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A Footprint to Quality Assurance

PLAN, IMPLEMENT AND


REVIEW A QUALITY ASSURANCE
PROGRAM AHCWRK501A
Workforce Innovations Program Project 275

Materials produced by Regional Skills Training Pty Ltd


Funding provided by the DIISRTE Workforce Innovations Program

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

WEB
Activity

Fact

Website

CONTENTS
01

About yourself

03

02

Trouble with website links

03

03

How are these materials used

03

04

What are these learning materials about

04

05

Employability skills

05

06

Unit descriptor and how the unit applies to your workplace

05

07

Determine quality assurance objectives for the enterprise

05

08

Plan the quality assurance program and develop implementation strategies

18

09

Implement the quality assurance program

32

10

Review the quality assurance program

43

11

Summary of key innovations/opportunities as a result of adopting these skills

49

12

Bibliography and source material

50

13

Being confident about your skill levels

52

14

Assessment

53

COPYRIGHT NOTICE
Bridging the Gap between Chemical and Organic Food and Fibre Production.
These interactive workbooks were produced by Regional Skills Training and funded by Department of Industry,
Innovation, Science, Research and Tertiary Education, Workforce Innovations Program and are intended for free
use to any student, RTO or school. Note that any work is copyright and should not be reproduced or copied for
commercial gain.

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

ABOUT YOURSELF
Please fill in your details below and save this PDF to your files.

Name
Phone
Email

TROUBLE WITH
WEBSITE LINKS

Sometimes you may click on a web link and the


site will say it is not available. Please revisit the
site when you are next working on your resource
materials as web sites are sometimes off line for
maintenance reasons.
If you are consistently unable to access a site
you are free to answer any associated workbook
activity or assessment question by searching
for and finding an alternative site that you feel is
applicable. PLEASE INCLUDE THE LINK IN YOUR
ANSWERS so we know where to look to check
your information.

HOW ARE THESE


MATERIALS USED

The workbook has a strong focus on the selfdirected application of knowledge. Completing
this workbook and all formative assessments
will thoroughly prepare you for your summative
assessment. On successful completion of
appropriate summative assessments provided by
your Registered Training Organisation (RTO), you
will achieve competency in this unit.

Please complete the


feedback form at the back of
the unit and advise us of any
links that do not work

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

The workbook
has a particular
focus on the
opportunity for
quality assurance
in food and
fibre production
systems.

WHAT ARE THESE LEARNING MATERIALS ABOUT

This workbook describes the skills and knowledge required to plan, implement and review a quality assurance
program for an agricultural or horticultural enterprise. The workbook has a particular focus on the opportunity for
quality assurance in food and fibre production systems with an effort to reduce chemical usage and defines the
standard required to:




define product quality standards based on the needs of the customer


determine quality assurance objectives for the enterprise
develop and implement procedures for quality assurance
maintain required records to support quality assurance
review the quality assurance program

The workbook has a strong focus on the self-directed application of knowledge with substantial depth in the
areas of market projections and customer requirements, cost/benefit of quality assurance implementation,
system analysis, enterprise culture and values, leadership and administrative skills, human resource induction
and performance monitoring practices.

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

EMPLOYABILITY
SKILLS

The workbook provides an opportunity to develop


and apply employability skills that are learnt
throughout work and life, to your job.
The statements below list the typical employability
skills that would be applied in a situation related
to plan, implement and review a quality assurance
program for an agricultural or horticultural
enterprise.
In completing your daily work tasks, activities and
summative assessments related to this unit of
competence, you must be able to demonstrate that
you are applying the employability skills listed
below to this competency.





Communication skills
Identify and accurately report problems
Organisational skills
Teamwork skills
Technological skills
Use mathematical ideas and techniques

UNIT DESCRIPTOR
AND HOW THE
UNIT APPLIES TO YOUR
WORKPLACE

This unit of competency covers the process


of planning, implementing and reviewing a
quality assurance program for an agricultural or
horticultural enterprise.
Quality assurance may include:
regulation of the quality of raw materials,
assemblies, products and components
services related to production
management, production and inspection
processes

Quality assurance programs are likely to include


planned and systematic production processes that
provide confidence in the suitability of a product or
service for an intended purpose. The processes are
encouraged to have an increasing focus on reduced
or nil chemical use and increased food safety.
Market requirements may include:
trends and directions from regional, domestic
and overseas markets, chemical free
production, guaranteed food safety
Industry quality assurance programs may include:
programs developed by industry organisations
and marketing authorities, processors,
wholesalers/retailers and other stakeholders
a few examples include Cattlecare, Flockcare,
Freshcare, Graincare and Proven Perfect

DETERMINE
QUALITY
ASSURANCE OBJECTIVES
FOR THE ENTERPRISE
Future market requirements for quality assured
products are assessed
Australia has a reputation for supplying clean
and natural products with low chemical residues,
however the consumer is demanding increasingly
higher levels of assurance related to food safety
and quality. To maintain our current status,
strict standards and regulations are applied
and enforced along the supply chain. Excellent
research and development facilities, both public
and private, assist in the innovation process by
facilitating development of new and differentiated
products, as well as continual improvements to
packaging and production processes.
Take a few minutes to look at the Australian Trade
Commission Australian Government; Food and
Beverage Unique, diverse, clean and green web
pages. Click on the link below:
www.austrade.gov.au/Buy/Australian-IndustryCapability/Food-and-Beverage/default.aspx

WEB

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Australia is able to
produce a diverse
range of products
due to large climatic
differences across the
Australian continent

As you can see from the web link food and


beverage is a major industry sector for the Australian
economy, in terms of both its financial contribution
and employment. Food and beverage processing is
Australias largest manufacturing industry with sales
exceeding A$70 billion and accounting for around
18 per cent of manufacturing employment. Industry
players are diverse in size from multinationals
producing large volume fast-moving consumer goods
through to smaller players with flexibility to meet
demand for niche gourmet items.

These basic advantages immediately mean that


the range of opportunities and innovations that
could be introduced to a food production and/
or manufacturing system are significant. It is
important that any small business does not get lost
in the opportunities and so it is critical to complete
accurate research in the first instance to define
realistic, measurable and achievable objectives.

In addition Australia is able to produce a diverse


range of products due to large climatic differences
across the Australian continent, from the tropical
north to the temperate south. Australia also has
a counter seasonal advantage when supplying
international markets in the northern hemisphere.

Throughout this unit you will complete a variety


of activities. Each of the activities will ensure
you thoroughly research all aspects of a quality
assurance program for your business or part of
your business. Activities are divided into a logical
sequence and will include tasks that will:

Also, right across the supply chain, the Australian


food and beverage industry has adopted innovative
manufacturing, packaging, product development
and marketing efforts with the opportunity for further
innovation being increasingly supported by research
and development as well as consumer preference.

determine quality assurance objectives for the


enterprise or business
plan the quality assurance program and
develop implementation strategies
implement the quality assurance program
review the quality assurance program

Activities

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 1

Determine quality assurance objectives for the enterprise or business.


Start your initial research and select appropriate quality assurance measures for your production systems,
business or industry sector. Remember that in any one business it is quite probable that a variation of QA
programs will occur to ensure measures are specific and appropriate to an enterprise or product. Summarise
your findings by completing the table below. Remember to look at the bibliography and source material at the
end of this workbook to get you started in your research. It is also important to include your sources so we can
check your information. It is intended that you will complete all categories in this table as you progress through
this section. However for this activity complete the non-shaded sections only.

What is your business


Enterprise
or production
system

Objectives
required from the
QA program for
this enterprise

Intended market
as a result of the
QA program for
this enterprise

Risks in
adopting the
program for this
enterprise

Opportunities
in adopting
the program for
this enterprise

Your web links


and information
sources

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

You have now identified the enterprises in your


business that you think will benefit from a quality
assurance program. You have also determined
the specific objectives that you want from a quality
assurance program.
Now you need to thoroughly research the market
potential, risks and opportunities as a result of
implementing the quality assurance program.
TRAPS The internet has enabled us to source a
vast range of facts, figures and information to help
you make choices. The important thing is.dont
get bogged down in information overload.be very
ruthless in considering only the information and
facts that are appropriate to your business and your
enterprise. It is also critical that you search equally
for the risks and negative aspects of any proposed
program. Ignoring the bad data and concentrating
only on the good is a very real problem when people
are excited about a new opportunity.
The extracts below are taken directly from the
identified source. They are not included as
recommendations or as suggestions related to
risks and opportunities. They are simply provided
to help your thinking process and get you started
researching in appropriate areas according to your
particular business or enterprises.
Extracts of opportunities

DAFF Australian Food


Statistics 2007 published
in May 2008
Consumer demands and trends are increasingly for
more convenient, healthier, fresher, less processed
foods, with minimal storage time. By developing
new food processing, separation and packaging
technologies and innovations, Australia is staying at
the forefront of the food industry worldwide.
Australia is a reliable supplier of high quality raw
materials with a trusted food safety regime through
Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ).
This reliable and safe food supply encourages
creativity, innovation and collaboration, and
Australia is an ideal location for investment all
along the chain. International companies recognise
this, which is why most of the worlds leading food

companies, including Nestle, Unilever, Associated


British Foods, DSM, Danisco, Parmalat, Mars,
McCains, Simplot, and Hakubaku have a presence
in Australia, many of them for decades.
Australias excellent environmentally sustainable
safety credentials, as well as its disease-free status,
are also backed by a strong regulatory framework,
and innovations in traceability, quality assurance
and supply chains. These attributes are considered
by international analysts to be important factors in
the industrys future export success.
Companies providing value-added products in food
processing are supported by Australias strong,
export focused, agricultural industry, particularly in
areas such as:
The dairy industry (e.g. innovative companies
focusing on extraction and purification of
proteins, peptides and colostrum from milk).
Wine (a sector that has demonstrated both
strong leadership with its 2020 Strategy and an
ability to take up innovative technology).
The brewing industry (which also has a strong
focus on innovation).
The sugar industry, through the Cooperative
Research Centre for Sugar Innovation through
biotechnology (developing new wellness food
products including healthy fibres from bagasse).
The meat industry through work supported by
Meat and Livestock Australia.

