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THE OIL & GAS YEAR


The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry
ARTICLES | INTERVIEWS | VIEWPOINTS | MARKET ANALYSIS | RESOURCES | PROJECTS | MAPS | INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS

THE OIL & GAS YEAR


QATAR 2015

9 781783 021123

ISBN 978-1-78302-112-3

2015

www.theoilandgasyear.com

QATAR
Adapt to the volatile market

Abdullah bin Hamad AL ATTIYAH


Chairman
AL ATTIYAH FOUNDATION FOR ENERGY & SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Supply surplus

Alistair ROUTLEDGE
President and General Manager
EXXONMOBIL QATAR

Market leadership

H.E. Seyed Mohammad Hossein ADELI


Secretary-General
GAS EXPORTING COUNTRIES FORUM

Photo courtesy of RasGas

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Qatars North Field, with 24.5 tcm (865 tcf) of natural gas reserves, is the largest nonassociated gasfield in the world and was discovered in 1971. After beginning production
from the field in 1991, Qatar Petroleum invested in the development of large-scale
liquefaction facilities in partnership with international oil companies through the Qatargas
and RasGas ventures to utilise its competitive advantage and access to open seas.
Between 1999 and 2010, 14 LNG trains were brought on line, including the largest in
the world. This makes Qatar the largest producer and exporter of the commodity globally,
with a total liquefaction capacity of 77 million tonnes per year. The country accounted
for 31.9 percent of global LNG trade in 2014 with exports totalling 76.4 million tonnes.

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THE OIL & GAS YEAR

QATAR 2015

24

Diplomacy & Politics

Exploration & Production

Qatars extensive financial reserves and stable political environment are poised to carry
the market through the oil price downturn
for at least the medium term. The government is holding to large-scale domestic and
international energy investments, aiming to
expand oil and gas development both at
home and abroad as well as maintain its position at the worlds leading supplier of LNG.

Qatar Petroleum is aiming to expand production at established oil and gasfields such as
Dukhan and the North Field, as well as stepping
up its international exploration and production
efforts with new investments in countries as
far afield as Canada and the Republic of Congo.
Meanwhile, the government is looking to restructure long-term hydrocarbons concessions
that are coming up for renewal in order to secure greater gains from its resources at home.

6 THE YEAR IN REVIEW


7 ARTICLE: The new face of Qatar Petroleum. The stateowned hydrocarbons giant undergoes a restructuring effort
9 RESOURCE: Qatar Petroleums companies and investments
10 INTERVIEW: Abdullah bin Hamad Al Attiyah, Al Attiyah
Foundation for Energy & Sustainable Development
11 RESOURCE: Estimated minimum oil prices required to
balance government budgets
12 THE YEARS AWARDS
13 QATAR AT A GLANCE
14 THE INVESTORS INDEX
15 AMBASSADORS FORUM: A history of collaboration
16 THE YEAR IN ENERGY
18 DIPLOMACY & POLITICS
19 ARTICLE: Time to expand. Big bets on infrastructure, both
domestic and abroad, are driving Qatars economy
21 VIEWPOINT: Market leadership. H.E. Seyed Mohammad
Hossein Adeli, Gas Exporting Countries Forum
22 INTERVIEW: Jrme Ferrier, International Gas Union
22 IN TRANSIT: Qatar yearly LNG exports by regional
destination, 2014
23 INTERVIEW: Keejong Chung, South Korean Ambassador
to Qatar
23 IN EXPORTS: Qatar's exports in 2014 by type
24 EXPLORATION & PRODUCTION
25 ARTICLE: Qatars upstream consolidation. The
country aims to boost production at home and abroad
27 PULLOUT MAP: Blocks, fields and hydrocarbons
infrastructure 2015
28 GEOLOGY REPORT: Beneath the surface. An exploration
of the Arab Gulf Basin
30 INTERVIEW: Alistair Routledge, ExxonMobil Qatar
30 IN PRODUCTION: Qatars gas production and consumption
32 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Barzan Gas Project
33 ARTICLE: Qatars potential redeveloped. New projects are
in the works to halt production decline
34 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Al Shaheen eld
35 RESOURCE: Al Shaheen oilfield infrastructure
36 COMPANY PROFILE: Dolphin Energy
37 COMMENT: Natural adaptation. Potential changes to LNG
pricing
37 MAP: Dolphin Energy regional pipeline network
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

38 COMPANY PROFILE: Total E&P Qatar


39 IN THE REGION: Natural gas production and consumption
40 ARTICLE: The tortoise and the hare. Iran is primed for gas
development following its nuclear deal
42 THE YEARS FOCUS: LNG Outlook
43 ARTICLE: Competition heats up. LNG projects in the US
and Australia change market dynamics
45 COMPANY PROFILE: RasGas
45 IN EXPORTS: LNG exported by selected countries in 2014
46 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Jetty Boil-off Gas Recovery project
47 COMPANY PROFILE: Qatargas
48 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Plateau Maintenance Project
49 INTERVIEW: Gary Sykes, ConocoPhillips Qatar
49 IN TRAINS: Qatari LNG plants
50 COMPANY PROFILE: Nakilat
51 MARKET ANALYSIS: A position of advantage. Gopal
Balasubramaniam, KPMG
52 RESOURCE: LNG wholesale and retail supply chain
53 PULLOUT MAP: World LNG Outlook 2015
54 OILFIELD SERVICES
55 ARTICLE: Status quo. Qatari oilfield services companies
focus on maintaining upstream output
56 VIEWPOINT: Modern approach. Ross White, Baker Hughes
57 ARTICLE: Services survive in the Gulf. The GCC services
sector remains largely unscathed through low oil prices
58 COMPANY PROFILE: Gulf Drilling International
58 IN COMPARISON: Qatari rig count and Brent Crude
price, January 2014-July 2015
59 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Delta Corporation,
Schlumberger Overseas, Al Shaheen Weatherford,
National Oilwell Varco
60 RESOURCE: Enhanced oil recovery techniques
62 DOWNSTREAM & INDUSTRY
63 ARTICLE: Refined expansion. Niche products are driving
Qatars downstream sector
63 IN CAPACITY: Capacity of existing and planned facilities
at Qatar's QP and Laffan refineries
64 COMPANY PROFILE: Muntajat
64 IN PRODUCTION: Qatars chemicals and petrochemicals
production, 2003-2013
FOLDOUT MAP: Qatars sphere of influence

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THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

1
QATAR 2015

18

CONTENTS

The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

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QATAR 2015
The Oil & Gas Year is audited by BPA Worldwide

CONTENTS
2

42
The Years Focus: LNG
outlook

QATAR 2015

Qatar exported 76.4 million tonnes of LNG in


2014, and the countrys unmatched capacity
for LNG production positions it to remain dominant in spite of a changing global market. Even
as rival supplies begin emerging from markets
such as the US and Australia, Qatars established
infrastructure gives it an advantage, particularly
during a period of low commodity prices.

