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Chapter-I

1.0 Introduction

This chapter explains the variables of customer satisfaction and its constructs in the present
study. The chapter in the beginning highlights on the overview of customer satisfaction
factors, its meaning and types. After that it explains about research motivation, research
objectives and research issues. Later it also highlights on issues like research scope and
significance of the study. Lastly, research overview is presented. The chapter provides the
justifications for the choices made with regard to the aspects of customer satisfaction.
1.1

Customer satisfaction: An overview of research:

Prior research highlights that direct toll road access, location near family (Colwel et al., 1985;
Waddel et al., 1993), location near religious centre(Brandt et al., 2013), and good social
communication (Jim and Chan., 2009) factors under location aspects. In the layout factors
floor of the apartment (Tejendra Pal Singh., 2013) is taken in to consideration in the prior
research. With regard to basic amenities factors prior research has been done on car parking
issues (Manivannan and Somasundaram, 2014). Lastly, the prior research has been done on
service factors with parameters like dwelling unit service, dwelling support service, and
neighbourhoods facilities (Mohit et al., 2010). But in this research researcher has viewed
customer satisfaction as causal framework research.
1.2

Customer satisfaction: Meaning and types:

To understand the importance of customer satisfaction, considering these facts like only 4%
of the people among those who complain. Normally a person with problem tells 9 other
people about it while the satisfied customers tells 5 others about their experiment. Cost of
keeping a customer would 1/7of the cost acquiring a new customer retaining a current
employee cost 1/10of hiring and training new one. These facts highlights the need of
customer satisfaction for an organisation and in turn brings employee satisfaction which
brings profit maximisation of company.
Thats Customer satisfaction how companies should understand how its customers are
satisfied ant to what extend they are satisfied in marketing context has specific
meanings.Anders Gustafsson, Michael D. Johnson, & Inger Roos (2005) brought
customer satisfaction definition as customer's overall evaluation of the date.

This

satisfaction has a lot o positive effects on retaining customers among different varities of
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services and products. In service industries service quality directly affects customer
satisfaction. Satisfaction refers to achieving the things we want. If satisfaction interprets as
"not going wrong" the firm should decrease complaint which by its own is not
sufficient. There are various types of expectations that a customer has before measuring
customer satisfaction is to be understood. Some of them are listed below.
1.2.1 Explicit Expectations:
Explicit expectations are mental targets for product performance, such as well-identified
performance standards. For example, if expectations for a colour printer were for 17 pages
per minute and high quality colour printing, but the product actually delivered 3 pages per
minute and good quality colour printing, then the cognitive evaluation comparing product
performance and expectations would be 17 PPM 3 PPM + High Good, with each item
weighted by the associated importance.
1.2.2 Implicit Expectations:
Implicit expectations reflect established norms of performance. Implicit expectations are
established by business in general, other companies, industries, and even cultures. An implicit
reference might include wording such as Compared with other companies or Compared
to the leading brand
1.2.3. Static Performance Expectations:
Static performance expectations address how performance and quality are defined for a
specific application. Performance measures related to quality of outcome may include the
evaluation of accessibility, customization, dependability, timeliness, accuracy, and user
friendly interfaces. Static performance expectations are the visible part of the iceberg; they
are the performance we see and often erroneously are assumed to be the only dimensions of
performance that exist.
1.3

Research motivation:

There is high demand for the flat in the modern times. People behaviour of shifting from
individual house to flat has been increased due to old age and safety matters. Cost involved in
purchasing land and constructing houses diverted peoples mind towards flats which cost
lesser when compared to individual houses. There is shortage of land which led the people to
initiative in buying flat than houses/Villa/ Apartment. Since researcher and his family are
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involved in the construction activities has motivated to do research work on same field which
benefits to the business as well as institute.
1.4

Research objectives:

Research Objective 1: To explore the role of basic amenities in consumer buying


behaviour of flats.
Research Objective 2: To investigate on the layout aspect on flat which induces consumer
purchasing behaviour
Research Objective 3: To analyse the perception of buyer on location factors of flats.
Research Objective 4: To identify the service factor perception of buyer on purchase of
flats.
1.5 Research issues:
1.5.1 Direct effect of basic amenities on customer satisfaction in the buying behaviour
of customer on flats:
Research question 1: What extent the basic amenities plays a vital role in people life
regarding purchase of flat?
1.5.2

Direct effects of layout factors on consumer satisfaction in their purchasing


behaviour:
Research question 2: Does layout is also an important factor for common man while
buying a flat?

1.5.3

Direct effect of location factors on customer satisfaction while buying flats:


Research question 3: How far location factors influence the buying behaviour of
customers?

1.5.4

Direct effect of service factors on customer satisfaction with regard to their


purchasing of flats:
Research question 4: In what ways service is significant for a person while purchasing
a flat?

1.6 Research scope:


The scope of study is limited to a construction firm called Heera constructions Pvt
Ltd. The projects is limited to four Pillars which is nearing completion stage at Killipalam,
Trivandrum, and Kerala. The four pillars includes 500 apartments including 1BHK, 2BHK,
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3BHK apartments. Researcher was a part of their supervising as well as marketing team in
the months of May and June, 2015.The departments included projects, marketing, planning
and quality.
1.7 Significance of study:
This enables the people take into consideration the researchers research variables while
purchasing flat/s. It uphold the image of company in front of general public and its
customers. This work pave ways for the builders to improve or implement immediate or
urgent parameters mentioned by the researcher so that it may attract the prospects. It
improves the efficiency and reliability of the organization. These parameters in the research
work makes organization more sophisticated and lucrative when compared with the
competitors. The organization can make product differentiation in their products and compete
with a number of players in the market and prove to be different.
1.8 Project overview:
The first chapter deals with customer satisfaction and its different types that are existing.
Customers being the most important part of an organisation its really important to keep track
of their needs. Introduction to customer satisfaction makes easier to understand about how the
change is inevitable in an organisation. Second chapter explains about the literature review
based on which the whole research has been done. It has been found that market in Kerala
needs a study on purchase of flats with independent variable being location, service, layout,
amenities factors and dependent variable being customer satisfaction. The third chapter is all
about research methodology adopted to correlate between various factors that was taken into
the study.
The fourth chapter figure out the data analysis part, where the collected data has been
evaluated based on various SPSS methods including regression, correlation, factor analysis
etc. The fifth chapter identifies managerial implication. This can be used to find out how the
organisation should infer from the data collected. This can be useful for the future
development of organisation in customer retention and customer needs. The sixth chapter
concludes the whole project mentioning its implications.

