following newspaper of general circulation: San Mateo Daily Journal
Filed: 02/03/2016
/s/ Robert D. Foiles /
Judge of the Superior Court
Dated: 02/03/16
(Published 02/05/2016, 02/12/2016,
02/19/2016, 02/26/2016)

NOTICE
OF
PUBLIC
HEARING ON A PRECISE
DEVELOPMENT
PLAN
AMENDMENT WITHIN THE
PLANNED DEVELOPMENT
DISTRICT
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Tuesday March
8, 2016 at 7:00 p.m. in the
Council Chamber, 621 Magnolia Avenue, Millbrae, CA,
the Millbrae City Council will
hold a public hearing to consider the following:
The application of Central
Peninsula Church for an
amendment to the Precise
Development Plan for Millbrae Square Shopping Center to allow for a civic land
use utilizing 20,858 square
feet on the second floor and
1,278 square feet on the
ground floor of the three
story 90,000 square foot
building, located at 855
Broadway (formerly the
Kohl’s Department Store),
where only retail uses are
allowed.
The requested amendment
is a project for the purposes
of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA)
and is subject to environmental review. However,
CEQA Guidelines Section
15270 provides that CEQA
does not apply to projects
which a public agency disapproves. Therefore, at this
time, no CEQA review has
been done for the proposed
project.
At the time of the hearing, all
interested persons are invited to appear and be heard.
If you challenge the decision
of the City in court, you may
be limited to raising only
those issues you or someone else raised at the public
hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the
Planning Commission at, or
prior to, the public hearing.
For further information or to
review the materials regarding these matters, please
contact the Millbrae Community Development Department 621 Magnolia Avenue,
Millbrae at (650) 259-2341.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268227
The following person is doing business
as: Steadfast Herbs, 2601 Cloverdale
Rd, PESCADERO, CA 94060. Registered Owner(s): 1) Heidi Cunningham,
same address 2) Lauren Anderson, 270
Andersen St, SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94110. The business is conducted by a
General Partnership. The registrant commenced to transact business under the
FBN on
/s/Heidi Cunningham/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/22/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16, 03/18/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268098
The following person is doing business
as: Belmont Tattoo, 1485 El Camino Real Ste. 203, BELMONT, CA 94002. Registered Owner: 1) Karen Varela 2) Rodil
Varela Jr., 611 Brighton Rd., PACIFICA,
CA 94044. The business is conducted by
a Genral Partnership. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on 2015
/s/Karen Varela/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/11/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #267964
The following person is doing business
as: 1) TEC Solutions USA 2) TEC Help
USA, 650 El Camino Real, BELMONT,
CA 94002. Registered Owner(s): Jaspal
Singh, 1469 Bellevue Ave, Apt. # 206,
BURLINGAME, CA 94010. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Jaspal Singh/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/29/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16)

PUBLISHED: February 26,
2016
BY: Angela Louis, City Clerk
2/26/16
CNS-2848818#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

203 Public Notices

Tundra

Tundra

Tundra

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

Over the Hedge

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

203 Public Notices

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268100
The following person is doing business
as: MJ - Home Improvement, 700 E. 17th
Ave #302, SAN MATEO, CA. Registered
Owner: Marvin J. Ochoa, same address.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Marvin J. Ochoa/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/11/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268185
The following person is doing business
as: Naked Chorizo, 604 Fifth Ave, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94063. Registered
Owner: Zenia Llamas, 1540 Sheron Pl,
SAN MATEO, CA 94401. The business
is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on
/s/Zenia Llamas/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/18/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 267972
The following person is doing business
as: Sugar Crumb Creations, 537 Park
Way, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA
94080. Registered Owner:Cristina Arcinas, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/Cristina Arcinas/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/01/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/16, 02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 267859
The following person is doing business
as: Konditorei, 3130 Alpine Rd #284,
PORTOLA VALLEY, CA 94028. Registered Owner: Fong Fong Katie Lau, 7226
Glenview Dr, SAN JOSE, CA 95120. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on
/s/Fong Fong Katie Lau/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/22/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/16, 02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 267967
The following person is doing business
as: Ortiz Brothers, 28 Claremont Ave,
REDWOOD CITY, CA 94062. Registered
Owner: 1) Manuel Ortiz 2) Fernando Ortiz, same address. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 01/29/2016
/s/Manuel Ortiz/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/29/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/16, 02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 267966
The following person is doing business
as: Cake Pops By Divine, 3 Captain
Lane, REDWOOD CITY, CA 94065.
Registered Owner: Divina Gracia R. Dinulos, same address. The business is
conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on NA
/s/Divina Gracia R. Dinulos/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/29/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/05/16, 02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268093
The following person is doing business
as: Crystal Energy, 209 Sebastian Dr,
MILLBRAE, CA 94030. Registered Owner: Rachel Jayne Ho, same address. The
business is conducted by an Individual.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on N/A
/s/Rachel Jayne Ho/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/10/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268083
The following person is doing business
as: Matco Tools, 1144 Dix Street, SAN
MATEO, CA 94401. Registered Owner:
PL Ventures Inc., CA. The business is
conducted by a Corporation. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/Paul Jimenez Jr./
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/10/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 267909
The following person is doing business
as: Binka Bites, 304 Alida Way, SOUTH
SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. Registered Owner: Jasmin Ongsiako, 532
Swallowtail Ct., BRISBANE, CA 94005.
The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on
/s/Jasmin Ongsiako/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 01/25/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268135
The following person is doing business
as: Kerwin Associates, 1733 Woodside
Road, Suite 260, REDWOOD CITY, CA
94061. Registered Owner: Kerwin Associates, LLC., CA. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company.
The registrant commenced to transact
business under the FBN on 02/11/2011
/s/Anne Kerwin Payne/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/16/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268012
The following person is doing business
as: Sports Whistle, 844 Alta Loma Dr,
SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080.
Registered Owner: Suleem Kazmi, same
address. The business is conducted by
an Individual. The registrant commenced
to transact business under the FBN on
N/A
/s/Suleem Kazmi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/03/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/12/16, 02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16)
FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268127
The following person is doing business
as: My Sweet Treats And Delites, 302
Crown Circle, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO, CA 94080. Registered Owner(s):
Suzette Viray, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on Jan 2016
/s/Suzette Virayi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/12/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16, 03/18/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268178
The following person is doing business
as: Fair Oaks Cellars, 3808 Fair Oaks
Ave, MENLO PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owner: 1) Mark Bui-Ford 2) David
Bui-Ford, same address. The business is
conducted by a Married Couple. The registrant commenced to transact business
under the FBN on N/A
/s/Mark Bui-Ford/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/17/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268231
The following person is doing business
as: Kerith Lisi Artworks, 674 Dartmouth
Avenue, SAN CARLOS, CA 94070. Registered Owner(s): Kerith Lisi, same address. The business is conducted by an
Individual. The registrant commenced to
transact business under the FBN on
/s/Kerith Lisi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/22/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16, 03/18/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268081
The following person is doing business
as: Paradigm Hotels Group, LLC, 150 W
Harris Ave, SOUTH SAN FRANCISCO,
CA 94080. Registered Owner: Paradigm
Hotels Group, LLC, CA. The business is
conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 12/1/15
/s/Ganendra Singh/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/09/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268255
The following person is doing business
as: WDG Family Foundation, 20 Citrus
Ct, HILLSBOROUGH, CA 94010. Registered Owner(s): 1) William Joe 2) Gloria
Jue, same address. The business is conducted by a General Partnership. The
registrant commenced to transact business under the FBN on 8/11
/s/Gloria Jue/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/22/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16, 03/18/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT 268141
The following person is doing business
as: Arrow Intermodal Transport, 815 Sea
Spray Ln. Unit #102, FOSTER CITY, CA
94404. Registered Owner: Kiyohiro Niimi, same address. The business is conducted by an Individual. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on NA
/s/Kiyohiro Niimi/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 2/16/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/19/16, 02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME
STATEMENT #268278
The following person is doing business
as: Woodland Park Communities, 2882
Sand Hill Road, Suite 241, MENLO
PARK, CA 94025. Registered Owner(s):
Woodland Park Property Owner, LLC,
DE. The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The registrant
commenced to transact business under
the FBN on N/A
/s/Peter Pau/
This statement was filed with the Assessor-County Clerk on 02/24/2016. (Published in the San Mateo Daily Journal,
02/26/16, 03/04/16, 03/11/16, 03/18/16)

LEGAL NOTICES

Fictitious Business Name Statements,
Trustee Sale Notice, Name Change, Probate,
Notice of Adoption, Divorce Summons,
Notice of Public Sales and More.
Published in the Daily Journal for San Mateo County.

