You are on page 1of 32

DESTINATION OF LEAVERS FROM

HIGHER EDUCATION 2004/05


Findings

Prepared by Helen Gleaves and Matthew Ball


May 2006
Contents
Page
Executive Summary 1

1 Introduction 5

2 Data Collection Methods 5

3 Response Rates 6

4 Findings 6
4.1 Overview 6
4.2 Faculty of Communication Media 7
4.2.1 Cert HE Post Production 7
4.2.2 Foundation Degree Broadcast Digital Technology 8
4.2.3 Foundation Degree Broadcast Media Technology 8
4.2.4 Foundation Degree Broadcast Operations and Production 9
4.2.5 Foundation Degree Broadcast Post Production 11
4.2.6 Foundation Degree Computer Visualisation and Animation 11
4.2.7 Foundation Degree Creative Sound Design 12
4.2.8 BA (Hons) Animation 13
4.2.9 BA (Hons) Broadcast Production 14
4.2.10 BA (Hons) Content Creation for Broadcasting and New Media 16
4.2.11 BA (Hons) Graphic Design 18
4.2.12 BA (Hons) Moving Image Design 19
4.3 Faculty of Design 21
4.3.1 BA (Hons) Fashion (2 Year Fast Track) 21
4.3.2 BA (Hons) Fashion (3 Year) 22
4.3.3 BA (Hons) Interaction Design 24
4.3.4 BA (Hons) Interior Design and Environment Architectures 25
4.3.5 BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design 26
4.4 Postgraduate 28
4.4.1 MA Interactive Digital Media 28

Note: The relatively small sample size may exaggerate the percentage findings.
Please review the percentage findings in conjunction with its corresponding
number. Furthermore, where the sample size is small, e.g. FdA Creative Sound
Design, the data is not statistically significant. Figures have been round to the
nearest whole number.
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

Executive Summary

Introduction and Context


The report provides information regarding the activities (i.e. employment, further
study etc) taken up by UK-domiciled and other EU students from Ravensbourne
College of Design and Communication who successfully completed undergraduate
and postgraduate programmes during the academic year 2004/05.

As in previous years, the information was collected annually for the Higher Education
Statistical Agency (HESA) and shows the former students’ first destinations
approximately 6 months after graduation. The data collected is used to measure the
University’s performance against other Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) and thus
impact on our league table positions.

The Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey (previously known
as the First Destination Survey or FDS) is also a useful tool for prospective students
who can see where their future qualifications might take them and for current
students who can use the DLHE information to plan their job search. The DLHE is
also important for course design and development.

The information was captured at two collection points. A postal questionnaire was
carried out in April 2005 which was followed by a telephone survey between May and
June 2005. The second collection point took placement between December 2005
and March 2006. A postal survey was distributed in December 2005 and a telephone
survey conducted between January and March 2006. The telephone survey provided
the majority of the DLHE data.

Key Findings
The 2004/05 academic year was a relatively good year for the destination of
Ravensbourne graduates and the response rate of the survey:
• 6 graduates (67%) responded to the April survey and 3 (33%) were
unobtainable.
• 332 (89%) graduates responded to the January survey and 39 (11%) were
unobtainable. Of the 332 graduates, 324 (98%) completed the survey and 8
(2%) refused. The response rate was the same as the 2003/04 survey.