Chapter 2
2.0 Introduction:

This chapter highlights about various exhaustive literature pertaining with dependent variable
customer satisfaction and other independent variables like locations, basic amenities, layouts
and service factors. Research is carried by taking in to consideration several aspects but in
this literate review parameters which connected to my research work was given more
importance.
2.1 Chronological literature review:
Beamish et.al (2001) explored influences on housing choice and proposed a conceptual
framework that examined the influence of lifestyle as an intervening factor in housing choice.
Influences on housing choice included age, family type, and family size, stage in the life
cycle, social class, income, occupation, education and value.
Zhaohui (2003) from the perspective of the consumer residential real estate market,
investigated the basic characteristics of the homebuyers, homebuyers purchasing preferences
and influencing factors.
Leishman et al. (2004) gave a detailed examination of new-built housing buyers housing
needs and preference and analysed on the basis of the physical, location and quality
characteristics of housing actually constructed by house builders. Study, further, examined the
relative importance of physical property, locational, neighbourhood and price factors to
consumers in the housing choice process.
Shi Lin (2005) determined the housing preferences and priorities among residents in different
socio demographic and socioeconomic groups in Stellenbosch and explored a functional
formula by which the price of housing in Stellenbosch could be predicted. As per the findings
of the study, dwelling related attributes were found to be more important than neighbouring
and location-related attributes.
Gupta et al. (2006) captured the impact of environmental, structural and location variables on
housing prices prevailing in the city and found proximity to water body fetches the highest
18.9 per cent of the total value in Navi Mumbai, and garden proximity fetches the highest

13.2 per cent in Central suburb. The capitalization of land was also observed proximate to
water and greenery.
Ariyawansa (2007) in his study aimed to provide a scientific insight into the consumer
behaviour of housing market in Sri Lanka. It was found that consumer preference mainly
depends upon the housing transaction, appreciation in the future, complementary products
and services like water and electricity supply.
Litman (2011) investigated consumer housing location preferences and their relationship to
smart growth. It examined claims that most households prefer sprawl-location housing and so
was harmed by smart growth policies. This analysis indicated that smart growth tends to
benefit consumers in numerous ways.
Conclusion:
The review of literature reveals that in India, there is dearth of studies on understanding the
consumer behaviour towards buying of residential apartment. Moreover, no such study has
been conducted to study the market in Kerala and surrounding areas. Therefore, the present
study will contribute to the domain of existing knowledge too.

Chapter 3
3.1 INTRODUCTION:

This chapter describes the research design adopted in the study. The chapter provides
discussion on sample element, sample size, inclusion criteria, exclusion criteria, data
collection procedure, instruments used, data analysis, research hypothesis, conceptual
framework and limitations.
3.2 Sample element:
Sample element are from the population who resides in Heera four
pillars, Killipalam, Kerala. People who are residing in this apartment is
taken in to consideration as sampling element for the research work.
3.3 Sample size:
The total sample size is 69. Out of which 80 percentage of people are
men and remaining are women.
Formula used to derive sample size is as follows:
n=

Z2 x PQ
----------E2

Z = 95 percentage of confidence level= 1.96


E= 10 percent of error (90% power) with 10% non-response
p= proportion to buyer
q= 1-p
So based on this formula sample size is 69.
3.4 Inclusion criteria:
Only the people who are purchased and staying in Heera four pillars are taken in to
account for the research purpose.
3.5 Exclusion criteria:
Those who are window browsers and just seek information about Heera four pillars
are not taken in to consideration. People who are purchased but not staying are not
included in the survey. Consumer who are not aware of the brand name is not
included in this research.
3.6 Data collection procedure:
First step is the pilot study for validity and reliability test purpose. Validity refers to
how well a test measures what it is supposed to measure (Cooper and Schindler, 2001:
210). In case of validity test two academicians and two experienced industrial people
who are well versed in marketing subjects/field will be contacted with questionnaire.
They recommended inclusion and exclusion of few things which will be implemented
in final the questionnaire. Second step followed in this research is reliability test
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where ten consumer surveys will be done. Reliability refers to the accuracy of the
measurement procedure (Cooper and Schindler, 2001: 210). After getting informed
consent form signed by the subject, the third step is pre structured proforma will be
distributed to subjects after informing about the objective of study.
Primary data will be collected from the questionnaire methods. Some data will be
collected from the secondary sources like books, magazines, journals, internet,
dissertation, articles and thesis.
3.7 Instruments used:
The main instruments will be used in this research are Rensis Likerts 5 rating scale in
order to measure customer satisfaction and its components.
3.8 Data analysis:
Reliability test results will be analysed through SPSS (Statistical packages for social
sciences). Reliability is done by using Cronbach alpha. Factor analysis will be
applied. Multiple regressions will be used in order to test hypothesis and measure
customer satisfaction.
3.9 Research hypothesis:
Null hypothesis 1: There is no significant relationship between executed interior
design and income.
Alternative hypothesis 1: There is significant relationship between executed interior
design and income.
Null hypothesis 2: There is no significant relationship between maintenance of
building and age.
Alternative hypothesis 2: There is significant relationship between maintenance of
building and age.
Null hypothesis 3: There is no significant relationship between availability of servant
room and marital status.
Alternative hypothesis 3: There is significant relationship between availability of
servant room and marital status.
Null hypothesis 4: There is no significant relationship between attractive area and
age
Alternative hypothesis 4: There is significant relationship between attractive area
and age.
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Based on the various aspects, why a person selects a flat from Heera is studied in the
following part with reference to various factors which are grouped under Independent and
dependant Variable in data collection. The main objective of the project is to study on the
preference of customers in selecting a flat in 4 Pillars is done and also on how the satisfaction
level is related to the factors that are mentioned in the study.

