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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical

Engineering

MPY 315
Practical Training Report
Compiled by:
Charles F Chivengah

Period:
1 December 2014 to 16 January 2015

Degree course and year:


BEng Mechanical (4 Year)

Student number:
13202953

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

Summary
The main objective of practical training is to develop an insight in the practical
application of engineering science in industry and the related human relationships
and safety aspects.
I did my practical training at an automotive engineering company, Automotive
Precision Engineering (A.P.E.).
Automotive Precision Engineering (Pvt) Ltd
2nd Ave, Mutare, Zimbabwe
Phone:
+263 206 2840
Fax:
+263 206 5446

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

Acknowledgments
It is always a pleasure to remind the fine people in the engineering program for their
sincere guidance I received to uphold my practical as well as theoretical skills in
engineering.
Firstly I would like to thank Dr. Lauber Martins for meticulously planning the
academic module in such a way that students are industry ready by including such
industrial training patterns.
I would also like to acknowledge and give my heartfelt gratitude to Ms Foster who
continuously supported me in every possible way and giving me an opportunity to
work at her establishment.
I express my immense pleasure and deep sense of gratitude to Mr Mchemwa
(Foreman) and my guide and solicitor Mr Dzingai (Technician) for spending his
valuable time with me and also helping me in the completion of task.
Automotive Precision Engineering (Pvt) Ltd
2nd Ave, Mutare, Zimbabwe

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

Contents
SUMMARY....................................................................................II
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS.............................................................III
1 INTRODUCTION.......................................................................1
2 THEORETICAL WORK............................................................2
2.1 MILLING MACHINE.....................................................................2
2.2 REBORING MACHINE.................................................................3
2.3 HONING MACHINE.....................................................................4
2.4 CRANKSHAFT GRINDER.............................................................4
2.5 SURFACE GRINDER...................................................................5
2.6 LATHE MACHINE .......................................................................5
3 METHOD...................................................................................6
3.1 REBORING MACHINING..............................................................6
3.2 HONING MACHINING..................................................................6
3.3 CRANKSHAFT GRINDING............................................................7
3.4 SURFACE GRINDING..................................................................7
4 RESULTS..................................................................................8
4.1 REBORING MACHINE RESULTS ..................................................8
4.2 HONING MACHINE RESULTS.......................................................8
4.3 CRANKSHAFT GRINDER RESULTS .............................................9
4.4 SURFACE GRINDER ..................................................................9
5 SAFETY....................................................................................10
6 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT.................................................11
7 CONCLUSIONS........................................................................14
APPENDIX: REPORT ON PRACTICAL..............................................15

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

1 Introduction
Automotive Precision Engineering (Pvt) Ltd (APE) is a company which provides
quality service in the automotive engineering and general engineering fields for the
local and international markets. APE deals with the refurbishment, design and
machining of automotive components.

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

2 Theoretical Work
APE is a small company with not more than eight personnel working in the building.
The company has a drop off counter where the customer is informed on the services
required for the component and a quotation. If the customer agrees then a technician
is called to finalise on the exact specifications for the job.
There is a workshop behind the counter where all the work is done. The sales
person will give the technician the component together with its job number and
name. A grinder is used to write the job number on the component and it should not
be a part which is in direct contact in the movement of the engine parts.
The workshop consists of various machinery. The simplest being drills, hacksaws,
filing tools, measuring instruments and many more.

2.1 Milling Machine


The milling machine was used to machine metal, wood, and other solid materials
after a design was made.

Figure 1: Milling Machine


(http://www.nenabarreramachinery.com/vertical-milling-machine-b.jpg)

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

2.2 Reboring Machine


This machine was used to rebore the cylinders to a size which can accommodate the
sleeves or new pistons.
A cylinder is rebored because:
1. The piston to cylinder bore clearance is too large
2. There are deep scratches, grooves in the bore that hinder cylinder sealing
3. The bore is out round compared to the piston.

Figure 2: Reboring Machine


(http://www.maquina.com.cn/uploadfile/20130427/20130427151607302.jp
g)

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

2.3 Honing Machine


Works the same as a reboring machine but the cylinder diameter is reduced in small
divisions.

Figure 3: Honing Machine


(http://pimg.tradeindia.com/00367585/b/2/Vertical-Cylinder-HoningMachine.jpg)

2.4 Crankshaft Grinder


The crank grinder was used to grind the crankshaft to the next undersize. A crank is
ground because:
1. The clearance between the bearings and crankshaft is too large

Figure 4: Crankshaft Grinder


(http://www.rtsalesinc.com/web_quotes_english/Crankshaft_Camshaft_Equi
pment)
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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

2.5 Surface Grinder


A surface grinder is used to skim a small part of the cylinder head off. The cylinder
head is skimmed because:
1. The engine has overheated and this excess heat can distort the cylinder head in
the process.

Figure 5: Surface Grinder


(http://www.tecnoup.it/components/com_virtuemart/shop_image/product/S
330R)

2.6 Lathe Machine


The lathe machine was used to machine metal, wood, and other solid materials after
a design had been made.

