BIG SAVINGS: Over $100 worth of coupons INSIDE

SOUTH CAROLINA’S PREMIER WEEKLY
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

GREER, SOUTH CAROLINA VOL. 103 NO. 9 75 CENTS

Recent shooting raises questions of gang activity
BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER

‘Every community that I’m aware of with

As investigation into
last Monday’s shooting at
Oakland Place Apartments
continues, police are having to consider the possibility that the incident,
which sent one man to the
hospital with a gunshot
wound to his head, is gang
related.
The victim is expected
to be okay, but Greer Police say they will not tolerate violence of this sort
whether gang related or
not.

the exception of some real suburban
or rural areas has some kind of gang
activity.’
Dan Reynolds
Greer Police Chief

“If we have something
we feel, even if it isn’t
gang or group activity, we
hop right on it, and we
solve most of those cases
involving that kind of situ-

ation,” Police Chief Dan
Reynolds said.
In the case of the Oakland Place shooting, police have some leads, but
they have yet to make any

arrests, said Lt. Eric Pressley.
“We are investigating the
crime for what it is,” Pressley said. “And that’s our
main focus, but underly-

Tryon
Center to
get new roof

BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER

kmaple@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

INDEX
CLASSIFIEDS
COMMUNITY CALENDAR
CRIME
ENTERTAINMENT
OBITUARIES
OPINION
SCHOOLS
SPORTS
WEATHER

|
B3-4
A2
A8
B6
A6
A4
B8
B1-3
A6

you we don’t have gangs,
but that may not be true.
They don’t want to get
an overreaction from the
community or make people feel unsafe, but the
levels of activity in gangs
can go from just minor
stuff where people identify themselves as gangs
to actual hard-core gangs
where they’re shooting up
the neighborhoods and
things like that. Basically
we’re not there yet and
we’re not getting there.
When we have something
like this, we have people
SEE GANGS | A5

Council accepts
bids for PD,
courthouse

Filing
open for
council
seats in
Lyman
Lyman Town Council
could have a new look
after this June’s general
election.
The seats currently held
by councilmembers Rita
Owens, Teresa Shuler and
Daisy Carter will all need
to be filled, and the town
will also elect a new mayor.
Former Mayor Rodney
Turner has been suspended after his arrest
on charges of wiretapping
and misconduct in office.
Filing for
these seats
opened at
noon
on
Tuesday and
will
close
at
noon
on
March Owens
16. Lyman
residents
interested
in filing for
council must
file with the
Spartanburg Shuler
County Election Commission a NonPartisan Statement of Intention of Candidacy form.
A filing fee of $15 also
needs to be paid at Lyman
Town Hall. The charge for
filing for mayor is $25.
Mayor Pro Tem, Tony
Wyatt, has already announced his intention to
run for the seat.
Carter said that after five
terms she will not seek the
seat at the conclusion of
the term.
“I’ll finish 20 years this
year,” she said, mentioning she has enjoyed her
time on council. “I think
it’s time to step down. It’s
been a good 20 years.”
Owens said she also will
not be seeking another
term after serving for one
term and a short time on
an unexpired term following a special election.
Shuler has also decided
not to run for another term
after serving two years following the resignation of a
former councilmember.
Questions regarding filing can be directed to Lyman town clerk Tammy
Redd at 485-0240.

ing we’ll certainly look and
see if there are any gang
issues involved here.”
While both Pressley and
Reynolds said they could
not single out a particular gang-related incident
in recent memory, they
said Greer is not devoid of
gangs.
“Every community that
I’m aware of with the exception of some real suburban or rural areas has
some kind of gang activity,” Reynolds said. “This
is a very sensitive issue
to any community and
most communities will tell

BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

Columbia bound
Layne Fowler and the Byrnes boys basketball team will compete for a state championship
this Friday in Columbia. The Rebels will take on Irmo for the Class AAAA title after
defeating Spring Valley in the Upper State championship Saturday.

Greer City Council approved bids for work on
the roof of the Tryon Center, as well as renovations
at the police department
and courthouse at last
week’s meeting.
David Seifert, director
of finances, shared with
council the bid summaries
and council unanimously
approved the low bid in
both instances. Prior to
acceptance of bids, it was
estimated that the city
would need $169,000 to
cover the two projects.
“When you look at these
projects
individually
where we budgeted those
dollars within the depart-

ments one proposal has
come in over budget, one
proposal has com in under budget,” Seifert said.
“So we want to present
the budget information
to you that between the
two projects that we have
transferred and set aside
that money that is ready
to go for these projects we
are under budget on both
projects together.” Parks
and recreation director
Ann Cunningham shared
that the Tryon Recreation
Center will be completed
by IES Coatings, LLC for
$29,276, which is $10,724
under budget for the project.
“I feel confident that this
product and this company
are the best choice for the
roof repair at the Tryon
Recreation Center,” Cunningham said of the company and its roof coating
product. The project as
the police department and
the courthouse involves
SEE COUNCIL | A5

Hollywild seeks public support, input
To keep
gates open

‘...Closure is one
word that it just
tears my insides up
to think about.’

BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER
Hollywild Animal Park
officials are turning to the
public for assistance in
keeping the zoo alive and
functioning.
After the park’s dismal
2015, in which a January
fire claimed the lives of
27 animals and did damage to facilities, the nonprofit fell short of needed
funds because visitors
simply didn’t frequent the
park. Now Hollywild is
launching an aggressive
fundraising campaign to
avoid the reality of closing
the park’s gates. During a
public forum on Wednesday at the Spartanburg
Chamber of Commerce,
executive director Kim
Atchley said they need to
raise $500,000 by the end
of the year and $250,000
each year beyond that.
“The bottom line is that
if a nonprofit doesn’t have
the support of its community it has to look at tough
options, and closure is one
word that it just tears my

DEATHS
Gerald Joseph Cronin,
91
Alan Wood Hughes, 64
Dora Idella Barker
Moore, 60
David Leon Taylor
Martin Luther Tooke,
Jr., 88

|

Kim Atchley

Executive director

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Hollywild Executive Director Kim Atchley said the animal
park is need of community support.
insides up to think about,”
she said. “But to be a realist and to look at what
we’re doing for a community and to be responsible
with that it has to be one
of those options and I pray
that we will never have to
consider it.“
Hollywild’s budget has
been just over $1 million

to provide care for almost
500 animals year round.
This number also includes
the numerous educational
and entertaining programs
offered by the 100-acre
park. Atchley mentioned
the numbers of other zoos
across the country, including the nonprofit park in
Austin, Texas. She said

LIVING HERE
LOVE!LOVE!

|

Little Caesars
Love Kitchen stops
at soup kitchen

B5

Austin Zoo has 200,000
admissions a year.
“If we had 200,000 visitors during our park season we wouldn’t need to
set our annual campaign
goal so high,” she said.
Hollywild relies on its
admissions, though. Atchley said in past years they
have received donations,
but 90 to 95 percent of the
park’s income is from admission.
That’s just simply not
going to be enough moving forward,” she said,
mentioning
admissions
were down nearly 50 percent last year.
In addition to visiting
the park, officials said
Hollywild supporters can
sponsor special events, assist in renovation projects,
give in-kind donations,
provide educational materials, support through

businesses and corporations and also give towards the Renew the Zoo
Campaign, which is about
to kick off. The simplest
way to give, said Atchley
is to give through the website.
While financial assistance was discussed at
length during the forum,
it wasn’t the only topic.
Atchley said the covet input from the community
on how the park can meet
the needs of its visitors.
“We’ve got to realize
that we are a nonprofit
organization and as such
we need to be what our
community wants us to
be, and the only way to do
that is to ask for response
from our community,” she
said, mentioning a survey
that will soon be up on
the park’s website at hollywild.net.
Park employees and
board members heard
from a couple of interested persons during the
forum. Dr. Ron Garner,
superintendent of Spartanburg District One said
he appreciates the partnership and friendship of
Hollywild to the schools.
Jack McBride, CEO of Contec, Inc. said his family has
SEE HOLLYWILD | A5

TO SUBSCRIBE TO
THE GREER CITIZEN,
CALL US TODAY AT 877-2076

COMMUNITY

A2 THE GREER CITIZEN

COMMUNITY
CALENDAR
THURSDAY, MAR. 3
THE TAYLORS LIONS Club
meets at 7 p.m. at the “Clubhouse”, 500 East Main St.,
Taylors. Call Jerry 420-0422.
THE SOAR BINGO CLUB
meets at 10 a.m. at Victor
Gym through out the year,
and in the summer, beginning June 8, at Greer City
Hall, 301 E. Poinsett St. The
cost is 50 cents per card. Call
Meredith at 968-7001.

FRIDAY,MAR. 4
GERMAN-AMERICAN CLUB
STAMMTISCH will meet
starting at 6p.m. at wBangkok
2, located at 1398 Boiling
Springs Rd, Boiling Springs.
Call 864-814-0418

SATURDAY, MAR. 5
MR. JOHN’S MEDICINE show
is guaranteed to make you
laugh. Come sing along on
Saturday, March 5 from 7-10
p.m. at Stomping Grounds in
Greer.

SUNDAY, MAR. 6
THE NEVER ALONE Group
of Narcotics Anonymous
meet at 7:30 p.m. at the Greer
Recreational Center, 226
Oakland Ave.

MONDAY, MAR. 7
GRACE PLACE in Greer will
have its mini-mall open from
10 a.m. - noon. Grace Place
is located at 407 Ridgewood
Drive. I.D. required.
BARBERSHOP HARMONY
CHAPTER meet at 7:30 p.m.
at Memorial United Methodist Church, 201 N. Main
St., Greer. Call Richard at
384-8093.

TUESDAY, MAR. 8
GRACE PLACE in Greer
holds its clothing closet
from 6-8 p.m. at Grace Place,
407 Ridgewood Drive. I.D.
required.
THE NEVER ALONE GROUP
CANDLELIGHT MEETING
at 7:30 p.m. at the Greer Recreational Center,226 Oakland
Ave.
THE ROTARY CLUB of
Greater Greer meet at 7:15
a.m. at Wink Cafe, 1209 W.
Poinsett St.. Guests welcome.

Call 630-3988.
GAP CREEK SINGERS
rehearse from 7-8:30 p.m.
at The Church of the Good
Shepherd, 200 Jason St.,
Greer. For further information or to schedule a performance contact Wesley Welsh
at 877-5955.
THE GREER DAY Lions Club
meets at noon at Mutts BBQ,,
101 West Road. Call Caroline
at 848-5355.
BLUE RIDGE LIONS Club will
meet at 6:30 p.m. At Big Boys
Country Cooking,430 Groce
Meadow Road (across from
Lake Robinson). For more
information, call Jerry Hatley
at 268-0567.
NEWCOMERS CLUB OF
Spartanburg will meet at
11:30 a.m. at O’Charley’s Restaurant, 106 East Blackstock
Road, Spartanburg. Call (864)
595-4011.
Calendar deadline is
noon on Tuesdays. All listings are subject to editing
and/or omission due to
space constraints. Please
submit information to
Kenny Maple at 877-2076
or kmaple@greercitizen.
com or by mail to The
Greer Citizen P.O. Box 70
Greer, SC 29652.

Talk to mom and dad
Q: My boyfriend is wondering if he should buy
life insurance for his mom
and dad. They’re both
in their seventies, and
they’re no longer married
to each other. His mom is
disabled and remarried,
and she doesn’t have any
life insurance coverage.
The only coverage his
dad may have would be
through his employer.
He’s afraid he would have
to pay funeral expenses
if one of them died, and
he’s not in good enough
shape financially to do
that right now. What’s
your advice?
DR: If the only insurance his dad may have is
furnished through his employer, then yeah, when
he stops working he probably won’t have life insurance anymore. It would be
fine if he wanted to buy
them each a small policy,
but it’s going to be very

DAVE
SAYS
DAVE
RAMSEY
expensive at their age. He
would have to get them to
sign off on it, and they’d
also have to be healthy
enough to have a policy
issued.
This isn’t a good longterm plan, however. As
a long-term plan, I’d tell
your boyfriend that he
needs to build up his own
wealth. If he had $15,000
to $20,000 in savings,
that’s more than enough
to bury two people. I
don’t mean to sound
insensitive, but we’re talking about the economics
involved in this kind of
situation. You can have a
nice funeral for as little as
$5,000.

The other thing I’d do
if I were him is I’d have
a discussion with mom
as to whether or not the
stepfather has the funds
to handle this sort of
thing. When it comes
right down to it that
would be his responsibility, not the son’s. Then,
he should have a similar
discussion with his dad.
If his dad’s got insurance
through work, and the
stepdad is ready to pay
for his mom’s burial, then
I wouldn’t buy insurance
on them. They’re covered
for the immediate future.
So I wouldn’t do it
unless they absolutely
don’t have this sort of
thing covered. Even then
I’d prefer you just cover
it with cash, because all
we’re talking about is just
enough to cover burial
costs. Nothing needs to be
elaborate.
I hope this helps.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

COMMUNITY
NEWS
D5 FAMILY MINISTRIES
RECEIVES GRANT

District Five Ministries,
a crisis intervention program at Middle Tyger
Community Center, was
awarded a $1,200 grant
by Broad River Electric
Charity’s “Round Up” initiative. The grant will help
D5 Family Ministries provide families with heating
assistance during the winter.

REGISTRATION
BLUE RIDGE PAGEANT

Registration is open for
the Little Miss and Master
Blue Ridge Pageant. The
event is Saturday, April 30
at 5 p.m. and is for ages 0
to fifth grade. The deadline to turn in forms is Friday, March 25. For more
information, contact Kelly
at klehew77@gmail.com

FREE COMPUTER CLASS
FOR SENIORS

The City of Greer is offering three-week computer classes for seniors.
Class are free and offered
from 9 to 11 a.m. or 1 to 2
p.m. on Fridays beginning
April. Participants will
learn about laptops, tablets and about safeguards
on the internet. Contact

TimoThy J. Kemp
“Tim”

March 1, 1974 - June 8, 2015

“I love you, Daddy,
and
Happy Birthday.”
Love, Troy

Justin Miller at 848-2192
or
jmiller@cityofgreer.
org by March 31 to register for these classes. Must
be age 50 or older.

GCM NAMES
FAB 5 ITEMS

This year’s Fab 5 items
are: 18 oz. peanut butter,
breakfast food including
grits and dry cereal, spaghetti sauce, boxed pasta
and canned fruit.
Donate items between 8
a.m. and 4 p.m. Monday –
Friday, 738 S. Line St. Ext.
Greer. Call 877-1937

ST. PATRICK’S DAY
DASH AND BASH

Let There Be Mom is
hosting its Fifth Annual
St. Paddy’s Day Dash and
Bash on Saturday, March
12. As a benefiting charity, Let There Be Mom is
responsible for securing
30 volunteers and recruiting runners. To sign up as
a volunteer, visit stpaddy s da s h a n db a s h . c om /
volunteers.asp. and use
code 5LTBM16 for a $5
discount. Runners should
visit
stpaddysdashandbash.com/register.asp and
use code 5LTBM16 for a $5
discount.

TALENT SEARCH
WORKSHOP

Perfecting Talent, an
agency out of Atlanta,
will have a talent search
on March 12 from 9:30
a.m. to 5:30 p.m. in Greenville at Homewood Suites
by Hilton, 102 Carolina
Pointe Parkway. The workshop, put on by casting
director Alan Brooks and
professional agent Rose
Graham will include a
training course for $20,
movie screening insights
and question and answer
session. Seats are limited.
For more information call
803-682-4863 or 803-6825670. Registration can be
done online at perfectingtalent.com/event.

PURSES WITH A PURPOSE
COLLECTING DONATIONS

Middle Tyger River Community Center is collecting
donations for its “Purses
with a Purpose” sale. Donation bins are located at
all District Five schools
to collect purses through
April 13. The sale will
be held May 4-6 from 10
a.m. to 6 p.m. and on May
7 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
at the Community Chest
Thrift Store in Lyman.

page label

wednesday, march 2, 2016

the greer citizen

SELLING OUT TO
THE BARE WALLS!
139 E. Poinsett Street • Greer, SC 29651
1256 Pendleton Street • Greenville, SC 29611
203 S. Main Street • Fountain Inn, SC 29644

ALL 3 STORES CLOSED UNTIL FRIDAY TO MARK DOWN PRICES!

THE GREAT $2,000,000
THREE STORE
C
LOSING SALE!
- THE REASON FOR THIS GREAT SALE -

5

GREAT
SALE DAYS!
Friday 10-5:30
Saturday 10-5:30
Sunday 12-5
Monday 10-5:30
Tuesday 10-5:30

TERMS OF SALE

- ALL SALES FINAL.
- ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO PRIOR SALE.
- NO REFUNDS OR EXCHANGES.
- CREDIT CARDS WELCOME.
- DELIVERY AVAILABLE.
- FINANCING AVAILABLE OAC

After 72 years of service, the time has come to close our Mutual
Home Stores with showrooms located in Greer, Greenville
and Fountain Inn. We will be selling out our entire inventory as
soon as possible in a Great Store Closing Sale! OUR THREE
STORES ARE NOW CLOSED to mark down prices on our entire
and complete stock of quality Furniture, Accessories and
Appliances. Over 2 MILLION DOLLARS of Best, Serta, Spring
Air, Steve Silver, Bernards, Vaughan-Bassett, Liberty,
Frigidaire, Samsung, GE and others will be sold at liquidation
sale prices. FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER OUR STORES WILL
BE OPEN SUNDAY DURING THIS GREAT SALE! NOTHING
WILL BE HELD BACK. We will open all 3 stores to the general
public on Friday March 4th at 10 am.

SALE BEING HELD IN ALL 3 STORES!
WAS $1,099.00

WAS $519.00

NOW $548.88

NOW $258.88

WAS $850.00

WAS $279.00

DESK & HUTCH ROCKER RECLINER
(Greer Location)

(Greer Location)

WAS $550.00

COFFEE TABLE
& 2 END TABLES

NOW $278.88
(Greenville Location)

WAS $779.00

SOFA & LOVESEAT

TV STAND

LEATHER CHAIR

(Greenville Location)

(Fountain Inn Location)

(Fountain Inn Location)

NOW $428.88 NOW $138.88 NOW $398.88

SALE BEGINS
FRIDAY AT 10:00 AM!
Permit#

ALL ITEMS SUBJECT TO AVAILABILITY.