3.10 Conceptual framework:


BASIC AMENITIES

CUSTOMER
SATISFACTION

LAY OUT FACTORS

LOCATION FACTORS

SERVICE

3.10.1 BASIC AMENITIES FACTORS:

This factor refers to availability of basic amenities such as electricity backup, water supply,
sewerage system, car parking and availability of domestic help in the residential apartments
(Manivannan and Somasundaram. (2014).The factor basic amenities has been identified as
the most important factor, which influences the choice of customers. It clearly shows that the
first thing which prospective buyer looks for, are basic amenities like water supply,
electricity, sewerage system etc., which are essential to start with living Tejinderpal Singh
(2013).,
Factor name
Amenities

Researcher
Manivannan
Somasundaram. 2014).
Tejinderpal Singh (2013).

and

Variables
Electricity backup
Water supply
Sewerage system
Car parking

3.10.2 LAYOUT FACTORS:


The layout of the residential apartment is the second factor that affects purchase decisions of
residential flat. The items included in this factor are Exterior Look of the Apartment, Interior
Design, Floor of the apartment, Number of rooms/bedrooms and Servant room (Manivannan
and Somasundaram., 2014). Financial Factors, Connectivity factors and Layout factors are
other primary factors which influence the choice of the customers. Therefore, these factors
seek proper attention from the builder.

Factor name
Layout

Researcher
Tejinderpal Singh (2013).

Variables
Floor of the apartment
Number of rooms / bedrooms
Servant room

3.10.3. LOCATION FACTORS:


Accessibility and prime location are highly influential for a consumer when they select a
housing product (Molin and Timmermans, 2003). The location environmental factors include
direct toll road access, location near family, location near working area, location near activity
centre, location near shopping centre, location near education centre, location near religious
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centre, good security system, ease of accessibility, good social communication and location
uniqueness(Raden et al, 2015). The next deciding factor for consumer preference is the
housing location near close family members such as parents and brother or sister (Mulder,
2007). Proximity to activities centre, shopping centre, education centre and religious centre
ensure the quality of living inside one particular real estate development (Colwell et al., 1985;
Sirpal, 1994; Gibbons and Machin, 2008; Brandt et al., 2013; Wen et al., 2014). Lastly,
unique location characteristics that are the properties of the environment itself such as
Mountain View and fresh air quality or the artificial creation to support the real estate
development such as a golf course and an artificial lake are other fixtures often used by the
real estate developer to increase their housing product sales price (Jim and Chen, 2009).

Factor name
Location

Researchers
Variables
Colwell et al. (1985), Waddell
Direct toll road access
et al. (1993), Sirpal
Location near family
(1994), Rohe and Stewart
Location near working
(1996), Blakely and Snyder
Place
(1997a, 1997b), Adair et al.
Good security system
(2000), Smersh and Smith
Good social
(2000),
Boarnet
and communication
Chalermpong (2001), Molin
Ease of accessibility
and
Location near activity
Timmermans (2003), Bina et al.
center
(2006), Mulder
Location near shopping
(2007), Gibbons and Machin
center
(2008), Vadali (2008),
Location near education center
Fisher et al. (2009), Jim and
Location near religious
Chen (2009), Rahadi et al.
center
(2013), Brandt et al. (2013),
Unique location
Wen et al. (2014)
Overall location
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3.10.4 SERVICE FATORS:


Realizing the increasing need of proper management for facilities in buildings, the
government has launched a consultation to solicit the views of the public on putting in place a
regulatory framework for the property management industry, the scope of which covers
mandatory licensing for companies providing management services for residential properties
and facilities (HAD, 2010). While the purpose of this proposed legislation is to set a
minimum acceptable standard with which the provision of facilities management (FM)
services has to comply, the actual performance of the services, in any case, needs to be
identified to evaluate their effectiveness. In a recent research on the quality of FM services
(Lai, 2010), an analytical method has been developed for evaluation of the services perceived
by residential users. The method, as Lai and Yik (2011) have illustrated, is able to process the
users responses to distinguish which among them are drawn from inconsistent judgments or
consistent judgments. Based on the latter type of judgments, a weighted performance score
can be calculated for representing the overall quality of a residential FM service.
Subsequently, the method was extended for application in a study which compares the
performances of FM services between two residential estates with comparable characteristics
(Lai, 2011).
In fact, the influence of five parameters on the overall satisfaction of dwellers in Bangkok
(Thailand), namely, neighbours, public facilities, environmental conditions, dwelling units
and location aspects, were examined by Savasdisara et al. (1989). In Kuala Lumpur
(Malaysia), the residential satisfaction of housing dwellers was assessed with respect to a
range of variables, which were grouped into five components

(1) Dwelling unit features;


(2) Dwelling unit support services;
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(3) Public facilities;


(4) Social environment; and
(5) Neighbourhoods facilities (Mohit et al., 2010).
In Hong Kong, Hui (2005) studied the key success factors of residential building
management based on some interviews with the management committees of three residential
estates. The study of Hui and Zheng (2010), through a survey of residential customers,
identified the crucial variables of customer satisfaction toward FM service. Therefore, a study
has been carried out to explore the influence of the users personal attributes on their
perception of service factors.

3.11 Limitations of study:

1. Customers were sceptical about expression of their opinion as they got flats at
different price range.
2. The customer had to be explained the meaning of each question and the range for each
scale item which took considerable duration of time as many customers were never
exposed to this kind of rigorous study.
3. The process of capturing the data from customers was difficult because many of them
are very busy with their own work schedule.
4. The researcher had to commute the various flats across Killipalam to meet the
respondent

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Chapter 4
4.1

Introduction:

This chapter reveals about the detailed data analysis which contains about frequency
table, reliability measure with Cronbach alpha, factor analysis with KMO & Bartlett
test, and also hypothesis testing with regression model.
Table number 4.1 Demographic information about respondents
Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

AGE

25 30

21

30.4

30 35

10

14.5

35 40

22

31.9

40 45

2.9

50 55

13

18.8

55 and above

1.4

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 21 respondents fall under the age bracket of 25- 30, 10
respondents in the age group of 30- 35 years, 22 respondents in the age group 35-40years and
2 of them belong to the age of 40 45 years, 1 respondent from the age group 55 and above
and are accounted for 30.4, 14.5, 31.9, 2.9, 18.8, 1.4 percent respectively. This indicates that
most of the customers who buy flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd are from the age group of
25 -30 years.
Table number 4.2
Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Gender

Male

55

79.7

Female

14

20.3

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 55 males and 14 females which are accounted for 79.7 and
20.3 percentage respectively. This gives a clear indication that males are the larger purchaser
of flats at Heera constructions compared to females. But still we can find that females also
customers of the product

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Table number 4.3.


