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Hospitality Management

HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
Chapter 7
Human Resource Planning and
Recruitment

2007 Pearson
Lynn VanEducation
Der Wagen
Australia
& Anne Goonetilleke
(a division of Pearson Australia Group Pty Ltd)

Hospitality Management

Outcomes
This chapter provides knowledge required for assessment of the
following elements:

Identify recruitment needs

Administer recruitment

Select staff

Plan and organise induction programs

Develop staff rosters

Present and communicate rosters

Maintain staff records

Evaluate rosters
2007 Lynn Van Der Wagen & Anne Goonetilleke

Hospitality Management

Staffing needs
The challenge for the hospitality manager is to balance the need
for a permanent, trained and motivated staff with that of a
flexible labour force in order to minimise labour costs.
An employer has the choice of three types of employee:
permanent full-time staff, permanent part-time staff (working
on a pro rata basis) and casual staff.

2007 Lynn Van Der Wagen & Anne Goonetilleke

Hospitality Management

Staffing needs
Since casual staff have no continuity of employment and no
security, and receive no sick leave or annual leave entitlements,
their pay is loaded up to 25 percent above the standard hourly
rate for permanent employees. From the above it is clear that
the benefit of employing casual staff is their flexibility.
On the other hand, the benefit of permanent staff is that they
are well trained and familiar with the systems and procedures,
which leads to operational efficiency. Permanent staff also
provide good service, recognising regular customers and
anticipating their needs.

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Hospitality Management

Industrial context
Australian Fair Pay and Conditions Standard has
five minimum standards:
Guaranteed basic rates of pay
Maximum 38 hours per week (ordinary hours)
Four weeks annual leave
Personal/carers leave
52 weeks unpaid parental leave
See current minimum pay rate online
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Hospitality Management

Awards and agreements


Awards are generally negotiated for a
whole industry or profession
Eg Hospitality Industry award negotiated
between the Australian Hotels
Association and the Liquor Hospitality
and Misc Workers Union.

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Award
LHMU (union)

AHA
(employers)

Hotels Award

This is an example of collective negotiation

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Hospitality Management

Agreement
Chook Hudson
(employee)

Chilli Chicken
(employer)

Agreement

This is an example of an individual negotiation

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Hospitality Management

Awards and agreements


Industrial relations is further complicated
by the fact that there are laws and
regulations, as well as negotiations, at
State and Federal level.
This is why employer associations and
unions are often involved to support
their respective parties in negotiation.
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Hospitality Management

Two sides to every story


Debate or discuss:
When you accept your first job, you often
know nothing about pay and conditions
Employers are out to get everything they
can from their employees
Employees do as little as they have to
Carrots dont work, only sticks!
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Hospitality Management

Employment laws

OHS (prevention of injury)


Workers compensation (compensation
for injury)
EEO (equal employment opportunity)

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Hospitality Management

Recruitment and selection

Job analysis (plan for staffing needs)


Recruitment (attract applicants)
Selection (choose applicants)

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Hospitality Management

Selection
Debate or discuss:
Things are so bad these days, the only
qualification you need for employment
is breathing

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Hospitality Management

Job descriptions
The job description enables the manager to be explicit about
what a person will be doing and forms the basis for:

employment advertising
development of interview questions
analysis of interview performance
induction and training
performance management.

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Hospitality Management

Person specifications
Once the position has been outlined, the next planning task is
to identify the ideal candidate for the role. The person
specification describes the skills, knowledge and other attributes
required to perform the duties listed in the job description.
When the best candidate has been hired, a comparison can be
made between the position description and the person
specification to see whether there is a skills gap or a training
need.

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Hospitality Management

Training needs
Job Description
Duties
plan menus
requisition food,
equipment, etc.
prepare and cook food
manage portion control
and presentation
store, freeze and
preserve food
follow hygiene
regulations and HACCP
plan

Person Specification
Skills
menu planning
cost control
food preparation
food presentation
Knowledge
food products and suppliers
kitchen equipment and
suppliers
food hygiene regulations
Attributes
multi-tasking
time management

Training need skills gap between job


and person hired (person does not fit
specification 100 per cent)
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Hospitality Management

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Hospitality Management

Organisation charts

It is not difficult to construct an organisation chart once roles


and responsibilities have been decided. The general rules are:
Departments and functions should be arranged horizontally,
with the position titles in boxes of the same size.
Personnel should be arranged vertically, in accordance with
their position or grade.
All personnel with the same authority level should be on the
same horizontal line.
Unbroken vertical lines are used to show the flow of authority.
Broken horizontal or vertical lines are used to show the sources
of advice and service.

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Organisation charts
Owner

Accountant

Restaurant manager

Chef

Food and beverage staff

Kitchen staff

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Hospitality Management

Recruitment
Recruitment is the process of attracting suitably qualified staff
to the establishment. Advertising for personnel may be internal,
external, direct to the public, on the Internet or via a
recruitment agency, and must comply with enterprise policy and
legal requirements.

