StoryWeaver Wonder Why Week 
February 28th ­ March 6th, 2016 
 
Thank you for agreeing to conduct a reading session to celebrate StoryWeaver’s 
Wonder Why Week! 
 
PBChamps have been instrumental in helping children across the country discover 
the joy of books. The books we’re sharing during Wonder Why Week cover diverse 
topics in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics, and we are counting 
on your infectious enthusiasm to take these ideas to children and make them fun and 
exciting! 
 
Below is a curated collection of activities for you to choose from and conduct after 
your reading session. Remember to take photographs of the session and do share 
them with a small write up with us. If you have a great activity idea for one of these 
titles that you’d like to share with us, please do email us at 
storyweaver@prathambooks.org  
 
 
 

 
How do Aeroplanes Fly?  
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/4314­how­do­aeroplanes­fly 
 
Sarla wished she could fly high like an eagle or like an aeroplane. Of course you can 
fly, said her new teacher. Here, Sarla shares all that she has learnt about flight and 
aeroplanes. 
Activities 
 
WHICH PLANE CAN CARRY THE MOST CARGO  
(Source: ​
http://kidsactivitiesblog.com/77853/stem­paper­airplane­challenge​

 
Resources 
● Construction Paper 
● Cellotape 
● A handful of coins of different sizes and weight 
● A doorway 
● Whistle 
What to do 
● Ask each child to create a paper aeroplane using the YouTube tutorial shared 
here:  
https://youtu.be/qhuRw88A­8c 
● Once their plane is ready ask them to stick coins of different size and weigh to 
it using tape (this is why you need to use construction paper and not regular 
A4 paper) 
● Decide upon a start line and mark it with masking tape or even a long rope. 
Make sure it’s opposite a doorway! 
● Ask the children to line up together at the ‘starting line’. 
● When you blow the whistle they all launch their planes. 
● The plane that glides the farthest wins! 
 
********** 
STRAW ROCKETS 
(Source: ​
http://lifeasmama.com/10­rainy­day­activities­your­kids­will­love/6/​

 
Resources 
● Drinking straws 
● Paper 
● Glue or cellotape 
● Scissors  

● Crayons or markers.  
 
What to do 
● Cut down pieces of paper and decorate to your desire.  
● Then lightly fold around the end of a straw and tape the paper together (not to 
the straw) like a cap 
● Then just blow! Kids can see how far each can blow their rockets or come up 
with their own games. 
 
********** 
 
PAPER PLANE TARGET PRACTICE  
(Source: ​
http://lifeasmama.com/10­rainy­day­activities­your­kids­will­love/7/​

 
This is a variation of activity 1, but a little more tricky! 
 
Resources 
● Paper 
● Large sheet of thick board paper.  
● A doorway 
● Whistle 
● Scissors 
● Masking tape. 
What to do 
● Ask each child to create a paper aeroplane using the YouTube tutorial shared 
here: ​
https://youtu.be/qhuRw88A­8c 
● Cut out different sized holes on the board paper and hang it over an open 
door using masking tape 
● Ask children to line up at a pre­determined ‘starting point’ with their paper 
aeroplanes.  
● Blow the whistle. Kids must try and get their planes through the holes on the 
board sheet! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
How Far is Far? 
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/4445­how­far­is­far 
 
If you thought your friend's house on the other side of town was far away, you have 
clearly not read this book. Climb the Magic Math Ladder to get from where you are to 
the top of Mount Everest, to Kashmir, to the moon, the Sun, and ultimately, to the 
edge of the Universe, which is very, very, VERY far away indeed. Ready, steady, go! 
Activities 
 
USE YOUR BODY 
 
Resources 
● A Metre scale or strips of newspaper cut and taped together into meter long 
strips 
 
What to do 
● Find something long to measure. It could be a boundary wall, the length of 
garden pathway ­ anything you like! 
● First ask the children to lie down head to toe, one after the other along the 
length of the item and find out how many ‘children’ it takes to measure the 
wall. 
● Next, ask them to measure the same distance with their metre long strips of 
newspaper.  
● What’s the difference in the measurement? Talk about how it’s important to 
have a standardised unit of measurement!  
 
GUESSTIMATE! 
 
Resources 
● Globe 
● Google 
 
Ask the children to pick any two places on the globe and guesstimate how far apart 
they are. Then use Google to find the correct answer. 
The closest guestimates win a prize! 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
Dum Dum­a­Dum Biryani 
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/4772­dum­dum­a­dum­biryani 
Basha and Sainabi are in a panic. Ammi is ill, and Saira aunty has just announced 
that she is arriving for lunch ­ with 23 other people! Budding chef Basha thinks he 
can cook Ammi's Dum Biryani, but her recipe only makes enough for 4 people. Math 
wiz Sainabi jumps in to help, declaring that she knows how to turn a 4­person recipe 
to a 24­person recipe. Do the siblings succeed in serving up a truly Dum 
Dum­a­Dum biryani? 
Activities 
BALL TOSS! 
Material needed: A ball 
How to play 
● Have the children stand around in a circle. 
● Toss the ball to the next child, or any child if you want to make it mad. 
● Say a food ingredient while tossing the ball (keep this open across languages, 
for eg: haldi will do). 
● Every time the ball is tossed the child who catches it has to say the name of 
an ingredient.  
● First child to repeat or blank is out. 
Play till you get 3 winners. 
 