© Lynch Sales Company 2016

A3

OPINION
The Greer Citizen

A4 THE GREER CITIZEN

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

Tracks in the sand

D

espite a week featuring raw, wet
days with ‘Aunty Em’ caliber winds,
oh, look! According to television
commercials, it’s swimsuit season again
and gals, you’d better rush out now
before they’re all gone at Macy’s/Belks/
Ross.
Not me, baby. I stopped enduring that
annual ritual of torture years ago. It’s
difficult to decide, really, what is worse:
getting a mammogram or buying that
suit. There’s a lot of squishing involved
in both (and if you’ve nothing up top,
like me, the mammogram sensation is
something like a rather sensitive part of
your anatomy being caught in a mouse
trap), but at least after a relatively short
time, the mammogram is over.
Not so with buying a new swimsuit.
Because there is no way you’re going to
luck out after trying on one. Your point
of view after forty minutes changes
from, ‘What is going to look good on
me,’ to ‘OK, which one won’t make me
burst into tears?’ Just the thought of
shopping completely creeps me out: to

I’M JUST
SAYING
PAM STONE
try something on that someone else, or
twelve, has tried on, au naturale, is less
than appetizing, and from experience,
let me just say that as tempting as it
might be, trying on swimsuit bottoms
over your underpants is not a good look,
especially if you venture outside the
dressing room to find it in a larger size.
In a three-way glass, every lump,
bump, and orange peel is shown to us
and we women end up adopting the
same pose we see in photos of penguins,
looking down at their babies: head and
shoulders stooped, morose and defeated.
Why do we do it when we know that
there is no such thing as ‘photo-shop’ in
real life?

Surely the light of the sun is kinder
than flickering fluorescent light tubes,
but I just don’t see the point of subjecting oneself to such masochistic behavior. Why don’t we simply do what men
do? Men just basically wear loose trunks.
So what do you say, girls? A bikini top
and, if you’re 16 and a size 6, some ‘Daisy Dukes’ or if you’re older and haven’t
had a Pilates session in awhile, some
‘Mom’ jeans cut offs! Keep the waist high
enough and no one need ever know you
inhaled a half dozen Krispy Kremes for
breakfast.
But if you’re really brave and dare to
be completely liberated, you can follow
traditional European behavior and wear
nothing at all. I was in Spain the first
time I saw that, and not on a private,
nudist beach, “that I just happened to
stumble upon,” either- most people,
including moms of all sizes, had their
tops off, along with their families. In
fact, I felt exceedingly self-conscious in
that I had mine on! I stuck out like a very
thin and pale sore thumb, looking like

It’s difficult to decide, really,
what is worse: getting a
mammogram or buying that
suit. There’s a lot of squishing
involved in both...
a mime in a tankini. So I may just have
to follow their lead the next time I’m in
that part of the world...How wonderful,
really, not to even think about stretch
marks and flabby upper arms- to just
flop everything you’ve got out there for
the whole world to see and not care as
you go for a lovely walk along the Mediterranean with your less-than-perfectlybuilt mate.
Perhaps leaving the most interesting
tracks in the sand!

FROM THE
MAPLE TREE

|

THE UPPER ROOM

From
fear
to strength

KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
Staff Reporter

Leap day

A

Read Psalm 91:14-16

D

o not fear, for I am with
you; do not be dismayed,
for I am your God. I will
strengthen you and help you;
I will uphold you with my
righteous right hand. - Isaiah
41:10 (NIV)
When my late husband developed a debilitating disease
in his mid-thirties — a disease
that would gradually paralyze
him over a 24-year period — I
was afraid of what the future
might hold. How would we
make our living? How would

One of the blessings of
this adversity was that
through these difficult
times, we sought a
closer relationship with
God.
the disease affect our children
and our marriage?
As the disease progressed
and my husband’s abilities
diminished, we had to continually search for ways to adjust
to his new limitations.
One of the blessings of this
adversity was that through
these difficult times, we sought
a closer relationship with God.
As I look back, I can see that
even when we prayed for physical healing, which didn’t come,
God was with us — strengthening and blessing our marriage
and our family relationships,
sustaining us financially, and
upholding us through many
trials.
Life is not always easy, but
we can trust in God’s promise
to strengthen us and to help us
overcome any struggle.

Submission guidelines

T

he Greer Citizen accepts Letters to the Editor. Letters
should be 125 words or less
and include a name and a phone
number for verification.
The Greer Citizen reserves the
right to edit any content.
Letters to the Editor can be
mailed to 317 Trade St., Greer
29651.
SEE LETTER | A5

GUEST EDITORIAL

Fighting hunger still
a priority for GCM
More than 10,000 baby boomers reach the
age of 65 every day and one quarter of those
boomers will live past the age of 90. While many
celebrate the increasing lifespan, maintaining
quality of life and health comes with a price.
Without the support of programs like Meals
on Wheels, many senior adults have to give up
their homes and enter nursing facilities. Did
you know that it costs less to provide Meals on
Wheels for an entire year to a homebound senior than it does to spend one day in the hospital or six days in a nursing home?
The average cost of a one day stay in the hospital in South Carolina can be as high as $2,099.
At Greer Community Ministries (GCM), we provide a warm, nutritious meal to our Meals on
Wheels diners for $1,040 per year, at no cost
to them.
All services are provided through generous
donations from individuals, businesses, churches, civic organizations, grants, and fundraising
events.
GCM is celebrating the 14th Annual March for
Meals campaign during the week of March 21-25
along with other Meals on Wheels organizations
across the country. Community Champions including Greer Mayor Rick Danner, Blue Ridge
High Principal Reena Watson, City Councilman
Lee Dumas, Greater Greer Chamber President
and CEO Mark Owens, Deputy Administration
Chief Scott Keeley, Fire Chief Dorian Flowers,
Deputy Fire Marshal Carl Howell, and Deputy
Operations Chief Josh Holzheimer, have been
enlisted to prepare and deliver meals during
this week to show support and bring awareness
to this important program.
Here are a few ways you can help: Become a
March for Meals sponsor and donate funds to
help with food costs.
All meals are delivered at no cost to clients.
Businesses can help support us in March by offering cash register round-ups or donating a
percentage of a day’s sales to the cause. Also,
you can also encourage employees to get involved by hosting a workplace giving campaign

The Greer Citizen
Steve Blackwell | Publisher
Billy Cannada | Editor
Kenneth Collins Maple
William Buchheit
Preston Burch
Mandy Ferguson

Staff Reporter
Staff Reporter
Photographer
Photographer

Julie Holcombe
Shaun Moss
Suzanne Traenkle

GCM provides Meals on Wheels
in the Greater Greer area, which
includes Blue Ridge, Duncan, Greer,
and Taylors in both Greenville and
Spartanburg counties.
such as a dress down day or donate your lunch
money day. Stomping Grounds Coffee House is
supporting us again this year and ivivalife.com
is joining in as a new supporter.
GCM provides Meals on Wheels in the Greater
Greer area, which includes Blue Ridge, Duncan,
Greer, and Taylors in both Greenville and Spartanburg counties. Every Monday through Friday
volunteers come to 738 S. Line St. Ext. to deliver
over 300 daily meals to people right here in our
community.
The program provides senior citizens independence, dignity and self-respect because they
can stay in their own homes knowing they will
receive a nutritious meal. Often, the visit from
a volunteer driver may be the only contact that
these homebound, elderly and disabled recipients have with the outside world.
Greer Meals on Wheels is a critical program
serving our homebound neighbors that needs
the commitment of able citizens throughout
Greer. Support it by driving a route, purchasing
meals or praying for the continued success of
the program.
Doors are open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. Monday through Friday and visitors are welcome to
see first-hand the impact of neighbors helping
neighbors through Meals on Wheels.
This guest editorial submitted by Greer Community Ministries.

The Greer Citizen
is published every Wednesday by
The Greer Citizen, Inc.
317 Trade St., Greer, S.C. 29651
Telephone 877-2076

Established 1918

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s I write this on Leap Day
2016, it seems like simply
an extra day. My birthday
isn’t on February 29, so the
date hardly seems very special,
and my little girl is still seven
weeks from her due date, so
there’s no chance for her to be
a little leapling and graduate
from high school at the tender
age of four and a half. I’m
already married, so having a
woman propose to me is out of
the question. Apparently that’s
a thing.
Without the hoopla of
birthdates and backwards
proposals to celebrate, perhaps
the most interesting way to
recognize Leap Day is to look
into its cultural and historical
significance. The parallels with
other quadrennial events like
the Olympics or the World Cup
are obvious; perhaps I should
spend today learning how to
be a world-class curler in the
Olympics. I think I’d be a better
curler than soccer (football)
player.
For events that occur on or
around Leap Day, one doesn’t
have to look further than the
Oscars. Perhaps the most
notable Leap Day Oscar, at
least when viewed through a
2016 lens, was in 1940 when
Hattie McDaniel became the
first black actress to win an
Oscar for her role in “Gone
with the Wind.” Nineteen leap
years later, minus a day, it
seems that the problem with
skin color and film isn’t skin
color. Somehow I don’t think
“Straight Outta Compton” will
have the lasting impact of
“Gone with the Wind.” I guess
we can check back in four
years.
Actually, as long as we’re
focusing on four-year events,
maybe Leap Day is for strategic planning of one’s political
platform. By the time Donald
Trump has failed to “make
America great again,” I’ll be old
enough to run for president.
Good thing I wasn’t born on
a Leap Day; I’d still have 108
years to go before I would be
eligible to run. Coincidentally
I think that’s also the age of
Bernie Sanders, though I could
be mistaken. Speaking of that
guy, he and his opponents
in the presidential race may
dread or anticipate leaping to
the next day, Super Tuesday,
when candidates may realize
their campaigns have effectively ended with the passing
of February.

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by the Publisher upon the representation that
the advertiser/agency is authorized to publish
the entire contents and subject matter thereof.
It is understood that the advertiser/agency will
indemnify and save the Publisher harmless from
or against any loss or expense arising out of
publication of such advertisements, including,
without limitation, those resulting from claims
of libel, violation of rights of privacy, plagiarism
and copyrights infringement. © All material in
this publication may not be used in full or in
part without the expressed written consent of
management.

NEWS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

CHURCH
NEWS
TAYLORS FIRST TAKING
INTERN APPLICATION

Taylors First Bapitst
Church is now accepting
intern applications for the
summer of 2016.
Applications will be accepted from now until
March 15 and decisions
will be made by April 1.
For the fall, applications
will be taken from March
15 – May 1 with decisions
made by June 1.
For more information,
visit taylorsfbc.org.

UNITED CHRITIAN
TO HOST REVIVAL

United Christian Church
will host a revival on Friday, March 18, and Saturday, March 19, at 105
Daniel Ave. in Greer (right
behind Cannon’s drive in).
Services will begin at 7
p.m. nightly.
Guest speakers will be

Don Warren and Gene
Wiseman. Call 895-3966.

EASTER FAMILY TO HOLD
CONCERT AT MT. LEBANON

Jeff and Sheri Easter will
perform in concert at Mt.
Lebanon Baptist on Friday,
March 18, at 7 p.m.
The church is located at
572 Mt. Lebanon Church
Road in Greer. Call 8952334 or visit www.mlbcgreer.com.

LOCUST HILL HOSTING
GREAT EGG DROP

Locust
Hill
Baptist
Church will host a free
community event, The
Great Egg Drop 2016, on
Wednesday, March 23, at 6
p.m. The event will feature
over 3,000 candy and treatfilled Easter eggs, a magic
show and hot dog supper.
The Great Egg Drop is for
all children preschool to
fifth grade. Call 895-1771.

TINSLEY TO SPEAK
AT EBENEZER-WELCOME

John Tinsley will speak
at Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist Church on Sunday,

March 20, at 6 p.m.
Tinsley served 24 years
in prison and now shares
his testimony of how God
provides salvation and
how the Lord used him in
the prison system to share
the Gospel. Good Samaritan Prison Team will also
share in singing.
The church is located at
4005 N. Hwy 414 in Landrum.

‘GOLDEN HEARTS’ LISTS
UPCOMING EVENTS

A covered dish supper
is planned for Apalache
Baptist Church Golden
Hearts seniors on March
8 in the church CLC at 6
p.m. Guest for the meeting
is Cathy Schwartz of Rose
Petal Ministries.
The senior adults have
scheduled a shopping trip
March 15 to Hamrick’s in
Gaffney. The group will
eat lunch at Arby’s in Lyman.
Celebrate “March Madness” is on the calendar
for the seniors at Laurenda’s Restaurant in Greer at
6 p.m. on March 31.

|

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

Never forgotten
I’m writing in regard
to the destruction of the
Thomas – Edwards – Rush
cemetery located on Hwy
101 N., in Greer. Needless
to say I’m very unhappy
with the situation. As has
been said, “money trumps
common decency.” The
developer’s actions are
unlawful. An aspect that
is being overlooked is the
fighting spirit of Col. John
Thomas (1718-1811). Even
as a man in his late fifties

and early sixties, he was
leading the Spartan Regiment (Rev. War). Disturbing his grave may have
unleashed his courageous
spirit. I would beware. I
predict there will not be
peace in that development
until the cemetery is restored and those that are
buried there are honored.
And what about the
slaves of these three families? Col. Thomas referenced these slaves in his

HOLLYWILD: Plans to
address USDA issues
FROM PAGE ONE

long enjoyed what Hollywild offers. He said he recently came to the conclusion that Hollywild is the
closest experience one can
have to an African safari.
They confirmed what
Atchley and curator Nigel
Platt were saying throughout the meeting.
“Hollywild offers something unique and something absolutely unbelievably wonderful to the
Upstate if the Upstate will
venture out,” Platt said.
Atchley also addressed
the issue of recent violations during USDA inspections. She said they have

will. “My negro woman,
Moll and her children:
Frank, Seeboo, Ben, Edmond, Rose, Will, Charles,
and ‘Sinda.’ Negro men
Sharper, March and Rose.”
A lot of descendants
and interested parties are
closely monitoring this
situation. Gone yes, but
never forgotten.
Lorene Fisher
Greer

COUNCIL:
Talks security

addressed those violations, and moving forward
they will continue to be
transparent about any inspection issues. But without more financial support, they are unable to
move forward with renovation projects.
Hollywild reopens on
Saturday, March. 5. They
will remain open on weekend during the month of
March. Admission is reduced during this time to
$10 for adults and $8 for
children 2 to 14. In April
and May the park is open
during the week from 9
a.m.-2 p.m. and 10 a.m.-5
p.m. on weekends. Weekday hours will extend dur-

FROM PAGE ONE

installation of bulletproof
walls and windows. Seifert said Sealy Construction bid on the project at
an amount of $135,754,
which is over the $129,000
they had budgeted; however, as Seifert mentioned,
they would use the excess
from the roofing project
to cover the excess.
Police Chief Dan Reynolds said he discussed the
security of the department
and the courts with municipal court administrator Kirsten Pressley, and
they both agreed the level
of security needed to be
heightened.

GANGS: Bloods present in Greer
FROM PAGE ONE

out late looking. We take
this very seriously before
it gets to that level.”
In order to track possible gang activity, the department utilizes criminal
and intelligence analyst
Penny Ellis. She said Greer
has Blood gang members
and those belonging to
Folk Nation, but she is not
aware of the Crip gang
having a presence in Greer.
Reynolds added that Greer
also has Hispanic gang
members possibly from
groups like Latin Kings.
Of course, both Ellis and
Reynolds added that the
task of categorizing a
person as being a gang
member is more difficult
than it might seem. While
there are some gangs like
the Bloods and Crips that
identify with a color, or
some like Folk Nation that
identify with a symbol,
many gangs today try to
keep their identifies hidden.
“They either have to
self-admit and say they’re
in a gang or we have to
identify the criminal activity they’re involved in and
identify that it is gang related and then somebody
else, a third party has to
come in and say ‘Yes, that
person is a gang member,’”
Ellis said.
“There are a lot of rules
in terms of intelligence
gathering and labeling
someone as a gang member so you have to follow
those rules before you
label somebody,” Reynolds said. “Typically we’re
identifying them because
they’re involved in crimi-

nal activity whether it be
theft, drugs, violent activity. The level of violence
here is not what it is in
some communities.”
Larger communities are
indeed more prone to having gang-related activity.
Ellis said the Latin Kings
have more of a presence
in Spartanburg County,
and motorcycle gangs are
found in both Spartanburg and Greenville. While
gangs aren’t confined
to certain jurisdictions,
Reynolds said they can
have territories where opposing gangs typically do
not enter.
In regards to the area
schools, Greer has two
resource officers, Steve
Anderson and Perry Bowens, and both are on the
Upstate Gang Task Force.
The two officers attend
conferences and training.
Most of what they see,
says Reynolds, is juvenile
delinquency rather than
violent behavior.

However, whether it be
in the schools or in neighborhoods, the department
takes group or gang-related incidents very seriously.
“People are afraid for me
to mention that it might
be a problem here in the
city, but when it crops up,”
Reynold said, “it’s a problem.”

