You are on page 1of 139

COURSE HANDBOOK 

2007­2008 enrolment

BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 

Validated by the University of Sussex 
Foreword 

Welcome to Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication and 
congratulations on achieving a place on a higher education course at Ravensbourne. 

Your Handbook is an indispensable work of reference. This Course Handbook 
outlines the purposes and content of your degree. 

Please read it carefully – it will contain answers to many of your questions – and 
keep it so that you can refer to it again during your time at the College. 

It should be read in conjunction with the following documents. 

Student Contract Handbook 2007­  http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/quality/docs/Final 
2008  StudentContract2007­2008.pdf 
Academic Regulations for the Awards  http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/registry/Academic 
of BA and BSc  Regulations.htm 

Together with ‘Information – For new students from the UK and EU’ handbook or 
‘Information – For new international students’ handbook already sent to you. 

While every effort has been made to ensure accuracy, some of the information in this 
Handbook will become out of date rapidly, i.e. computer resources and software. This 
will be corrected in annual editions of the Handbook. It is intended that this document 
will be available in other formats, such as electronically and on the College Quality 
Intranet site (http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/quality/CourseHandbooks.htm). If you have 
any questions about your course, please see your Subject Leader or Head of 
Faculty. 

We hope you enjoy your course!

Quality Team  2  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Contents 

Page No. 

Introduction  4 

Educational Aims of the Programme  5 

Intended Learning Outcomes  6 
Knowledge and Understanding  6 
Practical/Professional Skills  7 
Intellectual Skills  8 
Transferable Skills  9 

Assessment Regulations and Principles  10 

Resources and Services  12 

E Learning  14 

Multidisciplinary Environment  14 

Unit List  15 

Unit Map  16 

Outcome Map  19 

Level 1 units  24 

Level 2 units  65 

Level 3 units  106 

Learning and Teaching Glossary  130 

Personal Tutorials ­ Guidelines  135 

Course Committees and Student Course Representation  137 

Contacts  138

Quality Team  3  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Introduction 

This programme is concerned with the development of the creative professional 
practice, technological knowledge and theoretical understanding necessary to enter a 
variety of careers in the area of design for interaction. 

In the context of this course, interaction design deals with the design of any product 
that requires a human to interact with technology. It is not purely design for the 
internet, although the exploration of the potential offered by this medium is fully 
explored, but it also encompasses the design and form of physical and virtual 
environments and artefacts. 

Students will have opportunities to develop creative skills in web design, interactive 
television, virtual reality, games, interactive spaces and interactive products. These 
skills will be reinforced by a comprehensive technical and theoretical understanding 
of the forces which drive and influence the interactive experience. 

Level 1 of the course deals with the design process and the underpinning skills and 
theory necessary to engage in interaction design. Activity in this level focuses 
primarily with on screen interaction and its conventions. Curriculum areas include 
storytelling, usability, typography and non­linear narrative along with software skills. 
All these “tools” are used as drivers for creative activities and are utilised in the 
visualisation and presentation of the outcomes of this creative thinking. Some of the 
course projects will be conducted in collaboration with students from other courses. 

In Level 2, students consolidate the skills developed in the first level and gain a 
broader understanding of how their new skills can be applied as they begin to 
engage with more challenging and complex media and environments. Project work 
will enable students to explore areas such as interactive television and virtual 
environments. In some cases, projects will involve collaborations with other courses. 

In Level 3, students develop more individual, independent lines of enquiry in the 
subject area through the medium of self­initiated projects and an accompanying 
dissertation. Artefacts created at this level may range from screen­based interfaces 
to multi user musical instruments to relational repositories of memories and images 
to innovative web sites. Students will also have the opportunity to enter national and 
international design competitions. Students will create a professional portfolio, which 
will act as a self­promotional device to aid the student transition into full time work.

Quality Team  4  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Educational Aims of the Programme 

The course aims to provide graduates with the knowledge and skills appropriate to a 
range of career outcomes in design for interaction. Students are encouraged to 
develop their individual creative ability and support this with the development of a 
high level of technical skills. In particular, the programme aims to enable students to 
develop:

· a range of creative, technical and professional skills relevant to employment in 
interaction design and related areas;

· an understanding of the key critical, social, cultural, historical and business 
concepts, issues and debates relevant to the area of interaction design;

· a comprehensive knowledge of contemporary professional practice and the 
creative process in the professional field in which they will specialise and an 
awareness of current areas of development and innovation;

· the ability to make creative use of and experiment with new and existing 
technologies;

· a clear vision of where their creative strengths lie and how this can be utilised 
in product development and potential career opportunities;

· skills in research, analysis, problem solving and critical reflection and the 
visual, written and verbal communication skills required of a graduate entrant 
to the interaction design industry;

· initiative and personal responsibility, experience of collaborative working 
methods and the ability to be responsive and adaptable to changing needs, 
and the transferable skills and competencies which enable life­long learning.

Quality Team  5  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Intended Learning Outcomes 

This programme provides opportunities for students to develop and demonstrate 
knowledge and understanding, skills, qualities and other attributes in the following 
areas: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

A knowledge and understanding of: 

1.  the design process in general and specifically in interaction design 
2.  the nature of interactivity and non linearity 
3.  the nature of representation within the sphere of “on screen” narrative 
4.  the nature of the data and processes used in the creation of interactive 
artefacts 
5.  the depth and breadth of the technologies upon which the discipline of Design 
for Interaction is based 
6.  the nature of human form, thought processes, its needs and responses in 
given situations relating to the usability of designed artefacts 
7.  computation in design and its application 
8.  the analysis of function 
9.  the creative potential of digital technologies 
10. the nature of technological change and the impermanence of knowledge 
11. key business processes necessary to underpin graduate employment in the 
creative industries 
12. a critical understanding of design practice and theory in the context of history, 
society, contemporary global culture, business and an appreciation of the 
significance of the work of other practitioners 

Teaching and Learning Methods 

Learning and teaching in relation to these learning outcomes tends to be primarily 
project based (see Practical and Professional Skills below). This is supported by 
varied learning and teaching methods which may include as appropriate: project 
briefings, studio based lectures, (staff and student led) group seminars, technical or 
practical workshops, demonstrations, critiques, individual or group tutorials and self 
directed study by the student. 

Learning is facilitated by well qualified permanent teaching staff and by sessional 
staff and visiting speakers who are practising professionals and bring an important 
industry perspective to the course. Traditional modes of delivery may be supported 
where appropriate by e­learning and/or resource based learning. 

Contextual and theoretical learning are delivered both as an integral part of the 
practice based units and separately in a progressive series of mandatory cross­ 
College units. This prevents a theory/practice dichotomy while ensuring that this 
aspect of learning is sufficiently weighted in the curriculum.

Quality Team  6  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Assessment Methods 

Knowledge and understanding is primarily assessed through essays, reports and 
individual and group presentations, and through its application in practical projects in 
a manner appropriate to each unit of delivery. Some units additionally require the 
submission of rationales, background research, development materials and/or 
evidence of reflection on the project process. 

Practical/Professional Skills 

Able to: 

1.  demonstrate an understanding of the skills used by the various branches of 
interaction design and how they are articulated 
2.  use digital technology creatively as part of the design process and as a tool for 
presentation and communication 
3.  articulate design proposals and concepts clearly, using a variety of appropriate 
media 
4.  define a design proposal for an interaction project which meets the 
requirements of professional practice 
5.  plan projects so that deadlines are met and all work is of required quality or 
better at these deadlines 
6.  deal effectively with the unexpected from both internal (personal environment) 
and external (client) sources 
7.  know what is achievable both personally and within a group situation 
8.  understand the nature of the professional experience in interaction design 
9.  work within a design process and to contribute to this 
10. understand the use of iconography when applied to interactive artefacts 
11. select, test and make appropriate use of processes and materials in the 
development of prototypes from design ideas 
12. complete a significant design project proposal and carry it through to a 
successful conclusion 

Teaching and Learning Methods 

Professional and practical skills are gained primarily through self­directed project 
based learning. 

Supported by staff, students work on project briefs designed to foster creative, 
technical and academic skills while progressively introducing professional contexts 
and constraints. This approach is student­centred, encourages deep learning, builds 
problem solving ability and integrates academic with professional learning. Students 
learn to take responsibility for their own learning progressively. Some projects are 
intentionally collaborative encouraging team working and peer learning. This may 
involve students from other courses. 

Projects are supported by briefings, studio lectures, workshops, critiques, group 
seminars and student self directed study. Learning is facilitated by permanent 
teaching staff and by sessional staff and visiting speakers who are practising 
professionals and bring an important industry perspective to the course. These

Quality Team  7  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
methods may be supported where appropriate by e­learning and/or resource based 
learning. The project based approach culminates in independently negotiated project 
work in the final level of the course. 

Assessment Methods 

Practical and professional skills are assessed primarily through their application in 
project work submitted for summative assessment. Some units additionally require 
the submission of rationales, background research, development materials and/or 
evidence of reflection on the process of development. An individual or group 
presentation may form part of the assessment requirements of some projects. 

Intellectual Skills 

Able to: 

1.  generate ideas, concepts, proposals, solutions or arguments independently 
and/or collaboratively in response to set briefs and/or as self­initiated activity 
2.  be intellectually curious, analytical and reflective, capable of carrying out 
sustained independent enquiry and develop the skills that underpin 
professional development and life­long learning 
3.  understand the similarities and differences between the interrelated disciplines 
of design and their interaction 
4.  be entrepreneurial, imaginative, have divergent thinking skills and think 
creatively whilst still satisfying the needs of the project/client 
5.  understand and simulate interactive environments 
6.  place their own work critically in the context of business, culture, society, the 
environment, ethics, history, and be aware of the impact politics and 
economics can have on the relevance of design 
7.  understand that the acquisition of knowledge is continuous and ongoing 
professional and personal development is essential 
8.  critically assess work with reference to existing and emerging professional 
and/or academic debates 

Teaching and Learning Methods 

Intellectual skills are gained primarily through lectures, seminars, workshops, 
individual tutorials and self­directed study but also through project based learning. 

Students are introduced to a variety of research and analytical methods through the 
contextual elements of the course and apply them in an independent major study and 
the preparation of a dissertation in the third level of the course. Project based 
learning stimulates analysis, contextual and visual research, problem solving, 
creative thinking and personal reflection. 

Assessment Methods 

Students are primarily assessed through a variety of means including essays, 
presentations and a dissertation. Some elements are assessed through their 
application in submitted project materials. This may include rationales, background

Quality Team  8  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
research, development materials and/or evidence of reflection on the process of 
development in addition to practical material. 

Transferable Skills 

Able to: 

1.  work independently, setting own aims, objectives and deadlines to manage 
learning, workload and projects, including time, personnel and resources 
2.  work effectively and collaboratively with others in a team from a variety of 
backgrounds and disciplines 
3.  manage information in a range of media, selecting and using a variety of 
sources and technologies to evaluate and record/present information 
4.  articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms, and 
communicate ideas and work clearly and appropriately to a variety of 
audiences, including technical and non­technical audiences 
5.  produce work that is literate, numerate and coherent, deploying established 
techniques of analysis and enquiry 
6.  identify, define and creatively solve problems, using appropriate knowledge, 
tools and methods, often in complex and unpredictable situations 
7.  demonstrate critical awareness and reflection through evaluating own 
strengths and weaknesses, and adapting proposals and plans accordingly 

Teaching and Learning Methods 

Students develop transferable skills primarily through self­directed project activity, 
which progressively introduces professional contexts. 

Though most learning takes place during the projects and through students’ critical 
and reflective responses to these, this aspect of learning is supported by a Personal 
and Professional Development unit in each of the course levels. The first level 
concentrates on ensuring that students ‘learn how to learn’. The second and third 
levels focus on career planning and the development of professional transferable 
skills to enable the student to make the transition to employment and/or further study. 

Assessment Methods 

Transferable skills are assessed within appropriate units throughout the course, and 
in particular through the submission of Personal and Professional Development Files. 
These files (containing a learning plan, reflective commentary and evidence­base) 
are developed within the Personal and Professional Development unit and provide 
evidence of work and learning carried out across the course. For instance, evidence 
of personal development achieved through research, design development and 
realisation; responses to briefs; and evidence of project management. Students are 
also assessed through peer, group and self­assessment.

Quality Team  9  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Assessment Regulations and Principles 

In common with all Ravensbourne honours degree courses, this course is subject to 
the Academic Regulations for the Awards of BA and BSc. 

In summary, in order to complete a unit, a student must successfully complete all the 
assessment specified for that unit. In order to progress from level one of the course 
to level two or from level two to level three, a student must successfully complete all 
the units in that level of the course. In order to achieve the award, a student (having 
completed level one and two of the course) must successfully complete all the units 
in level three. In certain circumstances, the Examination Board may at its discretion 
choose to permit performance in one area to compensate for underachievement in 
another subject to the provisions of the Academic Regulations for the Awards of BA 
and BSc. However, there is no automatic right to such compensation. 

The final degree is classified on the basis of the level three units only. Classification 
is determined by the average of the final results achieved in each of the final year 
units weighted by their credit size, according to the banding below: 

Classification  Grade  Percentage Banding 

First Class Honours  A  100 – 70 
Upper Second Honours  B  60 – 69 
Lower Second Class Honours  C  50 – 59 
Third Class Honours  D  40 – 49 
Pass  E  35 – 39 

Project Briefs 

Each unit of the course has assessment requirements set out in the unit 
specification. You will receive more detailed information about what you have to do 
during the course of the unit, which will take the form of a project brief on practical 
projects. Deadlines for the submission of assessed work will be published in these 
project briefs. 

Submission Deadlines 

Please be aware that deadlines are absolute and if you fail to submit the assessment 
or an element of assessment by the required deadline you will automatically be 
deemed to have failed that assessment and your result will be capped at an E grade. 

Extensions 

Extensions to deadlines will only be granted in exceptional circumstances (when you 
have medical or personal factors beyond your control and evidence that this is the 
case). In such cases, you must apply to your Subject Leader for an extension using 
the appropriate College form which is available from Registry or can be downloaded 
from their website: 

http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/registry/docs/Finalextensionrequestform.pdf

Quality Team  10  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Mitigating Circumstances 

There may also be occasions when you believe that there are circumstances which 
have impacted on the quality of the work which you submitted for assessment. If this 
is the case, you should bring them to the notice of the assessors by completing a 
mitigating circumstances form. You should provide evidence (i.e. medical 
certification) to back up your claims. The mitigating circumstances procedure and 
form is available from Registry or can be downloaded from their website: 

http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/registry/docs/MITIGATINGCIRCUMSTANCES.pdf 
http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/registry/docs/Finalmitigatingcircumstances07_08form.pdf 

Disability and Alternative Assessment 

Alternative assessment arrangements may be made if feasible or additional learning 
support arranged for students with disabilities or medical conditions which would 
impair their performance in meeting the assessment requirements of a course. 
Students who believe they are entitled to avail of this right should register in advance 
with Student Support (see below). Alternative arrangements or additional learning 
support must be discussed and agreed in advance with the Subject Leader and will 
be reported to the Board of Examiners. 

Retrieval 

Normally, students who fail an assessment will be permitted one further attempt to 
pass and will be given a retrieval task to complete. The result of the retrieval task 
result will be capped at ‘E’. Students who fail the retrieval task may be required to 
repeat the unit. 

Assessment Regulations 

Students should familiarise themselves with the Academic Regulations for the 
Awards of BA and BSc. These are the rules which govern the assessment process. 
These are available in hardcopy from the Registry or can be downloaded from: 

http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/registry/AcademicRegulations.htm 

Appeals 

If you think that you’ve been treated unfairly in assessment, the procedure for 
appealing against decisions is also contained in the Academic Regulations.

Quality Team  11  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Resources and Services 

As a student on the course you will have an access to an impressive range of 
facilities. 

The College has an open access policy to all resources. All resources are treated as 
common College assets and are normally accessible by all courses. Where 
appropriate assets are available to students via open access (outside of timetabled 
teaching time) or through a booking system for students who have the appropriate 
inductions for the resource. No course or grouping of courses has sole control of or 
access to a particular resource (with the exception of a small number of dedicated 
postgraduate resources). 

Information on how to access College ICT resource is available from 
http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/ict/resources/ 

College resources likely to be used on this course are:

· ILab Cave (7 workstations dedicated to interaction);
· Green cave (15 workstation for 2D and 3D design and animation);
· Blue (15 workstation for 2D and 3D design and animation);
· Purple (15 workstation for 2D and 3D design and animation);
· Ping­Pong Room (11 x Audio/Video Editing Workstations);
· Convergence (19 x Video/Editing Workstations);
· Digital TV Studio;
· Interactive Resource/PC (iTV resources);
· Studio A (full production TV studio);
· Studio B (24 Track Pro Tools Suite with 96 Channel Digital desk);
· College Wide General Computer Resource (Word Processing, Spreadsheets, 
Graphics etc). 

Learning Resource Centre (LRC) 

The Learning Resource Centre (LRC) offers you a transparent portal to the world of 
information. The information that you need in order to complete your studies can be 
found through a wealth of traditional and non­traditional sources. The staff of the LRC 
will be on hand to assist you with your information needs. 

The LRC contains information in many different formats; 20,000 books, 160 Journals, 
4,500 videos and DVDs, and access to dozens of on­line databases and information 
sources. Printed and electronic guides to all of our e­resources are available in the 
LRC, through the LRC webpage, and through Learn@rave – our Virtual Learning 
Environment (VLE). 

There is also access to a General Computer Resource in the LRC for functions such 
as word processing, spreadsheets, graphics etc. This consists of approximately 26 
PCs and 10 Macs. 

For further information please see the LRC Intranet site http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/lrc/.

Quality Team  12  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Student Support 

At Ravensbourne, we recognise that student life can be hard in different ways, for 
different people. 

The College has a dedicated team of people in Student Support Services to help you 
with a range of issues you may have whilst you are at Ravensbourne. 

The College will provide the following core of services, which may from time to time 
vary according to available resources:

· General Welfare support;
· Access to health advice;
· Counselling services;
· Disability advice and support services;
· Student financial advice service;
· Mediation services (relating to student complaints);
· Mentoring services;
· Learning support service. 

For further information please see the Student Support Services Intranet site ( 
http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/support/default.htm), or the ‘Information – For new students 
from the UK and EU’ or ‘Information – For new international students’ handbooks.

Quality Team  13  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


E Learning 

In addition to the aspects of the curriculum delivered in the traditional manner 
through lectures, workshops and other face to face delivery methods, learning will 
also be supported by the developing ‘Learn@rave’ Virtual Learning Environment 
(VLE) [http://learn.rave.ac.uk/moodle/]. Course Handbooks, project briefs and other 
course materials will be available for retrieval and access on or off campus. Similarly, 
students will be able to apply themselves to on­line group forums, critiques and tasks 
at the time and place most suitable to their personal schedules and commitments. 

As the “Learn@rave” system develops students should log­on to the VLE regularly to 
keep up to date with news and views in their subject area. 

Go to http://learn.rave.ac.uk/moodle/ and login as usual to gain access to the 
College’s online Virtual Learning Environment (VLE). 

Multidisciplinary Environment 

Like all courses, working on projects with students from other disciplines is central to 
the aims of this programme. Many of the projects in the BA (Hons) Design for 
Interaction programme will involve students working as team members with students 
on other courses at Ravensbourne College of Design and Communication. These 
would include the BA (Hons) Broadcasting, BA (Hons) Content Creation and 
Broadcast, BA (Hons) Design for Moving Image, FdA Broadcast Post Production and 
BA (Hons) Interior Design Environment Architectures. Much of this collaborative work 
will be geared towards the annual Rave on Air showcase event and in all cases will 
be subject to the development of negotiated learning contracts.