62

76

Downstream & Industry

Power Generation

The Qatari downstream sector is evolving to


add greater value to local oil and gas resources. Although the country has seen two
major petrochemicals projects cancelled, a
number of new developments are in the
pipeline to transform hydrocarbons into niche
and high-value products such as helium and
hydrogen. Meanwhile, a carbon dioxide recovery unit at the Mesaieed methanol plant
will raise output by 90,000 tonnes per year.

Demand for power is rising in Qatar along


with the expansion of the countrys population and economy. New generation projects
such as Umm Al Houl Powers Facility D independent power and water plant are in the
works to satisfy this demand. Power developments abroad are also being given a
boost, as investments are made or planned
in Oman, Turkey, Kenya and other markets.

65 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Gulf Cryo Qatar,


Qatar Plastic Products Company, Tasweeq,
Industries Qatar
66 INTERVIEW: Marjo Louw, Sasol
67 ARTICLE: GTL takes flight. Qatar stands as a gas-toliquids hotspot
67 RESOURCE: Fischer-Tropsch GTL Process
68 COMPANY PROFILE: Qatar Shell
69 MAP: Existing and planned GTL plants worldwide
70 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Laan Renery 2
70 IN OUTPUT: Qatars refined products output, 2004-2014
71 ARTICLE: Roll with the punches. Qatar revises petrochemicals
plans in response to low oil prices
71 IN PRODUCTION: Qatars downstream production
capacity by product segment, 2013
72 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: QAFAC carbon dioxide recovery
plant
74 COMPANY PROFILE: Gasal
75 IN THE REGION: Refinery capacity and throughput
76 POWER GENERATION
77 ARTICLE: Power up. An expected rise in electricity demand
leads to new projects
77 IN POWER: Qatars electricity capacity and demand
78 COMPANY PROFILE: Kahramaa
78 IN ENERGY: Energy consumption in Qatar by use, 2013
79 MAP: Qatars power and desalination plants
80 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Facility D independent water
and power plant
81 COMPANY PROFILE: Nebras Power Company
82 INTERVIEW: Arnaud Berthet, Engie
82 IN CONSUMPTION: Gas consumption of IWPP in Qatar
83 COMMENT: On the wire. Qatars power generation ambitions
84 VIEWPOINT: Asset digitisation. Ghassan Barghouth,
Schneider Electric
84 IN ENERGY: Qatari energy use by industry, 2012-2013
85 COMMENT: Facing the cyber threat. Qatar tackles a new
security frontier
86 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Marubeni Corporation, Qatar
Electricity & Water Company, ABB, Siemens
88 ENGINEERING & CONSTRUCTION
89 ARTICLE: New opportunities. Maintenance contracts and
upgrades are key to the stabilisation of the sector as oil prices
remain low
THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

90 VIEWPOINT: Priority shift. Syed Najeeb Akhtar Jaery


Etimaad Qatar
91 INTERVIEW: Syed Ali Aghfar Rizvi, Descon Engineering Qatar
92 INTERVIEW: Sarah Kent, Kentech
92 IN TOTAL: Flaring by sector in Qatar, 2012-2013
93 COMMENT: Brownfield benefits. Low oil prices make less
capital-intensive projects more attractive to the countrys EPC
market
94 COMPANY PROFILE: Qatar Kentz
95 INTERVIEW: Michael Rau, Manweir
96 INTERVIEW: Shizuka Ikawa, Chiyoda Almana Engineering
97 COMMENT: Greener pastures. Toxic waste and gas emissions
reduction objectives inspire new projects
98 COMPANY PROFILE: STFA Group
99 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Fata Gulf; JGC Middle East,
Doha Branch
100 INTERVIEW: Chakib Nayfe, Medgulf Construction
101 COMPANY PROFILE: Doha Petroleum Construction
Company
102 INTERVIEW: Emmanuel Fontan, Technip
102 IN DEVELOPMENT: Qatars largest industrial
construction projects
103 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Voith Industrial Services
Qatar, Al Jaber Engineering, Target Engineering Qatar
104 SERVICES & SUPPLIES
105 ARTICLE: Steady as she goes. A risk of market saturation in
Qatars services sector is countered by a variety of brownfield
opportunities
106 INTERVIEW: Eyas Al Homouz, Jaidah Energy
106 IN CONTRACTS: Value of GCC construction contracts, 2014
107 COMPANY PROFILE: United Safety
108 COMPANY PROFILE: Stork Oryx Turbo Machinery Services
109 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: SPIE Oil and Gas Services,
Emerson Process Management, Aamal Qatar, Al Shaheen
Holding
110 INTERVIEW: Saleem R. Bitar, Huawei Middle East
111 INTERVIEW: Ullattil Achu, Dyarco International Group
112 INTERVIEW: K. Viswanath, Brunel Middle East & India
113 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: CanAm Safety, Pretect, Gulf
Helicopters Company
114 COMPANY PROFILE: Madina Group WLL
115 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Al Rabban Holding, Cape East
116 ARTICLE: Shut down, start up. Gerrit Jan Pieterson, Anabeeb
116 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHT: Applus+ Velosi
117 IN THE REGION: LNG imports and exports in the Middle East

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THE OIL & GAS YEAR

QATAR 2015

The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

CONTENTS
4

88

118

132

QATAR 2015

Engineering & Construction

Marine & Logistics

Banking, Finance & Legal

Engineering and construction contractors in


Qatar are shifting their focus to brownfield
work as the countrys market matures. Projects
have been undertaken to maintain and upgrade Qatars existing upstream facilities, such
as the $2.3-billion Plateau Maintenance Project,
designed to prop up production at Qatargas
1s LNG trains, and the $1.5-billion Laffan Refinery 2 upgrade project, which will double the
facilitys output when it is complete in 2016.

