This is a DRAFT. It is NOT the final version and there need to be changes to this document.

Some of the items that appear here are from other people's works and I need to paraphrase the items. This is NOT for sale and it is for educational purposes only. Please read the TIPS section, chapter 3, and make recommendations wherever you want to. I seek submissions. Send your suggestions and criticisms to FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com These pages also need some spellchecking and reorganization.

[NOTE TO STUDENTS: yes, you can submit your essays and tips here and we can fatten the book – why not see your work in print?]

The Visual and Active SAT

Test Prep Book
With Tips Collected from Students who Took the Test
Claudia Gonzalez, abc, dge, your name goes here This book includes “The Vornle Method” and suggestions on “How to Create a Digital Portfolio” Edited by Steve McCrea 800 (M) / 720 (V)

Dedications To the Seventy Percent who don't have a passport May this book inspire you to get one. To John Vornle Thank you for sharing your method To Brooks Emeny Search Wikipedia for this guy's name and you'll see why his life inspired the creation of BuldingInternationalBridges.org To Dennis Littky Thank you for taking time to write The Big Picture and for putting dozens of important questions on metcenter.org. Your school will inspire millions of teachers to look for the passions in their students. To You, The Reader Without you, there would be no reason to create this book. To J.K.
I can't imagine what life was like before I had you by my side. I can't say what I'd do without you, knowing what it's like to have you near me.

(Ms. Little is correct) Many of the photos that appear in this book can be found on JKMcCrea.net

Dear Reader, This is one of least organized books you will ever open. It was compiled with passion, not a formal method of “let's make money with a book.” The aim of this book is to share with you the ideas, experiences, recommendations and names of these fabulous students who entered my SAT Prep classroom. Their dreams were expressed through their questions and I got the idea that they each “want to have an incredibly interesting life – they don't really want a higher SAT score. They are in school to prepare for the future.” This book is ten percent “How to get a higher score” and ninety percent “How to prepare for a fabulous future.” The structure of this book follows how I present my course: a) Define the goals (10% and 90%) b) Tell some stories c) Give some tips d) Show how to use the tips (practice, practice, practice) e) Put a mark next to (almost) every math problem in the book and on freevocabulary.com, number2.com and bestsamplequestions.com: A CHECK means “I can do this problem in less than 30 seconds” “30” or “FASTER” or “F” means “I know how to do this but I need a tip for doing it faster” “???” or “Huh?” means “I have no idea what to do here.” f) Listen to each student's dreams g) Check their understanding of the Vornle Method h) Encourage students to “broadcast” themselves using techniques described at EveryoneIsHere.com Invite students to come to future classes to help future students with the process. By teaching the tips, we become better at using the tips. They can start with elementary school students (described in the last chapter of this book). Please send your suggestions and comments to VisualAndActive@gmail.com or call +1 954.646.8246 and leave a message (someone will return your call). We invite you to participate in the next edition of this book. Let's get started.

Contents
1 - Goals Define the goals (10% and 90%) 2 - Stories to Inspire You 3 - Tips 4 - Practice, Practice, Practice Let's use the tips 5 - Swiss Cheese Test Prep: Find the Holes Put a mark next to every math problem in the book and on freevocabulary.com, number2.com and bestsamplequestions.com: CHECK for “I can do this problem in less than 30 seconds” “30” or “FASTER” or “F” means “I know how to do this but I need a tip for doing it faster” “???” or “Huh?” means “I have no idea what to do here.” 6 - What is Your Passion? Listen to each student's dreams 7 - The Vornle Method A strategic look at the college application process – what can help you get accepted into a university? 8 - Broadcast Yourself Use techniques described at EveryoneIsHere.com 9 - What's Next? Invite students to come to future classes to help future students with the process. By teaching the tips, we become better at using the tips. They can start with elementary school students (described in the last chapter of this book). 10 - What Inspires You? These items inspire me – perhaps something will work for you 11 - Building International Bridges My main motivation for writing this book – it's for “the 70 percent.” Appendix Appendices The Visual and Active Method Links

1 - Goals Define the goals (10% and 90%)

Ten Percent

Ninety Percent Let's estimate that there are 100 doors that we will have to walk through for a successful life. What percent of those doors will require a high academic result to get you through the door? What percent of the doors will open to you because you have a second language? What percent of the doors will open because you

have social connections? Because you inherited money? Because your parents know someone? Because you took time to make friends with someone?

------------I've seen remarkable schools. I've watched remarkable teachers. I want to share what I've seen. I can't do that if you are interested in ONLY getting a higher SAT score. Here's what happens in my mind when I'm standing in front of group of students: a) these kids are under a lot of stress. They have virtually no control of their time, they have to produce essasy and prepare for tests and submit homeowrk and prepare college applications. I'm sking them to study word lists and look at hundreds of math problems. These three hours might be the only time in this

week that they can “chill out” or perhaps they need at least two of these hours to prepare for a chemistry test tomorrow or perhaps they just need to have a nap. I'm not going to take attendance. I'm not going to require them to ask permission to leave the room. I'm not going to monitor their presence. They are near-adults and I'm going to treat them like colleagues, because they are helping me write this book. So it's easy to see why I look forward to these metings. I get paid to spend three hours with thoughtful, intelligent, probing minds. I learn so much in these sessions. I'm a chemistry researcher, experimenting with added ingredients (when I bring videos of Steve Jobs and Thomas Friedman and TED.com and see how the students react). I'm a networker when I suggest that they connect with my international students on Facebook. I'm a college counselor when I suggest ways to build a portfolio. Yes, I teach math. But it's just ten percent of what I do each week. I'm composing special projects and suggestions for twenty separate

lesson plans – a plan for each student.

2 - Stories to Inspire You The Lake story In 1974 I took the PSAT. I got 57 math, 55 verbal. Those scores predicted 570 math, 550 verbal on the SAT. That summer I spent three weeks on a lake in Canada with my grandfather. No cable TV, no nintendo, only the Watergate hearings on television. I spent mornings doing math problems in my SAT workbook – and this was before Princeton Review, Kaplan and Barron's. The only workbook I knew about was the college Board's version. The workbook had 750 “difficult” words and I read through the lists until I could give a synonym for each one. I might not have known how to pronounce “vicarious” but I knew it was something about a vicar (a priest) who could experience wild parties without being there... because he lived the moment vicariously through one of his licentious

parishioners. That's the source of the basic Visual and Active method for SAT test prep. In short: Look at every math problem in the workbook Look at every word on FreeVocabulary.com Bring questions to every class Write to FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com and send essays for me to check. Ask parents and other grownups to tell stories about how they remember words Read a lot (especially newspaper columns) to get the idea about how to write an essay ----------------

This method requires the student to do a LOT of work. It's a good idea to look at a variety to SAT prep videos. Here is a good playlist on Youtube for BASIC MATH
http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=14CFCA12A52BDB17&search_query=math+ehow

For SAT Vocabulary help, try some of these videos: SAT Words in the Kitchen 1 and 2 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iF0AaDeXKRU http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Al-kJWk9aU I have a playlist on my youtube channel MisterMath Look for this series Course March 2010 Tips for improvement (17) by Steve McCrea http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C7vgsVFaVV8 January 2010 p://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Qf5P8ejx7s0

SAT Prep Course Broward College Feb 2010 part A
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MoySrE0x-t0
SAT Prep Course Broward College Feb 2010 part L

I do not "inject" vocabulary words into you and I do not insert a "math chip" in your brain. I show you shortcuts and then you (the student) need to practice. You can practice with a study buddy, with a parent, or with me. I charge $50 per hour. I show you how you can work with your study buddy and do many of the things that I suggest. See the PLAYLIST on youtube.com/mistermath and youtube.com/satvideos Essay tips http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y_zDzXjAGHU Lecture by a teacher at Massey University

Math problems justmathtutoring.com http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qwnaKJCckTA

There are four types of student. Which one are you? Concrete - Random Concrete - Sequential Abstract - Random Abstract - Sequential Learn more at floatingneutrinos.com

Here's another tip: Get a book published.
We publish our books at AuthorHouse.com, iUniverse, BookSurge (CreateSpace) and other print-on-demand companies. We recommend that you get your student's work published there. Ask for Dan Heise and you'll get marketing guidance at the start of the bookmaking process. Build a portfolio of achievements... If you believe that your current goal is "to get a higher score on the SAT," I can help you achieve that goal. (I encourage you to find a longer-term goal. If you want to learn about how the Vornle Method can help you, contact me at Visualandactive@gmail.com)

BUILD YOUR PORTFOLIO 1. Connect with students in other countries. Become an Ambassador by BuildingInternationalBridges.org 2. Earn your Certificate as a Certified Conversation Assistant CCA 3. Make an old man happy: Visit www.TheStudentIsTheClass.com and DistorttheNet

4. Write to Steve and give him some ideas about how to improve your portfolio. 5. Read about Portfolios and the Vornle Method... again.

The importance of Portfolios (I will write about my experiences with portfolios and how these important documents are used in Littky schools.)

The Vornle Method (see later in the book)

3 - Tips This list appears to be random. In fact, it is deliberately jumbled to force the reader to look at each tip. If the items were presented in groups (math tips, essay tips, vocabulary tips, ….), then some students would scan the list and jump to the tips that were connected only to their areas of perceived weakness. This random list is intended to encourage students to examine each step, each tip, each recommendation. Some of the students who helped compile this list could not take the stress of looking at this “chaotic pile,” and they have placed these tips into categories. Please visit SATVideos.com and click on the link “Organized List of Tips” near the top of the home page. [note to students: anyone who wants to work on grouping these tips into categories can write to me and I'll put you together so you can be the “organized tip list” committee. 954 646 8246) 1. Print FreeVocabulary.com (50 words per

page or about 150 words per page on 36 pages). Check off the words you know. (It's fun to mark them as you learn them.) Read the remaining words. Ask adults to tell you how they remember the meanings of these words. Then call 954.646.8246 and talk about the words. Write to FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com and create sentences about these words. Write three of these words on a whiteboard and ask your teachers to use these words during the class. 2. Print problems from Number2.com that give you headaches. Bring these problems to the SAT class or email them to your SAT tutor. 3. Try the exercises at BestSampleQuestions.com 4. Get a good night's rest – every night between now and the test. 5. Visit SATVideos.com and click on all of the links. 6. Start with C. The middle answer is usually the right place to start. You can “plug in” the answers and see what works. If the result is too big, then you know which direction to go

7.

8.

(either toward A or toward E). Some examples: 10x = 40. A) 2, B) 4, C) 6, D) 8, E) 10. when we put in 6, 60 = 40. Too big, so plug in a smaller number. 10x = x + 72. A) 2, B) 4, C) 6, D) 8, E) 10. When we put in 6, 60 = 78. Hmmm. We need a larger number. Plug in 8 and 80 = 80. Carry the word list (that you printed in step 1). Make copies for your car, kitchen, parents, friends and ask them to use these words when they talk with you. Print the lsit of words gathered from the Visual and Active CD (also listed on SATVideos.com). Post the list (as shown on “SAT Words in the Kitchen” found on youtube.com/mistermath).

9.

ajdljf 11. sdf 12. sfsf 13. aeg 14. aoe 15. Call the test “SAT Reasongin Test” or SAT 1:
10.

SAT Reasoning Test. This exam has been developed to test the critical thinking skills that are required for success in college. The SAT Reasoning Test has

three parts: Critical Reading, Mathematics, and Writing. The SAT Writing section is always the first part of the exam. It consists of a series of multiple-choice questions and a short essay. The multiple-choice questions will test your ability to improve the sense and sound of sentences and paragraphs and identify grammatical errors. The level of SAT test vocabulary will be approximately that of a first-year college student. In the short essay, you will be required to develop a reasoned argument on a specific subject. The Critical Reading portion of the SAT exam consists of multiple-choice questions covering reading comprehension, sentence completion, and critical reading of paragraph-length passages. Analogies are not included in SAT testing any longer. The SAT Math section consists of multiple-choice questions as well as questions for which you will have to provide an answer. In order to be prepared for the math section, your SAT test prep should include number and operations; algebra and functions; geometry; and statistics, probability; and data analysis. The number and operations problems will focus on sequences involving exponential growth and the union, intersection, and elements of sets. The algebra and functions problems will focus on absolute value; rational equations and inequalities; radical equations; integer and rational exponents; diverse and inverse variation; function notation; concepts of domain and range; functions as models; graphs and equations of linear functions; and graphs and equations of quadratic functions. The Geometry and Measurement problems focus on geometric notation for length, segments, lines, rays, and congruence; problems in which trigonometry can be used; properties of tangent lines; coordinate geometry; qualitative behavior of graphs and functions; and transformations and their effect on the graphs of functions. The data analysis, statistics, and probability problems focus on data interpretation, scatterplots, and matrices; and geometric probability. In previous versions of SAT testing, estimation and number sense were featured; in current SAT exams, these topics are included but not featured. You will be allowed to use a four-function, graphing, or scientific calculator for the Math section of the SAT test.

agdsie 17. adgkie 18. dfaie 19. Get sleep. Yes, this is so important, we've listed it again. 20. Adj 21. Divide 100 by numbers less than 50: 40 x__ =
16.