Quality Team  14  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit List 

Level 1 
Unit Code  Unit Title  Credit 
Value 
ACT101  Storytelling  10 
ACT102  Principles of Interaction Design  15 
ACT103  Audio Visual Production  10 
ACT104  Design for Interactive Media  15 
ACT105  Usability  10 
ACT106  Interactive Narrative  10 
PPD1/ACT107  Personal and Professional Development 1  10 
C102/ACT108  Contextual Studies Elective 1  10 
D101/ACT109  The Design Elective  10 
C101/ACT110  Design and Communication Media, Theory  20 
and Context 
TOTAL  120 

Level 2 
ACT201  Games  10 
ACT202  Virtual Environments  10 
ACT203  Content Management Systems  20 
ACT204  Design for Urban Communities  20 
PPD2/ACT205  Personal and Professional Development 2  10 
ACT206  Interactive Spaces  20 
C203/ACT207  Contextual Studies Elective 2  10 
C201/ACT208  Know Your Audience: Society, Culture and  10 
Politics 
C202/ACT209  Dissertation Preparation  10 
TOTAL  120 

Level 3 
C301/ACT301  Dissertation  20 
CAVE301/ACT302  Negotiated Brief  20 
ACT303  Major Project (collaborative)  20 
ACT304  Major Project (individual)  40 
PPD3/ACT305  Personal and Professional Development 3  10 
ACT306  Major Project Report  10 
TOTAL  120

Quality Team  15  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Map 

Term one  Term two  Term three 


ACT101 Storytelling  ACT103 Audio Visual Production  ACT105 Usability 
10 Credits  10 Credits  10 Credits 

ACT102 Principles of Interaction  ACT104 Design for Interactive Media  ACT106 Interactive Narrative 


Design  15 Credits  10 Credits 
15 Credits 

C102/ACT108 Contextual Studies 
Elective 1 
10 Credits 

C101/ACT110 Design and Communication Media, Theory and Context  D101/ACT109 The Design Elective 
20 Credits  10 Credits

PPD1/ACT107 Personal and Professional Development 1 
10 Credits 

BA (Hons) Design for Interaction Level 1 

Quality Team  16  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Term one  Term two  Term three 
ACT201 Games  ACT203 Content Management  ACT206 Interactive Spaces 
10 Credits Systems  20 Credits 
20 Credits 

ACT204 Design for Urban 
Communities 
20 Credits 

ACT202 Virtual Environments 
10 Credits 

C201/ACT208 Know Your Audience:  C203/ACT207 Contextual Studies  C202/ACT209 Dissertation 


Society, Culture and Politics  Elective 2  Preparation 
10 Credits  10 Credits  10 Credits 

PPD2/ACT205 Personal and Professional Development 2 
10 Credits 

BA (Hons) Design for Interaction Level 2 
Quality Team  17  Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Term one  Term two  Term three 
C301/ACT301 Dissertation  ACT304 Major Project (individual) 
20 Credits  40 Credits 

CAVE301/ACT302 Negotiated Brief  ACT303 Major Project 
20 Credits  (collaborative) 
20 Credits 

ACT306 Major Project Report 
10 Credits

PPD3/ACT305 Personal and Professional Development 3 
10 Credits 

BA (Hons) Design for Interaction Level 3 

Quality Team  18  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Outcome Map  A = Knowledge and Understanding  D = Transferable Skills 
B = Practical/Professional Skills  X = Assessed and Delivered 
C = Intellectual Skills  d = Delivered 
A  A  A  B  B  B 
A  A  A  A  A  A  A  A  A  B  B  B  B  B  B  B  B  B 
Unit Code  Unit  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 
1  1  1 
1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 
1  1  1 
0  1  2  0  1  2 
LEVEL 1 
ACT101  Storytelling  d  X  d  d  d 
ACT102  Principles of Interaction Design  X  X  X  d  d  d  X  d  d  d 
ACT103  Audio Visual Production  d  d  X  d 
ACT104  Design for Interactive Media  X  X  d  d  d  X  d  X  d  d  d  d 
ACT105  Usability  d  X  d  X  X  X  d  X 
ACT106  Interactive Narrative  d  X  X  d  d  X 
PPD1/ACT107  Personal and Professional Development 1  X  d 
C102/ACT108  Contextual Studies Elective 1 
D101/ACT109  The Design Elective  d  d  d  X  d  X 
C101/ACT110  Design and Communication Media, Theory 
and Context  d  d  X  d 
LEVEL 2 
ACT201  Games  X  d  d  d  d  d  X 
ACT202  Virtual Environments  d  d  d  d  X  X  d  X 
ACT203  Content Management Systems  d  X  X  d  d  X  X  X  X 
ACT204  Design for Urban Communities  d  X  d  d  X  X  d 
PPD2/ACT205  Personal and Professional Development 2  X  d 
ACT206  Interactive Spaces  d  d  X  X 
C203/ACT207  Contextual Studies Elective 2  d  X 
C201/ACT208  Know Your Audience: Society, Culture and 
Politics  X  X 
C202/ACT209  Dissertation Preparation  d

Quality Team  19  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


LEVEL 3 
C301/ACT301  Dissertation  X  X 
CAVE301/ACT302  Negotiated Brief  X  X  X  X  X  d 
ACT303  Major Project (collaborative)  X  X  X  X  X  X  d  X  X 
ACT304  Major Project (individual)  X  X  X  X  X  X  X 
PPD3/ACT305  Personal and Professional Development 3  X  d 
ACT306  Major Project Report  X  d  X

Quality Team  20  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


C  C  C  C  C  C  C  C  D  D  D  D  D  D  D 
Unit Code  Unit  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  1  2  3  4  5  6  7 

LEVEL 1 
ACT101  Storytelling  X  d  d  d  d 
ACT102  Principles of Interaction Design  d  d 
ACT103  Audio Visual Production 
ACT104  Design for Interactive Media  X  d  d  d 
ACT105  Usability  d  d  d 
ACT106  Interactive Narrative  X  d  d 
PPD1/ACT107  Personal and Professional Development 1  d  d 
C102/ACT108  Contextual Studies Elective 1  X  d  d 
D101/ACT109  The Design Elective  X  d  d 
C101/ACT110  Design and Communication Media, Theory 
and Context  d  d  X  d 
LEVEL 2 
ACT201  Games  X  d  d 
ACT202  Virtual Environments  X  d 
ACT203  Content Management Systems  X  d 
ACT204  Design for Urban Communities  X  d  X  d  d  X 
PPD2/ACT205  Personal and Professional Development 2  d  d  d 
ACT206  Interactive Spaces 
C203/ACT207  Contextual Studies Elective 2  X  d  X 
C201/ACT208  Know Your Audience: Society, Culture and 
Politics  X  X  X  d 
C202/ACT209  Dissertation Preparation  X  d  X  X 
LEVEL 3 
C301/ACT301  Dissertation  d  X  X  X  X  X 
CAVE301/ACT302  Negotiated Brief  X  X  X 
ACT303  Major Project (collaborative)  X  d  X  X  X  X  X 
ACT304  Major Project (individual)  X  d  X  X  X 
PPD3/ACT305  Personal and Professional Development 3  d  X 
ACT306  Major Project Report  d  X  X  X  X

Quality Team  21  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


A ­ Knowledge and Understanding of:  B ­ Practical/Professional Skills – Able To: 

1.  the design process in general and specifically in interaction design  1.  demonstrate an understanding of the skills used by the various 


2.  the nature of interactivity and non linearity  branches of interaction design and how they are articulated 
3.  the nature of representation within the sphere of “on screen” narrative  2.  use digital technology creatively as part of the design process and as a 
4.  the nature of the data and processes used in the creation of interactive  tool for presentation and communication 
artefacts  3.  articulate design proposals and concepts clearly, using a variety of 
5.  the depth and breadth of the technologies upon which the discipline of  appropriate media 
Design for Interaction is based  4.  define a design proposal for an interaction project which meets the 
6.  the nature of human form, thought processes, its needs and responses  requirements of professional practice 
in given situations relating to the usability of designed artefacts  5.  plan projects so that deadlines are met and all work is of required 
7.  computation in design and its application  quality or better at these deadlines 
8.  the analysis of function  6.  deal effectively with the unexpected from both internal (personal 
9.  the creative potential of digital technologies  environment) and external (client) sources 
10.  the nature of technological change and the impermanence of  7.  know what is achievable both personally and within a group situation 
knowledge  8.  understand the nature of the professional experience in interaction 
11.  key business processes necessary to underpin graduate employment in  design 
the creative industries  9.  work within a design process and to contribute to this 
12.  a critical understanding of design practice and theory in the context of  10.  understand the use of iconography when applied to interactive artefacts 
history, society, contemporary global culture, business and an  11.  select, test and make appropriate use of processes and materials in the 
appreciation of the significance of the work of other practitioners  development of prototypes from design ideas 
12.  complete a significant design project proposal and carry it through to a 
successful conclusion

Quality Team  22  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


C ­ Intellectual Skills – Able To:  D ­ Transferable Skills – Able To: 

1.  generate ideas, concepts, proposals, solutions or arguments  1.  work independently, setting own aims, objectives and deadlines to 


independently and/or collaboratively in response to set briefs and/or as  manage learning, workload and projects, including time, personnel and 
self­initiated activity  resources 
2.  be intellectually curious, analytical and reflective, capable of carrying  2.  work effectively and collaboratively with others in a team from a variety 
out sustained independent enquiry and develop the skills that underpin  of backgrounds and disciplines 
professional development and life­long learning  3.  manage information in a range of media, selecting and using a variety 
3.  understand the similarities and differences between the interrelated  of sources and technologies to evaluate and record/present information 
disciplines of design and their interaction  4.  articulate ideas and information in visual, oral and written forms, and 
4.  be entrepreneurial, imaginative, have divergent thinking skills and think  communicate ideas and work clearly and appropriately to a variety of 
creatively whilst still satisfying the needs of the project/client  audiences, including technical and non­technical audiences 
5.  understand and simulate interactive environments  5.  produce work that is literate, numerate and coherent, deploying 
6.  place their own work critically in the context of business, culture,  established techniques of analysis and enquiry 
society, the environment, ethics, history, and be aware of the impact  6.  identify, define and creatively solve problems, using appropriate 
politics and economics can have on the relevance of design  knowledge, tools and methods, often in complex and unpredictable 
7.  understand that the acquisition of knowledge is continuous and ongoing  situations 
professional and personal development is essential  7.  demonstrate critical awareness and reflection through evaluating own 
8.  critically assess work with reference to existing and emerging  strengths and weaknesses, and adapting proposals and plans 
professional and/or academic debates  accordingly

Quality Team  23  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Level 1 
In Level 1 of the course, students receive a rounded introduction to interaction design 
and the skills and theories which underpin it, such as storytelling, graphical 
information design, usability and non­linear narrative. Students develop a sound 
understanding of the design process which they build upon and develop in Levels 2 
and 3. 

Level 1 of the course aims to produce students who: 

i)  Have a sound understanding of the underlying concepts, principles and 
skills associated with interaction design; 
ii)  Have a broad understanding of the wider social, cultural and historical 
context of the subject; 
iii)  Can develop lines of argument around the key concepts and principles of 
interaction design; 
iv)  Can evaluate the appropriateness of different approaches to solving 
problems in interaction design to different situations and can make sound 
judgements in their application; 
v)  Can communicate the results of their study/work accurately and reliably, 
using structured and coherent arguments and the presentation and 
interpretation of qualitative and quantitative data where appropriate; 
vi)  Have acquired the basic qualities and transferable skills necessary for 
employment, requiring the exercise of some personal responsibility; 
vii)  Are fully prepared to undertake Level 2 of the course. 

Activity in this level focuses primarily with on screen interaction and its conventions. 
Skills and knowledge are built gradually from the telling of a “story” using basic 
visual/graphical and media production skills through to the use of these skills in the 
creation of content and its deployment for a variety of current media platforms. 
Having created an interactive artefact students then begin to engage with the 
process of usability testing and the iterative design process that results from this. 

Personal and Professional Development in Level 1 focuses on the development of 
skills and techniques for reflecting upon experience both generally and in their 
specialist learning, developing their awareness of their own learning styles, time­ 
management, self­promotion and communication skills. 

A cross Faculty Design Elective provides an opportunity for students to work outside 
their degree subject area and to work with students from the other courses in the 
Faculty. The projects on offer in this unit will address areas fundamental to many 
disciplines in design though often in different ways (i.e. drawing, visual research or 
the study of colour). The unit should provide students with a broad understanding of 
the diversity of practice in the “creative industries”. 

Contextual Studies is offered on a College wide basis through two units in Level 1. It 
gives a broad introduction to critical theories and historical analyses of design,

Quality Team  24  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


communication and the creative arts in the 20 th  and 21 st  Century. Through these units 
students are encouraged to view their own developing specialist learning and 
understanding, within the broader context of historical changes and to bring this 
awareness to the historical, socio­cultural and commercial research tasks of the 
specialist units. 

Overall the level provides a sound underpinning for the challenges which students 
will face in the second level of the course.

Quality Team  25  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Storytelling 
Unit Code  ACT101 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  25  Access to Resources  20  Independent Study  55 

This unit aims to introduce students to the uses of narrative in visual 
communication. 

Interaction designers design the interfaces which enable humans to 
engage with products, media and information. It is important that 
these interfaces are self explanatory (i.e. tell their own story 
visually). An understanding of the nature of stories and storytelling 
Introduction 
enables a designer to do this effectively. 

Students will work on a project which examines the nature of 
storytelling and how it can be used in design. Since all designers 
need to present their designs to clients, students are introduced to 
the basic presentation skills which they will build upon and develop 
during the rest of the course. 

Topics that may be covered in this unit include:
Indicative 
· The structure of stories;
Curriculum 
· Visual techniques for the communication of ideas;
Outline 
· Cultural influences on storytelling;
· Basic presentation techniques. 

In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Knowledge and understanding about the nature of stories, 
storytelling and the creative possibilities of narrative in 
interaction design; (LO1) 
Unit Learning  2.  Knowledge and understanding about the interrelationship of 
Outcomes  visual communication and the content of that communication. 
(LO2) 

Skills 

3.  An ability to present their ideas to a defined audience through 
visual communication; (LO3) 
4.  An ability to use storyboarding to develop and present an 
interaction design proposal. (LO4)

Quality Team  26  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


This unit will make use of the following:

Teaching and  · Briefing(s);
Learning  · Studio based lectures;
Strategies  · Self directed student study;
· 1 formative assessment;
· 1 summative assessment by presentation. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will receive written feedback from project presentations, 
giving them an indication of their performance in relation to the 
learning outcomes before the final submission of their work. 

Summative Assessment 
This will include:
Assessable 
· A storyboard explaining the use(s) of a given artefact;
Elements 
· A project log containing background sketches and research. 

Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Storyboard (and presentation)  80% 
Project Log  20% 

Students will be assessed on the following: 

Storyboard
· The degree to which the storyboard meets specified formats 
and conventions; (LO1, LO3)
· The effectiveness of the storyboard in articulating the 
Assessment  purposes of a given artefact; (LO2, LO4)
Criteria  · How clearly the associated presentation explains the solution 
to the intended audience. (LO4) 

Project Log
· The level of research and use of available material; (LO1)
· Evidence of generation and exploration of a number of 
concepts. (LO4)

Quality Team  27  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Relevant Books 

O. Fraioli, James. (2000) Storyboarding 101: a crash course in 
professional storyboarding. 

Bell, Roanne (ed). and Sinclair, Mark. (ed) (2005) Pictures and 
words: new comic art and narrative illustration. 

Propp, Louis. and Wagner, A. (ed.) (1969) The morphology of the 
folk tale, University of Texas Press. (Analyses storytelling into 
formulae) 

Indicative  The Beano and other examples of comic narrative art. 
Reading List 
Manuals for any electronic appliances i.e. VCR, DVD, Microwave 
cooker etc. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

www.animationexpress.com 

www.animationexpress.com (Students will need to subscribe to this 
website for a weekly email) 

http://pages.prodigy.com/suna/storytel.htm (The History of 
Storytelling)

Quality Team  28  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Principles of Interaction Design 
Unit Code  ACT102 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  15  Level  1  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  50  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  70 

This unit introduces students to the basic building blocks of the 
design process with a bias towards the needs of interaction design. 
Students will be introduced to the nature of the brief in design and its 
interpretation. The unit will look at the role of typography and its 
effects on legibility and the representation of meaning through icons 
(symbols). The unit begins by looking at the presentation of static 
Introduction 
information and progresses to look at the presentation of dynamic 
information. 

The unit explores the conventions that underpin the recognition of 
signs and symbols in a variety of media, the semiotics of colour and 
the means by which people interact with these symbols. 

Topics which may be explored in this unit might include:

· Typography;
· Colour theory;
· Iconography;
Indicative 
Curriculum  · Information Design;
Outline  · Basic interaction software scripting. 

Students will be introduced to interaction prototyping software. The 
unit comprises a series of projects which are a vehicle for looking at 
the organisation and communication of information and the inter­ 
relationship of these two.

Quality Team  29  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  An understanding of the ordering of “raw” information and the 
way this affects its communication; (LO1) 
2.  An understanding of the design principles which underpin the 
Unit Learning 
presentation of information across different media. (LO2) 
Outcomes 
Skills 

3.  The ability to order and organise information for 
communication and interaction; (LO3) 
4.  The ability to use design software for image generation; (LO4) 
5.  The ability to use interaction specific software and 
technologies in ordering and presenting information. (LO5) 

This unit will make use of the following:

· Briefing(s);
Teaching and  · Demonstrations and studio based instruction workshops, 
Learning  which will look at guided software use;
Strategies  · Seminars, which will involve discussion of concepts and 
direction;
· Student directed study;
· Critique. 

The projects involve a design presentation in a number of media and 
the production of an interactive clip. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will submit the design presentation at an interim point in 
the unit and will receive written feedback giving them an indication of 
their performance in relation to the learning outcomes before the 
Assessable  final assessment. 
Elements 
Summative Assessment 
Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Design Presentation  50% 
Interactive Clip  50%

Quality Team  30  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on the suitability of their designs for the 
communication of the given information across a number of media 
including:

· Effectiveness of logotype; (LO1)
· Appropriateness of font; (LO1)
· Consideration taken of scalability; (LO2)
Assessment 
· Appropriateness of colour selection. (LO2) 
Criteria 
In relation to the interactive clip used within the interactive 
presentation, students will be assessed on:

· The functionality of the clip; (LO5, LO3)
· The degree to which it fulfils the terms of the brief; (LO1)
· The quality of production. (LO4) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Triedman, Karen. (2002) Colour Graphics: the power of colour on 
Graphic Design, Rockport. 

Miller, Anistatia and Brown, Jared. (2004) Logos: Making a strong 
Indicative 
mark: 150 strategies for logos that last, Rockport. 
Reading List 
Lippincott and Margulies. (2004) The Art and Science of Creating 
Lasting Brands, Rotovision. 

Ware, Colin. (2004) Information Visualization: Perception for design, 
Elsevier Science.

Quality Team  31  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Audio Visual Production 
Unit Code  ACT103 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  50  Independent Study  20 

Design for Interaction opens up a world of a non­linearity. However, 
in constructing that world, interaction designers often use video 
based narrative content which will be linear in its nature. It is 
therefore useful for them to understand the nature of its creation. 

The purpose of this unit is to introduce the tools of audio­visual 
production and the possibilities and constraints of the broadcast 
Introduction  studio. This unit introduces students to the professional TV studio 
environment and how it can be used to deliver their creative ideas. 

Developments in digital technology have made the portable single 
camera common in content creation across many media platforms. 
Students working across the range of media industries will need to 
be able to think creatively with the single camera and to understand 
its use. 

Topics covered in this unit may include:

Indicative  · Basic script writing and treatments;
Curriculum  · Single camera operation;
Outline  · Studio operations and protocols;
· Post­production;
· Direction.

Quality Team  32  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved. 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Knowledge and understanding of professional studio practice 
and the roles, relationships and responsibilities which 
underpin it; (LO1) 
Unit Learning  2.  Knowledge and understanding of the workflows used to bring 
Outcomes  a programme plan or script through the studio to completion. 
(LO2) 

Skills 

3.  An ability to produce video shorts in collaboration with others 
to a specified brief; (LO3) 
4.  An ability to use a portable camera and understand its 
strengths and limitations. (LO4) 

This unit will make use of the following:

· An introduction to the project;
Teaching and  · An introduction to the studio;
Learning  · Lectures, which will include consideration of health and safety 
Strategies  issues, studio protocols and the digital studio;
· Workshops, which will look at directed practice session in the 
studio;
· Seminar, critique and feedback. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will receive critique and feedback of treatment proposals. 

Summative Assessment 
Assessable  Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
Elements  proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Group Video Production  80% 
Project Log  20%

Quality Team  33  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on: 

Group Video Production 
The degree to which the video:
· Fulfils the specified brief; (LO4)
· Makes appropriate use of studio lighting; (LO1)
Assessment  · Makes appropriate use of studio sound; (LO1)
Criteria  · Demonstrates a grasp of basic camera techniques. (LO4) 

Project Log
· Evidence of self evaluation of own contribution to group; 
(LO1, LO2, LO3)
· Evaluation of the process of production; (LO2)
· Evaluation of roles and contribution of others. (LO3) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Winston, B. (1996) Technologies of Seeing, BFI. 

Maeda, J. (2000) Maeda & Media, Thames and Hudson. 