Qatars government has pledged $200 billion


for projects to increase the countrys land, sea
and air transport capacity. Developments such
as the new $7.4-billion Hamad Port, the creation of three special economic zones and the
construction of around 900 kilometres of new
roads promise a boost for Qatars oil and gas
industry, with the improvement of infrastructure and easing of congestion in shipping.

While the slump in global oil prices has left


Qatar without new additions to its roster of hydrocarbons financing projects, the country has
extensive resources and solid financial buffers
in place to weather a drop in oil and gas revenues. A mid-2015 Qatar National Bank report
forecast a 138-year stretch for the countrys
gas reserves at current rates of production.
Meanwhile, an upgrade to emerging market
status confirms Qatars economic momentum.

118 MARINE & LOGISTICS


119 ARTICLE: Infrastructure overhaul. Government money is
pouring into new projects
120 MAP: Qatars freight and transport infrastructure
121 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Hamad Port Project
122 COMPANY PROFILE: Nakilat Damen Shipyards
123 INTERVIEW: Michel Deleuran, Milaha
123 IN TOTAL: Milahas fleet by type, February 2015
125 COMPANY PROFILE: Nakilat-Keppel Oshore & Marine
126 PROJECT HIGHLIGHT: Manateq Special Economic Zones
127 MAP: Hamad Port and Umm Al Houl Economic Zone
128 COMPANY PROFILE: Halul Oshore Services Company
128 IN THE WATER: Halul Offshores fleet
130 INTERVIEW: Abdulsalam Srour, Ruwais Marine Services
130 IN COMPARISON: Number of commercial vessels
entering the Doha Port, 2013-2014
131 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Deugro Qatar, Nakilat
SvitzerWijsmuller, Doha Marine Services
132 BANKING, FINANCE & LEGAL
133 ARTICLE: Bank on it. Qatars economy remains stable
134 INTERVIEW: Abdullah bin Saoud Al Thani,
Qatar Central Bank
135 MARKET ANALYSIS: New project financing. Charles
Carlson, Standard Chartered Qatar
135 IN TOTAL: Share of government hydrocarbons revenues
136 INTERVIEW: Rashid bin Ali Al Mansoori, Qatar Exchange

137 MARKET ANALYSIS: Old markets, new markets. Yousuf Al


Jaida, Qatar Financial Centre
137 IN TRADE: Qatari balance of trade against oil prices
138 INTERVIEW: Essa Al Mannai, Quantum Global Solutions
140 RESEARCH & EDUCATION
141 ARTICLE: Nose to the grindstone. An innovation drive
142 INSTITUTION PROFILE: Gas and Fuels Research Center
143 INTERVIEW: Samer Adham, GWSC
143 IN CONSUMPTION: Water use by sector
144 INSTITUTION PROFILE: Gas Processing Center
144 IN EMISSIONS: Qatari greenhouse gas emissions by sector
145 COMPANY PROFILE: ExxonMobil Research Qatar
146 ARTICLE: Carbonate reservoir challenges.
Philippe Julien, Total Research Centre Qatar
146 IN RESERVES: Oil, gas and carbonate reserves, 2014
147 COMPANY PROFILE: MO-RTC
148 VIEWPOINT: Managers wanted. Laoucine Kerbache, HEC
Paris in Qatar
149 INVESTOR SPOTLIGHTS: Texas A&M University at Qatar,
QEERI
150 EXECUTIVE GUIDE
151 ACCOMMODATION
156 EVENTS
158 ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
160 IN BRIEF

Publisher: Emmanuelle Berthemet Editor-in-Chief: Gilles Valentin Regional Director: Ioana Marins Country Directors: Cristina Capatina, Karen Kumbasar Country Editor:
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THE YEAR IN REVIEW

The new face of Qatar Petroleum

10 Adapt to the volatile market


Abdullah bin Hamad AL ATTIYAH
Chairman
AL ATTIYAH FOUNDATION FOR ENERGY
& SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

12 The Years Awards

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 7

Qatar Petroleum (QP) supervises and drives Qatars energy industry. In the last quarter of 2014,
the company initiated a restructuring programme that ended in June 2015. As a result of low
oil prices worldwide, QP has streamlined its activities and is consolidating its international
presence under the leadership of president and CEO Saad Sherida Al Kaabi.
on their new strategic objectives, which is what QP
did, the president and CEO said.
As QP subsidiaries continue to review their internal structures, further changes are expected to
take place over the next year. QP is also relinquishing
its management responsibilities of land allocation
in the Mesaieed Industrial City.

QPs restructuring was seen as necessary


to increase organisational efficiency,
which had been hindered by the extent
of its non-core business interests and
decentralised operating structure.
bin Saleh Al Sada, minister of energy and industry,
had been the face of QP. Under his leadership, the
company and the government body ran concurrently,
almost as a single entity. The change will give QP
greater autonomy, though Al Sada will retain a symbolic role as chairman.
RESHUFFLE: Al Kaabi, former director of oil and
gas ventures, has reorganised the industrial giant to
realise the companys objective of becoming a global
force among national and international oil companies,
on par with the hydrocarbons industrys leaders.
Established in 1974, the hydrocarbons giant had
grown to a point where its size was making it
difficult to manage because of non-core business
interests. Numerous departments and a decentralised
management have hampered the companys efficiency.
QPs restructuring initiative has been an effort to
streamline the companys processes by simplifying
the internal structure and merging departments.
We are in a period of oversupply in the industry,
and we must be very efficient as an organisation.
While we have no control over markets and prices,
we do have control over our costs and expenditure,
Al Kaabi said in a June 2015 QP press release.
On June 23, 2015, Al Kaabi announced that the
restructuring, initiated in late 2014, was complete
and that there were no plans to extend the process.
It is normal for leading companies to frequently
reorganise in order to meet the requirements of the
ever changing competitive environment and deliver
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

