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News 2

Dean of Social
Welfare Paul
Smokowski resigns

Sports 15
Four seniors will
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games as Jayhawks
on Senior Day

Arts & Culture 5


Lawrences own Fox Mulder,
Daniel Lauing

THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2016 | VOLUME 130 ISSUE 13

THE UNIVERSITY DAILY KANSAN


THE STUDENT VOICE SINCE 1904

Finance Committee
adjusts fee allocations
CONNER MITCHELL
@ConnerMitchell0

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
Jameelah Jones and Kat Rainey speak on the amendment funding the Multicultural Student Government in
Finance Committee.

Multicultural Student
Government approved
LARA KORTE
@lara_korte

heers, laughter, and


shouts of joy echoed
off the walls of an
almost-empty lobby in the
Kansas Union Wednesday
night after the Senate Finance Committee passed
an amendment to fund a
Multicultural Student Government.
About 25 students stood
at the front of Alderson
Auditorium for an hour
Wednesday night with
Kat Rainey and Jameelah
Jones, both active social
justice advocates, as they
pitched the idea for a separate governing body that
would focus on the needs
and voices of marginalized
students. The amendment
ultimately passed and will
move on to Full Senate next
Wednesday.
Jones said the main
purpose of the group is to
provide a focused effort on
the needs of marginalized
students.
This is about centering students that are traditionally never thought of in
these spaces, that dont get
to speak and dont get to
advocate for themselves,

Jones said.
The group asked for a
$2 increase to the student
fee for the Office of Multicultural Affairs. Rainey said
the new Multicultural Student Government and current Student Senate would
act as two separate entities
but come together to talk
about various issues like
fee review, fund allocation
and changes to the Student
Code of Conduct.
Although many senators
gave positive speeches in
support of the establishment of a Multicultural
Student Government, not
all were so quick to cast
their affirmative vote. Student Body Vice President
Zach George spent time
questioning the group on
who would be involved,
what preparations had been
made and what the money
would be used for if allocated.
Members of the group
were quick to address
Georges statements. Tyler
Childress, normally chairman of the Finance Committee, expressed concerns
that no other student group
is ever interrogated so
thoroughly on how money
will be used. Jones argued
Georges reluctance in af-

firming the funding was


due to his lack of faith in
its ability to provide for
marginalized students on
campus.
Youre
questioning
our ability to do something with this money,
Jones said.
Jyleesa Hampton, a
graduate student studying communications, said
she thinks a Multicultural
Student Government will
be able to understand the
needs of minority students in a way that the
current Student Senate
cannot.
People have told us
what those problems are,
we are aware of what those
problems are, and we have,
I think a better mechanism
to fix it, Hampton said.
Hampton also said she
believes those who are on
the Multicultural Student
Government can act just
as, if not more, efficiently in
meeting marginalized student needs than the current
Senate.
There was a lot of interrogation we were getting about our capacity to
act and capacity to act in a
comparatively efficient or
advantageous way, and that
was frustrating because

Members of the Student


Senate Finance Committee voted to approve an
amended version of the
student fee allocations bill,
sending the bill to Full Senate next week for approval.
Full
Senate
voted
against the first draft of the
bill last week by a count
of 8-41-3. The first draft
recommended an increase
to the overall student fee
when an opportunity to
lower the fee was available.
One of the most debated issues of the evening
centered around a $1 increase to the University
Daily Kansan fee which
was proposed and passed
as an amendment in a Finance Committee meeting
on Feb. 17. The increase
would have doubled the
campus fee paid to the
Kansan from $1 to $2, restoring the fee the Kansan
previously received in the
2014-15 fiscal year.
After multiple positive
and negative speeches at
Finance Committee, the

they havent put in the time


to sort of talk to students,
students who are underrepresented, to see what is broken. We sort of know where
the system has failed, and
thats partially in not centering
underrepresented
students from the get-go,
Hampton said.
Despite the interrogation during the meeting, Rainey said she felt
supported by members of
Senate and believes theres
a bright future for cooperation between current senators and future Multicultural senators.
We have some allies in
the Senate and that means a
lot, and I think that speaks
to how well we can work together in the future, Rain-

University Daily Kansan


fee was amended back
to the $1 amount recommended by the Campus
Fee Review Subcommittee
by a vote of 8-5-1.
Graduate Senator Brittany Oleniacz gave a speech
in favor of the amendment
lowering the Kansan fee,
saying while she supports
the Kansan, Senate cannot
make a decision based on
what students wave during
basketball games.
What we need to keep
in mind is that increasing
the fee package by $0.60
is completely not right. We
should be equaling out with
last year's fees or decreasing the fees. Any increase
in the entire package is not
setting a great image to our
student body, she said. I
am cautious with the $2
increase and would prefer
to go with what the Fee Review Committee decided.
Junior Sophia Templin,
Journalism Senator, gave a
speech in opposition of the
amendment.
There are so many
great things that the UDK
brings to you, and I think

ey said.
Conversations about minority representation have
been heated over the past
few months, especially following the Nov. 11 Town
Hall Meeting. Jones said
after tonight, she no longer
feels like the only one fighting for social justice.
It encourages me because if nothing else, people
are learning and people are
seeing that this is important, Jones said. Its not
just us who want to change,
its not just us that sees that
something needs to change,
and its always encouraging to know that youre
not in it alone, that people
do work at different levels,
but youre not the only one
fighting.

theres a lot of issue I have


with the fact that were not
going to fund them based
on that we dont want to
fund an adviser when they
have the opportunity to do
whatever they want with
the money that we give
them, she said.
Other amendments to
the bill included a $0.25
increase to the Campus
Renewable Energy and
Sustainability Fee, raising
the fee to $0.75, as well as
a $2 increase to the already
amended Office of Multicultural Affairs fee, raising
it to $7.10. The Student
Senate Activity Fee was reduced $1.85, lowering the
fee to $14.15. As the bill
stands, student fees would
decrease from $455.50 to
$454.90.
The bill will be seen by
the Full Senate next week
as amended, and requires a
two-thirds majority vote to
move on for final approval
from Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little.
Edited by Michael
Portman

The amendment must


pass Full Senate next week
for funding to be fully approved. Although nothing
is certain yet, Rainey said
she is hopeful for the future
of marginalized students on
campus.
I think the future is
very bright for underrepresented communities and
persons on this campus,
because they will have an
organization that thinks
about them first and foremost, Rainey said. Its
very exciting.
Edited by Brendan
Dzwierzynski

Ted Cruz holds rally at Johnson County Community College


MIRANDA DAVIS
@MirandaDavis

Republican presidential
candidate and U.S. Senator
Ted Cruz spoke in Overland
Park on Wednesday where
he discussed his Super
Tuesday wins and attacked
Donald Trump.
During his speech, the
senator focused on illegal
immigration and Supreme
Court nominations.
Cruz, who won Texas,
Alaska and Oklahoma on
Super Tuesday, has said
during his campaign that
he is the Republican Partys
best chance to beat Donald
Trump. He reiterated that
idea on Wednesday night
at Johnson County Community College. Cruz also
discussed at a meeting with
donors where he said if he
had lost his home state
of Texas, he would have
dropped out of the race.
Last night made it clear
that there is only one campaign that has consistently,
over and over, beaten Donald Trump, Cruz said.