WEAVE A STORY 
 
Resources 
● Paper 
● Pens 
 
What to do 
● Put up a picture or a first sentence as a writing prompt.  
● Prompts: ​
My pet kangaroo was hungry and all I had in the fridge was a pod of 
garlic…. 
● More Prompts: ​
We, my sister and I, were making our first ‘all­by­ourselves’ 
cake for my mother’s birthday. What started out as a special day soon turned 
bizarre…to say the least…  

● And more:  ​
Remember the summer break when we managed to catch the 
‘milk stealing thief’ of our colony. 
● Divide the children into small groups and have them create the story from that 
prompt. 
● Each child takes a turn writing one sentence to add to the story and passes it 
on to the next. 
● Keep it going in the group until they have finished it (maybe helpful to have a 
length or a time limit so that the stories don’t go toooo out of control) 
● When all the groups have finished, ask a volunteer to come up and read the 
story out! 
 
THIS ISN’T A SPOON.... IT’S A... 
Materials needed: A bunch of kitchen utensils (10): ladle/spoon, pressure cooker 
whistle, lid of a pan, fork, wooden spatula, lemon squeezer 
What to do 
● Divide the group into clusters of 5 kids each 
● Hand over 2 utensils to each group. 
● Give the teams 15 minutes of preparation time to devise a play and use the 
utensils as creative props; use them for creative purposes other than their 
regular use. Is it a ladle or a microphone? 
● Other Teams and you act as judges and award points to each other.  
Team with the highest points wins! 
 
 

 

 
Let’s Go Seed Collecting 
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/4407­let­s­go­seed­collecting 
 
Join Tooka, Poi, and their best friend Inji the dog, as they go around collecting 
seeds. The adventure begins when the three friends meet Pacha the tamarind tree. 
Activities 
 
TREE 20 QUESTIONS 
 
Resources: 
● Blank visitings cards 
● Cellotape 
● Markers 
● Timer 
 
How to play 
● Write down the names of trees and plants on blank visiting cards. 
● Divide the group into batches of 4­5 children each.  
● A volunteer from the group will come up and choose a card without seeing 
what’s written on it.  
● Stick the card to the volunteer’s forehead without letting them see the name of 
the tree.  
● The volunteer returns to their group. Everyone else in the group can see the 
name of the tree.  
● The volunteer then begins to ask questions about their plant. The team can 
only answer yes or no. Egs Do I produce an oil? Am I fruit bearing? Do I grow 
in India?  
 
The volunteer has to guess which tree he is in 20 questions or in under 90 seconds. 
 
HOPPING CORN 
 
You’ve heard about pop corn what about hopping corn? This experiment makes corn 
hop up and down repeatedly in a container for over an hour.  It’s so much fun to 
watch! 
  
Resources 
 
• A clear glass container 





Popping corn 
2 1/2 – 3 cups of water 
2 Tbsp. of baking soda 
6 Tbsp. of white vinegar 
Food colouring (optional) 

 
What to do 
● Fill the glass container with water and add a couple drops of food 
colouring. 
● Add baking soda and stir well until it has completely dissolved. 
● Add a small handful of popping corn kernels. 
● Add the vinegar and watch the corn start to hop up and down! 
 
Talk about a terrific way to work on measurement concepts, listening skills, and 
practising patience too!  
 
The science behind it 
When the baking soda and vinegar combine, they react to form carbon dioxide 
(CO2) gas.  The gas forms bubbles in the water which circle around the corn kernels. 
The bubbles lift the kernels up to the surface and when they get there they pop and 
the kernels sink again. The “hopping” continues until the vinegar and baking soda 
have finished reacting.  
 
SEED SEARCH 
 
1. Printed Word Searches 
2. Timer 
3. Highlighter pens 
 
Divide the group into teams give them a pre printed word search or crosswords with 
a seed/plant theme. The first team to finish in under XX minutes gets a prize! 
 
Here are some links to ready made word searches 
 
1.h​
ttp://www.havefunteaching.com/worksheets/word­search­puzzles/plants­word­sea
rch­worksheet 
2.​
https://www.teachervision.com/tv/printables/seedsword.pdf 
3. http://www.education.com/worksheet/article/seeds­seedlings­word­search/ 
 
 
 
 

 
Bonda and Devi 
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/4782­bonda­and­devi 
 
Do best friends always have to be alike? Devi and Bonda are best friends, but Devi 
is a little girl, while Bonda is a… Well, he can lift heavy boxes, he can extend his 
arms and legs, he never forgets anything he’s told, he can be turned on and off. Can 
you guess what he is? 
Activities 
 
CREATIVE WRITING 
 
Resources 
● Paper 
● Pen 
● Colour pencils  
 
Imagine if you had a robot of your very own! What would you call it? What would it 
look like? What would you programme it to do? Draw a picture of your robot too 
 
Cereal Box Robot 
(Source: ​
http://kidsactivitiesblog.com/64846/recycled­crafts­cereal­box­robot​

 
Materials 
1. Old cereal boxes of different shapes and sizes 
2. Bottle caps 
3. Toilet paper rolls 
4. Aluminium foil, old newspaper  
5. Paint 
6. Glue 
7. Scissors 
8. Cello Tape 
9. Bowls 
10. Paintbrushes 
 
What to Do 
● Create small workstations by spreading newspaper on the ground 
● On each workstation leave a collection of supplies 
● Let the kids go crazy and create their own robots! 
 