UPSTREAM FOCUS: While QP has reaffirmed


its commitment to upstream operations, additional growth in the gas industry is restricted
by an ongoing moratorium limiting exploration
at Qatars North Field. The play holds the
worlds largest non-associated gas reserves at
an estimated 24.5 tcm (865 tcf).
Although the moratorium limits opportunity, progress has been made on Qatars latest
gas mega-project, the Barzan gas development.
As of August 2014, 95 percent of train 1 was
completed. The first train is scheduled to come on
line in 2015 and train 2 is expected to start up by in
2016. The natural gas facility is expected to produce
45.3 mcm (1.6 bcf) of gas daily for sale.
Qatars healthy natural gas market has allowed
it to concentrate on oil development. Oil production
has severely declined in recent years, falling from
845,000 to 709,000 barrels of oil per day (bopd)
between 2007 and 2014, according to OPEC figures.
Crude oil production in August 2015 was down to
an average of 643,000 bopd.
While this decline is primarily a result of reservoir
mismanagement and falling production at the
Dukhan onshore oilfield, the depletion of other
QP-operated offshore developments, such as those
at the Maydan Mahzam and Bul Hanine fields, has
also played a significant role in the countrys attenuated oil production. In July 2014, QP announced
plans to invest around $11 billion until 2028 drilling
150 new wells in Bul Hanine to more than double
the fields production by 2020, to 90,000 bopd.
QP is also assessing redevelopment plans for
Dukhan and Maydan Mahzam fields. Production
stood at around 225,000 bopd at the Dukhan field
and 22,000 bopd at Maydan Mahzam in 2013.
However, the global oil price slump will undoubtedly affect the execution of the governments
expansion projects. No announcements related to
these developments have been made since July
2014. However, Abdullah Al Attiyah, the former
minister of energy and industry, told TOGY that he

DETAIL

IN

In September 2014, Al Kaabi was appointed to


the newly created position of president and CEO
of state-owned QP. At a time when the price of
Brent crude was on a downward slide but still above
$100 per barrel, the move marked a shift within
the national oil company. Previously, Mohammed

AL KAABI WAS
APPOINTED
PRESIDENT
AND CEO
OF QP IN

September
2014
QP
ANNOUNCED
THE
COMPLETION
OF ITS
CORPORATE
RESTRUCTURING IN

June 2015
QATARS
NORTH FIELD
HOLDS
AROUND

24.5 tcm

OF NONASSOCIATED
GAS RESERVES

THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

7
ARTICLE

The new face of Qatar Petroleum

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

ARTICLE

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 8

ARTICLE

DETAIL

IN

THE YEAR IN REVIEW


8

Qatar Petroleum has built up a robust downstream sector over the past decade

ARTICLE

QATARS OIL
PRODUCTION
FELL FROM

845,000
TO

709,000
bopd

FROM
2007 TO 2014
THE GOLDEN
PASS
PRODUCTS
PROJECT IS
EXPECTED TO
COST

$10 billion
QP OPENED
BIDS FOR A
PARTNERSHIP
AT ITS AL
SHAHEEN
OILFIELD IN

May 2015

expects that the project costs will go down in direct


proportion to the slumping price of oil.
A RENEWAL OF OIL: While plans to ramp up production are in motion, one of the companys exploration and production-sharing agreements is up for
renewal. In 2012, QP and Total announced that
they would renew their partnership for the Al Khalij
oilfield starting in 2014. The renewal followed
the expiration of the licence, which produces
close to 25,000 bopd. QP now assumes a 40percent share for 25 years.
QP and Danish hydrocarbons exploration
and production company Maersk Oil seemed
likely to renew their alliance at the Al Shaheen
oilfield. The play accounts for more than 40
percent of Qatars total oil production. Maersk
has operated Al Shaheen one of the nations
largest fields since 1992.
In May 2015, QP invited international oil
companies, including Maersk Oil, to bid for
the planned 2017 concession renewal, indicating
QPs desire for better terms via competitive bidding.
The future operation and development of the
Al Shaheen oilfield is of critical strategic importance
to the optimum exploitation of the natural resources
of the state of Qatar. Therefore, the selection of our
partner in this endeavour will be based on such
partners ability to offer the best technological
solutions for the fields development combined with
the best financial return to the state, Al Kaabi
stated in a QP press release.
PETROCHEMICALS PLANS: Falling oil prices have
resulted in the cancellation of Qatars Al Sejeel and
Al Karaana petrochemicals developments in September 2014 and January 2015, respectively. Both
endeavours were no longer deemed economically
feasible. Following the cancellations, QP announced
that it would redistribute previously allocated feedstock for existing downstream projects in Qatar.
For example, ethane reserved for Al Karaana
would be dispensed to entities such as QP subsidiaries
the Qatar Petrochemical Company, the Qatar Chemical Company and the Ras Laffan Olefins Company.
INTERNATIONAL EXPANSION: QPs large-scale restructuring has also resulted in the absorption of
Qatar Petroleum International (QPI), the companys
foreign investment arm, which was created in 2007.

THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

QPI has delivered on its mandate by securing a


multi-billion-dollar portfolio of global investments
with leading international companies. This strategic
transition combines the strength of both companies
to become a fully integrated international energy
player, Nasser Khalil Al Jaidah, former CEO of
QPI, said in a QP press release.
Noting the companys international aspirations,
Al Kaabi announced that QPIs investments were
being evaluated and foreign production acquisitions
would follow restructuring and integration.
QP has plans to introduce export capabilities at
its Golden Pass LNG import and regasification terminal at Sabine Pass, Texas. A joint venture between
QP (70 percent), ExxonMobil (17.6 percent) and
ConocoPhillips (12.4 percent), the Golden Pass
project was completed in 2010.
In 2012, QP and ExxonMobil decided to add an
export terminal to the Golden Pass facility and ship
up to 15.6 million tonnes of LNG yearly, taking 70percent and 30-percent stakes, respectively.
The project, dubbed Golden Pass Products, is
expected to cost $10 billion. A joint venture between
US company CB&I and Japans Chiyoda Corporation
was awarded the front-end engineering and design
contract for the facility in July 2014. After the companys internal restructuring was completed in June