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Education

Higher secondary
Bachelors degree
Technical education
Masters degree
Any other(Specify)
Total

2
29
8
29
1
69

2.9
42
11.6
42
1.4
100

Frome the above data there are 69 respondents of which people who has the most percentage
of purchase is from bachelors degree and masters degree with percentage of 42. Others who
are the purchasers include technical education which is seconding of 11.6. There are also
people from higher secondary as purchasers of flat at Heera.

Table number 4.4


Characteristics
Employment

Measure group
Salaried
Self employed
Home maker
Retired
Total

Frequency
49
18
1
1
69

Percentage
71
26.1
1.4
1.4
100

From the above table there are 49 respondents of the SALARIED section, 18 respondents in
the self-employed and 1 of them belong to the home maker and retires section respectively.
Are accounted for 71, 26.1, 1.4, 1.4, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the

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customers who buy flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd are from the salaried section followed
by self-employed.

Table number 4.5


Characteristics
Marital

Measure group
Single
Married
Divorced
Live in
Total

Frequency
40
27
11
1
69

Percentage
58
39.1
1.4
1.4
100

From the above table there are 40 respondents of the single category, 27 respondents in the
married and 11 of them belong to the Divorced and 1 of them in live in category respectively.
Are accounted for 58, 39.1, 1.4, 1.4, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the
customers who buy flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd are from the single category and
married category followed by divorced.

Table number 4.6


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Income monthly

20 40k

29

42

40 60k

13

18

60 80k

10.1

16

80 100k

5.8

11.6

Would not say

10.1

Total

69

100

Above 1 lakh

From the above table there are 29 respondents of the income group 25- 40 thousand, 13
respondents in the income group of 40- 60 thousand, 7 respondents in the income group 3540years and 2 of them belong to the age of 40 45 years, 1 respondent from the age group 55
and above and are accounted for 30.4, 14.5, 31.9, 2.9, 18.8, 1.4 percent respectively. This
indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd are from
the category 20 thousand to 40 thousand.

Table number 4.7


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Electricity backup

Strongly disagree

11.6

is considered.

Disagree

11.6

Neither/nor

7.2

Agree

15

21.7

Strongly agree

33

47.8

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 33respondents among strongly agree category, 15 respondents
in the agree category, 5 respondents in neither nor agree and 8 of them belong to disagree
category, 8 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 47.8, 21.7,
7.2, 11.6, 11.6, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree electricity is needed.
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Table number 4.8


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Water supply is

Strongly disagree

8.7

needed

Disagree

8.7

Neither/nor

5.8

Agree

13

Strongly agree

44

63.8

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 44 respondents among strongly agree category, 9 respondents
in the agree category, 4 respondents in neither nor agree and 6 of them belong to disagree
category, 6 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 63.8, 13, 5.8,
8.7, 8.7 percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in Heera
constructions Pvt Ltd strongly water supply is needed.

Table number 4.8


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Appropriate

Strongly disagree

7.2

sewage system

Disagree

8.7

Neither/nor

11.6

Agree

11

15.9

Strongly agree

39

56.5

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 39 respondents among strongly agree category, 11 respondents
in the agree category, 8 respondents in neither nor agree and 6 of them belong to disagree
category, 5 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 56.5, 15.9,
11.6, 8.7, 7.2, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree appropriate sewage is needed.
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Table number 4.9


Characteristics

Scale

Frequency

Percentage

Spacious vehicle

Strongly disagree

5.8

parking

Disagree

11.6

Neither/nor

12

17.4

Agree

18

26.1

Strongly agree

27

39.1

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 27 respondents among strongly agree category, 18 respondents
in the agree category, 12 respondents in neither nor agree and 8 of them belong to disagree
category, 4 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 39.1, 26.1,
17.4, 11.6, 5.8, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree spacious parking is indeed needed.

Table number 4.10


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Childrens play

Strongly disagree

7.2

area is needed

Disagree

11

15.9

Neither/nor

17

24.6

Agree

19

27.5

Strongly agree

15

21.7

19

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 15 respondents among strongly agree category, 19 respondents
in the agree category, 17 respondents in neither nor agree and 11 of them belong to disagree
category, 5 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 21.7, 27.5,
24.6, 15.9, 7.2, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree childrens player area is needed.

Table number 4.11


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Effective security

Strongly disagree

2.9

systems.

Disagree

7.2

Neither/nor

10

14.5

Agree

14

20.3

Strongly agree

36

52.2

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 36 respondents among strongly agree category, 14 respondents
in the agree category, 10 respondents in neither nor agree and 5 of them belong to disagree
category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 52.2, 20.3,
14.5, 7.2, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree effective security is needed.

Table number 4.12


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Articulated gas

Strongly disagree

2.9

facility

Disagree

7.2

Neither/nor

12

17.4

20

Agree

14

20.3

Strongly agree

34

49.3

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 34 respondents among strongly agree category, 14 respondents
in the agree category, 12 respondents in neither nor agree and 5 of them belong to disagree
category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 49.3, 20.3,
17.4, 7.2, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree articulated facility is needed for gas.

Table number 4.12


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Sufficient number

Strongly disagree

2.9

of elevators

Disagree

10

14.5

Neither/nor

13

18.8

Agree

13

18.8

Strongly agree

30

43.5

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 360respondents among strongly agree category, 13
respondents in the agree category, 13 respondents in neither nor agree and 10 of them belong
to disagree category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for
43.5, 18.8, 18.8, 14.5, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who
buy flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree sufficient elevators with space is
needed.

Table number 4.13


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Attractive

Strongly disagree

7.2

appearance of

Disagree

13.0

21

building

Neither/nor

18

26.1

Agree

18

26.1

Strongly agree

19

27.5

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 19 respondents among strongly agree category, 18 respondents
in the agree category, 18 respondents in neither nor agree and 9 of them belong to disagree
category, 5 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 27.5, 26.1,
26.1, 13.0, 7.2, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree attractive exterior is needed.