BY KATIE CRUICE SMITH
FOR THE GREER CITIZEN
The first spring Craft
and Gift Fair to benefit
Greer Relief will be at
Memorial United Methodist Church on Saturday,
March 5, from 10 a.m. to
4 p.m.
The event, which is being organized by Amanda
Hopper, was spurred on
by the enthusiasm of the
vendors who participated
in the second annual Holiday Fair that was held in
November.
“We have a lot of returning vendors this year,” said
Hopper. “We’ve increased
from 36 vendors to 55,
which is our maximum.
We can fit 42 vendors inside the church, and we
have also been able to
open up the outside for 13
vendors, who will get the
first crack at shoppers.
We just are requiring that
they have their own tent in
order to draw more attention [from the road].”
Hopper estimates that
about 3,400 different people have been invited to the
event through the event’s
Facebook page and Greer
Relief’s page. This time,
vendors are also required
to invite their friends in
order to spread the word
about the event.
“This time in the fall, we
only had 1,000 likes on
our page,” said Hopper.
“But now we have more
people sharing, and over
200 of those shares have
been from non-vendors.”
Hopper is optimistic that
the spring event will be
even more successful than
the holiday event as there
appears to be no conflicts
in the community at this
time.
“Last time, there were
17 other events happening
within 30 minutes of us,”
said Hopper. “This time,
we will have no competition.”
There will be two food
trucks at the event from
Cluck, Squeal, and Friends
and Nut’n But Butts Bar B
Que & Catering.
The event in November
raised almost $1,500 for
Greer Relief, and Hopper
is anticipating that the
spring event will bring in
around $3,500.
The money is raised
through vendor fees plus
10 percent of their sales
and donations. Other vendors, who may not want
or need an actual booth
at the event, simply pay
a higher fee in order to
get their business names
out into the community.
Unlike the holiday event,
there will be no raffle this
month as local businesses
are also raising money for
Greer Relief’s annual gala.
This year’s gala will celebrate the non-profit’s
birthday with an 80th
Birthday Prohibition Party.
Tickets are now available
for $65. The event will be
held Saturday, March 19
from 6 to 11 p.m. at the
Cannon Centre in Greer.
“There will be people on

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site from Greer Relief who
will have more information about the gala,” said
Hopper. “The vendors are
also receiving information about the gala in their
packets.”
Hopper, who used to be
on the board at Greer Relief, wanted to find a way
to raise money for helping the non-profit “give
people a hand-up, not a
hand-out.” She also wanted to find a way to help local, small businesses. The
idea to hold a holiday fair
took off from there, and
now Hopper plans to host
two events each year to
help the community where
she lives and works. She
also hopes to increase the
number of vendors by just
a little bit each time until
she hits 70.
“In the late summer of
2014, I began trying to
think of ways that I could
support Greer Relief with
a larger impact than what I
had been doing,” said Hopper. “You can support an
organization in two ways –
with money and with your
time. We were pretty much
maxed out at how much
money we could personally donate but I had some
free time to give. I have
many friends who make a
living or earn extra money
making and selling their
products or working for
direct sales organizations.

The first annual Holiday
Fair was born out of a
desire to support Greer
Relief and my network of
friends and acquaintances
who supported their family through the sale of the
type products I was looking to offer at the fair.”
Vendors for the spring
event include Avon, ItWorks, Southern Roots
Rustic wall décor, Style
Dots high-end costume
jewelry, Jennifer Allen
Puhl’s children’s bedroom
décor, Gail Moore’s handmade jewelry, Emeline
Design’s girls’ classic-style
clothing,
photographer
Blaine K. Owens, Tastefully Simple, paintings by
Annelies Noel Cahill, Hayward Street Gourmet Popcorn, Purely essential oils,
and many more.
“Our vendors include
handmade,
specialty
items, retail, and a few of
the favorite direct sales
companies,” said Hopper.
“We literally have something for everyone.”
Parking and registration
for the event is free. Additional parking is also available next door at McLeskey
Todd Pharmacy. Memorial
UMC is located at 201 N.
Main St. in Greer.
For more information,
visit the event’s Facebook
page, Craft and Gift Show
Benefiting Greer Relief.

OBITUARIES
The Greer Citizen

A6 THE GREER CITIZEN
Gerald J. Cronin
USN Ret. Veteran

Gerald Joseph Cronin,
USN Ret., 91, widower of
Doris Elizabeth Hudson
Cronin, died Feb. 28.
A native of
Norwood, MA,
son of the late
Michael Joseph and Lillian
Veronica Coughlin Cronin,
he was a retired employee
of Springs Industries, a retired US Navy Veteran, life
member Mason of the Bailey Lodge, 32 degree Scottish Rite, member of Hejaz
Shrine ,American Legion,
Fleet Reserve Association
and of the Presbyterian
faith.
Surviving are one son
and daughter-in-law, Michael and Debbie Cronin
of Marietta, Georgia; four
sisters, Shirley Daniels of
East Walpole, Massachusetts, Marjorie Rooney of
East Walpole, Massachusetts, Jean Peavy of Walpole, Massachusetts and
June McCarthy of East
Walpole, Massachusetts;
two grandchildren, Carey
Cronin of Oklahoma City,
Oklahoma and Katie Cronin Davis (Brandon) of
Chancellor, Alabama and
two great-grandchildren,
Wyatt Michael Davis and
Kinley Rachel Davis.
Mr. Cronin was predeceased by one brother, Leo
Francis Cronin and two
sisters, Lillian Gianetti and
Patricia Jenks.
Funeral services will
be held 2 p.m. Friday at
Wood Mortuary conducted by Dottie Bryson. Entombment will follow in
Woodlawn Memorial Park
Remembrance
Chapel
Mausoleum with military
and masonic rites.
Visitation will be held
12:30-1:45 p.m. Friday at
Wood Mortuary.
Memorials may be made
to the American Cancer
Society, PO Box 22718,
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
73123-1718.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewoodmortuary.com.

Rusty Few

The family is at the home
of the daughter, Deborah
and Jonathan Shirk.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to
Alzheimer’s Association,
301 University Ridge,
Suite 5850, Greenville, SC
29601 or SC Hospice and
Palliative Care, 351-B East
Blackstock Road, Spartanburg, SC, 29301.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewoodmortuary.com.

followed in Greenville Memorial Gardens.
Visitation was held 5-7
p.m. Sunday at The Wood
Mortuary.
Memorials may be made
to the American Cancer
Society, P.O. Box 22478,
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
73123.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewoodmortuary.com.

Veteran

Dora Moore

Paul Vernon “Rusty”
Few, 84, husband of Virginia Frances Teseniar
Few, went to be with Jesus
on
Monday,
February
29,
2016. He was
loved and supported by
many family & friends.
Born in Greer, he was the
son of the late James Columbus and Annie Mae
Hardin Few.
He was a retired Plant
Engineer with JP Stevens,
served in the US Army,
and a member of Praise
Cathedral. He loved to
keep everyone laughing
with his goofy jokes. He
was an avid fisherman and
enjoyed growing his tomatoes.
In addition to his wife of
62 years, he is survived by
his sons, David Coster (Jan)
of Greenwood and Christopher Few of Taylors, his
daughters, Deborah Shirk
(Jonathan), Sandra Harvey
(Clint), and Robin Few all
of Greer; sisters, Morene
Henson of Greer, Patricia Stokes of Alabama, &
a brother, Charles Wade
Crocker of Summerville.
Cherishing his memory
are eight grandchildren
and 10 great-grandchildren. He was loved by his
special beagle and best
friend, Buddy.
He was predeceased by
a son, Kenneth Few; brothers, J.T. Few, Gabe Few,
and Raymond Leo Few;
sisters, Ruth Crocker and
Lila Mae Few.
Funeral services will be
held 3 p.m. Wednesday at
Wood Mortuary conducted
by Rev. Jerry Madden. Entombment will follow in
Hillcrest Memory Gardens
Mausoleum.
Pallbearers will be Matthew Few, Brandon Hamilton, J.D. Desrosiers, Ryan
Summey, Matt Coster and
John Coster.
Visitation will be held
1-2:45 p.m. Wednesday at
Wood Mortuary.

Dora
Idella
Barker
Moore, 60, of 2411 Brushy
Creek Road, died Feb. 25
at her home after a period
of declining health.
A native of Greenville
County, daughter of the
late Freeman Thomas and
Thelma Hamby Barker, she
was a retired employee
of General Electric and a
member of Edgewood Baptist Church.
Surviving are her husband, Ricky Austin Moore
of the home; three sons,
Donnie Holloway of Greer,
Shawn Bryant (Amy) of
Williamston; and Benjamin Holloway of Blue
Ridge; a daughter, Sandra
Itani of Greenville; three
step-sons, Brian Moore
(Chasity) of Pelzer, Joseph
Moore of Greer and Chaz
Massengale of Greer; a
step-daughter,
Rebecca
Duvall of Simpsonville; an
aunt, Wilma Yearwood of
Greenville; fifteen grandchildren and three greatgrandchildren.
Mrs. Moore was predeceased by a brother,
Thomas “Tony” A. Barker.
Funeral services were
held 1:30 p.m. Monday at
The Wood Mortuary, conducted by Rev. David Kay
and Sandra Itani. Burial

Weekend Outlook

Warm, dry weekend weather

After week with rain and chilly temperatures,
we will see warm, dry weather for the first
weekend of March. We will see mostly
sunny skies for the weekend both days. Our
afternoon temperatures will climb to the low
60s on Saturday and upper 60s for Sunday.
Our overnight lows will drop to the middle 30s
for Saturday and upper 30s for Sunday. Have a
great weekend!

56/29 Partly sunny
61/35 Partly sunny

58/30 Partly sunny
62/36 Partly sunny

Spring Craft and Gift Fair

61/34 Partly sunny
66/38 Partly sunny

Where: Memorial United Methodist

Alan W. Hughes
Alan Wood Hughes, 64,
of Taylors passed away on
Feb. 28. He was the son of
the late Dr. and Mrs. James
L. Hughes of Greer.
Alan graduated from
Chester High School and
from Mars Hill University.
After 38 years at State
Auto Insurance Companies, he spent his retirement playing golf, writing
stories, fishing, and walking miles per day. He loved
his family fiercely and was
a loyal friend.
Alan is survived by his
wife of 40 years Rebecca
Phillips Hughes; his son,
Sy Hughes and his wife,
Sarah and their children,
Marshall and Porter of
Lexington, Virginia; his
daughter, Alison Cobb and
her husband, Michael of
York; his sisters, Miriam
Owens of Asheville, North
Carolina and Edith Horner
(Tom) of Ormond Beach
FL; his brothers, Dr. Jim
Hughes (Virginia) of Brandon, MS, Tommy Hughes
(Marie) of Greer, and Dr.
Richard Hughes (Becky) of
Black Mountain, NC; fourteen nephews and nieces;
twenty-one grandnephews
and grandnieces. Also surviving are his aunt Pitts
Hughes, father-in-law Reg
Phillips, close cousin Rob
Hughes (Sharon), and family friend Nancy Rollins.
A graveside memorial
service will be held on Saturday, March 5, 2016 at
11 a.m. at Mountain View
Cemetery, conducted by
Rev. Brad Clayton and Rev.
Elizabeth Link.
In lieu of flowers, the
family requests that memorial donations be made
to either Greer Community Ministries at PO Box
1373 Greer, SC 29652 or
Lake Cunningham Firehouse Angels at 2802 N
McElhaney Rd Greer, SC
29651.
Online condolences can
be made online at www.
thewoodmortuary.com.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

Date: Saturday, March 5
10 a.m.-4 p.m.
Temps: Sunny.
45 to 61.

56/29 PS
59/36 PS
58/44 SUN
63/46 SUN
65/40 SUN
60/37 PS
64/41 SUN
60/37 PS

David Leon Taylor
David Leon Taylor’s
eight-month fight with
pancreatic cancer ended
peacefully early in the
morning, Feb. 28, in Greenville, South Carolina.
David was born in Wolcott, New York, the ninth
and last child of Elisabeth
and Donald. Life was never
easy for David. His mother
died of cancer when he
was only 12 years old and
in his father’s absence, he
lived with various siblings
until he left home at age
18 to put himself through
college. David earned a
bachelor’s degree in science from SUNY Cortland
and a master’s degree
from Adelphi University.
At Nova Southeastern University in Ft. Lauderdale,
Florida, David earned his
master’s degree in physical therapy, a calling he
first felt while visiting his
mother in the hospital
during the last days of her
life. David truly loved being a physical therapist,
wanting nothing more
than to help others heal
physically, spiritually, and
emotionally.
While in Florida, David
met and married the love
of his life, Laurie (Pieroni)
Richardson, and their shining stars, Chase and Bryce
followed suit. In 2003, the
family made Greer, South
Carolina,
their
home.
There the boys thrived and
David and Laurie fulfilled
their longtime dream of
opening their very own
physical therapy practice:
New Day Physical Therapy,
Greer, South Carolina. The
practice, which opened in
the spring of 2012, was
one of his greatest accomplishments, and his clients
came to love and cherish him. In June of 2016,
the cancer struck and the
family sold the business
and got to work extending David’s life. David beat
the odds by two months
– holding on for time with
Laurie and his boys. David
wanted his cancer publicized to others in order to
help further the advancement of prescreening and
research for a cure for
pancreatic cancer.
David was an active Boy
Scout parent and member
of the Knights of Columbus in his church parish
of Prince of Peace Catholic
Church. He was a healthcare practitioner for 26
years, achieving his bachelor’s and master’s degrees
and further certification
in craniosacral therapy,
visceral manipulation, dry
needling, manual therapy,
vestibular rehabilitation,
and exercise physiology.
Bitterness could easily
have taken control of David
but his faith in the Lord always kept it at bay and his
heart was never hardened
– it remained forever full
and flowing. All who knew
David admired his love
for family – not just his,

62/36 Partly sunny
68/40 Partly sunny

Wednesday

Saturday

61
34

61/35 PS
62/41 PS
65/47 SUN
66/49 PS
68/43 SUN
64/39 SUN
67/41 SUN
62/41 SUN

57
41

March 31

Thursday

Sunday

66
38

but his extended family
of Christ’s church, and his
faith in his Maker. To the
very end, Dave’s signature
smile never left his lips;
and his focus remained on
others’ needs and feelings
before his own.
He left behind his adoring wife and children, Laurie, Chase (18), and Bryce
(12); brother, Willie and
wife, Julie; sisters, Ruth
Kennelly and husband,
Tom, Hilde Houck and husband, Joe, Lisa Williams
and husband, Bull, and
Pam Taylor; mother-in-law,
Rose Marie Pieroni; sisterin-law, Donna Brown and
husband, Earl; brother-inlaw Keith Pieroni and wife,
Denise; and numerous loving nieces and nephews.
He was predeceased by his
mother, Elisabeth and father, Donald; sisters, Helen Kent, Katie Pender, and
Jennie Davidson; brother,
Donnie; and father-in-law,
Gilbert Pieroni.
David and his family
will never forget all the
love and support from
their family and friends
(Go Team Dave!). All the
cards, visits, acts of service, money raised, and
love showered on them
will forever be treasured
in their hearts.
David’s Funeral Mass
will be celebrated at Prince
of Peace Catholic Church,
1209 Brushy Creek Road,
Taylors, South Carolina,
29687 at 10:00 a.m. on Saturday, March 5, 2016 with
a reception immediately
following at the church.
In lieu of flowers, please
send donations to the Cancer Society of Greenville,
113 Mills Ave., Greenville,
SC 29605 and Pancreatic
Cancer Action Network,
1500 Rosecrans Ave., Suite
200, Manhattan Beach,
California 90266 (www.
pancan.org).
Condolences may be
sent to the family at www.
thomasmcafee.com.

Friday

54
33

Monday

March 8

March 23

60
38

58
37
Tuesday

68
41

March 15

4.72”
8.26”
+0.47”

68
43

Martin L. Tooke, Jr.
Veteran

Martin Luther Tooke, Jr.,
88, of 321 Zoar Heights
Road, died March 1, 2016
at his home.
A native of
Greer, son of
the late Martin
Luther Tooke, Sr., and Annie Laura Dill Tooke, he
was a retired employee of
J.P. Stevens Delta Woodside and a member of
Fairview Baptist Church
where he was a member
of Young at Hearts. Mr.
Tooke was a US Navy WWII
and Korean War Veteran,
and was a member of the
Hejaz Marching Patrol and
Chairman of Tyger River
Fire Department Board of
Commissioners.
Surviving are his wife,
Millicent Bright Tooke, of

6:56 AM
6:26 PM

the home; two daughters,
Deb Jordan (Rudy) and
Sandy Culpepper (Mike),
all of Greer; one sister,
Minnie Mae Vaughn, of Lyman; three grandchildren,
Matt Jordan (Jamie), Chris
Jordan (Whitney) and Lindsey Barnett and five greatgrandchildren,
Charlie
and Tucker Jordan, Grady
Jordan and Kamron and
Kaleb Barnett.
Funeral services will be
held 2 p.m. Thursday at
Wood Mortuary conducted
by Dr. Henry Johnson and
Rev. John Bedford.
Visitation will be held
6-7:30 p.m. Wednesday at
Wood Mortuary.
The family is at the
home.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to Tyger
River Fire Department,
355 Locust Street, Lyman,
SC 29365 or Greer Community Ministries, PO Box
1373, Greer, SC 29652.
Online condolences may
be made at www.thewoodmortuary.com.

ONLINE
View Obituaries
online at

greercitizen.com

Thomas McAfee Funeral
Home, Downtown.
Obituaries can be emailed
to billy@greercitizen.com or
dropped off at 317 Trade St.
Deadline: noon Tuesday. Cost:
$60; with photo $75.