Indicative  Fiske, J. (2003) Reading Television, Methuen. 
Reading List 
Amyes, Tim. (2004) Audio post­production in television and film: an 
introduction to technology and techniques, Focal. 

Unit Relevant Video 

Gregory, R. (2001) Eye and Brain.

Quality Team  34  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Design for Interactive Media 
Unit Code  ACT104 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  15  Level  1  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  40  Access to Resources  40  Independent Study  70 

This unit introduces students to the media platforms which they are 
likely to encounter as interaction designers (i.e. currently interactive 
television, DVD, CD­ROM, the web and mobile telephones). 

Increasingly, information and content is re­purposed across a range 
of media. The unit looks at the design issues associated with the 
translation of content from one platform to another. 

It will introduce students to specific interface design issues and 
technical constrains of the various platforms covered in this module. 
Introduction 
It will also require students to appropriately design and translate a 
user interaction experience across these platforms. 

The unit emphasises the skills associated with working in teams. 
Team work is particularly important in the design industry and 
students will invariably find themselves working with other people 
who possess knowledge and/or expertise in areas that they do not. 

Students on this unit may work closely with students from related 
Broadcasting courses. 

Topics covered in this unit may include:

Indicative  · Media platforms and the technologies which underpin them;
Curriculum  · The design and navigation issues relating to translation to 
Outline  various media (e.g. DVD, CD­ROM, web and interactive TV);
· Strengths and limitations of platforms;
· Production processes relating to different platforms.

Quality Team  35  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Appreciate media technologies utilised in the delivery of linear 
and non­linear content and their strengths and limitations; 
(LO1) 
2.  A knowledge of the differing techniques required for the 
creation of content within these delivery modes; (LO2) 
Unit Learning  3.  An understanding of the roles other specialisms play in the 
Outcomes  overall production process for cross platform media content 
and delivery. (LO3) 

Skills 

4.  The ability to plan and manage an interactive design project; 
(LO4) 
5.  Collaborate in groups and produce content suitable for use on 
a number of platforms; (LO5) 
6.  The ability to communicate the requirements of their 
specialism to collaborators in the production of content. (LO6) 

This unit will make use of the following:

· Lectures, which will include consideration of digital delivery 
Teaching and 
systems and associated needs;
Learning 
· Workshops, which will include practical introductions to the 
Strategies 
technologies;
· Seminar, critique and feedback;
· Self directed learning.

Quality Team  36  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 
This will include:

· Critiques and feedback on concepts and research. 

Summative Assessment 
This will include:

Assessable  · A Group Project involving the creation and repurposing of 
Elements  content across a number of specified platforms;
· Individual Project Journal. 

Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Group Project  80% 
Individual Project Journal  20% 

Students will be assessed on the group project and groups will be 
assessed on the degree to which: 

Group Project
· They have creatively utilised the potential of the interactive 
content delivery technologies in the final deliverables; (LO1)
· They understand the methods and processes involved in the 
creation and delivery of content across a number of media, as 
Assessment  evidenced by required deliverables; (LO2)
Criteria  · The effectiveness of the content delivery and access 
interfaces across a number of specified platforms. (LO3) 

Individual Project Journal
· Evidence of project planning and management in relation to 
the individual contribution’s and reflection upon the overall 
project management; (LO4)
· Evidence of effective collaboration across the duration of the 
project. (LO5, LO6)

Quality Team  37  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Relevant Books 

Pagani, Margherita. (2003) Multimedia and interactive digital TV: 
Managing the opportunities created by digital convergence, IRM 
Press. 

Srivastava, Hari Om. Artech. (2002) House Interactive TV 
technology and markets, Artech House. 

Bulterman, Dick and Rytledge, Lloyd. (2004) SMIL 2.0: Interactive 
Multimedia for web and mobile devices, Springer­Verlag. 

Negroponte, N. (1995) Being Digital, MIT. 
Indicative 
Reading List 
Oliver, R. (2000) Understanding Hypermedia, Phaidon. 

Unit Relevant Trade Journals 

Broadcast 

New Media Age Computer Arts 

Screen writer 

Viewfinder 

American Cinematographer

Quality Team  38  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Usability 
Unit Code  ACT105 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  25  Access to Resources  25  Independent Study  50 


This unit introduces the concepts underlying usability. Students will 
be given an interactive context and asked to solve the problems 
arising out of the specific conditions faced by users. Understanding 
Introduction  the impact of contexts on usability includes the 
physical/environmental constraints (such as background noise, 
space restrictions, portability etc.) and conceptual constraints arising 
from the users expectations. 

Topics covered in this unit may include:
Indicative 
· History of human factors analysis;
Curriculum 
· Basic ergonomics/usability;
Outline 
· Product semantics;
· Collection and analysis of usability data. 

In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Knowledge and understanding of the principles of usability 
Unit Learning  which influence effective interaction design; (LO1) 
Outcomes  2.  Knowledge of the historical and socio­cultural factors which 
impact on usability in interaction design. (LO2) 
Skills 

3.  The ability to apply user need analysis in the design of 
artefact functions in interaction design. (LO3) 

This unit will make use of the following:
· Briefing(s);
Teaching and  · Lectures;
Learning  · Seminars/discussion groups;
Strategies  · Demonstration by industry specialists;
· Practical workshops, which will include practical user testing;
· Critique;
· Feedback.

Quality Team  39  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 
Students will receive written feedback from critiques and tutorials 
giving them an indication of their existing performance in relation to 
the learning outcomes before the Summative Assessment. 

Summative Assessment 
This will include:

· A short Project on a usability task;
· A short Essay or Visual Presentation demonstrating an 
Assessable 
understanding of fitting functions to user needs, Human factor 
Elements 
analysis and product semantics (1500 words);
· A Project Log. 

Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Short Project  40% 
Essay/Visual Presentation  40% 
Project Log  20% 

Students will be assessed on: 

Essay/Visual Presentation
· Evidence of knowledge of a range of human factor analysis 
techniques and their development such as timed tasks and 
the use of graphs to determine optimum usability; (LO1)
· Focus, structure, referencing and organisation of the project 
matter. (LO3) 
Assessment 
Project
Criteria 
· Application of principles of usability in the design of an 
interface; (LO3)
· Evidence of the application of knowledge gained through 
testing in the development of the design. (LO1) 

Project Log
· Evidence that the student understands the strengths and 
limitations of these techniques within usability design. (LO1, 
LO2)

Quality Team  40  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Relevant Books 

Dix, Alan. (2004) Human­Computer Interaction, Pearson. 

Apple Computer, Inc. (1992) Human Interface Guidelines: The Apple 
Desktop Interface. 

Norman, Donald. (1993) Things that make us smart, Perseus. 

Papanek, Victor. (1985­95) Everything/anything. 

Courage, Catherine. (2005) Understanding Your Users: a practical 
guide to user requirements: methods, tools and techniques, Morgan 
Kaufmann. 
Indicative 
Reading List 
Nielsen, Jakob. (1993) Usability Engineering, Academic Press. 

Norman, Donald. (1988) The Design of Everyday Things. 

Norman, D. and Draper, S. W. (1986) User Centered System 
Design. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

www.useit.com 

http://www.usabilityfirst.com/ 

http://usableweb.com/

Quality Team  41  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Interactive Narrative 
Unit Code  ACT106 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  25  Independent Study  45 

This unit aims to introduce students to the concepts of interactive 
non­linear narrative. 

Non linear storytelling is not a new concept. However, its 
development was hampered by the linear nature of the media 
available. The advent of digital technologies allows users to interact 
Introduction  and influence the narrative. 

Students will learn how to tell a dramatic, compelling story in which 
the sequence of events or the outcome of the story may be 
influenced by the intervention of the audience. They will learn to 
approach script writing and narrative development in a manner 
appropriate to non linear interaction. 

Topics which may be covered in the unit may include:

Indicative  · Storyline development;
Curriculum  · Narrative development for non linearity;
Outline  · Writing treatments;
· Script writing for non linear narrative;
· Impact of interaction on drama. 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  An understanding of non linear narrative structures and of 
“architectures” within non linear narrative; (LO1) 
2.  An understanding of the interface needs of users in non linear 
environments; (LO2) 
3.  Understand the relationship between content and screen 
Unit Learning  aesthetics within the non linear narrative genre and how 
Outcomes  these influence each other. (LO3) 

Skill 

4.  The ability to exploit non linear narrative techniques and 
structures to form coherent visual presentations; (LO4) 
5.  The ability to produce an interactive story using non linear 
media. (LO5)

Quality Team  42  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


This unit will make use of the following:

· Lectures, which will include architecture and future of 
Teaching and  interactive narrative;
Learning  · Self directed learning and research;
Strategies  · Seminar, which will include discussion of research and 
concepts;
· Critique of treatment;
· Feedback. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will receive critique and feedback of concept storylines and 
architecture. 

Summative Assessment 
This includes:

· Treatment (from a list of given topics);
Assessable  · The Negotiated Project;
Elements  · Project Log. 

Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Treatment  20% 
Negotiated Project  60% 
Project Log  20%

Quality Team  43  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Student will be assessed on: 

Treatment (from a list of given topics)
· The degree to which the treatment sells the given topic; (LO3)
· The degree to which the treatment shows an understanding of 
non linear narrative structures. (LO1) 

Negotiated Project
Assessment  · The degree to which the story exploits the potential of 
Criteria  interactive media; (LO4)
· The usability of the story interfaces; (LO2)
· The aesthetic match of the content and the story vehicle. 
(LO5) 

Project Log
· Evidence of exploration of alternative concepts, 
representational solutions and narrative structures in the 
development of the project. (LO3) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Field, Syd. (1994) Screenplay: The Foundations of Screenwriting, 
Dell. 

Cowgill, Linda. (1997) Writing Short Films: Structure and Content for 
Screenwriters, Lone Eagle. 

Duranti, A. (1992) Rethinking Context: Language as an Interactive 
Phenomenon, Cambridge University Press. 

Brunhild, Bushoff. (2005) Developing interactive narrative content, 
HighText Verlag. 
Indicative 
Reading List 
Wolf, Mark. and Perron, Bernard. (2003) The video game theory 
reader, Routledge. 

Unit Relevant Films 

Gilliam, Terry. (Dir) (1995) 12 monkeys. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

http://www.boxesandarrows.com/view/use_of_narrative_in_interactiv 
e_design 

http://vismod.media.mit.edu/vismod/demos/kidsroom/kidsroom.html

Quality Team  44  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Personal and Professional Development 1 
Unit Code  PPD1/ACT107 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  20  Access to Resources  40  Independent Study  40 

Reflection upon experience is central to both academic learning and 
professional development. This unit will support and focus on the 
development of learners’ self­awareness, patterns and habits of 
learning, and their study, organisation, self­management and 
communication skills. It provides the opportunity for structured self­ 
Introduction  reflection that can be built upon, as learners work towards a 
continuing process of critical analysis of their professional practice. 

It will play an important role in setting students up for their course 
and supporting them to develop increasingly independent 
approaches to learning. 

Students will attend a number of lectures, workshops and seminars 
and be directed to supporting material covering areas such as the 
following: 

Primary Topics
Indicative 
Curriculum  · Learning styles/patterns and how these relate to other areas 
Outline  such as: 
o  Team working strategies and group processes; 
o  Study skills; 
o  Project/time management; 
o  Problem solving.
· Goal setting in relation to own strengths and weaknesses.

Quality Team  45  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Skills 

In order to pass this unit, the learner must demonstrate their ability 
to: 
Unit Learning 
1.  Consider their own strengths and weaknesses, particularly as 
Outcomes 
a learner; (LO1) 
2.  Develop personal and professional goals, particularly in 
relation to learning; (LO2) 
3.  Collect and present evidence of personal and professional 
development. (LO3) 

Overview 

Students will be exposed to key concepts and methodologies 
through lectures, seminars and workshops. However the majority of 
learning will take place through the development of their Personal 
and Professional Development File. 

Personal and Professional Development File 
The Personal and Professional Development File will be made up of 
three main elements: 

Learning Plan 
The Learning Plan will set out the students’ position in relation to 
their course/learning and possible future directions. This will mostly 
be produced by considering their strengths and weaknesses in 
Teaching and 
relation to their course and goals. 
Learning 
Strategies 
Reflective Commentary 
The Reflective Commentary will identify specific evidence from the 
Evidence Base (below) in order to demonstrate the achievement of 
learning outcomes (some of which may not be specifically delivered 
within this unit). 

Evidence Base 
The Evidence Base will contain documents and other evidence to 
support both the Learning Plan and the Reflective Commentary. 

Teaching Methods 
Students will be supported in developing knowledge and skills within 
this unit by the models used and the ways in which elements such 
as the Learning Plan, the Reflective Commentary and formative 
assessment are structured.

Quality Team  46  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Lectures/Guest Lectures/Workshops 
2­3 per term. 
Lectures and workshops will introduce underlying concepts, 
processes and models in areas such as learning styles, project/time 
management, communication skills and goal setting. Guest lectures 
may be used to help learners understand these concepts within a 
wider context where appropriate. 

Small Group Seminars/Workshops 
2­3 per term. 
These will be used to encourage discussion and reflection on the 
learning/working experience and to ensure learners gain from 
shared experiences. 

Self­Directed Study 
The majority of learning for this unit is self­directed. Students will 
learn by doing within the framework of structured and supported 
review already described. 

Tutorials 
2­3 per year. 

Personal and Professional Development File – Indicative 
Contents 

The list below details the type of content expected to demonstrate 
the attainment of the unit learning outcomes. While the list below is 
neither exhaustive nor prescriptive, most Personal and Professional 
Development Files will contain examples of the work detailed below:

· Learning Plan 
o  Personal and professional goals 
Assessable  o  Self analysis – strengths and weaknesses as a learner
Elements  · Reflective Commentary (750 – 1000 words or equivalent) 
o  Significant milestones in learning and in meeting goals 
o  Reasons for changes in direction or goals
· Evidence Base 
This may include, as appropriate: 
o  Initial portfolio 
o  Tutor/peer feedback 
o  Responses to Project Briefs 
o  Schedules/project plans/personal timetable 
o  Evidence of independent study/engagement 
o  Research notes

Quality Team  47  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 
There are normally formative assessment points during each term 
for students to receive feedback on their Personal and Professional 
Development File and progress. This will give students an indication 
of their existing performance in relation to the learning outcomes 
before submitting the File for summative assessment. 

Summative Assessment 
The Personal and Professional Development File is submitted for 
interim feedback and then as a final submission. The percentages of 
the final grade are weighted accordingly. 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Personal and Professional  25% 
Development File (1 st  submission, 
normally start of term 2) 
Personal and Professional  75% 
nd 
Development File (2 
submission, normally in term 3) 

Achievement in this unit will be assessed on evidence, within the 
Personal and Professional Development File, of the level to which 
learners have demonstrated their ability to:

· Thoroughly review their own strengths and weaknesses 
(particularly as a learner) and relate these to relevant models, 
Assessment  such as learning styles; (LO1)
Criteria 
· Develop and set out personal and professional goals, 
particularly in relation to learning, that are informed by the 
models covered within the unit; (LO2)
· Evidence their learning and personal and professional 
development by gathering relevant material and presenting 
this in an appropriate form. (LO3)

Quality Team  48  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be referred to relevant models, texts and discussions 
during and in support of other teaching. What follows is a more 
general guide: 

Marshall, L. (1998) A Guide to Learning Independently, Open 
University Press. 

Lakoff & Johnson. (1981) Metaphors We Live By, University of 
Chicago Press. 
Indicative 
Reading List 
http://www.support4learning.org.uk/education/lstyles.htm ­ links to 
many useful resources on learning styles, progress files, mind 
mapping etc. 

http://www.peterhoney.com/learning 
online questionnaire on learning styles. 

http://www.vark­learn.com/english/page.asp?p=questionnaire – 
additional model of learning styles.

Quality Team  49  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Contextual Studies Elective 1 
Unit Code  C102/ACT108 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  40 

Elective 1 is concerned with the notion that the disciplines of design 
and communication media are located within a broader context of the 
creative arts, including fine art, cinema, performance, writing and 
music. Developments in the creative arts impact on the theories and 
practices of design and communication media, providing them with 
rich sources of inspiration and content, and different ways of 
thinking. 

This elective enables students to begin, through experience, 
documentation and critical reflection, to exploit the relationship 
between design/communication media and the broader world of the 
creative arts. It requires them to move out of their normal framework 
of thinking and doing in their home discipline, and into an unfamiliar 
realm of experience in the creative arts. 

Students choose one out of approximately 5 contextual projects 
offered, dealing with areas such as: 
Introduction 
History of Cinema – filming or scriptwriting 
Creative writing – e.g. poetry, rap, songwriting 
Theatre – drama 
Dance – choreography 
Music – e.g. vj­ing or dj­ing 

Students are expected to immerse themselves in the project 
‘experience’; exercise their imagination and develop new interests; 
experiment with new ways of making, doing, seeing or 
communicating; and begin to build connections between this 
unfamiliar project ‘experience’ and their own world of design or 
communication media. 

Term Two, cross­College, varying time­blocks but normally: 
2­week block (64 hours total), plus 36 hours of independent work 
and Summative Assessment. 
30 hours delivered learning (approximately 5 days teaching). 
70 hours independent learning.

Quality Team  50  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Aims 

This unit aims to:

· Introduce students to a broader view of the world of creative 
arts and the practitioners working within it;
· Encourage students to undertake an unfamiliar experience in 
the arts and relate it to their principle studies – thereby 
discovering a new source of content, a new influence or a 
different way of thinking;
· Enable students to explore different ways of recording 
experiences in written or oral form (both new and existing 
uses of language). 

In this unit students learn:

· An introduction to their chosen area of the creative arts 
(historical/contextual aspects, practitioners and examples of 
their work, movements);
· Skills, techniques, methods or processes involved – i.e. how 
Indicative 
to create a performance or artefact (appropriate in scale or 
Curriculum 
length) or instruct/direct someone else to do so;
Outline 
· How to make connections between the creative arts and 
design and communication media (comparisons of themes, 
experiences, content, processes or ways of thinking) via 
discussions or seminars;
· Exploration of conventional and unconventional methods of 
documentation and recording. 

On successful completion of this unit students will be able to: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Appreciate a broader view of the creative arts, such as fine 
art, performance, writing and other activities; (LO1) 
2.  Understand and experience a (formerly) unfamiliar area of the 
Unit Learning 
creative arts; (LO2) 
Outcomes 
3.  Evaluate possible connections between that unfamiliar 
domain of creative activity and the student’s main field of 
study. (LO3) 

Skills 

4.  Document that experience in written or oral form. (LO4)

Quality Team  51  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


This unit will make use of the following:

· Tutorials for formal, individual support;
· Lectures or workshops for group instruction, demonstration or 
studio work;
· Seminars, as a context for group discussions and group 
work;
· Directed, specialist reading to encourage independent 
learning;
Teaching and 
Learning  · Study visits to galleries, museums, collections, professional 
Strategies  studios, city locations, film showings or theatrical events may 
be used for in situ discussions or direct experience of 
designs, artefacts or people;
· Guidelines (brief, select hand­outs) intended to inform and 
aid students during independent study;
· Individual dyslexia support and language mentoring as 
appropriate. 

Students are also encouraged to make independent study visits to 
galleries, museums, professional studios and other sites. 

Assessment Strategy 

Varying time­blocks but normally: 2­week block (64 hours total); 
Followed over the next few weeks by 36 hours of independent work 
and Summative Assessment. 

Weeks 1 – 2: 
Lectures or workshops, with discussions or seminars. 

Formative Assessment: 
Group seminar(s) or critique(s), end of week 2. 
Assessable 
Elements 
Spread over weeks 3, 4, 5 or 6 (varies): a total of 36 hours, including 
independent work and a Summative Assessment. 

Summative Assessment: 
Delivery of a short performance or artefact created by an individual 
or group; 
and; 
Submission of a written or oral/sound text (journal, diary, blog, 
archive or other form) that documents the creative and learning 
process involved in the above (1000­1500 words), with a 
bibliography.

Quality Team  52  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Assessable Elements – Percentage of Final Grade 

Formative Assessment
· Group seminar(s) or critique(s). 

Summative Assessment
· Delivery of (group or individual) short performance or artefact;
· Submission of written or oral/sound text (1000­1500 words) 
with bibliography. 

Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Delivery of (group or individual)  40% 
short performance or artefact 
Submission of written or  60% 
oral/sound text (1000­1500 words) 
with bibliography 

Students will be assessed for:

· Acquired introductory knowledge and understanding of their 
chosen area of the creative arts. (LO1) 

The Experience: creating a short performance or artefact (group or 
individual)
· Development of the concept and its communication or 
manifestation; (LO2)
· Use of new and known skills, methods or techniques in order 
Assessment  to execute a short performance or artefact; (LO1)
Criteria  · Ability to complete (the making of) the short performance or 
artefact in the time allowed. (LO2) 

Documenting the Experience
· Appropriateness and invention in the recording or 
documentation of the Experience; (LO4)
· Skills in observation, listening and analysis; (LO2, LO3)
· Reflection on the Experience and how it has changed the 
student and their thinking; (LO1, LO4)
· A sense of exploration and risk­taking throughout the entire 
project. (LO2, LO3, LO4)

Quality Team  53  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Project Reading Lists will be supplied by their respective tutors. 
Texts of general interest are also recommended, such as: 

Adams, Brooks et al. (2003) Sensation: young British artists from the 
Saatchi collection, Thames & Hudson. (First pub. 1997). 

Berger, John. (2003) Ways of Seeing, Penguin Books. (First pub. 
1972). 

Carnes, Mark C. (ed.) (1996) Past Imperfect: history according to the 
movies, Henry Holt and Company. 

De Oliveira, Nicolas et al. (1996) Installation Art, Thames and 
Hudson. 

Sabin, Roger. (1996) Comics, comix & graphic novels: a history of 
comic art, Phaidon Press. 

Wolfe, Tom. (1990) From Bauhaus to Our House. Cardinal. 

Zipes, Jack. (1991) Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion: the 
Indicative  classical genre for children and the process of civilization, Routledge. 
Reading List 
Barney, Matthew. (1994­2002) Cremaster, US. 

Lothe, Jakob. (2000) Narrative in fiction and film: an introduction, 
Oxford University Press. 

Morley, Simon. (2003) Writing on the wall: word and image in 
modern art, London: Thames & Hudson. 

Morrison, Bill. (2002) Decasia: US. 

Siddons, Suzy. (1999) Presentation skills, London, Institute of 
Personnel and Development. 

Staniszewski, Mary Anne. (1995) Believing is Seeing: Creating the 
Culture of Art, Penguin Books. 

Stott, Rebecca. and Young, Tory. and Bryan, Cordelia. (eds) (2001) 
Speaking your mind: oral presentation and seminar skills, Harlow: 
Longman. 

Watching BBC2 00.12.03.

Quality Team  54  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  The Design Elective 
Unit Code  D101/ACT109 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  1  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  25  Access to Resources  25  Independent Study  50 

The unit will look at the importance of drawing and colour as a 
central element in each of the four subject disciplines: Fashion, 
Product Design, Interior Design Environment Architectures and 
Design for Interaction. It will explore the similarities and differences 
in approach to drawing, colour and method in each of the disciplines. 

The unit also introduces students to the interdisciplinary nature of 
design, the working methods, creative design processes and 
practical applications and approaches to communicating ideas and 
design resolutions adopted in subject specialisations beyond their 
Introduction 
own. 

It will ask students to reflect on the learning process, particularly on 
the new/extended methodologies and knowledge they have 
experienced, and how this can benefit their approach to their main 
subject discipline. 

The same project is delivered by each of the four course teaching 
teams. Students are asked to choose to work in one of the three 
disciplines outside of their own. 

Topics covered in this unit may include:

· The development of drawing and visual research as part of 
Indicative  the design process;
Curriculum  · An introduction to the importance of colour in the development 
Outline  of design ideas and the use of interactive colour;
· Relevant technology and studio materials;
· The inter­relationship of colour/line and materials;
· Presentation techniques.

Quality Team  55  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Appreciate and gain knowledge of the differences in the way 
colour and line are affected by the delivery substrate or 
medium in the four design disciplines; (LO1) 
Unit Learning  2.  Understand the importance of drawing and colour in the 
Outcomes  design process; (LO2) 
3.  Understand the inter­relationship between sourcing; 
information, visual research, drawing and the development of 
ideas as part of an effective design process. (LO3) 

Skills 

4.  Understand the importance and the benefits of team work. 
(LO4) 

The unit will make use of the following:

· Initial briefing;
· Learning to collaborate with their peers – working in teams;
Teaching and 
· Introduction to methodologies of other design disciplines;
Learning 
· Demonstrations and studio workshops;
Strategies 
· Group seminars and critiques;
· Individual studio tutorials;
· Interim presentation/critique;
· Final oral and visual presentations and critique in groups. 

The assessable elements will be assessed as one body of work: 
Assessable 
Elements  Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Project work and presentation  100%

Quality Team  56  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Evaluation will focus upon the delivery of a final oral and graphic 
presentation, accompanied by a supporting portfolio of project 
development work, showing evidence of the following:

· An investigative and experimental approach to drawing and 
Assessment  the use of colour; (LO1, LO2)
Criteria 
· The design process: initial ideas, experimentation and 
development through a series of ideas, and the solution to the 
project brief has been carried out successfully; (LO3, LO4)
· The relevance and depth of the presentation and the solution 
to the project brief. (LO2) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Beasley, David. (1984) Design Presentation: Layout and Colouring 
Techniques. Heinemann. 

Mulherin, Jenny. (1988) Presentation Techniques For The Graphic 
Artist, Phaidon. 

Beazley, Mitchell. (1980) Colour. 
Indicative 
Reading List  Itten, Johannes. (1973) The Art of Colour, Van Nostrand Reinhold. 

Powell, Dick. (1985)  Presentation Techniques: a guide to drawing 
and presenting design ideas, MacDonald Orbis. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

www.colormatters.com 

www.colorvoodoo.com

Quality Team  57  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Design and Communication Media, Theory and Context 
Unit Code  C101/ACT110 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  1  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  40  Access to Resources  60  Independent Study  100 

This unit provides an introduction to the critical theories and 
historical analyses of design and communication media in the 20 th 
and 21 st  century. 

It shows how design and communication media influence, or are 
influenced by, the thinking and events of a particular time and 
place, located within a wider context of historical change and 
evolution. It explores issues of social, cultural and historical context, 
and local and global perspectives. 

It is progressed in two parts, over two terms. 

Part One – Theory (Term One, cross­College): a series of lectures, 
panel sessions and seminars dealing with some key critical theories 
and issues, from both local and global perspectives. 

Part Two – Historical Context (Term Two, course­specific but 
shared in part by courses): a series of lectures, panel sessions etc. 
dealing with historical perspectives. 
Introduction 
Term One:     2 hrs/wk x 10 weeks = 20 hours delivered 
8 hrs/wk x 10 weeks = 80 hours independent learning 
Term Two:     ditto 

Total both terms: 40 hours delivered learning plus 160 hours 
independent learning. 

Aims 

This unit aims to:

· Introduce students to key issues in the understanding of 
design and communication media and their processes, as 
developed in a global context of cultural and historical 
change;
· Raise students’ awareness of and enable engagement with 
recent developments in the study of design/communication 
media;

Quality Team  58  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


· Introduce students to ethical issues for influencing their 
interpretation of design/communication media and their own 
practice;
· Enable students to acknowledge and understand the 
inspirational role of history;
· Enable students to learn to ask questions – in order to 
investigate, research, challenge opinions or preconceptions 
and form their own standpoint;
· Develop students’ skills and confidence in conducting 
research and presenting their written ideas effectively and to 
a recognisable academic standard;
· Provide students with a supportive environment in which to 
articulate individual thinking and experience team work and 
group discussions. 

Part One – Theory: focuses on critical theories, issues and 
significant movements relating to design and communication media 
in a current global context, such as:

· Fundamental concepts of design theory and communication 
theory;
· Consumers and audiences;
· Ethics in design and communication media;
· Gender and ethnicity in design and communication media;
· The power of persuasion in design and the media (the 
individual vs. the mass);
· Storytelling, myth and geography;
Indicative  · The personal is political;
Curriculum  · Law, ownership and social responsibility;
Outline  · Meaning and value in research;
· Basic research skills and an introduction to the referencing of 
sources. 

Part Two – Historical Context: focuses on ways in which design or 
communication media affect or are affected by historical and cultural 
context, with consideration for social, economic and technological 
developments relating to the student’s course subject area, 
including:

· An introduction to the notions of sequence of time and 
consequentiality;
· Some significant art, design and media movements;

Quality Team  59 Course Handbook 2007­2008 
· The works of key art, design or media practitioners;
· The making of designs, artefacts or media texts as an 
evolutionary process;
· The analysis and critique of key exemplars – designs, 
artefacts or media texts – within an historical context;
· The historical implications of the production and consumption 
of design and communication media. 

In order to pass this Level 1 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

Students should be able to: 

1.  Demonstrate a comprehension of design and communication 
media as constructs in a global context of cultural and 
historical developments; (LO1) 
2.  Show their application of the skills of observation, description 
and analysis of artefacts in a wider context of theory and 
history of design and communication media; (LO2) 
Unit Learning 
3.  Demonstrate basic application of ethical issues in their 
Outcomes 
interpretations and analyse the meanings and values of 
design and communication media. (LO3) 

Skills 

Students should: 

4.  Apply basic research skills and understand the need for 
referencing; (LO4) 
5.  Use information technologies effectively to locate and 
correctly retrieve/record research; (LO5) 
6.  Effectively employ information technologies in support of 
research and for delivery of a written text to a deadline. (LO6)

Quality Team  60 Course Handbook 2007­2008 
This unit will make use of the following:

· Lectures, interviews or panel sessions (i.e. a panel of 
experts), supported by still or moving images;
· Moving image presentations, to provide experience of an 
artefact or evidence for interpretation of an artefact;
· Seminars, as a context for group discussions and group 
work;
· Student (oral) group presentations, to develop confidence in 
oral communication and argument;
Teaching and 
Learning  · Directed, specialist reading to encourage independent 
Strategies  learning;
· Study visits to galleries, museums, collections, professional 
studios, city locations, film showings or theatrical events may 
be used for in situ discussions or direct experience of 
designs, artefacts or people;
· Structured workshops (by the LRC) on basic research skills. 

Students are encouraged to make independent study visits to 
galleries, museums, professional studios and other sites for direct 
experience of designs, artefacts or people (interviews, discussions 
etc). 

Part One – Theory (Term One, cross­College) 

Weeks 1 – 4, each week involves: 
A one­hour lecture, interview or panel session (aided by still/moving 
images), followed by a one­hour discussion and/or question­and­ 
answer session. 

Week 5 involves: 
Assessable  A student­centred panel or seminar based on topics from lectures 1 
Elements  – 4 

Weeks 6 – 9, each week involves: 
A one­hour lecture, interview or panel session (aided by still/moving 
images), followed by a one­hour seminar. 

Week 10 involves: 
A panel or seminar, based on topics from lectures 6 – 9, and 
Formative Assessment:

Quality Team  61  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


The submission of an individual researched text (800­1000 words) 
based on a topic or issue from lectures 1 – 4 or 6 – 9, with a 
bibliography evidencing a variety of sources. 

Part Two – Historical Context (Term Two, course­specific, shared 
elements) 

Week 1 involves: 
A one­hour feedback panel on previous term’s formative 
assessment, followed by a one­hour session on how to correct 
weaknesses in the texts submitted. 

Weeks 2 – 4, each week involves: 
A one­hour lecture, interview or panel session (aided by still/moving 
images), followed by a one­hour seminar. 

Week 5 involves: 
Group presentations by students based on topics from lectures 2 – 
4. 

Weeks 6 – 9, each week involves: 
A one­hour lecture, interview or panel session (aided by still/moving 
images), followed by a one­hour seminar. 

Week 10 involves: 
A  panel  or  seminar,  based  on  topics  from  lectures  2  –  4  or  6  –  9, 
and Summative Assessment: 

The submission of an individual researched text (1000­1500 words) 
showing analysis/critique of a design(s), artefact(s) or media text(s) 
within a theoretical and historical context, and with a bibliography 
evidencing a variety of sources. 

Assessable Elements – Percentage of Final Grade 
Part One – Theory 
Formative Assessment 
Researched text (800­1000 words) with bibliography  20% 

Part Two – Historical Context 
Summative Assessment 
Researched text (1000­1500 words) with bibliography  80% 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Researched text (800­1000 words)  20% 
Researched text (1000­1500  80%
words) 

Quality Team  62  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on: 

Contextual understanding
· Ability to relate design and communication media to a 
theoretical context; (LO2)
· Ability to understand historical context and its relevance to 
design and communication media. (LO1, LO2) 

Analysis
· Observation and analysis of design and communication 
Assessment  media artefacts, processes and practice; (LO2)
Criteria  · Application of ethical issues to the analysis of design and 
communication media (and its effect on meanings and 
values); (LO3)
· Application of theoretical, contextual and analytical learning 
to current design/communication media practice. (LO1) 

Research
· Ability to carry out meaningful research, as well as presenting 
it; (LO4, LO5)
· The use of information technologies to support research and 
oral and written delivery to a deadline. (LO5, LO6) 

Brand, Stewart. (1995) How Buildings Learn, Penguin Books. 

Caplan, Ralph. (2005) By Design: why there are no locks on the 
bathroom doors in the Hotel Louis XIV and other objects, Fairchild. 

Gregory, Richard L. (2003) Eye and Brain: the psychology of seeing, 
Oxford University Press. (First edition 1966). 

Klein, Naomi. (2000) No Logo: taking aim at the brand bullies, 
Indicative 
Flamingo. 
Reading List 
Mander, Jerry. (1978) Four Arguments for the Elimination of 
Television, Perennial. 

McQuiston, Liz. (1993) Graphic Agitation: social and political 
graphics since the sixties, Phaidon Press. 

McQuiston, Liz. (2004) Graphic Agitation 2: social and political 
graphics in the digital age, Phaidon Press.

Quality Team  63  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Miyazaki, Hayao. (1997) Princess Mononoke, Jap. (Film). 

Molotch, Harvey. (2003) Where Stuff Comes From: how toasters, 
toilets, cars, computers and many other things come to be as they 
are, Routledge. 

Negroponte, Nicolas. (1995)  Being Digital, The MIT Press. 

Buck­Morss, Susan. (1993) The Dialectics of Seeing, MIT Press. 

Caws, Mary Ann. (ed) (2001) Manifesto: A Century of ISMS Lincoln, 
University of Nebraska Press. 

Crow, David. (2003) Visible signs: an introduction to semiotics for art 
and design students AVA, Worthing. 

Eco, Umberto. (1987) Travels in hyperreality: essays, Picador. 

Kepes, Gyorgy. (1964) Language of Vision; Painting, Photography, 
Advertising, Design, Paul Theobald & Co. 

The Century of the Self, BBC2 series 2002 video. 

Tate Modern Collection: Soviet Posters 
www.tate.org.uk/servlet/CollectionDisplays?roomid=3279. 

Aynsley, Jeremy. (2001) A Century of Graphic Design: Graphic 
Design Pioneers of the 20th Century. 

Barthes, Roland. (1977) Image music text, Fontana. 

Stevenson, Nick. (2002) Understanding media cultures: social 
theory and mass communication, Sage: London. 

Thurstun, Jennifer. (1998) Exploring academic english: a workbook 
for student essay writing, Sydney: NCELTR. 

Poynor, Rick. (2004) Communicate: independent graphic design 
since the sixties. London: Lawrence King. 

Redman, Peter. (2001) Good essay writing: a social sciences guide, 
London: Sage Publications. 

Weston, Richard. (1996) Modernism, Phaidon. 

Williamson, Judith. (1978) Decoding advertisements. Ideology and 
meaning in advertising, Marion Boyars.

Quality Team  64  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Level 2 
In Level 2, students consolidate the skills developed in the first level and re­evaluate 
their application in the more challenging and complex media and environments which 
they will encounter in this level. 

Level 2 of the course aims to produce students who: 

i)  Have a critical understanding of the established principles, skills and 
techniques associated with interaction design and can apply the principles, 
techniques and skills developed on the course effectively and confidently 
beyond the context in which they were learned; 
ii)  Understand the way in which interaction design has developed and is 
developing and how the broader social, cultural and historical context of 
the subject impacts on it; 
iii)  Can critically evaluate a problem, brief or task in interaction design and the 
different approaches which can be taken to solving or completing it and 
can confidently propose and deploy solutions; 
iv)  Understand the limits of their knowledge and skills, and the boundaries of 
their professional role and how this impinges on the completion of a brief 
and work related tasks; 
v)  Effectively communicate information, arguments and analysis related to 
interaction design in a variety of forms, to specialist and non­specialist 
audiences; 
vi)  Have the qualities and transferable skills necessary for employment 
requiring the exercise of personal responsibility and decision­making; 
vii)  Are prepared to develop existing skills and acquire new competences that 
will enable them to assume significant responsibility within employment 
situations; 
viii)  Have the academic and professional skills necessary to underpin honours 
level study. 

The curriculum shifts from a focus on flat screen based activity to an engagement 
with complex virtual and physical environments. The possibilities of semi­immersive 
and immersive environments are explored through units focused on games design 
and virtual environments. 

The course explores the design and the representational factors which facilitate ease 
of interaction in such environments. There is particular emphasis on the 
organisational principles which underpin the storage and retrieval of data for the 
minimisation of complexity in rich virtual environments. 

Students explore the uses to which interaction technology can be put in real world 
situations through a project focused on the solution of social or urban problems 
related to a real physical area of a city. This latter project is one which may involve 
students working in collaboration with students from other courses in multi

Quality Team  65  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


disciplinary teams. Students develop an understanding of the ways in which 
practitioners in complementary fields can work together. 

Personal and Professional Development at Level 2, complements this academic and 
professional development by focusing on skills and techniques of self­promotion, CV 
writing, networking and understanding the employment market and its requirements. 

Contextual Studies units at Level 2 continue the students’ reflection on key aspects 
of contemporary society and their impact on design practice. These units develop 
students’ frameworks of understanding and provide them with conceptual tools that 
can be applied in contextualising their own design praxis. The Dissertation 
Preparation unit develops students’ academic research skills and supports them in 
defining suitable research questions in advance of undertaking an extended study in 
the next level.

Quality Team  66  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Games 
Unit Code  ACT201 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  2  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  20  Independent Study  50 

The spread of gaming from traditional platforms like PC and game 
consoles to handheld computers, iTV and mobile phones and its 
uptake by wider demographic groups means that gaming is a 
growing sphere of activity for interaction designers. 

Games design involves the design of sophisticated human­computer 
interactions. Differences in the platforms available for gaming (i.e. 
Introduction  screen space or processing power) increase the creative challenges 
for games designers. However, these challenges place greater 
emphasis on the skill of the game­play creator as greater emphasis 
is placed upon the storyline and the simplicity of on screen 
interactions. These underlying skills underpin games development 
regardless of the platform. 

The unit looks at the elements that make a good game. 

The curriculum covered in this unit may include:

Indicative  · Story development for gaming;
Curriculum  · Types, genres;
Outline  · Platforms for gaming;
· Basic game architecture;
· Game graphics and animation technique.

Quality Team  67  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  An understanding of how people interact with and react to 
semi­immersive environments; (LO1) 
Unit Learning 
2.  An understanding of the range of narrative mechanisms 
Outcomes 
within game genres and structures. (LO2) 

Skills 

3.  The ability to create a simple game for a specified platform 
and genre; (LO3) 
4.  The ability to make basic games animations. (LO4) 

This unit will make use of the following:
Teaching and 
· Lectures ­ games storyline, structure and strategy;
Learning 
· Workshops, practical game­play and animation;
Strategies 
· Seminar, critique and feedback;
· Self directed learning. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will receive critique and feedback on game concepts. 

Summative Assessment 
Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
Assessable  proportions shown in the following table: 
Elements 
Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Game Synopsis  20% 
Game Project  60% 
Project Log  20%

Quality Team  68  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on the following: 

Game Synopsis
· The clarity of explanation of intent of the game; (LO1)
· The appropriateness for the given genre; (LO2)
· The feasibility of the game. (LO1, LO2) 

Game Project
· Whether the game works and conforms to the parameters set 
out in the synopsis; (LO3)
Assessment 
· Creativity in the deployment of narrative mechanisms suitable 
Criteria 
for 2D/3D game; (LO4)
· The efficiency of human game interaction and level of game 
play challenge presented to the user; (LO1)
· Effective use of games scripting. (LO2) 

Project Log
· Evidence of a creative exploration/experimentation with a 
range of narrative mechanisms in the development of the 
project; (LO1)
· Evidence of project planning and management. (LO4) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Rollings, Andrew and Adams, Ernest. (2003) On Game Design, New 
Riders Publishing. 

Indicative  Salen, Katie. and Zimmerman Eric. (2004) Rules of Play, Game 
Reading List  Design Fundamentals, the MIT Press. 

Rolfings, Andrew. and Dave Morris. (2003) Game architecture and 
design, New Riders Publishing. 