10; 30 x ____ =100; 33 x ? = 100 ?' ee 23. w 24. wer 25. gg 26. ]]]sdf 27. we 28. osdf 29. afe 30. etwqet 31. sgr 32. age 33. hr 34. et 35. 45 36. 36 37. dh 38. ry 39. eh5 40. What is the difference between “Many people in the US are 41. What's the difference between “I'm from the
22.

USA” and “I'm an American”? Well, it's not an SAT tip but it does stimulate your thinking, doesn't it? Search “Lateral thinking” on the Internet. Search “lateral thinking elevator story.” www.rinkworks.com/brainfood/p/latreal1.shtm 42. wh5 43. wh 44. j 45. 6j 46. jtj 47. 45u 48. Look at youtube videos. Search “SAT test prep,” “SAT exercises” and “SAT Tips.” 49. Read Strunk and White's book about the essentials of writing, grammar and punctuation. You can download free at 50. Take a nap at least once a day to make sure you get enough sleep. Yes, this is so important, we've listed it again. 51. 234 52. Tips about Essays:
53. Fist, the assignment should be read in its entirety. Each essay question on the SAT test is accompanied by a paragraph that that discusses the issue in question. This paragraph contains important information about the issue, and this information should be taken into account in answering the question. A good thing to do is to imagine that the test-taker is having a discussion with the writer of the paragraph. Figuring out what could be said in response to the author of

the paragraph, bringing up other ideas and examples about the test-taker's point of view on the issue, and determining if the test-taker agrees or disagrees with the paragraph author can all provide good starting points for writing the essay. In addition, making sure to not oversimplify the essay answer is very important. Each example or idea that is brought up in the essay must be thoroughly explained and supported. It is preferable to have a few well thought-out and supported ideas and thoughts than it is to have many simplistic and not well supported ideas. Furthermore, since the essay can be written using the testtaker's own personal examples and experiences, the use of the word “I” is permitted. Do not be afraid to use the first person in the writing of the SAT test essays. Remembering to let oneself shine through in the essay question is important. And, finally, make sure to write about the topic or issue that is presented. Any essays that are not written about the topic or issue presented receive a score of zero.

A student once told me, “Memorize ten words and fit them into the essay.” Well, that would certainly demonstrate the student's ability to memorize words. But would it be appropriate to use the word obstinate or diligent when discussing pollution? “Some communities admantly refuse to accept transfer points, part of the “Not in my backyard” (NIMBY) response that typifies many 55. Essay: avoid “all” and “None” and “not one” as in “all peple know...” and “Not one person” and “The USA has never...” – unless you are certain that the situation is without an exception. Select words like “many” and “some” and “Most” as in “many people in Miami know of the annual celebration held on
54.

Calle Ocho...” 56. Read David Brooks, old columns of Anthony Lewis, people who use challenging words, even William F. Buckley. 57. You don't need to react. You don't need to be upset by people or things. They are powerless. Your reaction is their only power. You can choose to be agitated or calm. The SAT is just an opprotunity for you to sit in one place for about four hours and move a pencil across a paper or move a computer mouse on a table. 58. You can bring a calculator. As often as possible, use your head and pencil and paper for calculations. See the suggestion about “a calculator” below. 59. Print the 7 pages of practice problems on the right side of the first screen of FreeVocabulary.com. 60. Write to Dr. Baku and tell him that he has a great website. This might encourage him to add words to the list. The act of thanking someone has a way of fixing in your mind the importance of using that site. As a result, you might look at his vocabulary list more often.

Learn about brain nutirents. Add omega-3 to your diet. How about some Vitamin D? Do a search “nutrients for the brain.” 62. Learn about male/female brain differences. This information might help you understand your strengths and help you find study partners who can explain answers and give tips in a way that a teacher hasn't. Many of us learn faster from a peer. 63. Teach some of these tips to a friend or classmate. The act of explaining the steps toward an answer solidifies the synapses that connect neurons related to math and verbal skills. 64. Search “brain growth in taxi drivers.” It's fascinating. Even people who say, “I'm just not a math person” can alter their brain's structure with intransigence, persistence and diligence.
61. 65.

re

(more tips go here) YES STUDENTS... this is the SPECIAL chapter about tips. Send your tips to FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com and call me with your three words each day... and talk with other people.... use the new words. ==========

How about “TIPS ABOUT WRITING THE ESSAY”? Websites that we found useful Owl English from Iowa

Students: what websites do you use? Vocabulary for SAT and GRE http://www.testprepreview.com/vocabulary.htm FreeVocabulary.com

Sections for studying... ProProfs.com gives examples of 27 types of math problems. http://www.proprofs.com/sat/study-guide/index.shtml math rational numbers http://www.proprofs.com/sat/study-guide/Topic1/N_O_M3_S1/html/10001.shtml Other topics include:

JustMathTutoring.com A tutor based in Austin, Texas has numerous videos about algebra and SAT Prep.

The list given on this page Adding and Subtracting Fractions Adding and Subtracting Polynomials Multiplying and Dividing Fractions Negative Numbers Factoring Numbers, Absolute Value. Radical Notation -What Radical

Notation Means, Simplifying Radicals, and Converting Fractional Exponents to Radical Notation, Finding the Least Common Multiple, LCM Finding the Greatest Common Factor, GCF Rationalizing the Denominator of a Fraction - A few basic examples Rationalizing the Denominator Graphing Linear Functions by Finding X and Y Intercepts Graphing Piecewise Defined FunctionsFinding the Slope between Two Points Finding the Equation of a Line Using Point-Slope Form Finding the Domain and Range of the Above Piecewise Defined Function Finding the Formula of a Piecewise Defined Function from a Graph A quick sketch of about 10 basic graphs you should know! Graphing the Great Integer Function also known as the Floor Function Graph Transformations - Horizontal and Vertical shifts Graph Transformations - Basic Formulas and Vertical Stretching/Compressing is Discussed Graph Transformations - Horizontal and Vertical Stretching/Compressing is Discussed Graph Transformations - Reflections about the X - Axis and Y-Axis are discussed - Basic Idea! Graph Transformations - Putting it All Together!! Example 1 Graph Transformations - Putting it All Together!! Example 2

Graphing Linear Systems of Inequalities - Example 1 Graphing Linear Systems of Inequalities - Example 2 Finding the Equation of an Exponential Function from a Graph The Basic Rules Negative Exponents and Fractional Exponents Evaluating Numbers Raised to Fractional Exponents Simplifying Numbers Under Square Roots Factoring Polynomials(*) - Basic Factoring (*) - Quadratics (*) Function Notation Adding and Subtraction Functions Multplying and Dividing Functions Composition of Functions Domain and Range - Basic Idea - Reading the Domain and Range from Two Graphs Long Division of Polynomials Long Division of Polynomials - Slightly Harder Example

Counting Techniques/ Probability
The Multiplication Principle

Factorials - Evaluating Factorials - Basic Numerical Examples Counting Using Permutations Counting Using Combinations Calculating the Probability of Simple Events Calculating Probabilities for "And" statements - Independent Events Calculating Probabilities for "And" statements - DEPENDENT Events Calculating Probabilities for "At Least One" statements Texas Millions! What is the probability of you winning the Texas Lotto if you buy one ticket?

SAT Math Videos
In addition, the site covers logarithms and matrices (one matrix, two matrices): These topics are NOT part of the SAT math exam. The webpage ends with ten videos, labeled as:

SAT Math Video #1 through #8 plus Another SAT Math Test - Part 1 Another SAT Math Test - Part 2

http://www.eduers.com/sat/studyguide.htm

Do you know the layout of the test? What kinds of questions appear on the test? Do you know the directions for each section of the test? You can save time by not reading the directions carefully months BEFORE you take the actual test. When “filling in a blank,” create your own answer first. “The ______ dog was too large for him to push through the door.” You could guess “heavy.” The choice are : loquacious lugubrious petulant obese … Now it is faster for you to eliminate the wrong answers. Instead of evaluating each potential answer, first eliminate the obivously wrong answers. Cross out the wrong answers. You can quickly find the better answer. Avoid guessing. If you have five questions left and you guess answer “B” for all of the five questions, you will probably get one answer correct. You'll get one point for the correct answer and lose a quarter piont for each incorrect answer. 1 + 4(-¼) = 1 – 1 = 0. No gain. Ignore the previous tip if you like 50-50 gambling. If you can reduce the number of choices from five to two, you will probably be ahead if you guess the answer. Remember, you lose a quarter point for an incorrect answer and uyou get one test point for a correct answer. Thirty test points might translate into a test score of 700. Save time for the more difficult section of the test. The first ten questinons might be easy, the next ten or 15 might be medium difficult and the last two or four questions coud be difficult. You could spend less than 30 seconds on the easy questions (5 minutes), a minute on each medium question (1015) and you'd have five to ten minutes for the difficult questions and for checking your answers. Take the test TWICE. Make notes and show your work along the way.

Remember that your “future self” will be looking at your notes parhaps twenty minutes from now...

Predict The Answer. On the PSAT and SAT I, the surest way to avoid falling for traps on test day is to predict the answer before looking at the answer choices. For example, if answering an SAT Sentence Completion, don't just jump into the answer choices to see which one fits; read the sentence, predict the missing work and scan the answer choices to see which one fits. Use the Order Of Difficulty. On the PSAT and SAT I, often the Math and Sentence Completion questions are arranged in order of difficulty, (i.e. the questions get progressively harder as you work through each question set). Use this knowledge to plot strategy for each section; for example, consider spending extra time on early questions to make sure to net "easy" points. Skip Around. Within any given section of the PSAT and SAT I, one may skip around and answer the questions in any order. If a particular question or passage is difficult, skip it; return to it later if there is time. Pace Yourself. The SAT I and PSAT ask a lot of questions in a short period of time. To get through a whole section, it's important not to spend too much time on any one question. Get used to the pressure by practicing under timed conditions and keep a brisk pace throughout the test. Make sure to wear a watch as the test proctors do not always provide numerous time-checks. Guess. Test takers often talk about a "guessing penalty" on the SAT. This is a misnomer; it's really a "wrong-answer penalty." Guess wrong and lose points. Guess right, and you gain. By eliminating one or more answers as definitely wrong, the odds of guessing the correct answer increases. Be Careful With The Answer Grid. Even if every question is correctly answered on these tests, the score will undoubtedly be lower if it is gridded incorrectly. Be careful when inputting answers. One timeproven gridding strategy is to circle the answer for each question in the booklet as it is figured out, then transfer those answers to the answer grid in groups of five or more. Look for Quick Points If Time is Running Short. Some questions can be answered more quickly than others. For instance, some reading

questions ask to identify the meaning of a particular word in the passage. Questions such as these can often be answered quickly when time starts to run out at the end of a section. The Most Obvious Choice on Difficult Questions is Almost Always Wrong - but it's not far off. When in doubt, look for the answer that is closest to the most obvious choice. The Correct Answer to Multiple-Choice Reading Comprehension Questions are Easily Defended Factual Statements or Carefully Worded Opinions. Choices that use exclusive or extreme words (only, always, never, all, none) are rarely if ever correct, unless proceeded by a qualifier like "not," in which case they are almost always correct. When Asked to Compare Fractions, Turn Them Into Their Decimal Equivalents by Dividing the Top number by the Bottom Number (with a calculator!) It's hard to know whether 6/15 is greater or less than 7/16 but it is easily compare their decimal equivalents. 6/15=.4 while 7/16=.4375. Clearly 7/16 is greater. Bring a Digital Watch (it's easier to read) and a calculator (it's permitted).