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|

A6 THE
THE GREER
GREER
CITIZEN
wednesday,
march
2, 2016
A8
CITIZEN

PAGE label
LABEL 
page

WEDNESDAY,
JANUARY
20, 2015
2016
theNOVEMBER
greer
citizen
A7
WEDNESDAY,
11,

And they were calling to one another: “Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty;
the whole earth is full of his glory.” - Isaiah 6:3

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Groveland Road
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Abner Creek
Creek Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Abner

2461 Abner
Abner Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-6604
877-6604
2461

Airport Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Airport

776 S.
S. Batesville
Batesville Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 848-7850
848-7850
776

Apalache Baptist
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1915 Gap
Gap Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-6012
877-6012
1915
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Bible Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Bible

6645 Mountain
Mountain View
View Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 895-7003
895-7003
6645

Blue Ridge
Ridge Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Blue

3950 Pennington
Pennington Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 895-5787
895-5787
3950

BridgePointe
BridgePointe

600 Bridge
Bridge Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 244-2774
244-2774
600

Burnsview Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Burnsview

9690 Reidville
Reidville Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-4006
879-4006
9690

Calvary Baptist
Baptist
Calvary

101 Calvary
Calvary St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-9759
877-9759
101

Calvary Baptist
Baptist
Calvary

108 Forest
Forest St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 968-0092
968-0092
108

Calvary Hill
Hill Baptist
Baptist
Calvary

100 Edward
Edward Rd.,
Rd., Lyman
Lyman
100

Calvary Road
Road Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Calvary
108 Bright
Bright Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 593-2643
593-2643
108

Camp Creek
Creek Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Camp
1100 Camp
Camp Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors
1100

Cedar Grove
Grove Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Cedar
109 Elmer
Elmer St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-6216
877-6216
109

Community Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Community

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Office
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Hours:
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7:30-6:00 Mon.-Fri.
Mon.-Fri.
7:30-6:00

848-5330
848-5330

400 W.
W. Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.
Blvd.
400
Greer
Greer

Ebenezer-Welcome Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Ebenezer-Welcome
4005 Highway
Highway 414,
414, Landrum
Landrum •• 895-1461
895-1461
4005

El Bethel
Bethel Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
El

Emmanuel Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Emmanuel

423 S.
S. Buncombe
Buncombe Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-2121
877-2121
423

Enoree Fork
Fork Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Enoree

100 Enoree
Enoree Dr.,
Dr., Greer
Greer •• 268-4385
268-4385
100

Fairview Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Fairview

1300 Locust
Locust Hill
Hill Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-1881
877-1881
1300

First Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
First

202 W.
W. Poinsett
Poinsett St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-4253
877-4253
202
Freedom Fellowship
Fellowship Greer
Greer High
High •• 877-3604
877-3604
Freedom

Good News
News Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Good

1592 S.
S. Highway
Highway 14,
14, Greer
Greer •• 879-2289
879-2289
1592

Grace Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Grace
864-848-5222
864-848-5222

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help then
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760 W.
W. Gap
Gap Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-3519
879-3519
760

Grace Place
Place
Grace

864.457.9122
864.457.9122

www.hocf.org
www.hocf.org

For information
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For
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on this page,
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UALITY
OODS

508 North Main St. • 877-4043
7 am
am -- 10
10 pm
pm Mon.-Sat.
Mon.-Sat.
7

2375 Racing
Racing Road,
Road, Greer
Greer •• 877-0449
877-0449
2375

Riverside Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Riverside

1249 S.
S. Suber
Suber Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-4400
879-4400
1249

Second Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Second

570 Memorial
Memorial Drive
Drive Ext.,
Ext., Greer
Greer •• 877-7061
877-7061
570

Southside Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Southside

Taylors First
First Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Taylors

200 W.
W. Main
Main St.,
St., Taylors
Taylors •• 244-3535
244-3535
200

United Family
Family Ministries
Ministries
United

13465 E.
E. Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.,
Blvd., Greer
Greer •• 877-3235
877-3235
13465

Victor Baptist
Baptist
Victor

121 New
New Woodruff
Woodruff Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-9686
877-9686
121

Washington Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Washington

3500 N.
N. Highway
Highway 14,
14, Greer
Greer •• 895-1510
895-1510
3500

Welcome Home
Home Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Welcome

1779 Pleasant
Pleasant Hill
Hill Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 901-7674
901-7674
1779

Blessed Trinity
Trinity Catholic
Catholic Church
Church
Blessed

CHURCH OF CHRIST
Riverside Church
Church of
of Christ
Christ
Riverside

2103 Old
Old Spartanburg
Spartanburg Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 322-6847
322-6847
2103

CHURCH OF GOD
Church of
of God
God -- Greer
Greer
Church

500 Trade
Trade St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-0374
877-0374
500

Church of
of God
God of
of Prophecy
Prophecy
Church

2416 N.
N. Highway
Highway 14,
14, Greer
Greer •• 877-8329
877-8329
2416

Eastside Worship
Worship Center
Center
Eastside

3390 Brushy
Brushy Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-4878
879-4878
3390

Good Shepherd
Shepherd Episcopal
Episcopal
Good

401 Batesville
Batesville Rd.,
Rd., Simpsonville
Simpsonville •288-4867
•288-4867
401

111 Biblebrook
Biblebrook Dr.,
Dr., Greer
Greer •• 877-4206
877-4206
111
Hispanic Baptist
Baptist Iglesia
Iglesia Bautista
Bautista Hispana
Hispana
Hispanic
199 Hubert
Hubert St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-3899
877-3899
199

Holly Springs
Springs Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Holly

250 Hannon
Hannon Rd.,
Rd., Inman
Inman •• 877-6765
877-6765
250

Locust Hill
Hill Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Locust

Greer Storage

1288 Brown
Brown Wood
Wood Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-4475
879-4475
1288

Zoar United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Zoar

LLC

1005 Highway
Highway 357,
357, Greer
Greer •• 877-0758
877-0758
1005

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Blue Ridge
Ridge Presbyterian
Presbyterian Church
Church
Blue

Devenger Road
Road Presbyterian
Presbyterian Church
Church
Devenger

FREE

1200 Devenger
Devenger Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 268-7652
268-7652
1200

Fellowship Presbyterian
Presbyterian Church
Church
Fellowship

MOVE IN TRUCK

1105 Old
Old Spartanburg
Spartanburg Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-3267
877-3267
1105

First Presbyterian
Presbyterian Church
Church
First

14372 E.
E. Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.
Blvd.
14372
Greer,
SC
29651
Greer, SC 29651

100 School
School St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-3612
877-3612
100

Fulton Presbyterian
Presbyterian Church
Church
Fulton

821 Abner
Abner Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-3190
879-3190
821

OTHER DENOMINATIONS
Agape House
Agape House

900 Gap
Gap Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 329-7491
329-7491
900

Anglican Church
Church of
of St.
St. George
George the
the Martyr
Martyr
Anglican
427 Batesville
Batesville Rd.,
Rd., Simpsonville
Simpsonville •• 281-0015
281-0015
427

Barton’s Memorial
Memorial Pentacostal
Pentacostal Holiness
Holiness
Barton’s
Highway 101
101 North,
North, Greer
Greer
Highway

Bethesda Temple
Temple
Bethesda

125 Broadus
Broadus St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-8523
877-8523
125

Beulah Christian
Christian Fellowship
Fellowship Church
Church
Beulah
1017 Mauldin
Mauldin Rd.,
Rd., Greenville
Greenville •• 283-0639
283-0639
1017

Calvary Bible
Bible Fellowship
Fellowship
Calvary

Holiday Inn,
Inn, Duncan
Duncan •• 266-4269
266-4269
Holiday

Calvary Chapel
Chapel of
of Greer
Greer
Calvary

104 New
New Woodruff
Woodruff Rd.
Rd. •• Greer
Greer •• 877-8090
877-8090
104

Christ Fellowship
Fellowship
Christ

343 Hampton
Hampton Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-8446
879-8446
343

Christian Heritage
Heritage Church
Church
Christian

Abiding Peace
Peace Ev.
Ev. Lutheran
Lutheran Church
Church
Abiding
Apostolic Lutheran
Lutheran Church
Church
Apostolic

453 N.
N. Rutherford
Rutherford Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 848-4568
848-4568
453

Immanuel Lutheran
Lutheran Church
Church && School
School LCMS
LCMS
Immanuel
2820 Woodruff
Woodruff Rd.,
Rd., Simpsonville
Simpsonville •• 297-5815
297-5815
2820

Redeemer Lutheran
Lutheran Church,
Church, ELCA
ELCA
Redeemer
300 Oneal
Oneal Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-5876
877-5876
300

Saints Peter
Peter and
and Paul
Paul Evangelical
Evangelical Lutheran
Lutheran
Saints
400 Parker
Parker Ivey
Ivey Dr.,
Dr., Greenville
Greenville •• 551-0246
551-0246
400

5080 Sandy
Sandy Flat
Flat Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 895-2524
895-2524
5080

Glad Tidings
Tidings Assembly
Assembly of
of God
God
Glad

Highway 290,
290, Greer
Greer •• 879-3291
879-3291
Highway
Greer Mill
Mill Church
Church 52
52 Bobo
Bobo St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-2442
877-2442
Greer

Harmony Fellowship
Fellowship Church
Church
Harmony
Harvest Christian
Christian Church
Church
Harvest

2150 Highway
Highway 417,
417, Woodruff
Woodruff •• 486-8877
486-8877
2150

International Cathedral
Cathedral of
of Prayer
Prayer
International
100 Davis
Davis Avenue
Avenue •• Greer
Greer •• 655-0009
655-0009
100

Lifesong Church
Church
Lifesong

12481 Greenville
Greenville Highway,
Highway, Lyman
Lyman •• 439-2602
439-2602
12481

Living Way
Way Community
Community Church
Church
Living

3239 N.
N. Highway
Highway 101,
101, Greer
Greer •• 895-0544
895-0544
3239

New Beginnings
Beginnings Outreach
Outreach
New

104 New
New Woodruff
Woodruff Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 968-2424
968-2424
104

New Covenant
Covenant Fellowship
Fellowship
New

2425 Racing
Racing Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 848-4521
848-4521
2425

Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.
Blvd. •• Duncan
Duncan •• 426-4933
426-4933
Wade

New Jerusalem
Jerusalem Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
New

413 E.
E. Poinsett
Poinsett St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 968-9203
968-9203
413

New Life
Life Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
New

90 Becco
Becco Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 895-3224
895-3224
90

Northwood Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Northwood

888 Ansel
Ansel School
School Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-5417
877-5417
888

O’Neal Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
O’Neal

3420 N.
N. Highway
Highway 101,
101, Greer
Greer •• 895-0930
895-0930
3420

Pelham First
First Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Pelham

2720 S.
S. Old
Old Highway
Highway 14,
14, Greer
Greer •• 879-4032
879-4032
2720

People’s Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
People’s

310 Victor
Victor Avenue
Avenue Ext.,
Ext., Greer
Greer •• 848-0449
848-0449
310

Piney Grove
Grove Missionary
Missionary Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Piney
201 Jordan
Jordan Rd.,
Rd., Lyman
Lyman •• 879-2646
879-2646
201

Covenant United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Covenant
Ebenezer United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Ebenezer
174 Ebenezer
Ebenezer Road,
Road, Greer
Greer •• 987-9644
987-9644
174

Faith United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Faith

New Hope
Hope Freedom
Freedom
New

Point of
of Life
Life Church
Church
Point
Springwell Church
Church
Springwell

4369 Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.,
Blvd., Taylors
Taylors •• 268-2299
268-2299
4369

Trinity Fellowship
Fellowship Church
Church
Trinity

Fews Chapel
Chapel United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Fews

3610 Brushy
Brushy Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-0419
877-0419
3610
1700 N.
N. Pleasantburg
Pleasantburg Dr,
Dr, Greenville
Greenville •• 244-6011
244-6011
1700

Grace United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Grace

1001 W.
W. Poinsett
Poinsett St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 629-3350
629-3350
1001

1301 S.
S. Main
Main St.
St. (S.
(S. Hwy.
Hwy. 14),
14), Greer
Greer •• 877-0308
877-0308
1301
4000 N.
N. Highway
Highway 101,
101, Greer
Greer •• 895-2522
895-2522
4000
627 Taylor
Taylor Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-7015
877-7015
627

Lee Road
Road United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Lee
1377 East
East Lee
Lee Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 244-6427
244-6427
1377

Liberty Hill
Hill United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Liberty
301 Liberty
Liberty Hill
Hill Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 968-8150
968-8150
301

Liberty United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Liberty

4276 Highway
Highway 414,
414, Landrum
Landrum •• 292-0142
292-0142
4276

Memorial United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Memorial
201 N.
N. Main
Main St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-0956
877-0956
201

Mountain View
View UMC
UMC
Mountain

6525 Mountain
Mountain View
View Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 895-8532
895-8532
6525

848-5500

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information
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about advertising
advertising
about
on this
this page,
page,
on
call 864-877-2076.
864-877-2076.
call

1400B Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.,
Blvd., Greer
Greer •• 350-1051
350-1051
1400B

1310 Old
Old Spartanburg
Spartanburg Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 244-3162
244-3162
1310

Bethel United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Bethel

301 McCall
McCall St.
St. •• Greer
Greer
301

Mountain Bridge
Bridge Community
Community Church
Church
Mountain

109 W.
W. Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.
Blvd. •• Greer
Greer •• 205-8816
205-8816
109
New Life
Life in
in Christ
Christ 210
210 Arlington
Arlington Rd.
Rd. •• 346-9053
346-9053
New

561 Gilliam
Gilliam Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-7080
879-7080
561

Commercial •• Residential
Residential
Commercial
SINCE 1930
Asphalt Paving
Paving •• Site
Site Preparation
Preparation SINCE 1930
Asphalt
14 • SC
PO Box 529
Highway 14
14 ••Hwy.
Greer,
Highway
Greer,
SCSC
Greer,
879-7311(864) 879-7311
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468 S.
S. Suber
Suber Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-8287
877-8287
468

105 E.
E. Arlington
Arlington Ave.,
Ave., Greer
Greer •• 879-2066
879-2066
105

New Hope
Hope Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
New

Division of Rogers Group, Inc.
ASHMORE
BROTHERS

Faith Temple
Temple
Faith

609 S.
S. Main
Main St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-1791
877-1791
609

572 Mt.
Mt. Lebanon
Lebanon Church
Church Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 895-2334
895-2334
572

864-879-2117
864-879-2117

COMMERCIAL •• RENTALS
RENTALS •• RESIDENTIAL
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
www.mcculloughproperties.com
www.mcculloughproperties.com

Faith Family
Family Church
Church
Faith

5534 Locust
Locust Hill
Hill Rd.,
Rd., Travelers
Travelers Rest
Rest •• 895-1771
895-1771
5534

Milford Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Milford

McCullough
Properties

85 Years

METHODIST

Maple Creek
Creek Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Maple

864-879-2117

3339 Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.,
Blvd., Taylors
Taylors •• 244-0207
244-0207
3339

Praise Cathedral
Cathedral Church
Church of
of God
God
Praise

218 Alexander
Alexander Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 989-0170
989-0170
218

Hillcrest Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Hillcrest

Woods Chapel
Chapel United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Woods

139 Abner
Abner Creek
Creek Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 801-0528
801-0528
139

Pelham Church
Church of
of God
God of
of Prophecy
Prophecy
Pelham

LUTHERAN

3270 Hwy.
Hwy. 414,
414, Taylors
Taylors •• 895-5270
895-5270
3270

Wilson Ave.,
Ave., Greer
Greer •• 877-5520
877-5520
11 Wilson

3794 Berry
Berry Mill
Mill Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 895-4273
895-4273
3794

O’Neal Church
Church of
of God
God
O’Neal

Groveland Road,
Road, Taylors
Taylors
22 Groveland

Heritage Chapel
Chapel Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Heritage

Join Us
Us Sunday
Sunday
Join

Victor United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Victor

900 N.
N. Main
Main St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-2288
877-2288
Management &
& Employees
Employees
900
5KPEG
Management
Christian Life
Life Center
Center 22 Country
Country Plaza
Plaza •• 322-1325
322-1325
Christian
Hwy. 14 • P.O. Box 529 • Greer, SC
Christian Outreach
Outreach 106
106 West
West Rd.
Rd. •• 848-0308
848-0308
Christian
(864) 879-7311
El-Bethel Holiness
Holiness 103
103 E.
E. Church
Church St.
St. •• 968-9474
968-9474
El-Bethel

601 Taylors
Taylors Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 268-0523
268-0523
601

200 Cannon
Cannon St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-2330
877-2330
200

Groveland Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Groveland

3856 N.
N. Highway
Highway 101,
101, Greer
Greer •• 895-5570
895-5570
3856

2094 Highway
Highway 101
101 North,
North, Greer
Greer •• 483-2140
483-2140
2094

445 S.
S. Suber
Suber Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 801-0181
801-0181
445

877-5417

St. Paul
Paul United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
St.

Groveland Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 879-2904
879-2904
22 Groveland

Suber Road
Road Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Suber

888 Ansel School Rd.

911 St.
St. Mark
Mark Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 848-7141
848-7141
911

PRESBYTERIAN

St. John’s
John’s Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
St.

Northwood Baptist Church

1421 Reidville
Reidville Sharon
Sharon Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-7926
879-7926
1421

410 S.
S. Main
Main St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 877-2672
877-2672
410

110 Pine
Pine Ridge
Ridge Dr.,
Dr., Greer
Greer •• 968-0310
968-0310
110

Greer Freewill
Freewill Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Greer

Mount Lebanon
Lebanon Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Mount

For information
information
For
about advertising
advertising
about
on this
this page,
page,
on
call 864-877-2076.
864-877-2076.
call
508 North Main St. • 877-4043

Rebirth Missionary
Missionary Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Rebirth

407 Ridgewood
Ridgewood Dr.,
Dr., Greer
Greer
407

1282 Milford
Milford Church
Church Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 895-5533
895-5533
1282

Greer
Greer

2020 Gibbs
Gibbs Shoals
Shoals Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-3483
877-3483
2020

EPISCOPAL

Highland Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Highland
Ask for
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Providence Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Providence

901 River
River Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 879-4225
879-4225
901

1600 Holly
Holly Springs
Springs Rd.,
Rd., Lyman
Lyman •• 877-4746
877-4746
1600

1379 W.
W. Wade
Wade Hampton,
Hampton, Greer
Greer
1379

St. Mark
Mark United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
St.

4899 Jordan
Jordan Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 895-3546
895-3546
4899

3800 Locust
Locust Hill
Hill Rd.,
Rd., Taylors
Taylors •• 895-1314
895-1314
3800

Friendship Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Friendship

DILL CREEK
CREEK COMMONS
COMMONS
DILL

Pleasant Hill
Hill Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Pleasant

CATHOLIC

313 Jones
Jones Ave.,
Ave., Greer
Greer •• 877-4021
877-4021
313

BENSON

Sharon United
United Methodist
Methodist Church
Church
Sharon

1002 S.
S. Buncombe
Buncombe Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 877-6436
877-6436
1002

642 S.
S. Suber
Suber Rd.,
Rd., Greer
Greer •• 848-3500
848-3500
642

Double Springs
Springs Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Double
989-0099
989-0099
1409 W.
W. Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.
Blvd.
1409

Pleasant Grove
Grove Baptist
Baptist Church
Church
Pleasant

United Anglican
Anglican Fellowship
Fellowship
United
United Christian
Christian Church
Church
United

105 Daniel
Daniel Ave.,
Ave., Greer
Greer •• 895-3966
895-3966
105

United House
House of
of Prayer
Prayer
United

213 Oak
Oak St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 848-0727
848-0727
213

Upstate Friends’
Friends’ Meeting
Meeting (Quaker)
(Quaker)
Upstate
P.O. Box
Box 83,
83, Lyman
Lyman •• 439-8788
439-8788
P.O.