The Centre for Food


and Health Studies,
2006, The Key Emerging
Functional Food Trends
and Technologies in
the International Market
Julian Mellentin,
The Centre for Food and
Health Studies, 2006

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Since 2000, the Australian


organic industry has more
than doubled in value

Functional foods are any foods that provide


inherent health benefits as well as those fortified with
concentrated ingredients, modified in a way that aims
to promote health and wellbeing, grown chemicalfree, improve performance or reduce the risk of
disease. The market for intrinsically healthy foods
has experienced remarkable growth and consumer
interest in recent years. Companies are increasingly
focusing on everyday foodstuffs, particularly whole
fruit and fruit juices, which carry the naturally healthy
message. Berries (high antioxidant content), oats,
whole grains, almonds, peanuts (all heart health),
herbs/spices and orange juice (reduces risk of stroke)
are examples of foods that have been successfully
marketed for their intrinsic healthfulness.
Australians are becoming increasingly health
conscious and interested in functional foods as a
way of managing health concerns such as weight
and high cholesterol. Australia has an ageing
population, which is contributing to the rising
interest in functional foods.
With Australias profile of food production, processing
and export, the opportunities for sourcing healthy
foods, nutritional components and functional food
development are extensive. Primary products such as
grains, dairy, fruit, vegetables, meat and fish all have
the potential to capitalise on their intrinsic nutritional
value in the functional food market and this in
addition to their known value as core foods.
The global wholefoods/organic industry is the
fastest growing food category, with demand
outstripping supply in most developed economies.
This presents significant export opportunities
for Australia. Organics is practiced in over 120
countries of which Australia has the largest area
of certified organic land with over 12.3 million
hectares available.

Since 2000, the Australian organic industry has


more than doubled in value, recording over A$400
million in retail sales in 2006. From 2002 to 2006 the
number of certified organic processors increased by
19 per cent; currently there are over 2,500 organic
operators representing all levels of the supply chain.
The most important sectors are beef and horticulture
which experienced significant growth in 2006 (25
per cent and 30 per cent respectively).
Risks must be considered as well as
opportunities
Strong competition to Australian produce in
international markets is expected to grow further,
particularly from other southern hemisphere
nations. The strong Australian dollar continues
to hamper the competitiveness of products in
world markets, and at the same time supports
the competitiveness of imported products in the
Australian market.
Climate variability is predicted to have a significant
impact on southern Australia. Implications for the
food industries include changes in frost frequency
and severity which may result in lower yields and
reduced quality.
The risk of crop failures due to more variable/
volatile growing conditions is also predicted
to increase, affecting the industrys ability to
meet increasingly specific and targeted quality
assurance/market requirements.
The industry may also be affected by policies to
mitigate climate change, which are likely to result in
higher energy, input and transport costs.

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 2
Determine quality assurance objectives for the enterprise or business.
You have already completed 2 sections on this table. After looking at the data extracts on the previous page, the
bibliography and source material at the end of this workbook as well as completing your own research, you are required
to complete the final 3 columns related to intended markets, risks and opportunities. Please make sure you also update
the web links and sources of information. Transfer the information from activity 1 so the table below is complete.
Enterprise or
production
system

Objectives
required From the
QA program for
this enterprise

Intended market
as a result of the
QA program for
this enterprise

Risks in
adopting the
program for this
enterprise

Opportunities
in adopting the
program for this
enterprise

Your web links


and information
sources

10

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Farmers and food


producers are facing new
demands of their food
and fibre products.

Premiums for quality assurance / organic


products are determined
It is a fact of business management that the cost of
production needs to be completely recovered, plus
a profit margin added for a business to thrive and
grow. The cost of production is definitely impacted
upon by the production systems or methods
used. As the agricultural industries have needed
to become more competitive in world markets,
costs of production have been continuously and
carefully analysed to find production efficiencies.
Production costs need to be as low as possible
without impacting on the ability to produce high
quality and high yields. In assessing production
inputs it is often the cost of labour, machinery, fuel
and management systems that combine to create
the greatest costs. Ways to reduce input costs has
been one of the biggest reasons for the increasing
use of chemicals and the reluctance to implement
quality assured systems.
However, farmers and food producers are now
facing new demands of their food and fibre
products. The consumer is increasingly insistent on
knowing that the products they are eating, using
or wearing are sustainable, clean, green, not
harming the environment, people or animals in the
production process.
This is creating a new management focus in that
the consumer preferences are likely to be adding
additional costs to the production system, but are
often not likely to be attracting an equal rise in the
price paid to the producer for the product.

The dilemma for the farmer is accurately


calculating the best options to minimise input costs
while still achieving financially sustainable yields.
The following statements are extracts provided to
help you consider issues and think about ideas as
you consider the premiums that would need to be
achieved for products that are quality assured and/
or organic.

Environment and
Natural Resources Service
Sustainable Development
Department; Organic
Agriculture, Environment
and Food Security; FAO; 2002
WEBwww.fao.org/docrep/005/y4137e/y4137e01.htm
Most consumers in developed countries will pay
a premium for organic, but only to a point. As the
premium increases, the number of consumers
willing to pay it decreases, because the
conventional commodity is always available as a
substitute.
Because fewer chemicals, fungicides and postharvest tools are available, fresh organic produce
tends to be more seasonal and local.

11

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Long-term high premiums often reflect severe


production problems related to chronic endemic
pests and diseases that cannot be managed
effectively by existing biological and cultural
techniques. On the other hand, situations where
organic production costs are as low as, or lower
than, conventional production will frequently see
little or no organic price premium received by
farmers.
Premiums must compensate farmers for skilled
resource management; higher labour costs, unit
costs, and handling expenses; and administrative,
inspection, and certification fees.

So it is easy to see why quality assured products


are likely to be more expensive in the retail market.
Production methods are often more labour-intensive.
If the quality assurance system requires organic
or biological production then the yields are often
below those of comparable conventional products.
Additionally, quality assured products normally
require dedicated processing, storage,
handling and distribution chains, which can
increase costs.
However it is an important issue to determine if the
premiums in the retail sector are also translated to
premiums in the production sector.

Many reasons contribute to the additional


costs to market organic and/or quality assured
products such as inspection and certification fees,
segregated storage, fewer options to control postharvest pests and diseases etc.
To date, consumers in industrialised countries
have been willing to pay a premium for organic
food because they perceive environmental, health,
or other benefits from that choice. However while
surveys show that consumer demand is unmet,
organic farmers also report insufficient demand for
their products. Clearly there is an anomaly in this
statement that must be carefully investigated to
ensure appropriate decisions are made.

12

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 3
In Activity 1 and 2 above you have already documented:



The objectives you expect to achieve from a QA system


The intended market opportunities as a result of implementing a QA system
The risks in adopting a system
The opportunities identified in adopting a QA system.

You are now required to research and carefully list all of the areas where your cost of production will increase,
where yields may be impacted and where a premium price must be achieved to warrant introduction of a system.
Product

List where you consider cost of


production will increase

List impact on yields if a


system is implemented

What is the
estimated % price
increase required to
justify introduction
of a QA system?

13

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Strategic benefits of a quality assurance


program are assessed
Any quality assurance program must have
demonstrated benefits for the producer as well
as clearly defined expectations and standards
that can be followed to enable documented and
auditable work procedures. Individual businesses
are able to determine the key principles that are
essential to their standards. However it is very
easy to become bogged down in the process
of developing procedures for a QA program. As
such, a standard or certification process already
developed by industry and recognised/accepted
by the consumer is likely to be more appropriate.
Often these industry standards will incorporate the
International Organisation for Standardisation, ISO
9000 Quality Management in part or entirely.

Principle 2: Leadership
Leaders establish unity of purpose and direction
of the organisation. They should create and
maintain the internal environment in which people
can become fully involved in achieving the
organisations objectives.
Key benefits:
People will understand and be motivated
towards the organisations goals and objectives.
Activities are evaluated, aligned and
implemented in a unified way.
Miscommunication between levels of an
organisation will be minimised.
Principle 3: Involvement of people

A summary of the ISO 9000 Quality Management


standard is provided below:

People at all levels are the essence of an


organisation and their full involvement enables their
abilities to be used for the organisations benefit.

www.iso.org/iso/iso_catalogue/management_

Key benefits:

WEBand_leadership_standards/quality_management/
qmp/qmp-1.htm
Principle 1: Customer focus
Organisations depend on their customers
and therefore should understand current and
future customer needs, should meet customer
requirements and strive to exceed customer
expectations.
Key benefits:
Increased revenue and market share
obtained through flexible and fast responses
to market opportunities.
Increased effectiveness in the use of the
organisations resources to enhance
customer satisfaction.
Improved customer loyalty leading to
repeat business.