In July 2014, QP announced plans to


invest around $11 billion to drill 150
new wells at Bul Hanine until 2028.
The programme is expected to more
than double the fields production.
2015, Al Kaabi confirmed that QP was now waiting
for the necessary permits from the US administration
before beginning construction in 2016.
THE VIEW FORWARD: The oil price slump has highlighted the need for companies to remain lean and
diversify their business interests to stay competitive
in a tumultuous industry. As the price per barrel
continues to fluctuate, businesses are attempting
to plan for sustained low oil prices.
With an estimated 25.7 billion barrels of oil in
proven reserves, according to the BP Statistical
Review 2015, QPs restructuring and commitment
to upstream activities, at home and abroad, is a
prudent move in the current economic environment.
Previously known for its gas export capabilities,
QP is turning increasingly to oil activities as a
means of boosting its long-term profitability and
contributions to government revenues.
The company remains state controlled and operates throughout the entirety of Qatars hydrocarbons
value chain, via subsidiaries and joint ventures.
This has exposed the company to risk and has had
the added effect of limiting the development of the
private sector in the oil and gas industry.
By capitalising on the totality of the countrys
hydrocarbons resources while concurrently divesting
unnecessary interests, QP hopes to cement its
position as an industry giant in spite of the slump.
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 9

QATAR PETROLEUMS COMPANIES AND INVESTMENTS*

Qatargas

LNG
terminals

LNG

RasGas

Qatalum - 50%

Qatar Steel - 51%


Qatar Steel International - 25.5%
Algerian Qatar Steel - 24.99%
Qatar Steel Dubai - 51%

RasGas Operating Company - 70%


RasGas 1 - 63%
RasGas 2 - 67.05%
RasGas 3 - 70%
Barzan Gas Company - 93%

METALS

Qatar Petroleum Shell Petrochemicals Singapore - 49%

ASTAD - 50%

QATAR PETROLEUM

SERVICES

Gulf International
Services - 10%

Al Shaheen Holding - 100%

Egypt Refining - 27.95%

United Helicharters - 3.6%


Gulf Helicopters Oman - 7%
Redstar Turkey - 4.9%
Almaha Aviation - 9.2%

DOWNSTREAM
AND
PETROCHEMICALS

Al Shaheen Weatherford - 50%


Al Shaheen GE Services - 50%
Pii Group - 50%
Pii North America - 50%

SEEF - 8%

ABROAD

Arab Refining - 36.68%

AMWAJ - 10%
Al Koot - 10%
Gulf Drilling International - 10%
Gulf Helicopters - 10%

South Hook CHP (Wales) - 67.5%


Long Son Petrochemical (Vietnam) - 25%
Nebras Power - 20%
CQ Energy Canada - 40%
Total E&P Congo - 15%
Total E&P Mauritania - 20%
Parque das Conchas (Brazil) - 23%
Heron 2 Power Plant (Greece) - 25%

Mesaieed Petrochemical
Holding Company - 74.27%

Gasal - 30.5%

Qatar Vinyl
Company - 66.9%

Industries Qatar - 51%


Qatar Fuel Additives
Company - 25.5%

Qatar Fertiliser
Company - 38.25%
Qatar Melamine - 62.95%
Gulf Formaldehyde - 26.78%

Qatar Chemical
Company 2 - 38.39%

Qatar Petrochemical
Company - 40.8%
Qatofin - 25.97%

Oryx GTL
51%
Qatar Chemical
Company - 38.39%

Ras Laffan Olefins


Company - 33.05%

Qatar Plastic Products Company - 13.59%

*This is a simplified version that represents Qatar Petroleums key companies and investments.
2015 The Oil & Gas Year Ltd., The Oil & Gas Year Qatar 2015. All rights reserved.
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

9
RESOURCE

Polyolefin Company Singapore - 14.7%


Tetra Chemicals Singapore - 14.7%
Petrochemical Corporation of Singapore - 24.5%

QATEX - 51%

Pearl GTL - 51%

South Hook LNG - 67.5%


South Hook Gas - 70%
QTL Hungary - 100%
QTL Italy - 100%
Adriatic LNG - 22.05%
Golden Pass LNG - 70%

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

Qatargas Operating Company - 70%


Qatargas 1 - 65%
Qatargas 2 - 67.5%
Qatargas 3 - 68.5%
Qatargas 4 - 70%
Qatargas Downstream - 65%
Laffan Refinery - 70%
Laffan Refinery 2 - 84%

THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 10

INTERVIEW

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

Adapt to the volatile market


Abdullah bin Hamad
AL ATTIYAH Chairman

AL ATTIYAH
FOUNDATION

10
INTERVIEW

Qatar is located
halfway between
Europe and Asia,
enabling it to
contribute to the
long-term energy
demands of both
regions.

IN FIGURES
Qatars natural gas
reserves in 2014

24.5 tcm
Qatars oil reserves in 2014

25.7 billion
barrels
Qatars LNG exports in 2014

76.4 million
tonnes
THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

Abdullah bin Hamad Al Attiyah, chairman of the Al Attiyah Foundation for Energy &
Sustainable Development, talks to TOGY about Qatars position in the LNG market
and how the country has reacted to fluctuations in the oil and gas industry through
diversification. Al Attiyah, former minister of energy and industry and managing
director of state-owned Qatar Petroleum, set up the foundation in 2015.
How has Qatar become the largest LNG producer and exporter in the world?
In 1992, Qatar was a minor oil-producing state
and one of the smallest in OPEC, producing
about 350,000 barrels of oil per day. That year,
the price of oil averaged $19.30 per barrel.
These were challenging times for the global
energy industry. It was at this time when we
made the decision to ramp up the development
of our natural gas production, which is based
on resources in the North Field, the largest
non-associated gasfield in the world. The North
Field holds almost all of Qatars total gas
reserves of 24.5 tcm (865 tcf ).
The ambitious progress of our LNG industry
necessitated the development of cutting-edge
technology and large capital expenditures.
This approach paid off. Japanese utilities
provider Chubu Electric Power signed a longterm LNG sale-and-purchase contract as Qatars
first customer in 1992. Companies in South
Korea, China, India, Thailand, Spain, the UK
and Belgium followed suit, securing long-term
demand for Qatars LNG production.
Since then, the country has been able to
bring 14 LNG trains on line, with a combined
production capacity of 77 million tonnes per
year. Qatar as a country has mastered the
entire LNG value chain, from extraction to liquefaction and marketing of the product. The
Qatar Gas Transport Company, known as Nakilat,
boasts the largest LNG fleet in the world, with
61 vessels. The company delivers LNG from
Qatar to markets around the world.
How has Qatar diversified its production to
extract value from its hydrocarbons reserves?
Qatar has been able to attain value from its
oil reserves, which are estimated to be 25.7
billion barrels. The country produces about
700,000 barrels of oil per day and the necessary
investments are being made to sustain this
production. With around 1.3 million barrels of
oil equivalent of condensates and natural gas
liquids produced every day, Qatars total liquid
production averages 2 million barrels per day.
The country has diversified its hydrocarbons
industry by becoming the largest producer of
gas-to-liquids in the world. The Pearl and Oryx
plants have a combined production capacity