Upstate Tree
Tree of
of Life
Life
Upstate

203 East
East Bearden
Bearden St.,
St., Greer
Greer •• 848-1295
848-1295
203

Victorian Hills
Hills Community
Community Church
Church
Victorian
209 Victor
Victor Ave.
Ave. Ext.,
Ext., Greer
Greer •• 877-3981
877-3981
209

Vine Worship
Worship Center
Center
Vine

4373 Wade
Wade Hampton
Hampton Blvd.,
Blvd., Taylors
Taylors •• 244-8175
244-8175
4373

Forest Hills
Funeral Home
For information
6995 Highway 101, Woodruff
about advertising
(864)576-9444
on this page,
(864)288-8700
call
864-877-2076.
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www.foresthillsfuneralhome.net

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4389 Wade
Wade
4389
arolinaHampton
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Taylors
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POLICE AND FIRE
The Greer Citizen

A8 THE GREER CITIZEN

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

Retired fireman recognized Lehr charged
in third case

BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER
Retired firefighter Vernon Jameson says he misses everybody at the Greer
Fire Department. During
last Tuesday night’s Greer
City Council meeting,
firefighters showed they
missed Jameson too, as
a group of them filled up
a row in Greer council’s
chambers.
Mayor Rick Danner began the meeting by recognizing Jameson, the senior
engineer who retired after
25 years of service to the
city.
“We pause to take time
to recognize those employees when they reach a
milestone in their service
to the city, and we do that
on a regular basis and for
the past number of years
we have recognized Vernon Jamison as his number of years and service
to the city have grown,”
Danner said. “And so tonight we will recognize the
years, but we also want to
recognize those in terms
of his retirement.”
Jameson worked at the
department from June 25,
1989 to March 27, 2002.
He returned a little over
a year later to work from
Aug. 28, 2003 to Jan. 6 of
this year.

BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER
Another victim has come
forward against a Taylors
man already charged with
two different criminal sexual conduct cases involving minors.
Arthur Edwin Lehr, 62,
of 104 Walker Springs Rd.
has been placed at the
Greenville County Detention Center for allegedly
sexually assaulting a victim who was five years
old at the time, said public
information officer Drew
Pinciaro. For this case,
Lehr is charged with first-

KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE | THE GREER CITIZEN

Greer Mayor Rick Danner, left, thanks retired firefighter Vernon Jameson for his service
during a recent meeting.
Standing in front of the
council between Danner
and City Administrator Ed
Driggers, Jameson said he
is “getting used to sleeping at home everyday.” His
comment was met with
laughter from the crowd
and council.

Greer Fire Chief Dorian
Flowers said it’s a bittersweet time when a firefighter retires, but he added working with Jameson
“has been a great experience.”
“When he retires with
the number of years he’s

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Wrongful death lawsuit filed
BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER
Family members of a
man fatally shot by deputies are filing a wrongful
death lawsuit against the
Greenville County Sheriff’s
Office.
The suit cites the office
and Sheriff Steve Loftis
as defendants in a case,
in which Charles Edward
Rosemond, Sr., 56, was
killed by deputy gunfire.
According to reports,
deputies responded to a
possible robbery at Spring
Grove Apartments at 1900
Boling Road Ext. in Taylors
on Dec. 10. Authorities say
they arrived at the apartment to investigate, and
when they forced their

way into the apartment
Rosemond allegedly fired
his weapon, striking deputy Dave Dempsey in the
head. Deputies returned
fire, hitting Rosemond
in his left leg. He bled to
death on the scene, according to reports from
Greenville County Coroner
Parks Evans.
Authorities say they
knocked on the door several times before forcing
their way inside Rosemond’s apartment. The
suit, filed by Attorney
Fletcher Smith, alleges that
the defendants did not
state who they were, did
not have a search warrant
to enter the home, were
not adequately trained
and “did not render any

medical care and/ or treatment.” It also says that in
firing at Rosemond, defendants “committed a willful, unlawful, and intentional assault and battery
upon the Decedent who
was acting peaceably and
committing no crime or
offense.”
Family members are
seeking “unspecified compensatory damages.” The
suit names Rosemond’s
wife, Camilla Rosemond,
and children Thomas,
Charles and Janice Jeffries as heirs and that they
“sustained pecuniary loss,
mental anguish, emotional
pain and suffering and
other damages” because
of Rosemond’s death.
Attorney Russell Har-

ter, Jr, is representing the
sheriff’s office.
Arrests were made in
the
robbery.
Deandre
Jevon Norris, 18, and Tiyarius Jerel Henderson,
22, and Aundra Hunter,
Jr., 27, were later arrested
on charges of kidnapping,
robbery, burglary, conspiracy, firing a weapon into a
dwelling and possession
of a weapon during a violent crime.
Dempsey was taken to
the hospital where it was
found that the bullet that
struck him fractured his
skull and created an exit
wound. He underwent surgery, but remained in the
hospital for over a month.

kmaple@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

Dentures from $399 set

put on, that we are losing a very valuable asset
with a lot of institutional
knowledge about the fire
department as well as the
city.”
kmaple@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

degree
criminal
sexual
conduct
with
a
minor.
Investigators
believe
there may Lehr
be
additional
victims. If you have been
a victim or have information regarding Lehr, the
sheriff’s office asks you to
contact Crime Stoppers at
23-CRIME.

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582-4308

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kmaple@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

Show to air Blue Ridge bank case
BY KENNETH COLLINS MAPLE
STAFF WRITER
Greer resident David
Holtzclaw
is
hopeful
Crime Watch Daily’s television special about the
unsolved triple homicide
at Blue Ridge Savings Bank
will surface helpful information about a suspect
who murdered his mother
and two customers at the
bank on May 16, 2003.
The show will air this
Thursday at 9 a.m. on local station WMYA channel
40 in the Upstate.
Crime Watch Daily is
a nationally syndicated
crime show that profiles
unsolved murders and
mysteries. Because the
show reaches audiences
all across the country,
Holtzclaw believes the
program could be useful
in providing answers to
family members who have
waited over 12 years to
know what happened inside the bank.
“Somebody knows something,” Holtzclaw said.
“It’s just getting to that
person. They may not live
here; they may not live in
South Carolina. They may
not live in the South, but
hopefully this show will
reach them either by television or on their website
and it may hopefully give
us the information we
need to solve the case.”
Holtzclaw’s mother, Sylvia, was the teller in the
bank, which was located
on Frontage Road and I85. While customers James
“Eb” and Margaret Barnes,
of Boiling Springs, were
inside with Sylvia, at least
one person entered attempting to rob the bank.
The robber shot and killed
all three.
Still seeking answers

after all this time, David reached out to Crime
Watch Daily, but he thinks
the program ultimately
decided to profile the case
following the investigation
of an unsolved mystery
in Chesnee in which four
people were killed inside
a motorsports shop. David
says they contacted him in
January.
He says it’s important to
keep the case in the minds
of people who knew his
mother or the Barnes’.
“If you go and look at

the stations and affiliates it affects throughout
the country it hits almost
every state in the United
States, and that is huge
for us just because someone that might have seen
something or knows someone who might be involved
may live somewhere else
and either not know what
happened that day or
just forgot about it and
thought it was solved.”
The case remains open
with the Greer Police Department and the FBI.

The City of Greer Planning Commission will hold a Public
Hearing at 6:30 p.m. on March 21, 2016 at Greer City Hall
located at 301 E. Poinsett Street on the following:
DOCKET NUMBER:
OWNER:
ADDRESS:
PARCEL ID NUMBER:
EXISTING ZONING:
REQUEST:
DOCKET NUMBER:
OWNER:
ADDRESS:
PARCEL ID NUMBER:
EXISTING ZONING:
REQUEST:

RZ 2016-08
Laurens Nicholson
Chandler Road/Memorial Dr. Ext.
G019000102103 and
G079000102104
C-3, Commercial
R-M2, Multi-Family Residential
AN 2016-09
Mark III Properties
Alexander Road
T035000101200 -18 acre Portion
Unzoned Greenville County
R-12, Residential Single Family
Cluster

DOCKET NUMBER:
OWNER:
ADDRESS:

FDP 2016-10
McGee Properties of Greenville
Brushy Creek Road -/+ 520 feet
Southwest of Suber Road
PARCEL ID NUMBER: T035000100716
EXISTING ZONING: PDR Single Family
REQUEST:
PDR Single Family Townhomes
DOCKET NUMBER:
OWNER:
ADDRESS:

VAR 2016-11
Mike McGee
Pleasant Drive and
Wayman Drive
PARCEL ID NUMBER: 5-28-01-111.00 & 5-28-01-113.01
REQUEST:
Variance-Sidewalks
Documents related to the requests are available for public
inspection in the Planning and Zoning Office located at 301
E. Poinsett Street.

Anyone with information
about the case can contact
the police department at
848-2151 or the FBI office
in Columbia at 803-5514200.

309 Northview Drive • Greer
848-1935

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SPORTS

B

The Greer Citizen

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

Rebels advance to state finals
With 69-66
win over
Spring Valley
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Rebels are playing
for all the marbles this
Friday.
The Byrnes boys basketball team knocked off
Spring Valley (69-66) to
claim the Upper State title
last Saturday, sealing a
date with Irmo in the state
finals.
“It has been a neat journey,” Byrnes coach Layne
Fowler said. “Knowing
where we were and where
we’ve come from, it’s
special. But we still want
more.”
The Rebels attempted
to pull away from Spring
Valley, but the Vikings
wouldn’t go away quietly,
forcing Byrnes to make a
couple of key defensive
stops down the stretch.
The Rebels held on behind double-digit outings
from Ray Miller (19), Bouvier Howard (15), Hayden
Brown (15) and Jaylan Foster (10).
“They made a few plays
and we missed a couple of
free throws, but our kids
were tough and they were
able to hang on,” Fowler

said. “We’ve beaten two really good teams in the last
two rounds, so the guys
are excited. At the same
time, we’re still not done
and we have some things
to work on.”
Fowler said the crowd at
the Bon Secours Wellness
Arena made a difference
in the game.
“It was a little different,
obviously, than your normal high school game, but
the atmosphere was amazing,” Fowler said. “We
knew we were up against
a tough opponent that was
athletic and long and wellcoached. It was a battle,
but it was good for us to
win a close game.”
The head coach credits
his team’s unselfish play
for the successful playoff
run.
“Our guys feed off unselfishness,”
he
said.
“They love seeing their
teammates make plays,
and when they’re playing
like that, they’re hard to
beat.”
After dropping a lateseason game to Wade
Hampton, Byrnes has been
on fire, winning 11 straight
games.
“We’ve been fortunate to
play good basketball since
the Wade Hampton loss,”
he said. “We’ve won 11
games now, and the kids
have just been competing. They’re doing all the
SEE STATE | B3

BILLY
CANNADA

Schooled

I

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

The Rebels punched their ticket to the state finals on Saturday, defeating Spring Valley
in the Upper State championship.

Rising Rebels learn keys to success
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Playing college football is
a dream many high school
students do not achieve.
But for those that do, the
success on the field starts
with commitment in the
classroom, according to
Byrnes coach Brian Lane.
Lane hosted his second
Rising Rebels Signing Day
last Thursday, an event
which seeks to explain the
importance of academics
to rising freshmen in Spartanburg District Five.
Dozens of future Rebels
were in attendance, along
with their parents and
teachers.
“Players have a misconstrued idea of what it
means to be a student-athlete and how to get into
college,” Lane said. “That’s
the purpose of this event—
to provide some clarity. I
want to show them what

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Byrnes hosted a Rising Rebels Signing Day for incoming freshmen last Thursday. The
event focused on the importance of academics.
it takes and what college
coaches are looking for.”
Lane began the event

when he came back to Byrnes to coach the football
team. He said students

often need help with the
transition to high school.
“Ninth grade is the hard-

est year when you’re talking about transition,” Lane
said. “If they can get a solid foundation during their
ninth grade year, it makes
the path a whole lot easier.
If you struggle your ninth
grade year, you’re going to
be behind trying to make
things up the entire time.
The closer you get to the
end (of school), the more
serious you get about it. I
want them to get serious
about it now.”
Lane was one of three
high school coaches to
speak at the Nike Coaches
Summit in Oregon recently. The event, which featured more than 40 of the
nation’s top high school
programs, provided the
opportunity for the Byrnes
coach to share about his
Rising Rebels Signing Day.
“The
response
was
great,” Lane said. “I talked
about our signing day, our
SEE RISING | B3

White,
Mitchell
win state
titles
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Two Eastside wrestlers
claimed state titles and
several more placed during the Class AAA and
Class AAAA individual
state tournament last
weekend.
Eastside’s Jordan White
(106) and Zane Mitchell
(120) took home the coveted hardware, placing
first in their respective
weight classes.
Also placing in the Class
AAA tournament were
Eastside’s Cruise Baker
(126, fourth), Chance Pride
(132, third), Caleb Carillo
(145, third) and DeShawn
Sullivan (220, fourth).
In the Class AAAA tournament, Byrnes wrestlers
Nick Murray (113) and
Landon Anderson (120)
each took home second
place, while Christopher
Addison (132)
placed
fourth.
Stephan Garber took
home fourth place in the
heavyweight division.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Andrew Messer will play his college soccer at Spartanburg
Methodist College next fall.

Greer Fernando Orellana recently signed with USC Upstate
for soccer.

Greer soccer signs three
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
Three Greer soccer players will be taking their
talents to the next level in
2016,
Nick Roberson (North
Greenville), Andrew Messer (Spartanburg Methodist) and Fernando Orellana
(USC Upstate) recently
signed their national letters of intent, getting their
college decisions out of
the way before the start of
their senior season.
Roberson had to decide
between football and soccer, having started for
both varsity teams as an
upperclassman
“I was fortunate enough
to be able to excel in both
sports,” Roberson said.

BLAME
CANNADA

BILLY CANNADA | THE GREER CITIZEN

Nick Roberson signs to play soccer for North Greenville.
“Once, I started talking
to colleges, I just kind of
based it on where I could

see myself in four years
and what I could see myself playing. Soccer has

just been there my whole
life. I have a love for the
game that’s kind of unmatchable. That solidified
my decision.”
Roberson had some offers for football, including North Greenville and
Union College.
“At first, it didn’t look
like soccer was going to be
an option,” he said. “Coach
(Bill) Martin have had conversations over the past
few years with him coaching at Eastside, and he had
always said, if I got the
chance to play for him, he
felt like he could turn my
athleticism into a soccer
player. He’s a great coach
and I’m looking forward to
playing with him.”
The senior said North
SEE SIGNINGS | B3

wish somebody had
given me a talking to
when I was going into
ninth grade. It would
have saved me a lot of
heartache, scrambling and
indecision.
At Byrnes High School,
that’s exactly what football coach Brian Lane is
doing for incoming freshmen.
Lane hosted his second
annual Rising Rebels
Signing Day last Thursday, where he schooled
students on the importance of grades and how
to balance work and play.
I had no concept of
this early on in high
school. I’d already spent
my middle school days
goofing off, interrupting
class and not really caring
about my report cards.
I played football and baseball—and that’s all that
mattered to me. I would
get through the week, just
so I could play on Thursday nights. Then, the next
day, I would try to get out
of school with some kind
of excuse for my mother.
I was not on the right
track in ninth grade, and
apparently I wasn’t alone.
“Ninth grade is the
hardest year when you’re
talking about transition,”
Lane said. “If they can get
a solid foundation during
their ninth grade year, it
makes the path a whole
lot easier. If you struggle
your ninth grade year,
you’re going to be behind
trying to make things up
the entire time. The closer
you get to the end (of
school), the more serious
you get about it.”
This quote exemplifies
my freshman year. By the
middle of the year, I’d
already failed two classes
and I wasn’t doing much
better in the rest. Because
of that, I had to give up
football, the one thing
I loved doing. Football
made school tolerable,
but what I didn’t realize
was that it was killing my
future.
I had to get it together.
I did what I could to get
my grades back on track
for the next three years,
but a lot of the damage
had been done. My GPA
took a major hit because
of that freshman year,
and it had implications on
my college aspirations as
a senior.
Now, things did work
out.
I did get into college,
where I knew I would not
make the same mistake
twice. During my freshman year, I made the
Dean’s list, and I graduated with higher than a
B-average.
But what if somebody
would have told me all
the things Brian Lane
told these kids last week?
What if someone cared
about me enough to sit
me down and tell me how
focused I needed to be?
Maybe I could’ve continued playing football.
Maybe I would’ve gotten
some scholarship money.
The fact is, all of that
was out the window just
months after my high
school career began.
Being a student-athlete
is incredibly difficult.
These kids go to school
all day, then stay well into
the evening to practice
what they love. I couldn’t
hack it, but it wasn’t
because I wasn’t capable.
I just had no guidance or
accountability.
Parents can only do so
much. My parents were
great, but they couldn’t
force me to do the work. I
had to get that motivation
on my own.
But, if I’d had friends
and coaches pushing
me at school, I would’ve
gotten it together a lot
sooner.
Kudos, coach Lane.
What you’re doing is truly
admirable and will certainly make a difference.

PAGE
sports
LABEL 

B2 the
XX
THE greer
GREER citizen
CITIZEN

WEDNESDAY,
wednesday,MONTH
marchXX,
2, 2016
2012

Tigers return experience, pitching depth
By Billy Cannada
Sports Editor
The Blue Ridge baseball
team won’t be sneaking up
on region opponents this
spring.
The Tigers return an experienced roster in 2016,
featuring a number of AllState and All-Region players.
“Last year, we had a
young group and we knew
we did,” head coach Travis
Henson said. “This year,
we’re much more experienced and we’ve looked
very good in the preseason.
“The strength of our

team is going to be in our
pitching depth,” he said.
“We’ve got some good,
experienced arms that are
going to be key for us.”
The Tiger pitching staff
will be led by senior Ethan
Few, an All-Region, AllState returning starter. He
is joined by John Coker
and Zach Waddell, Travis Lancaster and Colby
Thomas.
“Between those five
guys, we’ll have a chance
to win every night,” Henson said. “I think a lot of
teams can’t say that. It’s
nice to have some depth.”
Brandon Southern will
call the shots for Blue Ridge

behind the plate. Few and
Coker will each take reps
at third base when they’re
not on the mound and
Waddell will spend time at
second. Clemson commit
Elijah Henderson will anchor the Tiger’s infield at
shortstop, while Lancaster
and Colton Henderson see
time at first.
In the outfield, Jacob Wilbanks will lead Blue Ridge
in center. He will be joined
by C.J. Brooks, Blake Cannon and Thomas.
“We’ve got to make some
adjustments offensively,”
he said.
“We’ve had some nights
where we’ve looked out-

standing, but we’ve had
some times when we
didn’t. We’re going to have
to be consistent because,
with our pitching and defense, we’re not going to
have to score a whole lot
to win.”
Henson said this team is
one that won’t be afraid to
step up in big moments.
“This team does have
some intangibles that
some teams in the past
haven’t had,” he said. “We
always talk about things
like focus, work ethic, attitude and unity, and this
team has those things.”
Although the Tigers
have many returnees, they

won’t be the region favorite.
“We’re not ranked in
the preseason top 10,
and three other teams in
our region are. So, we’ve
got some work to do,” he
said. “Eastside, Travelers
Rest and Emerald are all
expected to be very good,
but you’ve also got Greer,
Chapman and Berea who
are very solid. When it
comes down to it, you have
to have pitching depth, because you’re going to face
some of the top teams in
the state every time out.
“Playing in such a competitive region, you’re going to have to be at your

K_\>i\i:`k`q\e

best every night,” Henson
added. “There are not
many off nights, so that’s
going to be a challenge for
us.”
If Blue Ridge can remain competitive, a playoff berth won’t be out of
reach.
“I think it’s pretty wide
open,” Henson said. “When
it comes to the top six or
seven teams in this region, there’s a lot of ways
it could fall. That’s why
there’s a very slim margin
for error.”
The Tigers will open the
season against Eastside
next week.