1
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

• Of the 330 1 graduates who responded to the survey, 211 (64%) were
working, 97 (29%) were undertaking further study, 9 (3%) were unemployed
and 13 (4%) were unavailable for work. Of those working, 117 (55%) were in
roles related to their studies, 53 (25%) were freelancing and 41 (19%) in jobs
unrelated to their study.
• 241 2 of the graduates surveyed and 7 refusals were from the Faculty of
Communication Media. 135 (56%) of those who responded were working
(78/58% in subject-related roles, 32/24% as freelancers and 25/19% in non-
subject-related roles), 94 (34%) undertaking further study, 3 (1%)
unemployed and 9 (4%) unavailable for work.
• 88 3 of the graduates surveyed and 1 refusal were from the Faculty of Design.
75 (85%) were working, 3 (3%) were undertaking further study, 6 (7%)
unemployed and 4 (5%) unavailable for work. Of those working, 38 (51%)
were in subject-related employment, 21 (28%) freelancing, 16 (21%) in work
unrelated to their study.
• In comparison to 2003/04 findings, the employment figures have slightly
dropped by 2% (2003/04 - 194 / 66%). However, the percentage of
unemployed has dropped by half from 17 (6%) in 2003-04 to 9 (3%) and the
further study figures have increased 75 / 25% in 2003/04 to 97 / 29% in
2004/05.
• Of the 211 graduates who were employed, 152 (72%) felt that the qualification they
obtained helped them to get the job and 65 (31%) commented that Ravensbourne
helped them to get the job through contacts, the degree show, referrals and work
placements.
• 43 (20%) of those working disclosed a disability. Of those 32 (74%) had dyslexia, 1
(2%) had mental health difficulties, 3 (7%) had an unseen disability (such as diabetes,
epilepsy and asthma), 2 (5%) had multiple disabilities, 1 (2%) was a wheelchair user
and 4 (9%) had disabilities which were not listed.

Conclusion / Issues
Although the 2004/05 destination findings are positive with the number of graduates
unemployed falling, there are a number of issues that need to be addressed if we are
to maintain the same level of success in future years:

1
Figures based on both April and January findings.
2
As above.
3
As above.

2
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

• The findings should be considered as part of course planning and


development. In particular, students need to be more aware of the career
options available and the nature of the industry in which they want to work.
This could be achieved through structured projects/workshops, PDP, staff
development activities and links with the Industry Advisory Boards.
• As previously noted, over a third of graduates found employment via the
College. The College must seek to develop this further through formalised
careers activities, such as organised recruitment events, guest speakers,
formalised links employers and recruitment agencies. This requires resources
and funding.
• Employability objectives should be set at course level for improving
employment and return rates of the DLHE, for example, number of students
undertaking work placements, number of employer talks, increase in amount
of ‘live’ briefs, careers provision etc. This could form part of Annual Course
Monitoring.
• Graduate information data was often inaccurate and/or out of date. This is
increasingly important in light of the introduction of the HESA longitudinal
survey. HESA requires institutions to provide contact details up to three and a
half years after graduation. At this time, Ravensbourne could not accurately
provide this information. It is strongly suggested that the graduate exit form be
updated to include mobile numbers and alternative/current email addresses.
Data should also be updated after graduation as part of an alumni
association. Currently there is no resource available to allow data to be
maintained and updated.
• Two collection points and a growing sample have added additional pressure
on resources. The College needs to implement new ways of collecting DLHE
data, such as adopting the HESA web-based and email questionnaire format.
This would increase student response rates and give greater efficiencies. This
has been raised with MIS in the past who advised that there were insufficient
resources and personnel to develop new systems. The implementation of
new data collection methods has become a priority and sufficient resources
and time must be allocated to develop new mechanisms.
• As graduate numbers increase, the DHLE sample will also increase.
Therefore sufficient resources and staffing in both the Enterprise and
Employability Unit and Registry must be made available.

3
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

• Coverage of success stories such as those of our alumni and the positive
employment rates of all graduates should be used in all College publicity and
in the media where possible.

4
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

1. Introduction
The Higher Education Statistical Agency (HESA) requires all Higher Education
Institutions (HEIs) to annually monitor the destination of its higher education students
within the first six months of graduation. This process is referred to as the
Destination of Leavers from Higher Education (DLHE) survey (previously named
First Destination Survey or FDS). Data supplied by Ravensbourne is nationally
benchmarked against comparable institutions/subject disciplines. These employment
performance indicators focus on one aspect of higher education (for example, first
degrees or foundation degrees may be used). This is decided once DLHE data has
been submitted and is then published nationally during the latter half of the year.
Both employment and further study performance indicators are included in this
publication and are therefore nationally benchmarked against other HEIs. In light of
recent and proposed changes to higher education (including tuition fees,
performance indicators, league tables, and increased public awareness and
accountability in higher education) the importance of this data should not be
underestimated, as adverse performance indicators may impact on future
recruitment and funding.