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

Figure 6: Lathe Machine


(http://www.veerakumarmachines.com/images/lathe_05.jpg)

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

3 Method
After the technician had received the component he would place it next to the
respective machine. Unless the job is extremely urgent, the component cannot be
worked on before other components which arrived earlier are complete. Any
machining done is done in stages so as to not remove more than the right amount of
material. Measurements are taken between each machining process to check the
progress.

3.1 Reboring Machining


The customer needs to provide the pistons before reboring takes place. If resleeving
is required then both the pistons and sleeves are required. The technician needs to
work with these so that everything fits well in the end.
The machine would rebore the cylinders to a bore size which the sleeves can be
pressed in.
Once pressed in the sleeves, inside the cylinders, would be rebored to the size
required for the piston.

3.2 Honing Machining


Once again the customer needs to provide the pistons before honing takes place. A
small division is being removed and there is lubrication during the honing process.

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

3.3 Crankshaft Grinding


After the technician measures the next
undersize he or she needs to inform the customer which bearings to buy. Small
divisions are removed so lubrication is also required.

3.4 Surface Grinding


A spirit level is required for this process and small divisions will be removed in stages
until there is no light shining underneath the spirit level and the bubble is in the
centre.

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

4 Results
After the technician finishes working on a component, the foreman comes to assess
the quality of the job and whether it is ready for the customer or if it still needs work.
Final measurements are done on the component before it is placed by the collection
rack.
When the customer comes to collect the component the technician will be present to
explain the modifications made to it.

4.1Reboring Machine Results

4.2 Honing Machine Results

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

4.3 Crankshaft Grinder Results

4.4 Surface Grinder Results

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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

5 Safety
The company requires each employee working in the workshop to wear a worksuit
and safety shoes. When operating on any machine safety goggles are a necessity.
There are gloves available for use if the components being worked on are hot.

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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

6 Personnel Management
Automotive Precision Engineering (A.P.E.) is a small establishment so it is not
difficult to manage.
The Chief Executive Officer is Ms Foster and she is ultimately responsible for all dayto-day management decisions and for implementing the company's long and short
term plans. She develops budgets and ensures the department adheres to it. She is
also in charge of determining the salary brackets and handles employee relations.
Mr Foster is the General Manager of the company. He is responsible for the planning
and directing of operations of the company. His other duties include formulating
policies, managing daily operations, and planning the use of materials and human
resources.
Mr John is in charge of sales. His duties include the planning and carrying out of all
sales activities on assigned accounts or areas. He is responsible for ensuring
customer satisfaction and managing quality of product and service delivery.
The foreman, Mr Mchemwa, occupies the first supervisory tier above technicians. He
is responsible for the provision of an efficient and effective workshop in accordance
with the policy determined by the General Manager and to undertake the full range of
duties of a multi skilled technician. His duty is to determine customers needs and
respond as necessary in accordance with directions issued on customer care. The
foreman is also in charge of assessing learners and trainees.
There are three technicians required in the workshop. Technicians check the part to
diagnose and repair problems such as an overheated engine block or heavy fuel
consumption. They repair or replace components that are subject to wear, such as
cylinder sleeves.
Learners are considered employees and may receive entitlements the same as other
employees such as: sick leave, public holidays. They are required to attend work, do
the job and follow the employer's lawful instructions. Their duty is to assist with
workshop duties as well as receiving training on service of equipment, repairs,
inspection and calibration duties.
A customer usually arrives by the counter with his or her part and Mr John will assist.
If it is something beyond his understanding Mr Mchemwa will assist in diagnosing the
problem. Afterwards the customer pays and a job card is attached to the part.
A technician then collects the part, using a trolley if necessary, and engraves the job
number on the part. The engraved surface should not be directly involved in the
system dynamics.
Each technician has his own operating area they are specialist in, which could be
honing, boring or surface grinding.
The workshop is open from 8am to 5pm, Monday to Friday. There is a lunch break
every day from 12pm to 1pm and the workshop will be closed during this hour. The
company closes during weekends and all the holidays.
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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

An employee is entitled to 15 leave days per


year and he or she has to first discuss with Mr
Foster if it is possible to take them on certain days. The employee and Mr Foster
have to negotiate on dates but Mr Foster is not obliged to agree. There is a
shutdown period of about 2 weeks in December and an employee is not obliged to
coincide his or her sick leave during this shutdown period.
A maximum of 10 sick leave days are allowed per year and if an employee cannot
attend work due to injuries on the job it is not considered a sick leave. If a person
cannot make it to work he or she must inform the person above them as soon as
possible.

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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

Ms
Foste
r
(CEO

Mr Foster
(GM)

Mr John
(Sales)

Mr Mchemwa
(Foreman)

Mr
Dzingai
(Technicia
n)

Mr Blessing
(Technician)

Learners

15

Mr
Innocent
(Technicia
n)

Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

7 Conclusion
From the report it is evident that the company is running well. It is a small company
therefore it is easy to monitor what goes on in the workshop.
There is great communication between the workers and they offer quality services
which are recognised in the country.
I would recommend that they replace some of the machinery which has aged and
may be hard for the technicians to use.
However it was a great experience being part of their team.

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Department Mechanical & Aeronautical


Engineering

Appendix: Report on Practical

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