Table number 4.14


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Well executed floor

Strongly disagree

5.8

works

Disagree

7.2

Neither/nor

17

24.6

Agree

14

20.3

Strongly agree

29

42.0

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 29 respondents among strongly agree category, 14 respondents
in the agree category, 17 respondents in neither nor agree and 5 of them belong to disagree
category, 4 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 42.0, 20.3,
24.6, 7.2, 5.8, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree executed floor with good quality is needed.

Table number 4.15


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Sufficient number

Strongly disagree

7.2

of flats

Disagree

11

15.9

22

Neither/nor

23

33.3

Agree

14

20.3

Strongly agree

16

23.2

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 16 respondents among strongly disagree category, 14
respondents in the agree category, 23 respondents in neither nor agree and 11 of them belong
to disagree category, 5 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for
23.2, 20.3, 33.3, 15.9, 7.2, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who
buy flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd neither disagree nor agree about having sufficient
number of flats.

Table number 4.16


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Availability of

Strongly disagree

11

15.9

servant room

Disagree

12

17.4

Neither/nor

24

34.8

Agree

12

17.4

Strongly agree

13.0

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 9 respondents among strongly agree category, 12 respondents
in the agree category, 24 respondents in neither nor agree and 12 of them belong to disagree
category, 11 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 13.0, 17.4,
34.8, 17.42, 15.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy
flats in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd neither agree nor disagree on availability of servant room

23

Table number 4.17


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Novelty factors is

Strongly disagree

5.8

considered

Disagree

7.2

Neither/nor

25

36.2

Agree

21

30.4

Strongly agree

11

15.9

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 11 respondents among strongly agree category, 21 respondents
in the agree category, 25 respondents in neither nor agree and 5 of them belong to disagree
category, 4 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 15.9, 30.4,
36.2, 7.2, 5.8, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd neither agree nor disagree that novelty factors is needed.

Table number 4.18


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Sufficient

Strongly disagree

14

20.3

recreation facilities

Disagree

10.3

Neither/nor

19

27.5

Agree

22

31.9

Strongly agree

10

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 7 respondents among strongly agree category, 22 respondents
in the agree category, 19 respondents in neither nor agree and 7 of them belong to disagree
category, 14 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 10.0, 31.9,
27.5, 10.3, 20, 3, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that sufficient recreation is needed.
24

Table number 4.19


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Electrical facilities

Strongly disagree

7.2

of well-known

Disagree

8.7

brand

Neither/nor

15

21.7

Agree

14

20.3

Strongly agree

29

42.0

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 29 respondents among strongly agree category, 14 respondents
in the agree category, 15 respondents in neither nor agree and 6 of them belong to disagree
category, 5 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 42.0, 20.3,
21.7, 8.7, 7.2, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree that well know electrical fittings ae needed.

Table number 4.20


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Building is

Strongly disagree

8.7

constructed of

Disagree

8.7

latest technology

Neither/nor

14

20.3

Agree

21

30.4

25

Strongly agree

22

31.9

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 22 respondents among strongly agree category, 21 respondents
in the agree category, 14 respondents in neither nor agree and 6 of them belong to disagree
category, 6 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 31.9, 30.4,
20.3, 8.7, 8.7, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree that building should be of latest technology.

Table number 4.21


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Flat area is

Strongly disagree

4.3

attractive

Disagree

12

17.4

Neither/nor

14

20.3

Agree

20

29.0

Strongly agree

27.5

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 9 respondents among strongly agree category, 20 respondents
in the agree category, 14 respondents in neither nor agree and 12 of them belong to disagree
category, 3 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 27.5, 29.0,
20.3, 17.4, 4.3, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that flat area should be attractive.

Table number 4.22


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Flat area has less

Strongly disagree

2.9

26

traffic noise

Disagree

13

Neither/nor

21

30.4

Agree

15

21.7

Strongly agree

21

30.4

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 21 respondents among strongly agree category, 15 respondents
in the agree category, 21 respondents in neither nor agree and 9 of them belong to disagree
category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 30.4, 21.7,
30.4, 13, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that flat area should have less traffic noise followed by
neither nor agree category.

Table number 4.23


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Crime reported in

Strongly disagree

2.9

this area is very

Disagree

10

14.5

less

Neither/nor

14

20.3

Agree

20

29

Strongly agree

23

33

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 23 respondents among strongly agree category, 20 respondents
in the agree category, 14 respondents in neither nor agree and 10 of them belong to disagree
category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 33.0, 29.0,
20.3, 14.4, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree that flat area should be having less crime
reports.

Table number 4.24


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Near to reputed

Strongly disagree

4.3

27

hospitals

Disagree

10.1

Neither/nor

23

33.3

Agree

18

26.1

Strongly agree

18

26.1

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 18 respondents among strongly agree category, 18 respondents
in the agree category, 23 respondents in neither nor agree and 7 of them belong to disagree
category, 3 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 26.1, 26.1,
33.3, 10.1, 4.3, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that neither nor it should be near reputed hospitals.

Table number 4.25


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Accessibility to

Strongly disagree

1.4

super markets

Disagree

13

Neither/nor

15

21.8

Agree

25

36.1

Strongly agree

19

27.5

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 19 respondents among strongly agree category, 25 respondents
in the agree category, 15 respondents in neither nor agree and 9 of them belong to disagree
category, 1 respondent from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 27.5, 36.1,
21.8, 13, 1.4, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that flat area should be near to super markets.

28

Table number 4.26


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Convenient for

Strongly disagree

7.2

work place

Disagree

8.7

Neither/nor

21

30.4

Agree

18

26.1

Strongly agree

19

27.5

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 19 respondents among strongly agree category, 18 respondents
in the agree category, 21 respondents in neither nor agree and 6 of them belong to disagree
category, 5 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 27.5, 26.1,
30.4, 8.7, 7.2, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats in
Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that flat area should be attractive.