Findings from the DLHE survey should also be utilised internally as part of
programme development and review to ensure that students are developing the
appropriate skills and attributes to find work or further study in their chosen field.

2. Data Collection Methods


The population target/sample for the DLHE survey is provided by HESA and is based
on the completion/graduation returns submitted by Ravensbourne each July. For the
2004/05 DLHE and beyond, HESA have introduced two collection points: April and
January. The April collection point surveyed graduates who completed their course
between 1st August and 31st December 2004, whilst the January survey focused on
graduates who had completed their course between 1st January and 31st August
2005.

The population target for the April survey was 9 and 371 for the January survey
(including home and other EU, both part-time and full-time).

HESA requires a minimum response rate of 80% for the DLHE return to be valid.
Given the significance of this information and the uncertainty as to the qualification

5
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

used in the performance indicator, it is vital that each programme has at least an
80% response rate. To ensure this, contact details must be accurately recorded and
maintained beyond graduation. Course leaders can also help by raising awareness
of the survey and its importance prior to graduation.

The data collection process established by HESA uses a standard questionnaire and
instructions, and two surveys: a postal survey (which, if required, can be repeated)
and a telephone survey. The postal questionnaire for the April survey was distributed
in April 2005. This was then followed up with a telephone survey of those who had
not responded. The questionnaire required graduates to comment on their
employment situation as of 15th April 2005. The January survey was distributed in
December 2005, with a telephone survey between January and March 2006. The
key date was 14th January 2006. Previous or future changes cannot be included.

3. Response Rates
6 graduates (67%) responded to the April survey and 3 (33%) were unobtainable.

332 (89%) graduates responded to the January survey and 39 (11%) were
unobtainable. Of the 332 graduates, 324 (98%) completed the survey and 8 (2%)
refused. The response rate was the same as the 2003/04 survey.

4. Findings
4.1 Overview
Of the 330 graduates who responded to the survey, 211 (64%) were working, 97
(29%) were undertaking further study, 9 (3%) were unemployed and 13 (4%) were
unavailable for work. Of those working, 117 (55%) were in roles related to their
studies, 53 (25%) were freelancing and 41 (19%) in jobs unrelated to their study.

6
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

NUMBER OF
DESTINATION
GRADUATES
Working – subject related 117
Self-employed / Freelance 53
Working – non subject related 41
TOTAL WORKING 211
Not available for work 13
Unemployed seeking work 9
TOTAL NOT WORKING 22
Further study at Ravensbourne 86
Further study elsewhere 11
TOTAL GOING ONTO FURTHER STUDY 97
REFUSED TO COMPLETE QUESTIONNAIRE 8
TOTAL UNOBTAINABLE 42
TOTAL 380

Of the 211 graduates who were employed, 152 (72%) felt that the qualification they obtained
helped them to get the job and 65 (31%) commented that Ravensbourne helped them to get
the job through contacts, the degree show, referrals and work placements.

In comparison to 2003/04 findings, the employment figures have slightly dropped by


2% (2003/04 - 194 / 66%). However, the percentage of unemployed has dropped by
half from 17 (6%) in 2003-04 to 9 (3%) and the further study figures have increased
75 / 25% in 2003/04 to 97 / 29% in 2004/05.

The following analysis examines the DLHE responses by programme of study. This
information should be fed into programme review and development.

4.2 Faculty of Communication Media


4.2.1 Cert HE Broadcast Post Production
Of the 9 graduates asked to complete the survey, 7 replied and 1 was unobtainable.
This equates to 78% response rate. The following destination results are based on
the responses from the 7 graduates who completed the survey.

7
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

The findings show that 1 (14%) of the graduates surveyed was employed as a
freelance editor and the rest (6, 86%) were undertaking further study; 5 have
continued their studies at Ravensbourne, whilst 1 graduate is now studying at the
National Film School, Denmark:

Destination of leavers Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Freelance 1 14
Further Study 6 86
Total 7 100

The graduate in employment was female, White British and aged 27. Those studying
were all male, with an average age of 24. 3 were White British, 1 was White Other
Background, 1 was Mixed – White and Black Caribbean and 1 was Unknown.