http://www.eduers.com/sat/sat_prep_tips.htm Tests make up a large percentage of most students' grades. They also cause a lot of grief because of this fact. Do you want to conquer that nervous grief? Read on. The Main Things to Remember Before You Dig Into the Material 1. Give yourself plenty of time. If a test is on Friday and you study for only five minutes on Wednesday all the while knowing that you'll be really busy on Thursday night, you're not setting yourself up for success. You need to plan to review a little bit (ten-fifteen minutes) Mon.-Wed. nights and then on Thursday night, you should study anywhere from thirty minutes to four or five hours or more, depending on the difficulty and length of the test. For example quiz might take thirty minutes to study for and a final would take longer than that. The main thing is to not rush yourself because studying takes time. 2. Make sure you are mentally fresh before you start to study. If you've

been doing homework for an hour already and take a ten minute break to clear your head you'll be much better off than if you just keep on studying. Keep something fun at your desk or workspace and time yourself. Give yourself ten minutes to play with the silly putty or to doodle. When your time is up, go back to work. 3. Realize when it's time to stop and go to bed. If you still don't get trigonometric functions at 1:30 AM, and you've been studying for four hours already, it's time to call it quits and get some sleep. When you're really tired like that, you'll hit a wall and you'll know it. My advice is if you can deal with late studying, go for it, but if you can't, don't waste your time. Get some rest and wake up early so you can study when you're refreshed. General Study Tips 1. When you're taking notes in school do it neatly. You won't want to read messy notes when you're studying for a test. You should also keep your notes in some kind of order. For example-chapter three notes go here, chapter four notes go there., etc. This will make things a whole lot easier for you when the test comes up. 2. Make sure that your workspace is neat and that the area you are in is quiet and non-distracting. If a TV or loud radio is on you will get distracted, so don't even try it. 3. Make sure that you have everything you need to study before you leave school. Make a mental checklist of all the things that you need. It's awfully hard to study with no information. 4. Before you start really memorizing or working out problems, you've got to read over your notes, the chapter in your textbook, any worksheets you have had and all other important materials. This will make studying significantly easier. There have been many times when I have worked out all my problems by simply reading something carefully for the second time. It might take a while to read everything, but the bounty will be plentiful. 5. When you're studying for a fact-ridden test like math, after you've read the material, write up a fact sheet. The purpose for doing this is twofold. First of all, when you write things out, you get more familiar with them and secondly, you can bring it to school and study it all day before the test.

LINKS Manage your time on the test http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/preparation_tips.php#time How to use a calculator effectively http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/calculators.php Number of questions http://www.sattest.us/ MOre tips http://www.eduers.com/sat/studyguide.htm http://www.eduers.com/sat/sat_prep_tips.htm

http://www.eduers.com/sat/test_taking_strategies.htm

Are you worried about the test? http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/anxiety.php SERVICES http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/services.asp http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/College/sati.asp http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/the_year_ahead.asp http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/ivy_league_table.asp Interesting table

http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/timeline.asp

http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/College/sat.asp

=============== http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/College/sat.asp

How to Easily Increase Your Test Score
Keep in mind that the SAT and ACT are games. Just as in playing chess, baseball, tennis, or any other game or sport, those who know how the game is played have a huge advantage over those who are ignorant of the game's idiosyncratic rules.

How to Manage Your Time Wisely
Take realistic practice tests
The most effective way to develop your time management skills is to put them to work through practice tests and simulations. It is impossible to over-emphasize the importance of this point. Therefore you are strongly encouraged to take at least a few mock SAT/ACT exams, and to try to simulate the actual testing environment as closely as possible (meaning no breaks, snacks, music, phone calls, etc.). You should secure a copy of either The Official SAT Study Guide or ofThe Real ACT Prep Guide, as these books use actual test questions from prior exams. Their practice material and tests will most closely simulate the types of questions you will see when you sit for the exam.

Recognize the ascending order of difficulty
SAT and ACT math questions become more difficult as you go through each section. If you are nearing the end of a section and find that you cannot figure out the last few questions, don't waste your time trying to answer them. Your time will be better spent reviewing your answers to the questions in the beginning and middle of the section. Keep in mind that all the questions are weighted the same. You won't get extra points for answering the hardest questions. Furthermore, a few blank answers will not make a material impact on your score.

Don't waste time
This probably sounds like self-evident advice. However, we mention it because we've often had clients tell us how they inadvertently wound up wasting precious test time by going back to re-read directions after the test had begun, or by not making it back from their hourly breaks promptly. Remember, these activities will take time away from working on the questions.

Read the questions carefully
As silly as this piece of advice may seem, it can make a big difference in your test score. The undisciplined test taker will feel the stress of the clock during the timed sections and will try to cut corners to save time however and whenever possible. As a result, they read questions hastily and often misinterpret them. Test writers are well aware of this tendency and are happy to exploit it. We guarantee that you will encounter questions on the test that offer incorrect answer choices that are deliberately designed to exploit a common misinterpretation of what the question is really asking.

Avoid random guessing in the multiple choice sections
The SAT's scoring formula has been "tweaked" to penalize you for incorrect answers. As a result, you will not be aided by random guessing. You lose more points for answering a question incorrectly than you do for not answering it at all. As a result, you will not be aided by random guessing. If you have absolutely no idea what the correct answer is to a question, we suggest that you simply skip it and move on. It will be advantageous for you to guess at the answer, however, when you can eliminate at least one answer choice as incorrect. Usually you will be able to identify at least one choice that is clearly wrong. Eliminating even one incorrect choice will improve your odds of selecting the correct answer. The only exception to this rule is when you face a problem solving question that requires you to write in an answer. In that case, obviously, you don't have a set of answer choices to give you a clue as to the correct solution. All you can do is solve the problem to the best of your ability and write in your answer.

Eliminate the deliberately deceptive wrong choices
With practice, you should begin to recognize how the SAT and the ACT present deliberately deceptive incorrect answer choices. There are several common patterns here that will begin to become apparent as you proceed through your preparation.

Practice, practice, practice
As we stated at the top of this page, there are tips and techniques to taking the SAT and ACT that will raise your overall score significantly. As a result, these are tests that you can prepare for – despite what the test-makers state. We strongly encourage you to take practice tests that use actual questions from previous exams, as we have detected a material difference in the quality of the test questions prepared by the test writers and those written by the test prep companies. (Unofficial test prep books are, however, superior to the official prep guides in their advice on study and test-taking techniques. That is why we recommend buying and using at least two test prep guides, one being the official guide for the test you are taking and the other being a good-quality unofficial

guide.) Finally, while we believe every test taker will benefit by reviewing each SAT or ACT exam section, we encourage you to spend the most time studying and practicing questions in your weakest subject area. This will provide you with the most efficient use of your testprep time.

Our Thoughts on Retaking the SAT or ACT
Obviously, it will be in your best interest to do your best on the SAT and ACT the first time you take it. If, however, you believe your test score is not indicative of your best ability, it will generally not hurt you to retake this important exam. Most colleges will only look at your highest test score. Many of the admissions officers we know will even be favorably impressed if you show an improvement in your test scores.

Number of questions on the test Source: http://www.sattest.us/

Excluding an experimental question section, which will not count towards your SAT score, you will see one essay topic, 49 writing questions, 67 critical reading questions, and 54 math questions.

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LINKS Manage your time on the test http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/preparation_tips.php#time How to use a calculator effectively http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/calculators.php Number of questions http://www.sattest.us/

Are you worried about the test? http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/anxiety.php SERVICES http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/services.asp http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/College/sati.asp http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/the_year_ahead.asp http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/ivy_league_table.asp Interesting table

http://www.admissionsconsultants.com/college/timeline.asp

College Admissions Timeline
The road to college is long – and sometimes confusing. To help keep you on track, here's a timeline of what college applicants should be doing, and when.

March – April
Seniors – At this point in the application cycle, there's little left for you to do but sit tight and wait for your admissions decisions. At many schools, admissions committees meet in March to make their final admit/deny/waitlist decisions, and then send notifications to applicants starting April 1. Good luck! Juniors – You'll be spending a good part of the rest of this year on your college selection

and applications. Check the items below to see what you should be focusing on this spring. Sophomores – You still have some time left before you need to start serious work on your college plans. Only a few of the items on the following list refer specifically to you. However, it's not a bad idea to look over the entire list to get an idea of what you'll need to be prepared for next year.

Standardized Tests:
Spring is an ideal time for high school juniors to take the SAT Reasoning Testor the ACT. Having your scores in hand this spring will give you an idea of how competitive an applicant you'll be at your targeted schools. You'll also leave yourself plenty of time to re-take the test in the fall if you're not happy with your first set of scores. Visit our SAT and ACT Test Preparation pages for more information about these tests. Don't forget: The next SAT test dates you can still register for are May 1 and June 5. The regular registration deadlines for those tests are March 31 and May 5. The next ACT test date is April 10, and the regular registration deadline is March 5. (Late registration continues through March 19.) Another ACT will be given in June. Most high school students now have the option of taking either the SAT or the ACT. Based upon your unique profile, you may be better off taking one test over the other. Don't settle for taking whichever test your peers take. Your choice of test can make a difference in your college admissions outcomes. We've worked with applicants who were admitted to higher-tier schools than they might have been because they took the trouble to identify the standardized test that better suited their learning style. Spring can also be a good time to get SAT Subject Tests (also referred to as SAT IIs) out of the way. Many selective colleges and universities require scores from 2 or 3 Subject Tests as part of their application. Check the requirements of the schools you're thinking of applying to, and then check the College Board webpage for this year's test dates. Think about how many Subject Tests you want to schedule for the same day, and whether a test date would overlap or conflict with AP exams or finals. If you're a sophomore, think about taking the PSAT sometime before your junior year, for practice. The PSAT will not be required for college admissions, and your score will not be reported to colleges or influence your admissions outcomes. But a practice PSAT can help you do better on the PSAT in your junior year, which could mean winning consideration for a National Merit Scholarship – which would certainly be a plus on your application!

School Selection:
"To simply say, 'I want to go to X University because of the great academics,' doesn't tell the admissions committee much. But if you mention something specific – a certain class or professor, or a notable alum – your reasons for wanting to attend the school will be more specific, and therefore more memorable." – Senior Admissions Consultant Nick Pantelides. Nick served as Director of Admissions at the US Naval Academy. Spring is the time for juniors to continue exploring their school choices and to continue compiling their lists of 'stretch,' 'good fit,' and 'safety' schools. Think about what type of college or university you would be happiest at – a big urban campus, or a small outdoorsy one? A large, well-endowed school with state-of-theart labs and classrooms, or a school with more modest infrastructure but more interaction between faculty and students? To learn more about the types of schools you have to choose from, see our webpage on "Your College Choices." Aim for a list of 8 to 12 schools that you would be happy attending. Include a mix of reach schools, 'good matches,' and safety schools. Plan to apply only to as many schools as you will be able to submit well-prepared applications for. You'll get better results by applying to 6 schools with applications that reflect 100 per cent of your best effort than you will by applying to 12 schools with applications that each reflect 50 per cent of your best effort. If you visit college campuses this spring, try to avoid periods like mid-terms, finals, and holidays. You'll get a better idea of campus life if you time your visit for a more typical period. Ask to see dining halls, dorm rooms, and recreational facilities in addition to classrooms and public areas. Ask how representative the facilities you're seeing are of the entire campus. Remember, you may be seeing the only residence hall that's been renovated in the past 10 years. If there's a college or university you're especially interested in, think about scheduling an interview. Many of the largest and most selective schools no longer offer interviews, but it can make a difference at the smaller colleges and universities. Prepare yourself ahead of time by researching the school and coming up with a list of questions about what it's like to be a student there.

Academics:
Continue to select classes that will challenge and stimulate you without overwhelming you. Admissions committees look for applicants who stretched themselves in high school. Having challenging courses on your transcripts will be even more important

to your admissions outcomes if your high school is one of the many that no longer provide class ranks. Take AP and IB classes if you have the opportunity to and are genuinely interested in the course being offered. Think about how much schoolwork you can handle at one time, or want to. Don't forget that the extra time you must devote to AP or IB classes means you'll have less time for other things that matter to you. You should also be realistic about how much impact having one more AP class on your transcripts will have on your admissions chances. For details, see our webpage on why "It Takes More Than AP Credit to Make Your App Stand Out."