Crawford, Chris. (2003) On Game Design, New Riders Publishing.

Quality Team  69  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Virtual Environments 
Unit Code  ACT202 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  2  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  40 

The use of computer controlled environments for training purposes 
is no longer the preserve of the military and aircraft manufacturers. 
They are increasingly used in industry to prototype and test 
proposed physical systems or to represent them for training or 
marketing purposes. Museums and historical sites now use 
interactive virtual experiences to replicate the real world. 

This unit introduces students to the possibilities opened up by virtual 
Introduction 
environments. It involves a re­evaluation of the common metaphors 
used in the typical two­dimensional computer interface environments 
and how these might be translated into virtual environments. 

The unit looks at how information can be effectively organised in 3D 
virtual environments without increasing complexity. Students are 
introduced to 3D modelling and their use in interactive design 
processes. 

Topics covered in this unit include:
Indicative 
· The challenge of usability in 3D;
Curriculum 
· Navigation and orientation;
Outline 
· VR technology;
· 3D modelling.

Quality Team  70  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Understand the iconographic challenges and metaphoric 
issues raised by 3D environments; (LO1) 
Unit Learning 
2.  An understanding of the usability and navigational issues in 
Outcomes 
designing interactive virtual spaces; (LO2) 
3.  Critical understanding of the concepts. (LO3) 

Skills 

4.  Use 3D modelling software to create virtual objects and 
environments. (LO4) 

This unit will make use of the following:

Teaching and  · Lectures on VR, VRML and scripting;
Learning  · Workshops on 3D modelling for VRML;
Strategies  · Seminars to discuss concepts and the context of the 
technology;
· Critique and feedback. 

Formative Assessment 
At this time students will be assessed on the quality depth and 
relevance of their research and receive critique and feedback on 
their concepts/proposals. 

Summative Assessment 
Assessable  Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
Elements  proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Research folder and project  40% 
journal 
Project 1  30% 
Project 2  30%

Quality Team  71  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students are assessed on: 

Project
· Their ability to use metaphors and iconography in different 
domains; (LO1)
· Their ability to construct virtual environments that enable 
users to retrieve assets; (LO4)
· Their degree to which the performance envelope of the 
Assessment 
technology have been explored. (LO3) 
Criteria 
Project Research folder and journal
· Evidence of relevant background research and its collation; 
(LO3)
· Evidence of a critical evaluation of the user issues relating to 
the project; (LO2)
· Evidence of mind mapping in the development of the project 
design. (LO1) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Bowman, D. (2005) 3D user interfaces, Addison­Wesley. 

Engeli, M. (2001) Bits and Spaces: architecture and computing for 
physical, virtual, hybrid realms: 33 projects by Architecture and 
CAAD, Birkhauser. 

Schneiderman, B. (1986) Designing the User Interface: Strategies 
for Effective Human Computer Interaction, Reading MA: Addison­ 
Wesley. 
Indicative 
Reading List 
Lakoff, G. and Johnson, J. (2004) Metaphors We Live By, Chicago: 
University of Chicago Press, Kline, Kevin. 

Churchill, Elizabeth, F. (et al) (2001) Collaborative virtual 
environments: digital places and spaces for interaction, Springer. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

http://wp.netscape.com/eng/live3d/howto/vrml_primer_index.html 

http://sim.di.uminho.pt/vrmltut/toc.html

Quality Team  72  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Content Management Systems 
Unit Code  ACT203 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  2  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  40  Access to Resources  40  Independent Study  120 

The aim on this unit is to enable students to gain an understanding 
of the principles of content management and the interaction of such 
systems with the user interface and subsequently with the user. 

Content management systems are used to prepare, organise and 
publish information to an audience for consumption and interaction 
Introduction 
through various media channels. This makes them an important tool 
for the interaction designer. 

The unit looks at the relationship of ‘front end’ design to the content 
management systems and databases to which they relate and their 
inter­operability. 

Topics covered in this unit include:
Indicative 
· Relational databases;
Curriculum 
· Client­server computing;
Outline 
· Programming techniques;
· Asset management.

Quality Team  73  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Knowledge and understanding of organisational structures 
within content management systems; (LO1) 
2.  Understand the possibilities of dynamic content generation; 
(LO2) 
Unit Learning 
3.  Understand the workflow management and security issues 
Outcomes 
related to client­server computing. (LO3) 

Skills 

4.  Create and manage databases for the purposes of creating 
dynamic content retrieval systems; (LO4) 
5.  Interface front end designs with databases; (LO5) 
6.  Use client­server scripting and SQL in content management 
systems. (LO6) 

This unit will make use of the following:
Teaching and 
· Lectures on database structure, creation and use;
Learning 
· Workshops on project management;
Strategies 
· Seminar, critique and feedback;
· Self directed learning. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will receive critique and feedback on concepts. 

Summative Assessment 
Assessable  Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
Elements  proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Project  80% 
Project Log  20%

Quality Team  74  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on: 

Project
· The ease with which a user can interface with the system (i.e. 
add, search for and extract content); (LO4)
· The efficiency of the underlying system (database) for the 
management of content; (LO1, LO2, LO3)
Assessment 
· The effective use of scripting in the retrieval system; (LO2, 
Criteria 
LO3, LO4, LO5, LO6)
· The degree to which workflow and security issues have been 
dealt with in the design. (LO4, LO5) 

Project Log
· The account taken of the organisational relationships within 
content in the design of the database and its interfaces. (LO1) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Newman, William M. and Lamming, Michael G. (1995) Interactive 
System Design, Reading MA: Addison­Wesley. 

Williams, Hugh. (2004) Web Database Applications with PHP and 
MySQL, O’Reilly. 

Van Dijck, Peter. (2003) Information architecture for designers, 
RotoVision. 

Indicative  Riewoldt, Otto. (1997) Intelligent Spaces / Architecture for the 
Reading List  Information Age, Lawrence King. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

For PHP reference check: www.php.net 

For mySQL reference check: www.mysql.org 

http://www.wdvl.com/Authoring/ASP/Content_Management/what_is. 
html 

http://www.oscom.org/

Quality Team  75  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Design for Urban Communities 
Unit Code  ACT204 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  2  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  55  Access to Resources  45  Independent Study  100 

Wireless access to the internet increasingly renders the whole city ­ 
not just its buildings, equipment and furniture ­ an interface to the 
world. (Jan Vervinjen. Spark 2003). 

This unit looks at the impact which technological developments such 
as mobile technology and the internet might have on the ways we 
think about and inhabit our localities and the urban environment. 
Technological developments have influenced the evolution of cities 
over time. Communication and interaction technologies will also 
impact on the social and physical fabric of the city. The traditional 
marketplace, the sites of political debate and communal interaction 
are no longer bounded by the physical environment. While the 
interaction of the community and the individual with the physical 
urban environment can be mediated by the use of interaction and 
communication technology. 
Introduction 
This unit explores the use to which interaction and communication 
technology could be put in an urban environment and the ways in 
which it can be used to improve the quality of communal and urban 
life. It revolves around an examination of a designated urban 
location and the needs of its communities. 

The unit project will involve students in working with students from 
other courses in cross course teams. For instance, they may join 
students from the BA (Hons) Interior Design Environment 
Architectures (IDEA) course in groups where each team member 
adopts a role related to their course specialism. While IDEA students 
will identify an architectural intervention in the locality designed to 
enhance it for its community, Design for Interaction students will 
identify ways in which information and communication technology 
can be used to enhance the urban environment and/or communal 
life.

Quality Team  76  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Topics covered in this unit may include:

Indicative  · Socio­economic development of urban environments;
Curriculum  · Communities – physical and virtual;
Outline  · Technology and socio­economic change;
· Collaborative communication technologies;
· Display and presentation technologies. 

In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Knowledge and understanding of the use of interaction and 
communication technology to support communities and their 
environments; (LO1) 
2.  Understanding of the inter­relationship between design 
proposals and their broader socio economic, geographic and 
Unit Learning  cultural contexts. (LO2) 
Outcomes 
Skills 

3.  Define, research and critically analyse the needs and 
requirements of an urban community or locality; (LO3) 
4.  Conceptualise an interaction design proposal to address a 
perceived communal or local need; (LO4) 
5.  Work collaboratively in the production of a design proposal for 
a specific site in an urban context; (LO5) 
6.  Communicate a comprehensive project proposal to non 
specialists. (LO6) 

This unit will make use of the following:

· Briefing(s);
· Lectures;
Teaching and 
· Software workshops;
Learning 
· Self directed and group research;
Strategies 
· Seminars/discussion groups concepts;
· Site visits;
· Critique;
· Feedback.

Quality Team  77  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 
Students will be assessed initially on a course based group 
presentation of the project proposal and supporting research 
documentation. 

Summative Assessment 
Assessable  Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
Elements  proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Initial group based presentation  30% 
Final group presentation  30% 
Individual report, sketchbook and  40% 
journal 

Students are assessed on: 

Initial group based presentation
· Appropriateness of presentation and use of media for 
proposal and audience; (LO6)
· Grasp of the arguments germane to the proposal and 
attendant research; (LO3)
· Feasibility of proposal for the implementation. (LO4) 

Final group presentation
· Effective response to site specific contexts; (LO4)
· Level of understanding of the socio­economic imperatives 
Assessment  attached to the development; (LO2)
Criteria  · Arguments fully and logically developed and supported by 
evidence; (LO6)
· An understanding of design and technological opportunities, 
factors and issues associated with the proposal; (LO1)
· Coherence of presentation for a public audience of non 
specialists. (LO5, LO6) 

Individual report, sketchbook and journal
· Evidence of appropriate research underpinning the 
development of design proposals; (LO3)
· Their understanding of the researched community and the 
level of articulation of historical, contextual and theoretical 
dimensions of the problems; (LO2)

Quality Team  78  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


· The extent to which appropriate technologies have been 
creatively employed in the meeting of community needs as 
evidenced in the project outcomes; (LO1)
· The level of professionalism evidenced at the presentation of 
the final outcomes; (LO6)
· Evidence of an understanding of and commitment to the 
group dynamic as evidenced through the individual project 
journal. (LO5) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Verwijnen, Jan. (2004) Spark! Design and locality, University of Art 
and Design Helsinki. 

Norman, Donald. (1990) The Design of Everyday Things, New York: 
HarperCollins. 

Dowmunt, Tony. (1993) Channels of Resistance: Global Television 
and Local Empowerment, BFI Publishing in association with 
Channel Four Television. 

Bell, David. (2004) Cyberculture: The Key Concepts, Routledge. 

Burry, M. (2001) Cyberspace. 

Indicative  Zellner, P. (1999) Hybrid space, New York: Rizzoli. 
Reading List 
Migayrou, F. and Brayer, M. (2003) Radical experiments in Global 
architecture, Thames and Hudson. 

Historical documents etc. for the chosen site. 

Unit Relevant Magazines and Periodicals 

The architectural Review 

Abitare 

Domus 

Metropolis 

Journal of space syntax UCL

Quality Team  79 Course Handbook 2007­2008 
Unit Relevant Websites 

UCL.ac uk bartlett school of architecture space syntax 

Harvard school of design and architecture lagos project 

Documenta.org 

URLs relating to the chosen site.

Quality Team  80  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Personal and Professional Development 2 
Unit Code  PPD2/ACT205 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  2  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  20  Access to Resources  10  Independent Study  70 

This unit builds on the Personal and Professional Development unit 
at Level 1, to enable students to reflect upon their own learning, 
Introduction  performance and achievement, and to plan for their professional, 
educational and career development. Students will be required to 
negotiate and develop their own Personal and Professional 
Development File, which builds on the learning at Level 1. 

This module focuses on personal and professional development and 
will include:

· Presentation techniques, including pitching;
· Self promotion and self­branding: preparing a self­promotion 
pack, including business cards and press releases and 
personal/professional ‘mission statement’;
Indicative  · Portfolio development;
Curriculum  · CV writing;
Outline 
· Applications and interviews;
· Self­awareness and self­assessment;
· Information gathering and analysis;
· Networking;
· Industry awareness;
· Understanding the employment market and identifying 
employer requirements. 

In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Skills 

1.  Identify and record a range of skills derived from College­ 
Unit Learning  based learning and wider activities; (LO1) 
Outcomes  2.  Evaluate the usefulness of these skills to personal and 
professional development; (LO2) 
3.  Reflect on how skills can be applied and evidenced in new 
situations; (LO3) 
4.  Identify areas for personal and professional development, 
and adapt the Personal and Professional Development File 
accordingly. (LO4)

Quality Team  81  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Overview 
Students will be exposed to key concepts through lectures, 
workshops and seminars. The majority of learning will take place 
through an ongoing process of reflective practice evidenced in the 
Personal and Professional Development File. 

The Personal and Professional Development File will contain three 
main elements: a learning plan, reflective commentary and 
evidence. 

Teaching Methods 
Learning in this unit will be gained primarily through a combination 
of: 
Teaching and 
Lectures/Guest Lectures/Workshops 
Learning 
2­3 per term. 
Strategies 
Lectures and workshops will introduce underlying concepts, process 
and models. Guest lectures will help develop students’ awareness of 
industry and current developments. 

Small Group Seminar/Workshops 
2­3 per term. 
These encourage discussion and reflection on the learning/working 
experience and ensure learners gain from shared experiences. 

Self­Directed Study 
The majority of learning from this unit is self­directed. 

Tutorials 
2­3 per year.

Quality Team  82  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 
There are normally formative assessment points during each term 
for students to receive feedback on their Personal and Professional 
Development File. This will give them an indication of their existing 
performance in relation to the learning outcomes before submitting 
the File for summative assessment. 

Summative Assessment 
Students will be required to develop a Personal and Professional 
Assessable  Development File detailing professional, educational and personal 
Elements  objectives. The File will consist of three main elements: a learning 
plan, reflective commentary and evidence. 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Personal and Professional  25% 
st 
Development File (1  submission, 
normally start of term 2) 
Personal and Professional  75% 
Development File (2 nd 
submission, normally in term 3) 

Students are required to create a Personal and Professional 
Development File which will contain:

· A comprehensive record of skills and understanding, from 
Assessment  both the course and wider activities; (LO1)
Criteria  · Reflection upon their skills and achievement in relation to 
personal and professional development; (LO2)
· Evidence of evaluation of skills gained; (LO4)
· Evidence of reflection upon the application of skills in new 
situations. (LO3)

Quality Team  83  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Vickers, T. (1997), From CV to Shortlist, Kogan Page. 

Drew, S. & Bingham, R (2001), The Student Skills Guide, Gower. 

Ruggiero, V. (2001) Becoming a Critical Thinker, Houghton Mifflin. 

Allison, B et al. (1996), Research Skills for Students by Brian, Kogan 
Page. 

Siddons, S. (1999) Presentation Skills, Chartered Institute of 
Personnel and Development (CIPD). 

Mumford, A. (1999), Effective Learning, Chartered Institute of 
Personnel and Development (CIPD). 

Bolton, G. (2001) Reflective Practice: Writing and Professional 
Development, London: Paul Chapman. 

Hawkins, P. (1999) The Art of Building Windmills: Career Tactics for 
Indicative 
the 21 st  Century, University of Liverpool: Graduate into Employment 
Reading List 
Unit. 

Caperez, E. (2004) Careers Uncovered Series: Art and Design 
Uncovered, Trotman. 

Harris, C. (2004) Careers Uncovered Series: Media Uncovered, 
Trotman. 

Appropriate journals and trade magazines. 

Useful Websites 

http://www.designcouncil.org.uk 

http://www.skillset.org 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/education/work 

http://www.presentersonline.com/

Quality Team  84  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Interactive Spaces 
Unit Code  ACT206 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  2  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  45  Access to Resources  55  Independent Study  100 

‘The future of artistic and expressive communication in the varied 
forms of film, theatre, dance and narrative is moving toward a blend 
of real and imaginary worlds in which moving images, graphics, and 
text co­operate with humans and among themselves in the 
transmission of a message’. (Sparacino et al, 2000). 

This unit introduces students to the impact of ubiquitous computing 
and the way that it is reshaping our world as consumer devices and 
our physical environment itself incorporates instrumentation, sensors 
and displays. Our private and public spaces are increasingly 
Introduction  adorned with displays and screens. Interaction is no longer confined 
to small screens, mouse movements and clicks but is becoming a 
part of our everyday experience. Large scale public and miniature 
personal digital displays combined with sensing intelligence blurs 
and the boundary between the virtual and the real. 

The unit centres around a group project in which students engage 
with the design and creation of an interactive space for the purposes 
of a narrative or thematic experience. This will involve equipping the 
space with sensors, displays, projections and automata and defining 
the patterns of interactions with the users. 

Topics covered in this unit include:
Indicative  · Sensors and sensing;
Curriculum 
· Signal processing (currently MaxMSP);
Outline 
· Spatial awareness and relationships;
· Intelligent ambience.

Quality Team  85  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Knowledge and understanding of the opportunities and issues 
raised by interactive/reactive spaces; (LO1) 
2.  Knowledge and understanding of design and usability issues 
Unit Learning  in interactive physical spaces. (LO2) 
Outcomes 
Skills 

3.  The ability to design interactive environments for narrative, 
thematic or experiential purposes; (LO3) 
4.  The ability to deploy sensory and projection technologies for 
use in interactive spaces; (LO4) 
5.  The ability to use scripting for sensors and signal processing 
in interactive spaces. (LO5) 

This unit will make use of the following:

Teaching and  · Lectures on applications and the use of sensors;
Learning  · Workshops on practical sensor scripting;
Strategies  · Self directed practical experimentation;
· Seminar, critique and feedback;
· Self directed learning. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will be assessed at interim point in the unit on the group 
project proposal, its supporting research and its feasibility. 

Summative Assessment 
Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
Assessable  proportions shown in the following table: 
Elements 
Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Project proposal and collated  20% 
underpinning research folder 
Project  60% 
Individual Project Log  20%

Quality Team  86  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on: 

Project proposal and research
· Identification and collation of appropriate concepts, 
technologies and processes pertinent to the project proposal; 
(LO3)
· Feasibility of proposed interactive environment; (LO2)
· Appropriateness of proposed interactive environment for the 
purposes specified in the brief. (LO1) 

Project
Assessment 
· Creative exploitation of technologies in the design of the 
Criteria 
physical interactions; (LO4, LO5)
· The quality of the designed interactive experience in the 
space; (LO3)
· The degree to which the realised project fulfils the purposes 
and specifications set out in the original brief and the 
intentions set out in the project proposal. (LO4, LO5) 

Individual Project Log
· Evidence of individual contribution to a collaborative and 
iterative process in the design and development of the 
project. (LO3)

Quality Team  87  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Relevant Books 

Courage, Catherine. and Baxter, Cathy. (2005) Understanding Your 
Users: A practical guide to user requirements, Morgan Kaufmann. 

Harris, Randy. (2005) Voice Interaction Design: Crafting the new 
conversational speech systems, Morgan Kaufmann. 

Kelley, Tom. (2001) The Art of Innovation, Harper Business. 

Sparacino (et al) (2000) Media in performance: Interactive spaces 
for dance, theater, circus, and museum exhibits, IBM Systems 
Indicative 
Journal. 
Reading List 
Unit Relevant Websites 

http://ic.media.mit.edu/Publications/Journals/MediaInPerformance/P 
DF/MediaInPerformance.pdf 

http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/sj/393/part1/sparacino.html 

http://www.ampfea.org/pipermail/idm­making/2004­July/000623.html 

http://www.makingthings.com/products/documentation/teleo_user_g 
uide/max_msp.html

Quality Team  88  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Contextual Studies Elective 2 
Unit Code  C203/ACT207 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  2  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  40 

Elective 2 offers students the opportunity to engage with some of the 
more controversial historical or political aspects of design and 
communication media. 

Focussing on a particular chosen theme, students receive lectures 
and undertake the research of images, issues and case studies for 
debate and discussion in groups. They are also required to reflect 
on how such matters may impact on their own future professional 
practice or career path, or alter their own ‘world view’. 

Students choose one out of approximately 5 contextual projects 
offered, dealing with themes such as: 

The Media and War 
Design and Health Campaigns 
Introduction 
The Politics of Clothing/Fashion 
A Visual History of Political Satire 
The Threat of Games and Virtual Reality 
Imagined Futures 
Consumption as Obsession and Dependency 

This unit also acts as a precursor to the Dissertation Preparation unit 
in Term Three, as it offers a possible source of, or pathway to, 
subjects for investigation in Dissertation work. 

Term Two, cross­College, varying time­blocks but normally: 
2­week block (64 hours total), plus 36 hours of independent work 
and Summative Assessment. 
30 hours delivered learning (approximately 5 days teaching). 
70 hours independent learning.