of around 170,000 barrels per day, along with


additional production of LPG and condensates.
Qatari natural gas contains relatively large
quantities of helium, which must be separated.
We are the second-largest producer of helium
and the top exporter worldwide. We have further expanded downstream, using our natural
gas to produce electricity for the country and
develop a solid petrochemicals sector.
In what ways can Qatar build on experience
to further develop its energy industry?
The country has already accomplished the
necessary infrastructure, experience and knowhow across all sectors of the energy industry,
paving the way for future developments.
Qatar has developed its own model for
the hydrocarbons industry under the leadership
of the Ministry of Energy and Industry and
state-owned Qatar Petroleum, and with the
support of major international oil companies.
Mohammed bin Saleh Al Sada, minister of
energy and industry, and Saad Sherida Al
Kaabi, president and CEO of Qatar Petroleum,
will continue to drive the Qatari industry
forward and position the country as a major
global provider of hydrocarbons. Qatar is
located halfway between Europe and Asia,
enabling it to contribute to the long-term energy demands of both regions.
How have changes in the global hydrocarbons
industry impacted Qatar, particularly in light
of the downturn in oil prices?
Qatar can easily live with the price of oil below
$60 per barrel and with lower natural gas
prices. State revenues from the energy industry
have always been invested wisely in the countrys economy to diversify the industry. The
Qatar National Vision 2030 aims to find the
balance between a hydrocarbons-based and
a knowledge-based economy.
Commodity prices are cyclical, and industry
players always adapt accordingly. We can
forget about oil at $100 per barrel for the next
decade and live with it as long as Qatar and
the industry adapt to the new situation. The
necessary steps have been taken, and the
Qatari government has based its new budget
on the price of oil being between $45-50.
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 11

The market share of the organisation is not


what it used to be. OPEC has lost part of its
ability to influence as a swing producer. It
now has no interest in cutting production.
This is what OPEC did in the 1980s, a move
that resulted in losses in the organisations
market share, while prices did not pick up.

Qatar has been a member of OPEC since


1961. How has OPEC reacted to the changes
in the oil industry during the past few years?
The fall of commodity prices is just a consequence of the changes in the energy industry
at the global level. Over the past few years,
the US has ramped up production to become
a major producer of both oil and natural gas.
The US has been able to do this by developing
its unconventional resources.
The market has been flooded with additional production coming from existing and
new players in North America as well as players
in other parts of the world. At the same time,
global economic growth slowed down, as did
the demand for oil in major consuming countries such as China and India.
In the first quarter of 2015, global oil production averaged around 94.6 million barrels
per day, while the demand was 93 million
barrels per day in the same period. OPEC produced about 33 percent of the entire output.

What are some potential challenges OPEC


may face in the near future?
The background has changed as producers
and consumers are more diverse, meaning
that new producers will emerge. OPEC will remain a source of stability in global oil markets
in this era of greater competition and will
continue to play a major role in the dialogue
between consumers and producers. OPEC
members will continue managing and co-ordinating their levels of production.
Now that Iran may ramp up its oil production after nuclear negotiations may lead to
the lifting of sanctions, the country might account for a greater share of OPECs output.
This may be the organisations next challenge.
However, I believe that OPEC will be able
to put politics aside and adapt to these changes
in the hydrocarbons industry. Furthermore,
Irans production will increase progressively,
and growing markets in Asia and elsewhere
will absorb the countrys additional volumes.

Qatar is
rationalising its
expenses and
concentrating on
major projects that
bring added value
to the country.

Estimated minimum oil prices required to balance government budgets in the Middle East and North Africa ($ per barrel)

2014

2015*

$96.29

$55.21

BAHRAIN
$120.6 $99.8

*third quarter

KUWAIT

OPEC basket price

$57.4 $49.4

$104.6 $68.1

IRAQ

ALGERIA

IRAN
$95.1 $107.4

LIBYA
$132.7

SAUDI ARABIA

$119.2
$213.7 $124.8

OMAN

$102.3 $87.2

$106.3 $95.9

QATAR
UAE
$56.2 $64.1
Fiscal breakeven oil price, 2014
Estimated breakeven
oil price, 2015

Source: IMF
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

YEMEN

$74 $73.8

$160 $157

2015 The Oil & Gas Year Ltd., The Oil & Gas Year Qatar 2015. All rights reserved.
THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

11
INTERVIEW

This is a conservative estimate showing that


Qatar is rationalising its expenses and concentrating on major projects that bring added
value to the country. Qatar Petroleum has also
gone through a period of change to adapt to
the new market outlook, and I am confident
that the right steps have been taken.

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

INTERVIEW

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 12

THE YEARS AWARDS QATAR 2015


MAN OF THE YEAR
Saad Sherida AL KAABI
THE YEAR IN REVIEW

In September 2014, Saad Sherida Al Kaabi was appointed to the newly


created position of president and CEO of Qatar Petroleum (QP), a
move that demonstrated a shift in the national oil company. Al Kaabi
initiated a restructuring programme in late 2014 to streamline the
companys processes and simplify its internal structure, underlining
the need to promote efficiency in an environment of depressed oil
prices. As part of the restructuring, QP divested itself of non-core
business ventures and absorbed its foreign investment arm. The
reorganisation is meant to make QP a global force in the international
hydrocarbons landscape, on par with the worlds leading companies.

12
THE YEARS AWARDS QATAR 2015

UPSTREAM PROJECT OF THE YEAR


In late 2015, RasGas is bringing on line the first of two natural gas trains associated with the $10.4billion Barzan Gas Project. Construction of the new gas extraction facilities in Qatars North Field,
the worlds largest non-associated gasfield, started in 2011. Total production from the projects twin
trains is expected to reach 45.3 mcm (1.6 bcf) of natural gas per day once it reaches full capacity in
2016. Most of the natural gas produced from the plant will be marketed domestically for power
generation and water desalination purposes to meet the growing demand of Qatars population.