Extracurricular Activities:
"Community service should clearly come from the heart and not appear to have been motivated just by a desire to 'add another bullet point to the resume.'" – Admissions Consultant Sheri Mural. Sheri is former Associate Director of Admissions for Barnard College, Columbia University. Extracurricular activities can be a great way to show there's more to you than simply good grades and test scores. With the proper strategizing, your after-school activities could produce the 'wow' factors you need to be successful at the very competitive schools where the vast majority of applicants clear the high academic qualifications hurdles. Continue enjoying extracurricular activities that appeal to your interests – but don't overdo it. Admissions committees can sniff out applicants who only became involved in the community in order to enhance their college candidacies. Selective colleges will be more impressed with evidence of a substantive commitment to one or two activities than by a long list of superficial memberships. Start thinking about what you're going to do over the coming summer. Do you want to devote more time to a favorite activity, or take a summer academic program, or get job to save up some money for college? Or just take a break between your junior and senior years? There's no single 'right' or 'best' way to spend your summer when it comes to your college applications, so long as you can explain the choice you made. If you want to play sports in college, continuing participating in appropriate NCAAapproved sports this winter and spring.

Strategic Positioning:
Start thinking ahead to how you can position yourself as a college applicant for Fall 2011

admissions. What makes you different from other applicants? How might that quality that make you an especially attractive candidate for your target school? These are ideas that can serve as the story themes and 'wow' factors that will make your application stand out from the crowd! Less than a year from now, college admissions committees will be taking a hard, critical look at your profile. You must do the same thing first. Only by understanding your candidacy from their perspective can you best mitigate your weaknesses, highlight your strengths, frame your fit, and employ the 'wow' factors that will differentiate yourself from the many other highly qualified applicants in your demographic. Your weaknesses. Sometimes it is best not to bring attention to a weakness. Other times, it must be acknowledged and explained. Weaknesses can be mitigated in the personal statement, addendum, or letters of reference. Your strengths. You need to become a self-promoter without coming across as arrogant. You also need to prioritize your strengths as you will not likely be able to highlight all of them in adequate detail within your applications. Your story themes and 'wow' factors. What are the most important points you need to make about your background, values, beliefs, and experiences? Have you adequately prioritized these points? If you attempt to convey too many different points, you risk coming across as unfocused. You also risk not covering any of your points in adequate detail to successfully distinguish your candidacy. Ask yourself what makes you unique in a way that is going to make any admissions officer just really want to recruit you to their school? Your fit. Why are you a match made in heaven for the specific school being targeted? Why will you be a better fit and contribute more to the program and community than the other applicants? Does your application convincingly argue that, if admitted, you will gladly attend the program? Does it express your genuine desire to attend the school in question, or does it include the kind of insincere, clichéd statements that doom many borderline applications?

Applications:
If you're a senior, there's still time to apply to a few schools for admission this fall – but just barely. Some schools with rolling admissions policies will continue accepting applications until April 1, or even later. Don't wait for those final deadlines to apply. Because of the ever-higher number of applications that most colleges and universities receive these days, many schools fill their available class seats before the application cycle formally ends. If you still have applications to submit, do so immediately.

Juniors might want to start thinking about which teachers, coaches, or supervisors they will ask for recommendation letters from this fall. Think about which points you will need your recommenders to address to support the rest of your application. If your GPA or test scores are weak, you might want to approach a teacher who can attest to the quality of your academic work; if you don't have many extracurriculars, you may want a letter from someone who can attest to your interpersonal skills and your non-academic interests.

Waitlisted Applicants:
If you're a Fall 2010 applicant who's been waitlisted at a school you hope to attend, make sure you let that school know of your continuing interest. However, you must use careful judgment in submitting additional application material. Many applicants make the mistake of sending application supplements that amount to 'more of the same.' To be effective, your supplements need to answer the questions that your application left open in the admissions committee's mind. Our consultants can help you understand what those questions might be and how you can put them to rest. Waitlisted applicants also need to be realistic about their chances of receiving an admissions offer. The number of waitlist acceptances at a given school can vary enormously from year to year, depending on acceptance rate and applicant yield. In recent years, however, the trend at most schools has been to admit fewer waitlisted candidates. For more information, see our webpage on Waitlist Statistics.

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Here's a list of application tasks that college-bound high school students should pencil into their calendars for the spring semester of their junior year and the fall semester of their senior year: The SAT and ACT: The spring of your junior year is an excellent time to take the SAT Reasoning Test or the ACT. You'll get your scores in plenty of time to use them in your college selection. If your scores match those of students who were recently admitted to your target schools, you can rest easy and turn your attention to other application tasks. If your scores fall below that mark, you've left yourself plenty of time to take the test a second time. SAT Subject Tests: A number of selective schools either require or encourage applicants to submit scores from 2 or 3 SAT Subject Tests (formerly known as SAT IIs) in

addition to their SAT or ACT score. Look into the requirements for your target schools now, so you'll know what tests you need to take, and then visit the College Board website to find out what dates you can take the tests on. SAT Subject Tests are given on most, but not all, of the same test dates that the SAT Reasoning Test is given on. Not all Subject Tests are available on all test dates. Each SAT Subject Test is one hour long. Although you can take multiple tests on a single day, you might find it less stressful to take just one or two tests at a time. If you can, it's a good idea to take at least some of your Subject Tests this spring. The material you're being tested on should be fresh in your mind from your classes, and you'll leave your summer and fall weekends free to work on other parts of your applications. (Don't forget, though, that you may also have to take AP or IB exams in May. Don't schedule yourself for too many major exams at one time.) Class Selection: It's not too early to start thinking about what classes you'll take in your senior year. Your first-semester classes are especially important because they will be listed on your transcripts and mid-year reports. Of course, admissions committees like to see high grades – but they also like to see proof that a student is curious and has sought out challenging courses. That doesn't mean that you have to load up on every AP or IB class that's available to you. On the contrary, there's a good argument to be made for deciding how much time you want to put into AP and IB coursework and then taking only as many classes as you feel comfortable with. For more information on the role of AP and IB courses in college admissions, see our College Admissions Blog entry on why "It Takes More Than AP Credit to Make Your App Stand Out." School Selection & Visits: You've probably been researching schools for some time now, at least informally. Now is the time to get serious. You want to come up with a list of 8 to 12 schools that you would be happy to enroll at, including 'stretch' and 'safety' schools. If you can, use this spring or summer to visit your top-priority schools. There's nothing like a campus visit to give you a better idea of what it might be like to actually attend a particular school. Let the admissions office know you're coming, especially if you're visiting a smaller school. Having a record of your visit could help you when admissions decisions are made. Schools prefer to admit students who show strong interest in them, and a campus visit is one way of showing your interest in a school. Essays: All selective schools require applicants to submit one or more essays as part of the application package. Look at the requirements for your target schools. Start thinking about topics for your essays and jotting down your ideas months before your application deadlines. Essays can be the most time-consuming part of preparing a college application – but good ones can pay off by setting you apart from the many other applicants with grades and test scores similar to yours, and by convincing an admissions committee that

you are someone they want as a student at their school. Application Deadlines: Start thinking now about what schools you want to apply to, when. Most Early Action and Early Decision deadlines fall on November 1. Regular admissions deadlines often fall on or around January 1. Although public universities with rolling admissions continue accepting applications into the spring months, it's advisable to submit your applications well before that. With today's large and well-qualified applicant pools, many state schools fill all of the available spaces in their freshman classes long before their final deadlines. This past year, several of the more selective state universities (including Penn State) advised high school students to submit their applications by the school's priority deadline (which is November 30 in Penn State's case). Check our College Admissions Timeline throughout the year to keep on track with your college planning and applications.

How to use a calculator effectively http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/calculators.php Bring your favorite calculator to the SAT exam...

The SAT allows you to bring a calculator to the exam - but don't celebrate just yet. If calculators made all the difference on SAT performance, then everyone would be scoring 800s on the math section, right?
But use it sparingly

SAT math questions are specifically designed not to require a calculator. If you rely on your calculator to answer more than about 1 out of every 5 questions, then you are doing something wrong.
Look for factoring and other shortcuts

SAT math questions present opportunities to benefit by factoring equations and using "guesstimation." If a problem seems too long or tedious to solve pretty much in your head and on scrap paper, stop and reexamine it. You probably missed a shortcut somewhere. Keep in mind that every SAT question is written for a very specific purpose, to test a particular academic skill (as crazy as that must seem to you right now). SAT questions

don't waste words. If you think a question presents an extraneous piece of data, look again, carefully. The data probably provides a clue as to how to make a long math equation much more manageable to solve -- which also means a much more efficient solution, from a time standpoint.
Never use the calculator until after you have read the question

The more heavily you rely on a calculator, the more likely you are to misread questions. That will have a negative impact on your score, since many incorrect answer choices are written to penalize test takers for not following directions. If you don't believe us, note what happens as you work through practice questions in your SAT preparations.
Times to use the calculator

You can, and should, use your calculator selectively. Use it to double-check your work, and to reassure yourself - if, for example, you should happen to draw a blank during the middle of the test and forget what 8 + 4 equals.
Things that can (and likely will) go wrong if you rely too heavily on Mr. Calculator:

You can hit a wrong key. Most calculators have small keys that are easy to hit by mistake. Even if you bring a larger calculator with a larger keypad (which, by the way, we recommend) you can still hit the wrong key. Haven't you ever dialed a wrong phone number? You become overconfident. A calculator cannot reason. It may spit out a number that you would never come up with on your own. You know, intuitively, that the average of 20, 25, 33, 78, and 81 CANNOT be 233. Your calculator doesn't. If you're lulled into believing that your calculator will ace the SAT for you, you may not catch that kind of mistake. You can't go back and check the intermediate steps when you use a calculator. That's why calculators with print capabilities are banned from SAT test rooms.

Manage your time on the test http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/preparation_tips.php#time

SAT Time Management
Keep track of the time (Duh!?!)

You'd be surprised at the number of people who panic on test day because they never

trained themselves to watch the time. Use clocks or timers as you work on practice questions, so you'll learn to pace yourself and intuitively sense when 10 or 20 minutes have gone by. Remember to bring a non-beeping watch with you to the SAT exam (don't count on being able to see a clock clearly). Before beginning work on each section, write down the time the test will end. You can refer to that note periodically during the exam to gauge your performance.
Allocate your SAT test time wisely

Don't spend test time reading instructions. The instructions for different kinds of SAT questions are quite standard. Familiarize yourself with them before test day so that you can go into the exam room already understanding how the SAT is structured and what types of questions you'll be asked. Remember, the SAT is intentionally designed to make you feel time pressure. You can alleviate that pressure by minimizing the amount of time you need to spend on reading instructions. That time is better spent answering questions.
Pace yourself

You will give your best performance if you pace yourself. Don't rush through every question just to finish a section - but don't take so long on just a few questions that you leave the rest unanswered, either. Taking practice tests will help you develop a sense of a pace works for you, and that lies between those two extremes.
Know when to skip a question

Every question on the SAT is worth the same number of points. There's no bonus for figuring out a hard question. That means it is NOT in your best interest to spend an inordinate amount of time with the more difficult questions. The most difficult questions are placed at the end of the test sections. Don't feel bad if you can't answer them. These questions are designed to be answered correctly only 10% of the time. If you come to a question on which you have NO idea of how to eliminate even one answer choice, do not spend more than 20 seconds on it before moving to the next problem. Keep in mind, though, that sometimes an easy problem looks difficult at first glance. Oftentimes, if you relax a moment, your mental "fog" will lift and you will find yourself able to answer the question very confidently.
Keep track of your omitted questions

Put a question mark or other notation next to each question you skip. That way, if you have time at the end of the section, you will be able to easily identify and take another try at your omitted questions.

Do NOT spend an equal amount of time on each question

Except in the critical reading section, SAT questions are arranged in ascending order of difficulty. That means that the easiest questions are asked first and the more difficult questions are asked later. You should allocate the amount of time you spend on each question accordingly. You will, hopefully, be able to knock off the first, easy questions quickly, so that you can spend more time on the difficult questions at the end of the section. With practice, you will develop a good feel for the upper limits of your questionanswering ability, and of the best way for you to use your time in each section. For example, you might find that even if you spend 7 minutes on each on the last five problem solving multiple choice questions, you do no better on them than you would by guessing at the answers. In that case, you would know that you should not spend an inordinate amount of time on test day trying to work out the math in questions at that level of difficulty.
Should you have some time left over at the end of a section...