Fax your request to: 650-344-5290
Email them to: ads@smdailyjournal.com

NOTICE
OF PUBLIC HEARING
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING: NOTICE IS HEREBY
GIVEN that on Monday,
March 7, 2016 at 7:00 p.m.
(or as soon thereafter as the
matter is heard) in the Millbrae City Council Chambers, 621 Magnolia Ave.,
Millbrae, CA, the Millbrae
Planning Commission will
conduct a public hearing on
the following matters:
330 CASTENADA DRIVE:
DESIGN REVIEW to allow a
2nd story addition to a single-story, single-family home
in an R-1 (Single-Family
Residential) Zoning District.
(Public Hearing)
9 HILLCREST BLVD: DESIGN REVIEW AND CONDITIONAL USE PERMIT for
a proposed tenant improvement and exterior remodel
of an 840 square foot (sf)
new restaurant, located in
the (DIA) Downtown Improvement Area Zoning District. (Public Hearing)
1355 TUOLUMNE ROAD:
DESIGN REVIEW for the
expansion of an existing 2nd
story AND SETBACK EXCEPTION to allow less than
the minimum required 2nd
floor setback on a single
family house located in the
R-1 (Single Family Residential) Zoning District. (Public
Hearing)
At the time of the hearing, all
interested persons are invited to appear and be heard.
For further information or to
review the application and
exhibits, please contact the
Millbrae Community Development Department 621
Magnolia Avenue, Millbrae
at (650) 259-2341.
If anyone wishes to appeal
any final action taken,
he/she may do so by contacting the City Clerk at
(650) 259-2333, to obtain
the appropriate form and
pay the corresponding fee.
A completed form must be
submitted before the end of
the appeal period stated at
the conclusion of the hearing.
2/26/16
CNS-2849609#
SAN MATEO DAILY JOURNAL

210 Lost & Found
FOUND: LADIES watch outside Safeway Millbrae 11/10/14 call Matt,
(415)378-3634
FOUND: RING Silver color ring found
on 1/7/2014 in Burlingame. Parking Lot
M (next to Dethrone). Brand inscribed.
Gary @ (650)347-2301
FOUND: WEDDING BAND Tuesday
September 8th Near Whole Foods, Hillsdale. Pls call to identify. 415.860.1940
LOST - Apple Ipad, Sunday 5.3 on Caltrain #426, between Burlingame and
Redwood City, south bound. REWARD.
(415)830-0012
LOST - Woman’s diamond ring. Lost
12/18. Broadway, Redwood City.
REWARD! (650)339-2410

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

27

210 Lost & Found

296 Appliances

298 Collectibles

300 Toys

304 Furniture

306 Housewares

LOST - MY COLLAPSIBLE music stand,
clip lights, and music in black bags were
taken from my car in Foster City and may
have been thrown out by disappointed
thieves. Please call (650)704-3595

AIR CONDITIONER 10000 BTU w/remote. Slider model fits all windows. LG
brand $199 runs like new. (650)2350898

1920'S AQUA Glass Beaded Flapper
Purse (drawstring bag) & Faux Pearl
Flapper Collar. $50. 650-762-6048

3-STORY BARBIE Dollhouse with spiral
staircase and elevator. $60. (650)5588142

COFFEE TABLE @ end table Very nice
condition $80. 650 697 7862

PLASTIC DUAL-LID Underbed Storage
Container with wheels, 31"x15"x5-1/2",
$7 (650) 952-3500.

1940 VINTAGE telephone bench maple
antiques collectibles $75 (650)755-9833

AMERICAN GIRL 18” doll, “Jessica”,
blond/blue. new in box, $65 (505)-2281480 local.

LOST CAT Our Felicity, weighs 7 lbs,
she has a white nose, mouth, chin, all
four legs, chest stomach, around her
neck. Black mask/ears, back, tail. Nice
REWARD.
Please
email
us
at
joandbill@msn.com or call 650-5768745. She drinks water out of her paws.
LOST PRESCRIPTION glasses (2
pairs). REWARD! 1 pair dark tinted bifocals, green flames in black case with red
zero & red arrow. 2nd pair clear lenses
bifocals. Green frames. Lost at Lucky
Chances Casino in Colma or Chili’s in
San Bruno. (650)245-9061
LOST SMALL gray and green Parrot.
Redwood Shores. (650)207-2303.

Books
16 BOOKS on History of WWII Excellent
condition. $95 all obo, (650)345-5502
NICHOLAS SPARKS Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861
QUALITY BOOKS used and rare. World
& US History and classic American novels. $5 each obo (650)345-5502

CHEFMATE TOASTER oven, brand
new, bakes, broils, toasts, adjustable
temperature. $25 OBO. (650)580-4763
CHEST TYPE freezer 4x2x3 approx 16
cubic ft $50 obo can deliver $25.
(650)591-6842
CIRRUS STEAM mop model SM212B 4
new extra cleaning pads,user manual.
$45. 650-5885487
ELECTRIC FIREPLACE on wheels in
walnut casing made by the Amish exl.
cond. $99. 650-592-2648
ELEGANT ELECTRIC Fireplace on
wheels in white casing can see flames,
like new. $99 (650)771-6324
FRIGIDAIRE - Chest Freezer, 25 cubic
feet. $250 OBO. Very Good Condition!
(650) 755-4648.
HOOVER FLOOR vacuum cleaner
(heavy duty) good condition $20.
(650)756-9516
ICE MAKER brand new $90. (415)2653395
RIVAL 11/2 quart ice cream maker
(New) $20.(650)756-9516.
SHARK FLOOR steamer,exc condition
$45 (650) 756-9516.

STEPHEN KING Hardback Books
2 @ $3.00 each - (650)341-1861

294 Baby Stuff

UPRIGHT VACUUM Cleaner, $10. Call
Ed, (415)298-0645 South San Francisco

GRACO DOUBLE Stroll $90 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

297 Bicycles

SIT AND Stand Stroll $95 My Cell 650537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.

295 Art
BOB TALBOT Marine Lithograph (Signed Framed 24x31 Like New. $99.
(650)572-8895

CHERISHED TEDDIES Figurines. Over
90 figurines, 1992-1999 (mostly '93-'95).
Mint in Boxes. $99. (408) 506-7691

COUCH – Designer gray, beige, white.
Excellent condition. $99. 650-573-6895

PUZZLES 300-1000 ps perf condition 26
for $2.00 ea. 650-583-4058

CUSTOM MADE wood sewing storage
cabinet perfect condition $75. (650)4831222

JOE MONTANA front page, SF Chronicle, Super Bowl XVI Win issue, $10, 650591-9769 San Carlos

STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Luke Skywalker (Ceremonial) $10 Steve 650-518-6614

DESK CHAIR, swivel, rolling, good cond.
$10. (650)560-9008

LENNOX RED Rose, Unused, hand
painted, porcelain, authenticity papers,
$12.00. (650) 578 9208.