Cruzs speech focused


on his core policies, specifically the economy and religious freedom.
Let me be very clear
to the men and women of
Kansas. I will not compromise our religious liberty
and I will not compromise
away our Second Amendment right to keep and bear
arms, Cruz said.
Cruz drew a crowd of
around 1,300 to the rally,
which fell three days before
Saturdays Kansas caucus.
He said he welcomes any
Kansas voters who have
been supporting other Republican candidates and
said his is the only campaign thats in a position to
beat Donald Trump for the
nomination, and then Hillary Clinton in the general
election.
If Donald is the nominee, its likely Hillary becomes the president, Cruz
said.
Cruz discussed the Supreme Court vacancy and
vowed that if he were elected he would only appoint a

principled constitutionalist worked for Cruzs campaign of his flat tax and his gun busy week, but lets go to
to the court.
in Iowa, made a last-minute rights policies, Kuder said. Kansas City. He is well
Cruz also talked jobs decision to drive two hours
Jan Medley, a Tope- worth supporting, Medley
and directed several of his to come to the rally. Kuder ka resident also said she said.
comments to young voters, said he has been with Cruz agrees with Cruzs ideas on
who he said are graduating since the beginning and the flat tax and the removal
Edited by Michael
college right now and up to agrees with many of the of the IRS.
Portman
their eyeballs in debt.
senators ideas.
When we learned about
He said he hopes to reIm a huge supporter the rally we said, Crazy
move
regulations
to
allow
for
more small
business success with the
hope
that
young people
can graduate
from college
with multiple
job offers.
Attendees
varied in age
and
hometown,
with
many hailing
from the Kansas City, Kan.
area.
Kerrick
Kuder, a junior at Kansas State UniChristian Hardy/KANSAN
versity who Republican presidential candidate Ted Cruz spoke March 2 at Johnson County Community College about his tax plan and how he
would help college graduates with their debt.

news
Kansan
staff

Paul Smokowski, dean of Social Welfare, resigns


LARA KORTE

NEWS MANAGEMENT

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@lara_korte

aul
Smokowski,
dean of Social Welfare, announced his
resignation Wednesday
evening, effective July 1,
2016.
In an email sent out to
students, Smokowski said
he will step aside from his
duties as dean effective
immediately, leaving Provost Sara Rosen to name
an acting director until a
permanent replacement
is chosen.
In a statement, Smokowski said he will instead focus his efforts
on special research initiatives in studying child
and family resilience. He
will officially step down
from his role on July 1,
and return to the University as a full professor in
the School of Social Welfare to teach in Fall 2016.
The
announcement
comes
after
several
months of contention between the dean and students in the School of Social Welfare. On Feb. 22,
students in the Student
Activist Committee called
for Smokowskis resignation and released a
timeline detailing several
incidents where they felt
the dean did not respond
appropriately to issues of

diversity and equity.


Around
noon
on
Wednesday, March 2,
members of the Student Activist Committee
and Rock Chalk Invisible Hawk demonstrated against Smokowski
on Wescoe Beach before
holding a study-in at
Twente Hall.
The nearly 50 students stood on the steps
of Wescoe Hall holding
signs protesting the dean
and the recently proposed amendments to the
Student Code of Conduct.
Caleb
Stephens,
a
member of Rock Chalk
Invisible Hawk and a
2014 alumnus of the
School of Social Welfare,
said the Student Activist
Committee had called for
the deans resignation by
March 1.
Trinity
Carpenter,
chair of the Student Activist Committee, said she
feels the students have finally gotten support.
Im elated, and its
been for the first time in
a long time in months I
feel supported by faculty,
staff, everybody, the administration, Carpenter
said. I dont know if its
false security, but its a
good feeling.
Edited by Cele
Fryer

Lara Korte/KANSAN
Students protest on Wescoe Beach against Paul Smokowski, dean of Social Welfare, and against recently proposed
amendments to the Student Code of Conduct.

Student Body Vice President Zach George


explains his decision to resign from position
CONNER MITCHELL
@ConnerMitchell0

Student
Body
Vice
President Zach George announced his resignation
from Student Senate, effective March 9, in a release
Wednesday. A new vice
president will be elected
next week at the Full Senate
Meeting.
George, a senior from
Ottawa, has been a member
of Student Senate for four
years, serving as a senator,
government development
director, and policy and
development director prior
to his election as vice president.
George said his resignation was prompted after
he accepted a job offer with
the National Association
of Counties in Washington, D.C., beginning in late
March.
With my academic
background and my interest
in public service, it was an
offer that I could not turn
down, he said. I wanted
to make sure that I left Student Senate in a good place
to continue to move forward, and so by doing this
now, it will allow Student
Senate to elect a new vice
president next Wednesday so there is no awkward
phase in the middle.
Student Senate Communications Director Isaac
Bahney said George will
chair as normal when members of Full Senate elect a

new vice president at the


March 9 Full Senate meeting.
At the end of the meeting, the plan is for there to
be an election for a new student body vice president.
That individual is elected
from the body, so you have
to be a current member of
Student Senate to be eligible to run, Bahney said.
Student senators will vote
on who the next vice president is, and that person will
fill out for the remainder of
the term on April 27.
George said his proudest
accomplishment in Student
Senate stemmed from his
work as government relations director when he was
a sophomore.
That
position
was
struggling, and I came into
that role, and during the
2012 presidential election
we had an opportunity to
reshape and restructure
that position, he said. In
that role, I was able to institute Rock Chalk The Vote,
which is still going on and is
still one of the leading civic
engagement campaigns at
KU.
As student body vice
president, George said his
administration was able to
accomplish many different
goals despite some trying
times.
We have been able to
do so much this year, even
with the more turbulent
times, he said. I still be-

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Lawrence, Kan., 66045
editor@kansan.com
www.kansan.com
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KANSAN.COM/NEWS | THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2016

Baxter Schanze/KANSAN
Student Body President Zach George addresses the Student Senate.

lieve that coming into this


position, we did a lot in
terms of inclusion and diversity [...] Weve been able
to keep our promises that
we made back in November
when we instituted the plan
of action, and we have been
able to cross out the majority of what we were working
on, and we still have things
in the works that we are
hoping to tie up at the end
of the year.
George said when he
reflects on his time at the
University he will first
think about his time serving on Student Senate,
rather than basketball and

football games or his activities in Greek life.


There has been no
greater privilege that I have
been able to have in this
role, because I get to wake
up every day with the responsibility of doing what
I can to serve and represent
students, he said. When
I think about my time at
KU, I think about my time
serving the students, being in this office, and it has
been amazing. Im sad to
leave, but also Im moving
on to continue my passion
of serving and serving at a
higher level.
Edited by Cele Fryer

NEWS

KANSAN.COM

Rabbis, students and families unite in Lawrence


for fifth annual Midwest Shabbaton Conference
BEN FELDERSTEIN
@Ben_Felderstein

habbat is a holy Jewish holiday for reflection and prayer.