Don't stop working until the proctor says to. Rather, go back and re-examine the questions you skipped. Answer any that you think you know the answer to, or can make a good guess at. We also suggest you double-check your answers to the very first questions. It's precisely because these questions are generally very easy that people tend to make dumb mistakes on them. Make sure you haven't been tripped up by subtle wording or a misplaced decimal point.
======== Are you worried about the test? http://www.satscore.us/sat-prep/anxiety.php

SAT Test Tips for Anxiety
Preparation and practice are the keys to overcoming SAT anxiety. (Are we beginning to sound like a broken record yet?) Preparation will familiarize you with what you'll face on test day, and build your confidence in your ability to use test-taking strategies. Practice tests that use actual questions from previous SAT exams and that mimic test room conditions will train you to do your best on the actual test. Do both these things, and you'll find there's nothing left to be anxious about on test day.
Knowledge is power

Many students suffer SAT anxiety because they do not understand what the test is or

what it is used for. Quite simply, the SAT was developed as a way for colleges to compare all of their applicants against a common standard. In theory, it allows them to assess the academic promise of a graduate from a large urban high school and one from a small country school on an equitable basis. The test would not be very meaningful if it were so easy that most students got a high score on it. It was deliberately designed to be difficult enough and complex enough that results could be spread out over a scale. The important thing about your SAT score is not whether it's better than anyone else's, but that it's high enough to qualify you for admission to your preferred colleges and universities.
The college admissions equation

A common misconception about the SAT is that admissions committees look at your SAT score and ignore everything else in your college application. In reality, the SAT is only one of a number of important factors that affect your college candidacy. We do not want to discourage you from taking the SAT seriously, because it is important to your future. But the fact remains that a disappointing SAT score does not necessarily mean end of your admission hopes. Let's say you score below the lowest quartile for your first-choice college or university. You still may be accepted - if you charm the admissions committees with your extracurricular activities, letters of reference, transcripts, etc. The bottom line is, take SAT preparation seriously, and do the best you can on the exam. But don't let SAT prep distract you from other things (class performance, extracurricular activities) that can also make you a strong college candidate.
SAT grading

Most of you have become accustomed to a grading scale where getting 90% of the questions on a test right barely earns you an "A." SAT scores are completely different. If you get 90% of the SAT questions right, you will be staring at a score in the neighborhood of 2160 - which would suggest to most admissions committees that A plus grades are run of the mill for you. By contrast, getting just 60% of the SAT questions correct gives you a score in the vicinity of 1440, which is still respectable. Don't start sweating when you realize that this exam is a bit more difficult than the ones you have seen before in your classes. And realize that you can still get a very good score even if you are guessing at far more questions than you ever did on any of your teacher's tests.

The testing environment and your proctor

Many students have told use that they dislike the regimented nature of the SAT. They were uncomfortable enough with the idea of being told when they could take the SAT, where they had to take it, what time they had to show up, etc. Worse, once they got to the test center they were told where to sit, when to begin, when to end, when they could visit the restroom (and for how long), and what they could and could not do during the test - all by a proctor who could seem pretty snitty. Unfortunately, there is nothing anyone can do to change this. We must accept the fact that the SAT has a quasi-monopoly on college admissions testing. As for the proctor, keep in mind that he or she must appear to be authoritative to maintain control over the testing. They're not unfriendly, they're just doing their job. Everyone taking the SAT feels the same discomfort we just described here. Controlling your anxiety over that discomfort can help improve your test score.
Visualization and simulation

If, after all your preparation and practice, you still find yourself concerned about your ability to control your nerves on test day, you may want to try a powerful technique often used by athletes facing high-stakes competition -- visualization. Visualize yourself taking the test. Develop a picture of how you will work through the problems, calmly and competently. Picture yourself applying your test taking strategies and drawing on your knowledge and skills to progress through each section of the test, confident that you're doing well. As simple as this technique sounds, it has worked for many SAT students in the past.

=========== http://www.petersons.com/testprep/test_info.asp?id=431&sponsor=1&path=ug.pft.sat
The SAT is a standard college entrance exam that measures skills in math, reading, and writing. The first section is always a written essay, which takes 25 minutes, and the last section is always a multiple-choice writing section, which takes 10 minutes. The other parts of the test - six 25-minute sections and two 20-minute sections - can appear in any order. One of the 25-minute sections (you won't know which) will not count toward your score; it is used to try out questions for future SATs. Total test time is 3 hours and 45 minutes. The SAT Critical Reading sections present you with reading comprehension questions about fulllength and paragraph-length passages. They also include sentence completions. The SAT Writing sections include multiple-choice questions on grammar, usage, word choice, and organization. The essay section asks you to respond to a prompt by developing a point of view supported by clear, well-organized ideas based on your experience and observations.

The SAT Math sections include multiple-choice questions and grid-in questions, which require you to generate a response. Topics include: numbers and operations; algebra and functions; geometry and measurement; and statistics, probability, and data analysis.

http://www.petersons.com/testprep/tips.asp?id=531&sponsor=1&path=ug.pft.sat
Relax the night before the test Don't cram. You are being tested on knowledge that you have accumulated over the course of the year. Studying at the last minute will only stress you out. Go to a movie or hang out with a friend - anything to get your mind off of the test! Test Specific Critical Reading: Sentence Completions Sentence completions test both your vocabulary and your understanding of the logic of a sentence. Each question is a sentence containing either one or two blanks. Your job is to figure out which answer correctly completes the sentence. As you read, try to predict what word should go in each blank. Sometimes you can guess the meaning of one blank, but not the other. In that case, scan the answer choices, look for a word similar to the one you've predicted, and then eliminate the answer choices that don't match up. Critical Reading: Reading Comprehension The Critical Reading test now includes both long and short reading passages. Skim each passage to see what it's about. Don't worry about the details - you can always look them up later if you need to. Just look for the main ideas. Then tackle the questions that direct you straight to the answer by referring you to a specific line in the passage. If you have time afterward, you can try solving the harder questions. Writing: Multiple-Choice Questions There are three types of multiple-choice writing questions on the SAT. The first group, Improving Sentences, tasks you with selecting the correct version - the one that is clearly written and grammatically correct - of an underlined portion of a sentence. Sentence Error questions ask you to figure out which part of a sentence contains an error. Those on Improving Paragraphs test your ability to organize and clarify information. For all of these question types, think about the simplest, clearest way to express an idea. If an answer choice sounds awkward or overly complicated, chances are good that it's wrong. Writing: Essay You will be given an open-ended essay prompt (topic) that asks you to state a viewpoint and support it. Essays are scored holistically, which means that the final score is based on an overall impression. It is important to develop your ideas and express them clearly, using examples to back them up. Your essay does not have to be grammatically perfect, but it does have to be focused and organized. The standard five-paragraph essay can be an effective way to make your point. Math: Multiple-Choice Questions As you work through the multiple-choice math questions, you'll be given reference information (formulas and facts), but you'll need to know how to use them. You're allowed to use a calculator, but it won't help you unless you know how to approach the problems. If you're stuck, try substituting numbers for variables. You can also try plugging in numbers from the answer choices. Start with the middle number. That way, if it doesn't work, you can strategically choose one that's higher or lower. Math: Grid-Ins These questions are not multiple-choice - you come up with an answer and fill it into a grid. The grid does not contain a minus sign, so there is no way to indicate that a value is less than zero. That means that an answer can't be a negative number. Unlike the multiple-choice questions, you won't be penalized for wrong answers, so make your best guess even if you're

not sure. You can't grid mixed numbers, so if you get a mixed number as an answer, you'll have to convert it to an improper fraction or a decimal.

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Last-Minute Study Tips
No matter what exam you're taking, there are certain things you can do in the days before to ensure a successful experience. It makes sense to review what you've learned, but eating well, sleeping, and taking time to relax go a long way, too. Sleep It is important to be well rested. Make sure to get a good night's sleep in the few days before the test. If you don't sleep well the night before the test, don't worry about it! It is more important to sleep well two and three nights before. You should still have the energy you need to perform at your best. Diet Don't change your diet right before the test. Now's not the time to try new foods, even if they are healthier. You don't want to find out on test morning that yesterday's energy bar didn't go down well. In the few weeks before the test, try to work a light, healthy breakfast into your daily routine. If you already eat breakfast, good for you - don't change a thing. Stress Try to be aware of whatever anxiety you're feeling before test day. The first thing to remember is that this is a natural phenomenon; your body is conditioned to raise the alarm whenever something

important is about to happen. However, because you are aware of what your body and mind are doing, you can compensate for it. Spend some time each day relaxing. Try to let go of all the pressures that build up during your average day. Visualize a successful test day experience. You already know what to expect on test day: when you'll get each test section, how many questions there are, how much time you'll have, etc. You also know where you are strong and where you are weak. Picture yourself confidently answering questions correctly, and smoothly moving past trouble spots - you can come back to those questions later. Find a family member or trusted friend with whom you can talk about the things that stress you out about the test. When this person tells you that everything is going to be OK, believe it! Verbal Questions For passage-based questions, first work on detail questions that you can easily locate the answer to. Then move on to inference questions, questions that ask what the author intended, and main idea questions. If a question involves a tough vocabulary word, use the surrounding clues in the text to determine what it means. Writing Questions Remember that a few spelling or grammar mistakes are tolerable, but you want to try to eliminate as many of those as you can. Try to vary your sentence length and word choice. Before you begin to write, spend a few minutes brainstorming ideas and outlining the argument you want to make. Planning will help you to write a well-organized and

cohesive essay. Practice and Review Whatever you do, don't cram for the test! It is a bad strategy because you aren't going to remember most of what you "learn" while cramming, and the odds are slim that the few things it will help you to remember will happen to be on the test. Save the energy you would have used to cram for test day. In the few days before the test, do a review of the skills and concepts in which you are strong. Be confident as you review everything that you know - and remember that confident feeling as you take the test.

http://www.eduers.com/sat/test_taking_strateg ies.htm

There is no substitute for preparation and knowing the material that you will be tested on. However, there are many test-taking strategies that will help you to use the information you do know to your best advantage. General Tips for Taking ACT, SAT and PSAT Find out information about the test well in advance
Exactly what material will the test cover? What kind of test will it be? (multiple choice, essay, time limit, etc.) How much of your grade in the class will this test be worth?

Give yourself plenty of time to prepare for the test
If you don't understand something, ask for help before it is time to begin studying Spread study time over several days. Give yourself extra time in case you run into problems. Decide whether it would help to spend time

studying with another person. You may find it best to study alone and review with another person Choose a quiet study place with good light, where you won't be interrupted. Know your strengths and weaknesses. Concentrate your study time on the area that you need to study the most. Know how to use your study time Use the Read-Test-Check Study Method Read the material or say it to yourself until you think you know it. Study a small portion of the material at a time. Test yourself. Try to remember or repeat the information without looking at it. Check to see if you remembered the information correctly. If not, ReadTest-Check again.

Feel confident about taking the test
One of the best ways to know you own information is to teach it to somebody else. Make sure you are comfortable about your environment o Get plenty of sleep and a good breakfast o Arrive early and sit where you are most comfortable Make certain that you understand the test directions o Ask for help if you are uncertain what to do Know how many points every section of the test is worth o If the test has a time limit, think about where your time will be best spent Don't sweat the small stuff. Once your test begins, your preparation is over. Even if you are unsure of some of the answers, the best thing you can do is keep your concentration and realize what strategies will help you succeed.

Tips for Taking Multiple Choice Tests
Do the problems that are the easiest first. Mark the questions that you need to come back to by either circling them or putting X by the question. Read all the possible choices before selecting an answer. Sometimes there is another choice that better fits the question such as an 揳ll of the above answer. The first time 揳ll of the above?is used, it will often be the correct answer. Use the process of elimination if you know that a certain choice is not the answer. When reading a question, be sure to notice if

there is an 搃s not?in it. Misreading the question will make you choose the wrong answer for the question. If you are completely unsure of the answer, the longest answer is slightly more likely to be correct. Mark the answer according to what the directions way and not how you think they should be marked. The directions may ask you to circle, mark the letter, or use a Scantron.

Standardized Tests
Most standardized test such as the SAT and the ACT are multiple-choice tests. When taking these tests, try to use these test strategies.

4 - Practice, Practice, Practice Let's use the tips

FREE TESTS http://www.petersons.com/testprep/tips.asp?id=400&sponsor=1&path=ug.pft.sat http://www.eduers.com/sat/practice_questions.htm http://www.proprofs.com/sat/exams/practice-tests.shtml

I'm seeking permission from Dr. Steve (the guy who created freevocabulary.com) to use his 7 pages of math problems.

5 - Swiss Cheese Test Prep: Find the Holes Put a mark next to every math problem in the book and on freevocabulary.com, number2.com and bestsamplequestions.com: CHECK for “I can do this problem in less than 30 seconds” “30” or “FASTER” or “F” means “I know how to do this but I need a tip for doing it faster” “???” or “Huh?” means “I have no idea what to do here.”

Examples of holes

6 - What is Your Passion? Listen to each student's dreams a) describe the project that most students at The Met complete... “My Biography” Procedure for documenting your passion.