STAR WARS – one 4” orange card action figure, Momaw Nadon (Hammerhead). $8 Steve 650-518-6614

RENO SILVER LEGACY Casino four
rare memorabilia items, casino key, two
coins, small charm. $95. (650)676-0974

STAR WARS SDCC Stormtrooper
Commander $29 OBO Dan,
650-303-3568 lv msg

GEOFFREY BEENE Jacket, unused, unworn, tags , pink, small, sleeveless, zippers, paid $88, $15, (650) 578-9208

SANDY SCOTT Etching. Artists proof.
"Opening Day at Cattail Marsh". Retriever holding pheasant. $99. 650-654-9252.
SCHILLER HIPPIE poster, linen, Sparta
graphics 1968. Mint condition. $600.00.
(650)701-0276
STAR WARS C-3PO mint pair, green tint
(Japan), gold (U.S.) 4” action figures.
$89 650-518-6614
STAR Wars Hong Kong exclusive, mint
Pote Snitkin 4” green card action figure.
$20 650-518-6614
STAR WARS Lando Calrissian 4” orange card action figure, autographed by
Billy Dee Williams. $50 Steve 650-5186614

2 BIKES for kids $60. Will email pictures
upon request (650) 537-1095

299 Computers

ADULT BIKES 1 regular and 2 with balloon tires $30 Each (650) 347-2356

MONITOR FOR computer. Kogi - 15".
Model L5QX. $25. (650)592-5864.

MAGNA-GLACIERPOINT 26" 15 speed.
Hardly used . Bluish purple color .$ 59.00
San Mateo 650-255-3514.

RECORDABLE CD-R 74, Sealed, Unopened, original packaging, Samsung, 12X,
(650) 578 9208

Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
DOWN
1 Pass
2 Modern kerchief
cousin
3 How many O.
Henry stories end
4 Writer Janowitz
5 Sunny day
phenomenon
6 Angora fabric
7 Republic since
1979
8 Search high and
low
9 Legendary
Australian outlaw
10 Fairness
11 “Treasure Island”
castaway Ben
12 Step up?
13 Prefix with bar
21 George’s lyrical
brother
22 __ alcohol: fusel
oil component
27 Bed-in for Peace
participant
28 “Blowin’ in the
Wind” songwriter
29 Early spaceflight
proponent
Willy __
30 Like petroglyphs
31 Nikita’s no

32 Sudden blow
33 Word processing
command
34 Blockage
38 Bolivian border
lake
39 Shade of green
41 Botanical beard
44 Smuggler’s unit
47 Wan
48 Caesar salad
dressing
ingredient

49 Acting guru
Hagen
50 “Good for you”
54 OK components
55 Throw out
56 Load in a basket
57 River of Spain
58 Con man’s target
59 Falco of “Nurse
Jackie”
60 Silk Road desert
61 2015 A.L. East
champ

ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE:

302 Antiques
ANTIQUE ITALIAN lamp 18” high, $70
(650)387-4002
BEAUTIFUL AND UNIQUE Victorian
Side Sewing Table, All original. Rosewood. Carved. EXCELLENT CONDITION! $350. (650)815-8999.
MAHOGANY ANTIQUE Secretary desk,
72” x 40” , 3 drawers, Display case, bevelled glass, $700. (650)766-3024

BLAUPUNKT AM/FM/CD Radio and Receiver with Detachable Face asking
$100. (650)593-4490

DRUM TABLE - brown, perfect condition, nice design, with storage, $45.,
(650)345-1111
END TABLES – Woven bamboo, offwhite. $89. 650-573-6895. (650)573-689
ESPRESSO TABLE 30” square, 40” tall,
$95 (650)375-8021

LEFT-HAND ERGONOMIC keyboard
with 'A-shape' key layout Num pad, $20
(650)204-0587
MOTOROLA BRAVO MB 520 (android
4.1 upgrade) smart phone 35$ 8GB SD
card Belmont (650)595-8855
ONKYO AV Receiver HT-R570 .Digital
Surround, HDMI, Dolby, Sirius Ready,
Cinema Filter.$95/ Offer 650-591-2393
OPTIMUS H36 ST5800 Tower Speaker
36x10x11 $30. (650)580-6324
ORIGINAL AM/FM 1967/68 Honda Radio for $50. (650)593-4490
PIONEER HOUSE Speakers, pair. 15
inch 3-way, black with screens. Work
great. $99.(650)243-8198

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c1470 $60.
(650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model L516b
$75. (650)421-5469
VINTAGE ZENITH radio, model yrb-791 1948, $ 70. (650)421-5469

304 Furniture
2 FOLDING tables.
500# capacity.
24"x48". Laminate top. $99.
650 591
4141
4 DRAWER black file cabinet. 52" high.
27" deep. Good condition. $95 (650)5954617
ANTIQUE DINING table for six people
with chairs $99. (650)580-6324
ANTIQUE MAHOGONY double bed with
adjustable steelframe $225.00. OBO.
(650)592-4529
ANTIQUE MOHAGANY Bookcase. Four
feet tall. $75. (415) 282-0966.
BEIGE CARPET. 12 1/2'x11 1/2'. Good
condition. Good for bedroom.$95.
(650)595-4617
BEIGE SOFA $99. Excellent Condition
(650) 315-2319
BRASS / METAL ETAGERE 6.5 ft tall.
Rugs, Pictures, Mirrors. Four shelf. $200.
(650) 343-0631
BROWN RECLINER, $75 Excellent Condition. (650) 315-2319
BROWN WOODEN bookshelf H 3'4"X W
3'6"X D 10" with 3 shelves $25.00 call
650-592-2648
CHAIR – Designer gray, beige, white.
Excellent condition. $59. 650-573-6895
CHAIRS - Two oversized saucer (moon)
chairs. Black. $30 each. (650)5925864.

CRAFTSMAN JIGSAW 3.9 amp. with
variable speeds $65 (650)359-9269
CRAFTSMAN RADIAL Arm Saw Stand.
In box. $30. (650)245-7517
DEWALT DRILL/FLASHLIGHT Set $99
My Cell 650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon request.
HEAVY DUTY Mattock/Pick, Less Handle $5. (650)368-0748
PULLEYS- FOUR 2-1/8 to 7 1/4" --all for
$16. 650 341-8342
SHOPSMITH MARK V 50th Anniversary
most
attachments.
$1,500/OBO.
(650)504-0585

IKEA WOOD table, 36” like new. Can
send picture $50. (954)907-0100

VINTAGE CRAFTSMAN Jig Saw. Circa
1947. $60. (650)245-7517

ILOVE SEAT, exc $75. Will send picture. (954)907-0100

WILLIAMS #1191 CHROME 2 1/16"
Combination "SuperRrench". Mint. $89.
650-218-7059.