But that doesn't mean the
2016 Midwest Shabbaton,
a weekend conference dedicated to leadership training
and personal growth for the
Midwest Jewish community, didn't have its share of
fun and games, said Rabbi
Zalman Tiechtel, Director
of KU Chabad.
This is the fifth Shabbaton that the University has
hosted, and universities
throughout the Midwest,
such as Missouri, Southern
Illinois and Bradley were
represented. Participants
checked in at Naismith Hall
on Friday, Feb. 26.
It is great having all of
these guests in town, said
Jacob Elberg, Naismiths
head resident assistant. As

a Jewish student, it is amazing to have all of these Jews


in my own home.
The Shabbaton participants met Saturday night at
Epic Fun Land in Lawrence
for a night of laser tag and
arcade games. Tiechtel also
catered sushi for the event
that lasted the remainder of
Saturday night. According
to Tiechtel and chabad.org,
the Chabad House offers
a family environment for
any and all Jewish students
on campus, and acts as a
"home away from home.
Joel Gutovitz, a freshman from Overland Park,
said the laser tag was his
favorite part of the entire
Shabbaton. He said that
meeting other Chabad participants from around the
Midwest was a memorable
experience.
Playing laser tag with
the seven rabbis who were
giving inspirational speech-

es over Shabbat showed all


of the participants that rabbis, aside from being sources of religion inspiration,
can also be fun, funny and
cool people to be around,
Gutovitz said.
In between laser tag and
arcade games, the guests

This is an opportunity where students can


get together and see
Chabad is larger than
just their campus,
Rabbi Eli Langsam
From Bradley
University

participated in serious and


enriching activities. In the
Jewish culture, Shabbat
signifies the Sabbath, or the
day of rest that God took

when creating the universe.


Jewish people all over the
world light candles, say
blessings, and share a meal
on the holy day.
Nearly 150 students, rabbis, and faculty members
gathered in a marquee in
the backyard of the Universitys Chabad House, located near 19th and Naismith,
to share a special Shabbat
dinner. Usually on Friday
nights, participants share a
meal and light candles on a
much smaller scale.
Tiechtel's wife, Nechama
Tiechtel, gave an explanation to the group of why the
Shabbat candles were lit.
It signifies the end of
mundane Friday and marks
the beginning of holy Shabbat, she said.
Prior to the candle lighting, students and rabbis
mingled. Rabbi Eli Langsam from Bradley University took this as an opportu-

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
Kids, parents and students from around the Midwest met in Naismith Hall before the start of Shabbat Friday
before sundown.

nity to wrap tefillin. Tefillin


is a small black box that
contains scriptures from
the Torah that Jewish people wrap around their arm
and head to remind them of
Gods intervention during
their exodus from Egypt.
This is an opportunity
where students can get together and see Chabad is
larger than just their campus, Langsam said. Everyone is united as one big
family.
The next event was Shabbat services, followed by the
dinner under the tent. Services were held in the main
room of the Chabad house.
During Shabbat services,
prayers were said praising
God for getting through the
week and to the day of rest.
Friday night was amazing and uplifting, Elberg
said. It was very inspirational to see so many Jews
pray and sing to praise

God.
Saturday was filled with
more Shabbat services,
games and activities, including a panel of rabbis
answering questions. Questions ranged from what life
is like as a rabbi to general
questions regarding Judaism.
On Sunday, participants
met for one last time before
heading home. A brunch
was catered for the morning
as a final round of blessings
and mingling took place.
The weekend was filled
with unity of so many different college students from
so many different schools
and backgrounds, Tiechtel
said. It was amazing.

Edited by Madi
Schulz

Alex Robinson/KANSAN
The group of visiting rabbis, families and students walk back to the KU Chabad House to begin the
celebration of Shabbat.

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8243

opinion
FREE-FOR-ALL
WE HEAR
FROM YOU

KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2016

Text your #FFA


submissions to
785-289-UDK1
(8351)
My favorite Tyler Self
story is when I saw him
at the Hawk and he shot
his cup into the trash
can and he missed.
I was so tired that I
waited 20 minutes at
IHOP to pay, only to
realize I had to go up
front and pay.
Its allergy season yall.

Illustration by Brandon Keenan

Current situation: Im
eating Oreos in the
shower.
There is a certain art to
drinking a whole bottle
of wine on a Tuesday
night and functioning on
a Wednesday. I have
not mastered that art.

Mikinski: America should be ashamed


of its overwhelming support for Trump
MADDY MIKINSKI
@Miss_Maddy

I bought my cap and


gown. The end is in
sight.
I want to be
reincarnated as one of
Hemingways cats.
Someone walked into
my class carrying a
pillow. Living the dream.
The beginning of Work
by Rihanna sounds like
the soundtrack to a
jungle level on Donkey
Kong Country.
When you realize
that the easy weekend
you had was because
you forgot to do an
assignment...DUE IN
FIVE MINUTES. May the
freak out commence.
Can you even graduate
college if you havent
thrown up from drinking
before 9 pm?

Ive never been one to


believe in conspiracy theories.
At best, theories are a
funny diversion from reality; at worst, completely unsubstantiated rants. In the
past few weeks, one particular conspiracy theory has
caught my attention.
One of my friends is an
adamant supporter of the
theory that Donald Trump
is running for office as a
Republican only to split the
Republican vote and ensure
a Democratic victory. This
theory has some semblance

The other day I was


so sleep deprived that
I was driving home at
2AM and I thought I
saw turtles in the street...
Dont you love when
your computer crashes
on you while writing a
paper thats due in a
couple days?
9 days until Spring
Break!
A whole bunch of
broadcast people
witnessed me spilling
tea all over myself.
#livingthedream

READ MORE AT
KANSAN.COM
@KANSANNEWS

constant
front-runner
status. Since his candidacy announcement last
June, Trump has built his
strong lead in the polls on
a foundation of lies and bad
sportsmanship. In the same
speech he announced his
presidency, Trump made
a now-infamous comment
equating all Mexican immigrants with rapists and
drug dealers. In December,
he made more comments
that heavily implied his
complicity in establishing a
database of Muslims in the
country.
The worst aspect of
Trumps campaign isnt his
xenophobia and racism
its that American voters
openly subscribe and perpetuate his own personal
brand of hatred. This week
he dominated Super Tuesday caucuses and primaries, winning seven out of 11
states. Over the past year,
Trumps standing in the

polls has only increased,


according to a Huffington
Post poll. The fact that some
of the people choosing him
in polls are white supremacists, including the grand
wizard of the KKK himself,
shows that hes catering to
the lowest tier of American
voters.
Our apparent approval of Trumps mendacious
views doesnt only affect us.
America has always been a
major player in international politics, but were hardly
the most likable world power. Widespread support for
Trumps hate speech only
makes it harder for us to be
taken seriously. We should
consider it out of the question to elect a man who
was nearly banned from
entering the United Kingdom. London Mayor Boris
Johnson once said, The
only reason I wouldnt go
to some parts of New York
is the real risk of meeting

Donald Trump.
To be fair, Trump gets
a multitude of attention
from his opponents, as well.
Whether people agree with
him or not, Trump has the
campaign that launched
a thousand thinkpieces.
But the people who oppose
Trump are not voting for
him in polls or caucusing
for him.
Trumps political success relies entirely on people who subscribe to his
controversial views, and
right now, Trump supporters are in the majority. In
the words of Mark Twain,
Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause
and reflect.