Table number 4.27


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Maintenance of

Strongly disagree

2.9

building is done

Disagree

12

17.4

properly

Neither/nor

10

14.5

Agree

17

24.6

Strongly agree

28

40.6

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 28 respondents among strongly agree category, 17 respondents
in the agree category, 10 respondents in neither nor agree and 12 of them belong to disagree
category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 40.6, 24.6,
14.5,1 7.4, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd strongly agree that flat area should be maintained.
29

Table number 4.28


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Society is there for

Strongly disagree

10.1

various programs

Disagree

13

Neither/nor

21

30.4

Agree

17

24.6

Strongly agree

15

21.7

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 15 respondents among strongly agree category, 17respondents
in the agree category, 17 respondents in neither nor agree and 21 of them belong to disagree
category, 9 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 21.7, 24.6,
30.4, 13.0, 10.1, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd neither agree nor disagree that flat area should have a society

Table number 4.29


Characteristics

Measure group

Frequency

Percentage

Waste disposal is of

Strongly disagree

2.9

good methods

Disagree

11

15.9

Neither/nor

11.6

Agree

16

23.2

Strongly agree

32

46.4

30

Total

69

100

From the above table there are 32 respondents among strongly agree category, 16 respondents
in the agree category, 8 respondents in neither nor agree and 11 of them belong to disagree
category, 2 respondents from the strongly disagree and above are accounted for 46.4, 23.2,
11.6, 15.9, 2.9, percent respectively. This indicates that most of the customers who buy flats
in Heera constructions Pvt Ltd agree that flat area should have disposable waste methods.

Reliability measure:
The reliability of perception on basic amenities questionnaire was computed by using SPSS20 software. Cronbachs alpha coefficients were computed to calculate reliability of all items
in the questionnaire.

Table: 4.34 Reliability statistics for perception on basic amenities.


Cronbachs Alpha

Number of items

.945

It is considered that the reliability value 0.7 is a standard value and it can be seen that in the
reliability method that applied here, reliability value is .945 which is approximate to the
standard value. So all the items in the questionnaire are reliable. So the statements in the
questionnaire were treated as reliable statements.
The reliability of perception on layout factors questionnaire was computed by using SPSS-20
software. Cronbachs alpha coefficients were computed to calculate reliability of all items in
the questionnaire.

Table: 4.35 Reliability statistics for perception on layout factors


Cronbachs Alpha

Number of items

.918

31

It is considered that the reliability value 0.7 is a standard value and it can be seen that in the
reliability method that applied here, reliability value is .918 which is approximate to the
standard value. So all the items in the questionnaire are reliable. So the statements in the
questionnaire were treated as reliable statements
The reliability of perception on location factors questionnaire was computed by using SPSS20 software. Cronbachs alpha coefficients were computed to calculate reliability of all items
in the questionnaire.
Table:4.36 Reliability statistics for perception on location factors
Cronbachs Alpha

Number of items

.898

It is considered that the reliability value 0.7 is a standard value and it can be seen that in the
reliability method that applied here, reliability value is .898 which is approximate to the
standard value. So all the items in the questionnaire are reliable. So the statements in the
questionnaire were treated as reliable statements
The reliability of perception on service factors questionnaire was computed by using SPSS20 software. Cronbachs alpha coefficients were computed to calculate reliability of all items
in the questionnaire.
Table: 4.37 Reliability statistics for perception on service factors
Cronbachs Alpha

Number of items

.840

It is considered that the reliability value 0.7 is a standard value and it can be seen that in the
reliability method that applied here, reliability value is .840 which is approximate to the
standard value. So all the items in the questionnaire are reliable. So the statements in the
questionnaire were treated as reliable statements

32

Factor analysis:
The raw score of 26 items were subjected to factor analysis to find out the factor that
contributes towards perception. After factor analysis 4 components were identified in each
table. The details about factors, the factor name, Eigen value, variable convergence, loadings,
and variance % are given in the table.

Table 4.38.1
KMO AND Bartletts test for Perception on basic amenities
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of Sphericity
Approx. ChiSquare
Df
Sig.

.875
494.613
28
.000

Table 4.38.2
Factor
name
Basic
amenities

Eigen
value
73.066

Var.no

Variable convergence

3
2

Appropriate sewage system


Availability of water supply
facilities
Effective security services
Safe articulated gas
facilities
Spacious vehicle parking

6
7
4

33

% of
variance
73.066

Loading
.931
.892
.879
.866
.858

8
5
1

facilities
Sufficient number of
spacious elevators
Childrens playing area is
well designed
I considered electricity
backup while purchasing
flat

.834
.797
.771

The Kaiser-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy value for perception of basic amenities
was .875 indicating that the sample size was adequate to consider the data as normally
distributed. The Bartletts test of sphericity was tested through Chi-Square value 494.613 is
significant at 0% level indicating that the intern-item correlation matrix was not an identity
matrix and therefore the data was suitable for factor analysis. The results of factor analysis
have clubbed 8 items statement of perception on basic amenities in to one component which
has received Highest Eigen value of 73.066.

Table 4.39.1
KMO AND Bartletts test for Perception on layout factors
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of Sphericity
Approx. ChiSquare
Df
Sig.

Table 4.39.2
Factor
Eigen
name
value
Layout
60.708

Var.no

Variable convergence

11
10

Quality of flooring
Well executed interior
designs
Buildings are constructed
by using modern techniques
Electrical fittings are of

17
16

34

.895
358.528
36
.000

% of
variance
60.708

Loading
.885
.832
.805
.802

12
14
9
15

13

Well-known brand
Sufficient number of flats
I consider novelty factors
when I buy flat
Attractive exterior
appearance of the building
Sufficient recreation
facilities (Swimming pool,
gym etc.)
Availability of servant room

.767
.756
.755
.707

.682

The Kaiser-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy value for perception of layout factors was .
895 indicating that the sample size was adequate to consider the data as normally distributed.
The Bartletts test of sphericity was tested through Chi-Square value 358.528 is significant at
0% level indicating that the intern-item correlation matrix was not an identity matrix and
therefore the data was suitable for factor analysis. The results of factor analysis have clubbed
9 items statement of perception on layout factors in to one component which has received
Highest Eigen value of 60.708

Table 4.40.1
KMO AND Bartletts test for Perception on location factors
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of Sphericity
Approx. ChiSquare
Df
Sig.
Table 4.40.2
Factor
Eigen
name
value
Location
66.862