Motivated, committed and involved people


within the organisation.
Innovation and creativity in furthering the
organisations objectives.
People being accountable for their own
performance.
People eager to participate in and contribute to
continual improvement.
Principle 4: Process approach
A desired result is achieved more efficiently
when activities and related resources are
managed as a process.
Key benefits:
Lower costs and shorter cycle times through
effective use of resources.
Improved, consistent and predictable results.
Focused and prioritised improvement
opportunities.

14

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Effective decisions are


based on the analysis of
data and information.

Principle 5: System approach to management


Identifying, understanding and managing
interrelated processes as a system, contributes to
the organisations effectiveness and efficiency in
achieving its objectives.
Key benefits:
Integration and alignment of the processes that
will best achieve the desired results.
Ability to focus effort on the key processes.
Providing confidence to interested parties as to
the consistency, effectiveness and efficiency of
the organisation.

Principle 7: Factual approach


to decision making
Effective decisions are based on the analysis of
data and information.
Key benefits:
Informed decisions.
An increased ability to demonstrate the
effectiveness of past decisions through
reference to factual records.
Increased ability to review, challenge and
change opinions and decisions.

Principle 6: Continual improvement

Principle 8: Mutually beneficial


supplier relationships

Continual improvement of the organisations overall


performance should be a permanent objective of
the organisation.

An organisation and its suppliers are interdependent,


and a mutually beneficial relationship enhances the
ability of both to create value.

Key benefits:

Key benefits:

Performance advantage through improved


organisational capabilities.
Alignment of improvement activities at all levels
to an organisations strategic intent.
Flexibility to react quickly to opportunities.

Increased ability to create value for both parties.


Flexibility and speed of joint responses
to changing market or customer needs
and expectations.
Optimisation of costs and resources.

15

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

As previously stated a quality assurance system does not necessarily incorporate the full ISO standard. However,
for any system to be endorsed and for it to create a marketable difference, the system must be transparent,
documented and measurable.
The following extracts, web links and videos from 4 different sectors of primary industries are also useful to study
as you increase your knowledge related to QA systems and their potential benefits for your production system.
Industry

Topic

Link

Dairy

Overview of Australian Dairy


Industry, QA and Food Safety.

www.youtube.com/
watch?v=AkBXIRp3SjE

Meat and Livestock Australia

LPA On Farm Quality


Assurance Manual incorporating
Cattlecare and Flockcare

www.mla.com.au/Meat-safety-andtraceability/On-farm-assurance/
AgriSure

Pig Industry

APIQ; Fact Sheet


On Farm Quality Assurance,
Information For Pig Producers

www.APIQ.com.au

Australian Pesticides
and Veterinary Medicines
Authority (APVMA)

How to Comply with The Law

www.apvma.gov.au/compliance/
how_to_comply.php

WEB

All of the systems listed above discuss similar benefits if a quality assurance system is implemented. However
every producer must make their own judgements related to perceived or actual benefits. Benefits that are
consistently discussed are:
Improved product consistency.
Improved risk management.
Greater professionalism e.g. better record keeping, better staff training, clearly defined areas of responsibility
and awareness of the customer requirements for product quality.
International recognition and market access.
Product differentiation producers are able to sell a branded product identified by logos e.g. Cattlecare and/
or Flockcare. This may result in marketing opportunities as the industry moves towards a multitude of product
brands, encompassing a wide variety of quality attributes from paddock to plate. It may also assist the
development of strategic alliances between producers, processors and consumers.
Industry best practice a QA program verifies a producers compliance with market and regulatory
requirements and industry standards.

16

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 4
List the strategic benefits that you believe will be achieved if a quality assurance program is implemented in your
business. Specifically identify:
The product/s
The QA system
The benefits

17

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

PLAN THE QUALITY


ASSURANCE
PROGRAM AND DEVELOP
IMPLEMENTATION
STRATEGIES
Product quality standards are defined
It is not possible to plan a quality assurance
program or develop implementation strategies
unless product quality standards are defined. A
quality assurance program is all about measuring
produce quality and workplace outcomes to meet a
defined standard.
The following information is provided to help you
determine what quality standards are applicable to
your production system and produce. The links will
also help you to get started in using web searches
for information applicable to your specific business
needs. The information is not an exhaustive list nor
is it a recommendation of any system or standards.
It is merely a list of suggested information sources
that should help you further refine your thinking
and expectations in these often confusing and
complicated areas.
Remember that this workbook is designed to
help you and your business. You will achieve the
maximum benefit if you tackle the activities as a job
that is important and useful to your business rather
than just an assessment activity to be completed
as quickly as possible. All of the activities from now
on SHOULD be considered as serious research
applicable to the decision, Is a QA system
beneficial to my business or not?

Department of Primary
Industries Victoria
What is Organic Farming?
www.dpi.vic.gov.au/agriculture/farmingmanagement/organic-farming/introductionto-organics/organic-farming-standards-andcertification

WEB

Organic standards specify the minimum


requirements for production, processing and
labelling of food and fibre products that are to be
marketed as organic or biodynamic. They outline
the practices and specify material inputs that are
either allowed or prohibited from use on certified
organic farms. Standards are available to the
public, allowing consumers and others to easily
determine what is meant by the terms organic and
biodynamic in the marketplace.

In 2009, after considerable public and industry


consultation, Standards Australia published the
Australian Standard: Organic and Biodynamic
Products. This new standard can be used to
define, and protect the integrity of, organic produce
in Australias domestic markets.
Organic standards and the principles they embody
can be applied globally, but the details of how
those principles are put into practice are largely
site specific. It is up to each farmer to translate the
principles and standards into practical on-ground
management approaches that suit their farm
with its particular crop, soil, water, climatic and
environmental characteristics.

M.F. Piccone and C.J.


Bunt; Designing Effective
Quality Systems for
Horticultural Businesses
and Organisations; ACIAR
Proceedings 100 (printed
version published in 2000)

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AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

An effective quality system in any part of the


horticultural supply chain should be designed
to meet the needs and requirements of the
customer(s), and must also make a valuable
contribution to the business or organisation
developing and implementing it.
A large number of Australian growers perceive
quality systems as basically prescriptive i.e. you must
do it this way programs where the primary objective
is producing a top quality product aimed at high
value markets. Product defects are defined and an
inspect and reject, quality control style regime is
implemented. These perceptions have developed
because many of the industry-based quality
assurance programs and training initiatives that have
evolved in Australian horticulture in the last 10 years,
have been designed with their primary focus on
product standards and product maintenance, e.g.
grading of product to meet product specifications
and prevention of spoilage, especially postharvest.
However, a more positive, commercial approach
to quality management from the perspective of
suppliers revolves around quality systems being
used by growers, pack-houses, transporters,
wholesalers etc. as an internal business
improvement tool, as well as a means of satisfying
customer and regulatory requirements.
Well rounded quality systems are seen as having
two main purposes:
The first is to provide a systematic, objective
way of finding out what customers really want
in terms of the goods and services, created
and supplied, ensuring this information is both
complete and up-to-date.
The second purpose follows on from the first in
that an effective quality system ensures that the
organisation(s) or marketing chain as a whole
can deliver exactly what is expected, as costeffectively and efficiently as possible.

Meat and Livestock


Australia; LPA On Farm
Quality Assurance Manual;

WEBwww.mla.com.au/Meat-safety-and-traceability/Onfarm-assurance/AgriSure

The On-Farm Quality Assurance Standards are


maintained by the LPA Standards and Accreditation
Committee (LPASAC).
Individual producers cannot change requirements
within the LPA QA Standards, however they are able
to request changes via LPASAC. When changes to
the Standards are introduced, accredited producers
are advised of changes. They have a responsibility to
update the existing Standards with the new version
and implement changes.
The requirements for the LPA QA program, including
each element, are detailed within the LPA QA
Standards. Each element has a specified outcome
which must be met in order to demonstrate that the
requirements of the program are being met.
In addition to a stated outcome, each element has one
or more performance indicators which represent the
actual Standard to which a producer seeking to gain
or maintain accreditation is assessed, to determine
whether the designated outcome is being achieved.

APIQ; Fact Sheet


On Farm Quality Assurance,
Information For Pig Producers
www.APIQ.com.au

WEB

19

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

On-farm QA programs provide a set of standards for producers to meet in order to gain certification of the
integrity of their on-farm production system. In most cases, on-farm QA programs involve the implementation of a
management system and a food safety plan.
Being QA certified allows a producer to demonstrate compliance to a set of prescribed standards.
The Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service (AQIS) requires all pork exporters to verify that the pork and
pork offal they wish to export, meets domestic and importing country food safety requirements.
AQIS accepts that importing country requirements are met if the pigs from which the pork/offal was derived
were accompanied by a PigPass National Vendor Declaration (PigPass NVD) and were sourced from a farm
with a currently approved QA program, such as APIQ. Similarly, some state food authorities also require that
pigs must be accompanied by a valid PigPass NVD which means they were sourced from a farm with a current
approved QA program, such as APIQ.