EFFICIENCY INITIATIVE OF THE YEAR


On April 28, 2015, Qatargas and RasGas officially inaugurated the Jetty Boil-off Gas Recovery
Project. The estimated $1-billion endeavour, which began operations in October 2014, enables the
collection and discharge of boil-off gas from LNG ships during loading at six LNG berths at Ras
Laffan Industrial Citys port. After the gas is compressed, it is sent back to Qatargas and RasGas
LNG trains for use as a fuel source or reconversion into LNG. This system will allow for a reduction
in flaring by 90 percent and carbon dioxide emissions by up to 1.6 million tonnes annually.

POWER GENERATION PROJECT OF THE YEAR


On June 2, 2015, the Qatar General Electricity & Water Corporation, also known as Kahramaa,
awarded K1 energy, a consortium of Japans Mitsubishi Corporation (98.5 percent) and Tokyo
Electric Power Company (1.5 percent), a $2.5-billion contract for the construction of the 2.52-GW
gas-fired Facility D independent water and power plant. The plants desalination capacity will be
about 517 million litres per day and it will be the largest facility of its kind in the Middle East.
Construction is expected start in October 2015 and is slated for completion by the end of 2018.

EXPANSION STRATEGY OF THE YEAR


After opening Muntajat BV, the new Netherlands-based headquarters of its marketing network,
the Qatar Chemical and Petrochemical Marketing and Distribution Company, known as Muntajat,
successfully transferred all of Qatars chemicals products to its portfolio in 2015. The firm opened
its Vietnam office in the second half of 2015 and now has offices in 20 countries. Muntajat sells
and distributes more than 10 million tonnes of Qatari chemicals and petrochemicals products
worldwide every year. It plans to establish a network of warehouses to reduce delivery times.

LOCAL CONTENT DEVELOPMENT OF THE YEAR


In April 2015, Maersk Oil Qatar announced plans to quadruple the number of Qatari citizens
employed in leadership positions at the company by 2017. In 2014, this figure increased by 12
percent. As of the beginning of 2015, the companys Qatari employees numbered 215, accounting
for 23 percent of its total workforce. Maersk Oil Qatar spent about $962 million on local goods
and services in 2014, which represents 63 percent of its total yearly expenditures. Maersk Oil is
the operator of the behemoth offshore Al Shaheen field, Qatars largest oil producing field.

THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 13

QATAR AT A GLANCE

Al Ruwais

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

BAHRAIN
Hawar
Islands
(Bahrain)

Al Khor

Dukhan

QATAR

Arabian Gulf

13

DOHA

Al Rayyan

Al Wakrah

Mesaieed

10

20

40

Kilometres
National capital
City
International boundary
Maritime boundary
Main roads
Port

SAUDI ARABIA

2015 The Oil & Gas Year Ltd., The Oil & Gas Year Qatar 2015. All rights reserved.

POLITICAL

GEOGRAPHY

Official name: State of Qatar

Area: 11,586 square kilometres

Population: 2,194,817 (2015)

Capital: Doha

Official language: Arabic

Natural resources: Natural gas, oil, fish

Political system: Constitutional emirate


Head of state: Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani
ECONOMY

ENERGY
2014 natural gas reserves: 24.5 tcm (865 tcf)
2014 natural gas production: 177 bcm (6.25 tcf)

Currency: Qatari riyal ($1:QAR3.65)

2014 oil reserves: 25.7 billion barrels

GDP: $212 billion (2014)

2014 oil production: 709,000 barrels per day

Share of oil and gas in nominal GDP: 51.1 percent (2014)


Major trading partners: China, Japan, South Korea, the UAE, India
The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

Sources: CIA World Factbook 2014, General Secretariat for Development Planning,
OPEC Annual Statistical Bulletin 2014, BP World Statistical Review 2015, Qatar National Bank Monthly Monitor (July 2015)
THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

QATAR AT A GLANCE

Gulf
of
Bahrain

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 14

THE INVESTORS INDEX

The Qatar 2015 Investors Index


THE YEAR IN REVIEW

84.1

14

FORWARD THINKING: The 94.1 percent of


respondents that agreed 12 months from the
surveys date would be a good time to invest
reflects relatively high expectations and the

LOCAL CHALLENGES: While a strong sense


of confidence prevails, 52.9 percent of respondents described doing business in Qatar
as difficult. A lack of clarity on government
policy and the strategy of the national oil
company are mainly to blame. Still, 29.4 percent thought industry policies were pro-business, and 44.1 percent rated them pro-business,
but restrictive. Almost two-thirds of investors
considered it difficult to start an oil and gas
business in Qatar. Contributing factors included
administrative barriers, a saturated market
and a shortage of highly skilled workers.
SAFE HAVEN: Investors remained relatively
confident in industry policies, procedures
and tendering processes, as 61.8 percent
agreed they were transparent. Qatar also appeared relatively untouched by regional geopolitical concerns, suggested by the 66.7 percent
of respondents that rated the country as stable
and the remaining 33 percent that rated it

BY MARKET
Abu Dhabi (2015)

95

Kuwait (2014)

93

Iraq (2014)

90.2

Saudi Arabia (2014)

88.5
84.1

Qatar (2015)

Oman (2015)

69.1

20

60

40

80

100

highly stable. Once again, Qatar stands as


one of the top choices among investors, with
appeal both in the short and the long term.
ABOUT THE INDEX: The TOGY Investors Index
is designed to measure confidence among oil
and gas investors as expressed in their level of
spending in any given market. The index is
valued based on the responses of major oil and
gas executives in this market. The survey consists
of five attitudinal questions in which participants
are asked to give positive or negative responses.
A reading above 50 on the index represents
a positive perception among oil and gas investors,
while scores of less than 50 suggest a negative
outlook. The Qatar 2015 Investors Index is based
on the responses of 34 oil and gas executives.