QF
Greer

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Canopy
Enjoy the beauty of the great outdoors year
round with a screen room or room enclosure.
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Greer Awning & Siding, Inc.
877-7722 or 235-5659
610 South Main Street - Greer, S.C.
www.greerawningandsiding.com
Kyle Busch vs. Kevin Harvick

www.greer flooring.com

Race Contest

508 North Main Street
(across from Greer State Bank)

2016

877-4043
Mon.-Thurs. 7 a.m.-9 p.m.
Fri. & Sat. 7 a.m.-10 p.m.
Martin Truex Jr. vs. Carl Edwards

2016 Season Contest Winners
Publication ........Race Date, Location

2015

Feb. 17...............................Feb. 21, Daytona International Speedway
Winner: Ronnie Gregory, of Duncan

Feb. 24..............................Feb. 28, Atlanta Motor Speedway
Winner: Allen Batson, of Greer

March 2 ...........................March 6, Las Vegas Motor Speedway
March 30 ........................April 3, Martinsville Speedway
April 13 ............................April 17, Bristol Motor Speedway

CommerCial/residential sales and lease
14372 E. Wade Hampton Blvd.
PO Box 101 • Greer, SC 29652
Fax: 864-877-0286
For more information about properties call 864-879-2117

April 27 ............................May 1, Talladega Superspeedway
May 4 ................................May 7, Kansas Speedway

Joey Logano vs. Brad Keselowski

Kurt Busch vs. Denny Hamlin

May 25 .............................May 29, Charlotte Motor Speedway
June 1 ...............................June 5, Pocono Raceway
June 29............................July 2, Daytona International Speedway
July 6 ................................July 9, Kentucky Speedway
July 20 .............................July 24, Indianapolis Motor Speedway
August 3 .........................August 7, Watkins Glen International
August 17 ........................August 20, Bristol Motor Speedway

Jimmie Johnson vs. Ryan Newman

Dale Earnhardt Jr. vs. Jamie McMurray

Kasey Kahne vs. Matt Kenseth

This Week’s Race:

Las Vegas Motor Speedway - Sunday, March 6
YOUR PICKS:
Greer Awning & Siding, Inc._________________________________________
Greer Quality Foods _______________________________________________
Greer Flooring & Lighting Center ____________________________________
McCullough Properties/Greer Storage ________________________________
Kelly’s Karpet ____________________________________________________
ServiceMaster ____________________________________________________
Printing _________________________________________________________
We know where you live ___________________________________________
Paul Menard vs. Clint Bowyer

CONTEST RULES
Pick the driver from each group that you think will
finish in the higher position and place the name
beside the business on the entry form. Entries
must be received in person by Friday at noon or
postmarked by Saturday at noon. Judge’s decision
is final. One winner per month, per household.

Season Contest Winners _____________________________________

Kyle Larson vs. Austin Dillon

TIE BREAKER
Guess the number of caution LAPS in the race.

THE GREER CITIZEN

NAME _________________________________________
ADDRESS ______________________________________

317 Trade Street
O: Greer, SC 29651
T
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RIE
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IL
MA

E

SPORTS

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

SPORTS
ROUNDUP

OYSTER ROAST
IS MARCH 12

REBEL FISHING TEAM
REELS IN TOP FINISH

The Byrnes fishing team
snagged second place as a
team, and third place overall at the T.L. Hanna Invitational recently.
The Rebels battled it out
with over 150 other boats
on Lake Greenwood last
Saturday. Caleb Bellaire
and Dalton Eubanks took
home second place honors, weighing in 4 fish for
10.18 pounds.
Marshall Robinson and
Mason Fulmer added a
4.94 pound fish, to help
the Rebels reel in third
Place overall.

The third annual Rock
the Sides Oyster Roast and
BBQ between Eastside and
Riverside will take place
on Saturday, March 12,
from 6:30-10:30 p.m. at
Parkway Grill and Bar at
1083 S. Batesville Rd. in
Greer.
This event is open to the
public, but only to adults.

FAIRVIEW OFFERS FREE
BASKETBALL CAMP

Fairview Baptist Church
will sponsor a free basketball camp for girls at the
Fairview Baptist Church
gym every Monday for four
weeks beginning March 7.
Times will be from 6-7:30
p.m. The camp is free and
there is no need to register.
For more information, call
Paul Lister at 630-6625.

THE GREER CITIZEN B3

Veteran Jackets ready to fight
For region
title
BY BILLY CANNADA
SPORTS EDITOR
The Greer boys soccer
team is hoping an experienced roster and improved play can upset the
established order in the
Peach Blossom conference
this season.
Eastside has controlled
the region for several
seasons, but the Yellow
Jackets are returning 11
seniors this spring who
are in search of a playoff
appearance.

“Last year, we finished
fifth in our conference
and missed out on going to the playoffs,” head
coach Jorge Santos said.
“That’s something that
has been stuck in their
heads. They don’t want to
do that again. They don’t
want to be a team that has
to stay at home during the
playoffs.”
Santos said his team
has committed itself to
improving during the offseason.
“The majority of our
players play club soccer
now, and that’s big,” Santos said. “In the offseason,
you have to continue getting touches on the ball,
and I think they’ve had

a pretty good offseason.
They’ve gotten a lot better.”
Nick Roberson will lead
the team at forward. The
senior scored 26 goals in
2015, and Santos said, “If
he can even come close to
that this season, that’s a
good sign.”
“Last year, the season
ended with four teams in
our conference ranked in
the top 15 in AAA, so it’s
definitely a tough conference,” Santos said. “Eastside is always dominant,
but if you throw Berea,
Blue Ridge, Chapman and
TR in there, you’ve got a
great region. There’s never
an easy night. Hopefully
we can give Eastside a run

for their money this year.”
While tough competition
lies ahead, Santos said the
team is focusing on achievable goals.
“Right now, my seniors
have a losing record at
Greer High School,” he
said. “So, the big goal is to
help our seniors leave with
a winning record. If we’re
able to accomplish that,
we’ll be in position for the
playoffs. It’s always a goal
to win a region championship or a state championship, but we try to focus
on the small goals first.”
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

SIGNINGS: Three soccer standouts make decisions
FROM B1

Greenville just felt like the
right fit.
“I love the environment
and the intensity of their
practices,” he said. “That
was a big factor for me.
“I couldn’t have done
any of this without any
of (my teammates),” he
said. “There were times
throughout the past couple of years that I was
struggling with my confidence. They were always
telling me, ‘You’ve got it.
You’re a great player.’ It’s
just been a blessing to
have them with me.”

He will major in secondary education.
Orellana chose USC Upstate, a school he’s had
his heart set on for quite
a while.
“I’ve been wanting to go
there since I was a freshman,” he said. “It’s close
to my house and it’s just a
great opportunity for me.”
Orellana has experienced
the highs and lows of high
school soccer, but he said
he will head to the next
level prepared for whatever may come his way.
“My freshman year was
rough,” he said. “It was
a 4-13 season and it was

a long season. Now that
we’re older and we know
the game a lot better, I
think we’ve improved. This
should be a good season.”
Orellana will major in
computer science.
“I’m ready for the experience—meeting new people and getting to play the
sport that I love for four
more years,” he said.
Messer will attend Spartanburg Methodist, where
he hopes to transfer after two years to continue
playing soccer at the colligate level.
“I’m really happy for the
opportunity,” he said. “It’s

a good school and (Spartanburg Methodist) is notorious for sending players to really big colleges
after two years.”
As for this season, Messer is hoping for something
big from the Jackets.
“A region championship
is definitely the goal, but
as seniors, we want a positive record coming out of
high school,” Messer said.
“We’re 15 games away
from that, so we’re going
to have to work.”
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

PRESTON BURCH | THE GREER CITIZEN

Hayden Brown will be a dynamic option for the Rebels
against Irmo Friday night.

STATE: Byrnes will face
Irmo Friday at 8:30 p.m.
FROM B1

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Dozens of incoming freshmen football players attended the second annual Rising Rebels Signing Day on Thursday.

RISING: Rebels learn about academic standards
‘I want to inspire

FROM B1

weight room program and
our mentor program. A lot
of the schools were asking
about the presentation,
because they want to try
to implement it. It was a
great experience.”
Thursday night, the
head coach talked to his
players about playing college ball and the reality of
what coaches are looking
for during recruitment.
“If you’re not a recruitable kid, which a lot of
them won’t be, there are

these guys to be
something’
Brian Lane

Byrnes head football coach
still things you can do to
try to become a college
football player,” Lane said.
“Hopefully, this information will help and it will
be encouraging. I want to
inspire these guys to be

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NOTICES
PUBLIC
NOTICE
NOTICE All real estate
advertised in this newspaper is Subject to the
Federal Fair Housing Act
of 1968 which makes it
illegal to advertise any
preference,
limitation
or discrimination based
on race, color, religion,
sex, handicap, familial
status, national origin
or an intention to make
such preference, limitation or discrimination.
This newspaper will not
knowingly accept any

advertising for real estate which is in violation
of the law. Our readers
hereby informed that
all dwelling advertised
in this newspaper are
available on an equal
opportunity basis.

3-2,9,16,23,30-TFN

PUBLIC
NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC HEARING TO
CONSIDER PERMIT
FOR EXCLUSION FROM
COUNTY NOISE
ORDINANACE
A public hearing will be held
March 21, 2016 at 5:30 p.m.

something.”
Lane said his job is about
more than just Xs and Os
and he will continue to

by Spartanburg County
Council. Greer Dragway is
requesting to have a drag
race on April 2 and 16, 2016.
The events will be held at
1792 Dragway Rd. The requested exclusion is to run
cars without mufflers and
extend curfew to 12:00 a.m.

3-2,9

NOTICE
TO CREDITORS
NOTICE
OF
OF
ESTATES
APPLICATION
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
OF ESTATES. All persons
having claims against the following estates are required
to deliver or mail their claims
to the indicated Personal
Representatives appointed
to administer these estates,
and to file their claims on
Form #371PC with the Probate Court of PICKENS
COUNTY, the address of
which is 222 McDaniel Ave
B16, Pickens, SC 29671,
on or before the date that is
eight months after the date
of the first publication of this
Notice to Creditor (unless
barred by operation of Section 62-3-803), or such persons shall be forever barred
as to their claims. All claims
are required to be presented
in written statements, indicating the name and the ad-

host the program for incoming freshmen.
“They’re going to be men
for the rest of their lives,”
he said. “They’re only going to be a football player
for a short amount of time.
That’s why I try to spend a
lot of time showing them
how to be men and growing them into men. The
football stuff will come,
but teaching them about
becoming men is the most
important thing we can
do.”
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

dress of the claimant, the basis of the claim, the amount
claimed, the date when the
claim will become due, the
nature of any uncertainty as
to the amount claimed and
the date when due, and a
description of any security
as to the claim.
Estate: HAZEL CATHERINE
MELTON MOSER
Personal Representative:
JAMES D. MELTON
Address: 127 CEDAR CIRCLE
EASLEY, SC 29642
Date of Death: 1/25/2016

2-24,3-2,9

NOTICE OF
NOTICE
OF
APPLICATION
APPLICATION
Notice is hereby given that
SPARK
INVESTMENTS,
INC. d.b.a. TOBACCO PLUS
intends to apply to the South
Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit
that will allow the sale and
ON premises consumption
of BEER AND WINE at 1921
HWY 101 SOUTH, GREER
SC 29651. To object to the
issuance of this permit/license, written protest must
be postmarked no later than
March 18, 2016.
For a protest to be valid,
it must be in writing, and

things you would wan
them to do at this time of
year.
Looking ahead to Irmo,
the Rebels will have their
hands full on both sides of
the ball.
“They don’t beat themselves,” Fowler said of
Irmo. “They’ve got good
players and a great coach.
They’re going to be prepared. They play well together.
“They’re a lot like us in
the sense that they’re not
flashy, but our styles are
still different” he said.
“They play a 1-3-1 as you
bring the ball up, then
they’ll drop back into a
2-3. They’ve got some really quick guards that can
shoot it. We’re going to
have to beat them because
they’re a very good team.”
Friday’s game is set for
8:30 p.m. at Colonial Life
Arena in Columbia.
“We’ve just got to keep it

should include the following
information:
(1) the name, address and
telephone number of the
person filing the protest;
(2) the specific reasons why
the application should be
denied;
(3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a
hearing (if one is requested
by the applicant);
(4) that the person protesting resides in the same
county where the proposed
place of business is located
or within five miles of the
business; and,
(5) the name of the applicant and the address of the
premises to be licensed.
Protests must be mailed to:
S. C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box
125, Columbia, SC 29214;
or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

3-2, 9, 16

NOTICE OFOF
NOTICE
APPLICATION
APPLICATION
Notice is hereby given that
THORNBLADE CLUB intends to apply to the South
Carolina Department of
Revenue for a license/permit
that will allow the sale and
ON premises consumption
of LIQUOR at 1212 THORN-

‘Any time you can
practice in the
month of March in
high school, that’s
pretty special.’

Lane Fowler

Byrnes boys’ basketball coach

very routine,” Fowler said.
“We want to make sure a
lot of what we’re doing
stays the same. But really, I
just want them to enjoy it.
Any time you can practice
in the month of March in
high school, that’s pretty
special. We’ve got to learn
and get better because I
promise you Irmo is working.”
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

BLADE BLVD., GREER SC
29650. To object to the issuance of this permit/license,
written protest must be postmarked no later than March
18, 2016.
For a protest to be valid,
it must be in writing, and
should include the following
information:
(1) the name, address and
telephone number of the
person filing the protest;
(2) the specific reasons why
the application should be
denied;
(3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a
hearing (if one is requested
by the applicant);
(4) that the person protesting resides in the same
county where the proposed
place of business is located
or within five miles of the
business; and,
(5) the name of the applicant and the address of the
premises to be licensed.
Protests must be mailed to:
S. C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box
125, Columbia, SC 29214;
or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

3-2, 9, 16

classifieds

B4 The greer Citizen

homes
HOMES
FOR RENT
for
rent

Notice is hereby given that
The Spinning Jenny LLC
intends to apply to the South
Carolina Department of Revenue for a license/permit
that will allow the sale and
ON premises consumption
of BEER and wine at 107
Cannon Street, Greer
SC 29651. To object to the
issuance of this permit/license, written protest must
be postmarked no later than
March 4, 2016.
For a protest to be valid,
it must be in writing, and
should include the following
information:
(1) the name, address and
telephone number of the
person filing the protest;
(2) the specific reasons why
the application should be
denied;
(3) that the person protesting is willing to attend a
hearing (if one is requested
by the applicant);
(4) that the person protesting resides in the same
county where the proposed
place of business is located
or within five miles of the
business; and,
(5) the name of the applicant and the address of the
premises to be licensed.
Protests must be mailed to:
S. C. Department of Revenue, ATTN: ABL, P.O. Box
125, Columbia, SC 29214;
or faxed to: (803) 896-0110.

2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH,
house 106 Mullinax Drive.
$750 month/$700 deposit.
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH,
house 101 Belton Street.
$600 month/$600 deposit.
2 BEDROOM, 1 BATH,
house 3631 Morgan Road,
$600 month/$600 deposit.
Call 879-2015.

commercial
COMMERCIAL
property
PROPERTY
12,000 SQUARE FOOT
BUILDING
FOR SALE OR LEASE
Located at 438 North
Main Street in Woodruff.
Facility has 480/3 phase
and 220/3 phase electrical supply. Prime location. Call Kevin Pogue
with NAI Earle Furman,
LLC at 864-494-1466.

3-2,9,16,23,30-TFN

vacation
rentals
VACATION RENTALS
ADVERTISE YOUR VACATION PROPERTY FOR
RENT OR SALE to more
than 2.3 million S.C. newspaper readers. Your 25-word
classified ad will appear
in 107 S.C. newspapers
for only $375. Call Alanna
Ritchie at the South Carolina
Newspaper Network, 1-888727-7377.

AUCTIONS
AUCTIONS
THE
PERSONAL
ITEMS of the following will be sold to satisfy owner’s lien for rent
due. If amount due is
paid by tenant before
auction, the auction will
be canceled. We have
the right to refuse any
bid.
Auction date
March 12, 2016
NO CHECKS,
CASH ONLY
Unit No. A-42 Kris
Oakes
Delta Self-Storage
2260 River Road,
Greer, SC 29650.
864-877-0594
ITEMS: Mattress, file
cabinets,
furniture,
clothes, bed, dresser,
misc. items.