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Hospitality Management

Recruitment
Advertising the position
By creating an advertisement that is positively worded, the
hospitality business is likely to achieve a good response.
However, if the positive features of the job are not balanced
with realistic requirements, such as the necessity to work on
weekends, an overwhelming response from poorly advised
applicants can waste a lot of time.
An employment advertisement must create strong appeal for a
number of readers, but deter applicants who do not meet the
minimum requirements.
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Hospitality Management

Recruitment
Advertising the position
In

(continued)

general, an advertisement should include:


job title
required experience
skills and qualifications
essential attributes, such as the ability to work shift work
location
wage/salary and any other benefits.

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Hospitality Management

Recruitment Advertising
Director of Food and Beverage
High earning potential and career development
Our organisation is looking for a Food and Beverage Director for our well-established and
expanding chain of successful country resorts. The applicant must have a strong
background in Food and Beverage in a similar managerial capacity. The ideal candidate will
hold a similar position with responsibility for a range of food and beverage outlets, including
room service and fine dining restaurant.

If you have an interest in career development in an organisation that promotes from within,
you are the perfect candidate. Our salaries include incentive bonuses. We are highly
motivated to identify and quickly hire for this opportunity. We will consider an Assistant F&B
Director ready to move up. If you have proven people management and financial expertise,
backed up with solid experience in operational planning and control, you will be able to join
us as we take the business into its next growth phase.

Phone: James Smarterson on 04 5678 8890 or email: jsmarterson@highlands.net

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Selection
The selection process involves reviewing applications,
shortlisting applicants, checking their references (the job
description and person specification can act as a guide for
asking relevant questions) and interviewing shortlisted
candidates. Interviewing is carried out with reference to the
selection criteria and to Equal Employment Opportunity
guidelines, which indicate that selection and promotion should
be made on merit.

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Selection
The offer
Generally, the offer states the position and the conditions of
employment (including the appropriate award, if applicable), as
well as sounding a welcome to the new staff member. A copy of
the job description discussed in the interview can be attached.
Asigned copy of the acceptance letter, as well as clear and
complete details of the selection process, should be kept on
record.

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Induction
In a formal induction program, briefings would be included on
the following:

company vision
customers and customer service
organisation structure
sales and marketing
employee rights and responsibilities
health and safety
security
evacuation.

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Rosters
When planning rosters, a major consideration for frontline staff
is the award or agreement under which the enterprise operates.
For example, agreements may state the minimum and
maximum number of hours that employees are permitted to
work, the number of consecutive days that employees are
allowed to work and the minimum number of hours between
shifts to enable employees to have sufficient rest.

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Rosters
Award and workplace agreement provisions may affect rostering
in relation to the following:

number of hours worked in a given shift


overall number of hours allocated to different staff members
breaks between shifts
nature of duties allocated
use of permanent or casual staff.

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Rosters
Records of staffing levels and staffing issues that arise, such as
under- or overstaffing, are extremely useful in planning. These
records should be kept for a twelve-month period to monitor
seasonal changes as well. Fast food chains do this very
scientifically, producing forecasts for every day and every hour.
This limits food waste and increases efficiency. Fast food
operations within the group are then compared in terms of their
labour cost per hour or customers served per labour hour.

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Hospitality Management

Rosters
Recommendations for rostering include:

developing rosters in accordance with relevant award provisions


or enterprise/workplace agreements and wage budgets
maximising operational efficiency and customer service levels
while minimising wage costs in roster development
combining duties where appropriate to ensure effective use of
staff
utilising the available skills base appropriately to roster the most
effective mix of staff and to meet different operational
requirements
presenting rosters in a clear format and in a timely way so that
employees are able to plan their commitments.

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Hospitality Management

Staff records
An employer must provide employees with pay slips containing the following
information and keep copies of these records for at least six years:

name of the employee


classification of the employee under the applicable industrial instrument
date on which the payment was made
period of employment to which the payment relates
gross amounts of remuneration (including overtime and other payments)
amount paid as overtime or sufficient information to allow the employee to
calculate the amount of overtime
amount deducted for taxation purposes
any amount deducted as employee contributions for superannuation purposes
particulars of all other deductions
net amount paid.

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Staff records
An employer must also keep the following leave records:

leave taken by the employee


the employees entitlement from time to time to that leave
the accrual of that leave.

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Hospitality Management

Staff records
If an employer is required to make superannuation contributions
for the benefit of an employee under an industrial instrument,
the employer must keep the following records:

amount of contributions made


period over which the contributions are made
when the contributions are made
name of the fund or funds to which the contributions are made
basis on which the employer became liable to make the
contributions (including particulars of any relevant election to
make contributions by the employee).

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