Maddy Mikinski is a junior from Linwood studying English and journalism.


Edited by Vicky
Diaz-Camacho

Clough: Surprise album trend does not


bode well for future of music industry
MATTHEW CLOUGH

My teacher cancelled
class the same day I
skipped class. Gives me
hope.

of credence.
In a piece last year for
CNN, Princeton professor Julian Zelizer argued
Trump has the power to
split the Republican vote
if he chooses to do so. The
Washington Post points out
that many of Trumps earlier statements conflict with
what hes saying now and
that, in the early 2000s, his
rhetoric had a sharply liberal slant.
Id like to officially announce my endorsement
for this conspiracy theory. My support, however,
isnt so much based on the
somewhat compelling facts
of the case, but on the fact
that Im a humanist and I
dont believe that anyone
could ever be as horrible
and malicious as Donald
Trump without some kind
of planning.
I could use a million different synonyms for horrifying to describe Trumps

@mcloughsofly

Flawless is likely the


word Beyonc fans would
use to describe the artists
most recent release. Her
self-titled album dropped
Dec. 13, 2013, with no promotion and achieved immense critical and commercial success. Since then, the
surprise album tactic in
releasing music has become
something of a cultural
trend as more artists reveal
little, if anything, about
their projects before releasing them.
Yet the phenomenon
doesnt carry the same
gravity as it did in the Beyonc era, nor does it have
such a profound effect on
the market. If anything,
releasing albums with little
or no promotion has become more of a complicated process than it has been

traditionally, and as artists


experiment with new ways
to release their work, I cant
help but worry that the music industry is changing in
less than favorable ways.
Most recently, Rihanna and Kanye West have
participated in a variant of
the surprise album trend.
Although the two extensively promoted their work
Rihannas Anti was
foreshadowed by rumors
surfacing over the course
of a year, while West ranted
on Twitter before finally deciding on the title The Life
of Pablo neither artist
declared a release date for
their albums.
The result, in both cases, was chaos. When Rihannas Anti was finally
released in late January, it
initially only appeared on
the streaming service Tidal.
Then she began issuing free
downloads via her Twitter
until the album was officially added to iTunes the
following day. So how well
has the album performed
commercially? Its difficult
to tell, given how many copies were downloaded for
free and the inconsistencies
in streaming availability

across platforms.
The release of Wests
album wasnt much better. Also appearing exclusively on Tidal, The Life
of Pablo still hasnt been
added to iTunes despite its
spontaneous release Feb.
14. And since Tidal doesnt
disclose streaming statistics, the much-anticipated
album isnt charting at all
a clear detraction from the
acclaim surrounding Wests
complete canon of work. If
artists continue to release
work in such scattered, experimental ways, recording
the success of albums in the
market is going to become a
challenge for the industry.
Another detractor from
West's release is that he's
not really profiting from his
work. Signed artists make
approximately $2.30 per
album download on Apple
Music, according to a report, but West isn't benefiting from this platform.
Even if he were to add the
album eventually, it'll sell
less than it would have
had it been added upon its
release. Ordinarily profit
wouldn't be a major concern for artists who already
have millions, but it may

hold some importance for


West, who claims he's millions in debt.
It also takes a big name
to successfully pull off the
surprise album. Without
promotion and pre-release
singles, most artists arent going to garner media
and fan attention not to
mention that music executives are losing value in the
industry, as their primary
responsibility is to market
artists.
Even well-known artists
sometimes cant make the
surprise release work. Anyone with an Apple product
will certainly remember
U2s Songs of Innocence,
which was downloaded
automatically to iPhones
and computers in 2014 to
the chagrin of users worldwide. Although it was an
experimental, new method
of release, tracking commercial and critical success
is, again, a murky process. This release affirmed
theres certainly a downside
to making an artists work
available to too many people just as there is to making it available to too few.
Quite simply, as the surprise album release contin-

ues to rise in popularity,


it loses the notoriety that
made it so powerful several years ago. With so many
artists attempting the practice, its almost become a
standard in some markets,
and fans are starting to lose
interest.
Experimentation in creating music is a great thing,
but it becomes problematic
in releasing that music. The
industry trend of releasing
albums with little or no
promotion has given rise
to numerous other issues,
including incongruities in
recording commercial success and achieving critical
acclaim, and the inability of access across certain
streaming services. For the
sake of fans and producers
alike, new music should be
released through the traditional promotional process.
Matthew Clough is a junior from Wichita studying
English and journalism.

Edited by Samantha
Harms

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@UNIVERSITY
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arts & culture


KANSAN.COM | THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2016

HOROSCOPES
WHATS YOUR
SIGN?

Aries (March
21-April 19)
The next two days bring
plenty of professional
activity. New skills
are required. Make a
connection to take new
territory. Avoid stress
with short, frequent
breaks.
Taurus (April 20May 20)
Check your itinerary
before dashing off. The
next two days favor
travel and study. Review
long-range goals, and
align current actions to
suit. Keep your frugal
ways. Explore and
discover uncharted
territory.
Gemini (May 21June 20)
Consider new possibilities. For the next two
days, review financial
arrangements. Discuss
shared accounts, and
align on priorities. Make
plans, and keep your
team informed. Opposites attract.
Cancer (June 21July 22)
Kindle passion with
tender care. Refine plans
for mutual motivation.
Partnership negotiations
occur today and tomorrow. Ask for what you
want. Give generously.
Get promises in writing.
Leo (July 23-Aug.
22)
Energize your work
today and tomorrow. A
production streak checks
things off your list. Get
into powerhouse mode.
Gather support for a
project. Make agreements and deals.
Virgo (Aug. 23Sept. 22)
Get carried away by
someones fascinating
ideas. Share fun with
family and friends today
and tomorrow. Play and
practice your arts. Consider tossing everything
and starting over.
Libra (Sept. 23-Oct.
22)
The next two days are
good for making changes at home. Get family
to help. Talk it over.
Draw up your fantasies,
and limit to one shared
dream.
Scorpio (Oct. 23Nov. 21)
Youre especially persuasive. Take advantage
of your way with words
over the next two days.
Write a novel, comment or post. Upgrade
your communications
infrastructure. Learn like
a child.
Sagittarius (Nov.
22-Dec. 21)
Bring home the bacon
today and tomorrow.
The more you complete,
the higher you climb.
Pay attention to maintain
positive cash flow.
Capricorn (Dec. 22Jan. 19)
Youre becoming more
confident and powerful over the next two
days. Make a personal
change. Keep your
promises, and make
new ones for exciting
projects.
Aquarius (Jan. 20Feb. 18)
Youre entering a twoday pensive phase. Get
into thoughtful planning
mode. Get intimately
involved with a project.
Peaceful productivity
suits your mood. Make
nostalgic diversions.
Listen to your heart.
Pisces (Feb.
19-March 20)
Group projects and
team efforts go far over
the next few days. Pay
back a debt. Hold meetings and gatherings.
Delegate tasks, and take
advantage of diverse
talents. Build a shared
dream together.