4.2.2 Foundation Degree Broadcast Digital Technology


4 graduates completed the survey. 3 were freelancing in engineering and technical
operations. The other graduate was studying on the BA (Hons) Broadcast Production
at Ravensbourne.

4.2.3 Foundation Degree Broadcast Media Technology


Of the 12 graduates asked to complete the survey, 9 replied and 3 were
unobtainable. This equates to 75% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 9 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 6 (67%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (5/83% as
employees and 1/17% as a self-employed/freelancer) and 3 (33%) were undertaking
further study at Ravensbourne.

All of the graduates in employment were working as broadcast engineers/technicians


and were based in London and Nigeria. They were employed by:
• Adstream
• MTV
• Satellite Information Services
• SNG Broadcast Services
• U-Media

8
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

All were male with an average age of 28. 67% (4) were White British and 33% (2)
were Black or Black British – African.

4.2.4 Foundation Degree Broadcast Operations and Production


Of the 68 graduates asked to complete the survey, 62 replied and 6 were
unobtainable. This equates to 91% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 62 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 25 (40%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (18/72%
as employees and 7/28% as self-employed/freelancers), 34 (55%) were undertaking
further study at Ravensbourne, and 3 (5%) were travelling and therefore unavailable
for work.

Of the 25 graduates employed 22 (88%) were working in roles related to their study
and 3 (12%) were not:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Camera Operation 7 28
Runner - Ops 3 12
Technician / Trainee Engineer 4 16
MCR Ops 1 4
Photographer 1 4
Production Assistant 2 8
Sound Assistant 1 4
Editors Assistant 1 4
Floor Manager 1 4
Ingest Operator 1 4
Unrelated Work 3 12
Total 25 100

9
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

FdA Broadcast Operations and Production - Graduates field


of work
Floor Manager Ingest Operator
4% 4%
Unrelated Work
Editors Assistant 12%
4%
Sound Assistant
4%
Production
Assistant
8% Camera
operation
Photographer 28%
4%
Technician /
MCR Ops Trainee
4% Runner - Ops
Engineer
12%
16%

Those working in jobs related to their study were employed by:


• Advance Broadcasting
• Ariel Camera Systems
• Channel 4 / ITN
• Fallon
• Globecast
• Image 2000
• Input Media
• ITV News Channel
• Optimistic Network
• Pacific TV
• Roll to Record
• Ruggle Media
• Sit-Up TV
• Sky news
• The Photo Artists
• Zone Vision

Graduates were based in the South East, Leeds and Lincoln. The average age of
those working in subject related roles was 23. 6 (27%) were female and 16 (73%)
were male. 21 (95%) were White British and 1 (5%) was Other Ethnic Background.

10
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

4.2.5 Foundation Degree Broadcast Post Production


Of the 13 graduates asked to complete the survey, 11 replied, 1 refused and 1 was
unobtainable. This equates to 92% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 11 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 2 (18%) of the graduates surveyed were employed, 8 (73%)
were undertaking further study at Ravensbourne and 1 (9%) was travelling and
therefore unavailable for work:

The 2 graduates that were employed are working in roles related to their programme
of study:

Breakdown by occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


VT Technician 1 50
Editing 1 50
Total 2 100

One was employed by the Moving Picture Company and the other by Channel 4.
Those in employment were both White British, with an average age of 25. One was
male and one female.

4.2.6 Foundation Degree Computer Visualisation and Animation


Of the 42 graduates sampled, 41 completed the survey. This equates to a 98%
response rate. The following destination results are based on the responses from the
41 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 4 (10%) of the graduates surveyed were working, 1 (2%)
were unemployed, 2 (5%) unavailable for work, and 34 (83%) were undertaking
further study at Ravensbourne. All graduates in further study are on the BA (Hons)
Animation at Ravensbourne.