INFINITY FLOOR speakers H 38" x W
11 1/2" x D 10" good $50. (650)756-9516
LAWN CHAIRS (4) White, plastic, $8.
each, (415)346-6038

LOVESEAT – Designer gray, beige,
white. Excellent condition. $89. 650-5736895
MAPLE COFFEE table. Excellent Condition $75.00 (650)593-1780
MAPLE LAMP table with tiffany shade
$95.00 (650)593-1780
NEW TWIN Mattress set plus frame
$30.00 (650) 347-2356
NIGHT TABLE, 2 drawers, $20. Will
send pictures. (954)907-0100
OAK BOOKCASE, 30"x30" x12". $25.
(650)726-6429
OAK SIX SHELF Book Case 6FT 4FT
$55 (650)458-8280
OAK WINE CABINET, beautiful, glass
front, 18” x 25” x 48” 5 shelves, grooved
for bottles. 25-bottle capacity. $299.
(360)624-1898
OUTDOOR WOOD SCREEN - new $80
obo Retail $130 (650)873-8167
PAPASAN CHAIRS (2) -with cushions
$45. each set, (650)347-8061
QUEEN SIZE Sofa bed and love seat,
dark brown
and
beige.
$99
for
both obo 650-279-4948
RATTAN SIX Drawer Brown Dresser;
Glass top and Mirror attachment;
5 ft long. $200. (650) 871-5524.
RECLINING SWIVEL chair almost new
$99 650-766-4858
ROCKING CHAIR fine light, oak condition with pads, $85/OBO. 650 369 9762
TABLE, like new, black with glass top
insert, 40 x 30 x 16. $40.(650)560-9008
TEAK CABINET 28"x32", used for stereo equipment $25. (650)726-6429
TEAK-VENEER COMPUTER desk with
single drawer and stacked shelves. $30
obo. 650-465-2344
TWIN MATTRESS with 3 drawers wood
frame, exc condition $85. Daly City (650)
756-9516.
VINTAGE LARGE Marble Coffee Table,
round. $75.(650)458-8280
WALNUT CHEST, small (4 drawer with
upper bookcase $50. (650)726-6429

WILLIAMS #40251, 4 PC. Tool Set
(Hose Remover, Cotter Puller, Awl, Scraper). Mint. $29. 650-218-7059.
WIZARD STAINED Glass Grinder, extra
bit, good condition, shield included,
$50. Jack @348-6310

310 Misc. For Sale
"MOTHER-IN-LAW TONGUES" plants,
3 in 5-gal cans. $10.00 each. 650/5937408.
8 TRACKS, billy Joel, Zeppelin, Eagles
,Commodores, more.40 @ $4 each , call
650-393-9908

GAME "BEAT THE EXPERTS" never
used $8., (408)249-3858
HARLEY DAVIDSON black phone, perfect condition, $65., (650) 867-2720

INCUBATOR, $99, (650)678-5133
LIONEL CHRISTMAS Boxcars 2005,
2006, 2007 New OB $90 lot 650-3687537

LIONEL CHRISTMAS Holiday expansion Set. New OB $99 650-368-7537
LIONEL ENGINE #221 ‘Rio Grande diesel, runs good ex-condition
$90.
(650)867-7433
LIONEL WESTERN Union Pass car and
dining car. New OB $99 650-368-7537

MISSION HIGH School (S.F. ) June
1928 year book. Good condition, no autographs. $20.00. 650-588-0842.
MISSION HIGH School (S.F.) leather
belt w/ metal buckle, late 1930's. $10.
650-588-0842.

RMT CHRISTMAS Diesel train and Caboose. Rare. New OB $99 650-368-7537
SAMSONITE 26" tan hard-sided suit
case, lt. wt., wheels, used once/like new.
$60. 650-328-6709

STAR TREK VCR tape Colombia House,
Complete set 79 episodes $50
(650)355-2167
TASCO LUMINOVA Telescope.with tripod stand, And extra Lenses. Good condition.$90. call 650-591-2393

ULTRASONIC JEWELRY Cleaning Machine Cleans jewelry, eyeglasses, dentures, keys. Concentrate included. $30
OBO. (650)580-4763
VASE WITH flowers 2 piece good for the
Holidays, $25., (650) 867-2720
VINTAGE WHITE Punch Bowl/Serving
Bowl Set with 10 cups plus one extra
$30. (650)873-8167

WHITE WICKER Shelf unit, adjustable.
Excellent condition. 5 ft by 2 ft. $50.
(650)315-6184

311 Musical Instruments

WOOD - wall Unit - 30" long x 6' tall x
17.5" deep. $90. (650)631-9311

BALDWIN GRAND PIANO, 6 foot, excellent condition, $8,500/obo. Call
(510)784-2598

WOOD BOOKCASE unit - good condition $65. (650)504-6058
WOOD FURNITURE- one end table and
coffee table. In good condition. $30
OBO. (760)996-0767.
WOOD WALL unit, 7 upper and lower
cabinets, 90" wide x 72" high. FREE .
(650)347-6875
WOODEN MINI bar with 2 bar stools
$75. (415)265-3395

306 Housewares
BED SPREAD (queen size), flower design, never used. $22. Pls call
650-345-9036
CHRISTMAS TREE China, Fairfield
Peace on Earth. Complete Set of 12 (48
pieces) $75. 650-493-5026

CHILD’S TABLE (Fisher Price) and Two
Chairs. Like New. $35. (650) 574-7743.

COMPLETE SET OF CHINA - Windsor
Garden, Noritake. Four place-settings,
20-pieces in original box, never used.
$250 per box
(3 boxes available).
(650)342-5630

COFFEE TABLE – Woven bamboo with
glass top. $99. 650-573-6895

SOLID TEAK floor model 16 wine rack
with turntable $60. (650)592-7483

CHAIRS 2 Blue Good Condition $50
OBO (650)345-5644

CRAFTSMAN 9" Radial Arm Saw with 6"
dado set. No stand. $55 (650)341-6402

IKEA POANG chair, exc. $25. Will send
picture. (954)907-0100

LOVE SEAT, Upholstered pale yellow
floral $99. (650)574-4021

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-442c $60.
(650)421-5469

02/26/16

DRESSER 5 drawer , like new. light color with brown top. $75. (650)560-9008

FIRST ALERT CO600 Carbon Monoxide
Plug-In Alarm. Simple to use, New in
pkg. $18 (650) 952-3500

VINTAGE G.E. radio, model c-430-a
$60. (650)421-5469

02/26/16

CRAFTMAN RADIAL SAW, with cabinet
stand, $200 Cash Only, (650)851-1045

LIGHT OAK Cabinet, 6 ft tall, 3 ft wide, 2
ft deep, door at the bottom. $150.
(650) 871-5524.

SONY PROJECTION TV 48" with remote good condition $99 (650)345-1111

xwordeditor@aol.com

DRESSER 4 drawers like new height 36"
width 14” $75. will send picture.
(954)907-0100

COMPLETE COLOR photo developer –
Besler Enlarger, Color Head, trays, photo
tools $50/ 650-921-1996

JVC EVERIO Camcorder, new in box
user guide accessories. $75/best offer.
(650)520-7045

308 Tools
BOSTITCH 16 gage Finish nailer Model
SB 664FN $99 (650)359-9269

GLASS TOP dining table w/ 6 chairs
$75. (415)265-3395

46” MITSUBISHI Projector TV, great
condition. $400. (650)261-1541.

TABLECLOTH. 84” round hand crocheted and embroidered tablecloth with 12
napkins. $65. San Bruno. 650-794-0839.

DINING ROOM table – Good Condition
$90.00 or best offer ( 650)-780-0193

OLD VINTAGE Wooden “Sea Captains
Tool Chest” 35 x 16 x 16, $65
(650)591-3313

303 Electronics

TABLECLOTH, UNUSED in original box,
Royal Blue and white 47x47, great gift,
$10.00, (650) 578-9208.

ALUMINUM LADDERS 40ft, $99 for two,
Call (650)481-5296

FUTON COUCH into double bed, linens
D41"xW60"xH34" 415-509-8000 $99

PAIR OF beautiful candalabras . Marble
and brass. $90. (650)697-7862

PRE-LIT 7 ft Christmas tree. Three sections, easy to assemble. $50. 650 349
2963.