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Last week’s answers

call for
services Announcements
SERVICES

for
sale
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
Announcements

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notice
of
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wednesday, march 2, 2016

LIVING HERE
The Greer Citizen

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

THE GREER CITIZEN B5

Ludley to take over for Waters
As new
Greer High
principal
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
Justin Ludley has some
big shoes to fill, and he
knows it.
The current Southside
assistant principal will
take over for Greer High
Principal Marion Waters
at the end of the school
year. Waters is retiring after 45 years in education
and more than 40 years in
Greer area schools.
“It is an absolute honor
and blessing,” Ludley said
in an email with The Greer
Citizen. “Coming back to
Greer is simply coming
home. The support from
Greer High School, Mr. Waters and the Greer community has been wonderful.”
Ludley worked as a
teacher and coached football at Greer High School
from 2006-2012 before
taking the administrative position at Southside.
Ludley said he wanted to
come back to Greer High
for “the strong traditions
of family, community and
achievement.”
“Greer has long standing
traditions of excellence
in the academics, athlet-

ics, and the arts,” he said.
“There is nowhere else
that I would rather be.
“Although being an administrator at Southside
High School has prepared
me, the most challenging
aspect of this transition
will be to learn all of the
nuances and processes
that go along with being
a high school principal,”
Ludley added.
Ludley said Waters is
leaving quite the legacy
at Greer, and he hopes to
continue in his mentor’s
footsteps.
“Taking over for Mr. Waters is a humbling endeavor,” he said. “Mr. Waters
has been an icon in Greer
for over 40 years. You certainly cannot fill his shoes,
but hope to walk in them.
He has always been tremendously supportive of
me during my entire career and I will always be
grateful for his guidance.
I have also been able to
benefit from his wisdom
and vast knowledge in the
education field and will
continue to do so.”
When he announced his
retirement in January, Waters said he felt like the
time was right.
“You always want to
leave when all the indicators are positive and
things are on top, and I
think that’s the case here.
I knew it was a good time,”
Waters said at the time.
“I’ll be 67 in June, so I’d

PHOTO COURTESY | JONATHAN DUTY

Justin Ludley will take over duties as principal next year from Marion Waters, who retires after 45 years this June.
like to have enough time,
with the remaining chapters of my life, to be able
to do some things I’ve deferred in doing—maybe
some travel, hunting or
fishing, things like that,”
he said.

Ludley, a native of Georgia and graduate of Presbyterian College, said he
is already setting goals for
his first year as principal.
“We are going to focus on
working together as a staff
to meet the diverse needs

of all of our students,” he
said. “Greer High School
has had a history of success and achievement and
we want to keep the positive momentum going. We
want our students to be
engaged in the opportuni-

ties that are available to
them and to find success
early and often.”
Greer High’s Amy Yarborough contributed to
this report.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

Love Kitchen returns for second year at GSK
BY BILLY CANNADA
EDITOR
The Little Caesars Love
Kitchen, a mobile pizza
delivery bus, made its way
back to Greer Monday afternoon, serving up more
than 280 slices of locally
made pizza to folks at the
Greer Soup Kitchen (GSK).
The Love Kitchen made
its first appearance at
Daily Bread Ministries last
May, and it was a hit.
“We were under the impression that they only
did this once at your facility before they moved
onto other areas, but fortunately they came back,”
said Martha O’Neal, Greer
Soup Kitchen operations
manager. “We’re pretty excited about it and we are
very grateful.”
The Little Caesars Love
Kitchen has visited 42
states and parts of Canada meet the needs of the
homeless and disaster survivors. The mobile truck
partnered with the Little
Caesars in Greer to cook
the food.
“Last year, it was great,”
O’Neal said. “It’s always
wonderful for the Soup
Kitchen because you don’t
have to pay for the lights
and the water. We don’t
have to turn on our stoves
and we don’t have to use
any of our products. This
saves us a good amount of
money. It’s a win-win.”
O’Neal said an event
like this gets people out
of the routine they’ve gotten used to at The Soup
Kitchen.
“It’s the same thing every
day for them—go through
the line, get the food, sit
down,” she said. “Today,
they get to go through a
tractor trailer and sit outside with some canned
drinks, cookies and pizza.
It’s just nice to be able to
get out there, mingle with
them and love on them.”
O’Neal and the Greer
Soup Kitchen have been
the beneficiary of a lot of
generosity from the Greer
community over the past
year.
“We never have a problem with volunteers,” shel
said. “I have over 500 that
come on a regular base,
not to mention the churches in the general area that
bring in 20 every time they
come.
“There are certain things
that we absolutely need,
but we work around it,”
O’Neal added. “I really

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Little Caesars employee Ally Mefford gives out pizza from the mobile kitchen Monday afternoon at the Greer Soup Kitchen.
work and plan my menus
on faith. I plan a menu a
month ahead. At the time,
I don’t have the stuff, but
it comes in.”
Daily Bread Ministries attempts to feed nearly 130
people each day through
the efforts of the kitchen,
but that’s not the only way
the organization is helping the community.
Daily Bread is also putting the finishing touches
on a homeless shelter
(Greer STEP), which will
house local families while
they get back on their feet.
Greer STEP, located next
to the soup kitchen on E.
Poinsett Street, is nearing
completion.
“Right now, we’re targeting the first of May (to be
done),” Adam Wickliffe,
development director for
Daily Bread Ministries,
said. “We’ve just about
gotten all the construction
stuff done. Now, we’re just
getting donations for furniture and raising money
to buy furniture. We’re
definitely in the home
stretch. Things are really
coming together.”
Community
members
and businesses have given
hundreds of thousands of
dollars to the project, and
Wickliffe said the final
donations are starting to

MANDY FERGUSON | THE GREER CITIZEN

Volunteers from First Presbyterian Church distribute drinks, chips and cookies to visitors during the event.
come in.
“We’re in pretty good
shape when it comes to
fundraising,” he said. “We
raised the money that
we needed to raise and I

think we actually have all
the funds neccessariry to
finish construction. Now,
we’re just in a stage where
finishing up some stuff
and we’ll be good to go.”

Daily Bread Ministries
will soon identify families
for Greer STEP. The Greer
Soup Kitchen is currently
in need of: cream of chicken and cream of mush-

room, canned fruit, sugar
and paper products.
billy@greercitizen.com | 877-2076

ENTERTAINMENT
The Greer Citizen

B6

THE GREER CITIZEN

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

THINGS
TO DO

ner Detective” while wining and dining. During this
who-done-it
experience,
attendees will watch and
interact with other guests
and actors while dining on
three courses at The Poinsett Club. For more information, call the box office
at 233-6733.

SPO CONCLUDES ‘ESPRESSO’
SERIES FRIDAY

FOX SEARCHLIGHT PICTURES

Saoirse Ronan in ‘Brooklyn’

COUCH THEATER

|

DVD previews
By Sam Struckhoff

NEWS RELEASES
FOR WEEK OF MARCH 14
PICKS OF THE WEEK

“Brooklyn” (PG-13) -- As
a quiet Irish girl in a quiet,
windswept coastal town
in the south of the country, Eilis (Saoirse Ronan)
is driven to America more
by circumstance than wanderlust. She arrives in New
York in the early 1950s,
and immediately struggles
with homesickness and
alienation. Eilis -- and the
world she inhabits -- seem
to change after finding
romance with a charming
Italian boy (Emory Cohen).
Just when she’s starting to
feel at home, Eilis is called
back to Ireland, meets another suitor (Domhnall
Gleeson) and must decide
which life she wants to
live.
What needs to be said
upfront is that the story
is more than its love triangle. Ronan shows Eilis’s
growth in deep ways with
the right volumes of sadness and strength, fear
and hope. The film was
nominated for three Oscars, including best picture, best lead actress and
best adapted screenplay.
“The Big Short” (R) -There were a few people
who saw the financial crisis of 2007-08 coming,
and with no power to stop
it, mitigate it or credibly
warn the public, they used
that foresight to make
tons of money. An all-star
ensemble hilariously depicts the characters swimming in the sharky waters
of Wall Street, all occupying different positions
on the moral spectrum
-- Steve Carrell’s character knows he’s about to
make money while others
are ruined, Ryan Gosling’s
character just wants the
payday already. Brad Pitt
and Christian Bale inhabit
their characters, portraying nuanced fish in the
murky pool.
It is alarmingly funny
-- funnier than any reality-based film about a financial crisis would have
the right to be. It works,
however. Director Adam
Mckay ditches the screwball comedy lens, and
finds a snarkier tone that
make can make a fun little
spiel out of investment
voodoo. This one’s got
five Oscar nominations,
including best picture, director, adapted script and
supporting actor.
“Carol” (R) -- Cate
Blanchett stars as the titular Carol, an elegant and
confident married woman,
smartly dressed and chic
for the 1950s. Mostly, we
see her through the lens
of Therese (Rooney Mara),
a somewhat timid younger shop girl who forms a
quick and difficult-to-understand attraction to Carol when they first meet.
For much of the film, their
connection is felt but not
seen -- it’s in tiny glances,
a slight touch, chit-chat
that barely qualifies as
flirtatious -- but it’s really
there, just covered by layers of drama and social
stigma.
“Sisters” (R) -- When
their parents put their
childhood home up for
sale, two polar-opposite
adult sisters (Amy Poehler and Tina Fey) pledge
to throw One Last Party in
the old place. Maura (Poehler) is a divorced nurse
who never had much fun
and isn’t too assertive.
Kate (Fey) is the raunchier
big sister, a single mom
and lover of loud clothing.
Both of these players have
turned in better stuff for
TV that this movie cannot
match in wit. Wit aside,
it’s still a fun experience,
though it drags on a bit.

Spartanburg
Philharmonic
Orchestra
will
conclude its 2015-2016
“Espresso” chamber concert series Friday, March 4,
with a shot of Caffé Americano. The event will start
at 5:30 p.m. when doors
open to Chapman Cultural
Center’s theater for happy
hour that will include beer,
wine, and hors d’oeuvres,
all leading up to the 6:30
p.m. concert that will feature the orchestra’s best
brass musicians playing
an all-American set that
will include hymns, dance
tunes, and ragtime.
One special feature of
the program will be the
premiere of a student
work. In partnership with
Treefalls New Music, SPO
held an open Call for
Scores Competition for
emerging composers in
this region. First prize
went to 17-year-old Chandler Hyatt, who was born
in Greer but now lives in
Simpsonville. Honorable
Mentions were awarded
to Julie Mitchell (Atlanta,
Gerogia) and Isaac Pyatt
(Greensboro, North Carolina). All three composers
will be at the concert.
Tickets can be purchased
by calling 542-ARTS or in
person at Chapman’s box
office Monday-Friday afternoons. Tickets are also
available anytime online at
ChapmanCulturalCenter.
org. For more information,
please call SPO at 9489020.

GINGER CEBE EXHIBIT
OPENS AT CENTRE STAGE

Centre Stage will host
a gallery opening the art
exhibit “Out In The Open”
by Ginger Cebe on Friday
from 6:30-9 p.m.
Using loose and bold
brush strokes, Cebe strives
for an emotional connection with the viewer, bringing them to a place where
she finds excitement, adventure and peace.
Admission is free. Gallery hours are Monday-Friday 2-6 p.m. Centre Stage
is located at 501 River St.
in Greenville.

CLASSICAL GUITARIST
PERFORMS FREE CONCERT

Diverse classical guitarist Kevin Lorenz of
Asheville, NC, will present a free concert Sunday,
March 6, 2-4 p.m. at Chapman Cultural Center has
part of the venue’s weekly
Sundays Unplugged program.
Lorenz’s musical career
has many facets including
performance, conducting,
composition,
teaching,
and arranging, all in many
different musical styles.
Lorenz focused classical
guitar at UNC-Greensboro,
where he earned his doctorate degree in music education. He uses his training in classical music and
applies it to other styles including jazz, pop, ragtime,
bossa nova, and Irish music. Currently, he is Director of Music and a music
teacher at Emmanuel Lutheran Church and School,
where he regularly plays
his many arrangements
for solo guitar. Also, he
teaches guitar at Montreat
College, where his arrangements for guitar ensemble
are frequently performed,
including works for guitar
ensemble with chamber
orchestra. To sample his
music, please visit KevinOnGuitar.com.
For more information,
please call 542-ARTS.

BALLET SPARTANBURG
PRESENTS DANCE EVENT

Ballet Spartanburg will
present So You Think
You Can Dance Spartanburg on Thursday, March
24, at Chapman Cultural
Center. Cocktails and hors

ONGOING EXHIBITS

|

JONATHAN MCFADDEN
PRINTS ON DISPLAY

PHOTO | SUBMITTED

Centre Stage will present ‘The Addams Family’ musical comedy by Jersey Boys authors
Marshall Brickman, Rick Elice and Drama Desk Award winner Andrew Lippa March 17April 10. Showtimes are Thursday-Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m. All seats are
reserved. For tickets, call 233-6733 or visit www.centrestage.org.
d’oeuvres begin at 6:30
p.m. with the show at 8
p.m.
Dance groups participating include Ballet Spartanburg (not competing), Boys
and Girls Clubs of the Upstate, Charles Lea Center,
City of Spartanburg Police,
Meeting Street Academy,
Parkinson’s On the Move,
Spartanburg
Methodist
College, The SC School for
the Deaf and the Blind,
Spartanburg School District 7 and Wofford College.
Celebrity dance judges
include Carlos Agudelo,
Valerie Barnet and Jack
McBride.
For more information,
call 583-2776 or visit
www.balletspartanburg.
org/SYTYCD.

LAUREL EXHIBIT OPENS AT
RIVERWORKS GALLERY

Local artist Christina
Laurel’s exhibition Refugium will be on display
at RIVERWORKS Gallery
March 10-April 17.
Refugium is a quiet space
filled with orderly floating
strands of constructed
paper gingko leaves. The
gentle currents created
by movement through
the strands activates the
leaves. The strands and
individual leaves rotate,
wave, quiver in response
to this movement through
the gallery. RIVERWORKS
Gallery becomes a meditative oasis created to relax
and refresh. Mirroring the
interior gingko leaves are
the fresh, spring leaves of
a specimen gingko growing outdoors near the gallery entrance. The gingko
itself is a fossil tree that
has been growing for thousands of years. The gingko
is a survivor. Its leaves are
an iconic fan shape that allows them when brilliant
yellow in fall to gracefully
perform their deciduous
dance as they end their
growing season.
RIVERWORKS Gallery is
located at 300 River Street,
Suite 202, in Greenville.
For more information,
visit www.gvltec.edu/dva
or email fleming.markel@
gvltec.edu.

ARMIN MÜHSAM
PAINTINGS ON DISPLAY

Paintings by Northwest
Missouri State University
(Maryville, Mo.) Professor
of Art Armin Mühsam will
be on display in Furman
University’s
Thompson
Gallery, Roe Art Building,
March 17-April 7. A reception with Mühsam is
set for Tuesday, April 5, 6
-7:30 p.m., with a talk by
the artist at 6:30 p.m. in
the gallery.
The exhibition, Clear Cut
Spaces, is free and open to
the public, and is presented by the Furman University Department of Art.
“Landscape is the stage
where people and land
interact; on it, the drama
between the natural, or
the given, and the humanbuilt, or technology, plays
itself out. Technology in
this sense encompasses
all human activity to assert control over the land;
in this process, technology
also transfers its values
and its symbols to architecture. I have come to the
conclusion that technology
(read: western man) writes
or draws into a landscape
just like an artist would
draw on a sheet of paper
– through and with technology, forms are assembled and manipulated to
compose a kind of envi-

ronment that suits man’s
needs,” Mühsam said.
Mühsam holds a Master
of Fine Arts degree from
Montana State University
(Bozeman, Mont.) and a
Bachelor of Fine Arts degree from the University
of Applied Sciences, Munich, Germany.
Thompson Gallery hours
are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.5 p.m. For more information, call 294-2074 or visit
www.arminmuhsam.com.

SPACE DAY AT ROPER
MTN SCIENCE CENTER

Space Day is an awardwinning educational initiative that seeks to advance
science, technology, engineering, and mathematics
education. It also helps
to inspire young people
to realize the vision of
our space pioneers and to
promote the field of aviation. Space Day 2016 celebration will take place 9
AM to 3 PM on Saturday,
March 12th at Roper Mountain Science Center. Featured guest Larry Bounds
of Greenville Chautauqua
performs as Wernher Von
Braun.
Join a multi-media presentation about a little German boy who put rockets
on his little red wagon and
then rose through World
War II and the Cold War to
create the most powerful
rocket ever fired on earth
- the rocket that carried
Americans to the moon.
Dr. Wernher Von Braun led
NASA’s development of
the mighty Saturn V rocket
and joined Walt Disney to
inspire the American public to believe in and support our race to the moon.
His story is told in photos,
film, and models of the
engines that first carried
humans into space. Our
presenter is Larry Bounds,
a teacher with Greenville
County Schools. He will be
presenting the ideas of Dr.
Von Braun for Greenville’s
Chautauqua Festival in
June, playing the role of
the famous rocket scientist himself.
Space Day Saturday
hours are 9 a.m.-3 p.m. All
events are included in the
general admission to the
Center. Roper Mountain
Science Center is located
at 402 Roper Mountain
Rd. For more information,
RoperMountain.org
or
355-8900

YOUTH ART MONTH
EXHIBITS

There will be two separate exhibits held at Chapman Cultural Center in
March to celebrate national Youth Art Month.
As a venue, Chapman
will host one very large
exhibit, displaying hundreds of student artworks
from nearly every school
in Spartanburg County.
The other exhibit, Focus
on Youth, will be held in
the Artists’ Guild of Spartanburg Gallery, which is
also located at Chapman
Cultural Center. Both will
be free for public viewing,
Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5
p.m., and Sunday, 1-5 p.m.
Guild’s juried exhibit
will feature the artwork of
Spartanburg County high
school students. “With
events like these, we are
getting more involvement
from the community in the
support of arts education
in Spartanburg,” Executive
Director of the Guild Caitlin Boice said. There are
more than 100 applicants
from all seven Spartanburg high schools that the

Guild will narrow down to
around 40 pieces to display in the gallery.
A reception for the
Guild’s exhibition will be
held during ArtWalk on
March 17, 6-8 p.m. Local artist Trey Finney will
judge the artwork and
will choose seven winners
to be given awards and
cash prizes. A few teacher
awards will also be given
out.
For more information,
visit
ChapmanCulturalCenter.org or call 542ARTS.