Examples John the Fisherman

Ask about portfolios

"I don't know why more students don't submit a portfolio. Harvard looks at portfolios from home-schooled kids,
A professor at Harvard told me,

so why not from anyone if there is a wellorganized portfolio..." Find out more by asking Mr. Mac
+1 954 646 8246 +1 954 OH MUCHO FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com

Put your passion in the college essay that you will write for your college application. Here is an example.
This Essay was written by Brett Kushner. My Film School Essay As a child, I wanted to create something. I wanted to take charge; be the one to make decisions; to lead the way. I'm sure you know where I'm going with this. That's right: I wanted to be a mommy. After much education, however, especially an anatomy class or two, I realized my dreams were futile and I began to seek out a new area of interest that did not involve any kind of surgery. I entered high school as an actor. At the time, I was even considered the best actor in my forensics class. At the end of my freshman year, my forensics class required groups of four to make a short narrative film. As an actor, I was able to watch my original inspiration, Adam Fairholm, make Sleeper, the highly regarded short narrative that is still shown as the ideal film in forensics class. Adam was a grade above me and taught me how to fully utilize a mini-DV

camcorder and Adobe Premier. I have always been very computer literate, so I picked up this new skill quite quickly. Since then, I have loved every moment of amateur filmmaking. I continued to watch Adam Fairholm create teasers and trailers for the school plays, and I would go home and try to recreate his After Effects techniques. I knew that he would graduate a year before I would, and that I could take his place one day. Scouring the internet for as much information I as I could find, I learned that being a filmmaker was much more complicated, in some respects, than being a mommy; however, I knew that I was up for the challenge. Junior year rolled around and I had been creating many videos for personal use, friends, class projects, etc. In fact, a rumor had spread around the school that I could help with any video assignments. People that I had never even seen at Saint Thomas would come up to me, greet me by name, and then ask, or sometimes beg, for me to help them with a last minute project. These tasks certainly helped me improve my skills because I never turned down a request, and I never settled for a mediocre piece of work. I experimented with blue screen, animation, music videos, hidden cameras, DVD's, Macromedia Flash, After Effects, and many other tools. With a motto "Nothing is impossible with filmmaking," I would go to great lengths to see my vision on the screen. When I applied to the Duke's T.I.P. Filmmaking In California summer program, I thought I had no chance of acceptance. I was thrilled to find I was wrong. During my two-week stay on the Chapman University campus, I was able to learn more about film than I had for three years. The two weeks culminated with a gala, showcasing the films we were able to make. I presented Put It In Reverse, a short narrative filmed entirely in reverse and then played at -100% speed using the Avid. This created an effect showing the main character acting normally, while the world around him was in reverse. This required much pre-production and choreography with the actors, and it worked out superbly. After my arrival back in Florida, I acquired a position as intern editor at RMS, the leader in private television networks. With my own editing bay, I learned about many of the real-life hardware that a professional editor might use. I started out using their Avid Media Composer, cutting down music videos. Now I am using In-Sync's Speed Razor, working at the same level as the other editors there. I constantly put out content that is broadcasted throughout the day across the country in stores such as FYE, Music Nation, Sam Goody, Advance Auto Parts, and upcoming Office Depot and Autonation. The highlight of my internship was visiting an Advance Auto Parts in Tallahassee and seeing my work playing there. I work at RMS three times a week, and I always look forward

to it. All of my technical experience, however, means nothing compared to my creativity. My technical abilities are just a beneficial edge, since they are all learnable in time. What greatly advantages me is my creative spark. I have always been taught to think outside the box. In eighth grade I began "The Annals of Brett" that soon became a bi-monthly newsletter read around the world. Besides my friends and family, my newsletter was subscribed to from Michigan, California, Denmark, and even Taiwan. The Annals were my first real outlet for creativity as I was able to write on any humorous idea that I could think of. My next forte was acting. I started as a stage manager, but by the end of eighth grade and beyond, I acquired all parts from dramatic to comedic, major to minor roles, whether it be for school, camp, or forms of community theater. Meanwhile, I started a band, the PHB's or Pretty Hot Barbers, which produced the two hits "Tangerine" and "The Brett Song" that have become quite popular amongst friends. I also learned programming languages such as PHP that certainly provided a means to express myself. On my web page, with PHP, I started "Brett's Schedule Matching and Lookup" that allows Saint Thomas students to input their schedule before the year starts and find out whom they share classes with. After the success of that service (594 students or roughly thirty percent of my school), I created "Brett's Friend Rankings?or how to lose a bunch of friends" that ranks my friends based on a point system that I can update freely. Luckily I have not lost any friends yet. What drives me to create such pieces of work is the understanding that they will help or touch others. That is why I want to pursue my dream of a film career. Film can affect another more greatly than any other medium. People lose themselves in film and I want to be a part of that experience. With my creativity and my early practical experience, I know that I can successfully continue to learn about my passion and continue to share it with the world. I want my work to influence the world, just like mothers want their children to. I guess I wasn't so far off as a child; I guess I still do want to be a mommy.

7 - The Vornle Method A strategic look at the college application process – what can help you get accepted into a university?

The Vornle Method
The following description is a DRAFT and it includes some
of the commentaries made by the author and editors of the material. It was written as a long letter from John Vornle (a skilled writer and a graduate of Colgate University) to his children. None of them read the material completely, but perhaps you will. Posted by one of the editors... -------------------------------------------------------------------------

A perspective on College
by John Vornle ---------------- d r a f t -------------

Introduction
by Stephen McCrea

This pamphlet opened my eyes. I am a high school teacher. At least once a day I hear: “I need to pass this course to get into college.” “If I get a good score, I’m in.”

Once a week I hear “Man, how am I ever going to raise my SAT? I just don’t get it.” (This is usually a student who wants to get into a first-rate school and needs a combined score of at least 1150). Most people believe that you need to get three good ratings. Good GPA Good SAT Good rank in class (top 10 percent) Having a 3.9 GPA means nothing if you are ranked in the top quarter of the class (grade inflation is everywhere!). But I hear of students with 3.8 GPA, a combined SAT over 1200 and a rank of 24 out of 300 who have applied to five colleges -- and they get no letters of acceptance. What went wrong for these students who have accumulated such good records? Mr. Vornle’s analysis (“U.S. universities are businesses”) helps me explain the system to my students and it reveals two strategies: a) If you are a “full pay” student (able to pay full tuition), you have a surprise waiting for you … a “line of negotiation” into the process of college admission. b) If you are not an athlete or if you lack the funds , this pamphlet gives you three steps to use to improve your chance of getting accepted. After reading Mr. Vornle’s manuscript, I now ask my students, “What else should you be doing to get ready for college?” I hope you will agree that this short pamphlet will give students a new view into the “admission process” and that you will become a negotiator. It’s no longer a passive “admission process” (I hope they pick me). It’s more of a “Seize the Day” process: what can you do to grab the attention of the reader of your application? “Hey, reader! Look at what you will lose if you don’t read about me!” Good hunting!
Steve McCrea High School Teacher, MPA, Math 800, Verbal 720 Certified to teach English 6-12, Math 6-12, ESOL K-12, Political Science 6-12 Accepted at MIT, Yale, Swarthmore, Haverford, Princeton

Waitlist at Harvard.

Some questions about colleges and the college application process:
A) Getting perspective on American Universities What are the revenues of a university? What are the expenses?...Hmmm.. What are revenues divided by the number of students? hmmmm. That number is HALF of the tuition? That means any student paying full tuition is carrying another student... What should be an applicant’s strategy of negotiation? B) Selecting a College/ How do you get to know a college? Big school or small school? What is your personality? International or close to home? Junior year abroad? How do you REALLY get to know a college? Should you stay over night? What questions should you ask? How do you get away from the college appointed "guide" to the campus and really get to know what it's like to be on campus? Is the student-written guide to campus life and to the professors overly spiteful? Can you believe what you read in web sites? Is any of this important? C) How do you best prepare yourself? What is needed to be successful in college? What skills do you need to pick up in high school? What should you ignore at school? What is "fluff" and what is needed in later life? A) Getting perspective on American Universities Question: What is the business plan reality of a college? Answer: If you divide the average revenue of a university that charges $32,000 per year by the number of enrolled students, the average revenue per student is actually around $17,000. This is the average tuition (and other fees) collected by colleges for each student. To me, this means that every student paying more than $17,000 is subsidizing the rest of the student body.

• American Colleges are excellent at promoting themselves to students, parents, and the business community. They are expert marketers. They are far ahead of European
universities who have not spent much money marketing themselves over the past 20 years. Why do I tell you this? American colleges are full of fluff. Note: Spend your time in college making friends with the people you will want to remain in contact with after college. They are life-long friends. Get involved in as much as you can.

• Universities are businesses. They collect revenues from the
parents of students.

• Why do I tell you this? Most people think that universities have a “higher purpose.” They do, but most fail in the execution. • What are most American Universities? The American university is a simple business. • McCrea adds: Universities claim that they are “not for profit” but running a university is a business. The typical college seeks clients who will pay for its services. B) Selecting a College/ How do you get to know a college? At almost any university you can find a positive situation. Pick subjects you are interested in learning about now and dedicate yourself to associating yourself with the best teacher/ professors in the university system you can find. Question: Given the importance of the teachers, why do universities not tell you much about their teachers, classes and curriculums? Answer: Profits. C) How do you best prepare yourself? Question: What are the three top qualities colleges look for? Conventional Wisdom: GPA SAT Rank in class

The Vornle Answer: Other than athletic ability (which is number one for many colleges), I am going to say: (1) evidence of leadership (...of having organized peers and motivated a group to do something); (2) extra-mural distinction in some extracurricular activity, i.e. not just editing the high school paper, but writing for the local community newspaper, or getting nationally ranked in chess or debating; (3) personal dash, charisma, popularity, especially with adults. Evidence of leadership in fundraising is very attractive. “Personal dash with adults” is a trait schools won't ever admit noticing, but it influences them, like it or not. Why do I tell you this? #3 is important. You need to capture the attention of adults so that they volunteer to write you the letters of recommendation. What are Admission Realities? Selective American colleges and American Ivy League colleges are very difficult to enter. The competition is intense. However, there is room at those top schools for middle-ability kids from eastern prep schools and ambitious families to attend the best programs in the mid-west.

Afterward/ Conclusions/ Comments
D-1 The marketing hype and tension associated with American colleges, their emphasis of being a business first and foremost, distracts from the reason for seeking a higher education. The world is open to each of you. I want you to consider colleges and universities outside the United States where: a) you may get a better education, and; b) you won’t be distracted by American conventional wisdom and being stuck with students that are less mature, less culturally aware. D-2 Don’t base your choice of universities on “feel,” or “comfort” with the campus. Since information about teachers, classes, course requirements, teachers’ assistants, etc., are hard to find, maybe you can create your own system of questions that you want to know about places.

As far as the application process goes, make yourself stand out! The French have a saying: “Vive la difference!” It’s the differences that will make you attractive. Document yourselves well. Aim high! Aim for whatever you are interested in.

Appendix Other Points
E-1 • The important factors in selecting a college are the characteristics of the teachers/professors with whom you spend your time and the legacy of learning and inquiring process they are able to impart to you. Why do I tell you this? This is why I think you should be going to college. E-2 Question: What do colleges want? Answer: They want full-pay, traditional age (between 17 and 19 years old in the freshman class), well-rounded students, who also have exceptional grades and Board scores. Why do colleges want “free kids”? It allows them to earn more profits. “Free kids” are considered desirable because: 1) As current students, they are likely to be rewarding to teach and to graduate on time (Incoming grades and scores are the best predictors of on time graduation.); 2) They are likely to contribute to the extracurricular life and morale of the community (Their future is expected to be like their past.); 3) They raise the rankings of the school, which heavily turn on the academic profile of the undergraduate body (The fact that rankings rest heavily on profile of student body is partially defensible, since students do learn from each other, and partially sheer snobbism.); 4) As alumni, the full-pay kids contribute more to the school. E-3 The type of person who reviews your application is not a professor. They are regular people trying to select an “entering class of students” who will meet the criteria as determined by the school’s president. As an applicant you need to have done the things that make you stand apart from your classmates. Being like everyone else is a distinct disadvantage.