11
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

Destination of leavers Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Working 4 10
Unemployed 1 2
Further Study 34 83
Gap year 1 2
Travelling 1 2
Total 41 100

2 (50%) out of the 4 graduates who found employment were working in subject-
related fields:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Animation - Games 1 25
Animation - Film 1 25
Unrelated work 2 50
Total 4 100

The graduates working in subject-related roles were employed by:


• Hibbert Animation
• Sony Corporation

Both were based in London. The average age of those working in subject related
roles was 25. Both were male and White British.

4.2.7 Foundation Degree Creative Sound Design


All of the 6 graduates sampled completed the survey. The following destination
results are based on the responses from all of the 6 graduates who completed the
survey.

The findings show that 2 (33%) of the graduates were working in roles relating to
their subject of study and 4 (67%) of the graduates were undertaking further study at
Ravensbourne. Those working were employed by TTMT, in Brighton, as a Website
Promoter and BBC Asian Network, in Birmingham, as a Sound Technician. Both
were male with an average age of 26. One was White-British and the other Asian or
Asian British-Indian.

12
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

4.2.8 BA (Hons) Animation


Of the 28 graduates asked sampled, 20 completed the survey, 2 refused and 6 were
unobtainable. This equates to 79% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 20 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 15 (75%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (11/73%
as employees and 4/27% freelancing/self employment), 1 (5%) was unemployed, 1
(5%) was undertaking further study and 3 (15%) were unavailable for work:

Destination of leavers Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Working 11 50
Freelance / Self-employed 4 18
Unemployed 1 5
Refused 2 9
Further study 1 5
Travelling 2 9
Preparing Portfolio 1 5
Total 22 100

Of the 15 that were employed (including both employed and freelance), 9 (60%)
were in work related to their programme of study:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Animator / assistants 3 20
Design related work 3 20
Architectural work 1 7
Broadcast related work 2 13
Unrelated Work 6 40
Total 15 100

13
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

Animation - Graduates field of work

Broadcast
related work
25%

Architectural
work
13%

Design related
work
25% Animator /
assistants
37%

The graduates in subject-related roles were employed by:


• BDN
• Creative Assembly
• Escape Studios
• Fubra Ltd
• Inter Reality
• Julian Thahov
• The Mill

One graduate was working in Bulgaria. The others were based in the South East.

The graduate undertaking further study was at Bournemouth University.

89% (8) of graduates in subject-related employment (including freelancers) were


male. 56% (5) were White British, 22% (2) Other White Background, 11% (1) Asian
or Asian British – Indian and 11 (1%) Other Ethnic Background. The average age of
those in employment was 23.

4.2.9 BA (Hons) Broadcast Production


Of the 35 graduates asked to complete the survey, 29 replied, 2 refused and 5 were
unobtainable. This equates to 89% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 29 graduates who completed the survey.

14
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

The findings show that 27 (93%) of the graduates surveyed were employed
(including 20 (74%) employees and 7 (26%) freelance/self-employed), 1 (3%) was
undertaking further study at the University of Greenwich and 1 (3%) was
unemployed.

Of the 27 that were employed, 25 (93%) were in work related to their programme of
study:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Camera Operations 5 19
Multi Skilled Operators 5 19
Researcher 2 7
Editor 3 11
Studio Management 2 7
Producer 1 4
Director / Assistant 2 7
Graphics Ops 2 7
Transmission Controller 1 4
Dubbing Mixer 1 4
Media Studies Teacher 1 4
Unrelated work 2 7
Total 27 100

BA (Hons) Broadcast Production - Field of Work


Media Studies
Transmission Dubbing Mixer Teacher Unrelated work
Controller 4% 4% 7%
4%
Graphics Ops
7%
Camera
Director /
Operations
Assistant
19%
7%
Producer
4%
Studio
Management
7% Multi Skilled
Editor Operators
11% 19%
Researcher
7%

Graduates working in subject-related roles are employed by:


• ABS
• Advanced Broadcast Services

15
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

• Audioworks South
• Channel 4
• Chelsea TV
• Cruet Company
• Elan Productions
• Freemantle Media
• Granada TV
• Grays Media College
• Great Big British Quiz
• Home Choice
• Ladbrookes
• London studios
• Media solutions
• Optimistic Network
• Quiz TV
• QVC
• Roll to Record
• Sit-Up TV

All of the graduates were based in London.