Activity 5
In the previous activity you were required to list the strategic benefits that you believe would be achieved if a
quality assurance program was implemented in your business. You were required to specifically identify:
The product/s
The QA system
The benefits
You are now required to select a specific QA system and standards for your business. Whilst the system you
select now may not be your final choice you need to become more specific to enable your research to become
more focussed and applicable to your business.
List the products that will be grown/processed/marketed under your selected QA system.

What QA standards are the most appropriate to your needs and why?

20

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

What are the benefits of implementing this QA system?

What are the risks of implementing this system?

List your research/information sources that have been used in making your decision.

21

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

There are
a number of
publications
that are useful
in your research

Current status of products and operations is audited


In order to select an appropriate QA system as well as efficiently plan the implementation of the system, you need
to have a very clear picture of the current status of products and operations.
In other words, how can you determine new work procedures and standards if you are not able to honestly
appraise how you are currently operating?
There are a number of publications that are useful in your research, which will clarify the level of detail required at
this stage to achieve an honest appraisal of your current system, as well as allowing for an accurate starting point
for implementing a new system.

Rural Industries Research and Development Corporation,


Should I Convert to Organic Farming Aug 2005; pp 26-30.
Section 4 outlines the process of auditing current operations
in preparation for organic certification.
www.rirdc.infoservices.com.au/items/05-084

Meat and Livestock Australia; LPA On Farm Quality


Assurance Manual;
www.mla.com.au/Meat-safety-and-traceability/On-farm-assurance/AgriSure

WEB

22

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 6
Complete the following table making an honest appraisal of your current operating systems

Enterprise type

Products

Current records held to substantiate/audit/record


the production system

23

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Industry quality assurance programs are


evaluated and costed
If you have completed Activity 6 thoroughly, you
could be feeling that changing your practices and
implementing a QA system is too daunting. Now
that you have a good idea as to current business
practices, you should continue your research into QA
programs that may be applicable to your business.
Look at as many sources as you can applicable
to your produce. With each system you research,
evaluate the benefits and costs of implementing the
system to your business.
The following sources are provided to help start
your research as it becomes more specific to your
business. The information is not an exhaustive list nor
is it a recommendation of any system or standards. It
is merely a list of suggested information sources that
should help you further refine your thinking.

Department of
Agriculture and Food West
Australian Government;
Farming for the Future,
Industry Best Practice and
Guidelines; Resource
Management Technical
Report; December 2008.
WE
B

www.agric.wa.gov.au/objtwr/
imported_assets/content/sust/
f4findustrypracticebaselinejune09final.pdf

This document provides a comprehensive review of


quality assurance programs for the following industries:



Grains
Horticultural
Pastoral
Diary

Department of
Agriculture and Food
(DAFWA)
At the beginning of the Farming for the Future
project, the national horticultural industry had
begun to develop the Enviroveg self-assessment
tool and Horticulture for Tomorrow guidelines
for environmental assurance, using Australian
Government NHT Pathways to Industry funding.
The Department of Agriculture and Food (DAFWA)
(including the Farming for the Future project)
participated in the consultation and development
of these resources and had begun to build its
knowledge of assurance programs through the
process.

NSW Farmers
Association; Growing
the Best Submission
to National Food Plan;
Sep 2011; pp45-46.

WE
B

http://www.daff.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_
file/0019/2152432/nsw-farmers-association.pdf

While many consumers have a general


understanding of what the term organic
represents, there is scope for improved recognition
of produce grown under an integrated pest
management (IPM) system, particularly by retailers.
One of the reasons farming businesses have
adopted an IPM system is to address consumer
demands for a reduction in chemical use.
Australasian Biological Control Inc. has an IPM
accreditation scheme and logo.

Sheep
Beef
Poultry
Pig

24

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Changes that are being implemented by Australian


industries to their systems, in order to meet
consumer demand, will often negatively affect the
profitability of the enterprise. While consumers
are making demands, they are not always willing
to pay for these changes. Consumer perceptions
are not always reflected in consumer behaviour.
There are concerns amongst primary producers
that these changes are not recognised and
they are competing against products imported
from countries which have not been required to
implement similar changes. This is a market failure,
with consumers not understanding that imported
products may be produced under standards that
they do not believe are acceptable.
Another major burden to horticultural industries is
that there are a number of individual food-safety
and quality programs, with retailers each having
their preferred and accepted programs. For
example all growers, packers and wholesalers
supplying Woolworths directly, must have
Woolworths Quality Assurance. The on-farm
assurance program for the Australian fresh produce
industry, Freshcare, is not accepted for direct
supply to Woolworths. However, it is accepted by
Coles (with an additional Coles Supplier Checklist).
As a result, farming businesses supplying more
than one retailer often have to be certified to
more than one system, each requiring their own
audit. Implementing one system, as well as its
management, review and auditing, is not at an
insignificant cost. To implement two systems may
be too costly as well as creating real difficulties in
maintaining procedures and keeping records for
both systems. In these cases the end market has
created a competition barrier for their suppliers as
it is often just too hard for a grower to comply. In
NSW farmers seek to have each food safety and
quality system that is Hazard Analysis and Critical
Control Point (HACCP) based recognised by all
retailers, so that farming businesses do not have to
implement more than one system. Clearly this is a
sensible approach but may not be easily attained.
Some examples of quality assurance programs
relevant to Australias food and fibre production
industries are provided below. This is not a
comprehensive list but is certainly enough to
ensure you are satisfactorily researching systems
that may be applicable to your products.

ISO (9000, 14000, 22000)


HACCP
Codex
FlockCare
CattleCare
GrainCare
FreshCare
Better FarmIQ
Australian Pork Industry QA Program
Australian Quarantine and Inspection Service
Aus-Meat
TruckCare
Australian Government Authorised Halal
Free Range Farmers Association Code of Practice
National Saleyards Quality Assurance
Meat Standards Australia Food Safety Program
Meat Standards Australia Livestock
Production Assurance
Meat Standards Australia AgriSure
Safe Quality Food Program
In addition to the QA system, ensuring compliance with
food regulations and acceptable workplace practices,
selected as appropriate to your business and products,
it is likely that your management systems need to take
into account contingency plans for potential crises such
as product recall especially related to food safety.
Food Safety Programs that may be appropriate to meet
regulatory requirements, retailer requirements or your
own requirements may include:











HACCP (Hazard Analysis of Critical Control Points)


FSSC 22000
ISO 22000 Food Safety Management Program
BRC
SQF
GFSI Global Food Safety Initiative
Retailer programs like Coles, Woolworths and ALDI
Southern Rock Lobster Seafood
2nd Party Audits against your own Standards
National Heart Foundation Australia
Supply Chain Verification
Certified Organic

Look at the website for SAIGlobal who are able to


audit and verify all of the Food Safety Management
programs listed above. The site will give you a
very good tutorial related to food safety, meeting
standards, product recall and regulatory requirements
for the food producer and processor. It is certainly
a daunting topic, but one that cannot be ignored in
todays ever increasing market of consumer demand
for food that is able to be verified as safe.

WEBhttp://www.saiglobal.com/assurance/food-safety/

25

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 7
The information and links provided on the previous page should have taken you quite a while to look through.
Remember that the better your research is now the better informed you are to make a decision and the better the
outcome is likely to be.
In completing your research to make final selection of a QA system for your business you should be able to
answer the following questions. As a precaution that you have completed your research correctly complete the
activity below.
List the products that will be grown/processed/marketed under your selected QA system.
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

If you will be supplying a particular processor or market, do they have a preferred certifier?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

How much has the whole certification process cost for farmers like you?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

26

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Which certifiers are other farmers happy with?


Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed


Which certifiers are well recognised in local and/or export markets?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

Which certifiers provide a timely and cost-effective service?


Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed


Which certifiers use farm auditors who have a good understanding of your type of enterprise?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

27

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Which certifiers support farmers in other ways such as assisting with technical queries?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

What certification gives you access into the markets you need?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

What are the fees and charges for initial certification including inspection and residue tests?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

What is the annual fee/inspection cost for maintaining certification?


Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

28

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Is support and information on markets and marketing of produce with this certification provided?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed

Does the certifier have staff readily available to answer questions about certification issues?
Your answer

Caution/concerns/more research needed


Required processes and practices are documented in the quality assurance program manual and an
implementation plan is prepared
Activity 5 asked you to select a specific QA system for your business. Activity 6 and 7 should have further refined
your thinking as we challenge the research information and make sure the selected system is appropriate. We
are now assuming that you have selected your appropriate system. The remainder of this workbook is about
preparation for and implementation of the system.
It is critical at this stage that you are properly prepared to implement your chosen system and this means having
a detailed implementation plan. As a minimum starting point your implementation plan should:
ensure you have accurate records of your current position
have accessed all of the standards applicable to your QA system
have accessed all of the legislation applicable to your QA system

29

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 8
Complete the activity with specific reference to documenting your QA implementation plan.
List each process/
practice that must
be completed
to achieve
implementation

Who is responsible What is the cost


for completing
associated with
the task?
the task?