E-4 • Of an entering class of 1000 students, the Admission Committee objective is that 800 must meet the GPA and SAT criteria, and half must pay the full tuition. The remaining 200 are selected to complete sports teams, meet social objectives (blacks, other minorities, religion), satisfy special organizational skills (band instruments, chorus, art, student government, newspaper reporting, community service). Why do I tell you this? You have a chance to get into even the most selective colleges if you meet special criteria that they need. The challenge is figuring out “what” is needed and then landing with an admissions person who agrees with this characteristic’s importance to the school. E-5 Reality check: All the double-700 SAT, full-pay, top 10% of high school class, wellrounded 17 year-olds in the whole country will not fill the freshman classes of Harvard, Yale, Princeton, and Stanford. E-6 • Student Counselors in High School provide suggestions based on statistics (GPA, SAT and acceptances of past students). • Why do I tell you this? Don’t expect much! E-7 • For students, universities are a place of learning and fun! However, they are not “transparent”: Universities don’t make good information available about their teachers and courses (especially not to applicants). • It is difficult for non-students to find out about the personal teaching style of professors and the reaction of students to the professors; E-8 • If a person becomes a tenured professor, he then has an easy secured life with relatively no pressure. • Why do I tell you this? Professors are sometimes good, sometimes bad. E-9 Why go to University? The certificate is important. It is the expected thing to do in the American system. The interaction with the student body is important for your education. However, keep it fun. Participate fully in the life of the campus and the community. Good luck.

8 - Broadcast Yourself Use techniques described at EveryoneIsHere.com

In a typical year, 12% of Americans go to a school reunion. How can we include the absent 88%? About one-third of graduates attended their 10th high school reunion. What about the missing 2/3rds?
Source: Roper Starch Worldwide in American Demographics

Everyone Is Here: Facebook for School Reunions PLUS Facebook for Small Businesses
This is the WELCOME PAGE for the DVD produced by Steve McCrea.

"Everyone Is Here" is the title of a DVD that helps you turn absent alumni into Virtual Attendees at your next school reunion. The seminar/workshop introduces you to the use of Facebook, Youtube, Skype, Twitter, LinkedIn, and Sites Google (and other free software. To learn more, click here "Facebook For Small Businesses" is the video tutorial on the same DVD for any organization that wants to tap into the power of social networking.
For information about the DVD, write to Steve McCrea at TheEbookMan@gmail.com His workshops include: Everyone Is Here: Using Facebook, Skype and Youtube for School Reunions Facebook for Business Facebook for Classrooms For other topics, see CruiseTalks.net The "Everyone Is Here" DVD is available through Filmbaby.com Search on the Filmbaby site: "steve mccrea" and you will find the right listing.

9 - What's Next? Invite students to come to future classes to help future students with the process. By teaching the tips, we become better at using the tips. They can start with elementary school students (described in the last chapter of this book).

10 - What Inspires You? These items inspire me – perhaps something will work for you
Quote from Telecosm by George Gilder

"The supreme time waster, though, is television. Many people still have trouble understanding how egregious a time consumer, how obsolete a business model, how atavistic a technology, and how debauched a cultural force it is. You sit down on a couch in front of a screen, to watch degrading and titillating lowest-common-denominator trivia, scheduled for you in some netherworld between Madison Avenue, the FCC, and Hollywood, offering a sordid stream of sleazy banalities, gun grunge, bedroom mayhem, and offal innuendoes, some preening as "news" and some leering as entertainment, for as much as seven hours a day, on average, consuming perhaps two thirds of your disposable time, year after year, all in order to grab your eyeballs for a few minutes of artfully crafted advertising images that you don't want to see, of products that you will never buy. Is it a breast? Is it a thigh? No, it is a fender! A frosted Beemer? No, a beer bottle. TV ads that are as irrelevant to you, 90 percent of the time, as the worst telemarketing spiel. Justifying this scheme is the "free public service" that television supposedly offers, namely the "serious" portions of the "news" (chiefly government propaganda) and Saturday morning children's programming (more

propaganda)."
Distributed by John P. Vornle, President and Managing Director, Long Term Capital Company, 2 Mystic Lane, Westport, Connecticut 06880 USA Tel: 203-454-2263

Silver moons and paper dreams Faded maps and shiny things You're my favorite one-man show A million different ways to go

Will you fly me away? Take me away with you, my love

Painted scenes, I'm up all night Slaying monsters, flying kites Speak to me in foreign tongues And share your secrets one by one

Will you fly me away? Take me away with you, my love

Can hardly think what life was like Before I had you by my side

Can't say what I'd do without you Knowing what it's like to have you

11 - Building International Bridges My main motivation for writing this book – it's for “the 70 percent.”
Hundreds of thousands of kids arrive at school an hour before the school day starts. They sit in the dining hall and eat breakfast. I was lucky. In my teens I went to a boarding school and I ate lunch and dinner with a group of boys and an adult. The adult guided conversation and made sure that the meal time did not devolve into a scene from Lord of the Flies. I thought, "Why not sit with some kids during the free breakfast program at local schools?" I describe the concept in videos on www.youtube.com/buildingintlbridges ... Time: 15 minutes to drive to the school 30-40 minutes with the kids 5 minutes to continue on to work. I go to sleep an hour earlier so that I can arrive at school around 7:15 a.m. You can read some "publicity" that I've tried to foment about this program in a letter to the editor penned for the West Gazette (in Fort Lauderdale).

For the videos that explain the concept more completely, please go to http://sites.google.com/site/buildinginternation albridges/home/breakfast-club-with-mentors

(1) BIB aims to bring the Internet to homes that have no computers or internet connection. (2) BIB aims to connect people in different cultures (either internationally or within a country), overcoming barriers of language, cost, distance and technology. BIB aims to accomplish these goals with the minimum cost and to identify resources that are already delivering parts of the services and products needed to accomplish (1) and (2). BIB aims to develop the TECH-spertise (technology + expertise) to fill the gaps that other organizations do not offer. In particular, BIB aims to provide work

shops to overcome difficulties that arise in diverse communities and thereby promote intercultural communication. Please share your suggestions for more aims by writing to our Advisory Council or by contacting the Executive Director at (206) 6665092 See also our youtube channel and search for "The BIB DVD" www.youtube.com/buildingintlbridges

t costs a kid in Cartagena 2000 pesos, about 80 cents (US) to connect for ten hours on the Internet. Of course, $0.80 is a month's pocket money for some of these kids. The money goes to support an after-school based in a community center.
Granitos de Paz, a local organization Fundación Granitos de Paz - [ Translate this page ] Recreación y Deporte. Frentes de trabajo. Estira tus manos, al otro lado hay alguien esperando tomarlas. Fundación Granitos de Paz. www.granitosdepaz.org.co/

BIB supports Granitos de Paz, thanks to a recommendation by BIB Advisor John Lipkin.

THIS IS A DRAFT PAGE. THIS IS NOT AN ACTIVE CHARITY. THIS IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION and the non-profit structure has not yet been set up. This is for discussion purposes only.
PASSPORTS There are a variety of sources of data on passports. An excellent discussion appears here: http://www.gyford.com/phil/writing/2003/01/31/how_many_america.php Here is an extract:

Update 2: Here is a source for the above figures, the Canada Tourism Commission research report ‘The Potential Impact of a Western Hemisphere Travel Initiative Passport Requirement on Canada’s Tourism Industry’ (500K PDF). They conducted “household surveys” in Canada and the US with the results summarised in a table titled ‘Passport possession in the United States and Canada’ on page 4: 2005 Survey United States Results General population 34% Canada 41%

(18 years and over) Same-day 44% 60% travellers (transborder) Overnight auto 50% 70% travellers (transborder) Overnight air 67% 75% travellers (transborder) The percentages of passport holders among those who travel between the two countries might help to make better comparisons with Europeans travelling between countries. (21 Nov 2005)
Letter posted on GYFORD.com Thank you for your thorough article. It seems that somewhere there is a concept of 100 million passports issued in the past 10 years, 300 million US residents, so 33% ownership. Let's build bridges and encourage the majority who don't have passports to at least connect with people overseas via Facebook or skype. I am a teacher of English and I encourage you to connect with one of my students -- they benefit by practicing English with you -- and you learn about their cultures... S. McCrea, BuildingInternationalBridges.org

What does BIB do? EXAMPLE There's a school near I-95 on Sunrise Blvd. in Fort Lauderdale. One of our volunteers goes to the dining hall two or three times a week. BIB pays for the workshop that he will give to other volunteers. Sure, we could ask the volunteer to give his time to give a workshop, but training is part of the BIB mission, and we are developing materials that volunteers (even you, yes, you who are reading this sentence right now) can use to train adults to create and support a Breakfast Club with Mentors.

BIB is a dream. Someday you will read the following:

Obstacles 1. "The IRS is scrutinizing charities very closely." Yes. That's why we will not take shortcuts and we won't try to hide expenses. We are transparent. We will post our expenses whenever possible (hiding only documentation that might compromise the charity's ability to remain competitive). Part of the scrutiny by the IRS is aimed at ensuring that funds donated in the USA do not wind up supporting terrorist activities. Could a computer donated to a school in Iran be used for promoting terror? Well, we'll try to work with these concerns. The aim of BIB is to promote intercultural communication -- in a positive sense. If it is necessary to record every keystroke on the machines that we donate, we'll be happy to comply with such requirements. 2. "A recession is the worst time to start a charity." True. But it is a great time to find volunteers who are itching to do SOMETHING besides hunting for a job. 3. "It must be very difficult to get money and support for such a simple idea." Sure. "It's so simple, why do we need another charity?" Several of our volunteers (Friends of BIB) have been donating their services to local schools. They buy CDs at Office Depot, use a borrowed duplicator, and give useful items to parents. They also bring along their laptops to demonstrate the power of Skype to the kids. Why is

there a need for a charity to organize such simple work? Because many teachers don't know how to download free ebooks. Many teachers have never used Skype. Many teachers don't know

what to do with an old computer. Many teachers don't know how to present videos from Youtube to their students. Many teachers have no idea how to integrate real-world problems in their lesson plans. Many adults don't know the Power of One (that they have) to transform a breakfast program into a learning opportunity.

As long as there is a teacher or parent who fears the Internet, there will be a role for BIB.
Frequently Asked Questions 1. Where does the money go? We put money into buying computer parts that are missing or faulty in the donated computers. We pay for expenses that volunteers incur, such as fuel costs, wear and tear on technological devices and automobiles, transportation, Internet costs, time on computers, etc. 2. How much of the money goes to cover administration? Much of the work that BIB does is cajoling, urging, pleading and . We contact businesses and individuals who might be moved to contribute time or funds to support the BIB programs. We use computers (email, skype) and telephones as well as targeted marketing through the post office. About 10 percent of the money donated to BIB actually goes into buying computers. The rest is spent on pushing people to donate their time or hiring experts at a reduced rate "for the children." (Yes, we know the lines to use and the appeals that have worked for other charities.) 3. How does BIB handle legal costs and the costs associated with paperwork (especially accounting)? Isn't it difficult to deal with the high level of scrutiny that many charities are subjected to? BIB has a separate account that handles the costs of . We have donors who

specifically support the legal and accounting costs related to administering the charity. Your donation goes "100%" into the programs. 4. If your mission is focused on getting computers into schools and community around the world, why is there no funding in the budget for travel? The BIB philosophy is to use local resources whenever possible. In the future, for publicity purposes, it may be advantageous to pay for some of our volunteers or paid staff to go to high-profile locations to promote the spirit of BIB. However, Friends of BIB are encouraged to monitor the activities of the BIB staff. Trust, but verify. 5. What are the plans for expanding BIB? The plan is to stay lean. Where possible, the real estate costs will be kept low by encouraging staff to work out of their homes. Virtual offices and transparency will keep spending low -- what could possibly be a justification for generating 1000 photocopies? Instead of spending $90 at a photocopy store, why not create a webpage or an ebook? That's the spirit that will guide the expansion of the charity. Cheap. 6. Will the program disappear if the founder passes on or is incapacitated? The BIB program has three Directors on the Board and nearly a dozen Advisors. The mission of the charity is in their hands. The Directors approve the budget and extend or terminate the employment of the Executive Director. If you have other questions, please write to us at BuildingInternationalBridges@gmail.com

THIS IS A DRAFT PAGE. THIS IS NOT AN ACTIVE CHARITY.

THIS IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION and the non-profit structure has not yet been set up. This is for discussion purposes only.