Photo Illustration by Jake Kaufmann/KANSAN

Lawrences Fox Mulder: Local ufologist


and alumnus believes the truth is out there
COURTNEY BIERMAN
@courtbierman

aniel Lauing is the


kind of person that
might have inspired
the character of Fox Mulder
from The X-Files. Lauing,
64, is a Lawrence resident,
1974 University graduate
and ufologist (yoof-ologist).
He has spent the better part
of his adult life studying the
UFO phenomena and the
governments alleged efforts
to cover it up, as can be seen
on his website.
His appearance doesn't fit
the conspiracy theorist stereotype; there's no tin foil on
his head. He's well-groomed
at the meeting with the Kansan, with a bushy grey mustache and clear, sincere eyes.
Lauing received a degree
in Liberal Arts from the University in 1974 and returned
to his home state of Illinois
shortly afterward. It was in
Chicago that he became obsessed with Carl Jungs theory of synchronicity meaningful coincidence that put
him on his current path.
On Dec. 2, 1992, three
military aircraft crashed
across North America. Lauing said he sees a link between supposed unidentified
aerial phenomena and nuclear weapons. He said five
C-141Bs were flying in formation in the northern Unit-

ed States before two of them


collided along the Canadian
border in northern Montana.
About half an hour later, a
B-1B bomber crashed along
the Mexican border in Texas.
That is just phenomenal
that the Air Force would lose
three of their largest planes
specifically designed to carry
atomic weaponry, and, one
day later, Im at the University of Chicago at the golden
anniversary of Enrico Fermis controlled Pile-1 reaction; that was the creation,
the energy needed for a
self-sustained reaction needed for the atomic bomb,"
Lauing said.
Both crashes were covered by the media, but Lauing said its all about synchronicity. He claimed the
crashes occurred along an
almost-perfect longitudinal
axis. Not only that, but he
said he thinks his very presence at the University of Chicago the very day after the
crashes is indicative of something paranormal.
Hes even written a book
on the subject: Manitou,
Fountains of the Deep,
which was published in
2012. Much of Manitou
is about the crash of United
Airlines passenger flight 585,
which Lauing said is related
to UFOs and their [fascination] with atomic weaponry
and nuclear-related endeav-

ors. He spoke to the Kansan about cattle mutilations


in McPherson County, UFO
sightings over Haskell University and Hillary Clintons
campaign Chairman John
Podestas efforts towards the
disclosure of UFO files.
Media like X-Files and
Close Encounters of the
Third Kind upset Lauing.
He said he thinks people
like Steven Spielberg exploit
ufologists hard work without furthering the cause, and
he wishes Spielberg would
help fund UFO research.

...nothings ever
going to happen.
There will never
be disclosure.
Daniel Lauring
Ufologist

Theres nothing thats


ever going to be done [about
disclosure]," he said. Steven
Spielberg and the producers
of 'The X-Files' on Fox are
going to make all their fortunes off of it, and nothings
ever going to happen. There
will never be disclosure.
In 2011, Lauing organized
the Reykawvik Summit at
Liberty Hall. The inaugural
event brought together UFO
experts from all over the

country for three days of lectures.


The word Reykawvik is
the portmanteau of Reykjavk, the capital city of Iceland where Ronald Reagan
and Mikhail Gorbachev held
a summit meeting in 1986
to negotiate a nuclear treaty,
and Kaw, the name of the
Native American tribe from
which Kansas gets its name.
Rob Fitzgerald, former
events manager of Liberty
Hall, worked with Lauing
to organize the summit. He
said, apart from the subject
matter, it wasnt a particularly unusual event.
They had some really interesting speakers, Fitzgerald said. Of course, the subject matter is a little bizarre,
people might say. Belief in
extraterrestrials or not, some
of these people had pretty
compelling stories. They obviously believe what theyre
taking about, and they experienced something.
Lauing is very much
aware of the stigma associated with his work. He frequently uses the term kiss of
death to describe his career.
No matter how wild and irrational his beliefs may seem,
Lauing genuinely believe
he's making the world a better place with his work and
its not just alien stuff.
He and his partner John
Leatham, who assists Lau-

ing with his writing and research, are currently working


on a book about Abraham
Lincolns role in the Sand
Creek Massacre. They hope
to bring justice to the dozens
of Cheyenne Indians killed
by United States militiamen
in 1864.
When an individual receives an iconic stature of
immortality and basic superiority over everybody else,
and then theyre worshipped
for it for centuries and beyond, and its not true, it
needs to be put out there that
its not true, Leatham said.
Its not about convincing everyone he knows
that UFOs are real, he said.
From the outside, it looks
like his unending quest is
one for peace of mind. With
so many people around you
telling you youre crazy, can
you blame a guy for trying to
prove that he isnt?
There is a whole genre.
And once you get to know
these people, theyre mortally sane." Lauing said.
"Theyre normal. They have
business lives. And you just
sit there and go okay. My
persona has been decoded to
accept all this. I know that its
real. I can accept it."

Edited by Michael Portman

Art from Spencer Museum still visible through


Collections Open House despite renovations
MINSEON KIM
@adropofsunny

The Spencer Museum


of Arts Collections Open
House features ceremonies
and rituals in African Art
this month. The installment,
which happened yesterday,
is from the museums Global
Indigenous Collections.
We have everything
from masks that would have
been used in initiation rituals to materials related to
the brewing and consumption of beer, which was a
highly-ritualized ceremonial
activity, Associate Collection Manager Angela Watts
said.
This series is only one
part of the AT LARGE program through the museum. This program allows
the museum to continue to
bring out artwork for people
to see, despite the fact that
the museum has been closed
for renovations, which will
continue until mid-2016.
Cassandra Mesick, the

curator of Global Indigenous Art, said the Collections Open House provides
an opportunity for students
to still see some of the museums collection.
Watts said the series also
allows the museum to shed
light on items that have not
been on display at the museum.
Several of these items
have actually not been on
the display yet, she said.
Mesick said the museum uses the program as an
opportunity to showcase
standouts in its collection.
We are also trying to
just use this to highlight
what weve received as real
strengths and highlights of
our collection, Mesick said.
The next Collection Open
House will open March 28
at the Commons in Spooner
Hall, featuring Native American ceramics of the Southwest.
Edited by Samantha
Harms

Kelcie Matousek/KANSAN
As part of their AT LARGE program, the Spencer Museum of Art held an African art exhibit in the Spooner Hall
Commons today. Among the pieces were items such as a Makishi mask (right) that was worn during initation
rituals, and a funerary portrait (center) which were put on graves and were supposed to be a mixture between a
portrait of that person and an idealized version of the deceased.

ARTS & CULTURE

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ARTS & CULTURE

KANSAN.COM

Fairground Saints to open for Carly Rae Jepsen

Contributed Photo
Fairground Saints is a pop band based out of Los Angeles. The groups influences include Bob Dylan, Simon and Garfunkel, and Ben Folds.