What legislation
or compliance
requirements must
be considered?

How is the practice


measured to
ensure correct
implementation?

30

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

List each process/


practice that must
be completed
to achieve
implementation

Who is responsible What is the cost


for completing
associated with
the task?
the task?

What legislation
or compliance
requirements must
be considered?

How is the practice


measured to
ensure correct
implementation?

31

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

IMPLEMENT
THE QUALITY
ASSURANCE PROGRAM
Instructions are documented defining
task and process requirements
Standard Operating Procedures
Every quality assurance program consists of rules
that are defined by Standard Operating Procedures
(SOP). Creating a Standard Operating Procedures
Manual from scratch can be quite daunting as most
owner/operators start with the information in their
heads. Each farm will have its own way of doing
things, partly because of the infrastructure and
partly because of the management.
Many QA programs will provide you with SOPs but no
existing system will fit all circumstances. The skill is to
refine the SOPs that you are provided with to specifically
suit your production system and business whilst still
achieving compliance for the whole QA program.
Dairy Australia has created a very useful tool
to support the development of a simple set of
operating procedures to help farmers get started. It
is useful to look at this tool as well as using search
engines to find other SOP templates. Remember
that there are 2 key criteria that must be met in
developing your SOP manual:
Each SOP must be applicable to your business
and in a format that will allow ease of use and
documentation.
The whole manual must allow for you to meet
the certification and audit requirements of the
QA system.

Look at the following tool


from Diary Australia 2012
W
EB

www.thepeopleindairy.org.au/farm-policiessystems/farm-standard-operating-procedures.htm
The (SOPs) are descriptions of the way particular
tasks should be carried out on the farm. There
is no set way that each process must be carried
out across the industry, but the Generator tool
allows you to create a simple document with a set
of generic operating procedures including safety
procedures to use as a starting point. From here
you would be expected to refine the SOPs to
ensure they meet your own business requirements
as well as still allowing for compliance in the whole
QA system. SOPs can be generated for:





milk harvesting
animal husbandry
feed management and delivery
pasture production and cropping
plant equipment and infrastructure maintenance
administration

Once the tool has been downloaded and installed


onto your computer you can use it as often as you like.
The documents you can create with the Generator are:
position descriptions for the people working on
your farm
standard operating procedures for a particular
person, task or the entire farm
safety procedures for a particular person, task
or the entire farm
safety protocols related to safety procedures

32

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

APIQ Model Code Compliance Plan


The following example of a piggery standard operating procedure was emailed directly to
Regional Skills Training Pty Ltd from APIQ.
Date

Version No

Approved By
Purpose: To ensure that the piggery facilities and environment are suitable to maintain the welfare of pigs,
and protect them from biological, physical or chemical hazards.
Also relates to APIQ Standards 1.1, 1.2, 1.3, 2.2, 3.1, 3.2, 3.3, 3.4
Action and Person Responsible

Owner

Manager

Record(s)

Staff

Other (specify)

Facilities design and contingency planning


Appropriate facilities and structures are provided and maintained to
protect and shelter pigs from weather extremes, pests and predators.

Piggery Plan

Pig accommodation is designed to provide at least the minimum space


requirements outlined in the Appendix III of the Model Code of Practice
for the Welfare of Animals Pigs (3rd Edition, 2007) and to protect pigs
from injuries as much as practically possible.

Model Code Compliance Plan (SOP17)

Contingency arrangements are in place in case of power failures or failures


of automated temperature and ventilation control equipment including:
outline arrangements in place, for example, a standby generator.

Daily Checklists/Diary

For deep bedding systems: Adequate supplies of fresh bedding are


provided and a procedure is in place to ensure bedding does not
contain unacceptable levels of chemical residues.

Vendor Declarations (SOP16)

For pigs kept outdoors: Pigs are not able to access areas which contain,
or are likely to contain, contaminated soil that may cause chemical
contamination in pigs or pork.

Soil test results (SOP15)

33

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Cleaning and maintenance


Facilities are cleaned as necessary, including laneways, after pig
movements or feed spillages.

Daily Checklists/Diary

Pens and feeders are cleaned between batches of pigs, ensuring that
manure build-up is minimised.

Daily Checklists/Diary

Pens are allowed to dry before pigs are moved in.


Facilities, plant and equipment are checked and maintained, as necessary.

Piggery Maintenance Record/Diary

The pig environment is kept free from protrusions and foreign objects by: Daily Checklists
checking there are no cracks, holes or problems in flooring,
roofing, feeders, fences, drinkers and other facilities that may
cause injury to pigs or people
maintaining fences in outdoor systems
checking that all mechanical equipment essential to pig husbandry
and welfare requirements is in good working order
ensuring that all materials, plant and equipment used for
maintenance is removed prior to pigs accessing the area.
Maintenance and clean-up is recorded in a Maintenance Record.

Piggery Maintenance Record/Diary

In fully automated sheds, temperature is monitored daily, maintaining


ambient temperatures for different classes of pigs, as per the
Model Code Appendix IV, Table 9 recommendations, and adjusting
temperatures if required.

Daily Checklists/Diary

Feeder space and drinker heights are adjusted for the size of pigs.

Daily Checklists

Malfunctioning water nipples are repaired or replaced, as required, and


drinker flow rates are maintained as per the Model Code Appendix II,
Table 4 recommendations.

Piggery Maintenance
Record/Diary

Sufficient ventilation is maintained at all times in pig sheds so that there is no,
or only a slight, smell of ammonia and no, or only a slight, visible dust haze.
If ventilation is unsatisfactory, one or more of the following actions is taken:

sheds are cleaned out at more regular intervals

effluent channels are flushed

laneways are cleaned out.

Checklists

Mating areas are kept dry and non-slip.

Checklists

Fire and electrical safety


All buildings have fire prevention measures in place, in accordance with
the requirements of the local controlling authority.

Fire safety advisor recommendations

Approved fire-fighting equipment is available to service all pig housing,


except the large straw-based shelters that have gates at both ends
doubling as emergency fire exits for pigs.
Staff are trained in the correct use of fire safety equipment and fire
emergency procedures.

Staff Training/Competency Register

Electrical installations at mains voltage are not accessible to pigs and


are properly earthed. All such fittings are checked by staff in routine
facility inspections and an electrician called in if any signs of obvious
damage or malfunction are found.

Piggery Maintenance Record/Diary

Annual electrical safety inspections are carried out by a registered


electrician (or other suitably qualified person).

Piggery Maintenance Record/ Diary/


Electrical inspection report

34

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 9
You are required to complete the following
activity related to Standard Operating
Procedures for your business.
Write 4 complete SOPs that are applicable to your
business and will be used in your QA system.
You can use templates that you have downloaded
or those that have been provided by your QA
program but they must be contextualised to your
business systems. Attach each completed SOP
to this interactive document and submit to your
lecturer.
Contractor and staff training is established and
implemented
It is not possible to successfully implement a
quality assurance system that involves significant
procedural changes in the workplace without
providing training to staff. In some cases the
training may be legislated e.g. related to chemical
accreditation or licensing for machinery operation.
In other cases the training will be specifically
related to the required changes in the workplace to
ensure accreditation is met.
Successful training will involve the strategic use
of techniques, tools, activities and actions to
engender change in target groups e.g. staff. The
capacity of the business managers to achieve
practice change is determined by the knowledge
and confidence gained by staff in the training
process.
The following examples are provided of specific
training provided by different programs. The
examples provided are not recommended training
nor are they the only options. Looking at these web
sites will help clarify your research and thus ensure
you find training specific to your business needs,
staff needs and quality assurance objectives.

WEBwww.mla.com.au/Research-and-development/

Extension-and-training/More-Beef-from-Pastures
MLAs More Beef from Pastures (MBfP) program
was developed in 2004 as a delivery framework for
outputs from research and development activities in
southern beef production systems. In its first phase
(2004-09), MBfP focused on industry awareness
and engagement around the programs suite of
tools and activities.

More Beef from Pastures


MBfP phase 1 successfully engaged over 21,000
southern beef producers and achieved an
overall benefit: cost ratio of 4.4:1. MBfP phase 2
commenced in late 2010 and is building upon the
achievements of phase 1 by encouraging adoption
and practice change, especially among those
producers primed in phase 1.
The producers manual
The More Beef from Pastures: The producers manual,
remains central to the MBfP program. The producers
manual is an information package designed to deliver
the essential principles and practices for a successful
beef business. The manual draws on the latest
research and development as well as the knowledge,
skills and experience of producer advocates who
helped write the eight modules.
These modules provide tools and information
to enable southern beef producers to increase
productivity and profit while minimising risk:
Module 1 Setting directions Helps
producers set clear business objectives and
the strategic direction of the beef enterprise.
Module 2 Tactical stock control Provides
information and tools to help producers
manage stock numbers and tactically increase
or decrease numbers to match animal feed
demand to available feed supply.
Module 3 Pasture growth Helps producers
develop expertise in soil, pasture and grazing
management to boost productivity and profitability.
Module 4 Pasture utilisation Details methods
to increase stocking rates and adopt a plant
growth-based approach to grazing management.
Module 5 Genetics Provides information to
help producers lift productivity and profitability
through ongoing genetic improvement.
Module 6 Weaner throughput Outlines
practices to determine how and when to wean
calves early in order to maximise production
and profitability.
Module 7 Herd health and welfare Outlines
procedures required to manage a healthy,
productive and profitable cattle herd.
Module 8 Meeting market specifications Helps
producers to increase financial returns by better
meeting target market specifications, exploiting
market opportunities and managing the risks.