DINETTE TABLE with Chrome Legs: 36"
x58" (with one leaf 11 1/2") - $50.
(650)341-5347

OLD COFFEE grinder with glass jar.
$40. (650)596-0513

SONY DHG-HDD250 DVR and programable remote.
Record OTA. Clock set issues $99 650595-8855

By James Sajdak
©2016 Tribune Content Agency, LLC

COMPUTER SWIVEL CHAIR. Padded
Leather. $80. (650) 455-3409

LARGE STUFFED ANIMALS - $4 each
Great for Christmas & Kids (650) 9523500

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Publishing tasks
6 Jack letters
9 “Hotel Imperial”
(1927) star
14 Best New Artist
Grammy winner
after Alicia
15 Tesoro de la
Sierra Madre
16 Horse play
17 Kitchen drawer?
18 It can be cured
19 “Beats me”
20 Québec quiche,
e.g.?
23 Start of a weekly
cry
24 “Either thou, __
... must go with
him”: Romeo
25 Ran into
26 Saying “It wasn’t
me” when, in
fact, it was?
33 Digitize, in a way
35 Squawk
36 Greenwich
Village sch.
37 Set apart, as
funds
39 Layer
40 Eastwood’s
“Rawhide” role
42 Ref. book
43 Retail giant with
stores in 23 U.S.
states
45 Bit of power
46 “Wish we had
built a bigger
pyramid,” e.g.?
51 Feel poorly
52 Source of bills
53 Stretcher, to
Huck Finn
56 Greeting from a
faithful friend?
61 Sitar
accompaniment
62 Citrus cooler
63 Sarge’s superior
64 “Hamlet”
courtier
65 Fix
66 Supports
illegally
67 Mary’s upstairs
neighbor
68 Cooper creation
69 Performed, in the
Bible

COMPUTER DESK $25 , drawer for keyboard, 40" x 19.5" (619)417-0465

GULBRANSEN BABY GRAND PIANO Appraised @ $5450., want $1800 obo,
(650)343-4461
HAILUN PIANO for sale, brand new, excellent condition. $6,000. (650)308-5296
HAMMOND B-3 Organ and 122 Leslie
Speaker. Excellent condition. $8,500. private owner, (650)349-1172
MONARCH UPRIGHT player piano $99
(650) 583-4549
UPRIGHT PIANO. In tune. Fair condition. $300 OBO (650) 533-4886.
YAMAHA PIANO, Upright, Model M-305,
$750. Call (650)572-2337

312 Pets & Animals
AIRLINE CARRIER for cats, pur. from
Southwest Airlines, $25, 2 available. Call
(505-228-1480) local.
BAMBOO BIRD Cage - very intricate design - 21"x15"x16". $50 (650)341-6402
ONE KENNEL Cab ll one Pet Taxi animal carriers 26x16. Excellent cond. $60..
650-593-2066

28

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

312 Pets & Animals

317 Building Materials

318 Sports Equipment

PARROT CAGE, Steel, Large - approx
4 ft by 4 ft, Excellent condition $300 best
offer. (650)245-4084

32 PAVING/EDGING bricks, 12” x 5”x1”
Brown, smooth surface, good clean condition. $32. (650)588-1946 San Bruno

VINTAGE GOLF Set for $75 My Cell
650-537-1095. Will email pictures upon
request.

PET CARRIER, brown ,Very good condition, $15.00 medium zize leave txt or call
650 773-7201

CULTURED MARBLE 2 tone BR vanity
counter top. New toe skin/ scribe. 29” x
19” $300 (408)744-1041

WET SUIT - medium size, $95., call for
info (650)851-0878

315 Wanted to Buy

EXTERIOR BRASS lanterns 20" 2 NEW,
both $30. (650)574-4439

WE BUY

INTERIOR DOORS, 8, Free. Call 5737381.

Gold, Silver, Platinum
Always True & Honest values

SHUTTERS 2 wooden shutters 32x72
like new $50.00 ea.call 650 368-7891

Millbrae Jewelers
Est. 1957

WHITE DOUBLE pane window for $29
or Best offer. Call Halim @ (650) 6785133.

650-697-2685

318 Sports Equipment

400 Broadway - Millbrae

316 Clothes
BRAND NEW mans dress pants w/ tags
size 42X30, $19, 650-595-3933
BRAND NEW quarts S-shock sports
watch, in pack $19 650-595-3933
FAUX FUR Coat Woman's brown multi
color
in
excellent
condition
3/4
length $50 650-692-8012
LADIES BOOTS size 8 , 3 pairs different
styles , $20/ pair. call 650-592-2648
LEATHER JACKET, New Black Italian
style, size M Ladies $45 (650) 875-1708
MANS DRESS shirts 18.5X34/35, 100%
cotton, (3) $5 each 650-595-3933

ATOMIC SKI bag -- 215 cm. Lightly
used, great condition. $15. (650) 5730556.
DELUXE OVER the door chin up bar; excellent shape; $10; 650-591-9769 San
Carlos
G.I. ammo can, medium, good cond. $8.
Call (650) 591-4553, days only.
GOLF BALLS-15 dozen. All Brands: Titeslist, Taylor Made, Callaway. $5 per
dozen. (650)345-3840.
GOLF CLUBS, 2 sets of $30 & $60.
(415)265-3395
IN-GROUND BASKETBALL hoop, fiberglass backboard, adjustable height, $80
obo 650-364-1270

MANS TAN pants size 42X30, 100% cotton, exel, $9, 650-595-3933

LADIES MCGREGOR Golf Clubs
Right handed with covers and pull cart
$150 o.b.o. (650)344-3104

MANS TAN pants size 42X30, 100%
silk, perfect, $15, 650-595-3933

POWER PLUS Exercise Machine
(650)368-3037

MEN'S SKI boots size 10, $75.
(650)520-1338

SET OF Used Golf Clubs with Cart for
$50. (650)593-4490

MEN'S VINTAGE Pendleton,100% virgin
wool, red tartan plaid, large,like
new,$25,650-591-9769, San Carlos

SOCCER BALLS - $8.00 each (like new)
4 available. (650)341-5347

$99

WOMEN'S LADY Cougar gold iron set
set - $25. (650)348-6955
WOMEN'S NORDICA ski boots, size 8
1/2. $50 650-592-2047

335 Rugs
CARPET RUNNER, new, 30 inches,
bound on both sides, burgundy color, 30
lineal feet, $290. Call (650)579-0933.

345 Medical Equipment
ADULT DIAPERS, disposable, 10 bags,
20 diapers per bag, $10 each. (650)3420935
BATH CHAIR LIFT. Peterman battery
operated bath chair lift. Stainless steel
frame. Accepts up to 350lbs. Easily inserted I/O tub.$250 OBO.
(650) 739-6489.
BATH TRANSFER bench, back rest and
side arm, suction cups for the floor.
$75/obo. (650)757-0149
COMMODE TOILET Seat with arms &
bucket; never used; $30.00 cash only.
(650)755-8238
FOLDING
WHEELCHAIR
(650)867-6042

$70.

NOVA WALKER with storage box &
seat; never used; already assembled;
$70.00 cash only. (650)755-8238
QUICKIE WHEELCHAIR - Removable
arms for transferring standard size.
$350.00. (650) 345-3017

Garage Sales

GARAGE SALES
ESTATE SALES
Make money, make room!

List your upcoming garage
sale, moving sale, estate
sale, yard sale, rummage
sale, clearance sale, or
whatever sale you have...
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500 readers
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

AA SMOG

Complete Repair & Service
$29.75 plus certificate fee
(most cars)

869 California Drive .
Burlingame

(650) 340-0492

Call (650)344-5200

379 Open Houses

Just $42!
We’ll run it
‘til you sell it!

OPEN HOUSE
LISTINGS

Reach 76,500 drivers
from South SF to
Palo Alto

List your Open House
in the Daily Journal.
Reach over 76,500
potential home buyers &
renters a day,
from South San Francisco
to Palo Alto.
in your local newspaper.

470 Rooms

625 Classic Cars
FORD ‘63 thunderbird Hardtop, 390 engine, Leather Interior. Will consider
$5,400. /OBO (650)364-1374

630 Trucks & SUV’s
DODGE ‘01 DURANGO, V-8 SUV, 1
owner, dark blue, CLEAN! $5,000/obo.
Call (650)492-1298

640 Motorcycles/Scooters
Don’t lose money
on a trade-in or
consignment!
Sell your vehicle in the
Daily Journal’s
Auto Classifieds.