Var.no

Variable convergence

21

Nearness of reputed
hospital in the locality
Accessibility of super
markets
I purchased flat because
area of the flat is attractive

22
18

35

.847
232.050
15
.000

% of
variance
66.862

Loading
.875
.862
.838

20
19
23

Crime reported in this


locality is very less
This area is known for less
traffic noise
This locality is convenient
for me to reach my work
place

.821
.769
.731

The Kaiser-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy value for perception of location factors
was .847 indicating that the sample size was adequate to consider the data as normally
distributed. The Bartletts test of sphericity was tested through Chi-Square value 232.050 is
significant at 0% level indicating that the intern-item correlation matrix was not an identity
matrix and therefore the data was suitable for factor analysis. The results of factor analysis
have clubbed 6 items statement of perception on location factors in to one component which
has received Highest Eigen value of 66.862
Table 4.41.1
KMO AND Bartletts test for Perception on service factors
Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin Measure of Sampling Adequacy.
Bartlett's Test of Sphericity
Approx. ChiSquare
Df
Sig.

Table 4.41.2
Factor
Eigen
name
value
Service
75.986

Var.no

Variable convergence

26

They have appropriate


waste disposal methods
This group provides
importance to maintenance
of the building

24

36

.687
90.070
3
.000

% of
variance
75.986

Loading
.911
.894

25

This building has society to


conduct various activities

.806

The Kaiser-Olkin measure of sampling adequacy value for perception of service factors was .
687 indicating that the sample size was adequate to consider the data as normally distributed.
The Bartletts test of sphericity was tested through Chi-Square value 90.070 is significant at
0% level indicating that the intern-item correlation matrix was not an identity matrix and
therefore the data was suitable for factor analysis. The results of factor analysis have clubbed
3 items statement of perception on service factors in to one component which has received
Highest Eigen value of 75.986

Regression:
H0: There is no significant relationship between executed interior design and income.
H1: There is significant relationship between executed interior design and income.
Table 4.42
Model

Unstandardized

Standardized
coefficients
Beta

coefficients
B
Std.Error
3.840
1.549

(Constant

)
EI
1.061
Dependent variable: Income
Y=A+BX

0.485

0.692

Sig.

2.480

0.019

2.190

0.036

Y= 3.840+1.061
Here,
Y= Independent variables (Executed Interiors)
X= Dependent variable (Income)
The multiple regressions were applied between executed interiors and income. The result of
regression indicates that independent variable executed interiors has a significant impact on
the dependent variable income signified by the coefficient beta factor of 0.692 also the t37

value significant even at 0% though compare the computed t-value with critical value(1.96)
at 5% of significance.
Since the value is less than 0.05 the null hypothesis got rejected and the alternative
hypothesis got accepted. So there is significant relationship between executed interior design
and income.

Ho: There is no significant relationship between availability of servant room and marital
status.
H1: There is significant relationship between availability of servant room and marital status.

Table 4.43
Model

Unstandardized

Standardized
coefficients
Beta

coefficients
B
Std.Error
1.304
.653

(Constant

)
ASR
-.318
.143
Dependent variable: Marital

-.479

Status

Y=A+BX
Y= 1.304+ (-.318)
Here,
Y= Independent variables (Availability of servant room)
X= Dependent variable (Marital status)

38

Sig.

1.997

.054

-2.220

.034

The multiple regressions were applied between availability of servant room and marital
status. The result of regression indicates that independent variable availability of servant
room has a significant impact on the dependent variable marital status signified by the
coefficient beta factor of -.479 also the t-value significant even at 0% though compare the
computed t-value with critical value (1.96) at 5% of significance.
Since the value is less than 0.05 the null hypothesis got rejected and the alternative
hypothesis got accepted. There is significant relationship between availability of servant
room and marital status.
Ho: There is no significant relationship between attractive area and age
H1: There is significant relationship between attractive area and age.

Table 4.44
Model

Unstandardized

Standardized
coefficients
Beta

coefficients
B
Std.Error
5.905
1.484

(Constant

)
AA
1.189
Dependent variable: Age
Y=A+BX

.499

.811

Sig.

3.981

0.000

2.381

.023

Y= 5.905+1.189
Here,
Y= Independent variables (Attractive area)
X= Dependent variable (Age)
The multiple regressions were applied between attractive area and age. The result of
regression indicates that independent variable attractive area has a significant impact on the
dependent variable age signified by the coefficient beta factor of 0.811 also the t-value

39

significant even at 0% though compare the computed t-value with critical value(1.96) at 5%
of significance.
Since the value is less than 0.05 the null hypothesis got rejected and the alternative
hypothesis got accepted. So there is significant relationship between attractive area and age.
Ho: There is no significant relationship between maintenance of building and age.
H1: There is significant relationship between maintenance of building and age.
Table 4.45
Model

Unstandardized

Standardized
coefficients
Beta

coefficients
B
Std.Error
5.905
1.484

(Constant

)
MB
.946
Dependent variable: Age

.418

.628

Sig.

3.981

0.000

2.263

.031

Y=A+BX
Y= 5.905+.946
Here,
Y= Independent variables (Maintenance of building)
X= Dependent variable (Age)
The multiple regressions were applied between maintenance of building and age. The result
of regression indicates that independent variable maintenance of building has a significant
impact on the dependent variable age signified by the coefficient beta factor of 0.628 also the
t-value significant even at 0% though compare the computed t-value with critical value(1.96)
at 5% of significance.
Since the value is less than 0.05 the null hypothesis got rejected and the alternative
hypothesis got accepted. So there is significant relationship between maintenance of building
and age.