88% (22) of the graduates in subject-related employment (including freelancing)


were White British, 4% (1) White Scottish, 4% (1) Asian or Asian British –Indian and
4% (1) refused information. 84% (21) were male. The average age of those in
employment was 24.

4.2.10 BA (Hons) Content Creation for Broadcasting and New Media


Of the 26 graduates asked to complete the survey, 20 replied and 1 refused to give
any information and 5 were unobtainable. This equates to 81% response rate. The
following destination results are based on the responses from the 20 graduates who
completed the survey.

The findings show that all of the graduates surveyed were employed. Of the 20 that
were in employment, 13 (65%) were working in broadcasting (9/69% as employees
and 4/31% as freelancers):

16
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Runner 3 15
Producer / Assistant 4 20
Researcher 4 20
Broadcast award co-ordinator 1 5
Photographer 1 5
Unrelated Work 7 35
Total 20 100

Content Creation for Broadcasting and New Media -


Graduates field of work

Unrelated Work
35%

Runner
15%
Photographer
5%
Broadcast
award co-
ordinator
5% Producer /
Assistant
20%
Researcher
20%

The graduates working in subject-related roles were employed by:


• BBC
• Betty TV
• Celador
• Endemol
• HA Media
• North One
• Pacific TV
• Promax
• Spun Gold TV
• The Mill

All but one of the graduates were working in the South East. The other was working
in Birmingham.

17
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

69% (9) of graduates in subject-related employment (full-time, freelancers and


unpaid) were White British, 8% (1) Other Ethnic Background, 8% (1) Other Mixed
Background, 8% (1) Mixed – White and Asian and 8% (1) Unknown. 31% of those in
employment were female. The average age of those in employment was 25.

4.2.11 BA (Hons) Graphic Design


Of the 19 graduates asked to complete the survey, 18 replied and 1 was
unobtainable. This equates to 95% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 18 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 12 (67%) graduates were in full-time employment, 1 (6%) was
freelancing, 2 (11%) working part-time, 1 (6%) was due to start within a month of the
survey and 2 (11%) were undertaking further study.

12 (75%) out of the 16 graduates in employment were working in roles related to


their programme of study:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Graphic Designer 9 56
Branding Designer 1 6
Web Designer 2 13
Unrelated to Subject 4 25
Total 16 100

Graphic Design - Graduates field of work

Unrelated Work
27%

Graphic Design
Web Designer 59%
7%

Branding
Design
7%

The graduates worked for:


• Aylesford Property
• Acre Resources

18
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

• Bromley Council
• CDT
• Hansell Design
• Iris
• North Star Publishing
• Nucleus
• The Brewery
• Urban

All were working in the South East.

10 (83%) of graduates in subject-related employment were White British, 1 (8%)


Other White Background and 1 (8%) Other Ethnic Background. The average age
was 24. 7 (58%) of those in subject related employment were male. Both graduates
undertaking further study were also male.

4.2.12 BA (Hons) Moving Image Design


Of the 17 graduates asked to complete the survey, 14 replied to the survey and 1
refused. This equates to 88% response rate. The following destination results are
based on the responses from the 14 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that all of the graduates surveyed were in employment: 9 (64%)
were in full-time employment, 4 (29%) were freelancing and 1 (7%) was working
part-time.

Destination of leavers Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Working – full-time 9 64
Freelancing 4 29
Working – part-time 1 7
Total 14 100

13 out of the 14 graduates were working in fields relating to their programme of


study:

19
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Animator / Designer 3 21
Motion Graphic Design 8 57
Applications Specialist 1 7
Runner 1 7
Unrelated Work 1 7
Total 14 100

Moving Image Design - Graduates field of work


Unrelated Work
7% Animator /
Designer
Runner
21.4%
7.1%

Applications
Specialist
7.1%

Motion Graphic
Design
57.1%

The graduates employed in subject related roles, worked for the following
organisations:
• Abbey Road Interactive
• Bikini Films
• Communicator Ltd
• Crush Inc
• Home Choice
• Jump Design
• Lightmill
• Quantel
• Silent Productions
• United Visual Arts

11 (85%) of those in subject-related employment were working in London, 1 (8%) in


Demark and 1 (8%) in Canada.