Call (650)344-5200

TREADMILL BY PRO-FORM. (Hardly
Used). 10% incline, 2.5 HP motor, 300lb
weight capacity. $329 (650)598-9804

620 Automobiles

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

CHEVY HHR ‘08 - Grey, spunky car
loaded, even seat warmers, $9,500.
(408)807-6529.
DODGE
‘99 Van, Good Condition,
$4,200 OBO (650)481-5296

BMW ‘03 F650 GS, $3899 OBO. Call
650-995-0003
DAINESE BOOTS Zipper & Velcro Closure, Cushioned Ankle, Excellent Condition Unisex EU40 $55 (650)357-7484
MOTORCYCLE SADDLEBAGS, with
mounting hardware and other parts $35.
Call (650)670-2888

670 Auto Service
MENLO ATHERTON
AUTO REPAIR
WE SMOG ALL CARS
1279 El Camino Real

Menlo Park

650 -273-5120

www.MenloAthertonAutoRepair

670 Auto Parts
BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL 42 All Season Like
New $100. (650)483-1222

FORD ‘98 Mustang. GT Convertible.
Summer fun car. Green, Tan, Leather interior, Excellent Condition. 128,000
Miles. $3700. (650) 440-4697.

BRIDGESTONE TURANZA RFT (Run
Flat) 205/55/16 EL42 used 70% left $80.
(650)483-1222

LEXUS ‘01 IS300, $4,900. 200K miles.
(650)342-6342

NEW CONTINENTAL Temporary tire
mounted on 5 lug rim Size T125/70/R1798M $100. (650)483-1222

625 Classic Cars

SHOP MANUALS for GM Suv's
Year 2002 all for $40 (650)948-0912

HIP HOUSING
Non-Profit Home Sharing Program
San Mateo County
(650)348-6660

1955 CHEVY BEL AIR 2 door, Standard
Transmission V8 Motor, non-op $14,800
obo. (650)952-4036.

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

620 Automobiles

86 CHEVY CORVETTE. Automatic.
93,000 miles. Sports Package.$6,800
obo. (650) 952-4036.

VINTAGE 1970’S Grecian made dress,
size 6-8, $35 (650)873-8167

VINTAGE ENGLISH ladies ice skates up to size 7-8, $40., (650)873-8167

CHEVY ‘10 HHR . 68K. EXCELLENT
CONDITION. $8888. (650)274-8284.

‘88 BMW 635 CSI Silver Coupe 2dr.
$5,000. 135,000 miles. (650)347-3418.

Wanted 62-75 Chevrolets
Novas, running or not
Parts collection etc.
So clean out that garage
Give me a call
Joe 650 342-2483

Appliance Repair

Cleaning

Concrete

Construction

Construction

Electricians

TOP NOTCH

ANGIE’S CLEANING &
POWERWASHING

AAA CONCRETE DESIGN

650.918.0354

Quality Workmanship,
Free Estimates

PARIS HILTON purse white & silver unused, about 12" long x 9" high $23. 650592-2648
VELVET DRAPE, 100% cotton, new
beautiful burgundy 82"X52" W/6"hems:
$45 (415)585-3622

In Home TV Repair
Services
All TV Brands

(707) 567-1545

TWO SETS of 10lb barbell weights @
$10 each set. (650)593-0893

Move in/out; Post Construction;
Commercial & Residential;
Carpet Cleaning; Powerwashing
www.MyErrandServicesCA.com

680 Autos Wanted

ALL ELECTRICAL
SERVICE

Stamps • Color • Driveways •
Patios • Masonry • Block walls
• Landscaping

650-322-9288

for all your electrical needs

(650)533-0187

ELECTRIC SERVICE GROUP

Lic# 947476

Gardening

Carpets

J.B GARDENING

Maintenance • New Lawns
Clean Ups • Sprinklers
Fences • Tree Trim
Concrete & Brick Work
Driveway Pavers
Retaining Walls

(650)400-5604
LAWN MAINTENANCE
Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

Call Robert
STERLING GARDENS
650-703-3831
Lic #751832

Construction

Decks & Fences

O’SULLIVAN
CONSTRUCTION

MARSH FENCE
& DECK CO.

• New Construction
• Remodeling
• Kitchen/Bathrooms
• Decks/Fences
(650)589-0372
Licensed and Insured
Lic. #589596

State License #377047
Licensed • Insured • Bonded
Fences - Gates - Decks
Stairs - Retaining Walls
10-year guarantee
Quality work w/reasonable prices
Call for free estimate
(650)571-1500

Flooring
SPECIALS
AS LOW AS $2.50/sf.

Mention this ad for
Free Delivery
See website for more info.

kaprizhardwoodfloors.com

650-560-8119

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

Housecleaning

Gutter Cleaning

PENINSULA
CLEANING

GUTTER

RESIDENTIAL AND COMMERICAL

BONDED
FREE ESTIMATES

1-800-344-7771

CLEANING

Handy Help
AAA HANDYMAN & MORE
Since 1985

CAPRIS REMODELING
Kitchen, Bathroom,
Additions, Water Heaters
Residential Plumbing
Electrical, Decks
Windows, Doors
Call (650) 771-1911
Free Estimates

Hardwood Floors

T&A
Hardwood
Floors

“WE BEAT ANY PRICE”

• Fences • Tree Trimming
• Decks • Concrete Work
• Kitchen and Bathroom
remodeling

(650)288-9225
(650)350-9968

Hauling

CONTRERAS HANDYMAN
SERVICES

Free Estimates

contrerashandy12@yahoo.com

AAA RATED!

SENIOR HANDYMAN

“Specializing in any size project”

• Painting • Electrical
• Carpentry • Dry Rot
40 Yrs. Experience

Retired Licensed Contractor

650-201-6854
THE VILLAGE
CONTRACTOR
Licensed General and
Painting Contractor

• Remodels • Carpentry
• Drywall • Tile • Painting

CHEAP
HAULING!

NATE LANDSCAPING

BELMONT PLUMBING

Light moving!
Haul Debris!
650-583-6700

* Tree Service * Fence
* Deck * Pavers
* Pruning & Removal
* New Lawn * Irrigation
* All Concrete * Ret. Wall
* Sprinkler System
* Stamp Concrete
* Yard Clean-Up,
Haul & Maintenance

Lic. #973081

•Installed •Refinished
•Pergo
•Laminate
“OLD FLOORS MADE
LIKE NEW”
FREE ESTIMATES
Call John Ngo
415-350-2788

License #080853

Plumbing

650.353.6554

ALL WORK GUARANTEED
Lic: #468963

Landscaping

Free Estimate

Repairs* Maintenance *Painting
Carpentry *Plumbing * Electrical

(650) 453-3002

Hauling

SEASONAL LAWN

MAINTENANCE

(650)348-7164, (650) 372-8361

(650)341-7482

Lic#979435

CHAINEY HAULING
Junk & Debris Clean Up

Furniture / Appliance / Disposal
Tree / Bush / Dirt / Concrete Demo

Starting at $40 & Up
www.chaineyhauling.com
Free Estimates
(650)207-6592

2030 S Delaware St
San Mateo

650-350-1960

Hillside Tree

Service

LOCALLY OWNED
Family Owned Since 2000
• Trimming

Pruning

• Shaping
• Large

Removal
Grinding

• Stump

Free
Estimates
Mention

The Daily Journal
to get 10% off
for new customers
Call Luis (650) 704-9635
Tile
CUBIAS TILE
LIC.# 955492 & GRANITE DESIGNING
Kitchen
Marble
Bathroom
Natural Stone
Floors
Porcelain
Fireplace
Custom
Entryway
Granite Work
Resealers
Fabrication &
Ceramic Tile
Installation
CALL(650)784-3079
cubiasmario609@yahoo.com

Windows

corderoapainting94401@aol.com
Lic # 35740 Insured

JON LA MOTTE

PAINTING

Roofing

(650)368-8861

REED
ROOFERS

Interior & Exterior
Quality Work, Reasonable
Rates, Free Estimates
Lic #514269

(650)701-6072

Toilets, Sinks, Vanities,
Faucets, Water heaters,
Whirlpools and more!
Wholesale Pricing &
Closeout Specials.

