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Jeff Goodman's Library of Classical Guitar Music

Master Class Edition

Romance d'Amour
by

Anonymous

This edition contains a fully annotated and fingered version of the iconic Romance d'Amour,
study notes for the player, and a complete harmonic reduction of the piece. It outlines a distinct and
fruitful pathway to deeper technical mastery and musical comprehension, and offers a simple
methodology that can be applied to a broad array of pieces and musical styles.

Shelter of Clear Light Publishing


www.ShelterofClearLight.com

Romance d'Amour

arranged by
Jeffrey Goodman

Anonymous

i
4

IX
4

BV
7

V
4

BVII

3
1

1
1

II

10

VII
1

III
1

II
2

3
1

13
3

3
0

3
0

15

1.

2.
2

3
0

Copyright 2009

18
4
0

4
0

2
0

II

4
3

4
3

BVII

21
4

2
3

1
1

3
1

3
1

3
1

3
1

B IX
24

4
2

4
3

4
1

4
1

BV
27

3
1

4
1

4
1

4
1

3
1

%BII
30
4

32

1.
0
2

4
3

0
2

1
4

2.

1
1

35

i
4

38

V
4

IX
4

VII
-1

III
1

II
-2

BV
41

3
1

BVII
43

4
3

45

II
2

3
0

48
4

3
0
1

3
0

2
p

poco rit.............................................

4
1
p

Study notes for the player:


The Romance d'Amour, sometimes called Romanze or Spanish Romance, is one of the most
beloved of all pieces for the guitar. There is no definitive evidence of who the composer was.
The style of the music suggests its origin as the late 19th century Spain. The first section in E minor
is playable by guitarists in their first few seasons of study, whereas the second section in E major
is somewhat more difficult, but can readily be played by an intermediate player.
Here are a few guidelines and suggestions that can assist the player to master the technical
and musical challenges of the piece:
1. After learning the basic arpeggio that repeats throughout the piece, it is helpful to highlight
the melody notes, making them distinct from the accompanying pattern of triplets in each beat. One
way of doing this is by playing the first note of each triplet using a rest stroke. (The rest stroke is
often notated using a short horizontal line above the note.) The second and third
notes of each beat are to be played with free strokes:
rest strokes using the a finger:
a
4

m
p

II
2

free strokes using m and i:

2. The musical design of the piece is actually very simple. The melody is the first note of a
descending arpeggio pattern, and this pattern is repeated throughout the piece. Since an arpeggio
is composed of notes from a chord, it can help greatly in both technical control and memorizing
to practice the arpeggio sections as a series of chords. Look at the example below for how to
convert an arpeggio pattern into the chords they are composed of:
arpeggios

54

4 a

arpeggios

chords
4

chords
II
2

II
2

You can readily convert each measure of arpeggios into the underlying chord progression. On the
next pages you will find the entire Romance presented as a chord progression.

Harmonic Reduction of the Romance d'Amour

The term "harmonic reduction" is used generally to refer to the result of reducing the complexities
of a more elaborate piece of music to the essential chord progressions that are the underlying
harmonic structure of the music.
Learn to play the harmonic reduction of the Romance, and practice it until it flows without any
hesitation or technical glitches. Once you can play the chords smoothly, go back to the arpeggio
version and play it again. Then, over time, go back and forth between both versions, letting your
intuition guide you to deeper comprehension and technical mastery .

E minor section:
1

BV
5

4
1
1

BVII

3
1
1
2

13
3
2
1

3
2
1

1
1
1

4
1
2

1.

3
2

2.

7
The middle section of the Romance modulates to the key of E major. The harmonic progression is
more challenging for the guitarist. Many students find it helpful to make a chord diagram above the
notes of the chords that are unfamiliar. Over time trained guitarists learn to visualize the chord shape
on the fretboard for any chord they are playing.
This method of using a harmonic reduction of arpeggio passages can be applied to any
piece of music in any style.

E major section:
18
4

0
1
3

4
1
3

VII

BVII
22

3
1
2

3
1
2

4
3
2

1
3
2

1
3
2

4
3
2

4
3
2

BIx
26

30

BV

1
1

1
1

4
1
2

1
2

%BII
4
3
1
1

4
3
1
1

1.
1

0
1
2

1
2

1
4

2.

8
This section is an exact repeat of the first section in E minor. For this repeat it is effective to vary the
phrasing you used at the beginning. Try playing this a little more freely and expressively, rather than
playing it in the same way you did the first time.
-

E minor section:
35

BV
39

4
1
1

1
1
1

BVII

43

3
1
1
2

4
1
2

3
2

47
3
2
1

0
2

4
1
p