JACKSON DODD
@snooopdodd

ountry trio Fairground Saints are


opening for Carly Rae
Jepsen on March 8 at the
Granada as part of Jepsens
Gimmie Love tour. Based
out of Los Angeles, the band
includes Megan McAllister,
Mason Van Valin and Elijah
Edwards. And their music
career is only getting started.
The bands self-titled
debut album released last
August, and its upbeat folk-

pop sound has garnered


praise from Rolling Stone
and The Huffington Post.
The standouts on their selftitled record include Cant
Control The Weather and
Turn This Car Around.
Simply by chance, the
group came together by
nothing other than a mere
Facebook post. Before
McAllister came along, Van
Valin and Edwards were a
separate musical duo. Edwards and Van Valin met
through Facebook and
found McAllister on YouTube. Edwards and Van Va-

lin wanted a third member,


and from there, Fairground
Saints was born. The group
started making songs for its
first album and then went
on to sign a record deal
with Verve and Universal
Records.
It just felt right, McAllister said.
Their charisma and
chemistry in their music
transcends over to their
music taste, or to simply
who is on the aux cord
during a car ride.
When we get in the car
and are all driving together,

KANSAN
CLASSIFIEDS
785-864-4358

JOBS
1st & 3rd Shift
WEEKEND CLEANING
Fri. & Sat., 8:00am4:30pm or
10:00pm6:30am, $10/hr, background check. Apply at 939 Iowa
7858426264. Same building as
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EVENING CLEANER
35 nights weekly, 24hrs. nightly,
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owned since 1984. BPI Building
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Parts bldg.) References required,
stable work history. 7858426264
Other shifts P/T, F/T. EOE

it doesnt matter who has


the iPod, Van Valin said.
No one ever complains.
When youre with your family, someone is always yelling, Turn that off. We all
kinda like the same things.
Im not a big fan of jazz, but
Elijah is always showing
me what he likes, and that
turns into us all liking the
same thing.
The group has a choice
group of influences that
includes Bob Dylan, Simon
and Garfunkel, and Ben
Folds.
Fairground Saints mix-

housing

SALE

Great American Bank is currently


accepting applications for 2 P/T
teller positions at our downtown
Lawrence location. Hours are flexible but must be available to close
until 6pm and Sat. mornings. Send
resume to HResources@greatambank.com or stop by one of our
branches to complete an application.
Help wanted for Phoenix Gallery
downtown Lawrence. Evenings,
weekends & summer hrs. needed.
Must be outgoing, friendly & have
computer exp. KS work study eligible students preferred. Call 785
8430080 for more info or bring resume to 825 Massachusetts.

City of Lawrence
Provide highly responsible & confidential admin support in Human
Resources. P/T position works
9am1pm; must have ability to
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Apply by 3/16/16.
Apply online at
www.lawrenceks.org/jobs
EOE M/F/D

Edited by Matthew
Clough

SUBJECT
of
IMPOrTANCE

jobs

for sale

JOBS

are just songwriters. If


you focus on writing good
songs, then the record will
be whatever you want it to
be. You cant really pin the
artist or pin the sound, and
thats our goal. We dont
want to be pinned to one
genre.
Tickets are still available
at thegranada.com and at
the Granadas box office
located at 1020 Massachusetts St. for $25 in advance
or $28 the day of the show.

textbooks

announcements

hawkchalk.com

JOBS

ture of genres like alternative, pop, and folk didnt


come about by accident,
though. Edwards said the
band is open to all styles of
music when writing songs.
Its important in the
sense that if you sit down
and try to become something you arent, youre doing yourself a disservice,
Edwards said. We didnt
sit down and shoot for one
certain genre. We just sat
down and wrote songs.
Look how diverse the songs
are.
Edwards added: We

classifieds@kansan.com

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City of Lawrence
The City of Lawrence is seeking
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13

ARTS & CULTURE

KANSAN.COM

Melinda Sue Gordon/AP PHOTO


This image released by Broad Green Pictures shows Christian Bale in a scene from Knight of Cups.

Lamb: Malicks improvised Knight of Cups offers


beautiful artistry in characters and cinematography
ALEX LAMB

@Lambcannon

On a surface level,
Knight of Cups plays out
as little more than existential, self-important and
insubstantial yet very
stylish visual poetry. The
inactive protagonist aimlessly wanders from one
beautiful woman to another
in 90 percent voice narration. He follows pleasure
and temptation through
glitzy Hollywood parties,
beautiful, open landscapes
and evocative Los Angeles
streets and architecture.
Visionary director Terrence Malick reached a creative and emotional zenith
with The Tree of Life, then
quickly followed it with his
weakest film, the boring,

To the Wonder. He walks


a thin line between the brilliance and relatability of the
former and the pretentious
shallowness of the latter in
"Knight of Cups."
If you attentively immerse yourself in Malicks
abstract rumination on LA
indulgence and the all-consuming hedonism ruling
over the land there still
wont be a real story, nor a
compelling main character.
But wayward screenwriter Rick (Christian Bale)
becomes a simple conduit
for viewers to step outside
themselves and insightfully
reflect on their own intoxicating desires.
Theres very little characterization or personality
to Rick, and he says few
words out loud during the

film. His occasional narration isnt terribly interesting either, but his go-withthe-flow attitude and lack
of defining qualities are
exactly what allow viewers
to paint themselves onto
his blank canvas and relate
the colorful characters and
situations he encounters to
their own experiences.
Imogen Poots, Natalie
Portman, Cate Blanchett
and more offer different
kinds of allure and perspective as the engaging
women in Ricks life, while
numerous actors show up
briefly to enjoy themselves
at parties or to give advice,
notably Antonio Banderas,
who muses about romantic
variety.
The only semblance of
narrative comes from a fa-

s
n
o
p
u
o
c
n
a
s
kan
Clip and Save!

ble told in the beginning


about a prince sent to find
a pearl deep in the sea in a
faraway land, but he loses
his way and falls in with the
locals, forgetting about his
quest and where he came
from. This serves as a key
piece of information to understanding the film, a representation Ricks journey
to Hollywood and the malaise of his current life.
If you dont pay attention to the fable and how
it sporadically returns
through Ricks father (Brian Dennehy) and brother
(Wes Bentley) the family dynamic being the most
authentic bit of character to
Rick the loose archetypal
elements within Knight of
Cups may feel too concise
and disconnected to be able

to emotionally synthesize
into a meaningful whole.
Emmanuel
Lubezkis
jaw-dropping cinematography (as always) combined with the energetic
stream-of-consciousness
editing give lively images
such as an aerial dancer
bathed in neon light or the
flashing lights on a crowd
at a music festival, a transcendent, ethereal wonder.
Also key to that aesthetic
achievement, is the wall-towall sound design, which
seamlessly mixes waves
crashing and jet engines
roaring with the lush score
for a powerfully captivating
aural experience.
Malick didnt have a
script for the film and all
the scenes were improvised, which definitely

shines through and feels


akin to a collage made to
express an idea, assembled
from whatever magazine
was available to cut up.
The auteur explores impure
loves titillating but ultimately unfulfilling grasp,
a depiction of the quest for
flesh, financial freedom and
constant fun, with a dizzying kind of artistry to complement the thematic sense
of losing ones greater purpose in life. Some viewers
will leave Knight of Cups
and think Malick has lost
his sense of what makes for
an actual film, but theres
no denying his sense as an
artist continues to expand.
3.5 out of 4 Stars
Edited by Cele Fryer

SPORTS

14

KANSAN.COM

basketball gameday
26-4 (14-3) KANSAS JAYHAWKS
EVAN RIGGS

KANSAS

@EvanRiggsUDK

vs.