Quality Team  89  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In this unit students learn:

· Some contextual and/or historical information of significance 
to their chosen theme;
· To formulate a critical point of view or argument with regard 
to their chosen theme;
· To acknowledge different attitudes towards and opinions on 
their chosen theme;
Indicative  · To articulate a personal and political stance with regard to 
Curriculum  their chosen theme;
Outline  · The currency and validity of their chosen theme in local and 
global terms;
· The use of a variety of research (information gathering) 
techniques and the application of an appropriate method of 
referencing sources;
· The application of relevant research;
· Examples of the appropriateness of different modes of writing 
or oral presentation with regard to subject and target 
audience. 

In order to pass this Level 2 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

Students should: 

1.  Demonstrate an informed understanding, and some 
contextual and/or historical aspects, of their chosen theme; 
Unit Learning 
(LO1) 
Outcomes 
2.  Understand their chosen theme as a polemic – and a source 
of inspiration (for further study); (LO2) 
3.  Understand and appreciate different attitudes towards and 
opinions on issues of critical consequence; (LO3) 
4.  Formulate their own attitudes and an ethical/political stance 
with regard to their chosen theme; (LO4) 
5.  Think of themselves and their work as part of an international 
design/communications industry – or community of 
professionals. (LO5)

Quality Team  90  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Skills 

Students should be able to: 

6.  Apply a variety of research techniques and use an 
appropriate method of referencing; (LO6) 
7.  Begin to conduct relevant research; (LO7) 
8.  Communicate in an appropriate form/mode of writing or oral 
presentation with regard to subject and target audience. 
(LO8) 

This unit will make use of the following:

· Lectures, supported by still or moving images;
· Seminars, as a context for small group discussions (of ideas 
and research) and group work;
· Directed, specialist reading to encourage independent 
learning;
Teaching and 
Learning  · Study visits to galleries, museums, collections, professional 
Strategies  studios, city locations, film showings or theatrical events may 
be used for in situ discussions or direct experience of 
designs, artefacts or people;
· Individual dyslexia support and language mentoring as 
appropriate. 

Students are encouraged to make independent study visits to 
galleries, museums, professional studios and other sites.

Quality Team  91  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Varying time­blocks but normally: 2­week block (64 hours total), 
followed over the next few weeks by 36 hours of independent work 
and Summative Assessment. 

Weeks 1 – 2: 
Lectures, with discussions or seminars and a possible study visit. 
Formative Assessment: 
Group seminar(s) end of week 2. 

Spread over weeks 3, 4, 5 or 6 (varies): a total of 36 hours including 
independent work and a Summative Assessment. 
Summative Assessment: 
Group or individual submission, negotiated with the tutor, of what 
has been learnt including research and critical reflection on their 
Assessable  topic and study experience – in the form of a written or oral/sound 
Elements  text (journal, diary, blog, script, oral history or other form) of 1500 – 
2000 words, with a bibliography. 

Assessable Elements – Percentage of Final Grade 
Formative Assessment 
Group seminar(s). 

Summative Assessment 
Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in the 
proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Group or individual submission of  100%
written or oral/sound text (1500­ 
2000 words) with bibliography 

Quality Team  92  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on: 

Group or Individual Submission (written or oral/sound text)
· Evidence of acquired knowledge (contextual and/or historical) 
and an informed understanding of their chosen theme; (LO1)
· Analysis of their chosen theme as a polemic; (LO2)
· Recognition and understanding of different attitudes towards 
and opinions on their chosen theme; (LO3)
· The formulation of a personal and political stance with regard 
Assessment  to their chosen theme; (LO4)
Criteria  · Critical reflection on how this study experience has affected 
the student’s international perspective with regard to their 
future work or career; (LO5)
· Application of a variety of research techniques and an 
appropriate method of referencing; (LO6)
· Evidence of an understanding of relevant research; (LO7)
· Ability to communicate ideas and researched material in a 
distinctive mode/form of writing or oral presentation; (LO8)
· The appropriateness of the mode/form of writing or oral 
presentation with regard to subject and audience. (LO6, LO8) 

Project Reading Lists will be supplied by their respective tutors. 
Texts of general interest are also recommended, such as: 

Dick, Philip K. (2005) Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep? (aka 
Blade Runner), Orion. (First Pub. 1968). 

Hudson, M. and Stanier, J. (1999) War and the Media, Sutton 
Publishing. 

Leonard, Mark. (2005) Why Europe will run the 21 st  century, Fourth 
Indicative 
Estate. 
Reading List 
Lévy, Bernard­Henri. (2004) War, Evil, and the End of History, 
Duckworth & Co. 

Molotch, Harvey. (2003) Where Stuff Comes From: how toasters, 
toilets, cars, computers and many other things come to be as they 
are, Routledge. 

Baudrillard, Jean. The transparency of evil: essays on extreme 
phenomena (trans. James Benedict), Verso.

Quality Team  93  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Crimp, Douglas. (1990) AIDS Demographics, San Francisco: Bay 
Press. 

Resnais, Alan. (1955) Nuit et Brouillard /Night And Fog FR. 

Ross, Andrew. (1991) Strange Weather: Culture, Science and 
Technology in the Age of Limits, Verso. 

Tofts, Darren. and McKeich, Murray. (1997) Memory Trade; A 
Prehistory of Cyberculture, Australia: Interface. 

Wurman, Richard Saul. (1991) Information Anxiety London, Pan 
Books. 

Riefenstahl, Leni. (1934) Triumph of the Will, GER. 

Films 

Godard, Jean­Luc (Dir). (1965) Alphaville, Fr/It. 

Kubrick, Stanley (Dir). (1968) 2001: A Space Odyssey, GB. 

Lang, Fritz (Dir). (1926) Metropolis, Ger. 

Miyazaki, Hayao (Dir). (1986) Castle in the Sky, Laputa, Jap. 
version. 

Moore, Michael (Dir). (2002) Bowling for Columbine, USA.

Quality Team  94  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Know Your Audience: Society, Culture and Politics 
Unit Code  C201/ACT208 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  2  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  20  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  50 

This unit explores some key aspects of contemporary society and 
models of audiences within it. 

It offers students the opportunity to reflect critically on notions of 
social groupings such as subcultures and tribes, on current cultural 
issues and debates such as inclusivity Vs diversity and on other 
movements and concerns that are evidence of social change. 

The unit also looks at different approaches to researching society 
and how those tools of analysis are applied to commercial, social or 
political purpose in design and communication media. 

Level Two, Term One, course­specific, with some elements shared 
between courses: 
Introduction  2 hours/week x 10 weeks = 20 hours delivered learning 
8 hours/week x 10 weeks = 80 hours independent learning 

Aims 

This unit aims to:

· Relate students’ awareness of contemporary society and 
current socio­political issues to their main field of study;
· Introduce students to tools for measuring and researching 
society, and their use and abuse;
· Explore the definition and importance of target audiences and 
their role in design and communication media;
· Encourage students’ appreciation of design and 
communication as people­centred activities.

Quality Team  95  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In this unit students learn:

· Cultural diversity: subcultures, tribes, issues of gender, class, 
ethnicity;
· Cultural identity and representation;
· Social codes and behaviour;
· Social anthropological and cultural approaches to research;
Indicative  · Sociological research methods: demographics, statistics and 
Curriculum  extrapolations;
Outline  · How audience research or its presentation can be 
manipulated (e.g. marketing, branding);
· Meeting the needs of a target audience: success and failure;
· A variety of research (information gathering) techniques and 
the use of referencing;
· The notion of relevant research and the 
qualities/characteristics of different modes of writing or oral 
presentation. 

On successful completion of this unit, students will be able to: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Identify and appreciate some of the characteristics of, and 
groupings within, our ever­changing contemporary society; 
(LO1) 
2.  Understand some of the tools and methods used for 
communication within, or designing for, society such as 
measuring, researching and defining target audiences; (LO2) 
Unit Learning 
3.  Criticise the effectiveness of a media text or a design 
Outcomes 
(campaign, product, service or other) with regard to 
interaction with its target audience. (LO3) 

Skills 

4.  Apply a variety of research techniques and use a method of 
referencing; (LO4) 
5.  Understand the notion of relevant research; (LO5) 
6.  Communicate ideas and researched material in a considered 
form/mode of writing or oral presentation. (LO6)

Quality Team  96  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


This unit will make use of the following:

· Lectures, interviews or panel sessions (i.e. a panel of experts), 
supported by still or moving images;
· Seminars, as a context for group discussions and group work;
· Directed, specialist reading to encourage independent learning;
Teaching and  · Structured workshop(s) by the LRC on sociological and 
Learning  anthropological approaches to research. 
Strategies 
Students are encouraged to make independent study visits to 
galleries, museums, professional studios and other sites for direct 
experience of designs, artefacts or people (interviews, discussions 
etc.). 

Debates may also be staged within courses, or cross­College. 

Weeks 1 – 4, each week involves: 
A one­hour lecture, interview or panel session (aided by still/moving 
images), followed by a one­hour seminar. 

Week 5: 
Formative Assessment 
Group seminar(s). 

Weeks 6 – 9, each week involves: 
A one­hour lecture, interview or panel session (aided by still/moving 
images), followed by a one­hour seminar. 

Week 10 involves: 
Summative Assessment 
Group Presentation: an oral critique of the effectiveness of a media 
Assessable 
text or design (campaign, product, service or other) with regard to its 
Elements 
target audience. 
and 
Submission of an individual researched text in a considered 
form/mode of writing (1000­1500 words), with a bibliography 
evidencing a variety of sources. 

Assessable Elements – Percentage of Final Grade 
Formative Assessment 
Group seminar(s). 
Summative Assessment 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Group presentation (oral)  40% 
Researched text (1000­1500  60%
words) with bibliography 

Quality Team  97  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed for:

· Evidence of researched knowledge of background/history or 
current debate relating to a social group(s), subculture(s) or 
event(s); (LO1)
· Evidence of understanding the role and use of a target 
audience in design/communication media; (LO2, LO3)
· Evidence of knowledge of a number of tools and methods for 
researching and measuring target audiences; (LO2)
· Demonstrating an ability to analyse the effectiveness of a 
Assessment 
design/media text with regard to its interaction with the target 
Criteria 
audience; (LO3)
· Evidence of working productively in a group or team for the 
purpose of a seminar and presentation; (LO6)
· The use of a variety of research (information gathering) 
techniques and a method of referencing; (LO4)
· Evidence of understanding the notion of relevant research; 
(LO5)
· An ability to communicate ideas and researched material in a 
distinctive, considered mode/form of writing and oral 
presentation. (LO6) 

Bailey, David A. et al. (2005) Shades of Black: Assembling Black 
Arts in 1980s Britain. Duke University Press. 

Benedetti, P. and DeHart, N. (eds.) (1996). Forward Through the 
Rearview Mirror: reflections on and by Marshall McLuhan. The MIT 
Press. 

Brittain, V. and Slovo G. (2004) Guantanamo: ‘honor bound to 
defend freedom’. Oberon Books. (Script of the play). 
Indicative 
Canetti, Elias. (2000) Crowds and Power. Weidenfeld & Nicholson 
Reading List 
history (First pub. 1960). 

Faludi, Susan. (1993) Backlash: The Undeclared War Against 
Women. Vintage. 

Faludi, S. (1999) Stiffed: the betrayal of the modern man. Chatto & 
Windus. 

Hebdige, Dick. Subculture: the meaning of style. New Accents 1981. 
(First pub. 1979).

Quality Team  98  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Paxman, Jeremy. (1999) The English: a portrait of a people. 
Penguin Books. 

Tulloch, Carol (ed.) 2004 Black Style. V&A Publications. 

Douglas, Mary. (1987) How Institutions Think, Routledge and Kegan 
Paul. 

Sabin, Roger. and Triggs, Teal. (eds) (2000) Below critical radar: 
fanzines and alternative comics from 1976 to now, Brighton: Slab­O­ 
Concrete. 

Singer, Marc. (2000) Dark Days, US. 

Helen Hamlyn Research Centre 
www.hhrc.rca.ac.uk 

Innovation RCA 
www.innovation.rca.ac.uk

Quality Team  99  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Dissertation Preparation 
Unit Code  C202/ACT209 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  2  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  40 

This unit is designed and conducted as the preliminary stage leading 
to the Dissertation unit in Level 3. 

It provides students with the means of beginning and progressing an 
extended study. It does this by introducing them to the use of 
‘creative questioning’ as a way of formulating a lead question and 
driving a research strategy. 

This introduction to the dissertation process therefore offers 
students a tool of empowerment, with emphasis on a transparent 
process of questioning that allows them to make discoveries and 
learn for themselves. 

Level 2, Term Three (course­specific, with LRC workshops or one­ 
to­ones): 
Introduction  3 hours/week x 10 weeks = 30 hours delivered learning 
7 hours/week x 10 weeks = 70 hours independent learning 

Aims 

This unit aims to:

· Introduce students to thinking skills and the process of 
creative questioning as tools for developing professional and 
life strategies;
· Challenge students’ preconceptions about dissertation work 
and demonstrate the relevance of skills and processes 
involved to their future personal and professional 
development;
· Provide a foundation for the extended independent study to 
be further developed in Level 3.

Quality Team  100  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In this unit students learn:

· An introduction to the dissertation process;
· An introduction to the ‘progress map’ (a documented record 
of key contacts, experiences, decisions etc in notes or 
phrases marked on a calendar – accompanied by supporting 
material such as notebooks);
· The art of asking questions…and what is a lead question?
Indicative  · The value and appropriate use of desk research (the use of 
Curriculum  books, magazines, newspapers, the internet etc) and the 
Outline  value and appropriate use of discovery research (the use of 
observation, experience and experts/people);
· What is a research strategy?
· How to reflect on your research findings;
· How to communicate your research findings. 

LRC learning support workshops will be provided on information 
gathering and management, and individual dyslexia support and 
language mentoring as appropriate. 

On successful completion of the unit students will be able to: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Understand what is meant by a lead question and its value in 
Unit Learning 
focussing both research and analysis; (LO1) 
Outcomes 
2.  Identify and formulate a lead question; (LO2) 
3.  Understand what is meant by a research strategy; (LO3) 
4.  Identify and design a research strategy;(LO4) 
5.  Understand the process involved in undertaking and 
communicating an extended study. (LO5)

Quality Team  101  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


This unit will make use of the following:

· Tutorials for formal small group support;
· Lectures, supported by still or moving images (diagrams, 
models);
· Seminars, as a context for small group discussions (of ideas 
and research) and group work;
· Student (oral) presentations, to develop confidence in oral 
communication and argument;
Teaching and  · Directed, specialist reading to encourage independent 
Learning  learning;
Strategies  · Guidelines (brief, select hand­outs) intended to inform and 
aid students during independent study;
· Structured workshops (by the LRC) on information gathering 
and management, and individual dyslexia support and 
language mentoring as appropriate. 

Students are encouraged to make independent study visits to 
galleries, museums, professional studios and other sites for direct 
experience of designs, artefacts or people (interviews, discussions 
etc). 

Weeks 1 and 2, each week involves: 
A lecture followed by a seminar. 

Week 3: 
Students submit a lead question for discussion in a seminar session 
(followed by the discussion ‘What is a research strategy?’) 

Weeks 4 and 5, each week involves: 
Assessable  A lecture followed by a seminar. 
Elements 
Week 5: 
Formative Assessment: 
Submit draft of lead question and research strategy. 

Weeks 6 – 9: 
Individual tutorials. 
In week 7 or 8, Guidelines are handed out in the form of ‘Questions 
you should be asking yourself’.

Quality Team  102  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Week 9: 
Summative Assessment: 
Submission of a lead question and research strategy, plus a 
‘progress map’ (a documented record of key contacts, experiences, 
decisions etc in notes or phrases marked on a calendar – 
accompanied by supporting material such as notebooks). 

Week 10: 
Group feedback session of identified issues, and briefing for the 
follow­on unit (the Dissertation). 

Guidelines are handed out explaining the possibilities of producing a 
dissertation which is read, viewed, heard or experienced (and how 
the mode of communication must be the best means of 
communicating the argument). 
A dissertation which is read should have a minimum of 6,000 words 
and a maximum of 12,000 words. 

Formative Assessment 
Draft of lead question and research strategy. 

Summative Assessment 
Each assessed element will contribute to the final grade, in 
proportion shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Lead question and research  95% 
strategy 
Progress map (evidence of self­  5%
management) 

Quality Team  103  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed for: 

The Lead Question 
(What do I want to find out?)
· Formulation of the lead question; (LO1, LO2)
· Development of the lead question. (LO1, LO2) 

The Research Strategy 
Assessment  (How do I go about finding it out?)
Criteria  · Formulation of the research strategy; (LO3)
· Development of the research strategy; (LO4)
· Plausibility of the research strategy. (LO3, LO4) 

Self­management 
(How do I plan out this whole process?)
· Evidence of planning out what needs to be done and how it 
needs to be done against the timeframe of the deadline. 
(LO5) 

Students compile their own subject­specific bibliographies aided by 
the dissertation tutors. Texts that may be useful during the research 
process include: 

Study Guides and Module Outlines on Research Techniques (6 – 
COMM1670), Making Notes (2 – STSK1020) and other useful 
subjects. 

Download from the Institute of Communications Studies, University 
of Leeds. http://ics.leeds.ac.uk/icsmods/index.cfm 

Indicative  Or http://www.angelfire.com/or3/tss/millsoic.html 
Reading List 
Truss, Lynne (2003). Eats, Shoots and Leaves: the zero tolerance 
approach to punctuation, Profile Books. 

Wright Mills, C. (2000) ‘On Intellectual Craftsmanship’, an Appendix 
in The Sociological Imagination, Oxford University Press. (First pub. 
1959). 

Allison, Brian. (1996) Research skills for students, De Montfort 
University, London: Kogan Page. 

Cottrell, Stella (1999) Study skills handbook, Macmillan.

Quality Team  104  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Glendinning, Eric H. and Holmstrèom, Beverly A. S. (1992) Study 
reading: a course in reading skills for academic purposes, 
Cambridge [England] New York, Cambridge University Press. 

Kuniavsky, Mike. (2003) Observing the user experience: a 
practitioner's guide for user research, San Francisco, Calif, Morgan 
Kaufmann Oxford, Elsevier Science. 

Rudestam, Kjell Erik. and Newton, Rae R. (2001) Surviving your 
dissertation: a comprehensive guide to content and process, Sage 
Publications. 

Walliman, Nicholas. (2001) Your Research Project, Cambridge 
University Press. 

Key Skills 98.03.26 BBC2. 

Short Cuts 99.06.03 /Communication At Work BBC2. 

Design Observer: www.designobserver.com 

Design Talk Board: www.designtalkboard.com 

Herb Lubalin Study Center of Design and Typography: 
www.cooper.edu/art/lubalin 

LRC user guides; Resources for Graphic Design, Using Other 
Libraries, How To Reference Academic Work, Conducting Research 
on the WWW, E Resources: Databases & Newspapers.

Quality Team  105  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Level 3 
In Level 3, students develop more individual and independent lines of enquiry in the 
subject area through the medium of self initiated projects and an accompanying 
dissertation. 

Students strengthen and refine the range of design, technical and transferable skills 
developed in the first and second level of the course and focus them on projects 
which reflect their design ambitions and career trajectory and allow them to explore 
aspects of interaction design independently. Reflecting the realities of professional 
practice, one of these projects is collaborative. 

In the early part of the academic year, students complete a major independent study 
leading to a dissertation. This builds on the contextual knowledge and academic 
skills built up during the course and encourages students to make links and 
connections across different contexts and apply them. 

The collaborative and individual Major Projects allow students to hone their 
professional skills and normally involve the design and development of a functioning 
artefact. Some students have chosen to undertaken work of a more exploratory 
nature with more documentary outcomes. Artefacts created at this level have in the 
past ranged from multi user musical instruments, interactive TV, screen based 
interfaces, relational repositories for images and memories or innovative web sites. 
All students are required to submit a Major Project Report reflecting on the 
development of their individual Major Project. This will articulate the conceptual, 
technical and creative issues which surround the development of their individual 
Major Projects and give an insight into its contexts. 

Personal and Professional Development in this level focuses students on the 
transition to work and/or further study. Students reflect on their career goals in 
relation to their professional development and the areas of enterprise and business 
start up are also explored.

Quality Team  106  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Dissertation 
Unit Code  C301/ACT301 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  3  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  08  Access to Resources  70  Independent Study  122 

This unit builds on the work which has progressed from the 
Dissertation Preparation unit in Level 2 and continues the use of 
‘creative questioning’ as the mode of operation that is driving the 
research strategy. 

