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El Servicio de Transporte

• Servicios Brindados a las Capas


superiores
• Primitivas del Servicio de Transporte
• Berkeley Sockets

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Servicios Brindados a las
Capas superiores

3-2
Primitivas

3-3
ENCAPSULADO

3-4
Primitivas (2)

Las lìneas llenas representan la secuencia de estados de


cleinte. Las punteadas las secuencias de estados del server. 3-5
Berkeley Sockets para TCP

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Elementos de Protocolos de
Transporte
• Direccionamiento
• Establecimiento de Conexión
• Liberación de conexión
• Control de Flujo y Buffering
• Multiplexing
• Recuperación de Caidas
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Protocolo de Transporte

(a) Ambiente de capa data link


(b) Ambiente de capa de transporte.
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Direccionamiento

TSAPs, NSAPs y conexiones de transporte.


3-9
Establecimiento de la Conexión

Proceso usuario en host 1 establece una conexión con


un servidor de tiempo en host 2.
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Establecimiento de la Conexión

(a) TPDUs no pueden entrar en la región prohibida.


(b) El problema de la resincronización 3-11
Establecimiento de la Conexión(3)

Three protocol scenarios for establishing a connection using a three-way


handshake. CR denotes CONNECTION REQUEST.
(a) Normal operation,
(b) Old CONNECTION REQUEST appearing out of nowhere.
(c) Duplicate CONNECTION REQUEST and duplicate ACK.
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Liberación de la Conexión

Desconexión abripta con perdida de datos.


3-13
Connection Release (2)

The two-army problem.

3-14
Liberación de la Conexión

6-14, a, b

Cuatro escenarios de protocolo para liberación de conexión.


(a) Caso normal ( three-way handshake.)
(b) Pérdida de ACK . 3-15
Liberación de la Conexión

6-14, c,d

(c) Respuesta perdida. (d) Respuesta


perdida y pérdida de DRs .
3-16
Control de Flujo y Buffering

(a) Chained fixed-size buffers. (b) Chained variable-sized buffers.


(c) One large circular buffer per connection.

3-17
Control de Flujo y Buffering

Dynamic buffer allocation. The arrows show the direction of


transmission. An ellipsis (…) indicates a lost TPDU. 3-18
Multiplexing

(a) Upward multiplexing.


(b) Downward multiplexing.
3-19
Crash Recovery

Diferentes combinaciones de estrategia de server y cliente


3-20
A Simple Transport Protocol

• The Example Service Primitives


• The Example Transport Entity
• The Example as a Finite State
Machine

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The Example Transport Entity

3-22
The Example Transport Entity
(2)

Each connection is in one of seven states:


• Idle – Connection not established yet.
• Waiting – CONNECT has been executed, CALL REQUEST sent.
• Queued – A CALL REQUEST has arrived; no LISTEN yet.
• Established – The connection has been established.
• Sending – The user is waiting for permission to send a packet.
• Receiving – A RECEIVE has been done.
• DISCONNECTING – a DISCONNECT has been done locally.

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The Example as a Finite State
Machine
The example protocol as a
finite state machine. Each
entry has an optional
predicate, an optional
action, and the new state.
The tilde indicates that no
major action is taken. An
overbar above a predicate
indicate the negation of the
predicate. Blank entries
correspond to impossible
or invalid events.

3-24
The Example as a Finite State
Machine (2)

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The Internet Transport
Protocols: UDP

• Introduction to UDP
• Remote Procedure Call
• The Real-Time Transport
Protocol

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Introduction to UDP

El Encabezado UDP.

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Remote Procedure Call

Steps in making a remote procedure call.


The stubs are shaded. 3-28
The Real-Time Transport
Protocol

(a) La posicion de RTP en el stack de protocolos .


(b) Packet nesting.
3-29
The Real-Time Transport
Protocol (2)

The RTP header. 3-30


The Internet Transport
Protocols: TCP
• Introduction to TCP
• The TCP Service Model
• The TCP Protocol
• The TCP Segment Header
• TCP Connection Establishment
• TCP Connection Release
• TCP Connection Management Modeling
• TCP Transmission Policy
• TCP Congestion Control
• TCP Timer Management
• Wireless TCP and UDP
• Transactional TCP
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The TCP Service Model

Port Protocol Use


21 FTP File transfer
23 Telnet Remote login
25 SMTP E-mail
69 TFTP Trivial File Transfer Protocol
79 Finger Lookup info about a user
80 HTTP World Wide Web
110 POP-3 Remote e-mail access
119 NNTP USENET news

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The TCP Service Model (2)

(a) Four 512-byte segments sent as separate IP datagrams.


(b) The 2048 bytes of data delivered to the application in a
single READ CALL.

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The TCP Segment Header

TCP Header. 3-34


The TCP Segment Header (2)

The pseudoheader included in the TCP checksum.


3-35
TCP Connection Establishment

6-31

(a) TCP connection establishment in the normal case.


(b) Call collision. 3-36
TCP Connection Management
Modeling

The states used in the TCP connection


management finite state machine. 3-37
TCP Connection Management
Modeling (2)
TCP connection
management finite
state machine.
The heavy solid
line is the normal
path for a client.
The heavy dashed
line is the normal
path for a server.
The light lines are
unusual events.
Each transition is
labeled by the
event causing it
and the action
resulting from it,
separated by a
slash.
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TCP Transmission Policy

Window management in TCP. 3-39


TCP Transmission Policy (2)

Silly window syndrome.


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TCP Congestion Control

(a) A fast network feeding a low capacity receiver.


(b) A slow network feeding a high-capacity receiver.
3-41
TCP Congestion Control (2)

An example of the Internet congestion algorithm.


3-42
TCP Timer Management

(a) Probability density of ACK arrival times in the data link layer.
(b) Probability density of ACK arrival times for TCP.
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Wireless TCP and UDP

Splitting a TCP connection into two connections.


3-44
Transitional TCP

(a) RPC using normal TPC.


(b) RPC using T/TCP. 3-45
Performance Issues

• Performance Problems in Computer


Networks
• Network Performance Measurement
• System Design for Better Performance
• Fast TPDU Processing
• Protocols for Gigabit Networks

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Performance Problems in Computer
Networks

The state of transmitting one megabit from San Diego to


Boston
(a) At t = 0, (b) After 500 sec, (c) After 20 msec, (d) after
40 msec. 3-47
Network Performance
Measurement

The basic loop for improving network


performance.
• Measure relevant network parameters,
performance.
• Try to understand what is going on.
• Change one parameter.

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System Design for Better
Performance
Rules:
• CPU speed is more important than network speed.
• Reduce packet count to reduce software overhead.
• Minimize context switches.
• Minimize copying.
• You can buy more bandwidth but not lower delay.
• Avoiding congestion is better than recovering from
it.
• Avoid timeouts.
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System Design for Better
Performance (2)

Response as a function of load.


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System Design for Better
Performance (3)

Four context switches to handle one packet


with a user-space network manager.
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Fast TPDU Processing

The fast path from sender to receiver is shown with a heavy line.
The processing steps on this path are shaded.
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Fast TPDU Processing (2)

(a) TCP header. (b) IP header. In both cases, the shaded


fields are taken from the prototype without change.
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Fast TPDU Processing (3)

A timing wheel.

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Protocols for Gigabit Networks

Time to transfer and acknowledge a 1-megabit file over a


4000-km line.
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