20
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

6 (46%) of graduates in subject-related employment (including those in full-time


employment and freelancers) were White British, 4 (31%) Other White Background,
2 (15%) Other Ethnic Background and 1 (8%) refused. 10 (77%) of those in subject–
related employment (including those in full-time employment and freelancers) were
male and 3 (23%) female. The average age was 25.

4.3 Faculty of Design


4.3.1 BA (Hons) Fashion – 2 year fast – track
Of the 9 graduates asked to complete the survey, 7 replied and 2 was unobtainable.
This equates to 78% response rate. The following destination results are based on
the responses from the 7 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 5 (71%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (of which
40%/2 were freelancing and 60%/3 were employees) and 2 (29%) were undertaking
further study (at the University of Bournemouth and Central St Martins).

Out of the 5 graduates in work, 4 were working in the fashion industry:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Fashion Design 3 60
Shop Manager - Fashion retail 1 20
Unrelated Work - Musician 1 20
Total 5 100

Fashion 2 Yr - Graduates field of work


Unrelated Work -
Shop Manager - Musician
Fashion retail 20%
20%

Fashion Design
60%

21
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

The graduates were working for:


• d/k
• French Connection
• Mulberry

Graduates were working in New York and London.

1 (25%) of graduates in subject-related employment was White British, 2 (50%) were


Other White Background and 1 (25%) was Asian or Asian British – Indian. 50% of
those in subject-related employment were female. The average age was 25.

4.3.2 BA (Hons) Fashion – 3 year


Of the 36 graduates asked to complete the survey, 33 replied and 3 were
unobtainable. This equates to a 92% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 33 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 28 (85%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (of which
7 (25%) were freelancing), 3 (9%) were unavailable for work and 2 (6%) were
unemployed.

Destination of leavers Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Employed 19 58
Freelance / self employed 7 21
Unpaid work 1 3
Travelling 3 9
Due to start in 1 month 1 3
Unemployed 2 6
Total 33 100

22
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

Of the 28 graduates employed, 22 (79%) were working in the fashion industry:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % surveyed


Fashion Design - Employed 9 32
Freelance / Self-employed -
Design 7 25
Fashion Promotion 1 4
Visual Merchandiser 1 4
Fashion Retail 4 14
Unrelated Work 6 21
Total 28 100

Fashion 3Yr - Graduates field of work


Unrelated Work
21%

Fashion Retail
14%

Visual
Merchandiser
4%
Fashion
Promotion
4% Fashion Design -
Freelance / Self- Employed
employed - 32%
Design
25%

The graduates working in fashion-related roles were employed by:


• 6876 Ltd
• Alison Hume 101
• Amelia De La Morna
• Collection Design Studio
• Decypher
• Fern Hirst
• French Connection
• Gharani Strok
• Hardy Amies
• International Textile design
• John Richmond

23
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

• Keeler Gordon
• Knickerbox
• Members Cnly
• Next Retail
• Nikki Fukai
• Reiss
• River Island
• Tesco

The graduates were working in London and Italy.

82% (18) of graduates in subject-related employment (including freelancers) were


White British, 5% (1) White Irish, 9% (2) Other White Background and 5% (1)
Chinese. 77% (17) of those in employment were female. The average age of those in
employment was 24.

4.3.3 BA (Hons) Interaction Design


Of the 9 graduates asked to complete the survey, 8 replied and 1 was unobtainable.
This equates to 89% response rate. The following destination results are based on
the responses from the 8 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 6 (75%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (of which
2 (33%) are freelancing and 4 (67%) are employees) and 2 (25%) are unemployed.

5 (83%) of the 6 graduates in employment were employed roles relating to their


programme of study.