In this stage of this extended study, emphasis is on the iterative 
process of questioning and reflection that leads to the construction of 
a coherent argument and finally, a defensible conclusion. 

The unit also requires that students develop personal strategies for 
self­management, valued as an empowering life­skill. They must 
maintain control of the dissertation process within a defined 
timeframe, while proving their ability to make meaningful use of 
independent study. 

Level 3, Term One (course­specific, with LRC workshops or one­to­ 
Introduction  ones). 

Aims 

This unit aims to:

· Provide Ravensbourne students with a process for 
developing an extended study leading to a dissertation, which 
is relevant and useful to them as creative designers and 
communicators;
· Help students acquire a process of independent learning 
through questioning, and to understand the value of their own 
self­development and discoveries;
· Enable students to develop effective self­management of 
time, resources and processes through an extended study on 
a subject of personal and professional interest.

Quality Team  107  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In this unit students learn:

· The formal elements of the dissertation (structure, 
referencing, bibliography etc);
· The issues surrounding plagiarism and its consequences;
· How to further review and refine a lead question and 
Indicative  research strategy;
Curriculum  · How to analyse research material;
Outline  · How to use conceptual models in developing an argument;
· How to apply an iterative process of questioning and 
reflection throughout;
· How to develop tools for self­management; 

Learning support will also be provided such as dyslexia support and 
language mentoring as appropriate. 

On successful completion of the unit students will be able to: 

Skills 

1.  Review and refine a lead question; (LO1) 
2.  Review, refine, test and implement a research strategy; (LO2) 
Unit Learning 
3.  Think creatively: analyse research material and draw 
Outcomes 
conclusions, develop models and concepts that lead to 
insights, and develop a coherent argument; (LO3) 
4.  Communicate effectively the outcomes of the study; (LO4) 
5.  Support the communication of the study with accurate and 
traceable evidence of sources, experiments etc; (LO5) 
6.  Manage an extended, self­directed study. (LO6)

Quality Team  108  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


This unit will make use of the following:

· Tutorials (individual and small group);
· Lectures, supported by still or moving images (diagrams, 
models);
· Seminars, as a context for small group discussions (of ideas 
and research) and group work;
· Student (oral) presentations, to develop confidence in oral 
communication and argument;
Teaching and  · Directed, specialist reading to encourage independent 
Learning  learning;
Strategies  · Guidelines (brief, select hand­outs) intended to inform and 
aid students during independent study;
· Structured workshops (by the LRC) on plagiarism and 
referencing, and individual dyslexia support and language 
mentoring as appropriate. 

Students are encouraged to make independent study visits to 
galleries, museums, professional studios and other sites for direct 
experience of designs, artefacts or people (interviews, discussions 
etc). 

Week 1: 
Seminars or individual tutorials: show ‘progress map’ and supporting 
material. 

(A progress map is a documented record of key contacts, 
experiences, decisions etc in notes or phrases marked on a calendar 
– accompanied by supporting material such as notebooks). 

Weeks 2­4: 
Seminars or individual tutorials. 
Assessable 
In week 2 or 3, a lecture is held and Guidelines are handed out 
Elements 
describing the formal elements of the dissertation and referencing 
(ways of supporting the study with traceable evidence of sources, 
experiments etc). 

Week 5: 
Formative Assessment 
Submit draft of dissertation. 

Weeks 6 – 8: 
Individual tutorials, feedback on drafts.

Quality Team  109  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Week 10: 
Summative Assessment 
Submission of the dissertation, plus the completed progress map. 

Assessable Elements – Percentage of Final Grade 

Formative Assessment 
Submit draft of dissertation. 

Summative Assessment 
Normally, students will submit a dissertation which shall be between 
7000 and 9000 words in length on a subject related to their main 
area of study and agreed in advance with their assigned dissertation 
tutor. 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Submit dissertation (7000 – 9000  95% 
words) 
Submit completed progress map  5% 
(evidence of self­management) 

Subject to negotiation and agreement with the dissertation tutor, and 
provided the subject matter lends itself to exploration and articulation 
in this way, an alternative format for the dissertation may be 
proposed. 

Alternative assessment arrangements may be made or additional 
learning support (see above) arranged for students with disabilities 
or medical conditions which would impair their performance in 
Assessment 
meeting the above requirements and who have registered in 
Criteria 
advance with Student Support. 

Students will be assessed for: 

The Lead Question 
(What do I want to find out?)
· Review and refinement of the lead question; (LO1)
· Quality of the lead question. (LO1)

Quality Team  110  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


The Research Strategy 
(How do I go about finding it out?)
· Review and refinement of the research strategy; (LO2)
· Implementation of the research strategy; (LO2)
· Effectiveness and elegance of the research strategy; (LO2)
· Appropriateness of research methods and techniques used; 
(LO2)
· Ability to acknowledge quality of status to research sources. 
(LO2) 

Reflection 
(How do I make sense of what I found out?)
· Evidence of analysis of research; (LO3)
· Quality of analysis of research findings; (LO3)
· Development of models and concepts that lead to insights; 
(LO3)
· Development of frameworks that lead to a coherent 
argument; (LO3)
· Ability to maintain a distance from the subject of the research. 
(LO3) 

Communication 
(How do I communicate it in the most appropriate form?)
· Appropriateness of form; (LO4)
· Appropriateness of tone of voice; (LO4)
· Ability to maintain a balanced stance in relation to your 
material; (LO4, LO5)
· Provide appropriate, accurate and traceable evidence of 
sources, experiments etc; (LO5)
· Communication of insights; (LO4)
· A conclusion that expresses the author’s own confident, 
defensible point of view. (LO4, LO5) 

Self­management 
(How do I manage this whole process?)
· Ability to manage all the stages of the dissertation as an 
iterative process; (LO6)
· Evidence of weighing what needs to be done against the 
timeframe of the deadline; (LO6)
· Identifying support needed for independent study and 
acquiring it. (LO6)

Quality Team  111  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students compile their own subject­specific bibliographies aided by 
the dissertation tutors. Texts that may be useful during the research 
and writing processes include: 

Hicks, Wynford. (1998) English for Journalists, Routledge. 

Coe, Norman. (1983) Writing skills: a problem­solving approach for 
upper­intermediate, Cambridge University Press. 

Glatthorn, Allan A. (1998) Writing the winning dissertation: a step­by­ 
step guide, Thousand Oaks, Calif. London: Corwin Press. 

Hampson, Liz. (1994) How's your dissertation going? Students share 
the rough reality of dissertation and project work, Unit for Innovation 
in HE. 

Swetnam, Derek. (2000) Writing your dissertation: how to plan, 
Indicative  prepare and present successful work, Oxford, How to Books. 
Reading List 
Study Guides and Module Outlines on Research Techniques (6 – 
COMM1670), Making Notes (2 – STSK1020) and other useful 
subjects. 

Download from the Institute of Communications Studies, University 
of: 

Leeds. http://ics.leeds.ac.uk/icsmods/index.cfm 

Truss, Lynne. (2003) Eats, Shoots and Leaves: the zero tolerance 
approach to punctuation, Profile Books. 

Wright Mills, C. (2000) ‘On Intellectual Craftsmanship’, an Appendix 
in The Sociological Imagination, Oxford University Press. (First 
pub.1959) 

Or http://www.angelfire.com/or3/tss/millsoic.html

Quality Team  112  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Negotiated Brief 
Unit Code  CAVE301/ACT302 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  3  Unit Status  Cave ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  70  Independent Study  100 

The unit provides the student with the opportunity to take 
responsibility for their direction of study while creatively engaging 
with the real world constraints provided by an externally set brief. 

In negotiation with their tutors, students select an external brief 
complementary to their main body of work. It provides students with 
the opportunity to take part in design competitions, live projects or 
industrial collaborations. 

This unit hones the professional and intellectual skills developed in 
the earlier levels of the course combining the challenges of 
Introduction 
creatively interpreting and developing a brief, with the realities of 
working independently within the constraints of a client’s 
specifications and deadlines. It compels student engagement with 
the cutting edge of contemporary practice in the area of their project. 
The potential for public or industry exposure elicits innovativeness, 
risk taking and a personal creative positioning in students’ 
responses to the briefs. 

Students’ communication skills are sharpened as they meet the 
project briefs’ requirements in terms of the communication of design 
intent. 

The exact curriculum will be directed towards the range of projects in 
which the cohort engages. However, it might include as appropriate:
Indicative 
· Interpreting and reformulating an external brief;
Curriculum 
· Professional communication techniques for remote 
Outline 
evaluation;
· Specification, succinct report writing and detailing;
· Current and developing visual and physical design polemics.

Quality Team  113  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 3 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Research and familiarise themselves with the emerging 
practices, technologies, materials and techniques in the area 
of a design proposal; (LO1) 
Unit Learning 
Skills 
Outcomes 
2.  Interrogate critically an external brief and its assumptions and 
respond effectively and creatively; (LO2) 
3.  Communicate a design proposal in a professional manner 
using media appropriate to the proposal and its audience; 
(LO3) 
4.  Make effective use of time and project management skills 
towards the resolution of project work under minimal 
supervision. (LO4) 

This unit will make use of the following:

Teaching and  · Briefing(s);
Learning  · Tailored lectures and seminars;
Strategies  · Topic related group seminars or presentations;
· Tutorials;
· Final presentation. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will submit a proposal setting out their project intentions 
and intended plan of action (and any associated supporting 
materials specified) formulated in response to the external brief. 

Assessable  Summative Assessment 
Elements  Summative assessment is through the completed design proposal or 
project (and any supporting materials or presentational requirements 
specified in the brief). 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Final Design Proposal/Project  100%

Quality Team  114  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


The extent to which there is evidence that the Final Design 
Proposal/Project demonstrates that there has been:

· Analysis of the brief identifying the key criteria, assumptions, 
opportunities, issues, concepts, data and areas of ambiguity 
relevant to its solution; (LO2)
· Presentation of completed proposal/project, formatted and/or 
Assessment 
constructed appropriately to meet the competition/external 
Criteria 
brief requirements; (LO3, LO4)
· Appropriate judgement in the selection and/or specification of 
materials, processes and/or technologies appropriate to the 
realisation of the design solution; (LO1)
· The response shows creative individuality in response to the 
brief and an awareness of its positioning in relation to 
contemporary practice. (LO2) 

Books 

Jones, JC. (1992) Design Methods, John Wiley and Sons. 

Butler, J. (2003) Universal Principles of Design: 100 Ways to 
Enhance Usability, Influence Perception, Increase Appeal, Make 
Better Design Decisions, and Teach Through Design, Rockport 
Publishers Inc. 

Goodrich, K. (2003) Design Secrets: Products: 50 Real­Life Projects 
Indicative 
Uncovered, Rockport Publishers Inc. 
Reading List 
Indicative reading will also be suggested in relation to the topic (as 
chosen by the student) requirements. 

Websites 

http://www.design­technology.info/designcycle/default.htm 

http://www.blueclaw­db.com/databasesoftwaresolutions/project­ 
management­tools.htm

Quality Team  115  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Major Project (collaborative) 
Unit Code  ACT303 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  20  Level  3  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  30  Access to Resources  30  Independent Study  140 

This unit is complementary to the individual Major Project. Students 
explore an area of independent negotiated learning but as a 
member of multi­disciplinary team. 

Working in teams with other specialists and non­specialists is a 
fundamental part of the professional life of interaction designers. In 
this unit students build upon the earlier experience of collaboration 
within the course and learn to function as specialists within a multi­ 
disciplinary team focused on a project initiated by the team itself. 
Introduction  Students are required to collaborate with at least one other student, 
on the proposal and realisation of a project. This may be on a cross 
course basis and the timing of the unit facilitates work with 
broadcasting students for the annual ‘Rave­on­Air’ event. Projects in 
the past have involved collaborations with student content creators 
and programme makers to produce iTV programming. 

Students produce and negotiate with their tutors a collaboratively 
written brief. The student group then works independently towards 
the resolution of that brief within the timescales agreed. 

Whilst the teaching in this unit will be responsive to the range of 
projects undertaken in any particular cohort, students are likely to be 
Indicative 
supported by sessions in areas such as:
Curriculum 
Outline 
· Collaborative brief writing;
· Project management systems (e.g. Gantt or CPA).

Quality Team  116  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 3 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  A critical understanding of the needs and requirements of 
other professionals in a multi disciplinary design project; 
(LO1) 
2.  A comprehensive understanding of time and project 
management methods for interaction and collaborative 
projects. (LO2) 
Unit Learning 
Outcomes 
Skills 

3.  Contribute confidently, creatively and effectively to the 
design, development and resolution of a multi­disciplinary 
collaborative project; (LO3) 
4.  Analyse interpret and incorporate the views and opinions of 
other project collaborators in the design and development of 
a collaborative project; (LO4) 
5.  Communicate design thoughts and proposals (and the 
associated technical issues) to specialists and non 
specialists. (LO5) 

This unit will make use of the following:
Teaching and  · Briefing(s);
Learning 
· Two to one and one to one tutorials;
Strategies 
· Self directed and group research;
· Feedback. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will be given critique, direction and assessed on project 
concepts and proposals. 

Summative Assessment 
Assessable  Each of the assessed elements will contribute to the final grade, in 
Elements  the proportions shown in the following table: 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Negotiated Project Brief  20% 
Presentation of completed project  60% 
Individual Project Log  20%

Quality Team  117  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Students will be assessed on: 

Negotiated Project Brief
· The challenge of the project proposal for its participants and 
the degree to which it provides a learning opportunity for 
them; (LO3)
· The degree to which it represents a creative or innovative use 
of skill and technology; (LO5)
· Feasibility of project in relation to group expertise within the 
timescales of the brief and the professionalism of the project 
management underpinning the proposal; (LO2)
· Evidence of research underpinning the proposal in the project 
brief. (LO1) 

Presentation of completed project
· The degree to which the finished project reflects the design 
Assessment 
intents set out in the original brief; (LO5)
Criteria 
· The level of functionality and quality of the interactivity of the 
completed project; (LO5)
· The degree to which the creative opportunities afforded by 
the brief have been exploited; (LO5)
· Professionalism of the presentation of the project outcome. 
(LO5) 

Individual Project Log
· Evidence of analysis, interpretation and critical understanding 
of the needs and requirements of other professionals during 
the project development; (LO4)
· Evidence of reflexivity and flexibility in relation to the process 
of collaboration and effective contribution to the project team; 
(LO4)
· Evidence of effective communication with other participants in 
the project development. (LO4)

Quality Team  118  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Relevant Books 

Dowmunt, Tony. (1993) Channels of Resistance: Global Television 
and Local Empowerment, BFI Publishing in association with 
Channel Four Television Company. 

Holtzblatt, Karen. (2005) Rapid Contextual Design: A how­to guide 
to key techniques for user­centred design, Morgan Kaufman. 

Indicative  Roszak, Theodore. (1994) The Cult of Information: The Folklore of 
Reading List  Computers and the True Art of Thinking, Berkeley, University of 
California Press. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

http://www.findtech.com/keyword,Interactive+Design+Collaboration+ 
Planner/search.htm 

http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/kcdc/journal/vol2/dcnet/sub5/transfer.ht 
ml

Quality Team  119  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Major Project (individual) 
Unit Code  ACT304 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  40  Level  3  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  80  Access to Resources  80  Independent Study  240 

The Major Project unit is an opportunity for students to identify and 
develop a substantial and complex area of individual enquiry. The 
unit commences with preparation of a project proposal, which is 
scrutinised by tutors and student peer group, and is subsequently 
refined and developed as the unit progresses. 

The work produced for the major projects represents the culmination 
of the student’s education at Ravensbourne and should therefore 
reflect their ambitions, philosophy and professional direction. 

Although the learning outcomes and assessment criteria are 
Introduction 
described below, students are responsible for the definition of their 
own specific project brief and a programme of work, and to present 
a fully resolved functional artefact at the end of the unit. However it 
is possible, subject to the agreement of the course team, for 
students to propose work of a more experimental or investigative 
nature which may have a more theoretical resolution, provided the 
learning outcomes are fulfilled. 

Students are encouraged to contextualise their individual practice, 
with the opportunity to embark on industrial collaborations or 
consultations where appropriate. 

Whilst the teaching in this unit will be responsive to the range of 
projects undertaken in any particular cohort, students are likely to be 
supported by sessions in areas such as:
Indicative 
Curriculum 
· Defining, framing and a ‘problem’;
Outline 
· Researching and interpreting user needs;
· Developing a personal brief;
· Managing a complex project from conception to realisation.

Quality Team  120  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 3 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Understand comprehensively the technical, commercial and 
professional contexts related to the design proposal. (LO1) 

Skills 
Unit Learning 
Outcomes  2.  Conceptualise, develop and realise a personal design 
proposal and programme of work; (LO2) 
3.  Analyse critically the main opportunities, factors, issues and 
contexts relating to the brief and synthesise these in the 
design resolution; (LO3) 
4.  Exercise judgement and responsibility in defining and 
completing a personal programme of learning and creative 
work; (LO4) 
5.  Effectively present a resolved body of work in a professional 
appropriate manner. (LO5) 

This unit will make use of the following:
Teaching and  · Self directed research;
Learning  · One to one tutorials;
Strategies 
· Critique;
· Feedback. 

Formative Assessment 
Students will be given feedback on the self written project brief 
(submitted at an interim date), concepts and progress. 

Summative Assessment 
Students will be required to submit for final assessment:

· Self written brief (to be submitted at a published interim date);
· The finished artefact or proposed solution;
Assessable  · A comprehensive finished presentation relating to the finished 
Elements  artefact or proposed solution (for exhibition);
· Appropriate development prototypes or models and 
supporting materials (sketchbooks etc). 

The project and associated materials are assessed holistically as a 
single body of work. 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Self Written Brief  10% 
Presentation of completed project  90%

Quality Team  121  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


At the end of the unit the students will be assessed on: 

Self Written Brief
· Evidence of a critical analysis and integration of the 
commercial aspects of the project (e.g. markets, users, costs 
etc); (LO2)
· Evidence of an understanding of the relationship of the 
project to current or emerging technologies and professional 
practice. (LO1) 

Completed Project
Assessment 
· The degree to which the finished artefact or proposed 
Criteria 
solution fulfils the intent set out in the self written brief; (LO5)
· Whether the finished artefact or proposal has fully exploited 
the creative opportunities afforded by the brief; (LO3)
· The degree to which the design has been underpinned by an 
iterative and reflective design process involving the 
consideration of alternative ideas/solutions; (LO4)
· The degree to which the project or proposed solution 
addresses or resolves the key factors and issues related to 
the project; (LO5)
· Professionalism and clarity of the presentation of the project 
outcome. (LO1 – LO5) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Kurzweil, Ray. (2001) The Age of Spiritual Machines: How We Will 
Live, Work, and Think in the New Age of Intelligent Machines, 
Discovery Institute. 

Ronell, Avital. (1989) The Telephone Book: Technology, 
Schizophrenia, Electric Speech. 
Indicative 
Reading List  Young, Trevor L. (2003) The handbook of project management: a 
practical guide to effective policies and procedures, Kogan Page. 

Sharp, John A. (2002) The management of a student research 
project, Gower. 

Unit Relevant Websites 

http://project­manage.guide­for­you.com/

Quality Team  122  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Personal and Professional Development 3 
Unit Code  PPD3/ACT305 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  3  Unit Status  Core ­ Mandatory 

Contact Time  20  Access to Resources  10  Independent Study  70 

This unit builds on the Personal and Professional Development units 
at Levels 1 and 2, to enable students to critically examine and 
Introduction  develop their own Personal and Professional Development File, so 
that they are prepared for the transition to work and/or further study. 
The focus of this unit is on professional development. 

This module includes:

· Career planning and career paths;
Indicative 
· Developing and managing a portfolio career;
Curriculum 
· Enterprise and business start­up;
Outline 
· Funding opportunities;
· Networking and communications;
· Portfolio preparation and professional planning. 

In order to pass this Level 3 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Skills 

Students should be able to: 

Unit Learning  1.  Reflect upon their career goals in relation to their personal 


Outcomes  and professional development; (LO1) 
2.  Diagnose and access resources and services to assist in their 
own career planning; (LO2) 
3.  Diagnose future employment trends in relation to their 
discipline and relate this to their Personal and Professional 
Development File; (LO3) 
4.  Effectively communicate their skills and abilities to employers 
and future clients. (LO4)

Quality Team  123  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Overview 
Students will be exposed to key concepts through lectures, 
workshops and seminars. The majority of learning will take place 
through an ongoing process of reflective practice evidenced in the 
Personal and Professional Development File. 