35

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

WEB

www.dpi.vic.gov.au/agriculture/animals-and-livestock/pigs/australian-pig-industry-quality-assurance-program
Staff at the Pig Health and Research Unit at DPI can assist pig producers to understand and implement the
Australian Pork Industry Quality Program (APIQ) on their farms.
Individual producers who are thinking about starting APIQ on their farms, or who are making the transition from
PigPass QA to APIQ can get assistance on getting started or information on how to update APIQ.
APIQ workshops are held at the DPI offices with small groups of producers on an as-needs basis. These allow
producers the opportunity to discuss any issues with APIQ implementation.
APIQ Example of a model compliance plan
Plan to manage pig accommodation for
1. Description of current situation
This piggery has 200 gestation stalls. 160 of the stalls measure 0.6 m width x 2.0 m length; 30 stalls are
0.6 m x 1.9 m, whereas the other 10 are 0.55 m x 1.95 m.
Sows are housed in these stalls for eight weeks of gestation.
All other pig housing meets the requirements outlined in the Model Code of Practice for the Welfare of
Animals Pigs (3rd Edition, 2007).
2. Management system
Sows are placed in stalls according to their size. For example, smaller sows and gilts are placed in the smaller stalls,
as per the sow fit outcome based requirements in Standard 4.1.3 in the Model Code. If the size of a stall does not
allow a sow to stand normally, lie with her limbs extended and to stretch, she is moved to another larger stall.
Sows are maintained in an adequate body condition, for example, a body condition score of around 3
[scale 15]. The water provided is fresh, cool and palatable.
All other conditions are managed to provide maximum comfort possible in accordance with the Model Code,
including maintaining an ambient temperature between 15C and 30C, as target temperatures. Water drippers
are activated for cooling if temperatures exceed 30C.
The gestation shed is maintained to prevent draughts, and blinds and shutters are in place to protect pigs from
cold winds during winter.
Mechanical ventilation ensures a constant supply of fresh air.
3. Plan to meet Model Code requirements
In 2015, it is planned to build a new sow gestation shed housing 120 sows in groups of five. Once that shed is
completed, 115 stalls will be removed from the existing gestation shed, including all the smaller stalls. Group
pens will then be fitted into the existing shed and sow numbers will be increased over time to fill them. From
2016 onwards, sows may spend, between weaning and five days post mating, in a mating stall to ensure they
are confirmed pregnant and their body condition is adequate to move into loose housing.

Owners signature:

Date:

Printed name:

36

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 10
Many industry sectors as well as specific quality assurance programs offer training applicable to a
farmers needs.
In previous activities you have selected quality assurance procedures that are applicable and useful to your
business. Complete the table below identifying the training needs for your workplace to implement and maintain
your QA outcomes.
Who is the
person needing
training?

What training
do they need?

What role will they


participate in when they
have completed training?

What QA program or
legislation does the
training apply to?

37

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Communication takes account of social, cultural


and ethnic backgrounds
In addition to the training needs to implement a
new system, another major block is caused by
inappropriate or inadequate communication.
It is generally not acceptable, nor successful
to implement change simply by saying this is
happeningit starts tomorrow
There are a number of factors that will impact on
the success of the strategy used to implement a
QA system and a large % relate in some way to
communication.
This unit is not intended to discuss communication
in detail, however the following extract has been
provided to encourage participants to think about
the communication barriers that are likely to exist in
their workplace.

Coggins E; 8 Factors
That Impact Cross-Cultural
Communication in the
Workplace and Beyond.
W
EB

www.ecoggins.hubpages.com/hub/Factors-thatImpact-Cross-Cultural-Communication

The Cultural Identity Factor Cultural identity


is the first factor that impacts cross-cultural
communication. Culture is the values, attitudes,
and ways of doing things a person learns during
the socialisation process in the particular place
where they were brought up as a child. The
cultural identity factor impacts cross-cultural
communication because the norms and practices a
person acquires and practices in their country and
local community, will be different from and clash
with the norms and practices of co-workers brought
up in different countries or societies.

The Ethnic Identity Factor The ethnic identity


factor is the third factor that impacts cross-cultural
communication. The ethnic identity factor highlights
the role ethnicity plays in how two co-workers from
different cultures interact with one another.
The Gender Role Identity Factor Another
factor that impacts intercultural communication
is the gender role identity factor. This means that
communication between members of different
cultures is affected by how different societies view
the roles of men and women.
The Individual Identity Factor The individual
identity factor is the fifth factor that impacts crosscultural communication. This means that how
a person communicates with others from other
cultures depends on their own unique personality
traits and how they esteem themselves.
The Social Class Identity Factor A sixth factor
which influences intercultural communication is the
social identity factor. The social identity factor refers
to the level of society that a person was born into or
references when determining who they want to be
and how they will act accordingly.
The Age Identity Factor The age identity factor
is a seventh factor that impacts cross-cultural
communication. The age identity factor refers to
how members of different age groups interact with
one another. In old terms this might be thought
of in terms of the generation gap. Such attitudes
towards age cause the age identity factor to impact
intercultural communication at the workplace.
The Roles Identity Factor The eighth factor
that affects intercultural communication is the
roles identity factor. The roles identity factor refers
to the different roles a person plays in his or her
life including their roles as a husband or wife,
father, mother or child, employer or employee and
so forth. How two members of a workforce from
two different cultures view these various roles
influences how they will interact with their fellow
colleague or counter-part.

The Racial Identity Factor The second factor to


impact intercultural communication is the racial
identity factor. The racial identity factor refers to
how ones conscious membership in a particular
race affects how they interact with folks in the
workplace who come from different cultures.

38

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 11
List the communication issues that will affect the introduction of procedural change in your workplace. Consider
what practical and applicable options are available to minimise communication issues.

Changes to processes and practices are introduced including monitoring and recording systems
As has been discussed, there are a number of actions that must be implemented to achieve sustainable and
productive changes to processes and practices.
In each section of this unit to date, you have completed activities that have been building your knowledge and
gradually accumulating a structured plan of implementation. At this point you should have a clear understanding of:
the quality assurance objectives for the enterprise
the appropriate QA program
implementation strategies including a concise and appropriate training program
You are now at the stage of actually achieving implementation. To achieve successful implementation of a quality
assurance program means that you must be able to monitor and measure the requirements of the program to
ensure you are achieving the objectives.
What is monitoring? Monitoring is the regular gathering and analysis of information needed for your day-to-day
management, to ensure a system is being implemented and expected outcomes and objectives are being
achieved. Without good record keeping and monitoring, it is difficult for a business to accurately determine that
system requirements are being met. This is especially important when there are multiple participants/staff.
Every QA program or certification system will have different monitoring requirements with many systems
providing management tools to assist with record keeping and compliance requirements. The following systems
are provided as examples only.
www.dairyaustralia.com.au/Industry-overview/Food-safety-and-regulation/RegulatoryFramework/Farm-regulation.aspx

WEB

39

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

One of the most sophisticated regulatory systems


applies to the dairy industry with all Australian
dairy farms required to have documented food
safety programs (FSP). State Dairy Food Authorities
(SDFAs) approve the FSP before a dairy farm
licence is granted. Approved auditors conduct
regular audits of the farm FSP.
Core elements of the FSP include:
Control of contaminants physical, chemical
and microbiological
Dairy milking premises
Hygienic milking
Water supply and quality
Cleaning and sanitising
Traceability and records
Personnel competency

AQIS Australian
Government; HAZARD
ANALYSIS CRITICAL
CONTROL POINT (HACCP)
A Guideline to Compliance
with the Export Control
(Fish and Fish Products);
2005 p13.
WEBhttp://www.daff.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_
file/0019/126181/haccp_ffp.pdf

Department of Primary
Industries Victoria;
Victorian Produce
Monitoring Program
2007/08
WEBhttp://www.dpi.vic.gov.au/agriculture/aboutagriculture/publications-resources/produce-

The Department of Primary Industries (DPI) is


committed to maintaining a high standard of
agricultural chemical use in Victoria. Chemical residue
monitoring is one way that DPI can assess and
improve good agricultural practice with chemicals.

Department of
Primary Industries NSW;
Manufactured Stock Food
Requirements.
www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/agriculture/livestock/

WEB nutrition/safety/manufactured-stock-foodrequirements

The Stock Foods Act 1940 and the Stock Foods


Regulation 2005 must be complied with by anyone
who:
Manufactures or supplies any manufactured animal
food material for use as a stock food or any food
which is represented as being suitable for use as
stock food. These requirements apply to all stock
foods, both at wholesale and retail level.