CORDERO PAINTING

$40 & UP
HAUL
A+ BBB Rating

MEYER
PLUMBING
SUPPLY

Tree Service

Painting
Commercial & Residential
Exterior & Interior
Free Estimates

Free Estimates

650-766-1244

Drought Tolerant Planting
Drip Systems, Rock Gardens
Pressure Washing,
and lots more!

INDEPENDENT
HAULERS

Since 1988/Licensed & Insured
Monthly Specials
Fast, Dependable Service

Complete Local Plumbing Svc
Water Heaters, Drain Clearing
Faucets, Sinks, Bathtubs
Showers, Toilets, Gas Repair
Bonded & Insured
Lic #836489 C-36

29

NICK MEJIA PAINTING

A+ Member BBB • Since 1975
Large & Small Jobs
Residential & Commercial
Classic Brushwork, Matching, Staining, Varnishing, Cabinet Finishing
Wall Effects, Murals, More!

Serving the entire Bay Area
Residential & Commercial
License #931457

Call for Free Estimate

(650) 591-8291

(415)971-8763
Lic. #479564

Notices
NOTICE TO READERS:
California law requires that contractors
taking jobs that total $500 or more (labor
or materials) be licensed by the Contractor’s State License Board. State law also
requires that contractors include their license number in their advertising. You
can check the status of your licensed
contractor at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800321-CSLB. Unlicensed contractors taking
jobs that total less than $500 must state
in their advertisements that they are not
licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

Tree Service
NECK OF THE WOODS
Tree Service
Certified Arborist
WC 1714
Eddie Farquharson
Owner-Operator-Climber
State Lic. 638340
650 366-9801

TheNeckOfTheWoods.com

30

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

Dental Services

Food

Health & Medical

COMPLETE IMPLANT
Dentistry Under One Roof

PANCHO VILLA
TAQUERIA

EYE EXAMINATIONS

Same day treatment
Evening & Saturday appts available
Peninsula Dental Implant Center
1201 St Francisco Way, San Carlos
650.232.7650

I - SMILE

Implant & Orthodontict Center
1702 Miramonte Ave. Suite B
Mountain View

Exceptional.
Reliable. Inovative
650-282-5555

MILLBRAE SMILE CENTER

Because Flavor Still Matters
365 B Street
San Mateo
www.sfpanchovillia.com

THE CAKERY

A touch of Europe

1308 Burlingame Ave
Burlingame
650 344-1006
www.burlingamecakery.com
Find us on Facebook

Valerie de Leon, DDS

Fitness

Implant, Cosmetic and
Family Dentistry
Spanish and Tagalog Spoken

LOSE WEIGHT

(650)697-9000

15 El Camino Real,
MILLBRAE, CA

In Just 10 Weeks !
with the ultimate body shaping course
contact us today.

(650) 490-4414
RUSSO DENTAL CARE
Dental Implants
Free Consultation& Panoramic
Digital Survey
1101 El Camino RL ,San Bruno

(650)583-2273

www.russodentalcare.com

CROWNE PLAZA
Foster City-San Mateo

Furniture

CALIFORNIA

STOOLS*BAR*DINETTES

(650)591-3900

Peninsula Showroom:
930 El Camino Real, San Carlos
Ask us about our
FREE DELIVERY

The Clubhouse Bistro
Wedding, Event &
Meeting Facilities

Health & Medical

(650) 295-6123

BACK, LEG PAIN OR
NUMBNESS?

1221 Chess Drive Foster City
Hwy 92 at Foster City Blvd. Exit

GET HAPPY!
Happy Hour 4-6• M-F
Steelhead Brewing Co.
333 California Dr.
Burlingame
(650)344-6050
www.steelheadbrewery.com

1159 Broadway
Burlingame
Dr. Andrew Soss
OD, FAAO
www.Dr-AndrewSoss.net

KAY'S HEALTH
& BEAUTY
Facials • Waxing • Fitness
Body Fat Reduction

381 El Camino Real
Millbrae

Real Estate Loans

Travel

LEGAL

REAL ESTATE
LOANS

FIGONE TRAVEL
GROUP

DOCUMENTS PLUS
Non-Attorney document
preparation: Divorce,
Pre-Nup, Adoption, Living Trust,
Conservatorship, Probate,
Notary Public. Response to
Lawsuits: Credit Card
Issues, Breach of Contract
Jeri Blatt, LDA #11
Registered & Bonded

Cosmetic Spa Cool Sculpting
Laser&Cosmetic Dermatology
1838 El Camino Rl#130
Burlingame. 650 542-7055
www.skintasticmedicalspa.com

DIRECT PRIVATE LENDER
ALL CREDIT ACCEPTED
Since 1979

(650)574-2087

WACHTER INVESTMENTS, INC.

"I am not an attorney. I can only
provide self help services at your
specific direction."

Real Estate Broker
CA BRE#746683
NMLS #348288

Marketing

Seniors

GROW

Sign up for the free newsletter

AFFORDABLE
24-hour Assisted Living Care
located in Burlingame
Mills Estate Villa
Burlingame Villa
Short Term Stays
Dementia & Alzheimers Care
Hospice Care
(650)692-0600
Lic.#4105088251/
415600633

Massage Therapy

Tax Preparation

legaldocumentsplus.com

(650)697-6868

SKIN TASTIC
MEDICAL LASER

REFINANCE HARD MONEY
AT LOWER RATE

YOUR SMALL BUSINESS
Get free help from
The Growth Coach
Go to
www.buildandbalance.com

(650) 595-7750

www.cruisemarketplace.com
Cruises • Land & Family vacations
Personalized & Experienced
Family Owned & Operated
Since 1939
1495 Laurel St. SAN CARLOS
CST#100209-10

650-348-7191

www. SanBrunoMartialArts.com

Tons of Furniture to match
your lifestyle

Food

579-7774

Legal Services

Non-Surgical
Spinal Decompression
Dr. Thomas Ferrigno D.C.
650-231-4754
177 Bovet Rd. #150 San Mateo
BayAreaBackPain.com

SLEEP APNEA
We can treat it
without CPAP!
Call for a free
sleep apnea screening

650-583-5880
Millbrae Dental

BEST ASIAN
BODY MASSAGE
$39.99/hr
Call (650) 787-9969
Free Parking Behind Building
Mon-Fri, 10am-9pm
Wknds-Holidays Call Ahead

1838 El Camino #103,
Burlingame

Insurance

Music

AFFORDABLE

LIFE INSURANCE

www.barrettinsuranceservices.net

Eric L. Barrett,

CLU, RHU, REBC, CLTC, LUTCF
President
Barrett Insurance Services
(650)513-5690
CA. Insurance License #0737226

Music Lessons
Sales • Repairs • Rentals

Bronstein Music

363 Grand Ave, So. San Francisco

(650)588-2502

bronsteinmusic.com

JIE'S
INCOME TAX
QUALITY &

FAST
TAX RETURNS
STARTING AT

$50

1710 S. Amphlett Blvd.# 350
San Mateo 94402

Office - 650.492.1273
Cell - 650.274.0968

DENTAL
IMPLANTS

MORE THAN JUST A TAX RETURN

Save $500 on
Implant Abutment &
Crown Package.