The Personal and Professional Development File will contain three 
main elements: a learning plan, reflective commentary and 
evidence. 

Teaching Methods 
Learning on this unit will be gained primarily through a combination 
of: 
Teaching and 
Lectures/Guest Lectures/Workshops 
Learning 
2­3 per term. 
Strategies 
Lectures and workshops will introduce underlying concepts, process 
and models. Guest lectures will help develop students’ awareness of 
industry and current developments. 

Small Group Seminar/Workshop 
2­3 per term. 
These encourage discussion and reflection on the learning/working 
experience and ensure learners gain from shared experiences. 

Self­Directed Study 
The majority of learning from this unit is self­directed. 

Tutorials 
2­3 per year.

Quality Team  124  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 
There are normally formative assessment points during each term 
for students to receive feedback on their Personal and Professional 
Development File. This will give them an indication of their existing 
performance in relation to the learning outcomes before submitting 
the File for summative assessment. 

Summative Assessment 
Students will be required to develop a Personal and Professional 
Assessable  Development File detailing professional, educational and personal 
Elements  objectives. The File will consist of three main elements: a learning 
plan, reflective commentary and evidence. 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Personal and Professional  25% 
Development File (1 st  submission, 
normally start of term 2) 
Personal and Professional  75% 
Development File (2 nd  submission, 
normally in term 3) 

Students are required to submit a Personal and Professional 
Development File and will demonstrate:

· A critical reflection upon their career goals in relation to their 
personal and professional development; (LO1)
Assessment 
· An analysis of resources and services available to assist in 
Criteria 
career planning and professional development; (LO2)
· Evidence of the ability to effectively communicate skills and 
abilities to employers and future clients; (LO4)
· Evidence of reflection upon future employment trends and 
their relationship to their career pathway. (LO3)

Quality Team  125  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Bolton, G. (2001) Reflective Practice: Writing and Professional 
Development, London: Paul Chapman. 

Hawkins, P. (1999) The Art of Building Windmills: Career Tactics for 
the 21 st  Century, University of Liverpool: Graduate into Employment 
Unit. 

Caperez, E. (2004) Careers Uncovered Series: Art and Design 
Uncovered, Trotman. 

Harris, C. (2004) Careers Uncovered Series: Media Uncovered, 
Indicative 
Trotman. 
Reading List 
Reuvid, J. & Millar, R. (2004) Start up and run your own business. 
Kogan Page. 

http://www.designcouncil.org.uk 

http://www.skillset.org/careers 

http://www.fashioncapital.co.uk 

Appropriate journals and trade magazines

Quality Team  126  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Unit Title  Major Project Report 
Unit Code  ACT306 
Programme  BA (Hons) Design for Interaction 
Credits  10  Level  3  Unit Status  Mandatory 

Contact Time  15  Access to Resources  20  Independent Study  65 

Activity in the Major Project Report unit complements the 
independent project activity undertaken by the student in the Major 
Project (individual). 

Its purpose is to make students think about and articulate the 
conceptual, technical and creative issues which surround the 
development of their individual major projects and to gain insight into 
its contexts. 

Students document the development of the project from its inception 
to its completion and reflect on the opportunities and issues which 
Introduction 
arose during this process and the constraints which impacted on it. 
In the course of developing their major project, they will research 
and define user needs, develop prototypes and test usability and 
they will record and collate this process in the Major Project Report. 

The outcome of this process will be a document in which students 
address whether the completed project resolved fully the problem or 
intention which they sought to address and the relationship of the 
finished artefact to their original design intent as laid out in the brief. 
This will be in a format which can be presented to a client or future 
employer who may not necessarily be a subject specialist. 

The curriculum covered in this unit will involve:
Indicative 
· Professional report writing;
Curriculum 
· Structuring and writing a reflective design report;
Outline 
· Reflection on the process of design and project management;
· Presentation of project research.

Quality Team  127  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


In order to pass this Level 3 unit, students must show that the 
following learning outcomes have been achieved: 

Knowledge and Understanding 

1.  Situate their design practice critically in relation to current 
professional practice; (LO1) 
2.  Identify, research and synthesise data and information which 
Unit Learning 
supports an interaction design solution. (LO2) 
Outcomes 
Skills

3.  Communicate effectively all aspects of the intended design 
proposition and its development to subject and non subject 
specialists; (LO3) 
4.  Reflect critically upon the development and resolution of 
their design. (LO4) 

This unit will make use of the following:
Teaching and 
Learning  · Self directed research;
Strategies  · One to one tutorials;
· Feedback. 

Formative Assessment
· Project report content;
· Research and time­plan;
· Project report presentation;
· Format. 
Assessable 
Elements  Summative Assessment
· Format;
· Depth and accuracy of reporting;
· Clarity of information presented. 

Assessable Elements  Percentage of Final Grade 
Project Report  100%

Quality Team  128  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


At the end of this unit students will be assessed on the level to which 
their report:

· Provides an accurate and reflective account of the project 
development and the realisation of its intended outcome; 
(LO4)
· Documents and explores critically the relevant contextual, 
Assessment  technical and feasibility factors informing the development of 
Criteria  the project; (LO2, LO3, LO4)
· Explains how the project was planned and managed; (LO1)
· Evidences the application of critical analysis and reflection in 
the design process; (LO4)
· Is supported by relevant evidence from research and project 
testing; (LO3)
· Shows professionalism of presentation and suitability for a 
professional audience. (LO1) 

Unit Relevant Books 

Bolton, Gillie. (2001) Reflective Practice Writing and Professional 
Development, Paul Chapman. 

Van den Brink­Budgen, Roy (2000) Critical Thinking For Students: 
Learn the Skills of Critical Assessment and Effective Argument. 
Indicative 
Reading List 
Unit Relevant Websites 

http://www.eee.strath.ac.uk/ugprojects/98­99/ces/report.htm 

http://www.completeteacher.co.uk/report_writing.htm 

http://lorien.ncl.ac.uk/ming/Dept/Tips/writing/writeindex.htm

Quality Team  129  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Learning and Teaching Glossary 

The learning and teaching activities associated with a course are set out in course 
handbooks, programme specifications and unit specifications and in project briefs. 
This glossary may be useful for students and other stakeholders to help understand 
the terminology used and a guide to the sorts of activities which they can expect to 
participate in on their course. 

Please note the following list has been organised in alphabetical order. 

Assessment Criteria 

The criteria by which student work submitted for assessment (see below) will be 
judged. These are published in unit specifications and relevant project briefs. 

Assessment Deadline 

The date by which work completed for assessment must be submitted. Failure to 
submit by the deadline is likely to mean that you will fail the unit. Deadlines are 
published in project briefs. 

Assessment Requirements/Assessable Elements 

The work or materials which a student is required to complete and submit for 
assessment (by the published deadline) in order to pass a unit. These are set out in 
the unit specification in the Course Handbook and in relevant project briefs. 

Critique/Crit/Interim Presentations 

Presentation of work by students to an audience of peers and staff to facilitate 
feedback for reflection. 

Demonstrations 

A member of staff illustrating the operation of technology, processes and ideas. 

E Learning 

At Ravensbourne, traditional forms of teaching are increasingly supplemented and 
supported by on line materials and activities. Activity will vary from course to course 
and may involve the use of the Moodle (see below) virtual learning environment 
(VLE) to allow students to access course information and learning materials or to 
take part in activities and forums. On line journals and databases may be accessed 
via the Learning Resource Centre. Other courses use on line tests to evaluate 
student learning or publish electronic materials to support software learning.

Quality Team  130  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Formative Assessment 

Assessment aimed at determining a person's strengths and weaknesses with the 
objective of improving them. Generally expressed in words rather than grades, and 
generally not used in the final assessment. 

Grades 

Student work submitted for summative assessment is assigned a letter grade as an 
indication of the degree to which the work demonstrates that the learning outcomes 
have been met. Grading is conducted on a generic College scale of A to F (amplified 
by a '+' or '­' sign where this is appropriate) where 'A' is first class work and 'F' is a 
failure. More detail is contained in the Academic Regulations. 

Grading Descriptors 

These relate to the grade assigned to work submitted and are textual descriptions of 
the level of student achievement in relation to the learning outcomes (see Academic 
Regulations). 

Group Projects 

Project based learning (see below) specifically designed to require collaboration and 
team working by students. These may be inter disciplinary and may sometimes 
involve the simulation of real world situations which individual working could not 
realise. Normally, summative assessment involves a group submission though an 
element of individual work is usually required as well. Peer assessment is often an 
element of the assessment. 

Group Seminars 

These involve presentation(s) to and discussion with a group normally on a 
predetermined topic. They are sometimes led by a staff member but sometimes 
student led. They normally include plenty of opportunities for interaction between 
staff and students and/or students and their peers (i.e. questioning of students by 
staff and vice versa). 

Guest Lectures 

Formal or informal talk on subjects related to the course by a visiting speaker, often 
by a noted practitioner or commentator. 

Independent Study/Self Directed Study 

Learning undertaken in a self directed manner independent of any teaching, 
supervision or formal guidance. In order to complete any course at Ravensbourne, 
students must undertake independent study in addition to the formal teaching which 
takes place on the course. Independent study might involve accessing books, 
journals or on line resources, carrying out research, working on skills development or 
preparing assessment requirements.

Quality Team  131  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Individual Learning Plan 

An individual Learning Plan is one of the elements which make up a student’s 
Personal and Professional Development File (see below) which is part of the 
assessment requirements of the Personal and Professional Development unit in each 
level. It sets out the student’s academic, personal and professional goals and 
priorities in relation to their individual strengths and weaknesses. 

Individual Tutorial 

One on one input from individual staff to a student in relation to a project. This sort of 
tutorial more commonly takes place in major project work in the third level. 

Induction 

Specific organised period of introduction to the College, the Staff and the Course. 
Students may also be introduced to specific technology for Health and Safety 
purposes. 

Initial Briefing 

Introduction to the unit and the associated project(s) by unit leader or a member staff 
associated with the unit. 

Learning Outcomes 

Statements indicating what a learner should have acquired at the end of a given 
learning period. 

Lectures 

Formal talk by a staff member given on a subject before an audience or a class, for 
the purpose of instruction. The organisation of the lecture will normally include some 
opportunities for questioning by members of the audience. 

Moodle 

This is a virtual learning environment (VLE) utilised by Ravensbourne. It may be used 
to post materials relating to the course such as handbooks, project briefs and 
timetables. It may also be used to host materials and discussion forums related to 
particular topics or projects. 

Negotiated Learning Agreement 

Some projects, particularly in level three of our courses, allow students substantial 
independence to focus their learning and project activity and in some cases to 
negotiate their own project brief. Where a unit allows for such an approach, they will 
negotiate and agree the parameters of such activity with their course leader or 
another designated member of staff at the beginning of the unit.

Quality Team  132  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Peer Learning 

As in professional life, students often learn as much from interacting with each other 
as they do through formal structured teaching. Opportunities for group learning, 
group projects, student presentations and critiques form part of all courses at 
Ravensbourne. 

Personal and Professional Development File 

Throughout their time at Ravensbourne, students are provided with structured 
opportunities to think about and plan their future both at the College and afterwards. 
In the Personal and Professional Development units in each level of their course, 
students develop a Personal and Professional Development File. This is made up of 
an Individual Learning Plan, a Reflective Commentary supporting the achievement of 
their learning goals and an Evidence Base. Students learn to reflect on what they 
want to achieve, make informed academic, personal and professional decisions; set 
personal targets and prioritise curricular and extra­curricula activities to achieve 
them; reflect critically on their performance and progress and to record their 
achievement and evidence their skills for employment purposes. 

Personal Tutorial 

A formal meeting between a personal tutor and an individual student where the 
discussion concentrates on overall monitoring, evaluation and planning rather than 
instruction (see Tutorial Policy). 

Presentations 

Students will be required from time to time to make presentations to students and 
staff. This is to help them develop communication skills and learn how to articulate 
their ideas but also to facilitate peer learning or the wider dissemination of learning 
across the group as a whole. Commonly, students may have to make presentations 
in relation to an aspect of a subject in a seminar or on their particular research in 
relation to a project. 

Project­based Learning 

Many units at Ravensbourne centre around a project requiring students to explore an 
area of knowledge and/or skills and their application. These projects are often based 
on real­world problems and require students to carry out in­depth research, apply 
problem solving skills and realise a practical outcome. Most projects allow for a 
creative personal response to the brief and require independent thinking and working 
by the student. Some projects are explicitly group projects, requiring teamwork and 
the realisation of a group outcome. Most will involve some element of peer learning 
(i.e. through student presentations or crits). Some projects may be interdisciplinary 
involving students from other courses.

Quality Team  133  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Small Group Tutorial 

Small group of students (3 ­ 5) discussing a particular topic, often led by a staff 
member or a student. These normally will include plenty of opportunities for 
interaction between staff and students (i.e. questioning of students by staff and vice 
versa). 

Studio Based Lectures 

Informal structured talks given by tutors on subject matter related to the unit or the 
project. Normally, students are given the opportunity to ask questions in relation to 
the subject matter at points during the talk. 

Submission Requirements 

See Assessable Elements above. 

Summative Assessment 

Assessment generally taking place at the end of a course and leading to the 
attribution of a grade or a mark to the learner, which will allow the learner to move to 
the next part of the course, or which completes the course. 

Work Based Learning (WBL) 

WBL means any learning which derives from sustained engagement with the 
experience of work, whether this is directly in the workplace (through placement) or 
though some form of 'close to work', simulated or ‘live’ project experience. Many of 
the projects conducted at Ravensbourne replicate real life situations in industry, 
including the (often inter­disciplinary) team working and the practitioner­client 
relationships and simulate the constraints which students will experience in the 
workplace. 

Workshops 

Students learn skills through their practical application with direction or supervision 
from a lecturer or technician.

Quality Team  134  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Personal Tutorials ­ Guidelines 

Background 

Ravensbourne seeks to ensure that all of our students work within a supported 
learning environment. During your time at the College you will be offered a variety of 
tutorial opportunities in small groups and individually. The Personal Tutorial system is 
one of the main ways in which we will offer you personal and academic support. 

Objectives 

The objectives of our Personal Tutorial system are:

· To enable improved retention and achievement on programmes of study;
· To identify and support the needs of all students;
· To encourage student self evaluation;
· To ensure that students have regular opportunities to reflect on their learning 
and progression, and discuss this with a relevant member of staff;
· To offer students the opportunity to discuss individual learning priorities and 
plans at key stages of study;
· To promote equality of opportunity for all students through the identification of 
individual learner needs;
· To offer all students the opportunity to access additional support when 
necessary. 

Personal Tutorials are intended to encourage and help you to manage and evaluate 
your own learning. They offer a focussed opportunity to discuss your progression, 
and identify any difficulties or obstacles to this, with relevant staff. The system aims 
to achieve a co­ordinated view of your achievements and any relevant difficulties. 

Personal Tutorials are a central part of your Personal and Professional 
Development units at all levels. These units are the main way that we encourage 
Personal Development Planning and are designed to support you in the process of 
reflecting upon your learning and performance and planning your personal, 
educational and career development. They will also help you in developing (and will 
make use of) the Personal and Professional Development File that is part of this unit. 

You will normally be offered 2­3 Personal Tutorials per year. Course, Subject or Unit 
Leaders will allocate and notify you of your personal tutor and the timing of sessions. 

How Personal Tutorials work 

Your tutor will normally:

· meet with you individually at least twice per year, usually for 20­30 minutes;
· work with you to reflect on your learning and how you are meeting your goals;
· help you to identify difficulties that you are having on your course and consider 
possible sources of support such as the Student Services team, for example.

Quality Team  135  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Your tutor will not normally:

· provide you with an academic tutorial on specific projects, or give out grading;
· be able to provide you with immediate solutions to any difficulties identified. 

Responsibilities in relation to Personal Tutorials 

Your tutor will aim as far as possible to ensure that:

· the date and time of your Personal Tutorial is fixed in advance;
· the place is as private as possible and that you are not interrupted unduly;
· you know what areas are likely to be covered during the tutorial and that you 
have the opportunity to raise other relevant issues during the discussion;
· relevant/important documentation is available during the tutorial. 

Tutors will work with you to ensure a common understanding and wherever required 
ask for clarification. They will aim to ensure that any written record they keep of the 
tutorial is accurate and summarises areas such as the issues and targets discussed 
and complies with our Data Protection Statement (see Student Contract Handbook). 

If they consider it important for your progression or well­being tutors may, in some 
circumstances, ask for your agreement to share personal information that you have 
discussed with other relevant staff. They will not do so without your agreement 
except where there is serious danger of harm to yourself or to others or where they 
would be liable to civil or criminal court procedure if the data were not disclosed. 

You should ensure that you:

· attend the review tutorial on time;
· understand or clarify what areas are likely to be discussed;
· identify any other relevant issues that you wish to cover;
· have completed any relevant preparation that is asked of you;
· bring with you any materials/work that you need to refer to, such as your 
Personal and Professional Development File. 

You should ensure that you are clear about:

· what follow up work is expected of you and any targets agreed;
· that what has been agreed is achievable within the time scale;
· what the consequences, if any, will be of failure to achieve any agreed targets 
in the time agreed;
· what additional support is available and how this can be accessed, for 
example, the Student Services team, learning support sessions, counselling;
· who else may be informed of any personal or confidential issues discussed.

Quality Team  136  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Course Committees and Student Course Representation 

Student Course Representatives 

The College is committed to listening to its students and to taking their views into 
account in its decision making. Student Course Representatives are students who 
are elected by the other students on the course to represent the views and concerns 
of the student body on their course to the course staff and the College. You may also 
wish to look at the Student Course Representative Policy ( 
http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/quality/a_to_z.htm#s). 

Student Course Representatives attend Course Committees once a term, where they 
have the opportunity to:

· feedback on the views of the course student body on the student experience 
on the course;
· raise issues which are of concern to students;
· give their opinion on developments on the course;
· actively participate in improving the quality of the learning experience. 

Student Course Representatives are elected annually at the start of the academic 
year. 

Course Committees 

Each course has a Course Committee consisting of academic staff (permanent and 
sessional), Student Course Representatives and representatives of College services. 
Course Committees are chaired by the Subject Leader and meet termly. They 
provide a forum for the discussion of academic business on the course, the 
identification of issues arising in running the course and the monitoring of actions 
outlined in response to these. 

In particular, they provide an opportunity for Student Courses Representatives to 
provide feedback on their experience of the course and for student views to inform 
the development of course policy and practice. Course Committees report to their 
respective Faculty Committee which receives their minutes.

Quality Team  137  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Contacts 

Main contacts 

Subject Leader 
Michelle Douglas 
Telephone:  020 8289 4983  Email:  michelle.douglas@rave.ac.uk 

Responsible for the daily management of the course. 

Senior Lecturer 
Martin Schmitz 
Telephone:  020 8289 4900  Email:  m.schmitz@rave.ac.uk 

Other useful contacts 

Business Support Officer 
Kerry O’Halloran 
Telephone:  020 8289 4961  Email:  k.o’halloran@rave.ac.uk 

Responsible for aspects of course administration. 

Acting Head of Faculty 
Peter Pilgrim 
Telephone:  020 8289 4968  Email:  p.pilgrim@rave.ac.uk 

Responsible for overall management of the Faculty of Design. 

Finance 
Graham Reed 
Telephone:  020 8289 4994  Email:  graham.reed@rave.ac.uk 

General Finance enquiries 
Email:  fees@rave.ac.uk 

IT Service Desk 
Telephone:  020 8289 4900 (Ext. 8208) 
http://support.rave.ac.uk 

Learning Resource Centre 
Telephone:  020 8289 4974  Email:  lrc@rave.ac.uk

Quality Team  138  Course Handbook 2007­2008 


Quality Team 
Ernest Grainger 
Telephone:  020 8289 4928  Email:  e.grainger@rave.ac.uk 

http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/quality/ 

Responsible for Course Committee organisation, liaison with Student Course 
Representatives, complaints and appeals. 

Registry 
http://intranet.rave.ac.uk/registry/ 

Registry is located on the main College corridor and operates a counter service from 
11:00­12:00 and 14:30­15:30, Monday to Friday. 

Responsible for admissions, enrolment, bursaries and Examination Boards. 

Student Support 
Sue Cowan 
Telephone:  020 8289 4982  Email:  s.cowan@rave.ac.uk 

Responsible for student welfare, disability support and learning support. 

Student Union 
Daniel Gittings 
Telephone:  020 8289 4801 or 020 8289 4810  su@rave.ac.uk 

Elected representatives of the student body, who represent on the Board of 
Governors and Academic Board.

Quality Team  139  Course Handbook 2007­2008