RESPONSE

IN

THE INVESTORS INDEX

The Qatar 2015 Investors Index rating of


84.1 percent indicates a positive outlook for
the countrys hydrocarbons industry, in spite
of the domestic impact of the downturn in
world energy markets. In a context of political
instability in the Middle East, the country
stands as one of the top destinations for investments and for companies to do business.
More than 97 percent of respondents described business conditions in Qatars oil and
gas industry as favourable, and 76.5 percent
believed it would improve over the next year.

likelihood of a business upswing in the near


future. Investors remain fairly confident in
the strength of Qatars industrial base, as 73.5
percent thought that it is a good time to
invest in the country, and 82.3 percent thought
that their companys revenue would increase
during the following 12 months.
The positive financial outlook, in spite of
the global fall in oil and gas prices, suggests
companies efforts towards efficiency and
streamlining are coming to fruition.

How would you describe the


How would you rate the ease of
policies of this government vis-- doing business in this country?
vis the oil and gas industry?
Pro-business
Pro-business, but restrictive
Anti-business, but accommodating
Anti-business

29.4 %
44.1 %
26.5 %
0%

How would you rate the ease of


starting an oil and gas business
in this market?
Very easy
Easy
Difficult
Extremely difficult

Very easy
Easy
Difficult
Extremely difficult

Dicult
52.9%

0%
47.1 %
52.9 %
0%

Easy
47.1%

0%
14.7 %
64.7 %
20.6 %

How would you rate the level of


transparency in this oil and gas
market?
Very transparent
Transparent
Not transparent
Corrupt

2.9 %
61.8 %
35.3 %
0%

How would you rate the level of


political and economic stability
in this oil and gas market?
Highly stable
Stable
Unstable
Highly unstable

33.3 %
66.7 %
0%
0%

Source: Survey conducted by The Oil & Gas Year in Qatar between January 2015 and July 2015
THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

02_THE YEAR IN REVIEW_QATAR_2015.qxp 10/15/15 4:24 PM Page 15

AMBASSADORS FORUM

A history of collaboration

Nicholas HOPTON
UK Ambassador to
Qatar

The UK-Qatar relationship was successful in 2014. Two-way trade exceeded 5 billion, and
Qatari government investment in the UK was more than 30 billion. The highlight was the
visit to the UK of His Highness the Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani.
In the energy industry in particular, the relationship is strong and continues to grow. In
November 2013, the UK and Qatari energy ministers signed a bilateral energy communiqu
in Doha, followed by further meetings in London in June and October 2014. In March 2015,
Stephen Lovegrove, permanent secretary at the UKs Department of Energy and Climate
Change, visited Qatar for high-level talks with Qatari ministers and senior officials. Qatar is a
key partner for the UKs energy security and our most important LNG supplier. In 2013,
Qatar provided 18 percent of total UK gas imports, and LNG overall met 13 percent of total
UK gas demand. Qatars South Hook LNG terminal at Milford Haven in the UK has the
capacity to supply 20 percent of total UK gas demand.
Gas will continue to play a key role in the UK energy mix. There will be increased demand
for electricity generation as we will reduce the use of coal to meet international climate
change targets, and several nuclear power plants will come off stream in the 2020s. Declining
domestic production will lead to increased import dependency, which will be met by both
LNG and pipeline gas. This highlights the importance of Qatari LNG to the UK. British
companies have played a key role in helping Qatar deliver its 2030 National Vision as well.

To strengthen bilateral co-operation, His Highness the Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al
Thani paid his first official visit to India in March 2015, where he met Prime Minister Shri
Narendra Modi and Minister of Petroleum and Natural Gas Shri Dharmendra Pradhan.
During this visit, six agreements and memorandums of understanding were signed to
further strengthen bilateral relations and promote investment in India from Qatar. Qatari
companies are encouraged by the governments to increase their involvement in Indias
national development strategy, Make in India, by participating in projects related to the new
industrial corridors, such as the one between Delhi and Mumbai.
Bilateral trade between India and Qatar stood at nearly $17 billion between 2013 and
2014, of which $16 billion was in the import of energy-related products from Qatar. Qatar is
the largest supplier of LNG to India. Since 2004, India has been importing 7.5 million tonnes
of LNG from Qatar per year under a 25-year sales and purchase agreement signed between
RasGas of Qatar and Petronet of India in 1999. In addition to that, India bought more than 5
million tonnes of Qatari LNG on spot markets and under short-term contracts in 2014.
Qatar is also Indias 10th-largest oil supplier, providing it with about 5 million tonnes of
oil per year. The Gulf nation also supplies India with fertiliser products, such as urea. The
Qatar Chemical and Petrochemical Marketing and Distribution Company, known as Muntajat,
opened an office in Mumbai in 2014, affirming its commitment to the Indian market.

The Whos Who of the Global Energy Industry

Shingo TSUDA
Japanese Ambassador
to Qatar

Sanjiv ARORA
Indian Ambassador
to Qatar

THE OIL & GAS YEAR | QATAR 2015

15
AMBASSADORS FORUM

Qatar is a major supplier of energy resources to Japan. With 16 million tonnes of LNG
delivered per year, which accounts for 18 percent of our LNG imports, the country is the
second-largest supplier of LNG to our country. Qatar is also Japans third-largest oil
supplier and produces 11 percent of our total oil imports.
Seeking economical LNG prices and securing needed LNG from producing countries
at the global level are important challenges for Japans future energy policy. Maintaining
stable and reliable energy supply is the most important factor for Japans energy security,
and Qatar is our most reliable and stable partner. Qatar proved that it is ready to respond
to emergency situations after the Tohoku earthquake in 2011, when it shipped additional
LNG to Japan. Japan was a member of the international consortium that developed Qatars
LNG industry from the initial stage as pioneer, investor, financier, off-taker and engineering
contractor starting in the mid-1980s. This helped to enhance our excellent relationship.
His Highness the Emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani paid an official visit to
Japan in February 2015 and met with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe.
Both sides expressed their intention to strengthen ties and diversify the domains of
their bilateral co-operation. Japanese companies will participate in new projects in Qatar
as both investors and contractors, and they are encouraged to take part in projects
supporting the 2022 FIFA World Cup and the Qatar National Vision 2030.

THE YEAR IN REVIEW

Qatar began developing strong ties with countries in Europe, Asia and the Americas starting in the early 1990s. The Middle Eastern
nation has attracted foreign investors to support the development of its energy industry and has continuously aided the growth
of its partners economies through deliveries of hydrocarbons and various foreign investments.