BOOK TALKS AND SIGNINGS
AT FICTION ADDICTION

Stephanie
Evanovich,
the New York Times bestselling author of Big Girl
Panties, will be discussing
and signing copies of her
new book, The Total Package, at Fiction Addiction
on Saturday, March 19, at
2 p.m.
Ann B. Ross will be discussing her new book,
Miss Julia Inherits a Mess,
on Tuesday, April 12, at 2
p.m.
In the author’s latest
New York Times bestselling series, Miss Julia
finds herself an executrix
on a desperate hunt for a
valuable collection amid a
jumble of the estate’s antiques, and if she finds a
prize she can honor Miss
Mattie’s last wishes.
North Carolina author
Kristy Woodson Harvey
will be discussing her new
women’s fiction novel
about what it really means
to tell the truth, Lies and
Other Acts of Love, at a
book talk and signing on
Wednesday, April 13, at 6
p.m.
This event is free and
open to the public, but
please RSVP to Fiction Addiction.
For more information,
call 675-0540.

CENTRE STAGE PLANS
BENEFIT EVENT

Centre Stage will host
a mystery dinner theatre
benefit, “The Mousetrap
Society,” on Friday, April
22, 7 p.m. at The Poinsett
Club in Greenville.
Visitors become a “Din-

Prints by Jonathan McFadden, professor at the
College of Fine Arts, School
of Art & Visual Studies at
University of Kentucky,
will be on display in Furman University’s Thompson Gallery, Roe Art Building through March 15.
Thompson Gallery hours
are Monday-Friday, 9 a.m.5 p.m.
The exhibition, Clearly
this is satire, but …, is free
and open to the public,
and is presented by the
Furman University Department of Art.
For more information,
contact 294-2074 or visit
www.jonathanmcfadden.
com.

POST-WWII FURMAN
STUDENT LIFE EXHIBITION

A new exhibition about
post-World War II student
life at Furman is now open
on the second floor gallery of Furman University’s James B. Duke Library
through May 31.
The exhibition, “A Return to Normalcy? Growing Pains, Furmanville, and
Life at Post-World War II
Furman,” is free and open
to the public.
Duke Library gallery
hours are 8 a.m.-5 p.m.,
Monday-Friday.
For more information,
contact Jeffrey Makala
294-2714, or jeffrey.makala@furman.edu.

UPSTATE GALLERY
MAC ARNOLD EXHIBIT

The University of South
Carolina Upstate will host
a new exhibit by USC Upstate alumnus Brian S.
Kelly on display through
March 7 at the UPSTATE
Gallery on Main.
Kelley’s exhibit “Mac Arnold: Bluesman Close-Up,”
documents South Carolina
blues legend Mac Arnold,
who lives and owns a farm
in the Fork Shoals community of Greenville County.
The UPSTATE Gallery on
Main is located at 172 East
Main Street in downtown
Spartanburg.

HISTORY MUSEUM
TO SHOW TEXTILES EXHIBIT

Spartanburg
Regional
History Museum’s upcoming exhibit will feature
panels from the SC State
Museum’s traveling exhibit, “Textiles: A History of
Innovation and Community,” through April 16.
Also featured will be
items from SRHM’s own
collections that highlight
Spartanburg’s role in the
American textile industry.
For more information,
visit SpartanburgHistory.
org or call Julius Dargan
at 591-5596.

FUN AND GAMES

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

THE GREER CITIZEN

B7

Is prostate to blame
for sluggish bladder?
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
would like your opinion
on enlarged prostate. My
primary-care doctor sent
me for a blood test and
said my PSA number was
too high, then sent me to
a urologist. He said my
bladder is not emptying
and that I am having urine
retention in the bladder.
After one week of medication (Rapaflo), I had a catheter inserted for another
week. He measured the
urine in the bladder, and
it was 880 ml. Now he is
suggesting surgery. Is he
going too fast? What are
your thoughts on the procedure and side effects?
Will this correct the problem? -- D.G.
ANSWER: The bladder is
drained via a tube called
the urethra, and in men,
the urethra runs right
through the middle of the
prostate. As men get older, the prostate commonly
enlarges, and this can
cause resistance to flow.
The symptoms can range
from mildly annoying to
complete
obstruction.
Complete obstruction is
an emergency, since the
kidneys will fail within a
few days of being unable
to drain urine at all.
But the obstruction does
not need to be complete
in order to cause kidney damage. It’s the high
pressure in the urethra,
bladder and ureters (the
tubes that allow urine to
flow from the kidneys to
the bladder) that causes
kidney damage. Placing a

TO YOUR
GOOD HEALTH
KEITH
ROACH, M.D.
catheter allows the urine
to drain at low pressure if
the problem is in the urethra.
Normal bladder capacity
is between 300-400 ml. At
880 ml, you would experience very abnormal bladder drainage and would
be at high risk for ongoing kidney damage. Thus,
I completely agree with
your urologist that something, probably surgical,
needs to be done quickly.
It’s not completely clear
to me whether your inability to drain the bladder is
due to obstruction from
enlarged prostate, even
though an elevated PSA
suggests that this might be
the case. It also is possible
that there is something
wrong with the nerves that
go to or from the bladder.
I suspect your urologist
has done additional bladder tests to help sort this
out.
The booklet on the prostate gland discusses enlargement as well as cancer. Readers can obtain a
copy by writing: Dr. Roach
-- No. 1001W, 628 Virginia
Drive, Orlando, FL 32803.
Enclose a check or money
order (no cash) for $4.75
U.S./$6 Canada with the
recipient’s printed name

and address. Please allow
four weeks for delivery.
***
DEAR DR. ROACH: I
have weaned off Zoloft,
and I noticed a swelling of
my fingers -- I can’t get my
rings on. Do you think it is
related? -- E.P.
ANSWER:
Discontinuing an antidepressant
such as sertraline (Zoloft)
certainly can cause symptoms. Dizziness, fatigue,
muscle aches, anxiety and
irritability are common. It
happens more frequently
if the drug is suddenly
stopped versus tapered
down over weeks. Paroxitine (Paxil) seems to have
the highest incidence of
symptoms on stopping.
However, I haven’t seen
swelling as a result of
stopping sertraline. It may
be related, but I doubt it.
Is it possible that you are
consuming more salt?
That’s the most common
reason for increased fluid
in the fingers over a short
time.
I would see your doctor
if it doesn’t go away in a
week or so.
***
Dr. Roach regrets that he
is unable to answer individual letters, but will incorporate them in the column
whenever possible. Readers may email questions to
ToYourGoodHealth@med.
cornell.edu.

SOAP UPDATES
BY DANA BLOCK

THE BOLD AND
THE BEAUTIFUL

Quinn suggested to
Wyatt that he focus on a
career in the family business. Ridge sat Steffy
down for a father/daughter talk regarding her big
announcement.
Deacon
surprised Quinn with an
unannounced visit. Unaware that his son was being held captive by Quinn,
Bill became increasingly
angry at Liam’s irresponsibility. Katie sought professional help to cope with
her issues. Sasha jumped
at the opportunity to become a support system
for Zende as he dealt with
his heartbreak over Nicole.
An overly worried Bill was
brutally frank with Katie
regarding her drinking
problem. Nicole admitted
to Maya her biggest regret
about Zende. Wait to See:
A husband and wife prepare for the birth of their
baby.

DAYS OF OUR LIVES

Joey made a stunning
confession to Kayla. Hope
wondered if she had been
wrong about Stefano.
Steve lied to Roman in order to protect a loved one.
Summer had a run-in with
Maggie. Gabi and JJ continued getting to know one
another. Eric was taken
back when he realized that
Jennifer didn’t remember
their kiss. Nicole tried to
get all the dirt she could

PHOTO | CBS

Eileen Davidson stars as
‘Ashley’ on ‘The Young and
The Restless’
find on Summer. Several
Salemites gathered at the
pub to celebrate Stefano’s
death. Chad was shaken
up when he heard that
Ben escaped the psychiatric hospital. Brady asked
Fynn to check Summer’s
DNA. Hope rejoined the
police force. Wait to See:
Marlena and Arianna are
kidnapped.

GENERAL HOSPITAL

Dillon insisted that Tracy see a doctor. Ava was
strongly considering telling Jordan the truth about
being blackmailed by Paul.
Sam admitted that part of
the reason she loved Jason
was because of the danger
surrounding him. Elizabeth hesitated to move
in to Wyndemere after
learning that Hayden was
living there too. Ava and
Sonny found a brief moment of understanding.
Tracy feared the worst

about her health. Nathan
was concerned that Nina
might spill the truth to
Maxie. Morgan’s mental
health and future created
a lot of tension for Sonny
and Carly. Franco was annoyed when he discovered
that Nina was researching
how to start a family. Maxie urged Lulu to give Dante
a second chance. Wait to
See: Helena’s will is read
and has a lasting impact.

THE YOUNG AND
THE RESTLESS

Summer caught Luca
searching Natalie’s computer for information on
PassKey. Chelsea threatened to leave Adam when
he didn’t tell her that Victor had been blackmailing
him. She later warned him
that he would never win his
father’s approval. Stitch
told Abby that he was having a hard time connecting with Max, who was
starting fights at school.
Ashley feared that Simon
would lose focus on finding a cure for her disease
if he was busy doing photoshoots for Hilary. Phyllis
was upset when Summer
decided to tell Victor her
suspicions about Natalie.
Billy and Victoria found it
difficult to separate business from pleasure. Devon
convinced Hilary to make
a peace offering to Ashley.
Wait to See: Max overhears
a secret at the Jabot lab.

THE SPATS by Jeff Pickering

|

RFD by Mike Marland

|

AMBER WAVES by Dave T. Phipps

|

OUT ON A LIMB by Gary Kopervas

|

(c) 2016 King Features Synd., Inc.

OUR SCHOOLS
The Greer Citizen

B8

THE GREER CITIZEN

SCHOOL
NEWS
|

GREENVILLE COUNTY
SKYLAND SHINING STARS
ARTS NIGHT

Skyland Elementary will
celebrate the arts in South
Carolina
on
Monday,
March 21, from 6-8 p.m.
The event will feature a
student art gallery,Skyland
Singers, a third grade music program at 6:30 p.m.
and shag dance lessons.

NOMINATIONS OPEN
FOR ARTS PROGRAM

Nominations are now
open for the ARMES program at the Fine Arts Center.
The program is a tuition-free arts initiative
designed for students in
grades three through eight
who have demonstrated
talents in theatre, visual
arts, strings or dance. The
classes are taught after
regular school hours twice
a week at the Fine Arts
Center (drama classes at
The Sterling School).
Nominations close April
18 with auditions scheduled for mid-May.
For more information,
visit
fineartscenter.net/
ARMES.

RIVERSIDE STUDENTS WIN
ART COMPETITION

Several Riverside High
students received honors
at the National Art Honor
Society Winter Art Show
recently.
Students
receiving
awards included:
Art 1
1st: Madeline Corvin
2nd: Asia Hopwood
Honorable Mention: Collin Neel, Abby Stageberg
Art 2
1st: Cheeun Kang
2nd: Megan Lamb
3rd: Amber Hradec
Honorable
Mention:
Kenshin Sugisawa, Emma
Spencer
Art 3H/AP
1st: Emma Simonis
2nd: Justin Kujath
3rd: Morgan Chopp
Honorable
Mention:
Monique Louw, Marie Pirochta

SKYLAND STUDENTS MAKE
STATE HONOR CHOIR

Skyland Elementary students Wayland Davis and
Callie Trapp represented
the school at the State Elementary Honor Choir recently.

EHS BETA CLUB PLACES
AT STATE CONVENTION

The Eastside High Beta
Club received first place
for Quiz Bowl and Scrapbook at the SC Beta Club
Convention recently.
Ashley Rich was elected
Beta Club State Secretary
for the second year.
Individual students received awards including:
Sharon Nuthulapty took
first place in Pencil Drawing, and Caroline Patterson took second place in
Division I Social Studies.
Morgan Patton took second place in Acrylic Painting, and Tai Zheng took
second place in Division I
Spelling.
Tyler Catoe took placed
fifth in Division 1 Science.
Riverside
students
named to USC Band Clinic
Riverside High students
Monica Li, Sam Johnson,
Matthew Robison, Alyssa
Campanelli and Christopher Barron have been

Helping people love
what they do for a living:
Business &Technology
Health & Wellness
Public Service, Arts & Sciences
Corporate and Career Development

PHOTO | SUBMITTED

Showing support
Students and teachers at Riverside Middle recently wore matching t-shirts to support a
seventh grade student who is battling cancer.
selected to the USC Band
Clinic.
For thirty-eight years,
this clinic has drawn 450
students from across the
country
to audition for
seats in four bands, participate in master classes
with university studio
professors and engage in
an intense sequence of
rehearsals,
culminating in a concert on Sunday
afternoon in the Koger
Center for the Arts.

GREER BAND MATTRESS
SALE IS SUNDAY

The Greer High Band
mattress sale has been
rescheduled for Sunday,
March 6, from 1-6 p.m. in
the school commons area.

TEACHER RECRUITMENT
EVENT SET MARCH 14

Greenville
County
Schools and the business
community will host a
Shining Stars Teacher Recruitment event at the Bon
Secours Wellness Arena in
downtown Greenville on
Monday, March 14, from
8 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Prospective candidates can register online through Sunday,
March 6.

RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY
SPIRIT FEST IS MARCH 17

The annual Riverside
Middle Community Spirit
Fest will be Thursday,
March 17, from 5-7:30
p.m.
Visitors
can
stroll
through the building to see
the Model UN multicultural family exhibits, watch
the MVAD Fashion Design
Show, drop off Mirrors &
Windows donations and
get Battle for Bella t-shirts
and bumper stickers.
The Riverside Royals
soccer, baseball and softball teams will compete
against Northwood, and
food trucks will be on
hand.

EHS HOSTS LUNCH
AND LEARN MARCH 23

Eastside High’s School
Improvement Council will
host a Lunch and Learn
for parents with Dr. Harry
Shucker on March 23 at
noon.
Dr. Shucker is well
known in the Greenville
area and will be speaking
on how parents can help
high school students deal
with the stress and pressures they face every day.
To
register,
email
ahartsell@rhetel.com with
your
name,
student’s
name and grade with the
subject “Lunch and Learn”
by March 18.

GREER MIDDLE TDAP
VACCINE CLINIC APRIL 18

DHEC will be conducting
a vaccine clinic at Greer
Middle on Monday, April
18.
According to South Carolina State Regulations,
all students entering seventh grade are required to
have a Tdap vaccine.
Parents are asked to
send a copy of their student’s immunization record to the Health Room
if the child has already
been vaccinated.

RIVERSIDE MIDDLE IMOVE
WILL BE HELD APRIL 30

Riverside Middle will
participate in the iMove
5K run/walk and community health fair on Saturday, April 30.
Participants receive a
free t-shirt if registered
by April 15. This year’s
proceeds will benefit Upstate Backpack Blessings.
For more information,
visit the school’s website.

DISTRICT FIVE

|

ABNER CREEK PRESENTS
‘OFF TO NEVERLAND’

Abner Creek Academy
drama students will fly
away with Peter Pan, Wendy and friends on Friday,
March 4.
The school’s “Off To
Neverland” musical production will be presented
at the District Five Fine
Arts Center at 9:30 a.m.
and 6:30 p.m. Admission
is free.

D5 FACULTY AND STAFF
AWARDS

District Five schools and
facilities have announced
their 2015-16 Teacher and
Support Employee of the
Year.
Superintendent Dr. Scott
Turner visited each school
and facility to congratulate the winners and thank
them for their dedication
to students.
The 2015-16 Teachers of
the Year are:
Shannon
Woodroof
(Abner Creek Academy),
Adam McClain (Duncan
Elementary), Sherri Rogers (Lyman Elementary),
Tonya Williams (Reidville
Elementary), Anna Taylor
(River Ridge Elementary),
Katie Henderson (Wellford Academy), Ashley
Bailey (Beech Springs Intermediate), Chris Sudduth (Berry Shoals Intermediate), Marcia Kay (D.R.
Hill Middle), Kim McGaha
(Florence Chapel Middle),

Take a class or two this summer, and you
can return to campus a step ahead.
Students have different reasons for taking courses as a Transient Visiting Student at GTC, but no matter what the reason, most find that
the cost per credit hour here is lower than at their home school, many
classes are smaller, and if they stay at home, there’s no room and board
to pay. Choose from four campuses and hundreds of courses offered in
convenient formats with condensed and full summer schedules.
To get started, visit gvltec.edu/transient-visiting.

Marie Claire Mottet (Byrnes Freshman Academy),
and Geoff Turner (Byrnes
High).
The 2015-16 Support
Employees of the Year
are:

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 2, 2016

Amanda Weaver (Abner Creek Academy), Eric
Goode (Duncan Elementary), Debbie Sitman (Lyman
Elementary), Robin Petrina
(Reidville Elementary), Leslie Parham (River Ridge Elementary), Megan Johnson
(Wellford Academy), Melanie Brown (Beech Springs
Intermediate), Lesa White
(Berry Shoals Intermediate), Geannie Gilpin (D.R.
Hill Middle), Amy Miller
(Florence Chapel Middle),
Dorian Lane (Byrnes Freshman Academy), Jerry Rice
(Byrnes High), Lois Metcalf (District Office), Jerry
Hammett (District Maintenance) and Carolyn Cox
(Middle Tyger Community
Center).
The overall District Five
Teachers and Support Employees of the Year will
be announced later this
month.

HIGHER EDUCATION
ERSKINE ANNOUNCES
FALL DEAN’S LIST

|

The Erskine College Fall
2015 Dean’s List has been
announced by Senior Vice
President for Academic
Affairs Dr. N. Bradley
Christie. The dean’s list

honors full-time students
who earn a GPR of at least
3.80.
Students named to the
dean’s list includes:
Greer
Connor Colle Gibson
Alexander Stephen Preston
Matthew Thomas Preston

JOHNSON NAMED
TO MUSC DEAN’S LIST

Kinsley Johnson, of
Greer, has been named
to the Dean’s List for Fall
2015 semester at the Medical University of South
Carolina.
The MUSC Dean’s List
recognizes those students,
who, for any given semester, earn a GPA of 3.5 or
better.

WOFFORD OFFERING
SUMMER PROGRAM

STARTALK, a free Chinese culture and language
day camp, will be held at
Wofford College this summer.
The program offers a
two-week intensive program.
The application deadline
is May 25. Only 50 students will be accepted.
For more information,
visit www.wofford.edu/
startalk.