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % of surveyed


Web Based Design 2 33
IT Consultant 1 17
Interactive Media Design roles 2 33
Unrelated Work 1 17
Total 6 100

24
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

Interaction - Graduates field of work

Unrelated Work
17%
Interactive Media
Design roles
33%

Web Based
Design
33%
IT Consultant
17%

The graduates were employed by the following organisations in London:


• Apple Computers
• Bluechip
• Jones-Yarrell
• JP Morgan
• Sabotage

40% (2) of graduates in employment (including freelancers) were White British, 40%
(2) Chinese and 20% (1) Black or Black British African. 80% (4) of those in
employment were male. The average age of those in employment was 27.

4.3.4 BA (Hons) Interior Design and Environment Architectures


Of the 12 graduates asked to complete the survey, 10 replied and 1 refused and 1
was unobtainable. This equates to 92% response rate. The following destination
results are based on the responses from the 10 graduates who completed the
survey.

The findings show that 9 (90%) of the graduates surveyed were employed (of which
3 (33%) were freelancing) and 1 (10%) was unavailable for work.

Out of the 9 graduates in work, 7 (78%) were working design related roles:
Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % of surveyed
Interior Design / Architecture 5 44
Self-employed / Designer 2 22
Unrelated work 2 33
Total 9 100

25
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

Interior Design and Environment Architectures -


Graduates field of work

Unrelated work
33%

Interior Design /
Architecture
45%

Self-employed /
Designer
22%

Graduates were working for the following companies


• Architecture PLB
• David Collins Design
• Habitat
• Imagination Ltd
• Madis Interiors

All but one of the graduates were working in London. The other was working in
Sweden.

71% (5) of the graduates in subject-related employment (including full-time and


freelancers) were White British, 14% (1) Other White Background, 14% (1) Mixed –
White and Black Caribbean. 57% (4) of those were female. The average age of
those in employment was 27.

4.3.5 BA (Hons) Product and Furniture Design


Of the 34 graduates asked to complete the survey, 30 replied and 4 were
unobtainable. This equates to 88% response rate. The following destination results
are based on the responses from the 30 graduates who completed the survey.

The findings show that 27 (90%) of the graduates surveyed were employed, 1 (3%)
was undertaking further study at Exeter University and 2 (7%) were unemployed. Of
those in employment, 12 (44%) were working full-time, 9 (33%) were freelancing/self-

26
2004/05 Destination of Leavers from Higher Education Survey
Findings

employed, 3 (11%) part-time, 2 (7%) unpaid and 1 (4%) was due to start work within
a month of the survey.

Of the 27 graduates in work, 21 (78%) were working in a design related field:

Breakdown of occupation Graduates surveyed % of surveyed


Self-employed / Freelance
Designer 9 33
Employed Product Design related
role 7 26
Assistant Architect 1 4
New Media Designer 1 4
CAD Technician 1 4
Marketing / PR in design firm 1 4
3D Graphic Artist 1 4
Unrelated work 6 22
Total 27 100

Product & Furniture Design - Graduates field of work

Self-employed /
Freelance
Unrelated work
Designer
22%
32%

3D Graphic
Artist
4%

Marketing / PR
in design firm
4% Employed
Product Design
CAD Technician related role
New Media Assistant
4% 26%
Designer Architect
4% 4%

The graduates working in design-related roles were employed by:


• Andrew Stafford
• Beyond
• Bluestuff
• Drood Design
• Emporia Lingerie
• Frederik Roije

27
Enterprise and Employability Unit
Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication

• Haves & Davidson


• Maiden Outdoor Adverts
• Matthew Hilton
• Michael Sodau Partnership
• Monitor Audio
• My Design Company
• Next PLC
• O'Reilly Architects
• Pineapple Contracts
• Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication
• Stephen Reed Industrial Design
• Tom Dixon
• Vitra Holding AG

Graduates are working in London, Leeds, Switzerland and Holland.

61% (13) of graduates in subject-related employment (including freelancers) were


White British, 14% (3) Other White Background, 5% (1) Other Ethnic Background
and 5% (1) Asian or Asian British – Indian. 19% (4) were women and 81% (17) were
men. The average age of those in employment was 25.

4.4 Postgraduate
4.4.1 Interactive Digital Media
Only 1 graduate was required to complete the survey. He was employed as a New
Media Designer for Fox, Cal and Mnaski, an advertising agency based in London.

28