Appendix Appendices The Visual and Active Method Links Testimonials Excerpts from Portfolios Examples of Essays The 100 Doors Mentors on Video

The Visual and Active Method

Links

SAT Prep List http://www.testprepreview.com/sat_essay.htm http://www.testprepreview.com/sat_test_prep.htm

Brain Differences and Learning Styles Youtube: “Brain Differences Men Women” FloatingNeutrinos.com The Gregorc System KnowYourType.com (Jungian 16 types) BehindtheName.com

Search “Brain Lateral Thinking” www.rinkworks.com/brainfood/p/latreal1.shtm

Brain Food: Realistic Lateral Thinking PuzzlesLateral Thinking Puzzles,
unlike most puzzles, are inexact. ... Your job is to fill in the details and complete the story. ... In the evening, he gets into the elevator, and, if there is someone else in the elevator -- www.rinkworks.com/brainfood/p/latreal1.shtml Lateral Thinking Puzzles - PreconceptionsLateral thinking puzzles that challenge your preconceptions. ... Every morning he takes the elevator down to the lobby and leaves the building. ... 4. How could a baby fall out of a twentystory building onto the ground and live? … www.folj.com/lateral/

Situation Puzzles ListJul 18, 1999 ... A man enters the elevator of a high rise
apartment building, takes off one ..... story riddles, lateral thinking puzzles, mini-mysteries, … www.kith.org/logos/things/sitpuz/situations.html

Classic Lateral Thinking ExercisesOct 31, 2006 ... Everyday he gets the
elevator down to the ground floor to leave the building to go to work. .... Brown" mystery stories we read in elementary school? ... or a few of the great books in Book Links: Lateral Thinking, … wilk4.com/humor/humore14.htm

Defining the problem of elevator waiting times - (37signals) Sep 17, 2008
... I read the elevator story from Edward de Bono in the late 60s with his idea of lateral thinking. 37signals.com/.../1244-defining-the-problem-of-elevatorwaiting-times

Lateral thinking puzzles, with solutions @ Things Of Interest My major
issue with lateral thinking puzzles is not that they don't give you enough information to find the answer. ... (People commit suicide easily in these stories.) My answer: It's 1960. ... qntm.org/lateral

lateral thinking puzzle 1 [Archive] - Advanced Physics Forums12
posts - 8 authors - Last post: Apr 4, 2005 Here is a lateral thinking puzzle..... The man in the Elevator ... takes the elevator up the additional 3 stories, a catastrophe will occur. … www.advancedphysics.org

Lateral Thinking PuzzlesLateral Thinking Puzzles ~1. In the middle of the
ocean is a yacht. ... Every morning he wakes up, gets dressed, eats, goes to the elevator, takes it down to the lobby .... isn't really necessary; it was just part of the original story. … hubpages.com/hub/Lateral_Thinking_Puzzles

LateralMay 1, 2008 ... Lateral Thinking: A Creative Mental Exercise And A
Reporter's Tool: ... come up with an angle to the story that is not what everyone expects. .... Every day he takes the elevator to go down to the ground floor to go to … www.hollisny.com/lateral.htm

Testimonials

Excerpts from Portfolios If you want to get the full benefit of the Visual and Active Method, consider this quotation from a professor at Harvard University: “Students who come from home schools are asked to submit portfolios of their work, showing their progress. This information supplements the test data since there is no real way to assess the student's rank in a high school. It is often difficult to obtain letters of recommendation from a variety of teachers because the student has had only one teacher. The question now comes: Why doesn't every student submit a portfolio of essays, movies, summaries of projects?”

Dennis Littky, the innovative creator of the Met Center schools in Rhode Island, asks studnerts to give stand-up “exhibitions” (talks or presentations). Talking about a powerpoint slide show or video gets very close to the high-pressure, high-stakes world of persuading clients (advertising agencies, presentations to potential customers, testimony before Congress, etc.). Video recordings (appropriately edited) could also go on youtube to supplement the When thinking about what goes into your portfolio, think about what you plan to do later in life – and make a presentation about that. If you want to work with animals, show how you have worked with animals. If you want to fly an airplane or work in a hospital, don't show your skill as an accountant's aide (unless the actiity is somehow related to what you plan to do on the airplane or in health care).

Ideas for Projects Fishing

Filmmaking (do you have a youtube channel)

How to Download FREE BOOKS from Gutenberg http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DBRHhpX2IY

Examples of Essays
This Essay was written by Brett Kushner. My Film School Essay As a child, I wanted to create something. I wanted to take charge; be the one to make decisions; to lead the way. I'm sure you know where I'm going with this. That's right: I wanted to be a mommy. After much education, however, especially an anatomy class or two, I realized my dreams were futile and I began to seek out a new area of interest that did not involve any kind of surgery. I entered high school as an actor. At the time, I was even considered the best actor in my forensics class. At the end of my freshman year, my forensics class required groups of four to make a short narrative film. As an actor, I was able to watch my original inspiration, Adam Fairholm, make Sleeper, the highly regarded short narrative that is still shown as the ideal film in forensics class. Adam was a grade above me and taught me how to fully utilize a mini-DV camcorder and Adobe Premier. I have always been very computer literate, so I picked up this new skill quite quickly. Since then, I have loved every moment of amateur filmmaking. I continued to watch Adam Fairholm create teasers and trailers for the school plays, and I would go home and try to recreate his After Effects techniques. I knew that he would graduate a year before I would, and that I could take his place one day. Scouring the internet for as much information I as I could find, I learned that being a filmmaker was much more complicated, in some respects, than being a mommy; however, I knew that I was up for the challenge. Junior year rolled around and I had been creating many videos for personal use, friends, class projects, etc. In fact, a rumor had spread around the school that I could help with any video assignments. People that I had never even seen at Saint Thomas would come up to me, greet me by name, and then ask, or sometimes beg, for me to help them with a last minute project. These tasks certainly helped me improve my skills because I never turned down a request, and I never settled for a mediocre piece of work. I experimented with blue screen, animation, music videos, hidden cameras, DVD's, Macromedia Flash,

After Effects, and many other tools. With a motto "Nothing is impossible with filmmaking," I would go to great lengths to see my vision on the screen. When I applied to the Duke's T.I.P. Filmmaking In California summer program, I thought I had no chance of acceptance. I was thrilled to find I was wrong. During my two-week stay on the Chapman University campus, I was able to learn more about film than I had for three years. The two weeks culminated with a gala, showcasing the films we were able to make. I presented Put It In Reverse, a short narrative filmed entirely in reverse and then played at -100% speed using the Avid. This created an effect showing the main character acting normally, while the world around him was in reverse. This required much pre-production and choreography with the actors, and it worked out superbly. After my arrival back in Florida, I acquired a position as intern editor at RMS, the leader in private television networks. With my own editing bay, I learned about many of the real-life hardware that a professional editor might use. I started out using their Avid Media Composer, cutting down music videos. Now I am using In-Sync's Speed Razor, working at the same level as the other editors there. I constantly put out content that is broadcasted throughout the day across the country in stores such as FYE, Music Nation, Sam Goody, Advance Auto Parts, and upcoming Office Depot and Autonation. The highlight of my internship was visiting an Advance Auto Parts in Tallahassee and seeing my work playing there. I work at RMS three times a week, and I always look forward to it. All of my technical experience, however, means nothing compared to my creativity. My technical abilities are just a beneficial edge, since they are all learnable in time. What greatly advantages me is my creative spark. I have always been taught to think outside the box. In eighth grade I began "The Annals of Brett" that soon became a bi-monthly newsletter read around the world. Besides my friends and family, my newsletter was subscribed to from Michigan, California, Denmark, and even Taiwan. The Annals were my first real outlet for creativity as I was able to write on any humorous idea that I could think of. My next forte was acting. I started as a stage manager, but by the end of eighth grade and beyond, I acquired all parts from dramatic to comedic, major to minor roles, whether it be for school, camp, or forms of community theater. Meanwhile, I started a band, the PHB's or Pretty Hot Barbers, which produced the two hits "Tangerine" and "The Brett Song" that have become quite popular amongst friends. I also learned programming languages such as PHP that certainly provided a means to express myself. On my web page, with PHP, I started "Brett's Schedule Matching and Lookup" that allows Saint Thomas

students to input their schedule before the year starts and find out whom they share classes with. After the success of that service (594 students or roughly thirty percent of my school), I created "Brett's Friend Rankings?or how to lose a bunch of friends" that ranks my friends based on a point system that I can update freely. Luckily I have not lost any friends yet. What drives me to create such pieces of work is the understanding that they will help or touch others. That is why I want to pursue my dream of a film career. Film can affect another more greatly than any other medium. People lose themselves in film and I want to be a part of that experience. With my creativity and my early practical experience, I know that I can successfully continue to learn about my passion and continue to share it with the world. I want my work to influence the world, just like mothers want their children to. I guess I wasn't so far off as a child; I guess I still do want to be a mommy.

[NOTE TO STUDENTS: yes, you can submit your essays here and we can fatten the book – why not see your work in print?]

The 100 Doors I estimate that most people pass through roughly 50 to 100 doors during their academic and working careers. I ask students, “What percent of those doors open to you because you got a high SAT score?” “What are other ways to open doors?” “What percent of those doors open for reasons that are not connected to academics?”

I call this process LASSIE Language Academics Social Skills Inheritance Experiences

1) Language

2) Academics

3) Social Skills

4) Inheritance

5) Experiences I'm reprinting here the words of Will Sutherland. I could point you to his website, but then most readers wouldn't take time to look over the words and photos collected by one of the most innovative, passionate, clever, insightful and dedicated teacher-turned-edupreneur that I've ever worked with. I was one of three people who first saw these words and I believe that if more people read about Will's sailing schools, there would be a plethora of similar “adventure schools” appearing around the world.

Mentors on Video (another way to collect experiences) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MWs0rrzL7T8

IsawItOnYoutube.com, a collection of educational and inspirational videos. Travel the world, learn skills, build experiences, and add to the list by sending recommendations to IsawItOnYoutube@gmail.com. VeryCoolSites.com a collection of educatonal websites. Send your recommendations to 3verycoolsites@gmail.com or to FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com

INSPIRING QUOTATIONS We tend to move toard the things we think about, so let's thnk about good things. Jeraldine Saunders, the creator of the Love Boat TV series and author of The Love Boat.

Quote from Telecosm by George Gilder

"The supreme time waster, though, is television. Many people still have trouble understanding how egregious a time consumer, how obsolete a business model, how atavistic a technology, and how debauched a cultural force it is. You sit down on a couch in front of a screen, to watch degrading and titillating lowest-common-denominator trivia, scheduled for you in some netherworld between Madison Avenue, the FCC, and Hollywood, offering a sordid stream of sleazy banalities, gun grunge, bedroom mayhem, and offal innuendoes, some preening as "news" and some leering as entertainment, for as much as seven hours a day, on average, consuming perhaps two thirds of your disposable time, year after year, all in order to grab your eyeballs for a few minutes of artfully crafted advertising images that you don't want to see, of products that you will never buy. Is it a breast? Is it a thigh? No, it is a fender! A frosted Beemer? No, a beer bottle. TV ads that are as

irrelevant to you, 90 percent of the time, as the worst telemarketing spiel. Justifying this scheme is the "free public service" that television supposedly offers, namely the "serious" portions of the "news" (chiefly government propaganda) and Saturday morning children's programming (more propaganda)."
Distributed by John P. Vornle, Westport, Connecticut

List of some of the SAT words used in this book: plethora intransigence diligence Create sentences and then write them or speak them aloud or imagine sentences using each of these words. Then talk to adults and your peers about these words. “How do you remember these words?” Ask adults to talk about how they learned the differences between stationary and stationery, elude

and allude, compliment and complement. Then call the SAT tutor (+1 954 646 8246) and read the sentences over the phone. Send the sentences to FreeEnglishLessons@gmail.com and let the teacher use these sentences in his classes. Bring the words to class and write them on the whiteboard. Ask the teacher / facilitator to use the words during the class. Draw pictures to demonstrate the words. Make a video and post it on Youtube. Demonstrate or perform your understanding. Hey, Steve, isn't this more or less what you wrote in the beginning of the book? Answer: Yes. Some readers are random learners, jumping from page to page, section to section, and repeating a message with a difference color ink or with larger type or a different font.

Thank you for spending time with us.

Send your suggestions to VisualandActive@gmail.com Call +1 954.646.8246 954 (OH MUCHO)

Message to the “Random Reader” who looked at the last page first: This book will definitely help you

find something new – such as JK McCrea's fabulous photos. Go ahead, scan the book, look for great photos. Flip through chapter 10 and then send me suggestions for the following projects VeryCoolSites.com IsawItOnYoutube.com TeacherstoTeachers.com (English Visitors Network and the Guides for English Language Travelers) BuildingInternationalBridges.org MentorsonVideo.org GlobalCoolingCenter.com Grazie!

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