 

MAKER SPACE IDEAS 
 
If you have slightly older children in your group, do check out these links on making 
simple robots that actually move! 
1. http://researchparent.com/homemade­wobblebot/​
 ­ my first robotics idea 
2. http://researchparent.com/homemade­wigglebot/ 
3. http://www.evilmadscientist.com/2007/bristlebot­a­tiny­directional­vibrobot/ 
 
 
 
 

 
Where Did Your Dimples Go 
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/4938­where­did­your­dimples­go 
 
Langlen has curly hair like Appa and a cleft chin like Imma. It makes her wonder why 
brothers and sisters, or parents and children look alike. Is she just a collection of 
traits, then? So many questions, but Imma and Appa have all the answers. 
Activities 
 
MAKE YOUR OWN FAMILY TREE 
(Source: ​
https://in.pinterest.com/pin/442267625880885092/​

Ask the children to bring photos of their family members ­ siblings, parents, 
grandparents… may be even their pet dog! 
 
Resources 
1. Printouts of family tree template 
(​
http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~archibald/Pedigree­tree.j
pg​

2. Glue stick 
3. Colour pencils 
 
What to do 
● Children can stick their family members in the family tree template and colour 
it in.  
● Afterward they can study each other’s tree and decide who they look like, or 
perhaps older children can discuss who they take after in their family. 
 
WHAT DO YOU THINK A….  
 
Resources 
● Paper 
● Pencils 
● Colour pencils/sketch pens 
 
What would happen if a monkey and a giraffe had a baby together? What traits 
would it inherit from both its parents? Draw the results ­ which we promise will be 
hysterical! 
 
 

Jadav and the Tree­Place 
https://storyweaver.org.in/stories/5052­jadav­and­the­tree­place 
 
 Jadav has the best job in the world: he  makes forests! How does he do it? Read this book to 
find out! 

 
Activities  
 
DIY JUNGLE TERRARIUM  
(Source: ​
http://hikebloglove.com/tag/terrarium/​

 
Materials Needed: 



Rocks 
Potting Soil 
Plants (mosses, ferns and african violets work well) 
Jar/container with lid (even a 2 L soda bottle will work) 

 
Procedure: 
● Fill the bottom of your container with a layer of small rocks or pebbles. 
● Add a layer of potting soil. Make sure to only fill the container up about 1/3 of the way 
full. 
● Add some plants. (Ferns, rocks and tiny plants) 
● Water your tiny forest and place the lid on. 
●  Set the terrarium in a place where it can receive bright but indirect sunlight. 

 
After a little bit of time has passed, you can see the water cycle has begun. 
Be  sure  to  open  the  lid  and  let  some  fresh  air  circulate   every  couple   of  weeks  to   prevent 
mold from growing. Don’t overwater it either. 
Click here​
 for image references/inspiration! 

 
TAKE A TREE WALK 

 
A  nature  walk  is  a  fantastic  way  to  get  children  in  touch  with  plants  and  animals.  You  don’t 
need  to  go  far  either.  Your  local  park  is home to numerous  insects, birds and small animals 
and will do just fine. 
(Source: 
http://www.ourmontessorihome.com/curriculumscope­sequence/botanyzoology/ideas­for­nat
ure­walk­with­kids/​

  
We  love  the  idea  of  a  Bingo  Nature  Walk!  Make  a  simple  bingo  card  with  3  rows  and  3 
columns.  In each square draw a little picture of something for the child to find, like a butterfly, 
flower,  leaf,  etc.  If  you  laminate  the  card,  the  child  can  circle  what  they  find  and  then  reuse 
the card for another walk. 

 
HOW OLD IS THAT TREE? 

(Source: ​
http://www.education.com/activity/article/How_Old_Are_They​

What You Need: 




Tree 
Measuring tape 
Marker 
Pen 
Paper 

 
What You Do: 
1. Find a tree that is at least as tall as a grown up and wrap the measuring tape around 
the widest part of the trunk.  
2. The distance around the trunk of a tree is called the circumference. Write this 
measurement down on a piece of paper. 
3. The measurement of the circumference in inches is also the approximate age of the 
tree in years! 
 
Did You Know? 
Every year a new layer of growth occurs just under the bark. Some trees like firs and 
redwoods may grow more than this in a year, while others like cedars may grow less. This 
method is a good rule of thumb to estimate the age of a tree. 

 
 

Related Interests