CALL FOR YOUR FREE MEETING
Visit: Belmonttax.com for details

Call Millbrae Dental
for details
650-583-5880

650.654.7775
JEFFREY ANTON
540 Ralston Ave. Belmont, Ca 94002

ADVERTISE
YOUR SERVICE
in the
HOME & GARDEN SECTION
Offer your services to 76,500 readers a day, from
Palo Alto to South San Francisco
and all points between!

formerly Hogan’s Cafe

Several February Specials
$8.95 ea

Monday - Friday
125 Terminal Court #44
inside Produce Market

South San Francisco, CA 94080
www.producealley.com
Monday - Friday 6 a.m. - 2 p.m.

650-583-2293

BAR OPEN @ 6:00 AM

Call (650)344-5200
ads@smdailyjournal.com

THE DAILY JOURNAL

MEMORIES
Continued from page 1
Ishida, 90, still find time to tap together
whenever they can. Tap dancing has bonded
the women and helped them form a new
friendship well into their golden years.
These days it’s less dancing though and
more talking.
They are also uniquely bonded in another
way.
Both their families were sent to internment camps after Japan bombed Pearl
Harbor in 1942.
Ishida was a city girl living in San
Francisco when her father was abruptly
arrested and taken away. The remainder of
the family was forced to close their soda
fountain and candy shop on Sutter Street,
pack up their belongings and head off to
Tanforan race track in San Bruno where they
would live in horse stalls. After that, the
family was shipped off to Topaz, Utah, and
Crystal City, Texas, where they would live
for years until the war ended.
Ferry, whose maiden name is Doi, was a
farm girl living in Santa Ana, California,
when her father was arrested and taken away
to an assembly center in Tajunga near the
Hollywood Bowl.
She was able to visit her father but could
only speak to him through a high barbedwire fence. It was one of the saddest memories in her life.

SOUTH CITY
Continued from page 1
or hotel, tax revenue was collected by the
city last year, which is about $1.8 million
more than the previous fiscal year.
The $12.9 million collected in hotel tax
revenue set a new high bar for the city’s collection, surpassing the existing record set
the previous fiscal year.
City Manager Mike Futrell celebrated the
city’s economic progress.
“We’re very optimistic about our economy and the growth in Silicon Valley as a
whole,” he said. “Over the last several
years, the city’s economic outlook has
improved, and that has allowed us to address
some of the needs in the city.”
In all, the city’s general fund grew by
$85.3 million in revenue, fed also in large
part through property and sales tax collection increases.
The city collected an additional $1.5 million in property taxes than the year prior,
pumping $23 million in to the general fund.
Sales tax was the second leading source of

LOCAL
“It was so depressing and shocking,”
Ferry said.
Her family was forced to relocate to the
Walerga Assembly Center near Sacramento
before ending up at the Tule Lake
Relocation Center in Northern California
where she would live for years. She didn’t
see her father for nearly 18 months until he
too was sent to Tule Lake.
Both women said the period is a dark one
in their lives and that they try not to think
about it.
But the memories are still vivid in their
minds more than 70 years later.
On Thursday, both visited the Tanforan
Assembly Center Memorial at the San
Bruno BART station behind the Tanforan
Shopping Center.
Neither knew it even existed.
They strolled through the exhibit and
Ishida recognized her neighborhood from
the photos where Japanese-Americans were
forced to sell everything they had and leave
the city they loved.
She also recognized a man in a photo who
was once her Sunday School teacher. The
memories can bring the women to tears if
they let them.
Ferry’s mother died only two days after
the war had ended and it was announced Tule
Lake would be closed.
It split the family apart, sending the girl
to live on her own with another family in
Oakland where she completed high school.
Ishida remembers the censored letters she
received from her father while he was at a
camp in North Dakota.
revenue in the last fiscal year, adding $15.2
million to the economic growth of the city.
The growth of the variety of tax revenue
sources allowed the city to keep full
reserves with $3.2 million in an unrestricted account, $11.6 million stashed away for
emergencies and an additional $2.3 for
budget contingencies.
Officials have allocated some of the additional money toward addressing capital
improvement projects such as parks, building maintenance and fixes to underground
infrastructure, said Futrell.
Futrell commended the propensity of officials for responsible budget management.
“While we are very optimistic and upbeat
about the economy, we recognize we have
some serious challenges to tackle and the
extra revenue will be put to good use,” he
said.
The report did not account for the city’s
new half-cent sales tax which was approved
by voters in the fall election, past the end of
the previous fiscal year.
The half-cent sales tax is expected to generate roughly $210 million in additional
revenue over 30 years, slated to be used for
a variety of capital improvement projects,

The letters had holes punched in them
from censors and Ishida said she didn’t
know what her father had written. But what
he did send in the letters were pressed wildflowers.
“I kept them for years,” Ishida said.
Ferry remembers someone sending her
mother a tin of cookies while they were at
Tanforan. It was a little treat that brought
joy daily to the family.
“It left my mother in tears,” she said.
Everything about most of the experience
was horrible for both.
There was no privacy and the food was
very bad. Food poisoning was so rampant
that a bowl of rice is all many would eat.
Ishida’s mother grew radishes and that
such as the potential construction of a new
civic center.
As the city’s fiscal health has improved in
recent years, so has the economic standing
of its residents, according to the report.
A demographics study shows the per capita personal annual income in South San
Francisco was $30,923 last year, which is
roughly $400 more than the year prior, as
residents have enjoyed incremental but
steady growth over the past decade.
Personal annual income has increased by
roughly $1,000 since 2000, according to
the report, and is up from $26,050 in 2004.
Income has bulged and unemployment has
shrunk, as only 4.5 percent of the city’s
estimated 65,749 residents were without
jobs last year. Joblessness has decreased
precipitously in recent years, down from
when more than 10 percent of South San
Francisco residents were without work in
consecutive fiscal years between 2009 and
2010.
Life sciences industry giant Genentech is
far and away the city’s top private employer, offering 8,451 jobs, accounting for 12.9
percent of the total city employment,
according to the report.

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

31

would be often all they would eat with their
rice.
“My mother could not recognize what the
food was,” Ferry said about dinners served
at the mess hall.
The rotten meat was often cooked with
curry. To this day, Ferry will not eat curry.
On Friday nights, internees at Tanforan
were served a special dinner of hot dogs,
potato salad and Fig Newtons.
“We ate it because we were hungry, ”
Ishida said.
Ishida will not eat Fig Newtons to this
day.
She never told her children about her
camp experience until a daughter had a class
assignment on the subject.
“My daughter was shocked and her
teacher wanted me to speak to the class but
I couldn’t do it,” Ishida said.
Her husband, who has died, was a soldier
in the famed 442nd infantry regiment, the
most decorated unit for its size and length
of service in the history of American warfare.
Ferry started jotting notes down in 1984
about her time in the camps and the impact
it had on her family.
The notes end so:
“My last word: Not one Japanese out of
120, 000 was ever found guilty of any
crime!”
It’s a dark period in American history but
both are happy of who they have become
and the friendship they have formed.
“You never want to go back but you do
have your memories,” Ishida said.
Genentech offered 1,000 more jobs at its
headquarters on Oyster Point last year than
it had in the 2005-06 fiscal year, when it
was the city’s second leading employer.
Layton Construction was the city’s second largest employer last year, offering 779
jobs, which was 1.2 percent of the city’s
total employment.
South San Francisco is considered the primary hub in the biotechnology industry,
and four companies — Genentech, Onyx
Pharmaceuticals,
Life
Technology
Corporation and Amgen — were among the
city’s top 10 employers, offering more than
10,000 jobs combined last year, which is
roughly 15 percent of the city’s total
employment, according to the report.
In all, about 25 percent of jobs in South
San Francisco are related to the life sciences
industry, said Futrell.
He added though the economy has
improved, officials are still cognizant of
the threat of a downturn.
“We are optimistic and it is great to see
the economy rocking and rolling,” he said.
“But we are looking for the next recession
and our extra revenue is being used to catch
up from the last recession.”

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32

THE DAILY JOURNAL

Friday • Feb. 26, 2016

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