IOWA STATE CYCLONES 21-9 (10-7)


SHANE JACKSON

IOWA STATE

AT A GLANCE

AT A GLANCE
Heading into Saturdays
game, the Jayhawks have
already
accomplished
about all they could have
hoped to in the regular
season. They won the Big
12 outright, and they have
essentially locked up a No.
1 seed in the NCAA tournament. But Senior Day, in
addition to playing a team
that handled the Jayhawks
by double-digits in January, should be plenty of
motivation.

PLAYER TO WATCH

Wayne Selden Jr.


junior, guard
Since his career-high 33
points against Kentucky,
Selden has been wildly inconsistent. Hes scored
double figures in just three
of the Jayhawks last nine
games, and hes had two
games with just three
points. If Selden is able
to break out of his slump,
the Jayhawks will be very
tough to beat on Saturday.
They havent lost a game yet
this year where Selden has
scored at least 13 points.

PROJECTED STARTERS

Frank Mason III, junior, guard


Against Texas, Mason had a solid stat line of 14 points
and six assists and had complete control of the game
from opening tip. In January, he shot 50 percent from
the field just three times, but hes reached that mark
in five of his last six games. Mason is the leader of the
team, and may start, but he may also come off the
bench in favor of junior guard Wayne Selden Jr., who
has started every game over three years in a Kansas
uniform.

Evan Manning, senior, guard


Manning will make his first career start for the Jayhawks on Saturday. The walk-on has scored nine
points in his 27 minutes this season on 50 percent
shooting from the three-point line. If the Jayhawks
are able to open up a lead, Manning will get plenty of
time to get shots up.

PROJECTED STARTERS

Monte Morris, junior, guard


Monte Morris may be the most important
player on the Cyclones roster as he does a bit of
everything. He has started in all 30 games this
season, averaging 14.3 points per contest. He is
one of two players on the team shooting over 50
percent. In addition, he leads the team in assists
with 215 on the year.

Niang is averaging 19.3


points per game this season
and 18.3 points per game in
his career against Kansas,
so its very clear hes going
to get his points. But the
Jayhawks have to make sure
it takes him a lot of shots
to score those points. The
Jayhawks have six different
big men they can throw at
Niang, and if they are able
to make him an inefficient
scorer, the Cyclones will
have a very tough time in
Allen Fieldhouse.
BY THE NUMBERS

31 - Kansas has won 31 consecutive Senior Days.


12 - With a win on Saturday,
the Jayhawks would guarantee that they win the Big
12 by at least two games.
That would be the third
time they have done that in
the Self era.
10 - The Jayhawks havent
won 10 consecutive Big 12
games since 2010, when
they started conference play
13-0. A win Saturday would
give them 10 straight Big 12
wins.
BIG JAY WILL CHEER IF...

The Jayhawks are able to


get all of their seniors involved. The Jayhawks havent lost on Senior Days
in 31 years, and with the
way the team has played,
that doesnt seem likely to
change, even against the
Cyclones. If the Jayhawks
can build a lead, it will give
the seniors one last chance
at some extended minutes
in Allen Fieldhouse.

Iowa State currently sits


in fifth in the Big 12 with
a 10-7 conference record.
However, the Cyclones
could be ranked much
higher if they were able to
win away from Hilton Coliseum. Iowa State has a
3-5 road record in the Big
12, including three consecutive losses. Things dont
get much easier for the
Cyclones going into Allen
Fieldhouse.

PLAYER TO WATCH

Matt Thomas, junior, guard


Matt Thomas has been a serviceable replacement
for Naz Long, who was sidelined for the year with
a hip injury. Thomas has started in 22 games for
Iowa State, averaging 10.7 points per contest. He
is the teams best three-point option, making 76of-176 from downtown.

Deonte Burton
junior, guard
All five starters for Iowa State
average at least 30 minutes
per game. Still, Deonte Burton has a chance to make
a key contribution off the
bench. Though he averages
just 19.5 minutes per contest, Burton is averaging double-digits in points. He is the
only non-starter to lead the
team in scoring in a game,
which he accomplished when
he scored 20 at Texas Tech on
Feb. 10.
QUESTION MARK

QUESTION MARK

Can Kansas slow


down Georges
Niang?

@jacksonshane3

Perry Ellis, senior, forward


After his only single-digit outing in conference
play, Ellis followed that up with one of his best
games of the season Monday. He had 20 points,
but he did it on 9-of-11 shooting and he was
able to get any shot he wanted. Senior day may
be emotional for the rarely-emotional Ellis, but
his calm demeanor will probably pay dividends
on Saturday. In Kansas last meeting with Iowa
State, they had no answer for Ellis, who scored
23 points, and it will likely be more of the same
on Saturday.

Abdel Nader, senior, forward


Abdel Nader flies under the radar a bit, but is the
teams third option on the offensive end and a respectable one at that. Nader averages 13.5 points
per contest, shooting just a tick over 48 percent
from the floor. He is also third on the team in rebounding with 5.1 boards per game.

Jamari Traylor, senior, forward

Georges Niang, senior, forward

The fifth-year senior has been with the Jayhawks


longer than anybody, and hes even started some
games in the past two seasons. He didnt play
more than 17 minutes in any game in the month
of February, but hes brought constant energy
when hes been on the floor with plays like his
dunk against Texas, which may have been the
dunk of the year for Kansas.

Leading the way for Iowa State is Georges Niang,


who is one of the premier forwards in the conference. Niang averages 19.3 points per game, which
leads the team by at least five points. Niang is
shooting at a 54 percent clip and should clearly
be the main focus for Kansas defensively.

Will the bench be able to


contribute in Allen?

Iowa State has a tendency


to rely heavily on its starting lineup. At this point in
the season, its evident the
Cyclones players can handle
this kind of workload in a
single game. But the whistle
tends to favor Kansas in Allen
Fieldhouse, meaning Iowa
States starters may have to
deal with foul trouble this
Saturday, forcing more minutes on the reserves.

BY THE NUMBERS

3 - Iowa State has three


straight road losses, losing
to West Virginia, Baylor and
Texas Tech.
4.13 - Monte Morris has the
best assist-to-turnover ratio
in the Big 12 at 4.13 with 215
assists and 52 turnovers this
season.
82.2 - The Cyclones are the
highest scoring team in conference with an average of
82.2 points per game.

Hunter Mickelson, senior, forward


Mickelson went from being a starter to being
relegated to the bench in the first half of Big 12
play. Just a few weeks ago, Kansas coach Bill
Self made it clear that Mickelson still wasnt
100 percent after he suffered an ankle sprain at
the beginning of February. When he got in the
game against Texas, he appeared to be moving
pretty well, but his health will be tested early
on Saturday chasing Iowa State senior Jameel
McKay down the court.

Jameel McKay, senior, forward


Iowa States one-two punch in the post between
Niang and Jameel McKay is effective on opposing teams. While Niang is the scorer, McKay does
everything else well. Hes athletic and can finish
at the rim. McKay leads the team in rebounding
and blocks with 8.9 boards and 1.8 blocks per
game.

Beat writer predictions:


Scott Chasen | @SChasenKU: Kansas, 81-71
Shane Jackson | @jacksonshane3: Kansas, 88-75
Evan Riggs | @EvanRiggsUDK: Kansas, 85-70

BIG JAY WILL CRY IF...

