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Goal Setting Evaluation and Rubric

USF Elementary Education

NEW FL EDUCATOR ACCOMPLISHED PRACTICES


(a) Quality of Instruction.
1. Instructional Design and Lesson Planning. Applying concepts from human development and learning theories, the effective
educator consistently:
a. Aligns instruction with state-adopted standards at the appropriate level of rigor;
I have aligned instruction with the state-adopted standards for each lesson I have taught. I have used http://www.cpalms.org/Public/
to find standards that go along with each of the lesson I teach. An examples of a lesson plan in which I have used the appropriate
standards can be found here.
b. Sequences lessons and concepts to ensure coherence and required prior knowledge;
For each lesson that I teach, I make sure that I am building on students prior knowledge. For example, when teaching subtraction
within 10, I made sure to start at the most simplistic and basic strategies for the students to learn. I started with using pictures, and
then taught students how to use their fingers to subtract. After these simple skills, I moved into teaching students how to use a
number line to subtract numbers within 10. This lesson plan can be found here. After teaching students how to use a number line for
subtraction, I then taught how to use part-part whole and then we moved into finding the missing subtrahend. I taught these
subtraction skills in this order so that they would build upon each other. After students have learned the most basic subtraction
strategies they could then learn the more complex strategies.
c. Designs instruction for students to achieve mastery;
In order to help students achieve mastery, I have differentiated instruction in many different ways. One specific way in which I have
designed instruction for students to be successful was when teaching subtraction using your fingers. First, I taught the lesson to the
whole class. I then gave students time to practice what they have learned independently. While circulating the room to check for
students understanding, I noticed some students were not completing the activity correctly and had not fully grasped the lesson
objectives. In order to help these students, I pulled a small group and worked with them together to help them better understand the
subtraction strategy we were learning about. This helped this group of students because they were able to receive more
individualized instruction that was tailored to their specific needs. This also gave this group of students a second opportunity to hear
the directions and how to complete the subtraction activity.
d. Selects appropriate formative assessments to monitor learning;
The formative assessments that I use to check for students understanding is to circulate the room and monitor the answers and
strategies that students are using to solve problems. One specific way that I have done this is when teaching math. While teaching
math, many times the students follow along with me using their individual white boards. After I write an equation on the board, the
students are to then solve the problem on their own boards. While students are working to find an answer, I walk around the room
and look at how they are solving the problem as well as whether or not they are ending up with the correct answers. After seeing how
students are solving math problems, I am able to modify my teaching to better help them be successful.
e. Uses variety of data, independently and in collaboration with colleagues, to evaluate student-learning outcomes, adjust planning
and continuously improve the effectiveness of lessons.
Every week on Wednesday mornings, I take part in PLC meetings with the kindergarten team, the assistant principal, and the
principal. These PLC meetings are focused around the students that are considered to be in the tier 2 category and are in need of
interventions to help them improve in certain skills and subjects. Based on the data that is collected during these meetings, I adapt
my lessons to fit the needs of these students that need this extra exposure in order to help them improve in the recommended
subjects. Also, I am working to collect data for my inquiry this semester which is How can I help students develop strong reading
foundational skills so that they will be successful readers in the future? More about my inquiry and the data I have collected can be
found here.
f. Develops learning experiences that require students to demonstrate a variety of applicable skills and
competencies
I have taught students many different strategies in order to help them be successful when subtracting
numbers within 10. The different strategies I have taught include drawing pictures, using fingers, using a
number line, and using the strategy of part-part-whole. These lessons and reflections can be found here.
2. The Learning Environment. To maintain a student-centered learning environment that is safe, organized, equitable, flexible,