Department of Primary
Industries NSW; On Farm
Storage of Organic Grain
http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_
WEB file/0017/353321/On-farm-storage-of-organicgrain.pdf

Describes how to achieve on farm grain storage


in ways that comply with the National Standard for
Organic and Biodynamic Produce.
Many producers of organic grain make use of onfarm facilities for the storage of grain. Successful
storage requires protecting grain from insect
or animal pests, preventing contamination by
moulds or physical contaminants, and maintaining
the viability of the grain and its nutritional and
manufacturing properties.

monitoring-report

40

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Many producers of
organic grain make
use of on-farm
facilities for the
storage of grain.

Proper storage allows growers to:


store seed for sowing future crops
store stock feed for drought proofing or future
on-farm use
dry or store grain to suit market demands or to
achieve higher market prices
add further value or processing
manage cash flow/tax planning

OGA Certified Organic;


Organic Management Plan.
www.organicgrowers.org.
au/certification.php
Audit of process against industry standards.
www.organicgrowers.org.au/downloads/3.%20
OGA%20OMP%20Apr%2008.pdf

WEB

Animal Health Australia:


Organisation of the
Animal Health System
Chapter 1; p17
WEBhttp://www.animalhealthaustralia.com.au/wpcontent/uploads/2011/01/Organisation-of-the-

Department of Primary Industries NSW; EBeef


NLIS Equipment. http://www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/
agriculture/livestock/nlis/cattle/ebeef

WEB

Ebeef has evolved as cattle producers now


understand how they have to fulfill their legal
obligations with the National Livestock Identification
System (NLIS). It is a tool enabling producers to
gain economic and management benefits from
the system, and involves the use of electronic
equipment such as NLIS readers, scales and
software packages, allowing cattle producers to
capture and record data on individual animals.
Such systems enhance a producers ability to make
more accurate and informed decisions about their
business operations, meaning they are better able
to meet market needs. The National Livestock
Identification System (NLIS) is designed to protect
and grow Australias reputation as a producer of
quality beef by providing lifetime traceability for
every animal. At the same time, NLIS also gives
livestock producers other advantages. NLIS can
be used by producers seeking to collect on-farm
performance and management data, to boost
productivity and efficiency in their enterprise.
What are the benefits of using NLIS as an on-farm
management tool?
Easy recording in the yard or paddock.
Improves accuracy and saves on double
handling information.
You can make decisions based on accurate data.

animal-health-system.pdf

41

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 12
For the QA system you have selected for your business complete the following table.
What is the QA system you have selected to implement?

List the changes that have been


implemented in your production
system to incorporate the QA program

For each change describe the process


that has been introduced to monitor and
record the change

42

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

10

REVIEW THE
QUALITY ASSURANCE
PROGRAM
Establish and conduct verification procedures
So what does a QA system mean by verification.
Simply put, verification means; How do I know that
my HACCP Plan is working?
Verification procedures and checking schedules
should be considered during the development and
implementation of a HACCP system.
In determining how often you should conduct
regular internal audits there are a number of issues
to consider. The major ones are:
How frequently do I have to verify compliance
with my QA Program?
How much product am I prepared to
compromise? The less frequent the verification,
the more products that may be compromised.
A verification schedule should indicate which
records you will be reviewing, how frequently, and
what action will be taken if records are incomplete
or incorrect.
Verification activities should include regular review
of records relating to the QA system to ensure that:
monitoring is being conducted
critical limits and procedural requirements
are being met
documentation meets QA requirements e.g.
Have we documented what we are doing
correctly and is the information still current?
procedures are being conducted as
documented e.g. Are we doing what we say we
are doing?
corrective actions are being implemented
where deficiencies are identified?

Some examples of internal auditing and verification


processes are provided below. The examples are
not exhaustive and may not apply to your type of
business or program. However they should be able
to help better define your objectives and narrow
down research to find a system suitable for your
business. Typically, internal auditing and corrective
action processes will contain statements such as:
An internal audit (for food safety) shall be
carried out by the operator on the certified
operation/s. This shall occur no later than 6
months following an audit, and therefore at least
once per year.
Corrective actions shall be taken and recorded
by the operator where there is non-compliance
with the current version. This may include
instances arising from an internal audit,
a customer complaint or random market
sampling.
Identified non-compliant (e.g. food safety risk)
product shall have a documented process in
place to ensure this is segregated and relevant
buyers notified.
Customer quality specifications for all products
supplied to the operator or required by the
operator shall be maintained on file and
incorporated into the management plan.
Consignments shall be assessed for quality
specification conformance.
Where there are identified potential microbial
food safety risks, microbial test/s shall be
carried out on end product, and results
maintained on file, verifying ongoing
conformance of product to specifications.
Relevant customers shall be notified where
product is non-conforming (to specification),
and customer response/s shall be recorded
and maintained on file.

43

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Biological Farmers of Australia; Australian Certified

Organic Standard; version 1; 2010; section 4.6.3; p37.


www.bfa.com.au/Portals/0/ACO_2010_Standard_full.pdf

Meat and Livestock Accreditation processes.


www.mla.com.au/Meat-safety-and-traceability/On-farm-assurance/AgriSure

WE
B

Organic Certification process


www.dpi.vic.gov.au/agriculture/farming-management/organic-farming/organic-certification

Freshcare; Freshcare Food Safety and Quality Code of


Practice 3rd Edition.
www.freshcare.com.au/downloads

NSW Food Authority; Dairy Farm Audit Checklist.


www.foodauthority.nsw.gov.au/_Documents/industry_circulars/GenCirc072008_attachment.pdf

AQIS Australian Government; Validation and


Verification A Guideline to Compliance with the Export
Control (Fish and Fish Products) Orders 2005; Pp4-10
www.daff.gov.au/__data/assets/pdf_file/0004/112468/validation_verification_ffp.pdf

Dairy Australia; Farmer to Manufacturer Communication.


www.dairyaustralia.com.au/~/media/Documents/Industry-overview/Food%20safety/Farmer%20to%20
manufacturer%20communication.ashx

Australian Egg Corporation Ltd; Code of Practice For


Shell Egg, Production, Grading, Packing and Distribution
COD; August, 2010; pp: 23.
www.aecl.org/system/attachments/362/original/Code%20of%20Practice%20for%20Shell%20egg%20
production,%20grading,%20packing%20and%20distribution%202009.pdf?1291694499

44

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 13
List all of the verification processes that are implemented for your QA program. For each process describe the
steps that are taken and the evidence that is collected to prove compliance or the need for corrective action.

Verification process

Description of steps taken


and evidence collected to
prove compliance

Describe appropriate
corrective action

45

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

The review of the system and


verification processes
As discussed in activities 12 and 13 it is clear
that accurate record keeping is essential to the
application of a HACCP system for auditing
purposes, be it your own internal audit, verification
procedures, an AQIS audit, or another external audit.
All system procedures must be documented and
records kept should include:
1. Summary of the Hazard Analysis
2. HACCP Plan including:

A description of the product including


packaging, storage and distribution

A verified flow diagram

HACCP plan summary table with


information on:
Critical Steps
Potential Hazards
Critical Control Points
Monitoring Procedures
Critical Limits
Corrective Actions
Verification Procedures

3. Support documentation such as validation


records and planned verification activities
4. Records that are generated during the
operation of the plan e.g. monitoring records.
The following extracts are provided as
example of record keeping required for a
successful QA program.

MLA; LPA On Farm QA


Quality Assurance Manual;
Oct 2006; PDF download
of the LPA QA Manual is
available on this web page.

WEBwww.mla.com.au/Meat-safety-and-traceability/
On-farm-assurance/AgriSure

A set of example record forms for use by


participants is contained in the example form
section of the LPA QA manual.
Reporting forms may include:















Property risk assessment records


Stock treatment record
Paddock, crop and grain treatment record
Purchased feedstuff inventory form
Feeding record for purchased feeds
Identification records for introduced or
purchased livestock
Livestock identification records for stock born
and livestock reared on property
Livestock transaction/sales records
Employee training and job responsibility record
Staff duties and training record
Internal Audit Report and Checklist
Quality records archive register
Document control register
Farm chemical inventory
Duty of Care statement
animal welfare management
Commodity Vendor Declaration and
By-Product Vendor Declaration

46

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 14
You are required to list each record that is kept related to your QA system, who is responsible for maintaining the
record and why it is kept (i.e. how is the record used in the QA system)
Record name

Who keeps the record

Why is the record kept (significance to the QA system)

Quality assurance systems must constantly evolve to remain useful to the business and industry. This is because
product standards change, production systems improve and market or consumer preferences may change.
This means that your QA system will require changes from time to time. Generally these changes are identified
for implementation by regulatory or marketing bodies. However, proactive producers will always keep abreast of
these changes and those that are market leaders will seek to improve ahead of legislation or market demand.

47

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Activity 15
Consider your industry, your produce, your markets and your current QA system. Where would you like to see change?
Why do you suggest such changes and how will the changes improve your product and its market potential?

Did you identify any of the key innovations/opportunities listed in section 11?

48

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

11

SUMMARY
OF KEY INNOVATIONS/
OPPORTUNITIES AS A
RESULT OF ADOPTING
THESE SKILLS

The adoption of new opportunities and key


innovations should always be considered from the
perspective of the triple bottom line. However each
producer will need to determine:
What are the most important aspects of each
opportunity and innovation?
How can a new innovation or opportunity
be sustainably applied to your business or
production system?
The summary below is provided as a list of
suggestions. It is by no means complete. It is also
unrealistic to assume any single business can
adopt every opportunity.
Opportunity to differentiate products and
capitalise on the growing green, chemical free
food markets that consumers are demanding.
There appears to be a growing demand for
quality assurance programs that incorporate
green/biodynamic/chemical free/organic
principles. Government bodies (State/Federal)
and Industry Groups are starting to recognise
the need for QA programs to incorporate
environmental management requirements.