Kansas players go into this


game with a lazy mindset, and
Iowa State jumps out to an
early lead. With the Jayhawks
clinching an outright championship earlier this week, it
is plausible that players come
out with a lack of intensity
especially given that Kansas
has won the last 39 games in
Allen Fieldhouse.

sports
KANSAN.COM/SPORTS | THURSDAY, MARCH 3, 2016

File Photo/KANSAN
Georges Niang drives against Kansas forward Perry Ellis. The two will sqaure off in Allen Fieldhouse this Saturday.

File Photo/KANSAN
Perry Ellis pushes past Niang on the road in Ames, Iowa last year.

Senior Day against Iowa State marks final regular


season battle between two of the Big 12s best
SCOTT CHASEN
@SChasenKU

ast Saturday, Kansas


clinched a share of its
12th-consecutive Big
12 title. Two days later, the
team clinched it outright,
dominating a top 25 Texas
team on the road.
Now, theres only one opponent remaining between
Kansas and the start of conference tournament play, but
thats not the story of this
Saturdays game. With it being the last game this year in
Allen Fieldhouse, Saturday
will be Senior Day.
After losing just one senior last year, the feel is
slightly different this time
around. Kansas will lose four
seniors, one of which was
a member of the All-Big 12

First Team last year and expects to be on the All-Big 12


team this year: Perry Ellis.
In fact, it only seems fitting Ellis will face off against
Iowa State in his final game,
given the team is led by a
player who is essentially Ellis doppleganger when it
comes to career path.
Like Ellis, Iowa State senior Georges Niang is part of
a group of Big 12 players who
have contributed year after
year so much that a Twitter
search often reveals several
jokes about how long theyve
been at their respective universities.
While in good fun, this
speaks to both the talent and
consistency of the players.
For Niang, hes averaged
double-digits in scoring all
four years of college. Hes

been one of the best shooting


big men in the league year after year and improved a part
of his game each season.
On Monday, it was Senior
Night for Iowa State. The
team eked out a win over the
Oklahoma State Cowboys,
and when Niang took the
floor for his speech he was
emotional, pausing several
times to wipe his face.
Man, I dont even know
where to begin, Niang said,
starting his speech. I was
afraid coming to the game
today because I dont want to
leave this place.
On the other side sits a
Kansas legend, according to
some of the coaches in the
league. In fact, after an earlier game, West Virginia coach
Bob Huggins said he thinks
Ellis deserves to be honored

by the University once hes


gone.
Hes a great player. I
dont know if his number will
get retired. I dont know if
theres any room up there,
Huggins said back on Feb. 9.
He deserves to be up there.
Ellis and Niang have certainly been a part of several
fascinating battles in their
nearly 300 combined years
according to Twitter at
least of experience in the
Big 12.
Since the beginning, the
games have been electric.
In their first meeting as
freshmen, Kansas banked-in
a three at the buzzer just to
force overtime. In the second
meeting, it was Elijah Johnson exploding for 39 points,
carrying Kansas in another
overtime win.

One year later, it truly


became a battle of Niang vs.
Ellis. In the first meeting of
their sophomore seasons,
the duo combined for 44
points and 10 rebounds. Later in the Big 12 tournament,
they combined for 55 points,
as Niang's squad came out
on top.
As time has gone on, the
two have tested each other.
No team has had more success against the Jayhawks
than the Cyclones, who have
won four of the 10 meetings
since Ellis and Niang arrived.
Likewise, Kansas coach
Bill Self has been extremely complementary of Niang
and has called him one of the
toughest players to match up
against in the Big 12 in the
past.
This all leads to Saturday.

In one final regular season


game between the two teams,
and potentially the last ever
with Ellis and Niang, Kansas
has little to play for outside
of preserving the No. 1 spot
in both polls.
However, for the seniors
Ellis, forward Jamari
Traylor, forward Hunter
Mickelson and guard Evan
Manning this game will
be their last chance to play at
home in front of the 16,300
fans. Allen Fieldhouse is considered one of the top college
basketball venues by just
about every analyst, and the
crowd should be electric
and perhaps emotional for
the meeting.
Tip is scheduled for 3
p.m. Saturday.
Edited by Cele Fryer

Womens basketball set to battle TCU for


second time in a week in Big 12 Tournament
DYLAN SHERWOOD
@dmantheman2011

After finishing the regular season with their closest


loss in Big 12 play, the Jayhawks are gearing up for
the postseason. On Friday,
Kansas will open up play in
the Big 12 Championship
in Oklahoma City as the 10
seed in the tournament.
Kansas' opponent is
TCU, the seven seed in the
tournament. The Jayhawks
played the Horned Frogs
earlier this week, in the season finale losing on the road
55-52.
Kansas coach Brandon
Schneider liked the way his
team played, but the team
just fell short. He also mentioned how his team has not
been in those closing situations, in a late-game scenario.
"For us to have the two
possessions where we called
timeout and advanced the
ball, I thought we were
great," Schneider said in a
KU Athletics news release
after the TCU loss on Monday.
Schneider said he liked
how his team scored buckets out of timeouts, but free
throws down the stretch
haunted the Jayhawks.
Schneider said he believed
in that situation, someone
huge would step up and
make clutch free throws

down the stretch, in order


for Kansas to break a long
losing streak and earning its
first Big 12 win of the season.
"We just couldn't make
enough shots or enough
free throws to get over the
hump," Schneider said.
The first-year coach said
he knew what happened in
the first meeting of the season just two weeks ago when
TCU outplayed Kansas in
the second half and Schneider was not pleased the way
his team played that night.

We just couldnt
make enough
shots or enough
free throws to get
over the hump.
Brandon Schneider
Kansas Coach

"I was disappointed in


how we represented ourselves, but tonight [Monday] was the exact opposite," Schneider said.
Schneider said he knew
his team was not making up
excuses for Monday night's
game, after being in games
against Oklahoma and Texas Tech, both where Kansas blew double-digit leads
away.
"They wanted to win this

one bad," Schneider said. "I


feel bad for them."
Even though there is
nothing to play for, with
a 5-24 record, the team is
just looking ahead towards
the future of the program,
which Schneider has been
preaching all season.
Schneider said he believed his team could win a
game or two late this season,
but the result has been the
same. Kansas has lost its last
20 games. In fact, Kansas
has not won a game since
Dec. 13 in a 61-54 overtime
win over Navy.
But the Jayhawks can
put that streak behind them
if they can win just one game
in the Big 12 tournament.
This is Kansas' last chance
to give Schneider his first
win over a Big 12 foe in his
career at Kansas, and more
importantly his team's last
chance to display any improvement they may have
made this season under his
direction.
The winner of the Kansas-TCU game will play the
two seed Texas on Saturday
at 6 p.m.
Tip off of the first round
of the Big 12 Championship
from Chesapeake Arena in
Oklahoma City, Okla. is at
8:30 p.m. on Friday.
Edited by Ryan
Wright

Paige Stingley/KANSAN
Junior guard Timeka ONeal dribbles the ball down the court on Feb. 29 against TCU. The Jayhawks lost to the
Horned Frogs 55-52.

For more information & recruitment registration, visit


sigmadeltatau.org/sdt-at-kansas, or email SDTatKansas@gmail.com
/KansasSDT

@KansasSDT