Goal Setting Evaluation and Rubric

USF Elementary Education

NEW FL EDUCATOR ACCOMPLISHED PRACTICES


inclusive, and collaborative, the effective educator consistently:
a. Organizes, allocates, and manages the resources of time, space, and attention;
b. Manages individual and class behaviors through a well-planned management system;
c. Conveys high expectations to all students;
d. Respects students cultural and family background;
e. Models clear, acceptable oral and written communication skills;
f. Maintains a climate of openness, inquiry, fairness and support;
g. Integrates current information and communication technologies;
h. Adapts the learning environment to accommodate the differing needs and diversity of students; and
i. Utilizes current and emerging assistive technologies that enable students to participate in high-quality communication interactions
and achieve their educational goals.
3. Instructional Delivery and Facilitation. The effective educator consistently utilizes a deep and comprehensive knowledge of the
subject taught to:
a. Deliver engaging and challenging lessons;
I have provided engaging and challenging lessons consistently when teaching. One lesson in particular in which I have mastered this
objective was when using jellybeans to teach part-part whole subtraction with kindergarten students. By using the jellybeans for this
lesson the students were engaged and wanted to complete the lesson so that they could eventually eat the jellybeans they were given.
The students enjoyed using the jellybeans as manipulatives because it was different than what they were used to. Part-part-whole can
be a challenging topic to teach to students, but by providing students with materials that they were normally not able to use, students
worked hard to learn the objectives at hand.
b. Deepen and enrich students understanding through content area literacy strategies, verbalization of thought, and application of the
subject matter;
I used questioning and discussion techniques when teaching students about part-part whole subtraction. Below are notes taken during
this lesson by my University Supervisor:
Put your thumb on the first problem here. Your problem looks just like this (models on the board) Take 5 jelly beans out and put them
on the orange circle. Put however many jelly beans are left and put them on the white circle. Now count how many jelly beans are in the
white circle. Katie what answer did you get? Not three? 5 very good if you got five kiss your brain. The answer five is going to go in
the blanks. You should have a five in the box. Student read the box.
c. Identify gaps in students subject matter knowledge;
On February 24, 2016, I taught kindergarten students a lesson on writing a narrative story based on a given picture. I modeled how to
begin the story and explained that the story needed to have characters and a setting. When it came time for students to complete a
graphic organizer for their stories, I saw that students were unsure of how to complete the setting and characters boxes. I realized
that the students did not know how to identify the characters and setting in a story. In order to meet the needs of my students, I
stopped the lesson, and went back to specifically teaching on who the characters in a story were, and what the setting of a story is. In
order to successfully write a narrative story, students would need to be able to write about the setting and characters. After students
could do this, I was able to move onto having the students write their stories.
d. Modify instruction to respond to preconceptions or misconceptions;
When teaching students how to use a number line when subtracting, I foresaw students having the misconception of wanting to go
forward instead of backward when subtracting because prior to this lesson, the first time they used a number line was with addition.
In order to ensure that this misconception was changed and avoided, I explicitly taught students that when using a number line to
subtract you move backwards or the left because you are taking away numbers. I also explained that only when adding do you move
forward, or to the right. This lesson can be found here.
e. Relate and integrate the subject matter with other disciplines and life experiences;

f. Employ higher-order questioning techniques;

Goal Setting Evaluation and Rubric

USF Elementary Education

NEW FL EDUCATOR ACCOMPLISHED PRACTICES


g. Apply varied instructional strategies and resources, including appropriate technology, to teach for student understanding;
h. Differentiate instruction based on an assessment of student learning needs and recognition of individual differences in students;
i. Support, encourage, and provide immediate and specific feedback to students to promote student achievement;
Every morning, students are given morning work based on skills they have learned prior in class. Students complete this work
independently and I grade their work each day. When grading student work, I make sure to mark the questions that students did not
get correct, and I also provide feedback as to how students can correct it. These papers are handed back to students at the end of each
day. When I hand back papers to students I explain why I marked their worksheets they way that I did so that they know exactly
what they got wrong and what they got right, as well as exactly what the mistakes were. This allows students to learn from their
mistakes so that the same mistake is not made a second time.
j. Utilize student feedback to monitor instructional needs and to adjust instruction.
4. Assessment. The effective educator consistently:
a. Analyzes and applies data from multiple assessments and measures to diagnose students learning needs, informs instruction based
on those needs, and drives the learning process;
b. Designs and aligns formative and summative assessments that match learning objectives and lead to mastery;
c. Uses a variety of assessment tools to monitor student progress, achievement and learning gains;
d. Modifies assessments and testing conditions to accommodate learning styles and varying levels of knowledge;
e. Shares the importance and outcomes of student assessment data with the student and the students parent/caregiver(s); and
f. Applies technology to organize and integrate assessment information.
(b) Continuous Improvement, Responsibility and Ethics.
5. Continuous Professional Improvement. The effective educator consistently:
a. Designs purposeful professional goals to strengthen the effectiveness of instruction based on students needs;
b. Examines and uses data-informed research to improve instruction and student achievement;
c. Uses a variety of data, independently, and in collaboration with colleagues, to evaluate learning outcomes, adjust planning and
continuously improve the effectiveness of the lessons;
d. Collaborates with the home, school and larger communities to foster communication and to support student learning and
continuous improvement;
e. Engages in targeted professional growth opportunities and reflective practices; and
f. Implements knowledge and skills learned in professional development in the teaching and learning process.
6. Professional Responsibility and Ethical Conduct. Understanding that educators are held to a high moral standard in a community,
the effective educator adheres to the Code of Ethics and the Principles of Professional Conduct of the Education Profession of
Florida, pursuant to State Board of Education Rules 6B-1.001 and 6B-1.006, F.A.C, and fulfills the expected obligations to students,
the public and the education profession.