Chapter 5
40

5.1 Managerial Implications:

5.1.1 On the basis of layout factors:


Since respondents rated quality of flooring is a highest preferred factors company has to
concentrate on providing its customers with well-known branded tiles which last for long
duration. Secondly, attractive interior design has to be provided by the company so that
customer get more satisfaction which prompt them to buy flat. Thirdly, builders has to
concentrate on implementing modern technique s in construction work which provides safe
building, safety for workers, fast construction of building and also can finish work within
stipulated time. Finally, well known and branded electrical fitting is essential as respondents
are rated it as fourth important factors.
5.1.2 On the basis of basic amenities factors:
The first and the foremost factor considered by respondents under basic amenities are
appropriate sewage system. So when builders concentrate on buying land and constructing
building this factor has to be taken in to consideration very significantly. Another important
factors for the buyers is water supply facilities. Since water is a physiological need of
human being (Abraham Maslow need hierarchy theory) it is very important for the builders
to see that the locality gets very hygiene and continuous water supply. Once physiological
needs are satisfied human being demand for the safety need arises. In this research work
respondent even demanded safety need of security system. A very high quality of security
system has to be provided by the builders to the apartment where people buy flats. Another
safety aspect came in to the mind of majority of the respondent is gas facility which they
dont like to keep inside their house instead they prefer articulated gas facility. So the
builders has to implement safe articulated gas facility when they decide to construct the
building. Since almost all has vehicle facility in the modern times, definitely people prefer
sufficient and spacious parking facility which is demanded by majority of the respondents.
So builders has to provide spacious parking facility for the flat purchaser.

5.1.3 On the basis of location factors:


Health consciousness and healthy life styles are the most significant two sided factors which
are wide spread in the modern times. Survey showed that most of the respondent primarily
demanded this building mainly because of the nearness of reputed hospitals in the locality.
41

So it is essential for the builders to take in to consideration this factors when they construct
building. Respondents demand accessibility of super markets which will have very easy for
them to get in to and buy things of their expectations. So builders has to consider this factor
when constructing building. Respondent demanded attractive and less crime reported area.
So while constructing building builders has to give primary importance to these factors.
They should see that area where they construct building is very attractive, clean and also
very less crime reported.
5.1.4 On the basis of service factors:
Primary factors considered by the respondents while buying flat is appropriate waste
disposal under service factors. So it is essential to provide appropriate waste disposal
facilities for the flat buyers so that they can dispose it in effective and efficient manner
which leads to customer satisfaction. Secondary factors considered by the respondents under
service factors are maintenance of the building by the Heera Group. So they have to provide
periodically services. Lastly, respondents demanded society has to conduct various
activities. The organization should provide ample opportunities and initiatives for starting
such societies and also conduct various programmes according to the needs and expectations
of the people who resides in the different flats of building.
5.2 Suggestions for future research work:

The current study uses the convenience sample, so probably it is not representative
from a statistical point of view, so for future study, if with more time and budget, future
researchers may take random sampling that each member of that population has an
equal probability of being selected.
The second limitation for current study is that most of my respondents are basesegment consumers and I dont get enough samples on luxury segment. So, the future
research may increase the sample size to get more samples on premium segment or
conduct research which specializes on premium-segment customers.
Another l i m i t a t i o n for c u r r e n t s t u d y is about regression. Firstly, r e s e a r c h e r
m a i n l y used 95 % confidence level (Alpha=0.1). The alpha level is the probability that
the decision to reject the null hypothesis. So compared with 90% confidence level, a
95% confidence level increased the chance of Type II error. Secondly, the current study
probably doesnt consider enough variables and future study probably should include

42

more variables in the questionnaire. So other independent variables are needed to be


considered to help increase the predictive capability of the regression model in future
research.

Chapter 6:
6.1 Conclusion:

43

This research work has reviewed customer satisfaction in the Heera construction industry.
Several implications regarding customer satisfaction in the construction were drawn from
the findings of the research. Customers were typically satisfied with the organisations
abilities provide expected quality of work. Basic amenities, location, layout and service
factors are not considered in the study. The result of the regression analysis shows that
there is significant relationship between executed interior design and income in customer
satisfaction. Also there is significant relationship between maintenance of building and
age. The study also suggests that there is significant relationship between availability of
servant room and marital status in purchase of flats from Heera Constructions Pvt Ltd. On
comparing with various factors it was found that there is a significant relationship
between attractive area and age on flat purchase from this particular builders.

Annexure
Questionnaire

I am Mithun Mohan studying in Manipal University in its School of Management. I


am in to my Summer Internship Project on Customer satisfaction of Flats of
Heera builders. As part of my Summer Internship Project, I am expected to
44

collect data in few work related issues. This is the final survey to facilitate the
necessary data collection. I request you to kindly cooperate and give me honest
responses

which

make

project

work

robust

confidentiality will be maintained in this regard.


Section-A
Your name:
Age:

25-30 years old


30-35 years old
35-40 years old
40-45 years old
45-50 years old
50-55 years old
55 and above

Gender:
Male
Female

Education:
No schooling
High school
Bachelors degree
Technical education
Masters degree
Any other: Specify

Marital status:

Single
Married
Widow/widower
Divorced
Separated
Live in

Employment status:

Salaried
Self employed
Home maker
45

and

insightful.

Complete

Military
Retired

Income (Monthly):

20000-40000
40001-60000
60001-80000
80001-100000
Above 100000
Would rather not to say

Section-B
Sl.no

Components

SA
5

Perception on basic amenities


1
I
considered
electricity
backup

while

purchasing

flat
Availability of water supply

3
4

facilities
Appropriate sewage system
Spacious vehicle parking

facilities
Childrens playing area is

6
7

well designed
Effective security services
Safe
articulated
gas

facilities
Sufficient

number

spacious elevators
Perception on Layout
9
Attractive

of

exterior

10

appearance of the building


Well
executed
interior

11
12
13
14

designs
Quality of flooring
Sufficient number of flats
Availability of servant room
I consider novelty factors

15

when I buy flat


Sufficient

recreation
46

A
4

NAND
3

D
2

SD
1

facilities

(Swimming

pool,

16

gym etc.)
Electrical

17

Well-known brand
Buildings are constructed

fittings

are

of

by using modern techniques


Perception on location factors
18
I purchased flat because
19

area of the flat is attractive


This area is known for less

20

traffic noise
Crime reported

21

locality is very less


Nearness
of
reputed

22

hospital in the locality


Accessibility
of
super

23

markets
This locality is convenient

in

this

for me to reach my work


place
Perception on service factors
24
This
group

provides

importance to maintenance
25

of the building
This building has society to

26

conduct various activities


They
have
appropriate
waste disposal methods

SA - Strongly Agree
A - Agree
NAND - Neither Agree nor Disagree
D - Disagree
SD - Strongly Disagree

47

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