Improve market share and market position as


a result of being certified under an industry
approved/recognised QA program.
Better on-farm decisions resulting from timely,
complete and accurate recording of quality
assurance performance indicators.
Continuous improvement of food and fibre
production as a result of monitoring, reviewing
and resolving production issues
Improved customer confidence in quality
assured products, resulting in better reputation.
With a quality assurance system in place,
producers are able to prove they have been
following industry standards, and may be able to
reduce the chance of legal claims against them.
Greater professionalism.
Participation in industry certified QA will mean
better record keeping, better staff training,
and clearly defined areas of responsibility and
awareness of the customer requirements for
product quality.
International recognition and market access.
Accredited producers are able to sell a
branded product which may result in marketing
opportunities as the industry moves towards a
multitude of product brands, encompassing a
wide variety of quality attributes from paddock
to plate. It may also assist the development
of strategic alliances between producers,
processors and consumers.

49

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

12

BIBLIOGRAPHY AND SOURCE MATERIAL

Organisation

Standard
Legislation

Contact Details

Web

Reason for Inclusion

Australian Pork Industry

APIQ quality
assurance
Industry code of
practice

Steven Miller
Services Coordinator

www.APIQ.com.au

APIQ On Farm Quality


Assurance, Information
For Pig Producers.

T: 02 6270 8808
F: 02 6285 2288
M: 0439 261 168
E: steven.miller@
australianpork.com.au

Fact sheets and examples


of Quality Assurance forms,
templates and Standard
Operating Procedures are
available upon request.

www.australianpork.com.au
Australian Farm Institute
Farm Policy Journal

Australian Government
Australian Trade
Commission
AusTrade

Australian Pesticides
and Veterinary Medicines
Authority (APVMA);
How to Comply with The Law;

www.farminstitute.org.au/
contact-us.htm

www.farminstitute.org.
au/_catalog_68831/2011_
Spring_-_A_private_
future_for_food_and_
fibre_quality

Journals, research reports,


abstracts and conference
proceedings are available

Provision of
information about
domestic and
overseas trade
markets

www.austrade.gov.au/
Contact-us/default.aspx

www.austrade.gov.au

The Australian Trade Commission


Austrade is the Australian
Governments trade and
investment development agency.

Agvet quality
assurance code

Program Manager
Regulatory Strategy and
Compliance
T: +61 2 6210 4791

www.austrade.gov.au/
Buy/Australian-IndustryCapability/Food-andBeverage/default.aspx

www.apvma.gov.au/
compliance/how_to_
comply.php

Through a network of offices


in over 50 countries, Austrade
assists Australian companies
to succeed in international
business, attracts productive
foreign direct investment
into Australia and promotes
Australias education sector
internationally
Responsibilities under the
Agvet Code and the APVMAs
role in Quality Assurance and
Compliance

Manager Compliance
T: +61 2 6210 4796
Biological Farmers of
Australia

Australian Certified
Organic Standard;
version 1; 2010.

www.bfa.com.au/
ContactUs.aspx

www.bfa.com.au

Department of Primary
Industries NSW

State based
policies, regulations
and legislation
for food and fibre
industries

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au/
aboutus/about/contact

www.dpi.nsw.gov.au

Department of
Agriculture, Fisheries and
Forestry (DAFF).

Food Safety
Legislation
Codes of Practice
AQIS

www.daff.gov.au/about/
contactus

www.daff.gov.
au/__data/assets/
pdf_file/0006/183192/
australian_organic_
industry_summary.pdf

WEB

DAFF works to sustain the


way of life and prosperity of
all Australians by advising
the government and key
stakeholders how to improve the
productivity, competitiveness
and sustainability of agricultural
and horticultural industries.
DAFF also helps people and
goods move in and out of
Australia while managing the
risks to the environment and
animal, plant and human health.

50

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

Organisation

Standard
Legislation

Contact Details

Web

Reason for Inclusion

Department of Agriculture
and Food West
Australian Government

Farming for the


Future, Industry
Best Practice and
Guidelines

http://www.agric.
wa.gov.au/CONTACT.
html?s=1931015503

www.agric.wa.gov.au

Resource Management
Technical Report

Food and Agriculture


Organisation of the United
Nations (FAO)

Codex

www.fao.org/knowledge/
kfhome/kf-faqs/askfaofaq00/faq0800/en/

www.fao.org/documents/
en/docrep.jsp;jsessionid=
3E1BA867457FFEFC6EFA
4B1FF494CB4A

Corporate document repository


including research materials
and publications relevant to
sustainable and natural resource
management.

Freshcare

Freshcare Food
Safety and Quality
Code of Practice
3rd Edition.

www.freshcare.com.au/
contactUs

www.freshcare.com.au

International Organisation
for Standardisation,

ISO 9000 Quality


Management

www.iso.org/iso/support/
contact_iso.htm

www.iso.org/iso/
iso_catalogue/
management_and_
leadership_standards/
quality_management/
qmp/qmp-1.htm

MLA : Meat and


Livestock Australia

LPA Quality
Assurance Manual

Email: info@mla.com.au

www.mla.com.au

As part of MLAs goal to develop


competitive advantages and
increase industry capability for the
red meat industry, the company
is involved in a broad range
of research and development
activities on-farm to provide
practical information for Australian
red meat and livestock producers.
LPA Quality Assurance Manual is
available (PDF)

NSW Food Authority

Dairy Industry
Code of Practice

RIRDC - Rural
Industries Research and
Development Corporation

www.foodauthority.nsw.
gov.au/aboutus/contactus

www.foodauthority.nsw.
gov.au

Dairy Industry QA

http://www.rirdc.gov.
au/publications/forms/
contact-us

http://www.rirdc.gov.au/
research-programs/ruralpeople-issues/organicfarming

The objective of this program


is to deliver research and
development to facilitate the
organic industrys capacity to
meet rapidly increasing demand,
domestically and globally.

Standards Australia

Australian
Standard AS60002009 Organic
and biodynamic
products.

Standards Australia GPO


Box 476, Sydney, NSW
2001.

www.infostore.saiglobal.
com

This new standard can be used


to define, and protect the integrity
of, organic produce in Australias
domestic markets

Victorian Department of
Primary Industries

State based
policies,
regulations and
legislation for food
and fibre industries

www.dpi.vic.gov.au/
about-us/contact-us

www.dpi.vic.gov.au/
agriculture

Series of factsheets on organic


farming, standards, quality
assurance certifiers.

Victorian Government
Business Victoria

State based
policies,
regulations and
legislation for
business

www.business.vic.
gov.au/BUSVIC/
FEEDBACK/FEEDBACK.
html,contextPC

www.business.vic.gov.
au/BUSVIC/HOMEPAGE/
HOME

Business Victoria is a
comprehensive online resource
designed to help you start, run
and grow your business

WEB

51

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

13

BEING CONFIDENT ABOUT YOUR SKILL LEVELS

Before commencing on your summative assessment take a few minutes to review this workbook and ensure you
feel that you are confident about your skill levels related to this topic.
Use the table below to help you check your skills. Before commencing your final assessments it is important to
review any sections in which you feel unsure. Remember: it is always OK to ask your assessor/lecturer questions.
In the table below, read the list of skills and knowledge you should have after completing this workbook.
1. Put a tick in the column if you can do this now and a brief comment re why you believe you have this skill.
2. Put a tick in the next column if you feel you need more practice and must review the work before completing
final assessments also a brief comment as to why.

Need
Practice

Skills/knowledge you
should have

Yes

3. If you require further training, complete the third column listing what training is needed. Show this list to your
supervisor or assessor and ask for more time or training before completing the summative assessments.
Comment on why

What additional
training do I need

Determine quality assurance


objectives for the enterprise
Plan the quality assurance
program and develop
implementation strategies
Implement the quality
assurance program
Review the quality
assurance program
Market projections and
customer requirements
Cost/benefit of quality
assurance implementation
System analysis, HAACCP
or related processes
Enterprise culture
and values
Leadership and
administrative skills
Human resources
induction practices
Human resources performance
monitoring practices

52

AHCWRK501A Plan, Implement and Review a Quality Assurance Program

14

ASSESSMENT

You have now reached the end of this workbook. All of the information and activities you have covered have
developed your skills to competently plan, implement and review a quality assurance program in your workplace.
Your competency may be assessed through your successful completion of all formative activities throughout
this workbook. Alternatively, your RTO may require completion of a final summative assessment. You will need to
discuss this with your RTO.
FEEDBACK
This workbook has been developed to guide users to access current information related to gaining skills appropriate
to their workplace. Please complete the following table notifying us of any errors or suggested improvements.
Subject Name
Book Number
Page

What is the error

Suggested improvement

10

You tube video is not accurate

Better websites / You Tube example

Is there a link to your suggested improvement

Additional comments

Click here to email your feedback form to RST

53